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!-- Tuskawilla news ( Newspaper ) --
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mods:note numbering peculiarities Numbering irregular, .
"Blow your own horn."
D.E. Thompson, editor.
Published by: Purdy & Ruhl, .
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 14 (Mar. 2, 1891).
funding Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
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mods:subject SUBJ651_1 lcsh
mods:geographic Micanopy (Fla.)
Newspapers
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Alachua County (Fla.)
Newspapers
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The Tuskawilla news
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00048740/00011
 Material Information
Title: The Tuskawilla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Thompson & Ruhl
Place of Publication: Micanopy Fla
Creation Date: June 25, 1891
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Micanopy (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Micanopy
Coordinates: 29.506389 x -82.281944 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Numbering Peculiarities: Numbering irregular, <Mar. 1891>.
General Note: "Blow your own horn."
General Note: D.E. Thompson, editor.
General Note: Published by: Purdy & Ruhl, <June 4-July 23, 1891>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 14 (Mar. 2, 1891).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002019392
oclc - 32788820
notis - AKK6833
lccn - sn 95026081
System ID: UF00048740:00011

Full Text












One Dollar a Year In Advance.


BLOW YOUIm \0-10 HZN-


Micanopy, Fla., Thursday, June 25, 1891.


Grafting the Kakl.
The following from a paper on the
Kaki or Japan persimmon, read before
the Florida Horticultural society by Mr.
Robert A.. Mills of Chuluota, comprises
all that is based on the writer's ex-
perience;
In March, 1888, I had less than fifty
root grafts put in by the lamented Geo.
R. Robinson, an horticulturist who
stood high in his profession, nearly all
of which are now growing and fruiting
satisfactorily. Some of them fruited
when two years old.
The next year, 1889, I profited by the
former work of Mr. Robinson and root-
grafted probably one hundred more
myself, the majority of which are grow-
ing and some of them are fruiting now.
Again in 1890 and 1891 I put in quite
a number more so, that at the present
writing I have nearly three hundred,
all on native stock, just where the origi-
nal plants grew.
My choice of all the processes for pro-
pagating the kaki is root-grafting on
native persimmon stock and if possible
where the native tree comes up, and
best sizes is from-one-half to one and a
half inches in diameter at the crown. It
is not a serious objection if they stand
within a toot of each other, as the roots
can readily be transplanted in grove
form and when the leaves are off and at
the end of the following y-.ar root-graft-
ed. Graft will grow if put iu from
November until the leaf buds begin to
swell on the native pes'inmmon. Kakias
'*leave out" in this portion of Florida
later than tho native tre. s.
Grafting is so simple a process that
even a novice may succo d wi h v, ry
little previous experience After select-
ing the stock to be grafted, it is cut or
sawed oQ.at the ground or below the
surface if ihn "stock" is long enough to
allow splitting and inserting the graft.
The graft should be cut wedge shape,
the slape4 about three-fourths of an inch
long, leaving more bar k on the (to bl)
split "stock." Then place a piece of o'd
cloth or paper over the top of the stock
and heap damp earth on it, just cover-
ing the top of the graft. Gratting wax
is rot required.
Frank Phillips, a neighbor and expert
nurseryman, has adopted the plan of
cutting the stock to be grafted at an
angle of forty-five degrees, cutting the
sharp end square off about the width of
the graft and then applying grafting wax
as he usually grafts above the ground.
His theory is that the sloping cut will
heal quicker than a horizontal one. I
have adopted the slanting cut when
ffrff1; nff i ^{~- Al XA- rk:t>_


Ocala Advertisements.


-


SAVED THEIR NECKS.

HOW SOME CONDEMNED MEN NARROWLY
ESCAPED THE HALTER,.
A ew Very Cloas Calls-One Mar.
dered" Man Mwho ved a Fellow
About to Swing-An Engineer Whose
SLife Was Spared at the last Moment.
Some intensely interesting criminal law
eases have been related to the writer dur-
Ing the past week.
Judge Baldwin, with a career of more
than forty years at the bar, proved to be
one of the most valuable contributors.
One of the most remarkable cases that
has ever come. to my notice," said Judge
Baldwin, "was that of the two Booms,
who were convicted years ago in the
Supreme Court of Vermont, in Bennington
County, of the murder of Russell Colvin. It
Appears that Colvin, who was a brother-in-
law of the prisoners, was a person of weak
mind, and was considered burdensome to
the family of the prisoners, who were
obliged to support him; that at the time
of his disappearance he was in a distant
field where the prisoners were at work;
that a violent quarrel had broken out be-
tween them, and that one of them had
struck him a severe blow on the back of the
head with a club, which felled him to the
ground. Bome suspicions arose at the time
that he was murdered' these suspicions
were increased by the finding of his hat in
the same field a few months afterward.
"These suspicions in process of time
subsided, but one of the neighbors having
repeatedly dreamed of the murder with
great minuteness of circumstances, both
in regard to thelhissing man's death and
the concealment of his remains, the
Booms were vehemently accused and gen-
erally believed to be guilty of the murder.
After a close search, the pocket-knife of
Colvin and a button of his clothes were
found in an old open cellar in the same
field In which he had last been seen, and In
a hollow stump not many rods from it
were discovered nails and a number of
bones believed to be those of a man.
" Just prior to their trials friends of the
Boornms said that the evidence against themn
was too unmistakably plain for them to
longer hold out, and urged them to make a
clean breast of the entire matter, holding
that if they did so they would undoubtedly
get their sentence to death-which was
sure to be the result of their trial-com-
muted to imprisonment for life.
The men were tried and sentenced to
be hanged. Their friends renewed their
request that they make a full confession.
One of them finally complied with the re-
quest, detailing a long story as to just how
the murder had been committed. The
other confessed, but with great reluctance,
and doggedness, hnd would not go into de-
tails.
The one who had make the full confes-
sion had the sentence of death commuted,
while the sentence of the penalty of the law
was ordered carried out in the case of the
other.
"As the day of the execution approached
the doomed man made a declaration that he
and his brother had lied; lied outrageously;
and that for his part he would not risk fao-
ing his maker with so awful a lie upon his
soul. -6d'O
*-The lastT7unrse'sobe, for he doome
man, was .Just flooding his Vermont home
when who should appear at the door but
Bussell Colvin-the man for the murder of
whom Boom was upon the morrow to be
executed.
The expltion of the whole matter,
added Judge Baldwin," is simple in ilt
character.
"The two Booms had jumped upon Col-
vin in the field and beaten him. He had
escaped from them, leaving his hat behind,
and so overpowered was he with fear that
he continued his flight until he found him-
self in New Jersey. At'the last moment,
he had learned that one of his persecutors
was about to be hanged as his murderer,
and although he had suffered great bru-
tality at his hands, Colvin immediately
hastened back to save the unlucky fellow's
sleek. As for the confessions which the
Booms made-particularly the full and
very explicit one-they were made simply
for one purpose, that of trying to save
their necks.
While addressing the jury in a criminal
ease a few years ago, continued the Judge,
I found_ myself at a loss for a suitable
story with which to illustrate the great
and supreme need existing for calm judg-
mnent and a complete investigation, partio-
ularly when human life was at stake, and
A passenger train was pulling into a
altation of a little New England town. The
oagleewr had seen many years of contin-
poileervice on that particular run and
wae known and honored as a reliable man,
and it was known to an inch where he
would atop his engine upon reaching the
town.
"A great celebration was held in the
one day, and when the train came in
the track for fifty feat ahead of the point
where the old-time engineer had always
stopped his train was crowded with men,
women and children, so great a confidence
did all have in the power and rule of the
oldengineer to always stop his engine at
teone particular spot.
But on this festal day, when the train
euue in--horror of all horrors I Instead ot
fftopping at the usual spot, it plowed o
through the dense mass of humanity,
grinding the life from out a score of hu.
man beings, and stopping only when lt
wheels had found no more of humnai
blood to drink.
Curses deep and black as ever were ut
tered were rained down upon the engineer
Then came cries of Lynch him! Lyncl


himl'
"A rope was procured, but before i
eould be wound about his neck, some o
the cooler heads in the maddehed mot
counseled less haste-advised that the
fiend of an engineer' be give a momen
or two to explain.
1" With his face as white as a specter the
engineer stepped to the platform of his cab
and looked the turbulent sea of infuriated
humanity fuUll in the face.. But he wa
speechless.
'16Enough r hissed the crowd. 'BHIs erim
has stricken him dumb. Put the rope abou
is neck-the bloody monster r
"'NeverI For God's sake. never
shouted the fireman, whose trained ey(
had been eagerly caning the morerlin
portent mechanism of the locomotive.
"'Here,' he continued, holding aloft
Settle broken bolt. not 1 Inches In length
here is the cause of the accident-a broke
badt at the throttle.'
And so it proved to be, when those wh
had counseled discretion in the wreckingo
vengeance upon the engineer, had midea
examination.
I beeve," concluded the Judge," thi
Iwononeof thegreatest casesof myli
an that little bit of fiction, and what 6
7,u thinkI After court had adjourned,
fSne-appearing, gmy-halred old gentle
eameforwaMd and grp g y hand wa
elalmed:
S aiYOU told the o wn.d1 IYO
sold I% wUI I w im B In ro aw
.Att-A- atl- MwW N
I --- Wq -1


. r .


All kinds of work done in the best manner.
FIRiI3 B. WEIHEOcala. Fla,


GAINESVILLE,


I FLORIDA.


I


OFFICE R S ;
C. WRIGHT, V.-Presr; R. B. McOONNELL, Cashier


DUNN, Prewt.; U.


JAd.A. L. GRABAM. Cwo


1


Accounts of Merchants, Farmers, and Individuals solicited.


V - - % --


V,% -'L-


LL jfploltfla." --!Worn-lrT -eporL o mupx-u ou- u p v u
ency, December 19th, 1890.


wax, as 1 prefer the root graft and damp 1
earth, but apply crude pine gum, using r
the cloth or paper for protecting the slit
from tbe soil falling into it, until the
healing takes place. (Crude pine gum
is a valuable application to freshly prun- |
ed trees or to large limbs taken off when
they are to be transplanted.)
In this vicinity one fruit arower has
planted out twenty acres to Kakis and
several others have from a few hundred
to a thousand or more.
A NEW VARIETY.
At least one new variety has origin-
ated In Orange county at or near Z *ll-
wood, which is known as the Triumph.
It came from the root of an imported
grafted Kaki, which was killed to the
ground in the memorable freeze of 1886.
The fruit is small but exceedingly lus-
cious. The truth of the matter is that
every variety that I have so far tested is
open to the same sweeping encomium.
Very few insects are enemies to the
Kaki. An exception is the "girdler"
beetle, which is quite destructive to all
trees it may attack, but iUs ravages can
be ckeckmated, if everyone will care-
fully gather the severed branches in
which the eggs are deposited (before
girdled) and burn them.
Kaki trees come under the universal
requirements of being fed if the owner
expects paying returns from them. It is
an inexorable law of nature, applicable .
alike to cultivated fruit trees of all
kinds, field and garden c-ope, unless
some one can discover a certain method
for continuing the life of the plant after
f i, has become accustomed to subsist
Without "feeding." That's where the
, Dutchman signally failed after learning
" his best calf to do without eating-it
s died.
A ramous FloridA Tree.
. A late issue of the Scientific Ameri-
h can of New York, contained a fine pic-
ture, from a photograph by Mr. Wm. H.
t Jackson, of Denver, of the famous Amer-
b ican banyan or rubber tree at Palm
e Beach, on lake Worth, Fla. There are
t very few of these trees known at pres-
ent in this state, and the one abyve re-
b erred to is probably the largest in Amer-
d ice. There is, however, a remarkable
Sbanyan tree on the Island of Nassau that
e has attracted much attention, but South
It Florida has several fine specimens. The
r huge arms of this peculiar tree extend
S out in every direction, and drop down
a- shoots, which in time change into trunks
and instead of remaining a cumbrous
a! deprcndant, become a support to the pa-
n rent branch and furnish it sustenance
and life-a cur.ous and interesting pro-
of vision which leads to one of the most
N extraordinary growths that we have in
nature. The parent tree multiplies itself
At and becomes a group and then a grove,
(10 until it spreads oyer a tractof land large
. a enough to shelter an army from sun and
an storm.-Daytona Meensger. .
S Trheme is much more profit In looking
44 after the rail and wire fences than in
- fooling with ,,polticdl ffOce4


Loans money on improved Real Estate. Money al-
ways on hand. No delay or unnecessary expense.
Authorized Capital, $200,000.00
Paid up Capital 100,800.00
SURPLUS, $1 7,000.00
Not Incorporated Under$ Act of 1889.


UIPPMAN BROS.. PTOPdoWM
wNrtoLa uSDlt u. o M
'or sale by W W JohMbnon & Co.
Micanopy, Florida.


3,. T.J.BWKARi.. J"


E, BAIRD & CO.,


SIEDDIim


a BAJUD


1, O6I4Il1 Id lIIn I---
Oim. 0 ao Son MINI
esein at OxI* Waul l
ta p
it bot lb"he timr 1,IIIiii
uuara; oxymso oft ped



S- .... $oL ........
i mid VW I
t1** 0A tie OUs a o

wo i*itr R aLm as liB
Im.SM^ "w"
Mn^ 9f~8L^


HARDWARE & STOVES

House Furnishing Goods,



Til We ) Cl tG
HARNESS and SADDLE-Y.
Paints, Oils and Glaos..Nais,
Supplies. All nds of Tin & Sheet
Iron Works. Piping xor water
and wells promptly and sat-
ISfactorially done.

On West Si'de of Court Houre Square-
-AIMCBVjlAAA S I I LO MA


PatroaiE Bo~m ladtry I

Boat, Boates,
Row Hoats,. aDl Boea SOd G&eMed
every lse Ma dMemlpho.
Prin, io ftas ) I t(f6 l |, t**oleil
qality.
BOAT8 AND 8tAk LAtCUMI
SUILT tO ORDIR
Ebartn'i Claycotyold""t
oRIIs OIOT l lMnIMW ISA.
pursamil of and a*V Use an
^Wteh


TUSKAWILLA


" NEWS.


THE


Volume 1.


The Music House of Florit



An.B. CAMPBELL

Jacksonville, Fla.
Carry the largest stock in South Atlanto
states Of


PIANOS &


ORGANS.

Violins, Banjo, OGutars, Accordteo Anto-
Harp, Strings, Sheet Music. mah IUsru-
mente, trimmlng, and anything ad
everything musical at lowest
Northern price
PIAN O S IWeber, Halnes Brothh"
PIANOS Newby & KyaM MorMt.
OR GANS carrand VoteY. Ck-
0 R G A N sgo Cottage, Vocalloo.
I epecially recommend the Hline Brothers
I'iiitim and Farrnd uand Votey Orgin as fur-
niii~ing i he bestvtvltue of AUrIlot]rumtntot
wt1. h'+LThe F,. and V, oran con be takeo to
pieces and put to oeher in fve minutes by
nily intelltigtent 10)ear-old boy aud aIm I
.-very respect recognized as tie best organ laI
His, V nitc-d Stoles. _
KAqY Th RMS: $10 monthly on Pianos and
And $5unOrgans till paid. JUSLt tbink 31 id
Ail)onile t-an own an instrument on sucb
terms. LittAe more than ordinary rent. eo
for Free C ltta ues. State what Instum rt
ytoU want and you will prcmpty gotfuu minoere
imation that will astonish you. I have sIm
ti, Warvans lu SECOND HAND PIANOS
AND ()IiO A 8. Spend one cent for po
c.tard and write for valuable information.
A. B. CAMPBRUA.


C H LORD & CO.,
000 W10 SOQ 9^M M* A BWi)

--- TLALB AXD --TAX!DBAl RS






Al_9 Cofflup, Q-sakfta Ho O-e0 -a o Un-dasr,
Pik 1e4r.' or-I Good&,


y WVatche-,,




Silver and Plated Ware.
OPTICA L -GOODS. GOLD jPENS


Merchants' National Bank


Of Ocala. o


I RPPI


JOBU W. ASHLEY, Pretdet. J.j.. i Atil, v toe r'emdent.


THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK

Of GainesvMlle, Fla.
Capital, $50,000
Surplus and Undivided Profits $15,000
Does exclusively a baring boalneowith equ ltcllties to any bxWl
tn the tat SoU ts the amounts of ran, MMereanta, Corporaon,
be. Interest allowed on time depolt. All builBo tranearted promptly


NO F.


Capital paid in $100,000
Authorized capital 250,000
Surplus - 15,000


---kZD7--

UNDERTAKING


B H Hat son's Ff itet Establis] enl
Carries the largest and xmot complete Maormoui u: !irnture and
House Furnishinglt Goodo y ot hou #m Aa onty.

Burial Supplies, Wood and Metalic

CASKETO'S.
BFthfc pIptaO~entiom.^ 4Lha day or night
T~ht. iTe leapfhi o I Udertwilr e Cakp les m
il l attend funerals In asr rf e e mth.
S, 1U0d r a taN0 ON,
Manager, Undermaker and Bambet


THE BUFFUI LOAB & TROST COMPANY.
of Ocala. Plorida.


FIRST NATIONAL BANK


OF OCALA.


Paidup Capital $50,000.00
Authorized Capital $150,000.0)
Surplus and Undivided Profit2 $25,000.00
E. W. AGNEW, President; W. H. COUCH, Vice-President
A. McINTYRE, Cashier:


Fully Equipped for Every Kind of

Legitimate Banking.

Has the Largest Surplus, Largest Ilner of lDemits, and does the larg'I
busine of anty Bank in Marion County. We solicit your bank twzout antd
all business in our line and guarantee .satisfuotion.


SOALA NOVELTY WORKS
"". A Tg T MM (I )


UC,


pixjnr e W iM.* o)

(4 U IPAOO URER 8 OP1


Sast, Doors, loolt o )S, Bractt
Oaslngs, Flooring, O ping, Turning.
40Oin, UAWNQ OF AL; KINDS A SPECIALTTY
Ap*ent &a d ow*",ftI & Tr, of Ww%
Bi^ W"^! ^^f6,- -, b- -Y,^^ ^


i


Number 26.


Gainesvllle Advertisernents.


57=


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A, 0. STEENBURG.,
Wholesale ansd Retafl Dealer la
HardwaV-re


Agricultural Implemontz,

Paints, Oils and Glass, Mill Supplies,
saddlery anxd Harness.

FU RNI.T U R E!
I am Headquarters for STOVE3 OF ALL KIN DS, and Sole Agent lor
the Celebrated CHARTER OAK 1r Give me a trial and I willB guarantee satisfaction.


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PURDY &* RUHL, Publishers.



















































































ED.
lowing
InMiC
An act
of the
Sect
and p
and i
Mican
and St
flared
and in
valid a
State o
Feb.
T
Satu
morni
the to,
each o


MICANOPY, June 25th 1891.
NEws; Pleas copy the fol-
g for the benefit of a few cranks
canopy: Chapter 8685 No. 80,
t to legalize the incorporation
town of Micanopy.
ion 1, "That all the acts done
performed in the organization
incorporation of the town of
opy, in the county of Alachua,
tate of -Florida, are hereby de-
to be valid and legal in law
Equity and to be considered
and binding by the laws of the
of Florida.
221885." C. H. CRsMAK.
The Hungry Burglars.
arday night along towards
ng the noted burglars took in
wn, lingering long enough at
Df the places that attracted them
resh the "inner man". They
d Mr. W. WV. Brice's house and
ed him of a luscious pineapple;
ook his pantaloons, perhaps
ng they contained money, but
dlingthat they were mistaken
em in the yard. Then they en-
Mfr. C. E. Owen's house, carry-
way with them a "leg o' mut-
bread, cake, perhaps a little
and made their way to the
dist parsonage, where they
eed their thirst with several
f fresh milk. It is indeed too
at we can't catch the pilfering
s. Let's look for a moment se-
y at this matter and try te de-
some plan by which these
s can be brought to Justlce.
"fThe Golden Dawn."
hero of this pathetic story Is
other than the beautiful and
d cream horse that may be
t almost any time grazing upon
ads-clad shores of Tuskawilla
stands erect, with head up and
ver the dashboard, bearing the
caption. Whether he is an
an or Kentucky steed we are
Sto ascertain, though we can
hat he bears the weight of 25
bravely upon his well devel-
houlders. He has been, and is
he hero of many jokes, but he
and good-naturedly takes
all in. His pedigree or owner-
runs 'as follows: Mr. Avent
bt him here, ob, many long
ago (almost a voter then) and
since been the property of a
of our most valued oitisens.
as bought by 8nowden, by
, by Snowden, by Henderson,
ster, by Barnett, by Shiretskl,
rison, by Thrasher, by Moree,
nson, and again be falls into
nds of Stokee, and bobs up all
g and says he is good for more
tter trades. How's that for a


amfar Y., by Anne P.g, Aiioib
r .a. &ad J". W ops. loknl Oki
*^^^U|H----t CUL Ol>r" am &4 YnSa* wm 40L4

&I.7 I. 1 <> an -w k m) I* t
f6*^^~~~~~slw hi^ M-*f.tw.EM
7 s.tta^ r V.. a.. 0&0" 1potinut.T M map*


I*UUin APcnc
we are bitterly opposed A Picnic. to ref
out due consideration. ED. NEWS:. After so long an ab- entered
s to see that the farmer sence, will you please admit me to a relieve
%s his rights, but let ns correspondence in your brave little also t
sate our strength. In paper? think
fiance worked slowly Picnics are so frequent in your on fin(
I when they did make fun-loving, sociable community that left th
y made "Rome howl" I imagine you will hot objget to an tered A
Peffer stands before us account of one of these enjoyable Ing aw
f that strike. We say gatherings. ton",
rel before you leap." We left Orange Lake at 7 o'clock wine,
**a on the morning of the 18th inst., the Metho
P. Bates Dead. usual outits were used, for real dampen
plates, forty years old good time at the WilUsto picnic, pass 0
known and esteemed eighteen miles distant. Our road bad th
the office of President led us through a lovely forest of rascals
Pennsvlvania railroad pines, their branches swaying and riousl
ay after a brief Illness.eviseI
in the service of the sighing to the balmy, morning breeze, vise
fifteen years in differ- while the tiny birds flit to and fro in thieve
having been originally quest of their morning meal, as we
the 7ew York divis-
es was a vocalist of were briskly bourn to our destina-
d was choir-master at tion, while sparkling wit, gay laugh- Tne
f St. Martin's-in-the- ter and brilliant repartee fell from none o
ekonHeights, where thelips otfmy merrv ycompanions. blood
ties of sexton. Three and a half hours brought us seen a
is atone time a resl- to the picnic ground, which is situ- the gr
lace, and by his kind ated in a beautiful grove of ancient who sl
ly treatment of others oaks, festooned with gray moss, that tail ov
rnds who will be deeply seemed to wave a welcome to each above
ar of his sudden and new comer. In the midst of this Arabia
ath. Abouttwomonths grove, nestles a neat, and well-kept unable
our office and looked church, a true index to the charac- say th
health, but today he ter of those generous, hospitable peo- years
ith the departed. THx ple. I wish I could give you a full oped s
mnon with the citizens detail of the variety and quality of still, ti
extends sympathy to the good things set before us and smiles
wife' and family, and then the hearty manner in which them a
Thy will be done." these tempting dalnties were of- abip r
-r fered, and the cordial "come again," brought
COPIES FREE. seemed to be the prompting of pure. years
S unselfish friendship, such as wells he has
3outh, ou great Bouth- up in the heart and bubbles forth few(?)
weekly, Zifould be taken from the eyes of those who have felt He wo
isehold. The price ais its mystic influence. Stokes
r, and a present which After spending several hours on by Fea
&mount or moye is oent the picnic grounds we went to visit by Har
early subf0riptiom. A a cave called by the unpoetic name by Job
wi be sent t W ay ad- of "Devils Den," two mill west of the haz
at one to Williston. The distance was soon smillnj
J. H. BXAa & Co., made by our fleet team and we were and be
-Atlanta, Ga.-, 01 stationed around the entrance of horse?


Sole Agent for Duffy's Malt and
Catherweod'a

Celebrated Whiskies.

THE FINEST BILLIARD PAR-
LOR AND BOWLING ALLEY
IN FLORIDA.
Bowling Alley now open day
and Night.
-ORDERS FROM OUTSIDE THE CITY
PROMPTLv ATTENDED To.


Pa&tnts.
Orders promptly attended
eorreopondaenee solicited.
PALATKA, FLA.
dee2O-apri


STENCILS FURNISHED


O


APPLICATION


f


The Tuskawilla News.


THE START.


THE G R. P & M. R. R. IS
BEGUN IN EARNEST.

THEY MEAN BUSINESS-THE
WORK STARTED AT EACH
END OF THE LINE.

The Projectors Ask No Dona-
tions, But Request Your Sub-
scriptions, to be Returned
in Certificates.
Monday, the 15th inst., the first sod
was broken at Gainesville on the
Gainesville Rocky Point & Micanopy
Railroad. All fun was laid aside
and the work begun in dead earnest.
The following (last) Monday the
work of grading was begun at Mic-
anopy, and the two forces are head-
ing for each other. Soon Micanopy,
as well as Gainesville, can look for-
ward to one of the biggest booms
ever recorded in the pages of history.
It is useless tor us to repeat the ad-
Svantages of this section, you are all
aware of the natural wealth that
f we possess and what we can accom-
Splish, if we will, these enterprising
men simply place the instrument in
your hands by which you may ac-
s complish great things, and we in-
e sist on you coming to the front and
Small together endeavor to place this
e section upon the highest pinnacle o:
success.
Bear in mind, fellow citizens, tha
1 you are not asked to donate a red
y cent, but every dollar you subscribe
d will be returned in freight certify
e cates,) therefore you run no risk a
s all and can perhaps aid in doin
good to your section, besides thi
Smen at the head of this new line de
e, serve all the assistance they can get
h They have bravely battled with ever;
s difficulty, and they were many, an<
now that they have made it almost
d a certainty we say help them *'hol,
- up their hands" and we will surel;
have a new railroad to haul away ou
coming orange crop, which bids fai
? to be a large one, and freight rate
n will naturally be lower.
d Gainesville is doing all she can t
e make the scheme mature and Mican
d
s opy will do her share, so with pardon
t able pride we can say we have th
- finest section on earth. Keep th
", good work going on and let us nc
rest till we hear the whistle of th
e-"niopy--depf Whoop 'em up. --"

r" The Future of the South
5t
a The New York Herald prognosti
I- cates a most prosperous career for th
r south if the sectional politicians wil
s only let it alone. It says:
t- "The south has rolled up it
sleeves and proposes to be rich again
richer than ever. It has all the ns
e tural resources which attract capital
)f and enterprise. Young men fror
r the north on the lookout for a career
- are making investments there, help
a ing to develop the country and the;
'- always receive a warm welcome. Th
- tides of population, kept apart s
d long, are mingling their water, am
e unless the politicians raise a ro'
- there wont be any south or nort
s twenty years from now, and in steal
? we shah have a united, contente<
o and prosperous country. Therefore
)- hang the politicians, and let th
o good work go on."


WALTER S, HILL,




COMMISSION MERCHANT,
4


WOOD, WOOD, WOOD,

DELIVERED IN ANY PART OF
THE CITY AT THE LOWEST
PRICES.
-5tf- G. J. HAGOOD.


NEW 'YORK


CITY.


JUMBO BONANZA,

CITY BAKERY,

JOHNSON & CO. Props.
Fresh Bread, Cakes' Pies, &c.,
Kept always on hand. Families
furnished at reduced prices. 28
Loaf Bread Tickets for $1.00


ATTENTION 1


Clothing Made to Order.
J. R. & D. EMERSON
Have just received a fine line of
samples for pants and spring
suits made to order. Pants
$8.00 to $8.00. Suits $18.00
to $35.00. Fit guaran-
teed perfect.
Office Montgomery blocK, Room
No. 1. Call and see us.
ALL KINDS OF

FRESH MEATS

-EVERY DAY-

At B. J. MILLS' Market.
dec20-3m


DO YOU READ ? IF YOU DO

NOW IS THE TIME TO


SUBSCRIBE FOR

--AND--


ADVERTISE IN

-THE-




TUSKAWILLA NEWS,


THE BEST PAPER IN ALACHUA CO.


i


0. S. COOPER,

Blacksmithing,
Horseshoeing)
A specialty. Sactsfaction guaran-
teed. Wazon and carriage repair
neatlyv done. 141vl


$0 "i a n ''*'" '""'-
*All I II UZA I t I vNdw-*kv o b*r~trN
3 000ow.t.o* m T- r- Tlind* Dmon *





CONTRACTOR & BUILDER,
AND DEALER I.N
Lumber, Sh wiin gles, I a

arLa ths, Sash, Dor orsi
Blinds, Et c., Etc., W
E. T. HENDEM'ON,
CONTRACTOR & BUILDER,
AND DEALER IN

Lumber, Shingles,

Laths, Sash, Doors,

Blinds, Etc., Etc,,

MICANOPY, FLA.
Satisfaction guaranteed and cor-
respondence solicited.


St. AUGUSTINE

Marble and Stone

Company.

Monuments.
ail Head Slftones a Specialty
J. M. QUARTERMAN, AGENT,
Mlcanopy, Fla.

P. CUNNEELY,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL

WINE:-: MERCHANT.
PALATKA, FLA.


MRS. HAMILTON,
----
EVINSTON, -FLORIDA,
desires to luform the ladies
that she is prepared to do
Sewing, or Cutting and
Fitting
In the LATEST and MOST IM-
PROVED MANNER.
Satisfaction guaranteed. Give her
a call, or send your orders.
ifllinn II .. .M Ji-* r. .r nw .t


a~lmwnse wt..t .. pe .m a, s.a.fl .... t *
t..,--||y ud i .tLr>.i -- .. r *IIIl db W WI ItoW *
Wa"- r. T.: tow y
MON
TtMX ~ ~ ~ ~ n A~*WBI I rft-*l*& Tte


W. P. SHETTLEWORTH
(WITH)
M. F. PECK.

PRODUCE CORN. MERHRANT,
-AND DEALER IN-


FLA. FRUITS
AND-----

VEGETABLES.
334 WASHINGTCN ST., EW YORK.
Consignments Solicited, Returns
Promptly Made.

REFERENCES.
Judge G. W. Means, Evinston, Fla.
F. G. Sampeon, Boardman, l1a.
Geoo. Glover, Maoedon, N. Y.
Irvin National Bank, New York.
C. H. Register, Smyrna, DeL
R. Clark, Cornwall-on-IIHudson, N .Y.
J. H. Bird, Att'y Bradstreeoot Com.
Agency, New York.


ROBERT :-: BARNES,
Wholeale and Retail
dealer in
SASH, DOORS, BLINDS PAINTS,
OILS, WALL PAPER.
A FULL LINE OF PAINTERS'
SUPPLIES AND BUILD-
ER8' HARDWARE.

Agent for the Celebrated Averill


,;--- ---- ---~, :;--- -- --- i,--: -"-i--- .L -il---.r --:- :_- ~


bEFICIAL ORGAN OF ALACHUA COUN-
TY FARMERS' ALLIANCE.


C. J. PURDYEditors Pub.
P. A-., RUHL, io P


For 8le.
)ne Jersey cow With heifer calf,
.00. One Jersey cow with heifer
f (first calf), $65.00. One heifer
ue calf), $50.00. Younger heifers
Sto $40. Either of the above cows
11 give Iwo gallons of milk and
n be increased feeding more.
F. G. SAMPSON.
17tf Boardman, Fla.


PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY.


w S. DURHAM,V

CITY BARBER & JEWELER.

Neat Work Guaranteed.


CARTER & OWEN, AG'TS. Micanopy.


'*-w o ns on; ou


9


IP


O
$75
cal
(di
$38
wi
cal


Df
i-

f
J



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s;
y;

b-
s-


t-
y

n-
IE
ell
ur


N


the den, being assured by the gallant;
knights that there was really no dan-
ger, we cautiously proceeded to en-
ter this dismal cave. The entrance
is just large enough to admit one
person. On a frail ladder, twenty
feet almost perpendicular, we de-
scended and found a sort of colonade
or passage, about eight by two feet,
arched over head with lagged rock,
leading to a miniature lake of crys-
tal water, strongly impregnated with
sulphur, the odor reminding one of
that place we are told to shun. Now,
fancy had pictured to me a dark cav-
ern, inhabited by goblins and un-
earthly sounds, but his satanic
majesty was not to be seen and echo
was the only sound that greeted us.
We were told that the only occupant
of the pool was a white alligator, but
his 'gatorship did not put in an ap-
pearance. Having explored to our
satisfaction thi wonderful cave, we
retraced our steps, partook of some
delicious watermelons and, as old
Sol was disappearing through the
gates of crimson and gold, we turned
our faces homeward, over the un-
broken stretch of beautiful woods
with lights and shadows that seemed
there by design, so wonderfully do
they fit, and twilight slowly en-
croaches, mellowing and softening
t the outlines until all nature seems to
be in 'a delicious dream, by and by
Sthe mystic moonbeams take the
place of gentle twilight and the stars
shine brilliantly in the clear sky,
and down in the distant dell the
- frogs are busy in their never-ceasing
I croaking, the night winds sigh
s through the the tops of the majestic
f pines, as they reach heavenward
the little mocking-birds are warbling
their vespers hymn and soon the re-
t freshing breeze from Orange Lake
d fans our brow as we near the hospit
e able roof of the Orange Lake house
10 o'clocK, and all is welL Witb
many thanks and a hasty "good
Night" to our kind friends, we hie-a
g way to the land of dreams.
e "Novice,"
LENA VAUGHAN.


DIRECTORY OF SUB-ALLI-
ANCES OF L/HUA CO.
Following is jhe Ulliance Direc-
tory, furnished byr tt county secre-
tary, with the number of members in
the different Sub-Aliances as far as
known:
Antioch, Presidet J Vanlandin_-
ham, Mounteocht; Secretary, H.
L. Johnson, LaCrosse. Number
members 13. -
Prospect, President, W M Blitch,
Secretary, W H ,ope, of Lacrosse.
Number member 11.
Windsor, Presidnt, W D Dicker-
son; Secretary, Vm Bates, Wind-
sor. Number ol members 17.
Micanopy, President, B W Powell;
Secretary, P A Ruhl, Micanopy.
Number of menibers 36.
Waldo, Presidet, W N Gillett;
Secretary, T D Williams, Waldo.
Number of members 31.
Campville, Presflent, Gillet Miller;
Secretary, J H Dyess, Camp-
ville ; number o members 25.
Rochelle, Presicent, T R Kennedy;
Secretary, W A Porter, Rochelle;
number of members 18.
Evergreen, Preddent, W P Lipsey;
Secretary, T J Knight. Oceola;
number of members 16.
Gordon, President, E Dupree; Sec-
retary, T N Kirly, Jonesville; num-
ber of members 16.
Cleveland, President, J Holt; Sec-
retary, I Ginh, Alachua; number
of members I,.
Lochloosa, President. S C Hayman
Lochloosa; Secretary, Wm Crosby
Island Grov&; number of members
13.
Newnansvflle, President, J B Dell
Secretary, EN Bell, Newnansville
number atf members 10.
Hawthorn, President, W H H Hol
dridge, Grove Park; Secretary, 14
S Rogers, Hawthorn; number o
, members 50.
STrenton, Pres. Secretary,,
- A Ward, Prenton.
e Orange Hotehts, President, J oM
e Russell; 83dretary, W N Shotten
SOrange Heights..
Midway, President, C L Slaughter
h Secretary, .W J Mathews, Yular
d number of members 17.
-Bloxham, President, W C Rives
Secretary, C B EFasterlin, Gracy
number of members 24.
Gainesville.' President, I E Wel
ster; Secretary, H Ramsey, Gaines
ville; number of members 12.
N. ROGERS,
Secretary County Alliance.
Our better-half, C. J. Purdy, star
ed out on a canvassitig tour Monda
h morning. He will canvass the ex
e tire county in the interest of TH
. NEws, and we trust he may be we
s received by every one. Now is you
time to subscribe.


-Member of the
PRODUCE EXCHANGE, PHILA-


Member of the--
MERCANTILE EXCHANGE, NEW YORK.


SUBSCRIPTION RATE: One year,
$1.00: six months, 50 cents; three
months, 25 cents. All subscriptions
* due in advance.
JOB PRINTING: Connected with
the paper Is a complete and well-
appointed job printing office, and
with new type and presses and com-
petent printers, satisfaction.is as-
sured all.who may favor us with a
call. All kinds of work executed
with promptuess and accuracy and
at reasonable prices.
ADVERTISING RATES depend upon
location in the paper and- will be
furnished upon application.


I


I10ANOPY, : FL


lORIDA.


Thursday, June 25, 1891,


THE Kansas farmers are going to
try the Sub-Treasury scheme awhile.
THE Republicans of Ohio have
nominated Wm. McKinley for gov-
ernor of that state.
IT is said that the resignation of
Justice Rainy from the supreme
court &ay have some significance in
the senatorial appointment.
A SURE sign that the Alliance is
getting in good work is when the
crank publications of this broad land
begin to "slingmud" in her face. We
smile when we notice how little the
sturdy farmer notices the affront.
;Oe
LET the disappointed papers how
against the Alliance. They onlu
. give advertising free when they d(
it. The Alliance is here to stay an<
by degrees she is working to thi
point where these insignificant sheet
will be only too glad to hang on.

PENSACOLA now has a monument
to tWie memory of the confederate
dead. The unveiling, on the 17t]
Inst., was a gorgeous affair, Florida'
military being present with the ex
eeption of perhaps two companies
Hon. R. W. Davis, the silver-tongue
orator of Palatka, delivered the ora
tion.
"- '.. e**
WHAT is Alachua county going t
do about the Chicago World's Fair
Wake up, citizens, and let's foray
some idea of what course we intend
to pursue. Some of the counties ar
up and doing. Alachua is too gran
a county to be left behind in thi
race. As is well known the brilliant
legislature just adjourned did noth
ing towards the matter, and it de
volves upon us as individuals to d
the tlhng right. Don't allow the o


REFERENCES:


Irving National Bank New York.


First National Banx, Gainesville,


.,



u
S,

it
d.
d
y
y


Flemington, Fla.

ADDITIONAL LOCALS.
Notice.
The patrons of Micanopy high
school are requested to meet with m
at the school house Thursday morn
ing at 10 o'clock sharp, on business
of importance. J. W. SMITH,
Supervisor
The Glorious Fourth.
Remember, readers of THiiE NEWS
the Alliance of Alacbna county wil
give a grand picnic and barbecue a
Newnansville. Everybody is invited
Noted speakers will be present an
a jolly, good time is in prospect B
all means be present. Let ever
1h _r J -I


FsTAmmts IM 1853. awwNK ouTr M 1867
m-mmAumSX= X 1871

THE OLD RELIABLE


Micanopy Drug Store.

1 r'AAD01 AATLUrDO

DRUGGIST
-AND--

APOTHECARY
Drugs, Medicnes, Chemical
Points, Oil, Toilet Articles, Confec
tions and all other articles usually
kept in a first class Drug Store.
PRESCRIPTION A SPECIAL


For General Local news THE NEWS h as no equal
as a First-Class Family Journal; besides it is
published in the finest county i the State
of Florida, which is the richest
section in, the world.

THE OFFICIAL ORGAN.

At the la-st meeting of the Alachua County Farmers'
Alliance and Industrial Union THE VEjjWS was
endorsed as the Official Organ of the County. On
this line we wish to say we are with, and one of, the
.luliancenen, and shall ever be fuund advocating the
principles of the Alliance and fighting for the rights
of the Farmer. TIn a short time we shall publish a
full and complete directory of every Sub-Alliance in,
the County, with a weekly price list of Alliance Ex-
change.


We want 500 Subscribers


WITHIN THE NEXT SIXTY DAYS!
In order to get that number we are going to canvass thoroughly the
entire county, and if necessary, the whole State. TaB NEWS is here for
the benefit and development of this entire section and NOT FOR ONE
PARTICULAR POINT. It is the peoples' paper and as such shall fight
for the pepl,*, upholding the right and fearlessly condeming the wrong,
but DEMOCRATIC EVERY TIME, YOU BET. This paper will cost you



JOB WORK DONE.

We are prepared to do all sorts of job work such as

LETTER-HE.,DS,
NOTE-HEADS,
ENVELOPES,

CIRCUL.4RS, ETC.,

AT ROCK-BOTTOM PRICES.


GET YOURSELF READY,
*
FOR WE ARE COMING TO BEE YOU.
We need your help and we wish to extend our circulation, In order that
every household in the county may read Tas Nzwa.


GOOD, PURE READING

Can always be found in the columns of THE

NEWS, and we ask you to give a trial.


ONLY ONE DOLLAR A YEAR I
For Advertising rates addre&,

PURDY & RUHL,


SMICANOPY, FLOllDA.


t
n


pJUbtlU gIe~tt
means, ,and let
is the grandes
feredin Amer
come away
-,will do her be
polled to d0x
coat and let us
in dead earnest
Izens of Alkch

DIscusSIONS
third party m
the opinion th
slowly and car
fectual than
party and disc
wards. We fu
ance of a ref(
can consistent
resolutions ad
Stion at Cincini
it the right tin
Is the third pa
battle with th(
olist at present
appear as oppo
will place the
the lead, but m
to acting with
Our purpose is
and laborer ha
not over-estim
Kansas the Al
but surely and
the strike the
Senator-elect
as the result o
again "Look w
Roland
Roland P. B
who was well
as an usher in
Roberts of the
died on Monde
He had been
company for f
ent capacities,
a brakeman on
Iion. Mr. Bat
some note, an(
the Church o
Fields, Wissah
he also rang
formed the dut
Mr. Bates wa
dent of this pl
and gentleman
won many frie
grieved to hem
unexpected des
ago he was in
the picture of
is numbered w
Nzws, in com
of Micanopy,
the bereaved
can only say "

SSAMPL E
The Sunny 8
ern Family W
in every hou
I '. I Vy S$ a yea
iWprth that
r Aery yea
saplM dopy i
dry WIlte
i '


T, -guu. weG have the
tus apply them. Thi
t opportunity ever of
iea and Florida mus
victorious. Californi
st and we shall be eorm
Urs. So off comes ou
s get down to business
st. What say you, cit
ua?

s are rife regarding th
movement.. We are o
at to work this matte
refully will be more ef
to hastily organize a
uss the mistakes after
lly realize the import
orm government, and
ly endorse many of th
opted by the conven
nati and Ocala, but i
ne to make the move
trty strong enough to
e money of the monop
t? We do not wish te
>sing any measure tha
farmer and laborer i


a glorious Fourth of July, as they
used to have in "ye olden time."
Comnmunicated.





L


,a


The Tuskawilla News.

:.* CHURCH DIRECTORY.
S. ;Pr N. "SIYE',KS RIA N1.
x.Preachinga Fourth Sunday in each
. month at 1 ta. m. and 7:30 p. m.;
*; :..Prayer-meeting every Friday eve-
ning at 7:30; Sunday-school every
Sunday morning at 9:30.
SRBEV. T. E. SMITH, Pastor.
S' BAPTIST
Preaching Firstand Third Sundays
in each month at 11 a. m. and 7:30
S e. m.; Prayer-meeting every Thurs-
day evening at 7 :30 Sunday-school
iv every Sunday at 9:30 a. m.
S r BEV. L. D. GEIGER,
S< Pastor.
METHODIST.
Micanopy.;-Preaching Second and
Fourth Sundaya in each month at
11 a. m. and 8 p. m.; Sunday School
at 9:45 a. m. every Sunday. Pray-
meeting eyery Wednesday at 8
p. M.
Marvin.' Preaching First and Third
Sunday in each month at 11 a. m.
and 8 p. m.; Class meeting the first
Sunday; Wunday-school every Sun-
day at 9:45, a. m.
Schlloh. Preaching Second Sunday
at 8:30 p. m.
Tacoma. Preaching Fourth Sunday
at 4 p. m.
SMcIntosh. Preaching Third Sunday
at 8 p. m.
REV. J. P. HILBURN,
Pastor.

Offlidal Notice.
The Dost-office will be open fUom 9
Sto 10 o'clock a. m., every Sunday, for
the accommodation of the public.
S .. M,. C. ARNOW, P. M.

LOCAL HAPPENINGS.

SThe. blue pencil mark on ypur pa-
"> per is a reminder that your-subscrip-,


,printer needs money to meet'his
-bills as well as others. Don't put
: us off any longer.
Hoptdays. &


--i


.


i ~----p------- _I_


DA.


A. J. SHUFoRD


-----~------~~~~- ~~~~~~~-


I


I i


POPULAR DRUG STORE
You will find a Complete Stock of

Drugs, Patent Medicines and Toilet Articles
KEPT IN ST0CK ALL THE TIME,
-A GOOD ASSORTMENT OF-

FRESH GARDEN SEEDS.,
We will always keep in stock a Full line of Cigars an, Tobacew
CALL AND SEE US,

W. W. JOHNSON & CO.,

Micanopy, Florida.

THE VERDICT IS RENDERED THAI


I. HEYMAN'S STORE
Is the place where all the Latest Styles and Novelties can be fund,
Suitable for the

SPRING AND SUMMER OF 1891.
We respectfully call your special attention to our DRESS GOODS, of
the finest texture, shades and variety, the latest of which is the black em-
broidered, Lawn Dresses, also white, of exquisite patterns and at ROCK-
BOTTOM PRICES. To describe the quantities and different qualities of
our styles dress goods would be impossible, and we invite you to eall
around to our store and we will be pleased-to show you our new assortment
of goods. Our lovely.

MILLINERY DEPARTMENT
Is in full trim, with an endless variety of Flowers, Wreaths and Ribbons..
Our expert trimmer will trim you the head-gear artistically free of
charge and guarantee satisfaction.
We have recently added to our stock Miles' best hand made ladies' shoes of
best quality, also in Mens'. Misses' and Boys' shoes we claim to be Head-
quarters. Our general line of goods is complete, with Groceries according,
all of which will be sold to you FOR THE LOWEST POSSIBLE:
CASH PRICE. Yours very respectfuly,

I. HEYMAN.,


I I I LI I~-II 11, '' ,, I, -


i "


PERSONAL
Mr. J. H. Prater was i Gainesville
Friday.'
Mr. J. B. Emerson w n the city
Saturday.
i
Manager A. J. Shid was in,
Gainesvllle Friday. .
Hon. Wash Johnson tniied on us
a few days a4o.
Mrs. F. J. Hagood xile a flying
yisit to Gainesville Friry.
SHollie Barnett has e.to work
for Mr. J. M. Brown. i
Mr. J. W. Smith wa* welcome
caller at this office Mony.
Mr. Sam Chitty made Is a pleasant
call this week. Call ag~n, Sam.
G. V, Chamberlin, Esq., was
around to see us Monda afternoon.
/^
R.B.Taylor, Esq., left pr Leesburg
on a business trip Moundat afternoon.
Rev. L. D. Geiger preached at Or-
ange Lake S,unday inst ad of Mica-
nopy.,
Rev. J. P. Hilburn hel is appoint
ments at Marvin and M ntosh last
Sunday. ,'
The invincible Jeff ,Ctltt was in
to see us Monday. We were; glad to
see him. i >| "
Miss Rosa Culpepper, of Eireka, is
in town, being a guest of Mn. J. M.
Quarterman. .
Miss Annie Riggs, of (aidesville,
visited the family of M rskGi. Riggs
last Sunday. ,
Mr. J. F. Bruton and a urnd were
into see us Saturday. 'ill again,
gentlemen. *
Mr. G. F. Finger and w spent sev
eral days.-last week at airbaffks,
visiting relatives and friends.
Mr. Hutchinson, who has pur-
chased the Howard place.,with his
sonJacK, was in the cityj atuiday
last. .
Prof. O. B. Walton,-of/,Aredonda,
wasin the city Sunday and Monday,
and made us a call.,, Cari gin, Pro-
fessor. ,
Dr. Z. M. Price, wife aad baby of
Eureka are in thehty f'or few days,
shaking hands with thor many
friends. .
Mr. G. R. Harrisfone of our worthy
farmers called Saturday and renewed
his subscription tA the boss paper pf
the county. Thank you, sfr.
Mr. J. Barron, of Eviuston, was a
welcome caller at this office Tuesday,
in consequence of. which HE NEWS
visits his homne another year.
-... .. .. :,* i ,.. : ; ..' _


Remember the picnic at Tacoma
today (Thursday).
FOR SALE-Household and kitch-
en furniture. Only been used two or
three months. Enquire at this of-
fice. 24tf
Patrons of the Micanopy High
School observe the call o1 your su-
pervisor, and be on hand Thursday
(today).
Rheumatism was so bad that
James Irvin, of Savannah, could
hardly walk from pain in his shoul-
der and joints of his legs. P. P. P.
Prickly Ash, (Poke Root and Potas-
sium) was reesorted to and Irwin is
well and happy.
The lumber for a new church at
Hawthorne is being sawed, and soon
the Methodist f that thriving town
will have a nice, new church.
The report 'reaches us that Harry
Mitchell offered Henry Stokes his
half interest in the Jumbo Bonanza
bakery as ap inducement for him to
buy the beautiful "Golden Dawn."
Fruit Jars, "world without end;"
Finest, Freshest and Fattest Mack-
erel; the.,most extravagant and end-
less. varieties of Fancy and French
Candiest' at Stringfellow Bros'.,
Gainesville.
In this issue appears a brilliant
description ot the picnic at Willis-
ton, from the pen of Miss Lena
Vaughan, of Flemington. We trust
she will favor us with other writings
in the future.
Parties having wagon and teams
o' wagon and harness without teams
.can get contracts for- hauling
W. P. COUPE,
Willistpn Fla.
We suggest to the council that they
.extend the rock walk to the end of
Cain street in front of the Montgom-
ery block. It would be a great addi-
tion, as the boards are loose, and fast
becoming dangerous.
Terrible blood poison, body cov-
ered with sores, and two bottles of
P. P. P. (Prickly Ash, Poke Root and
Potassium) cured the disease, mak-
ing the patient lively as a ten-year-
old.
SA report reached here a few days
ago that one Mary Scarborough, col-
ored, killed another colored woman
whose name we did not learn, one day
last week, at Gainesville. We have
learned no particulars.
Mrs. W. W. Brice has growing in
her front yard a plant Known as the
"Spanish Bayonet," about 15 feet in
height, which has the loveliest white
-bloom upon it that we ever saw. It
is a handsome ornament for a flower
garden.
We publish this week the Alliance
directory. We find that Alaciua
contains, quite a number of thrifty
alliances. It is gratifying to not<:
this fact. We shall endeavor to meet
with 'them all ducla'in- r h..e a
summer.
The finest watermelons we have
seen are on sale at W. W. Johhson &
Co.'s drug store. They were raised
by Mr. J. J. Slappey, who is well
known as the "boss melon grower."
He certainly has the finest we have
seen so far.
The grist mill of Mr. J. A. Simon-'
ton, which was recently moved to
the lot opposite his store, will soon
be running again. Messrs. H. W.
Thomas and C. H. Chrisman have
charge of the job, a guaranteeoof a
good one.
The new packing house is fast
nearing completion. It is reported
that between seasons this house is to
be used as a canning factory. A bet-
ter scheme could not be placed on
foot as we have any amount of stuff
to feed a cannery. Who says Mican-
opy is not the best town in the State?
A certain young man in town
wishes to know who is that popular
young lady named Miss Carter &
Owen. As he was passing down the
street he saw several envelops lying
on the walk addressed to "Miss Car-
ter & Owen." Can some one give
the necessary information? He is
eager'lo meet her.
Rev. E. A. Holt, of Orange Lake,


arrived here Saturday in order to be
in time to fill his appointment Sun-
day. He spent Saturday night It
Tacoma intending to return in the
morning, but it rained so heavily he
could not get back, so morning ser-
vice at the Baptist churh was not
held. He preached a very interest-
ing sermon Sunday evening.
The Lone Star Dining Room,
Gainesville, .Fla., reently opened
opposite Endel Bro-., proves to be a
great convenience io the visitors to
that city. Besides furnishing the
very best table"in the city, Mr. Cul-
verhouse has. an excellent line of
fine Whiskeys, Beer, etq., separate,
but convenient to- the Lone Star
Dining Room. When you are in the
city give him a eall. (13tf)
Our old 'gator friend, F. C. Riggs,
took his departure for Bristol, Conn.,
Monday morning. Frank has been
visiting here and among the 'gators
for several months past, and amongst
the former will be sadly missed. His
many friends wish him a safe return
home. His cousin, Joe Riggs, re-
marked that he was going too. For
the latter we cannot vouch, as walk-
ing is very bad now days. Though
Frank has gone he left his dollar and
THE NEws will follow him.
J. W. Lane, Esq,.'representing the
popular Music House of A. B.
Campbell, of Jacksonville, will be
in town co-day and will remain
just one week. Parties desiring
instrumentsof any kind will do well
to call on Mr. Lane while here as
Ahs house bears the reputation of
"dealing in nothing butp first-class
goods and these are sold at the very
o"west prices Aud easiest terms, 1tl


\


\.:" ^'-


GROCERIES,


> *





--DEALER IN-


1- O v


SCool nights. .
Vegetables are fast giving out.
Mason's Improved FruitJars for
Sale at 8SH. BENJAMIN & CO.
: e weatherft simply exasperating.
S If, you want a good milchcow call
on Stokes & Johnson.
i" If yo are unhappy lsubscri e for
TiHE NEws and6 you will immediately
be comforted. V
D'e. ee cold Soda Water at W. W.
J Jhnson & Co.'s, drug store. 18
,Many of our citizens attended the
piclnidgivenby the Masons it' Haw-
.tharne Wednesday. .'
In 'order to get the lowest cash
prices for tomato wraps,' call on
(22tf) CIIITTY & JOHNSON.
Winkypins are becoming quite nu-
Smerous in Tuskawilla lake and are
now just right for eating.,'
Look Cut for the finest assortment
of shoes at the lowest price ever of-
fered in Micanopy. We are offering
fine ladies shoes for $1 per pair.
(22tf) CHITTY & JOHNSON.
We regret to learn of the illness
of Mrs. Walker, of McIntosh, but
we hope she may soon recover.
Use Stringfellow Bros.' Tube Rose
Butterine, at 25.cents per pound. It
has no equal. *
-Lumber was hauled last Friday by
Mnr J. W. Carter, for the repairing of
the livery stables. A good move.
Get a "Kake" of Colgates' Lace
Soap and prepared Boston Codfish,
at Stringfellow Bros'., Gainesville.
Mr. E. C. Chitty has been made su-
perintendent of the Baptist Sunday
school, vice O. B. Walton, resigned.
Catarrh originates in scrofulas
taint. P. 'P. P. purifies the blood,
and thus permanently cures Catarrh.
See the new ad. of Dr. R. G. Hun-
ter, and call on him for dental worK.
His office is in the store of J. C. Math-
ers, up stairs.
10 ozs.condensed milk for 10 cehts
and 1 lb. choice Vostazza currants
for 7)g cents at Stringfellow Bros'.,
Gainesville.
The colored people of our town had
a festival Friday night for the bene-
fit of their church." We understand
they cleared a nice sum.
1ew and Second Hand Wagons
and Buggies for sale at Carter's
shop. 10tf
The Micanopy Alliance held ameet-
ing Saturday and agreed to meet once
a month until further notice. The
time set is the third Saturday in each
month.
Abbot's East India Corn Paint
removes quickly al corns, bunions
and warts without pain.
we spoke last week ot the fine
muskmelons raised by Mr. J. D.
SKnox. Now \We can say they *are
certainly very fine flavored, as we
Shave tried one..
Readrthe dissolution notice of C. H.
Lord & Co., Ocala, in this issue,
and remember the new firrim-E. L.
Root &.Co.,--cansell you furniture
just as cheap 's ever.
S We kavite the ladies of.Micanopv
Sand vicinity to, our mammoth
Grocery store for everything first-
classin our line. Stringfellow Bros'.
Gahinesville. .
WV get this paper out a day earlier
this veek in order to attend the Ma-
sonic picnic at Hawthorne Wednes-
\ day. A full report will appear in next
:i Issue also the Tacoma picnic.
S 'Ice Cream Freezers. '
The White Mountain Improved
Freezer for sale at
(25tf) 8 H.BENJAMIN & Co.
Just as soon as Mr. L. H. Johnson
get's iln his new ,horses he will bave
;ogne of the beet eqizipppd livery sta-
S* bles in this country. Call and see
him when you want a good teagm


C


-AND-- .,

WHEELWRICHT,


FLORIDA
PERF'N ROACH EXTERMINATOR.
Clean and Harmless [Except for
the Insects], as it Contains no
Poison, no Offensive Odor,
WARRANTED
To destroy all roaches if directions
are followed.
Full Pound Packaged $ .25
Full Half Pound Package by
Mail Post-paid .25
MANUFACTURED BY
-. i -AiLUm vin'BiniTfmAt nA


J. W. CARTEI.E


-presume, -osUow nlor& oy actions
than by words what they are going
to do, as they all "saw wood and say
nothing." We have been assured
that work begun Monday, and the
line will be put through from here to
Gainesville. Three cheers and a ti-
ger for the G. R. P. & M.

One day last week Mr. J. R. Emer-
son was unfortunate enough to lose
his barn and a few farming imple-
ments by fire. He was in town at
the time and was disagreeably sur-
prised on arriving home to find his
barn a pile of ashes. The goodly
neighbors of that section did not dis-
cover the fire until too late to save
the building.' It is supposed that it
was set on fire accidentally by rats.

The sidewalk has been completed
and now extends from Benjamin &
Co.'s to the depot. Micanopy has
indeed wisely invested her money,
as the walks are firm, smooth, and
durable. To Mr. J. H. Prater we ex-
tend praise for his substantial work,
as he has personally superintended
the work and we can guarantee it is
well done, while to the city -fathers
we offer great praise. Micanopy is
fast coming to the front and can now
boast of a stone walk.

Marshal Chrisman has a word in
this issue concerning the incorpora-
tion of the town of Micanopy which
it will pay any one to read. It seems
that some are inclined to doubt the
validity of the corporation, owing to
the fact that before the last legisla-
tur a'petition was paced asking for
some needed amendment to the in-
corporation which did not effect the
legality of the incorporation. The
petition was not acted upon, in con-
sequence of which the town still ex-
ists-under the same old act of incor-
poration approved by the legislature
in 1885. Carefully peruse the article
in this issue and you will undoubt-
edly be convinced.

Friday morning last Shreriff Fennel
came down from Gainesville, bear-
ing on his person papers for the con-
signing of Mrs. Mercer to the State In-
sane Asylum. There was not as
much trouble getting off'as was an-
ticipated. She with some little
grumbling followed the officers to the
depot and was very pacive under the
soft and persuasive pleadings of
Charlie Chrisman, Jim Knox, Frank
Hagood, and ,others, to "please be
quiet," qntil the Citra train arrived
when her little daughter was taken
away from her and both commenced
'fereaming and crying, but soon this
was stopped and the train moved
off and nothing- was left but the sad
faces of those who came down to bid
her adieu and the pleasant remem-
berance ofthe past. The child was
taken by Mrs. Jackson to be cared
for until the mother recovers her lost
atvk '


iuss vs iargat-ee uea nau MnIyonIB
Walker went to Mclntosh Saturday
evening remaining over Sunday, in
order to attend service at that place.
Monday morning Messrs. C. E.
Owen, Jeff Chitty and Wash John-
son went out to the prairie to fish.
Look out for fishy stories next week.
Dr. W. W. Johnson, wife and child
and Miss Mattie Boyles left for Haw-
thorne Tuesday to take in the Ma-
sonic picnic. We hope they had a
pleasant time.
Mr. Stewart Johnson, a prominent
lawyer of Brunswick,, Ga.' who has
been visiting his brother, L, H. John-
son of this place, returned to his
home lasl Friday. :
Mrs. Waterman Johnson, of Flem-
ington, accompanied by her niece,
Miss Carrie Johnson, of ,this place,
who has been visiting at Flemington,
was in the city Monday
Mrs. Frazier Thomas, daughter of
Captain and Mrs. B. W. Powell, of
this place, leaves'today with her lit-
tle daughter, Alice, and infant for a
visit to friends and relatives in Geor-
gia. Pleasant trip to them.
Mr. Jenkins, civil engineer, who
surveyed the G. R. P. & M. road from
this place to Gainesville was in the
city Monday and held a meeting with
the management of the line. We
could not get any points from the
projectors, as "minum" seems to be the
word. .
For Sale.


- ----.


F. A. TEAGUE & CO.,xmm VD I
F. A. TEAGUE & CO.,


Prop's Palace Drug-store, Sole Agts.,
OCALA, FLORIDA.


_AT


THE


MILTON, FLA.
This is to certify that I have been
afflicted with scrofula, or blood poi-
son, for a number of years. The best
physicians of Mobile and this city
said nothing could be done for me.
I also took a large quantity of -, hut
found no relief in anything that I
took. My limbs were a mass of
ulcers, and when I was sent to phy-
sician in Mobile my entire body was
a mass of sores. I had given up all
hope, and as a last resort tried P. P.
P. (Prickly Ash, Poke Root and po-
tassium) andjafter using four bottles
(small size) the sores have entirely
disappeared, and my general health
was never better than at the'present
time, and people that know me think
it a wonderful cure.
Respectfully,
'ELIZA TODD.


One hundred head of'goats. The
entire lot can be bought at $1.00 per
head. Smaller lots, something
higher. OTIS L. FEASTER.
To Watermelon Growers.
We wish to work up an interest in
watermelon culture and Tn order to
do this we will give a year's sub-
scription to THE NEWS to the man
who brings us the largest, the ripest
and best flavored watermelon, we to
be the judges.
Bucklen's Arnica Salve.
The best Salve in the world for
Cuts, Bruises, Sores, Ulcers, Salt
Rheum, Fever Sores, Tetter, Chapped
Hands, Chilblains, Corns, and all
Skin Eruptions, and positively cures
Piles, or no pay required. It is guar-
anteed to give perfect satisfaction,
or money refunded. Price 25 cents
Tper box. For sale by W. W. Johnson
& Co


E. M. Hacker, Propnetor
THE LARGEST AND MOST COMPLETe ESTAB-
LISMMENT SOUTH.
Geo S Hacker & Son


C. H. KLEINFELTER.


J. a. KUSHMAN.


T. P. Wc-CIs..


r


Manufacturers of
DOORS SASH & BLINDS
MOULDINO BOILDINO MATERIALS
1 CffdL^WW\, 8 G.


41-


OUR

$2 AND $3 SHOES

have taKen the lead over everything.
They have become very popular, and
are growing more so eyery day,
They are
LIGHT, STYLISH, DURABLE,
WELL MADE.
Come and see them before buying
elsewhere.
DON'T FORGET
that we have also a full line of fine
SHOES atnmoderate prices.
H. T. VATTERLIN,
Gainesville, Palatka and Tampa.

Happy Hoosiers.
Wm. Timmons, postmaster of Ida-
ville, Ind,, writes: "Electric Bitters
has done more for me than all other
medicines combined, for that bad
feeling arising from Kidney or Liver
trouble." John Leslie, farmer and
stockman, of same place, says: "Find
Electric Bitters to be the best Kid-
ney and Liver medicine; made me
feel liKe a new man." J. W. Gard-
ner, hardware merchant, same town,
says: Electric Bitters is just the
thing for a man who is all run
down and don't care whether he dies
or lives; he found new strength,
good appetite and felt just liKe he
had a new lease on life. Only 50c. a
bottle, at W. W. Johnson & Co.'s
drug store.,
Notice of Dissolution of the Firm
of C. H. Lord & Co.
OCALA, Fla., June 6, 1891.
We take this method of notifying
you of the dissolution of the above
firm, which took place June 5, Mr.
C.H. Lord retiring from same. Mr.
E. L. Root, the remaining member,
assumes all liabilities, and hereafter
the business will be conducted under
the firm name of E. L. Root & Co.
Respectfully,
E.,L.BROOT & Co.

S Remarkable Rescue.
Mrs. Michael Curtain, Plainfield,
L., nAes tne statement that g she
caught cold which settled on her
lungs; she was treated for a month
by her family physician, but grew
worse. Hte tolat her she was a hope-
less victim of consumption and that
no medicine could cure her. Her
druggist suggested Dr. King's lNew
Discovery lor Consumption;, she
bought a bottle and to her delight
found herself benefitee from lirst
dose. She continued its use and af-
ter taing ten b ottles, found herself
sound and well, now does her own
housewor a nd is as well as she ever
was.-Free trial bottles of this Great
Discovery at W. W. Johnson & Co.'s
drug store, large bottles 50c. and $100.
a Railroad meetings are getting com-
' non i"' ... .. ....ucttm-
ou inMicanoIpy these days, but the
parties iuter6steda re intending, we


FEOR> THE ETO T IROTY A D

We wl~l 'be tdkind'an inventory of -ou stock andl are, now rleady -to offer


r


GREAT BARGAINS IN


ETC.




CO.


DRY-GOODS, NOTIONS,


H. BENJAMIN


S.


NEW STORE! NEW GOODS!


JOHN D. REEVES,

Contractor & Builder,

Will contract and build
complete. Will furnish
material to complete
houses, etc., etc.

BRICK WORK AND PLASTERING,
Carpenter work. Furnish
all ,kinds of materials,
doors, sash, blinds, -brick,
lime, etc., at l owest prices.
Estimates Free of Charge.
ORANGE LAKE, FLORIDA.


E. C CHITTY,


: General


Micanopy Florida.
If you want 100 cents worth of goods for a dollar come to iny Cheap
Cash Store, Montgomery block. .


W. :C R. E R

BLA ACK SMITH


REPAIRING NEATLY DONE ON SHORT NOTICE.

MICANOP Y, FLORI]


SHUFORD & CARTER,

ORANGE PACKERS and BUYERS,
-AGENTS FOR-
J. Hf. Killoukk J Co., Aew York,
Podfeld 3 Soni, -Ph Ua (lclp1ia, :.
C. Tatem Co., BaltimOre.

FOR

Daily Market Quotations and Stencils,
Call on us at our Packing Hous, near the Florida Bouthern Depot.


THE METROPOLIS.
ONLY AFTERNOON PAPER IN JACK-
SONVILLE.
Makes a specialty of Society and
Hotel Gossip. Latest telegraphic
and local news. The cheapest paper
in the State, and best advertising
medium. By the year. $5 00; six
mouths, $2.50; three months, $1.25.
Carter & Russell, Props.
Consumption Cured.
An old physician retired from prac-
tice, having had placed in his hands
by an East India missionary the for-
mula of a simple vegetable remedy
for the speedy and permanent cure
of Consumption, Bronchitis, Catarrh,
Asthma and all throat 'and Lung
Affections, also a positive and radie-
cal cure for Nervous Debilliy and all
Nervous Complaints, after having
tested its wonderful curative powers
in thousands of cases, has felt it his
duty to make it known to his surffer-
ing fellows. Actuated by this
motive and a desire to relieve human
suffering, I will send, free of charge
to all who desire it, this recipe, in
German, French or English, with
full directions for preparing and
using. Sent by mail by addressing
with stamps, naming this paper,
W. A. Noyes, 820 Powers' Block,
Rochester, N. Y,


KUSHMAN, WIGGINS & CO.,

-COMMISSION MERCHANTS,


R. G. HUNTER,

-THE-


DENTIST,

Is now ready to do all kinds of
Dental work at the lowest prices.
Office over J, C, Mathers' Drug
Store.

MICANtOPY, FLORIDA.


(HEADQUARTERS FOR)

FLORIDA CABBAGE


-AND-.

SOUT'HERNX VEGET ABLES,
15 WEST FRONT --BTREET, CINCINNATI, OHIO.
R C. A. ORAWFORD Agent,
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA





f





I-I r, ----- I i, I _


hedged against this, having changed
their sulphur burning_ furnaces to such
as will burn pyrites, and the sooner the
others, especially from Baltimore south,
follow suit and change to pyrites, the
better for them. And when forced to do
this, as they inevitably will be, they will
haAe to develop another source of un-
told wealth the South has, namely, the
utilization of her gold and copper ores,
now locked in sulphurettes.
The Virginia, North and South Caro-
lina and Georgia mineral belts can sup-
ply all of the pyrite required, and these
gold and copper ores, deprived of their
sulphur, will be in available form to ren-
der up easily and cheaply their precious
metals heretofore locked in sulphur.
And yet it is possible, and the writer be-
lieves it quite probable that vast amounts
of phosphates simply reduced to impal-
pable powder, will soon be used as fer-
tilizers, without being treated with acid,
and most especially when used on lands
now in grass and in good health, which
contain sufficient sulphuric acid to act
as a solvent. If the cost is much re-
duced, laage amounts will certainly be-
so used, and would in all cases -be as
readily available as plant 'food as that
portion of the super-phosphates which
even the stringent laws of cotton states
allow the manipulators to brand as avail-
able, actually insoluble in water and
available at some future time between
now and doomsday.
Practically, the South has a monopoly
of the supply of bone phosphate of lime.
As a big product in the manufacture of
super-phosphates, she gets all of the sul-
phate of lime required for agricultural
purposes, and she is to be profited by
them. /
1st. In all profits arising from ship-
ments to other sections of the Unibn and
abroad. ,
2d. By cheaply fertilizing her staple
crops of -c6tton, tobacco, rice, wheat
grass, etc., and more particularly in ex-
tending the growing area of cotton, the
fertilization hastening maturity in the-
cotton plant, aud thus spreading its
growth over tables of land where it
never grew before; and more by hasten-
ina development, the crops are harves-
ted in the earlier months of be fall, and
the lint is of better qualityand not dam-
aged by the winter's storms. -
3d. To use of these Southern phos-
phates may be credited $1,000,000 of our
increased crop of cotton annually, and
this will help to raise the Southern staple
crop to 10,000,000 balb s.
With the cheapest iron made on this
continent or in the world, with cotton
produced and manufactured. in great
part at home; with phosphates in abun-
drance for our soil, the South will be in
good trim to compare favorable or to
compete with any other section of thik
country or of tne globe.
AS AGRICULTURAL POSTAGE9,
Almost every American citizen born
in this country, is under the impresskin
that the institutions and advantages of
his country are far ahead of those of
~Tnrrpeancr7TTZ~rcon.~TrrBuie Itn.'pcu L,E
however, there is no doubt we are far
behind. In England the people have,
since 1883, had the benefit of a cheap
parcels post, whereby articles of merch-
andise up to 3 feet 6 inches long by 2 feet
6 inches in girth and weighing up to 7
pounds, can be sent to any part of the
country for 6 cents for first pound and 6
cents for every additional 2 pounds.
Thus a parcel 3 feet 6 inches by 2 feet 6
inchea and weighing 7 pounds, can be
ent to any part of Great Britain for 24
cents. Not content with this, the plan
is now being agitated of establishing an
,Agricultural postage, with rates still
lower than these, so as to enable the far-
mers and producers to send their eggs,
milk, vegetables, etc., direct to the con-
sumer, thus doing away with middle-
men's profit on such articles and giving
the consumers the advantage of having
fresh produce and free from the adulter-
ations so often added by dealers and
other intermediaries, between the pro-
ducer and the consumer. It is thought
and very reasonably, that this plan will
greatly assist in solving the problem of
the future of farming in England.
Freights have hitherto been o high on
many products, that the difference in
the prices of produce in town and coun-
try ha s been almost startling to the ob-
server; sometimes more than double,
and often tor ani inferior article. Th
new postage when !horoughly establish
ed ar~d understood will change all this
A family can order their butter, veget-


abl(s etc., direct from the farm, and in
quantity as needed.
The cost of postage would be very
light, probably half a cent per pound, It
seems to us, after hearing and reading
so much of Alliance and Third Party
demands, such as free coinage, abolition
of national banks, l< aning of money by
the government at a low rate of interest
to the farmers, purchase by the govern-
ment of the railroad systems of the coun-
try, etc.; that it would be far better and
more likely to afford permanent and
financial relief to the farmers, if these
parties concentrated their efforts on some
such plan as this, to bring the, farmer
and truck grower into close communica-
tion with the consumer, and avoid the
enormous profits which enables the mid-
dleman to ride in his carriage while the
producer starves.
The close approximation of the reve-
nue, of the postal department, to its ex-
penditure, has already caused talk of a
reduction in the cost of letter postage,
and other schemes for tne advantage of
the public have been discussed, but as
yet nothing has been done. Why not
add Agricultural postage, instead of
cheaper letter postage; the latter is cheap
enough for all practical requirements,
now.
That the plan would work for the ad-
vantage of both producer and consumer,
there can be no reasonable doubt. Sup-
ose that an Agricultural postage was
in force. Every newspaper in the land
would convey the fact to the people, that
they could buy the special products of
each district -in that district and conse-
quently at the lowest price, and also that
they could have quantities of the same,


These Palace Steamers, connecting with the Savannah, Floriea and Western Railway th
Waycross Short Line)offer to the travelling public and ship-per advantages evuallfd by no othe
line. Through tickets and bills of lading issued to all principal points. For further informal
tion and rooms apply to
-.<-I-IAL ,BB AN.gA~ent H R CHRISTIAN, Soliciting Agent,
WaldburgBuilding, Savanuah, Ga. 71 West Bay -t., Jacksonville, Fla
M. S. ORRELGen'al Mag'r, Savannan, Ga. B R PRICE, Ge'il Agt, Jacksonville, Fla.
W F ARNOLD, Gen. TravPass. Ait-., 71 W. Bay St.. Jacksonville Fla.



TheTropica* Trunk Line




J., T. & K.W. System.

Schedule in Effect May 3, 1891. Central Standard Time.
GOINO SOUTH READ DOWN ST ATTON- GOING NORTH RRA&D UP
+r + *
....... h I 00 pm 12 15 pm 8 50 Lm Lv Jacli-orvilleA r 6 0m 12 IM I m 610pmr .........
............ 5 57 pri 1 (6 m 9 48 Pm Ar Gr'n poveg]o 5 24 .,m 11 5sm 5 (*i m: ..... ..
............. 7 40 l,m 1 54rpm 10 45 am .."..lahatka... 4 256m 11 tO am 4 0 pm .......
....... ... 30 ]Pm 8 (12 Y-m .............. ... "vih..... 3 05 fim 9 46 am ........ .......
........... 4 40 pm ........... ....DeLand.... .... ....... 7.45 am ........... ........
........... 11 22pr 4 06ppm ........... Oriinge City J 1 49am 8 35 am ........... ..........
..... ... 12 15 am 4 40pm .............. .....Sanford..... 1 15 am 37156am ......... ..........
...... .... ......... t4 40 pm ........... .Enterprise.; l ........... 7 53 am ............. .......
........... ......... t6 40 pm ........... ...Titusville.... .. .......... 6 (0 am ......... ..... ...
........ ............. t6 50 pm ............. ... Tavares.... ............ 5 30 am ...... ..... ..........
......... ............... 5 52pm ........... .....Orlando ...... ". 15O0pm 645am ......... ..... .
.......... ............. 6 22pm .... issimmee.. 11 10pm 6 00am
........ ......... 8 20pm .......... 6 50pm ..... .......... ....
......... ...... 8 65 1-m ..... ..... .rl, mp ......" 8 2 Im ........... ..........
.... ..... ............. +. 7 35 im ......... .. : .N efc e...." +> 22 1ir ............. ............. .......
... .. ......... 11 CO n .... ... .. ln f2 4 (f'l ..... ....... ...........
+ <* + *
........... 2 00)pm 10 55 am Lv..Palatka ....... Ar ... ....... l50 am '3 60 pm ............
.. ....... 2 37 pi 11 35 ami Ar..lInterlachen Lv ........... 1010 am 3 10 pm ..........
3 19pm 12 11 am ...Hawthorn. .............. 9 33 am 2 34pm .........
............. 3 40pm 12 35 pm ..Rochell]...... ... ....... 9 ]0am 2 10 prm
....... 555pm 7 45pm I110pmi -.Gainesville. 9 940am 8 00aRm I 30pm ...........
......... 900pmr 437pm 117pm p ..OrangeLale' 545am 883am 1 9 pm ..........
.. ...... ........... 5 30pr 2 13pi ..Ocala ......... ......... 740am 1235pm ...........t
............ ........ 7 10ppm 4 07pi ..Leesburg. ............ 6 10 am 10 38am .............
........... ............ 118 35 pm 5 35 pm ...Pemberton ............ .............. 9 10am .........
............... V9 30 pm 6 30pm .. Brooksville ...................... 8 15 am ........... .
............. .......... 8 30 pm ............ ..Eustis ......... .................. 8 58 am ........ ,
............. .......... 8 55 pm ........... ..Tavares...... ...... 8 35 am .......... .


nipulators ar even now, by foresight,


to suit their requirements, conveyed Af
them rapidly nd surely at a cost of from
one-half, to 4e-twentieth of what the
railroads weO I charge. How many of I
ns would it .C benefit? Take for in. 1c
stance, our own orange industry, n
Thousands 0foeople who had never seen
an orange wld take advantage of the ]
chance of getig them for a reasonable n
price, we shoui not be under the neces-
sity of rushiniour fruit on~o the market r
and glutting . which has been such a t
fruitful sourciof loss in past yeprs. Our d
markets wou' be any post offrie in the
United States The consumer, too,would
have the satilaction of knowing that all
he paid for le fruit went to the man
who grew iti and that he was not sup-
porting thetaniddleman in luxury and
idleness. 'Apn to consider the advan-
tages which would accrue to residents
in Florida. 'Iake a common article of
consumption the Irish potato. It is
very seldon hat they can be bought in
this State fd less than $1.60 per bushel,
while in m4e northern countries they
often bring inly 50 cents per barrel. Sup-
posing now !he agricultural postage was
established,4t a uniform rate of half a
cent per poind, we could buy our pota-
toes in the heapest market and have
then sent ect by mail for about half,
or less whafowe now have to pay. In
this way every district would be able to
buy their ruit, etc., in the cheapest
market nd in return could sell their
own sleci*l product at a price, which
thoughche'ap to the buyer, would be
good f6 the seller, as all intermediate
profits Vould be done away with.
Of echse the weight of packages
would iave to be limited, but as many
packa&s as are required cgld be sent,
and if 4e department made the proper
arrangements for the increase, which
would )f course be made in their
freights, we see no reason'why the
limit of wight should be less than 50
pounds. ,Weshall watch with great
interest le progress of the bill through
t he Eglsh Parliament, and will keep
our readers ported On any new devel-
opments (if ihe bill. We hope and
think &hat the government of our
great public will not allow it to be
said th(at we cannot give to our citi-
zens suha substantial and needed
boon as ,he effete monarchies of Eu-
rope cai give thir subjects.
It maT be sai d that the idea is uto-
pian anid impracticable, to this we an-
swer thit in the days of high postage
it was considered that a two-cent rate
would be so, yet see the result of its
trial. !he farme*t of the country are
crying aloud for relief from bad times
and scarce money. Lct them consider
this plan, for their assistance, and when
the time'comes for voting have it un-
derstood. that no party man represents
you, who won't vote- for AGRICUL-
TURAL POSTAGE. Of course, cer-
tain changes would have to be made,
especially in third and fourth class of-
fices, in order to fit them for the hand-
ling of greatly increased amounts of
mail matter and probably increased
tvonpelIation^ToixnavBD aue" -gv"
to this class of officers, but there is
very little doubt that once this pos-
tage becomes established it will as-
sume such enormous proportions that
the revenue will soon equal the ex-
penditure even at the low rate of half
a cent per pound. A very perceptible
increase would take place in% other
branches of the postal system, such as
the rate of money orders, postal notes,
etc., to pay for the commodities bought
and sent through the mails. This
would help to make up the deficit, if
deficit there +were.
Opposition to agricultural postage if
introduced, will. be long and bitter, the
railroad and express companies, who are
making' their millions, by charging ex-
horbitant freight rates, will fight it to
the death, but if the farmers and work-
ing men of the country will support it
with their votes and insist on having .it
become ;a law, it will go through con-
gress triumphantly in spite of all opposi-
tion, for a~fcer all the law ie of the peoF le
and by the people.

"&6 South, Young Man.'
The Honorable Chauncey M.Depew,
in an address to the Alumni Associa-
tion of ale, said of his recent tour
througl the Southern States:
"The pet result of this visit to the
South, fto my mind, is just this--that
the Sou~h is the Bonanza of the fu-
ture. e have developed all the great


and sudden opportunities for wealth,
or most of them, in the Northwestern
States and on the Pacific slope, but
there is a vast country, with the best
climate in the world, with conditions
of health which are absolutely unpar-
alleled; with vast forests untouched;
with enormous veins of coal and iron
which yet have not known anything
beyond their original conditions; with
soil that, under proper cultivation, for
little capital, can support a tremen-
dous population; with conditions in
the atmosphere for comfortable living,
winter and summer, which exist no-
where else:in the country; and that is
to be the attraction for the young men
who go out from the farms to seek set-
tlement, and not by immigration from
our own country, it is to become, in
time, as prosperous as any other sec-
tion of thcountry, and as prosperous
by a purely American development.
Orange Oroves.
Fruit, track and lands for sale or ex-
hange. Send for a copy of the Flori-
a Home Journal.
E. RUMKLY, Keuka, Fla.
P. P. P. makes positive cures of all
stages of Rheumatism, Syphilis, Blood
Poison, Scrofula, Old Sores, Eczema,
Malaria and Female Complaints. P. P.
P. is a powerful tonic, and an excellent
appetizer, building up the system.
rapidly.- ",
Some men neyer seem to grow old.
Always active in thought, ready to
adopt new ideas, they are never charg-
able with fogyism. Satisfied, yet ever
dissatisfied; settled, yet ever unsettled,
they always enjoy the best of wlixt is,
and are always the first to find th-j best
of what will be. 1 ,


NEWNANSVILLE, FL.k., June 5, 1891. I
Messrs, Lippman Bros, Savannah, Ga
Dear Sirs:-I wish to give my testi-
nonial in regard to your valuable med-
cine, P. P. P., for the cure of Rheum-
tism, Neuralgia, Dyspepsia, Bilious--
ess, etc.
In 1868, I was attacked with Bilious -
Cuscular Rheumatism and have been a
martyr to it ever since. I tried all the
medicines I ever heard of, all the doctors I
n reach, but I found only temporary
elief; the pains were so bad at times
hat I did not care whether I lived or
lied. My digestion became so impaired
that everything 1 ate disagreed with
me. My wife also suffered so intensely
with dyspepsia that her life was a bur-
den to her, she would be confined to her
bed for weeks at a time, she also suf-
sered greatly fr im giddiness and loss of
sleep.
Some time in March I was advised to
take P. P. P., and before we (my wife
and I) had finished the second bottle of
P. P. P., our digestion began to improve.
My pains subsided so much that I have
been able to work and am feeling like
doing that which I haven't done before
in a number of years. We will continue
taking P. P. P., until we are entirely
cured, and will cheerfully recommend it
to all suffering humanity
Yours very respectfully,
jel6-tf J. S. DUPRISS.

Baltimore Orange Market.
REPORTED BY WM, BAKER, )
Fruit Commission Merchant,
105 S. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md.
MAY 25, '91.-Florida oranges about
out of market. What few arrive, sell
quick at good prices, say$3.50 to $5.00.
Florida tomatoes $2.00 to $3.50. Cu-
cumbers $2,50 $3.00, Potatoes $4.50 to
$7.00 ..

Spray your trees if you would raise a
crop of first-class fruit.
How's This,
We offer one Hundred Dol ars Re-
ward for any case of catarrh that cannot
be cured by taking Hah's Catarrh Cure.
F. J. CJIENEY & CO. Props. Toledo,
Ohio.
We, the undersigned, have known F.
J. Cheney for the last 15 years and be-
lieve him perfectly honorable in all busi-
ness transactions and financially able to
carry out any obligations made by
theIr firm.
/WEST & TRUAX, Wholesale Druggists.
Toledo, 0.
WALDIN, KINNAI & MARVIN, Whole-
sale Druggists, Toledo, 0.
Hall's Catarrh Cure is taken internally
acting directly upoin the blood and mu-
cous surfaces of the system. Testi-
monials sent free. Price 75c. per bottle.
Sold by all druggists.

Eresipelas, swolen limbs, bad sores
scales and, scabs on the leg have been on-
tirely cured by P. P. P., the most won-
derful blood medicine of the day.


same in Charleston, but who,after a ful


consideration of Pratt's plans and speci-
fications, acknowledged himself as con-
vinced, and actually offered to take
stock-in the enterprise. Thus encourag-
ed the Etiwan chambers were con-
structed under Dr. Pratt's direction, and
were a complete success from the com-
mencement. and are yet operated (over
20 years.)
It is said the net profits' of this con-
cern, for the first year, Were 73 per cent.
and for years afterwards. Not only
this, but various other companies,which
sprang into existence, made gilt-edged
profits.
The phosphate basis discovered, next
came the demand for ammoniacal and
potash supply. Peruvian guano (chin-
cha) for a year or two was the principal
supply; afterwards guanoppe, butlatro,
fish scrap, sWish, meat and bone, blood,
sulphate of ammonia, but at the present
time cotton seed meal is the principal
and best supply. Bases of potash sup-
ply came principally from the German
stassfurt mines, South America (Chili).
Too much of the inferior grades of pot-
ash comes unfortunately from the Ger-
man mines under the name of kainit.
Florida phosphates, but recently dis.
covered, have come prominently on the
market. Here again much is due to the
name of Pratt, and in great part to Dr.
N. A. Pratt, but more Farticularly to N.
P. Pratt, the doctor's eldest son, now a
chemist in Atlanta, Ga.
Soon after the importance of the South
Carolina phosphate was made known,
Dr. N. A. Pratt published a pamphlet
giving his theories as to the probable
origin of the bore deposit of South Car-
olina. In this pamphlet he drew a dia-
gram of the Florida Peninsular and
asserted that the same natural agencies
which placed the South Carolina beds
should have formed phosphate beds on
the Florida Peninsula. But all eyes
were turned to the working of the South
Carolina deposits, and the supply was
both abnndant and cheap, hence no
search was made further south.
A few years ago Col. Geo. W. Scott,
formerly of Florida, tnen as now a man-
ufacturer of fertilizers in Atlanta, had
amples of phosphate Pent to him from
Florida by some of his former acquaint-
ances. Acting on the hint thus obtained
of the existence of such deposits in his
former stato, Col. Scott promptly dis-
patch Nat P. Pratt, his working chemist,
to Florida to examine the Peace river
deposits. Mr. Pratt, the son of Dr.Pratt,
having his father's pamphlet published
twenty years before as a guide, and re-
pairing to the Florida coast, found h's
father's theories correct, and thus guided
he purchased a large area of lands on
the banks of Peace river for Col. Scott,
who at once organized a company to
work the same, which company is now
in sulccessful operations.
The'very inexpensive dredgers to'mine
these Peace River phosphates are, we
think, manufactured in the city ot Balti-
more. One dredge and five operatives
raisine-to the. surface- and-_
dumping into lighters alongside, 50 to 60
tons daily, at a cost of 80 to 35 cents per
ton.
The land deposits are unlike the South
Carolina formation in appearance, thick-
ness and richness. The South Carolina
formation is not near the surface and
al most entirely nodules, some imbedded
in a blue stick clay, and are seldom as
much as three feet in thickness, while
the land Florida phosphates'are masses
of nearly pure phosphates :n layers or
beds of many'feet thickness and general-
ly 8 to 15 per cent. richer than in South
Carolina in bone phosphate of lime. It
is true, that in some cases, there exists
iron and alumina chemically combined
with the phosphates to such an extent
that they cannot be manipulated into
commercial fertilizers. But even here
the alum of commerce may be extracted
and the rcsidue'm be utilized.
Some idea of the magnitude of this
trade may be formed when it is said tba
the companies mining phosphates from
deep water in-South Carolhna pay as
royalty to the State, for license to mine,
$1 per ton, and this has amounted from
$275,000 to $300,000 per annum of reve-
nue to the State for several years past,
one company alone, the Cooeaw, paying
annually a rental of over $100,000 Un-
fortunately, the present government of
South Carolinazhas attempted to raise
this royalty of $1 to $i.50 per ton, in


open -violation of the chartered rights of
the Coosaw company, which has com-
pelled this company to resort to court,
and this deep water industry now stands
'idle and enjoined by the Federal courts
thus cutthig the State, off from a large
revenue, all in the interest of the land
companies, who will thus be, for the
time being secured in a monopoly.
The recent'discoveries in Florida m ill,
without doubt decrease the royalty on
mining to less than 50 cents per ton,and
the building 9f new railroads, and open- -
mg up the land phosphates of Florida
.for shipment to deep water, greatly les
sen the cost of the material.
The South Atlantic coast is peculiarly
blest in having, as one may say, a com-
plete monopoly in the bases of bone sup-
ly. Such will not only give employ-
ment to numberless coasting vessels, but
soon employ foreign fleets of merchant-
men to carry the same abroadand South
Carolina and Florida will have a n.onop-
ly-of this trade.
So-far, to render the phosphates avail-
able as plant food, it has been consider-
ed necessary to treat the ground pow-
der with sulphuric acid, thus rendering
a great part of the bone phosphate solu-
ble in water and converting still another
part into sulphate of lime, gypsum or
land plaster, itself a valuable fertilizer.
To make, this sulphuric acid, sulphur
has been imported, and when the trade
first Sprung up was high, $45 to $48 per
ton. The prices though were reduced,
we believe, at one time as. low as $17
per ton, but a reaction has taken place
and sulphur from Sicily now bids fair to
go to its Old price, $45 per ton. If 'it
does, it will lead to serious complications
to manipulators and will cut off all pres-'
ent profits. Some of our Eastern ma-


THAT

You

GOING:

TO

TAT R

A


Is the aforesaid. Write to FRANK M.

JOLLY, District Passenger Agent,

Jacksonville, for rates, schedules, and

description. Motto: "Everything, fair."
B..W WRENN, Gen. Pass. Agent,

Knoxville, Tenn. ,


Savannah to New York
(Central or 90 Meridian Time.)
Kansas City .............. Monday, June 1. 1:30 pm
Tallahassee .. ..Wednesday, June 3, 3:00 am
Nacoochee....................Friday, June 5, 4:30 am
Chattahoochee ......-.Saturday, June 6, 6:00 pm
City of Augusta .... Monday, June 8, 7:00 pm
City of Birmingham,Wed'day June 10, 8:30 am
Kansas City ..... .. ........Friday, June.12, 10:00 am
Tallahassee ...... ... Saturday, June 13,11:00 am
Nacoochee ....... ......... Monday, June 1R,12:,)0'pm
Chattahoochee... Wednesday, June 17,, 2:00-pm
City of Augusta..........Friday, June 19, 4:00 pm
City of Birmingham,Sat'rday, Juue 20, 4:30 pm
Kansas City ...........Monday, June 22, 6:00 am
Tallahasse ....... Wednesday, June 24, 7:00 am
City of Savannah...,.. Friday, June 26, 9:00 am


Chattghoochee.... Saturday, June 27,1:0@ am
City of Augusta ..... Monday, June 29,12:0t m

Savannah to Boston.
Gate City..............Thursday, June 4,. 4:00 pm
City of Macon..... -Thursday, June 11, 9:('0 am
Gate City. .._. ...Thursday, June 18, 3:00 pm
City of Macon....... Thursday, June 25, 8:00 am

Savannah to Philadelphia.
FOR FRnEIGHT ONLY.
Dcsaoug...................Thursday, June 4, 3:30 pm
Dessoug...., ... .....Sunday, June, 14,11:30 am
Dessoug ............... Wednesday, June 24, 6:30 pm


TAE ODELL

TYPE -WRITER.

A 20 will buy the ODELL TYPE
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SINGLE CASE ODELL, warranted to
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It combines simplicity with durability,
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For Pamphlet giving indorsements.
&c., address,
ODELL TYPE WRITER CO.
85 and 87, 5th Ave., Chicago, 111.


*Daily. tDaily except Sunday. ISunaay only.
Trains leave Jacksonville at 8 0ham Pnd I ialka ai 4 a nWI anrt .Cilt i'w ti.e). (-I P(ni)
and Palatka.
INDIAN RIVERKSTEAMBOAT COMPANY
FQF.AM1FR Iflve Titlisville ssfolIcvf: B an tiify excel t cr,(193, for V(I-,mvno as-
waylandings,7am. Monday only, through boat Ior Jupiter. Leave Melbourr '1or Jupitem
on Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 130 pro.
CONNECTIONS-At Jacksonville with diverging lines north, eat and west. At OranaG.
City Junction for Orange City, Smyrna and I(ake Helen; at Jupiter with J. & L. W. R'y fore
Lake Worth; at Sanford with 0. B. R'y for Oakland, Tareion Springs, Cloarwater and GulV
Coast points; and with South Florida R. R. for Winter Park, Maitland, etc; -at Tampa witth
Plant Steamship Line for Key West, Havana and Mobile, and for Manatee (liver Points;
Punta Gorda with steamers for Key West, Havans,Punta Rassa, St. James City and Ft. Myerr
Pullman Palace Buffet Sleeping Cars on through fast mail trains daily between New Yorte
and Tampa without change.
For information regarding rates. routes and Pleeping-enr necomwodation. write or c&)
H. H. McDONALD. Tickeat Agent, Union Depot, Palatka. Fli o
R. B. CABLE, G D. ACKHRLY,
12wnf**i 'M~rtq~ffv, Tfoo^ffr ^ogApr


I We will send you the "South Florida Home"
six weekson trial for ten cents and insert your
name in our "Mailing List" free ot charge, whici
will bring you hundreds of sample copies of Flor.
ida newspapers, maps, circulars, etc., and if yog
want to visit or locate in Florida, you can very
easily decide where to go and how to get there,
and you will be pleased with the small invest&
ment of 10 cts. Stamps taken. Address SOUTHI
FLORIDA HOME, St. Petersbifg, Fla.


PHOSPHATE HISTORY.

THE FIRST DISCOVERIES IN SOUTH,'_
GAROLINA AND FLORIDA.

B1Y J. L. B.
Written for the Manufacturers' Record. 1
About 1820, an English tourist visited
the city of Charleston. S. C., who, after
turning to England, published a small
volume descriptive of his travels. A
stray -iopy reached Charleston and called
the attention of a rew to the coprolite
deposits near the city. The writer de-
scribed Charleston as situated on the
edge of a bone basin, similar to the basin
of London, England. From this data
the existence of fossil remains in that
section was known, and prior to the war
..several analyses were made of these fos-
oils, but in every case with poor results,
yielding only 30 to 35 per cent. bone
phosphate of lime. Hence no impor-
tance was attached to the deposit and
no further researches made, and this
act is notable, as from 1844 to 1856 two
geological surveys were made by able
men (Taomey and Leiber) for the state of
'Sduth Carolina, neither of whom seemed
to think it worth while to examine into
he fossil beds or to have any concep-
lion of the. possible value of the same.
The discovery of the great intrinsic
value of the phosphatic deposits was left
to be made, undor the lead of Dr. X. A.
Pratt, a native Georgian, but for part of
his life a citizen of Charleston, S. C.
During the Civil War, Dr. Pratt was
in the staff corps, Nitre and Mining Bur-
eau, under Col. St." John, actively en-
gaged in bunting up such sinews of
war as lead, iron, nitre, &c. At the
close of the war Dr. Pratt, then resident
in the eli o Augusta, Ga., determined
to seek Wmeltae of supply from which
he could beg*n the manufacture of ih
( super-phosphatts--commercial fertilizer.
Following up this idea, he went to
Charleston and consulted Dr. Holmesas
to the fossilf found in the vicinity of
the city,- and was told by Prof. Holmes
vhat he knew of the same and that such
analyses as had been made and were
known to him were only 30 to 85 per
cent, bone phosphate. The interview
led to an examination being made by Dr.
*Piatt and Prof. Holmes and having col-
lected samples and exploited for a few
days they each made two analyses. Dr.
Pratt's first analysis was 65 per cent.,
his second 73 per cent.; and the two
*made by Prof. Holmes rin about the
same. As scientific and well posted meh
they were each alive to the great import-
ance-of the discovery they had made.
But the money to make practical use of
same, was not in their posession, nor
could they expect to raise the same at
the south in her then impoverished con-
dition on any kind of security or prom-
ise of the expected golden harvest from
working these beds;.
However. both Pratt and Holmes
proved equal to"the emergency. So,
procm I ing a sack full of samples, they
at once quietly journeyed to the city- of
Batimore, w here Dr. Pratt made known
in confidence,, his discovery;: to- an ac-.
quaintance and capitalist-a man whose
name has since been a power in the fer-
tilizer trade. The phosphates, or what
was then considered a monopoly of them,
was offered to this Baltimorean, who,
after taking two or three days to con-
sider, declined the same. The result
was that Dr. Pratt and Prof. Hohnes
proceed directly to Philadelphia, where
h e samples and the offer of the same
were made to the Lewis Bros. of South
Front street'. These gentlemen asked
for two or three days to have their
+chemist make an analysis o the same;
at the end of which time they declared
themselves satisfied and offered to in-
vest, and that very day gave their check
i0 Pratt and Holmes for forty thousand
dollars, the full amount, as" these gen-
tlemen supposed, necessary to purchase
all of the known deposits, upon the'
verbal understanding that of all pu--
.... chases made the Lewis Bros. should, have
one-half interest for the money advanced
an~d Pratt andHolmes one-fourth each,
as ompensatiOn to them for their know-
ledge of discovery.
Returning at once te. ,South Carlonia,
., the purchases were made, and the phos-
phate lands so purchased were merged
i nto an incorporated company, capital-
' iea at $400,000 (the South Carolina
Mining Co.) The stock of this company
was soon at par, at which point Prof.
Holmes s01d out. Afterwad it was much


depreciated, as new discoveries were
made much faster than the trade de-
mand was generated for the same. But
this same original stock is now likely
worth from 5 to 8 to 1 on the original
capitalization.
The writer would here remark, that
not only South Carolina, but the entire
cotton making belt, owes much to the
Lewis Brothers, who so promptly step-
ped to the front and supplied the sinews
of war--the cash-to make this great de-
velopment, and the same is due to Dr.
Pratt and Prof. Holmes.
The bases discovered, the next move
was to manufacturethe commercial art-
oile. In this Dr. Pratt was again the
pioneer, .and the city of Charleston took
the lead in the cotton states.
The Wando Company was first organ-
ized, and grinding the bone, shipped the
,: acid, from Baltimore or Philadelphia,
with which it was mixed. In the mean-
time Dr. Pratt was busily at work or-
! ganizing the Etiwan Co. of Charleton,to
build a complete establishment and acid
0 chambers, succeed,.d in raising enough
capital in Charlestrn to make the enter-
prise a suci'esa. But in this matter Pratt
had to combat the opinions or prejudices
of his brother scientific men, south as
well a norith, who were universally of
the opinion that sulphuric acid could
not be manufactured successfully in the
South Temperate and' certainly not in the -
T i Id Zone, the prevalent opinion be-
ing then that Baltimore -was probably
the most southerly point at which acid
chambers could be successfully operat-
ed. Dr. Pratt drew plans and made ont
specifications and submitted them-to
P Ravenel, of Charleston, who held
'" the opihiou it was not safe to try the ,


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--ONTHB--


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AtOrmond,Fla.

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ADDRESS,
SEISER & VINING.
HOTEL COQUINA. ORMOND, FLA


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