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mods:note dates or sequential designation Began in 1857.
"Independent."
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 36 (Dec. 23, 1857).
funding Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
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mods:title Companion & Democrat
mods:subject SUBJ651_1 lcsh
mods:geographic Ocala (Fla.)
Newspapers
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Marion County (Fla.)
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Florida home companion
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Florida home companion
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00048735/00015
 Material Information
Title: Florida home companion
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: C.S. Reynolds
Place of Publication: Ocala Fla
Creation Date: June 5, 1860
Frequency: weekly (published every tuesday, except two)
weekly
normalized irregular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates: 29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1857.
General Note: "Independent."
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 36 (Dec. 23, 1857).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002020494
oclc - 32828475
notis - AKK7962
lccn - sn 95026107
System ID: UF00048735:00015
 Related Items
Preceded by: Companion & Democrat

Full Text








FL I IDA


0


C M (PAANI 0 N


C.S.REWNOLDS,
Edilor& Proprielor.


2n libckchlcblt fA


ilu NCeuspnjcr.


Two Dolliar per annaum.
S Payable in Advan&.
- .tli.,i, H -.


F,


.O. MORALITY, PURE LITERATURE, NE A AGRICULTURE, AND THE USEFUL ARTS& SCIEN L .
M. ... .. . . .. .. .' .


SVOL. IV.


OCALA, FLA., TUESDAY, JUNE 5, 1860.


JNO. t1.


P 0 E T.R Y.
The Honeysuckle.
,v Ywri. A v. VICTOR.
It covers the ancient eatle
Over all its southel n wall;
It makes for itself a trestle
Of arch and battlemirnt tall;
It waves from the lof ty turret-
-It swi'is fiomu the stately towel-
It curtains the grinm old castle
S As fair'ais a Iad.' bower.
At tihe tilme of tl, midnight wa.saii,
At the time ol mirth and wine,


.-*'" -P a li.rppi,'n - di+ 'ne.. .....
I see.ia no other Pleiur.ow


'h -e.ir sing lbW aund sri. t.,
Tl-.reiulou- light anr.i shade
S Play all arou.]J tIj frt ;
- I am full of liM ICer I lallie.,
I breathe the- breath of fl.Trvi e,
I see thc rive r that lrlLe3
BeneatL the astle-t-Wcos ;
I-hear the Awild-l.e'. tuio y,
j# I Cee thie r'-.-: twine-
But the cruva io l all, irnd the glory,
IL the Hoieyuekle % in I
'rIi the type rind ideal of summer,
Tropical, brilliant. s,-rene!
It sleltera the light-wiued.J :.'m,:r
In a cool ;.iJ] W:',\y c"el en:
It is full r vague. soi't no;sas,
Sweeter, te l a .etet I.t i hlies,
Than iijseets', lqirmr .uiu.s ,:',i.es.
Finer th'4ti`fair. *b'..ell.litnes;
is the q4'iJeaen aud the wionerr
O-. all the vines that giow,,
ii i the stately el standr'cnde,
6urpniisd to .e it ,.. ,
It floatsa.in the yellow sunshline-
It wiims in the ro,y light-
It dreams in the mellow jiooehine
Through all the August night.
It iQs still \%ihei the breeze is quiet,
It moes not leal uor limb-
And oh, what a wild, swee, riot.
It hul.ls al'n.r with hji !
They dance toietlher iruudly,
A eay, ethel ial darree, -
Ai5>i the.h-ipv lbreeze lau-ghs loudlly
As iti. gui uviint rutie aud glan,.-e!

4 ISt'ELLANEOUS.
-


A Little Hero.
In the city of Hartford, Connec
tut, lives the hero of the true story
am bouti to relate-but no longer
S little" as the perilous adventure,
which made him for a time famous
in hi-. native town, happened sever-
al.ayears ago.
Our hero was then a bright ac-
tive boy of fourteen-the son of a
mechanic. In the severe winter of
18-, the father worked in a factory,
about a mile and a-hatf from his
hoine, and every day the boy car-
ried him his dinner, across a wide
S piece of neadlow laud. -
n., ne keen, frosty day, _he found
t.e.-snow on the meadows nearly two
feet deep anld no traces of the little
footpath remaining. Yet he ran on
as fast as possible, plunging through
drifts-keeping himself warm by
vigorous exercise,/and brave cheer-
ful thoughts.
Whenin the midst of themeadow,
fully half mile from any house, he
suddenly felt himself going down,
do n He had fallen into a well!
/te sank down in the dark icy
a.ter, but rose immediately to the
/sut'fie. There he grasped hold of
a plank, which had fallen into the
wA_ w ,a.he went do -n^,te-end of
thisirested.on th h, tor.of6f4e well
p ot lepr.i B ut- f6'ih feet
ablt'e the surface o)the water.
The poor lad shouted for help un-
til he was hoarse and almost speech-
lessi,'but all in vain, as it was impos-
sible for him to make himself heard
at s.ucq a depth, and at such distance
from apy house. So at last he con-
chrled that it he was to be saved at
all, hbeipust save himself, and be-
gunrhtat once, as he was getting ex-
tremely cold in the water. Sd be
went to work.
First he drew himslf'tp the plank'
and braced against himself the top of
it andthe wall of the well, which was
of brick, and quite smooth. Then be-
ulled1;jff,1 i qoat, and taking out
is ekt i tfe, cilo U his boots,
-that1" might work F,'vear ad-
Svaetage. Then witiagajnst one
sidtlo the, Wel, and-hlim shoulders
O, aga*..the other, he worked his way
S.p, By the t most fearful exertion,


about halftime distance to the top.
Here he was obligerl to pause, to
take breath and gather up his ener-
gies for the work yet before him.
For hardiir was it than all he had
gone through, for the side (of it be-
ing from that point cinpletely cov-
ered with ice, he first cut with (his.
knife, grasping places for his fingers
slowly and carefully all the way up.
It was almost a,h,,peless attem-pt,
but it was all that Ihe couli do.
An his heart to .jeil fer,
vently- for help, fe-h',i 6e could
never get-out alone. -
Doubtless the Lord heard his
voice calling from the deep and pit-
ted him. He wrought no miracle to
save him, but breathed into his
heart a yet larger measure of calm-
ness and courage, strengthening him
to work out his own deliverance. It
is in this way that God oftenest an-
swers our prayers, when we call up-
on him in time of trouble.
After this, the little hero cdt his
way upward, inch by inch. His wet
stocking froze to the ice and kept
his feet from slipping, but his shirt
wans quite worn from his shoulders
eie he reached the top.
Hie di iireach it at last-crawled
out it) the snow, aud lay down'for
a moment to rest- panting out his
breath, in little nhite clouds, on the
clear frosty air.
He had been two hours and
a-half in the well.
His clothes soon froze to his body
-but he no longer suffered with
the cold, as full of joy and thankful-
ness, he ran into the factory where
his good father was waiting and
wondering.
The poor man was obliged to go
'without his dinner that day-but
you may be sure he car1d little
about that, while listening with
tears in-his eyes, to the thrilling
story his son had to relate to him.
IHe must have been very proud of
the boy that day, as he wrapped
him up in his own warm overooat,
and took him home to "mother."
And how that mother must have
wept and smiled over the lad, and
kissed him, and thanked God for
him!
I have- not heard of the "little
hero" for two or three years, but I
trust he is grown up into :a brave,
heroic man ; and I hope will never
forget the Heavenly Friend who
did not forget him in the hour of his
greatest need. __
l'. There is an old sayingthat truth
lies at the bottom of a well.
I trust that this brave boy found
and brought up from there this
truth, God help those who help
themselves.- Grace Greenwood.
--- *-4 --- ,.
Leaving Home.
There is hardly a time in the life
of a youth, which seems to gather
together so many tokens of a mo-
ther's affection and care, as when
he is leaving the roof that has shel-
tered him from infancy, and going
forth to prepare for, or to enter up-
on, thd duties and.seenes of life.-
That trunk, whi'ck.h- eag but a mo-
ther can arrange and pack, is filled
with the work of her -own hands;
wdrk which she has done while he
was, perhaps, asleep, or at play; on
which her tears have fallen, as she
has anticipated the moment of sep-
aration; and over whichher prayers
have often been silently offered for
blessings on her child. Piece after
piece is carefully put away, while
the children look on, and talk cheer-
fully of the morrow, and know not
the anxiety and care that is passing
in the mother's heart. All is at
length arranged, and! on the last
layer is placed a 3ibie, on the fly-
leaf of which is written the mother's


earnest wlsh.,:ita{ t-her child may
t.Ike that blessed volume as his
guide through life. And when he
:is far away,' amid 'scenes that are'
,strange and new, if there is one
motive next to the desire to obey
God, that should, above all others,
induce him to abstain from evil, and


to act wisely and virtuously, it
should be the wish to please his
mother, aun to repay her kindness
and care. Nothing will so surely
do this, as the knowledge that her
son remembers her instructions,
obeys her commands, even while
absent, and is growing up in wis-
dom and virtue.
From the Charleston Courier. .
Florida and Texas.
NO. vI.
3A-1I1% .nS LE Fa., stay .7, t o660.
lThletne are'inr erodTis 'p- 0-o-
ductions by the cultivation of any
one of which, a poor man of intelli-
gence, enterprise and industry, can,
in East Florida, make himself inde-
pendent in a very few years. To
-fully discuss these various produc-
tions would require a very extend-
ed space, and I shall therefore con-
fine myself to a few remarks on the
orange.
. The great advantages to be de-
rived from the culture of the orange,
the lemon and lime in East Florida,
is a subject little known or appreci-
ated out of the State. It presents a
field for profitable enterprise une-
qualled in the United States. There
is no c culture in the world by which
the foundation of an independent in-
come can be laid, :at the expense of
so small an outlay, as by that of the
orange and lemon -in East Florida,,
The method of establishing groves,
by transplanting the sour orange
trees from the hammocks where
they abound in the wild state,
and -which has been sv successfully
practised for several years, is of
great importance; in the first place,
because it does away with the diffi-
culty and expense of procuring sweet
trees, and in the second place, be-
cause the -sour trees planted and
budded, will bear much sooner than
sweet trees from a nursery.
The sour trees may be dug up,
carefully, in the hammock, at any
time from October till June. They
should be topped about four feet
from the ground, and carefully plant-
ed and watered. In about three
months, shoots, large enough to be
budded, will grow out. The buds
are taken from sweet trees and care-
fully inserted into the young trees,
just as peach trees are budded at the
North. It is common for trees to
bear the sweet orange, in eighteen
months' from the budding. If the
sour trees be selected from the ham-
mock, of good size, (and they caii-b,
found of all sizes) in three years
they will be competent to bear a
thousand oranges each, and will go
on increasing in size and produc-
tion. Some of the large old trees
in St. Augustine bore as many as
eight thousand annually.
This culture is well'adapted to
persons of small capital, whose
health require a residence in Flori-
da. A suitable piece of land is eas-
ily obtainedon which provisions can
be raised, and an extensive grove
established at a very moderate ex-
pense. But to farmers and planters
this culturepresents also advantages
over those of any other Southern
State; for, without interfering at
all with their agricultural opera-
tions, bhey can gradually, and with-
out the outlay of a dollar, "plant an
orange grove that may ultimately
yield a larger income than all their
other productions. I have aeen my-
self a small grove, on the St Johns
River occupying less than an acre,
the' annual income from which was a
thousand dollars. One very great
advantage in the cultivation of
oranges is, that the fruit may be
preserved for several months on the
trees aft r it has reached matnu
rity and be all disposed of leisurely,
'without the loss of a single orange.
The great longevity of the orange


tree is another that invests it with a
rpore permanent character than com
mon fruit trees. It-fives and flour-
ishes to a very advnced age. There
are orange trees now living in the
City of Rome, that are known to be
thre6 hundrelyears old! So that
an orange grove, whei oice etaib-


a- .C -. .-.-----. -.- -- __


--s


an o lantereof


of Indian incursions in he Southern
portion of the Pepitisula, there
would be long before this, a very
extensive cultivation of this fruit in
East Florida, and especially in the
Southern portion of it, where the
trees are entirely beyond the reach
of frost. Now that the insect is no
longer formidable, and that the
Southern portion of the Peninsula
is perfectly secure against all future
danger from Indians, the orange will
doubtless be cultivated on an exten-
sive-scale in Floridaras there is no
limit to the number of lew markets
which the extensive construction of
railroads has opened Within a few
years to this and to other tropical
fruits. ,
Cuba oranges, which ki-egenerally
very inferior to those of-Florida,
usually sell, wholesale, in Charles-
ton, Savannah and other Atlantic
seaports, at the average price of fif-
teen dollars a thousand, and sell by
retail, at four and five cents a piece.
If Florida oranges can be sold at
only ten dollars a thousand, (one-
third less than the price of inferior
oranges,) a grove of moderate di-
mensions, and one which would re-
quire but about eight hands to keep
it in perfect -order,owill yiel a&n in-
come far greater than a prosperous
sugar plantation, worked by one-
hundred hands. Sugar planting even
in Florida, will not, on .the average,
yield more than four hundred dol-
lars to the hand; which for onlehun-
dred hands would be forty thousand
dollars. Let us now see .what an
orange grove of four thousand trees
will yield, ne average number of
oranges produced by a tree in full
bearing is at least two thousand,
which at least tea dollars a thou-
sand, is twenty dollars a tree. At
twenty dollars a tree, the product of
four thousand trees would amount
to the sum of eighty thousand dol-
lars, which is the amount produced
by eight.hands, on about fifty acred
of land, in the culture of oranges
-and just double thq.pBllipt preduc-
ed by one hundred iWuds. on" four
hundred acres of land in that of su-
gar cane.
It requires no extraordinary en-
terprise, aud but a moderate capital


lishe:l, will n,,t onia lai a man's
life time, in progressive improve-
ment, but become a valualte inheri-
tance to his descendants' f many
generations.
The oranges of Florida have been
always celebrated for their superior
quality. There are certain tropical
pro.luctions, and the orange is one of
them, which coneagerterperfec-
1ion a degrees outside o .fie tropic
than withiiu it. It I mt-Tnis cause
Qha tlae C aw,aJ'e r i
more araomtrti~nc an Wuleut than
those of Cuba.
The orange tree in Florida, as
well as in Cuba, and many other
countrietliasbeen'fr some eighteen
years, seriously affected by an in-
sect (Coccus Hesperidum) which,
on its first incursion, destroyed
whole groves, and -when it did not
kill the trees, it debilitated them so
much as to prevent them from bear-
ing fruit. Although this insect is
still present in many-if the orange
groves of Florida, it seems of late
years to have become much less
mischievous in its effects Whether.
this fortunate change is to be attrij.-
Sbated to a decay ctpower'in tJe--
sect, or to the means of reSisting it
which have b*&.enerally adopted,
1 am unable to decide" Certain it
is, however, that trees which grow
in. very rich soil, or which are
strongly manured, are scarcely, if
at all affected by it; and groves
which were formerly ravaged by it
to a great extent, and which had
ceased to produce fruit noy flourish,
and bear large crops. The inference
is, that when the tree-is vigorous it
is capable of sustaining both the in-
sect and the fruit.
Had it not been for this discotir
agement which the ravages of this
vegetable epidemic gave to the or--


large export of lumber. Indeed the
few mills in operation in Jacksona-
ville, Pensacola, Cedar Keys, &o.,
give already an aual export of
more than two 'i=&1a of dontets,
and this may be.rigardbd as but the
commencement of her lumber trade.
Besides her pine lumber, there is
a considerable export already from


-----------


to establish an orange grove in Flor-
ida that will contain at least four
thousand trees, and when the very
large income which such a grove
would yield, and the small amount.
of labor and little care required in
its cultivation and management are
considered, it cannot be doubted that
as soon as the extraordinary advan-
tages of this culture become gener-
ally known, a multitude of enter-
prising men.will eng~agein it.
I I shall b.e. oae om pmapd.rk..oqn
the culture oi-the orange, having, I
trust, sai 1 enough on the subject to
call attention to the tempting field
which it offers to enterprise, and in-
deed, to all who desire to derive" an
ample income from a small capital;
and this with but little labor and
care, and with delightful and healthy
occupation. In the calculations I
have here made, I certainly have
exaggerated nothing; on the contra-
ry, I have very much underrated
(one-third) the wholesale price at
which Florida oranges will be al-
ways sure to sell, and also the aver-
age number of this fruit which trees
.of a large size will annually bear;
and yet it will be seen, at the lowest
calculation, that the culture of
oranges in Florida, can, with but
small capital and'but little labor, be
made a business of extraordinary
profit.
The peach, also, grows to great
perfection in Florida, and the trees
possess much more vigor and much
greater longevity than in the Mid-
dle States. The fruit ripens some
two months earlier than in New
Jersey, and its export to New York,
now that direct steamboat naviga-
tion is about being established be-
tween Fernandina and that city
will, doubtless, become a profitable
business, owing to the very early
pda.wh4ich the Northern mar-
ket can be supplied with them. I
Norfolk, Charleston and Savan-
nah have, for some years, made
the transportation of early vegeta-
bles to the New York market an
extensive and very profitable trade.
It is scarcely necessary to remark
that Florida will have a greater ad-
vantage over every other portion of
the South in this branch of busi-
ness, as she will be able to send to
the 'Northern market green peas
and tomatoes in December and Jan-
uary, green corn and strawberries
in March, and all otter vegetables
and fruits, long before they can be
supplied .either by Charleston or
Savannah.
This is a business that requires
but little capital, and one that can-
not fail to yield, with ordinary skill
and industry a large profit. Lands
of the best description for gardening
purposes can now be procured at
very moderate prices along the line
of the "Florida Railroad," which
has its Eastern terminus at Fernan-
dina. From Fernandina early fruits
and vegetables can be transported
direct to New York in about fifty
hours, and to Charleston in fourteen
hours. Indeed, it is probable that
fortunes can be made by the cul-
ture of early vegetables and fruits
in Florida, wrerraptdly and-with
greater certainty than by either
Cotton or Sugar planting, as this is
a branch of industry which Florida
can conduct without competition.
In addition to the many staples
already enumerated, Florida pos-
sesses in herinexhaustible amount of
fine timber, a resource of vast value.
There is no State in the Union that
can equal Florida in the possession
of valuable timber. Her forests of
the best species of yellow pine are
of immense extent, and 'now that
they are becoming extensively tra-
versed by railways will soon. yield a


Florida of live oak, red cedar and
red bay; and as her hammocks
abound in the finest species of white
oak for staves, and her swamps in
the best quality of cypress for shin-
gles, these, too,4will yield a valuable
export..
Florida will surpass every State
in the Union in the production of
Naval Stores. Pitch Pine forests
of great extent, and of richest qual-
ity, stretch.along the banks of her
.u.merly saV .a lJ'3l r nd.are-
now" become t-
ed b railway 'he turpentine
planpeTn f .Ai ort Carolina have al,
ready begun to discover these rich
players, and to abandon for them
the worn out fields of their former
industry. The turpentine planta-
tions of North and South Carolina
have very generallysbeen bled near-
ly to exhaustion, while the virgin
forests of Florida have as yet been
scarcely touched. The exhausted
landseof North and South Carolina
sell at comparatively high prices
and are generally less accessible to,
market than the rich unboxed lands
of Florida, which dell at very low
rates. Besides these important ad-
vantagds, the Florida trees have a
much longer running season than
those of North and South Carolina.
Rosin was sent to the Charleston
market early in February, this year,
from the Florida plantation, which
is abIot two months earlier than it
is generally produced in North or
South Carolina.
Several extensive turpentine plan-
tations have already beon establish-
ed at different points along the line
of the Florida Railroad by North
Carolinians, and are doing a prosper
ous business. These plantations,
now that the State is becoming ex-
tensively traversed by railroads, wiH ll
multiply faet,-aAd yi.wda a short
time a very large export of Naval
Stores.
The fisheries of Florida are much
more extensive and valuable than
those of any other Southern State,
and will when properly developed
and protected. form an important
export.
Having now given a brief sketch
of the immense undeveloped re-
sources which Florida possesses, in
the great extent to which she is ca-
pable of producing them, I shall in
my next letter, discuss the produc-
tions of Texas. VERDAD.
For the Florida Home Companiio.
Beauties of Natare.
The pleasures of winter; the
beauties of spring, with the sweet
chanting lullabies of the feathered
songsters; the rejoicings of the
brute creation, with ,the magnifi-
cence of nascent vegetation; the
delightful reposes under summer
shades, when the vertical sun op.
presses ; the seared leaves of au-
tumn, variegated with the luscious
fruits of nature, all have furnished
themes for every author, both prose
andpoesy.
'Tis easier to pursue the well-
beaten road than trace the trail
among unmarked mazes. There-
fore, kind readers, permit me to use -
the ideaa of older heAds than mine.
What in.tbh works of nature to me p
seem most to' be admired, is the for-
mation of the human 'mind. En- 1
dowed with such a variety of'attri- c
bates and emotions, its would appear
that God in His infinite wisdom had i
created us to enjoy all His works, g
both in pleasing the fancy and stor- t
ing knowledge. Whether we wan- *
der in the sequestered vale, tracing d
the meandering streamlets, and
plucking the rose-decorations of a
the ineffable landscap- or visit the f
mountain base and ut silence view h


n opportunity one day of
wurioaskywsm excited to
ook.coeldbeofGo eei

fras awid that not? rmAf
hidW been out! T eAun i
liealne eutm oiso t
extent in the Boston hboteu e s e
orry to say.


\


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_~_~_


The Norwegian refers you to the
gigantic whirlpool, picturing a ship
being engulfed in the revolving wa-
ters. The Esquimaux 'in silence
points you to the moving iceberg,
laden with its cargo-.of seals and
Arctic bears. The inhabitant of
Chili directs your attention to the
azure bosom of the Pacific and
Andes' threatening beights, as ob-
jects of his sa Te
Egyptian
in. the

on the.shore 6o The beau 4- e
Leman, and gaze on the picture be-
fore him. .'
While other nations boast $evr-
ally of their natural beauties, we,
the American, don't forget .to tell
some'lof our wonderful and'.beitdi-
ful freaks of nature-Nihgara, the
Mammoth, and the mountain.scene-
ry. Something, 'which (in ,.a land
like ours. washed with the brine of
the Atlantic and sprinkled with the
spray of the-Pacific, presents twicee
a day the most glorious seen. W
earth-the god of day raising .hft'
self from the crested wave-f the
East and burying hia'golden.2.istg
in the deep bosonr- of the W'eA,)
thrills the heart'of fthe ..re ,
tunes the harp of0tlte iB-r'd]hij .
soul to overflowing, and it gushes
forth in euphonioqs strains descrip-
tive.
While the American boasts the
attractions of this vast Republic,
each member speaks vaunt! 4of
her own possessions in ,atura
'Grand Panorama." 4
New Hampshire justly boasts, the
"Granite State;" New Yorki her
vast population; Micbigan, her
beautiful lakes; Kentucky, her won-
derful Cave; California, her inex- %
hanstible mines of gold and silver;
Vwginia, the. .,QU-Dominion -.
South Carolina, her chivalric'isg-
it; Georgia, the "Empire tate of
the South." As nations and their
members speak alike vauntinglf,
the same spirit is diffused into the
sections, and each claims her own.
Northern Georgia points to her
mountains and huge stones, raiing
their heads far above, and boats
the fertility of her ofil, with the
salubrity of her atmosphere; South-
era Georgia her vast oottop-growig
plains, and call it Commeroisl K "
Florida, too, has her boasts,-;! 1 wH'
she might-"The Laind.of Flo*er
"The home of the SemineuW".-
brave and -oble race, -A mU&ft
indeed blessed in many reapect--
delightful streams, and pure orysta"
waters; salubrious climate, abound.
ing in most luscious fruits; inha"-
ited by a growing, enterprising, andf
healthy people, whose beautiful
proportions-hoary sage or aged
matron, dashing youth or gentlb
maiden-may spread .alike. their
frosty hairs, or locks and curls of
raven hue, to the gentle fanning,
of the odoriferous sea-breeze, ai'"
enjoy the peninsularic blessings.

Americus, Ga., My 81st. .'
LTERATURE AND TBI
-One of our BSeet mJ
gives rathersa i
ose of the itiioeX:t UP n
which New York- belles resort
keep up their literary character. It
can't be true. can it?
A gentfeman who has been pass-
nga week or two at one of thi
great hotels of New.York, say that
here seems to be a sort of maui-
tmongthe lady boarders to oom.
town to the breakfast, or tea table
with a book in their hands, but they
re never seen. to open it. Oat
friend was told by a gentleman tb.
ie had seen a lady brig. the amB
look to the table fqr tdo .edks1- *


the towering summit, and hear the b
raring streams issuing from its I
snpw.oapt, top and leaping down the
almost p.perpendloula ales, we art
iunw-v A ronaf the constella- t
-tie 4 M==*I it w thou.
one we might roll igh term in-
atinot-to admire Sheturol oone-
ry of his home, iu whatever clime d
he dwell, among polar snows or un- e
der torrid Aun. a


Srf


71





0s


F- L D R I 1 -0 A -' ( IM; 2-. B D j .A'A. .In-


Speech of Rev. Jr B. Oweas,
The following report of the spee
denlifbny' the Rev. J. B. OWENs, i
MlicanopyJon tie 19th ult., wasfurniib
.ed by a hIighly intelligent citizen (
,-that plaee. It would doubil.?ss hay
r 'egcbedu in tin ie for last issue6,. u
for a curious freak in the mails. ]
was brought to us by the Souther
,Aznaili.
.- Mir. ONvrENq commenced by sayin
that heretofore he had taken no activ
'.pTart.in politics, further than was ir
cumbenton every good citizen-tha
a at every election where principle wa
Involved, he had felt it hij duty to vote
and uhiformily bestowed his suffrag
i upon men pledged to maintain th
equality of State and section. Hi
Nomination as delegate to the Oharles
Ston.Convention was an honor wholl'
Unexpected The assembling of tba
Convention so soon after his appoint
"met rendered. it impossible for himi t
confer with hifrienfids inr this seetiol
and ascert'ain their: views upoii thl ':ili
cy to be.,prursti in the evrit o
certain coutihin', ea_ The'refore hi:
Place was'Beof responsibility
dafoil.d eo ip ew1el l. acord
O !.e;.l.lrLis ideabt'.propriely ; conse
7.uently-whloti he discovered iliat the
"'bnvention was packed with Douglas
emirsaries. determined to withhili:
froth us any recognition of.ourG Consti
tutional rights and equalityhe was fore
*ed, in honor, to withiJraw from th(
'Convention. Had1 hI. remained aun.
'w vitnessed ithe disgrace and degrada
.-: tion of our section he would have beer
recreant to thie ligh trust 'reposed in
him as a representative of Florida
(Here the Speaker was interrupted b)
a.rapturous round of applause signifi.
cant of the h,-arly approval accorded
by the people ,-f our section to the se-
.eeding delegat-s.
.Mr. Ow.0%,s gave arfuil a nA ighly
creditable ucCOt"ilt of his stewardship
Hi .position reidliered. it improper to
divulge some cireunislatees, yet some
things which have out beoen published
should be konio .-.-a c''i nmiite corn-
posed of one from each State was ap-
Dioibted to fai'ae a P lat form upon
*w icn'6tn Demiocracy wver-, to fight the
gleaf eirjtest of lf.0I The menplac-
.tqjiUpnl th.l:u coitiittee were widely
ki';,n f-r t lhuir iiljilities. Atfirst the
S'luatter Sov,-reiity ? i .il ,,on assumed
a defiar, air, es[le(tigi to ucLed L'3by
-,.thre:ts and braiva,hi. Buit there were
ilacaqp ,ptn this couniitittee men bold,
.'ind -'epel'lIIt aiid dluljiit. hcyond what
'they hadr esXpected. The.y found they
th'adfto d,.:A with charaeters altogether
different r'm those -with whom :they
.bandy ep.rl-:is tju, the floors of Con-
Sgresa. VVhcu thz naspcrceived their
'-Wioloi manner cangdd-instead of
*threats they becamtne'suppliant' and re-
sorted to entreaties. But both were
alike uuavailing-friun this very cir-
oumsiance. lie argucil. all we have to
do to sefture our dermaus id s to present-
&,abold and Gfirm ',nmt For:'as long
.as, 'the southh yields her- position,
concession will follow compromise, till
all' is Iost. 'Southern delegates pre-
seated thts answer to the demands of
.the North, that we should abandon the
-position. ,' With you, Squatter Sover-
'ignty is an abstraetuion, but to- us it is
matter ofivital importance. Up6n the
,dgcision of this subject may depend our
.existence and our safety. :With or
without ilthis issue: you cannot. hope to
carry any other States than Connecti-
-cut, New York and Pennsyrlania, un-
aess we acept Douglas-anmd now rath-
-er than ignore thin great cardinal prin-
ciples of Democracy we will rejoice to
*see( the party.swept from'the face of
.he. ctrilh. In the contest vich raged
- 4-the Committee Room, Alabama,
.Mis-issiippi, Louisiana. Florida, Arkan,.
%as, 'Cldifornia' and Oregon, :labored
4qpg.aind garuestly to obtain aclear re-
Zogtnition,of.ire. powers of Congress to
.protect SJaveiw in the' Territories,, for
a, condemnaflioU of the doctrine of
-Sqatter.Sovereignty. Delaware,; Texas,
.Maryland and Nortli.Carolina, engaged
.in a running debate whilo thf delegates
from Virginia. Georgia andTennessee,
did not ,'pen their mouths, but sat silent
"as the shak's of Erubus while this im-
portaut ..iaff"ir was'being enacted. The
Speaker, here bestowed a glowing Eu-
3'log" upon C(lifornia and Oregon, and
athaikted their delegates forihav.i.ng ex-.
(pres.cd a deter iimintion to stand by us,
-to the bitter end. Peaceably if possi
'ble, forcibly if neceseary, they were
ready to atuppl.,, t the Southern States
,in defence of their demands. Despite
the inaction and apathy,, of a p.,ortion of
.the Southern delegation, a Platform
'was coi|trucied. uhich recognized the
eualn$y uf the Southien States and the
.ift'j t(l1:.r'ciizciizs to go with their
J t2t3n i ptrerritory of
JUnielaigiBr,,t. theinm and
proltitbY wiyl'eh thle Couscitu-tion
..diawna o1the rand extend to their
riethreuof thie non-slavclhmoding.Statcs
and their property. Tiats Plta~tt'r,


Swa approved and reliirted% by the fit'-
t--u. Southern mnd the two Pacific
S|atl- a cl.ear majority ofall the States.
lateeii otl)er States reported a Plat-
forjum iiiel, uon these gre.,t questions
i-.ciiizi ely isil.riii t ,I ; beeti lie il-
ai 'bl' ulee ot'Convri0 tnuiit. to iinme.
dia. adopt that Plat.form -s..; rtod by. the i liji.rity. But
")w iii.'rek,.dotbled ;is was tilhe exam-
ae v 1 .ntW lile' must i, -tdsiablihhed bind
e0ih' ooErify Pli4rfo'r bb ;eceived bo-
"14 iir e.'sed 'thie pecualur p'eritof
u6Iing 'he party test.
py.(ullituued Mr. OWrN.'Ns, had ari-
,ont.iiig"iicy when decided uIeas-
t,) be "a'duptd. The great
WIVt Part w'icbh bfr iuoro aan-
a.entury had withstood every cri-
ul&a r-Asised every storm wa.4 now
bnhto 'luiaxzable factions and disin-
p b.' .o.me of its inherent cor-
:,lI^'^S rit; no no' o longer
y0 a 0ifo 'hw swas
1-7' t.t-ln-eing..


re-
of
id
to
rn
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:-mu
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The Speaker said, that longer to r
h main was to acquiesce in the action
Sthe Squatter Sovereignty majority am
the alternative was lyreseijredI Cirler
wi thdroiw. -fimt'. 4l-e corrupt conce:
f or accept Do'liglas'with a-1 hi.. inl
L mous heresies. Dtut there was no fal
t erig or hesitation tnianifeste,-wh,
Alabama's eloquet Sonl gave the cot
mand to Right aboutface, march. A
n abama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Te
as, Florida, Arkanusas, South Carolim
Sand Delaware, left in a body.
e Mr. OWENS then portrayed theco
" sternation depicted on the countenar
ces of the Squatter Sovereigns in a wo,
s glowing manner. The secession ofse'
Serial States, was a matter of which
0 thaeyhad not the remotest idea. 8
Soften has the South threatened an
s failed to execute, that it has become
- one of our- most prominent danger
7 that the masses at the North are per
t suaded we will not resist. ,
S When it was known that eight State
. had seceded it is impossible to describe
tbte enthusiasm that prevailed. Fift
I ,iffere t. ha-lls iu'the city were offered'
Free of charge to, the delegates. anc
3 offers were made to subscribe.an
,m anatit, of ni:ne-y intecessary tfor the con
v:.iieineeidf 'te siec-ed-err The Can
v-..ttion'nif0.uT St ,'.A-,,ew's Hall, aint
the, Speaker,.miostfervently h ii.pedl tha
Hall might proae-to the Sof wha
Itnd'ependence Hall w't r Cfolonies
*- .lMr- OwENS indulged in somac reflect
tion upon the failure of the Conventiot
to nominate.. That was the purpose foi
which they assembled in Clharleston
why was it not accomplished? After
the withdrawal of eight States it was
an easy matter to nominate Douglas
was it not significant that they should
adjourn without evcn ,51ng thus much
They feared Ote seceders would fore.
stall- 0emr action and until they could
consult the office-holders, in Washing
ton, 'they dared not act. They knew
not which foot to put forvai'd.
Mr. OWENS 'thet spoke of Douglas
in the most withering:terms. To him
he assigned all the fault of disorganiz
ingthe party awli t.-ti-aging Sections.
His odious herusies of unfriendly legis.
lation was no better than the Wilmot
proviso-a more effectual mode of abol.
itionizing the Territories could not be
devised. "
Squatter Sovereignty was the new
meoon.;Black Republicanistnmthe moon
.in- the last.guarter, while Abolitionisnm,
was the full moon. The one wais scarce-
ly dirstinguihahn!ie from the other, and
blended as harmoniously as the colors
Andrew Johnson's Homestead bill
next came under review, and was
handled with. gloves off.
Mr. OWENS concluded by design
tingin his opinion the true policy of
the South. He thought we ought- to
stand united That the nofnination )f
John Bell, a man found only amid th6
ranks of the enemy and who never
gave a vote. saVe those which were
hostile to Southern Rights ought not
to- distract our forces. His nomination
was effete 4-by a weak and miserable
faction o0 bankrupt politicians incapa-
bleof accomplishing anything except
to divide the South. It was our im-
perative .duty to offer a firm and bold
front, yield 'not one inch, and fight for
a clear recognition of oar equality arnd
Constitutional Rights. To prefer hon-
o-r'ble defeat to doubtful victory.
Freqaent'manifestations of the ap-
proval and pleasure of the audience
were made during the address. The
independence and intelligence of Mr.
OWENs haeendeared him to the peo-
ple of our section, and they would be
happy to have a gentleman of like
character and intelligence to represent
our State in 0Congress.
'MIOANOPY.
--ANOTHERaSLAVER CAPTURED.-We
are indebted to Madison Post, Esq.,
for an account of the capture of the
bark William CUptrend, with 550 Af-
ricans on board, in advance of the mails.
The capture was made off the Isle of
Pines, South of the coast of Cirba, on
the 9th inst., by the United States
steamer Wyarndoit, Lieutenant Com-
manding, J. .Stanley. The captured
vessel cleared from Cuba about six
months since, f0r St. Thomas and a mar-
ket, with an assorted cargo. Her crew
consists of-all foreigners except the
Captain and one other. They are con-
fined in the Key West Jail. This
cargo, added to that of the Wildfire,
makes something over one thousand
.Africans, now awaiting the. action of
the governeuSiw, in Key West.--Tam-
pa Peninsubir, May 26.


No positive date has been fixed for
the departure of the Japanese frown
Wa.-shingtonnj lut.it. has been decided
thait they shal l visit the Naval School
at. Annapolis, step a d -y in Baltimore,
aand visit Philadelphia. Inaddition 1o
New York, they will probably .visit
West Point. and the arms manufactu-
ring .t.ablishment at rartford, and
Wfips ip'Hirt field.' There has been
no serious illLess among them since
their arrival.
MARVELOUSHENOMENON.--A STAR
DESTROYED Bt FIRE.-The Russian
correspondentof the London Telegraph
write thus: At Moscow a physical
phenomenon has been recently observ-
ed, such as would have given, rise to the
creation of a whole cycle of fantastic
minyths in times uf the world's infancy.
We learn from a-leading paper of, that
city, that at a quarter .past ten, on tbh
nights of the first and fifth of Maroha
,ti" on the south-west of the Great
Benr suddenly eommencd to work lar-
ger asquni'n.g at the same time the col-
or ofiron, at a hid hea;" but without
the "appeariince of 'a'y sparks or rays.
In this condition the star appeared tin-
tIl'"hilf-past eleven, varying hM the in-
tenjity of itg'-ght, 'and attaining the
size of nearly the half. moon. A little
before midnight ithe dimnness began to
iret" ieo aftd t twelve o'clock IhO str


had entirely disappeared. In its ste
a sort of a black speck was to be
ticed by the light of the stars. witi
were unusually brilliant that eyenir
It remains for the astronomers to -d
serbe, and th6 poets to sing the .
struction of the lutiin-iay, which f
aught we know, may have been t
abode of a race superior to our own.


,ad
no-
ich
rig.
de-
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for
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WASHINGToN, May SO -In the Sen- to
ate to-day, the Oregon War Debt Bill in
Was passed. The Postal Deficiency t
Bill comes up to-morrow. G
In the House, a.bill was introduced t
for the relief of invalid pensioners It g,
involves the expenditure of a million u
and a-half of dollars fbr arreages.
-4
NW Yoaur, My" 30.-The Steam-. n
,ship City of Norfolk, has been seized bi
by the Government authorities, under th
muspigipn of fitting out s a slaver,.


FLORIDA AICOMPA ,N9
n" OOALA, P-LORIDA --

st TUJEsDAV, 'JUNE 5, I860.

W 7Mr. WM. W. HoLSaOUSER is duly au-
5o theorized to act as agent for the "FLORIDA
d HOME COM]PANION," and will receive sub-
e scriptions, make collections, and receipt for
the same.
r- Public Meeting.
S We have been request to state
e that a meeting of the citizens of Ocala
y will be held at the Court House, at 8
d o'clock, on Thursday evening, the 14th
inst., for the purpose of deciding upon
. the prop-riety of having li he town-incor
r- porated, ,id aulkin.4,n.ecessary steps
d there'to. A general attendance is ex-
p t. J.," "

&"' Next week we intend tow co.".
Smence the publication of other valu-
r able article from, the pen of Major
, GAINs, he manuscript has -just been
received.

| 2r The Hon. WILLIAM C. PREs-
STON, one of the most eminent men of
the age, 'Aited at his residence, in Co-
lumbia. S. C., on the 22d, Ul1t., in the
sixty-eight year'of his age. His death
was the result of a disease of the heart.

REMOVAL.-COI; S. M. G. GARY has
removed -his Law Office from the Court
House to the building lately occupied t
* by S. M. Hone, which he has 'had fittedI
t up in good style. Col. GARY is an ex-
eellent lawyer,'and we don't iizteid to
let him remain'long in his pleasant
Quarters withoutt telling his clients
where to find himia. See his card. S
lHon. David L. Yulee.
Ini this number of our paper will be
found a letter from Hon. D L YUL.EE
Sto Col. JosEpH B. BROWNE, of Key (
West, in which the former expresses
his determination to retire from public (
life, for reasons therein given, after the
r expiration of his present term of office.
This decision will be deeply regretted
by his many ardent friends, and if ad- d
Ushered to, will cause a vacancy which it p
will be hard to fill; for he has ever'
t
proved an earnest, collstaalt4-bbce--in.r-,
the Senate for the interests of his State
and country. Unlike mot Statesmen c
in our day, he has not waited for the r
development of popular issues in or- a
der to show his wonderful devotion to
the cause of his country, but has at. -t
tended to all matters, both great and g
small, with-equal readiness and zeal.-
We cannot fill his place with an abler -
or mbre efficient man .t
The Cuban Ilessenger.
We. have received the first number i
of a new paper, bearing the above ti- .
tle, published weekly by Messrs. J. W.
.BRYANT & X'.L. WYMAN, in Havana, (
Cuba, Itivneatlfprinted on superior t
paper, manufactured on that Island, t
and is well filled with interesting arti- I
dcles on local and historical subjects; F
market reports, &c. It is a paper I
which will be appreciated by intelli- e
gent readers generally, but more es- e
specially by those who have business tl
or other interests in Cuba. CoLuMBus
DREW, Esq., of Jacksonville, is the a
agent for East Florida, and through I
him all orders should be addressed.- s
Terms-$5 a year, $3 for six months, t
or $2 for'three months.

On Tuesday last, 'we were fa- v
vored with a visit from the editor of ft
the Cheraw (S. C.,) Gazette. Re was r:
called to Florida unexpectedly, and
therefore did not come to stay as long a
as he would have designed; but he has ti
seen estoa-gh to satisfy him that Flori- a
da is a great State, and in general pro-
duotivepess of soil is far ahead of Car- it
olina. ,

The Steamer Everglade, formerly s
running between this city and Florida,
was sold by the United States Marshal,
at Jacksonville, Florida, on Tuesday
last, and was purchased by the Florida
Railroad for the sum of $39.000. She. G
is to be reinstated on the limie between om
Savannah and Fernaudina, and will be A
under the command of Capt. L. M. A
Coxetter, so long and favorably known tt
in connection with her career.- g
Charleston Mercury. w


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Leltter From the Hona. Datvid L. Returned.
"~~ ~~ 1 1 l e e .. .
P.,S. W MtitDY tIokes.. i.',le ur in in-r
W A.A lltniGruN. M Ivy 10. 16 0.). lturnini hI ol_-,tfri',4.- ana iatintrr,,
JI/?, D .eua S ir 'that lih ur hn e.'ij ,I,.,i i alad y t r'e
v a r d- at I-. .. I I ', I- ... a I I c-. a. 1 ; 4 v 1, i E. V.) .


LITER FROMI EUiiOPE.

ARRLR .iJ MOF .-T Th

Steamshiip i iL"n Liverpo,
May 16, via er o', was b,.,arde
off this port today.
tion. Garilbatldi hlmii:.d at MA:,'al
under the fire of two Neaiplitan fric
at'-s. Ono of his sItci.-i-nters wa. sun
and the other captwed- At the lates
accounts his t'oops were engaged wit
the Royalists. Col. Medici was read,
to 6'"irom Geneva, but would proba
bly be pitev..ited by foreign diplomacy
There wts great agitation at Naple
and Palyrmo.
Pullinger, the defaulting cashier o
the BA.k of England, hais been sen
teneeatio twentyyears' penal servitude
Russia is again threatening Turkey

Still Later from Europe.
S Arrival of the Arabia.
HALIFAX, May 28.-The Steamshif
Arabza. Capt Stone, from Liverpoo
MiaryT ,I tJwriI has arrived
In the, I. 4erpool market, Cotter
is declining., -Breadstuffs are steady
.Wha t is bu-w't. Provisior', are dull.
The- exp K of. Ge. Garabald:
attracts niuc ia4;tentiui N. o .ltin, a&.
thentic as tc is movements is known,
iAt.lt is believed he has been successful.
At Naples thpe was great excitement,
with every symptom of an'approaching
insurrection.
SIt is positively asserted that the
French army has been ordered to evic-
uate Rome.
Gen. Concha has been elected Pres-
ident of the Spanish Senate.
The Rev. Theodore Parker is dead.
The-Africa arrived at Queenstown
on Saturday.
Sumpter County Democratic
--meeting.
SUMPTERViLLE,Fla., May 28, 1860
Accordiagto notice duly extended.
the Democracy of Sumpter county met
at the Court 4-ouse of said county, for
the purposeol eWessing an opinion in
refefn'e to thi tion of the Florida
Delegates in the.Charleston Convention,
and to appoint Dejegates .4to represent
the D)einoerjL-ot'Sumpter jn the ap-
proaching Stiie Convention, to nomin-
candidates for Governor and Repre-
sentative in Congress.
.On notion of Hsn. John Tillmia,
Judge WILSON WILLIAMS, was
called to the Chair, and Mr. JOH\
ToMPKINS was requested to act as Se-
oretary.
The Chairman in an earnest and ex-
plicit -lanmetr, explained the object
of the meetlimg, and announced the
readineaA offtme meeting, to proceed to
business .
Hon. John Tillman moved that a
Committee of five be appointed whose
loty it should be to report suitable
persons to represent the Democracy of
Simpter. in thle State Convention. far
tbhe puroeg-of -iinating candidates
fo r "6ovir'or and Representaitive in
Congress. and to draft resolutions indi-
eating the true sense of this meeting
relative to tlhe Charleston Convention
and the course pursued therein by the
Florida Delegation.
SUpon the adoption of said motion,
he Chairman appointed the following
;entlemen-to serve on such Committee.
'iz: Hon. John Tillman, D. G. Leigh.
& J. Cassady. B. 0. Grenard and F.
W. Durrance, who retired for a short
ime and on returning reported the fol-
owing named persons as suitable Del-
gates to the State Convention, viz:-
Ron. J. B. Tillman. Judge Wilson
Williams, and D G. Leigh, Esq.
On motion, so mnch of the report
was adopted and the Chairman of the
Committee then reported in reference-
o the Charleston Convention and ac-
ion of the 1Forida Delegates therein.
ie said your Committpe having had
placed befro rtbln the Resolutions of
)uval county DNaooraoy, adopted May
5th, 1860. were so thoroughly impress-
d wttb, the soundness of the saute, so
ntirelyobionin~ed that they embraced
he tree sentiments of the Florida De-
nocracy, thrt they indicated the me
'us operandi that should hereafter be
adopted by the Sovereign State of
?lorida, in case of certain events, that
aid Resolutions so entirely expressed
heir views, that .they herewith h present
aid Resolutions embodying their re-
ort. The eight resolutions of the Du-
al Democracy, were then read. and
nanizmously adopted as expressing the
ill sentiments of the Sumpter Democ-
soy.
On motion, it was Resolved, Th.t if '
ny of the Delegates appointed by ibis
teetiug. find it inconvenient to attend
hue Convqlition. they be authorized to
point proxies ain their stead.
* tkwas then moved and carried that
he proceedings of this meeting be pub-
ished in the Home Covmpanion. -
On motion, the meeting adjourned
ine die.


atc lai Frla'.lJ I e at ,1e Lun, 1 tl
alIat, Fla, AIJY 19, 1,861). 8tf


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2numornwrncute. '
The friends qf J. L. McCGAHAGIN, an-
nounciheimn a* n Independent Candidate
for the next State Senate, to represent the
County or Mkar ....
MANy VoThfRs.


DR. R. F. MAURICE,
Respectfully offers his Professional
Services to the Citizens of Ocala and
Vicinity.
Office in the rear of Bell's Store.
June, 1860. imlo

JONES & CASSELS,

AND
Sommis ion ilerdlant0,

BAY STREET, SAVANNAH, GA.
DPARTICULAR attention paid to selling
I Cotton. Rice, Corn. Flour, Bacon and
produce generally. Liberal advances made
on consignments
RAxDAL F. Josxsm. Joan GASSELS.
RmaMz.wta.-Holeombe Co., A. &
Hartridge, Savannah, Ga ; Hon. William
B. Flelning Walthouiville, Ga- T. Q. Cos
eels. MeIntosh, Ga.; &. D. McConnell,
Oeal. Fla.; Rev. 1). Fraser, Madison, Fla.
June 4, 1860. qy10


H. WENTON,


marbcr anb air-brossrr,
COOA.Xj WBXj~.,
W OULD respectfully form the gentle-
SV men of Ocala and vicinity thathe has
opened a shop in front of the flaru-es shop
where he will be at all times in readiness
to perform any service required in his line
of business.
Ladies requiring his services will be vis-
ited at their residences.
May 28, 1840 9tf


SOMETHING NE W!
SCOVILE & GOODELL'S
DOUBLE LOCK-STITCH
SEWING MACHINE.
JHE above Superior" Family Sewing
Slashines a.t sold at the low prime of
ifty Dollars, and warranted fully equal to
thone uf a higher price. The subwriber
haspeeiww~'a~ taber of the Machines,
which he offer fur maje with the ammuramce
that he will confer. benefit upon every
pnrehaser. The citizens of Mrun and
a4djoininc counties are respectfully invited
o call and examine the M1chines for them-
Wel' W. LM. WHITE.
O0al.a, oMay 28,180. tf


,- For the kind terms of your letter
d am grateful I am receiving mat
similar pro.f. of continued confilenc
fromin the 'rilendq whose good infliien
I have lm:iipily fell ti-r s*i many vet,
k It seems due to ilihin th"ti I slihold
t' longer withhold from their knowledge
h .the intention I have indulged for soil
y years past, and which I have not h
fore announced, only because it migi
be regarded as premature. But no'
When our State is preparing for ele
tions which include a choice of Senati
f for a new term,. I am not at liberty
Suppress any longer the expression
my purpose. ,
I wish thlierefore, to say to my friend
and I beg you tlo make it known with
out reserve, that I do not desire to r
main longer in public life. I shall pr
fer to engage my remaining years i
Sthe duties of private citizenship
It has been my fortune to carry wit
Sme, to: the end. the cordial friendship
Sof most of those whose -support estal
Swished the early successes of my life
Many cherishbd memories, of thei
.kirhndrie"s fill the, iatrval. In closing
Sthe public relations which have been
' 'long maintained between us, it is pleat
ing to reflect that those personal bond
*of friendship and sympathy, which
were all the while most valued and de
sired by me, still remain to unite u3.
Of the causes which induce my pur
pose it is sufficient to mention, that
do not believe my health will longeren
dure under the climate of this latitude
and that after so much absence front
Florida,, I am naturally solicitous ti
enjoy at the last the pleasures of i
home life.
In thus withdrawing to my home']
do not propose a useless life. I shal
as warmly as heretofore co operate with
my friends in all that can promnrote the
moral and material progress of ou
State; but it will not be consistent
with the plan of life I propose to my.
self in the future, to accept or exercise
any political office whatever
I frankly confess 'that I do not con-
temprlate .this separation from the as-
sociatiois1, of the past twenty years
without some feeling of sadness. The
occurrence 'naturally imtnpresses me
.with the rejection that one stage of
life, the most active, has passed ; and
that my purposed retirement is but the
recognition of that advance in years
which has brought me to another and
graver stage. I cannot help looking
back upon the memory of the many
who started with tile in'the race of life
iand are no longer numbered among us;
nor can I help looking forward to the
still more rapid thinning of our num-
be'b we must expeet in the future.
But our race is not run, and the:ofore
our duties tnot yet ended. Every stage
of life has its duty and its pleasure.
We must all continue, while we live.
to do and to enjLv, according to our
opportunity and ability
It is pleasant to remember that
others, our children among them. fol-
low close upon our steps, with equal
motive to be diligent in promoting the
public weal, and with the greatermeans
of usefulness which the advancing en-
lightenment of mankind afford.
Very truly, and
always your friend.
D. L. YULEE.
Col. JOSEPH B. BI!OWN.E,
Key West, f-Yorida.


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OPPICE an-d Laboratory one door Sent
f J- M. Arnow's" Store.
April 6th, 1860. gdltf


0;


1860. Spring & Summer 1860

CLOTHING,

LABDIE' RESS GOODS,
And a General Assortment of


UNRIVALLED, IN THIS MARKET, FOR

Variety, Richness,
AND LOWNE.ss OF PRICE!
AT
J. W. S. CROWSON'S,
OC&.A3I.A, NrS.A_.
1''HE subscriber having found it necessa-
1t to extend his business tosupplythe
steady and rapid increase of trade, has en-
larged li.s Store to more than twice itsfor-
mer size, and has just opened his new
Sprintig and Snnmmer stock, which in varie-
ty and extent has never been excelled in
this part of the State. The attention of
the Ladij- is respectfully invited to his
large and beautiful assortment of
DRESS GOODS,
Bonne-s. Head Dresses.
hiding Hats, Flats,
Ribbons, Flotowers, -c.
For the gentlemen he has a good supply ci
READY-MADE CLOTHING,
S Elegant andt Durable.
Hat and Ca J.jpstta and ahoss6.alnd
everyth 'tu needed to complete the
outfit of a gentleman.
A Splemlid Lot of Jewelry.
He has also a good assortment of Wood,
Hard, and Tin-Ware, Glass-Ware, Crock-
ery, Saddlery,&c. In fact his Stock com-
prises a full assortment of all articles usu-
ally kept in a Dry Goods Store.
His stock was selected with care and
special reference to the wants of his cus-
to era, and be confidently believes that
he can suit allwho may call upon him. both
in price and quality of goods.
His old friends and customers will please
accept his thanks for their past kind and
liberal patronage, and he now desires to
assure then, as well asall others who may
hereafter favor'hlm with their patronage,
that he %till always strive to merit their
favor and. confidence.
The citizens of Marion and adjoining
counties, with their wives and daughters,
and their sons, too, are- reipectfuihly invi-
ted to caft AM examine his stock. No
charge for showing Goods.
'J. W S. CROWSON.
Ocala, Fla., April 17,1860. 8tf .

Masonic.
THE NEW MASONIC HALL of Marston
I Lodge, No. 49, at Silver Spring, will
be dedicated on the 28rd of June next, on
which occasion the FRev. WM. T. HaRRSON
will deliver an Oration at 11 o'clock, A.M
The Brethreni of the Mystic Tie are invited
to attend, and are requested to bring their
Regalia and Sash fora public procession.
The unuersigne. were appointed a Comn-
Inittee to make suitable arrangements.
We request that as speedily as posaiblI
we may be infornnd of the probable num-
ber ofthe brethren that would attend from
our neighboring Ldlges.
W.. B. WATI 8W.
D. H. WIL N, I/Committee of
H. MARTtN, Arrangement.
H. IBERLACK, J
A. WATBRMAN, Chairman.
May15, 180o. 6w6

NOTICE. .
I HAVE lost a Sorrel Mare pony, about
S4 years old, and a dark Bay Filly, about
2 years old. Any information given me
cmnnerning the said animals at PFJeming-
ton Posat 0ice, Marion county, Eat BloS
Ida, will be thankfully received, and re-
warded accordingly.
A. W. TONGUE.
April 1, 1800. SwO


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LL persons Indebted to the estate o a
SDr. William J. Keitt, late of Martiae
unty, dec'd., are hereby request to
me forward and make immediate pd
tnt to the undersigned; and persowa
ving clainis against said estate, will pr ,
mt the same, duly authenticated. Vhbk
e time prescribed by law, or fthia onotle
I! plead In bar. 83I. G. GARY,
Agent of Ji Octla, Fla., arch 16, le g 8w49 .


Ocla.Fia.,I4arch 16, 1500. Bu'49


NOTICE.
SIX months after date I will prmeat my
Accounts and vouchers as admtitstra-
torof the estate of Dr. Wiuian J. Ktirr,
dec'd., to ithe Hon. Judge .tof Prnbs of
Marion county. Fla.. for a fual seedeoMt,
and sak to ie dicharged fom furtebar ad.
muinistration t e-reoe.
XLL"U I. LKITT, AdAN.*
Ocel,?Fla.. Nr~l.W 16,l JI P


SUGAR! SUGAR! !
TT No. I, -t adind ee entire by W


uayti'% I4 tM


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HENRI H. LINT'ILLL.L JA,. 0. U.SMEDnEL..
LINVILLE & SMEDIBERG,


SAVANNAH, GEORGIA,
Manufacturers of Steam Engines, .Su-
gar Mills, inGearing, aw Mills,
AND fIVERY DESCRIPTION OF
WROUGHTAND CAS"riRON WORK, .
SREFERENCES--N. A. Hardee &'Co., An-
drew Low & Co., F. T. Willis, Esq., Erwin
& Hardee, Brighnmi, Baldwin & Co., Clag-'
horn & Cunninghanm.
May 16, ISdio. ly

S.IDICAL,
DR,.ROB T Y. H. THOMAS,
B EING thankful for past favors, continues
S to practice Medicine, Surgery and Ob-
stetrics, in Marion and surroiindin,_ coun-
ties, upon the same liberal terms as hereto-
foye. ReEidehe and office Twelve miles
North-went of Omala. -,
"' B Pure Ltdiintes furnished his pa-
tronsupon moderate term,.
Mity 165 l301 3ru7


-flA Eli & WHll ,
IMPOR'iERS AND DEALERS t
IN MILITARY GOODS
O EVERYPDESYCRIPTIOJV.
Bt BUTTONS, LACES, SASHES, SWORDS,
Belts, Epaulettes Gauntletts, Cliapeaus,
Company Officers fHats, Plumes and Spurs,
Horse Trappings, Banners, and Regi-
mental Colors made to order,
Companies furnished with outfits com-
plete.
Also, have on hand their usual large
stock of Watches, Jewelry, Sterling Silv.er
Ware.and Fancy Goods. i
Corner King and Hasel street, sign of
the Drum, Charleston, S. C.
May 4, 1860. 8m6


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aduizt


W C. WILLIAMS,
Chairman.
JoHN TcmpxgIs Secretary.
CASUALTIES -A friend writing from
3ainesville, states that a fatal aeoidrnit
oeurrediu that place on the 23d inst.
. young man by the name -f Dyatt
lhite, bad driven up to the Depot for
he purpose of obtaining a load of
eods. In removing hisgun from the
agon, the hammer canghtk in the wag-
n oloth, discharging the betire con-
mnts of the piece into his person, kill-
ng him instantly. We are also pained
Learn that Ool Tillmmi 'Ingram of
iainesville, loest a valuable negro by
he fall of a tree, during a thunder
storm on tha 19th insL-.-aast For- I
(iap. 4 .. 1
AGUTA, Sy.29.-A fire occurred
war this city lilt night, caused, as now ]
believed, by lightning. It is said that
he toli-houe oa the Plank Road, near i
elaigle'B, was I building destroyed.


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GEO. A. WIGGINS,
A T TO R VE YA T7 L A Ifj_
CoA.I.'-.A, I-..a,. 1^^
Will Itiaa:tic in tlie Court of'thel "a
ern Circuit on'Florida. -
3Iay 5, 1860. ly6

NO dbMPROM ISE'.
I ITH ANVTI-,SLA IVER '
A REGULAR

Southern Rigts



THE .isljeacrier is r,.,rei;ng and offering .
I forsale at the v-ery tow:t figures for'
cash ur arproved credit, a ehoi e selection
of good, selected to'suit the trade, from
markets ?outhl of MaEin.& Dixon's Lihe.
Thesto.k eonsiats in patit of Staple and
Fancy Goods., Mantillas, Dusters, &e., Shoes
and Boots,.Hats, Flats and Bonnets, Cut-
lery and Hard-ware, Crockery. Tin, Glass '
and Wood-ware, Saddlery,' Drugs and .
White Lead, Groceries, Tobaeoo, Cigars,
Wines, &e, &e .-,c ,; ,- .
A liberal discodiIn always 'made on cash
purchases. a m on a
Now gentlemen is the tilm to shoet your -
hands, whether yvbau will sanction Sto'UtheraM
trade or not. dive me a trial. '.'
J.PAINE.
Ocala, Fit., April 18, 1860. Stf ..
-. .' ..- 7
"Sure asYVbu're Boih,!' -
4_ < f' W lk L



PIOI O^- T3E^^N" .' ,
I N .O WN:
1 KEPT BY j

J.M.BELL&C .
North-East of the Public Square 0

CASH SYSTEM ADOPTED!
'* '
THEIR. STOCK CONSISTS IN PART OF
FLOUR, 'BACON, .
BUTTER,' LARD,
SUGAR, 'I RICE,
STARCH, CAJXDLES,
S FISH, -SOAP,
TOBACCO.
S SEGARS,- SNUFF,
FRENCH BRANDY,
-GINGER B A-Npy.E .
BLACKi-ERRY BRaN'DY
RASPBERRY BRANDY
STRAWBERRY BRANDY,
SHERRY BRAND Y,"
S OLD HOL.LAN!).GIN,
MADEIRA WINE,
PORT WINE, .
BITTERS, '
SRUM, :
CHAMPAGNE.
SCHEIDAM SCHNAPP8, b
'INE OLD WHISKEY. l-:
BRANDY PEACHES,'
FRESH FRUITS. -t "-
PRESERVES,
JELLIES, -
PICKLES,'*., *
KETCHUP. .

CANDIES.
RAISINS ,
FIGS.etc etc
Wood, Tin and Hard. Ware, .
il of'whieh will be sold Cheap for CASH
nly. The good citizens of the county arqs"
espectfully invited to call around. Thr
ladies are specially invited.
Aptil 9tb, 1880. ,. 2 .. -

DAVID WELSH,,.

WATCH-IWAEM, A
OCALA, EAST FLORIDA. :
fATr'H RBPAIRING of every deserip-
S(iton done Ahbe most thoroughly manner
id warranted at the following reasonable
nid usual rates, which isaelow Is firsth-ma
orkmanship will perunit viz: .
CleastngLpiS, or Lerers of all "
Idaid $2 40
.Each new Spring, Wheel, Sta, "
.. Chsin_9rJewel for the same, 2 60
Eaeh exta- ii, _crew a, B ..
Hand, or Chr3at "il,. _
Common Verge or Quartier-work pro- "
ortionably low. ,^'
P. S.-Terms-Cash orStoro acceptance.
March 19, 1860. 8m4 9

porn, Bacon, Flour, &c,
0 0 BDUSHELS Corn., ,i
UVUU.IB 10,0oo LIbs BaSon, Sidm
and Shoulder,
8,000 Lbs. RaBs, somc verry cwie, .
80 Bbls. Superfine and Extra
Flour, "
26 Kegs Prime Butter,.
800 Bushels Oat., \
600 Bale. Hay. \- -
With a large stock of Staple and Dr 3
oods, FBrRITUSB, Boota and 8bi\ .
atsand Cape, Crokery aoQl i \a .
ard ware and euaMer-, Clothing, SaddIe l
grienlturul .Daptem and a g-r -
stY of otber artiu, 1 '
A~ll et ftlmceh are Siet-ed Tcry lu'w-h ?' -
range for Cash, Cotton, Naval Stored, ,
od commercial acceptancee, by
BROOME & THOMPSO, "
Aernpldi,0 F. .
April 14, I8e0. Sm6. [
I~ o toDbtran rdo.