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UF
mods:note dates or sequential designation Vol. 1, no. 1 (Oct. 6, 1954)-v. 8, no. 228 (June 28, 1962).
issuing body Published 19 -1962 by: Sarasota News Corp.
funding Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
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The news
CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00048667/00001
 Material Information
Title: The news
Uniform Title: News (Sarasota, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ill. ;
Language: English
Publisher: KENMAR Ltd.
Place of Publication: Sarasota Fla
Creation Date: October 6, 1954
Publication Date: 1954-1962
Frequency: daily (except sat.)[19 -1962]
daily (except sun.)[ former 1954-19]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Sarasota (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Sarasota County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Sarasota -- Sarasota
Coordinates: 27.337222 x -82.535278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Oct. 6, 1954)-v. 8, no. 228 (June 28, 1962).
Issuing Body: Published 19 -1962 by: Sarasota News Corp.
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 003416527
oclc - 47932357
System ID: UF00048667:00001

Full Text


* '-p r
/ I -'" 71


For all depuhInents

of The News telephone


4-8511


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SwtM f( h WA
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Shop

ins

Sarasota


SARASOTA, FLORIDA, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1954


FIVE CENTS


G sKorea Deaths Laid ToSpyRing
Ko e .t. n-


New Newspaper


Greets

Today Sara&ota has a new
public servant.
THE NEWS, a six day a
week daily afternoon news-
paper, came into actual exist-
anoe today under the direction
/ of Editor and Publisher Kent
S. McKinley.
Its initial press run'blanketi
ed the City of Sarasota and the
county.
On hand to watch the first
papers ~me off the press were
Sarasota city ohd county offi-
clst, ti nijaders, represent-
atives -a OStO ota's churches
and leading businessmen. ,
With heavy emphasis on
local news, the new paper al-
so carries top national fea-
tures, comics and. up-to-the
minute sports and woman's.
Sections.
.Latest domestic and interna-
tional news is being supplied
by Asocitted Press: and Inter-


SIGN IOYALT VOA e
An a empyees.d .,da" t
NEWS have ~sgped asn eatb
loyalty to the &ntte States
aad have Badeswoa st.n e-
measts that they. ate-. &
memar ot any subimiesvte
tiL4raufra'% EditourS^Entf LS
;: -IP--,id_ *tmgfL a.,


sjoital News Servie through
direct wires. TNp columists
uInclde Fulbnr LewidsJr ch
Q'Dom.U. end Ef~ir AA i
S$ wrer. .. ... .


.ir* .,

printing of
the paper's: own ,I
stand, he declared
NEWS will suppo
honestly qualified
candidates, regar ar
ty affiliation
Published f ro p lant at
1045 N. Lime Ave., THE NEWS
enters the afternoon field in
Sarasota with a staff of ex-
Continued on Page 8

Late Stocks


Allis-Chalmers
Amer Tel & Tel
Anaconda 'Cop
Beth Steel
Boeing AirL
Chrysler
Dome Mines
Douglas Aire
DuPont
Eastman Kodak
Fla Power Corp
Fla Pow & Light
Gen Elee
Gen Motors
Int Bus Mach
Liggett & Myers
SMontg Ward
Natl Cash Reg -
N Y Central.
Niag Mohawit Pow
Nor Amer Aviat
Penn RR
Remt I1and
Repub 'Steel
Safeway Storny
Sears Roebuck
Socony Vacuum
Sou Pacific
Stand Oil (NJ)
Union C&C
United Air Lines
U S Steel
West'ghouse Elee
Woolworth
Dow-Jones:
Industrials
Rails
Utilities


Open Noon
67% 6st%
172%-172%
42% 42%
78% 78Y%
617/S 61%
68% 68




471/ 47%
43% 43%3
90% 90Y%
289 289
04% 64S
T3% 73%
9 90VW2
19%19'/
311/ 3132
1/4 46Y%
60 60%
27%5 2
63% 63%
447/8 44%
73% 74%
48% 487/S
46%/2 46%
101 s 101%4
83% 83%
27% 27%
57i l57%
72% 73
45 45%3


up
up
UD


65
4
9


3 Youths Held


Police today arrested a 17
year old Newtown youth and
two juveniles to solve recent'
burglaries of two Newtown
grocery stores.
Charged with breaking and
entering was Alonzo Belcher,
who admitted to police that he
broke into Perry's Grocery
Store 1803 2Tth St. in Newtown
on Sept. 5 and into the Herbert
Jenkins store on Oct. 3. I


F


Sarasota

PUBLISHERS EDITORIAL


To our readers, subscribers' and friends, one pledge
we make here and now .
This is your family newspaper and yours alone.
So long as it is in our charge, we will never champion
any cause Which is not for the best interests of the
west coast of Florida.
THE NEWS will report the facts impartially in its
columns.
The .views of THE NEWS will be set forth exclu-
sively in its editorial columns.
THE NEWS will confine itself to the upbuilding of
the State of Florida, and the'areas which it is pledged
to serve, through the dissemination of NEWS which is
timely, authentic and of value.
.Pplitically, THE NEWS Will be bi-partisan, and
fight for the success of the Two-Party System in the
State of Florida, and for States' Rights.


Kent Schuyler McKinley
i' .Editor & Publisher
r


MRS. KENT McEKNLt, *ife of the publisher of THE NEWS and vice-president of the new nee
by to start the press for today's first issue as her husband looks on smilingly at right. At the
Shorman, mechanical superintendent of THE NEWS.-Staff Photo.


Musisg Scandal FDR's Son


Pt i oUnit Formed ToAddress
WASHINGTONI-(INS)-Attorney General Herbert Brown- GOP Her


ell Jr. reed y a special
crate.wfi federall grand juries
4p a yjVee which he saio


d -graft and corrup-
W..1 Clyde L. Powell,
r Federal housing admin-
on official. a
Powell wa& summoned before
the.,panel-to answer charges,
aired In a senate investigation,
of-widespread irregularities, in-
cluding "gifts," gambling and
huge bank deposits, in connec-
tion- with rich windfall profits
reaped by builders.
Brownell designated Justice
Department Attorney Nathaniel
E. aossack tb head the special
housing scandal unit. The at-
torney general said the depart-
ment is receiving evidence on
10 to 15 cases of alleged FHA
frauds "daily," some of which
include bribery allegations.
Other matters under nation-
wide scrutiny are alleged false
advertising, personnel juggling,
and mortgage frauds.
Goldschein, w ho recently
completed work with a St. Louis
grand jury investigating labor
racketeering, will coordinate
the activities of United States
district attorneys who have
been directed to begin present-
ing housing-scandal cases as
soon as possible in key areas.
Hi also will cooperate with
United States Attorney Leo H.
Rover, who is handling the
Washington grand jury inquiry.
SPowell's appearance before
the District of Columbia panel
followed his refusal to testify
yesterday before the senate
banking committee.

Biggest Baby
CHICAGO (INS)--Mr. and
Mrs. Roman Kolatorowicz have
a right to be proud of their new
born son.
He popped into the w o r d
weighing a whopping 13 3j
pounds-the largest baby bori
at Chicago's St. Mary Hospital'
in 16 years.


Justice Department unit to op-
in a nationwide probe of hous-
L are "increasing daily."

tyof ffP


For tlvers


The driver who plays it safe
is going to get paid off!
And the Sarasota Police De-
partment will be in on the deal
along with the Sarasota Busi-
ness and Professional Women's
Club.
Starting Monday and contin-
uing through Saturday a roving
traffic policeman whose identi-
ty will be secret, will, each day,
select Sarasota's safest and
most courteous driver.
To this person will go a $1
prize, donated by the Business
and Professional Women's Club
who are sponsoring the safety
program in cooperation with
the Sarasota Police Depart-
ment.
Chief of Police Robert N.
Wilson says its'important in
this campaign that the people
know the police for once are
watching them-not to catch
them doing something wrong-
but to praise them for safe
driving.
At the end of the week a $10
prize will be given to the driver
whose acts of safety are judged
to be most outstanding of .the
daily awards.
Heading the campaign for
the Business and Professional
Women's Club is Miss Mary
Hirleman, 101 S. Osprey Ave.,
chairman of the club's Health
and Safety Committee whd will
present the prizes.
The campaign is a part of
the National Business and Pro-
fessional Women's Club Week
program.
CHECK CHARGE
Elton Underwood, 22, of Ven-
ice was arrested yesterday on
a bad check charge by Deputy
Sheriff Richard Curry. He was
released on a $1,000 bond.,


Mail This FIRST EDITION Of


; The. ws'

eTo Your Friends "Up North"
Addressed, Wrapped i|'
and Mailed Any- prop
where In The U.S.A. for
Place Your Orders Now At
THE NEWS Office or Crees News Stand


John .Roosqvelt, eply meo
r. .f the famia oo y<
yity .to .a i to One a
lican PariBtfw fl i be the
spok. at the second arou
hriawer Birthdav ditier


This Is The FIRST EDITONN Of


- m


TheA-News
If you have not already suhscrb'ed for requla
carrier delivery,arfiriq next Mondeay
a


hone
Switchboard open until 9 P. M. tonigrt


C hel duin dl;Saiota Ott. 14. 1 t._ *
The dinner will be scored hurricane
jointly by the Saraa=t. and
Manatee County Republica
Executive Committees and the J d s U p
Citizens' for Eisenhduor and
Sutton Committee. MIAMI -(INS)- Hurricane
Hazel's winds built up to 105
Country Club Site miles an hour today and threat-
It will be held at the Sara- ened to develop even more
sota Bay Country Club with muscles as the storm plodded
tickets available to the public through t he Caribbean Sea
at $5 each. Chairman of the about 375 miles south south-
affair will be Mrs. Sally East of San Juan.
Gernhard. The 11 a.m. advisory issued
A resident of Hyde Park, by the San Juan Weather Bu-
N. Y., John Roosevelt is the reau located the season's eighth
youngest son of the late Pres- tropical storm at latitude 12.6
ident Franklin D. Roosevelt. He north and 65.3 west longitude.
is currently serving as vice Winds had built up from 95
chairman of the National Cit- miles an hour to 105 miles an
izens' for Eisenhower Congres- hour over a small area near
sional Committee. the center and gale force winds
During the presidential cam- spewed outward 75 miles in all
paign of 1952, Roosevelt, directions.
then a Democrat, campaigned Athough the. weather bureau
as a- "Democrat for Eisen- classed Hazel as "a small
hower." storm," it warned that further
increase in size and intensity
Registered Republican is expected during the next 12
In the early part of 1953 hours.
Roosevelt registered as a Re- During this period, the hur-
publican at his Hyde Park ricane probably will continue to
residence near the Roosevelt move west northwest at about
family home declaring that the 15 miles an hour.
Republican Party suited his All vessels in the path of the
own middlee of the road storm were advised to take
beliefs." caution. Small craft in the vi-
cinity of the tiny islands of
It's A Double Curacao, Bonaire and Aruba
were advised to remain in port
Cn during the next 12 to 24 hours.
Celebrction At present, the storm is ap-
proximately 1,400 miles east
For Shor cmn southeast of Miami.
A double celebration was Swimming Steer
held today in the composing
room of THE NEWS following Startles Chicago
the publication of the first edi- CHICAGO-(INS)-A swim-
tion of the new paper. ming steer g a v e Chicago's
Leading in the celebrations South Side one of its wildest
was Harold Shorman, plant days in some time.
superintendent of the paper, The two year old Angus went
who was on hand not only for over the wall of a Stock Yards
the birth of hlis "baby"; but pen,-thundered for three failes
also to celebrate'his 31st .wed- along crowded streets and then
ding anniversary. plunged into the Chicago River.
He and his wife, Margaret, A speed boat finally lassoed
were married in Waukegan, the amphibious steer.
Ill., Oct. 6, 1923, while he was
working for the Waukegan Bright Spot!
News.* ,
This is the third time "Have you ever done a lick
Shqrman has been on hand for of work?" demanded the angry
the birth of a paper, but it is housewife of the tramp.
the first time he has celebrated "Lady," he retorted, "if you
the "blessed event" and wed- think asking dames like you
ding anniversary at the same for a bite to eat ain't work,
time. you don't know what work is."


Propose Non-Pus lsum Board


Board Votes Ti

Of Bee Ridge A
A strong plea for a non-par- the schc
tisan school board plus an ap- vote, Hi
pointive superintendent was political
voiced to THE NEWS today by
Mrs. Barbara Ingram who gram vo
broke the deadlock yesterday clearing
on the complicated Gillespie his mot
Shcool situation at Bee Ridge. opinion
Mrs. Ingram, one of the two posing C
Republican members of t he Chairma
Sarasota County Board of Pub- Hayes a
lic Administration, came up Democr
with the successful temporary Mrs.
solution to overcrowding at switch in
Gillespie School. She offered a made th
motion carried unanimously, vote, fig
which provided that the fifth dicating
and sixth grade students at Gil- a year
lespie School be transferred to and hire
the South Side. Then I
The school board action came to hire
after a three and a half hour convert
session Tuesday attended by a third cli
delegation of Bee Ridge parents feated, 3
whose opinions have been ser- Hiss and
iously split for some time. as again
A'state survey team has rec- Hayes a
ommended that the Bee Ridge With a
school, with more than 70 pu- hand, M
pils in six grades and only two her succ
teachers, be. abandoned. ferri
In agreeing to Mrs. Ingram's grades i
proposal, the board knocked
down a lengthy argument by This
Philip H. Hiss, Republican, fa- ton by
voring complete closing of the the teac
school. As no
When his motion to abandon the mot


Miami Motels

In Price War
MIAMI (INS) Miami's
motel prige war continued to
spread today with one operator
predicting the rate might drop
to 50 cents per person for
warning -'he would charge
double acCupancy and another
nothing to tourists.
Some 25 motels advertised
rooms at $1 per person. The
price war started when TI. S. 1
Motel Association members cut
their rates to counteract $2
signs put up by otK*r operators.
Meanwhile a gasoline price
war continued in te Miami
area. Prices droppTc from
22.9 cents a gallon 19.9
cents.
N


The b


r
Jl


French,


Russian


Tie Bared
PARIS-The possibility waS
S.not excluded in diplomatic cir-
cles today that American boys
S. may have lost their lives i
Korea because of Communist
access to French military si
crets.
S It is considered not tncon-
S-','. :","t ceivable that one or more ke ef
figures in Prpnce's greater
spy scandal could have been
responsible for leaks to. he
French Communist Party 'm.
Allied military operational
plans in Korea.
Korea has not h*tbn met-
tioned to date in.the official in-
quiry into th ;fre of cotnfatf a
tial milita.gita from t
French Natnt Defense :Oiw
mittee equivalat' i t the
United States Natioal Security
Council.
WORKED THROUGH WAB&
\Bdt it is now known that the
high-ranking official who hu
confessed giving -ilittary_ se-
wspaper, stands crets to a double aggent, Con-
left is Harold munist Andre Baranes, '
his post on the permn


Korean war.
This ma iJ Rog* La-Osses,
who was apq'arni 4,P-tv, a, .
fense chief of
secretariat othe.DeD.-
istry in Junm, 1950.
.jt about Wee wpeeb.iI


1run, jn U a


"V .1. .-." -.... .. POEM
he 40-year-old LaBruessl
ready was a fellow travel "
the time of his appolntmAtL,
Military court testiaeigE -
| -eady has aa ho :
that dmnf awise ita|"-
ar. i ifN marn uel I' ltero de lja
erie, direct ( the pw'xg
munist newsnIper T4beri-
'tudents b'Ate la Vgefo-
t whom the Tunisian Red Jwou.
nalist aid spy courier Adf
ool failed by a 3 to 2 Baranes worked, is marwaTid. it
si called it a "purely the daughter of a formerb Raem -
Scaed it a "purely sian ambassador to France and
decision." Mrs, In- he appear to have been a a-as-
oted with Hiss after de- ter manipulator of. agea tor
that she did not,think the Cominv*pit Party. ,
ion represented the GIVEN ARETICL
of the community, Op- According to, the
the Hiss motion were of Barnes before the
n Kickliter, W. P. magistrate it was the JlAr,
nd Williani Coe, all tor paper, editr who
ats.
trodiced .Brfes to Taaruui%
Ingram explained her part"ew worked as la
I that from the time she mentary correspondent to
he statement until the D'Astier de la Vigerie, 44
ures were presented in- also accepted ever a'png Fgat
that it would cost $5,000 od of time, prhA-.r
to improve the school 'for payment, .rtices g:
Sa third teacher. LaBruse cootr'itedI t iw .
Hayes offered a motion- aiel .. b ...
another teacher and .
the auditorium into a t D
assroom. This was de- Wy.
to 2 with Mrs. Ingram,
d Kickliter voting no, n H
ast the yes votes of H o
nd Coe. I -
an obvious deadlock at Weather .being what tflh,
:rs. Ingram then made THE NEWS'le
sessful motion of tras- .eluivel 2L t -r -
the fifth and,-pix1h t 1d, whe ability to 4.h
to other schools. the weather comes from being.
was followed by a mo- in close touch with Natmur
Hiss to transfer one of For opening day, Minnie re-
hers to another school. ports that rea its willhae'c ;
opposition was voicedcasional sunlight foUowed by
ion carried without ai ,
i vote.
board strewed that this .


action in no way leveled any
criticism against the teachers,
Mrs. Velma Tatum and her
daughter, Mrs. Evelina Vann.
As the Bee Ridge delegation
left the room, one of its leaders,
John Tolliver Denmark t,o 1 d
THE. NEWS that he felt' that
some progress had been made.

Features
Watch your new news-
paper, THE -NEWS, for
features of the Sarasota
area; stories and pictures
of things you never knew
about this section of the
Gulf Coast.
Read Tfiv NEWS tomor-
row-and every day, for
feature pictures and stories
of this area.


frequent clouds with perhaps a :;
shower or two.
"Hold on to the page. of
THE NEWS," she warns, "or
those east winds will blow them
around. Not much change fob
tomorrow, either."
Forecast
Sarasota* Clear to p a.r tl -
cloudy through Thursday wi*
widely scattered showers, lit-
tie change in temperature. East
winds, moderate to occasionally
fresh.
Florida: Clear to partly
cloudy. A few showers mostly
in south portion. Littletemper-
,ature change. /


A


VOL.


No. 1


. 1 91 .


If&


ecoruaue


i


-"' u


. d


ae




P-age


Pupils Jiioif


in Appeals

To End Riots
By International News Service
SWASHINGTON St u d e nt
leaders joi n e d Washington
school officials today in an ap-
peal to, end demonstrations
over admission of Negroes to
high school classrooms.
At Anacostia high s c h q o 1,
wh e r e demonstrations began
Monday against the Supreme
Court decision ordering integra-
tion, an assembly of striking
StIidents was scheduled, for this
mbfning at the athletic field.
Eugene Griffith, principal,
an& 1, "nucleus" of student
leaders planed to urge al i
"strikers' 'to return to :their
classes and use other means to
protest joint white-Negro edu-
cation.
1,500 PUPILS 0Q.T
.AtL McKinley higi sch o l,
where absenteeism" has also
been a problem, a student meet-
ing was summoned in the au-
ditorium.
Nearly 1,500 pupils were out
of sebool yesterday and detn-
onstrations reached a point
where police warned that "mob
rule would not be tolerated."
In Baltimore, where rioting
broke out last Friday, children
began returning to school as po-
lice gave "move along" orders
to groups of 20 to 50 young-
sters still roving about in var-
ious parts of the city.
COMPLAINTS AIBED
A group of mothers, some of
them with babies in their arms,
aired, their complaints before
Baltimore school 'wprintend-
ent Jphn Fischer. He charged
that :the anti-integration pro-
tests in Baltimore resulted
from a "germ that d r i f t e d
dowI from Delaware."
Thfi was a reference to Mil-
ford, Del., where segregation
was abolished and then rein-
state
In another area beset by its
own *roblenms, Georgia Attor-
-"y General Eugene Cook de-
alare that the state would
maintain segregated schools
and laid there is no need for
"seC~i societies" such as the
Ku ]3ux Klan,
S-,tTINALLY DID IT
ILE, Ala. (INS)-Mobile
tok the ki~lhen sink.
told pqliee some-
ted a wretch fj remove it
from b housq he ~vas tearing


- THE WHITE HOUSE
S WASH INGTON

September 29; 1954


Dear Mr. McKinley:

On the occasio#'of the first issue of The News, I am happy
to send you and' the members of your staff'my hearty con-
gratulations.

Throughout the years a free press has always played a most
important role in developing our nation. I am confident that
your newspaper will live up to that high tradition of public
service as it contributes to the knowledge and understanding
of all who live in the Sarasota area.

You have my best wishes for many years of success.

Sincerely yours,


James C. Hagerty | \
Press Secretary
to the President



Mr. Kent S. McKinley
Editor and Publisher
The News
Sarasota, Florida


Security Assembly

To Name New Members


UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. -
(INS)- Delegates from India,
Israel and Egypt wind up gen-
eral debate on world problems
in the U. N. assembly today.
Following their addresses at
the morning session, the assem-
bly was to reconvene at 3 pmn.
to elect Belgium, Iran and Peru
to succeed Denmark, Lebanod
and Colombia as non-permanent
members of the Security Coun-
cil.
Elections also will be held for
new posts in the 18-nation eco-
nomic and Social Council.
France, China, Argentina and
Egypt are marked for re-elec-
tion, while the Dominican Re-
public will succeed Cuba and
the Netherlands will replace
Belgium.
Red Proposals
RThe assembly also usti act
on the steering co~mitIee's
unanimous recommenaion to
place the new Sovfief ppoals


on disarmament and atomic
-controls on the U. N. agenda
for consideration by the politi-
cal committee.
The 15-nation steering group
shelved temporarily action on a
Soviet complaint charging Na-
tionalist China with "piratical
attacks" against' Communist
and western merchant ships
trading with the Red-controlled
Chiese mainland.
By- a 9 to 2 vote, the com-
mittee postponed consideration
of the item "for a few days"
to give France time to act as
intermediary in securing the re-
lease of the Soviet tanker
Tuapse now in Formosa. Rus-
sia and Czechoslovakia opposed
delay.
Nationalist sources.on Formo-
sA said the tanker's crew sought
asylum in the island strongholds
The Rissian 4laim the vessel
was seized illegally.


I


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J. M. Rhoddes Co.
347 So. Pineapple Ave.


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You'll change leftovers into treats,
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the powerful portable that beats
everything. Youll beat, mix, mash or
whip, in any bowl or pan. Full power,
all 3 speeds. Stands on end for
draining, hangs on wall for *toraae.
19.50
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PHONE 2-1231


Hardware Housewares Gifs
WE DELIVER


I


TUONiWS Welnesdiy, Qct., 1d54


Each of the columns will
cover a different subject and
will be written by persons fa-
miliar with their subjects.
GARDEN COMMENT
Of special interest to those in-
terested in gardening and floral
arrangements will be "Along
The Garden Path" which will
appear each Saturday in THE
NEWS.
The garden and flower col-
umn will be written by Mrs.
L. Roy Brace, -past president
of the Sarasota Garden Club
and of the Indian Beach Garden
Circle.
In writing her column Mrs.
Brace will call on the knowl-
edge she has gained in more
than 20 years' association with
garden and flower clubs and as
a judge, exhibitor, and teacher
in gardening and floral arrang-
ing.
A resident of Sarasota for the
past 24 years, Mrs. Brace has
frequently been called on to
submit special articles on horti-
culture and flower arrange-
ments for magazines and news-
papers. She recently wrote a
History of the Sarasota Garden
Club.
BETTY'S BACK'
Mrs. Betty Burket, a leader in
the social and cultural circles
of Sarasota since her arrival
here more than 25 years ago,
will write a twice weekly col-
umn on social and cultural
activities in the area.
Old-time Sarasota will blend
with the city of today in offer-
ing a contrast in the mores of
the two periods and the popular'
Mrs. Burket will revive the
past for long-time residents of
the city and county.
Book reviews, travel notes;
and comments on the theatre
and music will spice the col-
umns.
ANYBODY B6MEI
Something: different in col-
umns will be "A nyb ody
Home?" a eekly- feature to be
submitted 'by Rome T i n c h,
former Cincinnati and Ft.
Worth, TeAx.; newspaperwdnan
who has been living in Sarasota
the past four years with her
husband.and four daughters*
FIVE POINTS
' Five Points will be a general
comment on the passing parade
in Sarasota authored by Mrs.
Cleo Groven on a tri-weekly
basis.
A former columnist for the
Knox papers in Canton, Dayton,
and Springfield, Ohio, 'Mrs.
Groven for the past two years
has edited the Sarasota Visi-
tor's Guide.


at prices everyone can.

- Livingroom
- Bedroom
-- Dens and Breezeways
R- gs
S. Cut any size
l- eCarpets
Wall o Wall Installed
S.Lamps....
.A choice selection
Baby Furniture and.
Outside Gym Sets
Just recently added:
- Giff Department
All that's New
- Wall Decorations
A grand selection


afford


Take a ride over to' the South Osprey Avenue
Shopping Center Stop in and browse around


1824-32k OSPREY AVE. PHONE 4-0471


I


Four Local

Co1urms

In, NE WFS
In keeping with th plans of
THE NEWS to stress local
news, regular columns will ap-
pear daily written by Sarasota
residents, about Sarasota activ-
ities, for Sarasota readers.


*
BEE TEE RESTAURANT

1889 SOUTH TRAIL
Opposite the-water tower Sarasota, Florida
SERVICE DINNERS
(Year around prices)
STEAKS CHOPS ROAST B EE
AND CHICKEN $1.10 up
All dinners served with salad two fresh vegetables -
Bread Butter Coffee
WE SELL NO ATMOSPHERE
"JUST GOOD FOOD"
UWMrv .-9 .-. 7 Aw. a mil


1


IN THE BEGINNING
By Cleo Groven
What an assignment! Write
an 'interesting column about
Sarasota and its people. .This
is wonderful. If this column
has a hobby, it is Sarasota, so
what could be a more satis-
fying experience?
Then comes the light of cold
logic. We have just mate a
commitment to write with the
power of a Voltaire, the' hu-
manity of O.O.McIntyre, the
pathos of Ernie Pyle. To. be as
honest as Abraham Lincoln, as
truthful as George Washington,
as modern as Mickey Spillane
and as charming as Marilyn
Monroe. That will take a bit
of doing. We seem to be under-
equipped.
Today, we are breaking
ground for a split personality
as ,sure as you're born. Please,
Mr. Laurent, speak to the men
who are selling the hospital
bonds. Tell them to make it
snappy; you, have a patient
coming up for the psychia-
trist's couch.
We took our trusty type-
writer in hand and what hap-
pened? Nothing. Hours later,
it dawned upon us-the big-
gest news that has hit this
town in many a day-a new
newspaper is being born.
The City Roomn resembles
the paternity lounge at a hos-
pital. Men are walking the
floor, smiling broadly, saying
"This is it," and secretly shak-
ing in their boots. Thoughts
race through the ir minds.
Questions like: Is i' good? Is it
worthy? Is everything going
all right? The press, like a
mighty symphony rumbles on


with its pounding rhythm. What
if it breaks down? What if the
.paper gets snarled up? Will it
be on time? What will it look
like?
At last it's over. It is accom-
plished. THE NEWS is born.
Now we know how a father
feels. Who has an aspirin? The
lusty infant with a:nose for
news and printers' ink in his
veins enters third vale of tears
and says "Greetings"'
TO THE RESIDENTS of
Sarasota County: Today you
are making a new acquaint-
ance. It is our hope that we
shall become good friends.
To the Chamber of Com-
merce: Please add to your
statistics another industry. An
industry that has great con-
fidence in this fast-growing
hometown of ours. A confidence
that is, backed up by a sizable
investment.
To the Editors and Owners:
Today you have faced up to the
challenge of progress.'It'is no
light responsibility. You have
proclaimed a policy of printing
THE NEWS, with clear, concise
reporting, always in good taste.
For the Staff, it would seem
hitting -and proper that some-
thing fine should be said. Like
pledging faithfulness and loy-
alty, high principles and sense
of responsibility. We're too ex-
cited today to make fancy
speeches. Couldn't we just sim-
mer down and go to work?
But someday, we shall lit
back, gather our grandchildren
about us and say with juiti-
fiable pride "I was there when
the first edition rolled off the
press." What an experience


I














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Dunlop Rubber Company, famous
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this sensational foam rubbeW bed&.
Kane's of Sarasota has been se-
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bring this Dunlop quality bed set to
this area.
The extra firm, high quality foam,
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at less than the -price of' a good
quality innerspring mattress.
Dunlop and Kane's promise this
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*


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-"-,- .<: .


And There


Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1954, THE NEWS Page 37

itRun Driver Sought
Police are searching for a vestigation is underway.
hit and run driver who fled Property damage totalling an
after crashing into the car of estimated $500 resulted from a
J,anita Jenkins, 553 N. Jeffer- collision involving cats driven
son Ave., in the parking lot by Albert Koestling. of 1141
of Smack's Drive-In, Main and, Osprey Ave., and Jerry Ma-
Osprey, shortly after 7 p.m. tausch, of Englewood, Cal., on
A witness to the accident Hawthorne Ave. between Os-
gave police the license number prey and Orange Aves., late
of the fleeing car and an in- yesterday.


821102 :. .:.: C
IldYIO)ICI~- ~l~r~l~


' I Y "- .





Used As 'Whipping Boy'


Stop Insulting SouthL

Shivers Tells Politicos


NEW ORLEANS-Texas Cv.
Allan Shivers wants both' de
Republicans and the Democrat
to stop using the South as a
"whipping boy" and to admit
her as a full partner in shaping
national policy.
In a speech delivered in New
Orleans last night, Shivers stat-
ed that believers in s t a t e's
rights must "renew and redou-


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2.3241 2-M41


ble our efforts to make our voic-
es heard and our beliefs re-
spected."
His address was construed as
a call to arms for a united
southern political front.
Shivers lashed out at both the
GOP and the Democratic lead-
ership at.a testimonial banquet
for Louisiana Gov. Robert Ken-
non, newly-elected chairman of
the National Governor's Co n-
ferenee and said:
"For too long we have been
-as a region-insulted and de-
graded by the national parties
and their leaders.
"For too long- and I say for
'the last time-the legally-chos-
en officials and representatives
of the southern states have been
forced to crawl in humiliating
submission before the national
conventions and justify their
right to sit as equals among
delegates from other states."


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MRS. DES JARDINS


Brooklynite

In Circulation
Mrs. Annabelle Desjardins,


Circulation. Petite, brunette


Mrs. Annabelle Desjardins
looks for all the word like a
model, which she isn't, and not
at all like a politician, which


she is.
Since her arrival in Florida
five years ago, this young
mother of three children has
been active in political circles
and now serves as a state com-
mitteewoman for the Republi-
can party.


BORN IN BROOKLYN
Mrs. Desjardins was born in
Brooklyn, N. Y., but claims to
be a native of Connecticut
since she lived in East Haven,
Conn., most of her life.
Married in 1941, Mrs. Desjar-
dins joined her husband on the
lonely island post of Ft. H. G.
Wright, located in Long Island
Sound, Romantical sounding,
perhaps, but she remembers
mostly how cold it was.
It was a-common desire on
the part of the Desjardins to
seek out a warm climate that
brought them to Florida.


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240 S. Pineapple Ave.
Phone 60511
Barasota, Fla.


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The only exclusions are preg-
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Fran Pollack,

Secretary
SECRETARY FRAN POL-
LOCK. Mrs. Fran Pollock, sec-
retary to Kent S. McKinley,
editor and publisher of THE
NEWS, has a wide variety of
duties in the front office," not
the least of which is keeping the.
"Chief" posted on his many
appointments.
A Hawkeye from Ames, Ia.,
she and her husband, Dr. H. J.
Pollock, cane to Sarasota about
two years ago to speed his con-
valescence from a wound suf-
fered during World War II in
which he served in the Army
Dental Corps.
Mrs. Pollack, an attractive,
blonde, graduated from Iowa
State College, Ames, where she
majored in Home Economics
and later worked in dietetics in
New York City.
During World War n she
worked as a secretary and de-
cided, "This is for me, because
I have a chance to meet so
many people."
Shorty after her arrival in


I


* .


















S --
r















Watch This Space
In THE NEWS For
Dixie's Adventures


"Stand aside, Dixie, we're building "Boondoggle Boulevard (a Super-Stupid highway

S.. and giving you a beautiful little lake right at your front door without extra chage.
a


Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1954 THE NEWS Page 3


t Bridge Bond Plea Rehearing Denied


SSale of bonds to finance two
new bridges and a bayfront
drive will meet further delay if
opposition forces appeal a Cir-
cuit Court decision to the State
Supreme Court.


daughter, Sally, a student at
Sarasota High School, and their
10 year old son, John, while an-
other daughter, Sally, is a stu-
dent at the University of Iowa
where she ia studying speech
pathology.


FRAN POLLACK
Sarasota she took over the op-
eration 'of the gift/ shop in the
Orange Blossom Hotel while
waiting for a chance to get
back to secretarial work:
She has managed to maintain
a youthful appearance and a
youthful -outlook through her
activities with the Pan-Hel-
lenic group here.
Dr. and Mrs. Pollack live at
2504 Davis Blvd. with their


ogy-


EVERYTHING
For The Child From
Infancy To Junior High
Specializing In
Chubbies e Pre-Teens
Boy's Wear To Size 16

Youthland Inc.
1505 MAIN 4-6171


A motion seeking a rehearing
on the suit to toss out the $7,-
000,000 Sarasota County special
bridge and road program was
turned down yesterday by Cir-
cuit Judge W. T. Harrison.
However, those opposed to
the new facilities have 60 days
in which to file an appeal to


the State Supreme Court.
The improvement program
calls for a four-lane Ringlifi
Causeway. a bridge between Si
esta and Lido Keys at Big Pass
and a bayfront drive.
Representing those oppose
to the improvements is Gleni
L. Berry, attorney.
.


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782 (at-Siesta Drive-In Thea-' ''/

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U -
e -rE jS/6NS~ ~ ..- *.~


The Adventures of Dixie (Beetle -Brain) Lee, Likker Dispenser:


1


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I


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s I I II


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Sulpur and iror -rova 1
p!us sediment idTat;on in
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rra(eg~- ~I

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4It:'




/


fU ]\N0W S

of Sarasota, Florida
KENT S. McKINLEY, Editor & Publisher


A Birth Of Ideals


WASHINGTON SCENE


M' Carthy Issue


Ducked In East
By FULTON LEWIS, JR.


PAGE 4


SARASOTA, FLORIDA


OCT. 6, 1954


P)abt six days each week by KENMAR, L td., at 1045 North Lime Avenue, Sarasota.
T l h f ll d rt e ts Rin lin 4-8511


we&epone 4 orAaS3Aau& a e mn.. ,.a g g bb
Subscription rate:.By Carrier, 30c Weekly. Yearly $15.00

"bo well unto thy friend .and according to thy ability stretch out thy-hand and
give to him. Defraud not thyself of a good day, and let hot the blessing of a good
desire pass thee by."
--ECC. XIV: 13, 14


, .5 .


iiintroductng Itself to its readers,
THE NEWS can think of no better-
words to use than those used years
ago by the respected Manchester'
Guardian, published in England.
'"Readers," wrote The Guardian,
"NWst take us as they find us. They are
;intelligent people. They will hardly ex-
Spect the Manchester Guardian to dance
td their tune, or to tremble, lest oc-,
casionally a point of view conflicts with
theirs. The Manchester Guardian is an
outspoken newspaper which takes its
mission seriously (although never
eleamly!).
"A newspaper is an important in-
fluence in the life of the regular reader.
SLet that newspaper, then, be the best
that, in this fallible world, fallible
Sren cap produce. The Manchester
Guardian can mkW.a o higher claim
than that it does its best to respect the
truth, the English language, and the
Seader. You may find that this is ex-
actly what you want."

We rather think that this sums up
- the attitude with which THE NEWS ap-
poaches' its task of presenting the
Mws, of this section of Florida's won-
' d u West Coast. We are going to try.
to present that news impartially and
honestly. In our news columns we will
be-aas a newspaper should be-as
puously fair as fallible htman ef-
can be.
his does n*-nmean that we will
sl pleaseour readers No, f" by
4Vcry factof beingtimpartial, will
lmktlrose who take sidew'oa 4ny -is .
sue, as indeed all of us must. And, this
Is 'as it should be, for any newspaper
which pleases all its readers must be a
Sdull newspaper indeed-and, must have
Sa great horde of most tremendously dull'
readers.
In our editorial columns, we are go-
Sing to discuss issues in a manner that
will enable our readers to reach their
own independent conclusions. We will
write on the premise that in its editorial

Thanks A Million
t e are deeply appreciative of
the goodwill expressed by the
merchants in this first edition.
We are grateful to these who
generously consented to await later
editions, to manifest their "good neigh-
bore attitude toward the birth of ycur
new family newspaper.
To our readers, we can only utter
the expression, "thanks a million."
Yat6t response to the solicitation of sub-
icriptions by our personnel has been an
inspiration to all of us. This faith in us
will be our incentive always in the
years to come! We will not let you
down-ever.
We are especially grateful to the
people of this area for their kindness
and their warm expressions of interest
and friendliness during the long weeks
of work preceding the publication of
THE NEWS. It was heartening to have
So many people applaud our decision to
publish a newspaper here, and encour-
age us in that decision.
THE NEWS salutes all of you.

4 MAst cemnliments are not ftre-but


"A, AW J. I -
that makes them even more enjoyablee.

It'S never too late, if you are still
alive, to be careful on the highway.

Homer Sunshine


S'them, tr
amething n
io get off yeu
a line about i


MEMO to Readers of
THE NEWS: I'm Homer
Sunshine, and I'm going to
make some observations
from this corner on what-
-ver I happen to observe
7rom day to day. I like
o pat people on the back,
it sometimes I'll frown
you see some one do
or have a pet peeve
I1. _est, why not drop me
It? HRomer Sv-nsbh.


.columns a newspaper must have the
freedom to say what it thinks. More, it
also has the duty cf thus stating its
cause, for the purpose qf a newspaper
today is twofold:. To present the facts
carefully and impartially in the news
columns and to' discuss thode facts in
the editorial columns in an effort to,
stimulate the thinking of the reader and
to stir the minds of those interested.
There will be, of course, frequent
conflicts of opinion, but this is a good,
sign. It is healthy. It is typically Amer-
ican. And it is the basic purpose of any.
newspaper.

Now, regarding news stories: Read-
ers should remember that we do not al-
ways agree with what is printed in our
news columns. A news story, a set of
facts, a development -of any sort, does
not have to coincide .with our views
in order to warrant space in the news
S..olumns.. After all, if we write that it
rained, it does not necessarily follow
that we approve of it' having rained,
just as it does not follow that the bus
driver approves of your destination just
because he happens to drive you there.
THE NEWS invites-nay, urges-its
readers to write letters on any and all
subjects, asking only that readers stay
Within the bounds of good taste and good
sense, keep their letters reasonable in
length, 'and show their sincerity and
sense cf responsibility by signing their
names. Names need not be printed, and
such requests will be honored.
In; conclusion---E NEWS is going
S.to 'str fr what'it sincerely and
ft hone y.beves Js .best for Sarasota,
Sbestfor area, est for tle people of
Sthii gi, ei:,ctioti. There is always room,
for honet difference of opinion, and
we will respect the right of others to
"so differ with us.
We will not act from rancor or mal-
ice. We will do our best to put out a-
good newspaper, day after day.
The best thing a newspaper can do
for its readers is just that-be a good
newspaper. THE NEWS swill strive
earnestly toward that single goal.

Delenda 'est Kremlin
he first two words are Latin. The
last is Mongolian.
Abcut 140 B.C., Marcus Pro-
cius Cato, the great Roman sen-
ator, uttered the historical phrase -
Delenda est Carthago-Carthage must
be destroyed. Today, we will use the
same expression; bringing it up to date,
the Kremlin must be destroyed!
Cato, known to all readers of an-
cient Roman history as a, statesman,
warrior and writer, was surnamed "The
Censor". In later years, fearing the rival-
ry of Carthage, he always concluded
his speeches in the Roman Senate with
this famous quotation. Eventually, the
Romans awoke to a realization of their
danger and destroyed the Carthaginians
and Carthage. The ruins are near Tunis,
N. Africa.
There is a lesson to be learned from
this-in a world of mad dogs, either the
dogs must be destroyed, or we Ameri-
cans must die from their political
rabies. The Kremlin must be destroyed
and with it must go Russian culture, if
barbaric custom and Oriental cruelty
can be thus classified.
There is not space on this world'
planet to house two ideologies so op-
posed to each other. The time must
come, and soon, when our leaders, if
they are leaders, take action to elim-
inate this threat to our freedom.
We must choose between slavery
and the individual rights and dignity
of Man. The hour glass is runningg out
for America. We have the power now.
Tomorrow, we will be that much softer,
and an easier prey for the destructive
weapons of our cruel enemies, whose
sole purpose is world conquest, spurred
by the teachings of Marx, and the mem-


ories of their Mongol 'ancestor, Genghis
Khan, whp overran Asia and most of
Europe in the 13th century.
Delenda est Kremlin! --


CAPITOL anFrus


The Appeal Of Communism


For World's Malcontents

By EDGAR ANSEL MOWREB


Why is communism so pop-
ular when it is transparently
a compound of fraud and hor-
or-fraud as to the promises
it' makes, horror in what it
actually is?
My answer is pimple. Com-
munism is popular because it
promises to ucounted mil-
lions the change thai each of
them dreams of.
Most individuals are in
s4e 'way unsatisfied. Some
want more tb eat; others
more power, sti others re-
venge for a real or fancied
injury. But nearly all agree
That "things should be differ-
ent." The late unlamented
Joe Goebbels hooked millions
of Germans ,by answering
questions about what the Na-
tional Socialists would do with
the simple remark:
"Everything will be differ-,
ent."
Communist propagandists
make the most of this popu-
lar desire for change. But
they go farther.
Building on the technical


revolution and the modern
scientific wonders, they con-
vince millions that every de-
sired change is possible. If it
i not already here, that is
because it is being held back
by exploiting capitalists cap-
tained by "reactonary Amer-
ica.' 'For who else could be
preventing the coming of the
millennium? Just accept com-
munism-and wait for the
new sun to rise!
This is incredibly primitive
and simple-but it works.
Why does it work? Well,
in my poor judgment, it
works becausein one, detail it
is true. That detail is this:
among the peoples of the
world, we Americans are al-
most unique in being satis-i
fled with existing conditions.
We think we have the best
political system aid a reason-
ably good economic system.
Right or wrong, this satisfac-
tion of ours clashes ferocious-
ly with the dissatisfaction of
almost all other peoples.
As champions of the


Dear Editor:

SWhere Redders

Tell Us About It


More Benches
Dear Editor: I have been
thinking for some time that
Sarasota needs more benches
or seats along the streets in
the business section for per-
sons who are waiting for
buses or for friends who are
to pick them up in automo-
biles.
Any number of times I
have seen elderly women,
arms full of packages, stand-
ing on street corners waiting
for buses. No seats were
available for them. What few
benches already provided on
the streets are usually oc-
cupied, many times, by loaf-
ers.
Some organization, such as
the Jaycees' or one of the
service clubs could earn
plenty of thanks from these
elderly persons, by putting in
more "waiting benches" for
people who are unable to
drive automobiles.-MASON
KEITH.

Road Repairs
Dear Editor: As a resident
of the South Trail vicinity,
now being widened to make
a four-lane highway, I am
wondering why the city and
county always wait until the
start of the tourist season
to begin major repairs.
Of course, the highway is
being kept open after a fash-
ion, but many rough spots
and the number of machines.
along the road slow traffic.
Three years ago the sewer


and water extension work
tied up most of the town
during the winter season,
when the vicinity was jam-
med with tourists. Now the
only through route to the
south is tied up, probably
for most of this season.
Cannot the planners see far
enough ahead to map these
projects for the off, or sum-
mer season, when traffic is
at its minimum? MRS.
HONORIA PARKS.
Orphan Annie
Dear Editor: Congratula-
tions to THE NEWS. We
folks here in Sarasota wel-
come your new newspaper;
and are looking forward to
seeing what type of news cov-
erage and feature "material
you will bring us. We'll be
interested in looking over
your comic page, too. We
hope that you'll have an old
favorite of ours, Orphan An-
nie.-JAMES TOWNE.
.(Ed. Note: We got 'erl).
Parking
Dear Editor: Many times I
have driven downtown to
shop for a few minutes and
have been unable to find a
parking space. It is true'
that the city has provided
12-minute parking meters,
but could the city put in a
few more? I am sure the
downtown merchants would
prefer such a move since it
would allow shoppers to
come downtown to shop in-
stead of going to the outly-
ing districts.-MAUDE D.


(American) status quo, we
are-as an intelligent Itaian,
Luigi Barmini, recently wrote
-"alone in the world."
To the vast human major-
ity who want change, the
Kremlin with its promises ap-
peals more than the White
House, with its prayers for
peace. And it will continue to
do so until. either (a). the
Kremlin opdns' their eyes of
these millions by enslaving
them (when it i,ll be too
late) or (b) the lifted States
offers a rival and better plan
for transformingg the world."
YOUR HEALTH

Young People

Need Help In

Facing Future
By W. W. BAUER, M.D.
Too many adults have for-
gotten when they were
young, aid how they felt
about a number of matters
to which, now, they give little
thought. At the threshold of
maturity, many problems
and fears enter the mind.
Most young people meet and
solve these problems, but the
process is not always easy,
The problem of choosing'a
life work is a serious one. To
become a successful worker
at some respectable job,
-whether the work is "clean"
or "dirty," is a necessity. But
there is more to it-the choice
of life's work should be such
that there will be joy in work
itself. No job is worth holding
if it is nothing but an onerous
chore to be done ,as quickly
as possible and escaped from
to more congenial climes.

AMONG youth's most severe
indictments of the older gen-
eration is "they won't let us
grow up, and at the same
time they expect us to act
like adults." There are many
facets to this problem, in-
volving such' things as pos-
session of a key to the house,
use of the family car, an
allowance on which they can
depend, division of youth's
earnings with the rest of the
family, dating, how their
friends are treated in the
home, a courteous hearing
for their opinions a voice in
the family councils, and
many other ways in which
their status as "people" can
be recognized-or denied.

Golden Gleams
'Tis education forms the
common mind; Just as a twig
is bent, the tree's inclined.
Pope.
'Tis the taught already that
profits by teaching.'
S R. Browning.

A little learning is a danger-
ous thing. Pope.


Dewey's Future

-What Is It?
By JOHN O'DONNELL


THE POLITICAL future of
New York's Gov. Dewey,
twice the party's nominee for
the White House, is always
an absorbing topic of specu-
lation in Washington.
A few weeks back there
were reports that if Senator
Ives is elected governor,
Dewey would accept appoint-
ment to Ives' Senate seat-a
.post which would give him a
national sounding board with
an eye to '56 and also permit
him to engage in private,law
practice.
Now comes the report that
the Ives Senate seat-in the
event of his victory in No-
vember-will go to Dewey's
good friend and one time
campaign manager, At-
torney General Herbert
Brownell Jr.


DEWEY owes a lot to
Brownell.-So does Ike. It Was
Biownell who masterminded
the "stop thief" attack upon
the Taft forces in the '52 con-
vention over the southern
delegates (particularly those
from Texas) which gave Ike
the edge to win the nomina-
tion.
Leftwing, New Deal Repub-


licans have been gunning for
Brownell's post' since his
dramatic disclosure of Harry
Dexter White's treason in'the .,
New Deal Treasury under :
Henry Morgenthau and later
when he was promoted by
Truman to the International
Monetary Fund despite FBI
reports that White was a
Moscow agent.

ON THE OTHER extreme,
some of the big business
group who backed Eien-
hower enthusiastically two
years.ago (and are now acting
very coy when it comes to
helping out with campaign
contributions) 'have soured on
Brownell because of his an- ;
ti-trust, anti-monopoly Views.
On top of this is the argu-
ment by Brownell's personal
Following. This goes: -"Herb
duiing all his political career
has been working to put
across some candidate ef the
party. He was Dewey's cam-
paign mana ger, national
chairman of the GOP mas-
termind for Ike in the pre-'
convention deals. Now he do-
serves a chance to show what
he can do on his own."


maW mml--- --IvSi
CAL


TODAY'S I

Giving

Brings

By GEOI


It should thrill and
give spiritual comfort to each
one of us whenever' we are
given the opportunity, or
when we Create the opportun-
ity, whereby we please and
give joy to someone else. We
even should delight in pleear
ing ourselves, for theft we c
could not help but pass the
surplus around.
It is impossible to please
someone else without enrich-
ing one's own life. It often
takes Ipany years for some
people to realize this fact.,It,
won't matter if you don't get:
-paid for pleasing someone
else. The dividend is in your
heart the moment you ren-
der such a service.

IT'S A common expression.
that you can't please every-
body, which is quite true. All
the more reason why we
should make the effort, hap-
pily, to please as many peo-
ple as we can. An employee
earns pleasure for himself, or
herself, when-performing to
please the one paying him or
her for his or her services. In
,the large sense, however, we
should always work to please
ourselves. Thereby we gain
pride and self-respect.

M ARCUS Aurelius wrote an
inspiring little book that has
blessed millions of people. I
love to read his "Reflections."
Here is one: "Nothing is more
cheering than exemplificati-


ALEL

g Pleasure

SIt To Us

EGE MATTHEW ADAMg

6ns of virtue in the eharact-
ers of those about us, suggest-
ing themselves as copiously
as possible. We should keep
them always ready at hand.
Just to try and please people,
what a useful and worthwhile
occupation! '
People who are kindly, tol-
erant, and always anxious to
please others are people who
are always welcome by us.


Portraits
by James J. Metcalfe
To Miss My Promise

I hate to miss connections
on The train or but or,
plane But even more
those dates at home In
sunshine or in rain The
business obligation or. ,. A
social promise made .
When something happens and
I find... I cannot make the
grade It is that fateful
moment when ... Misfortune
interferes ... And explana-
tions cannot save Em-
barrassment or tear I
try so hard to be on time ..
But sometimes I am late ...
Not just a little but too,long
To keep a certain date .
Because when that occurs I
have ... To drink the bitter
cup... Of knowing that there
is no way. .To ever make
it up.
'A *


A New Voice Is Heard


Any so-called "liberals" la-
boring under the smug de-
SILision that they have licked
Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy
might take a look at the way
the Republican and Demo-
cratic senatorial nominees in
Massachusetts gingerly avoid
any anti-McCarthy pronounce-
ments.
Both knew that the feeling
in support of McCarthy and
his efforts to root out subver-
sion and corruption in gov-
ernment, is so strong that an
anti-McCarthy stand by either
candidate virtually would as-
sure election of the other.
The senatorial opponents
there are GOP Sen. Leverett
Saltonstall, seeking his third
term, and former Rep. Foster
Furcolo, long known as an
ADA left-wing Democrat.
ST I ON GEST state-
ment from Saltonstall on Mc-
Carthy has been that he will
not be able to say how he
will vote on the proposed cen-
sure resolution until he has
had an opportunity to study
documents and hear the Sen-
ate debate.


Furcolo. who seems to have
backed away from his former
ADA associations in many
respects, has been just as
cagey. Bay State correspon-
dents report that he has
shied away from the McCar-
thy question throughout the
campaign, to the surprise of
many who originally had no
doubt that he would climb on
the ADA platform of assail-
ing McCarthy from every
possible angle. If he has any
. intention of doing so, he most
assuredly is saving it for the
last minute.
Thus the Massachusetts
Senatorial campaign is being
waged entirely on such ques-
tiops as unemployment, eco-
nomic conditions and other
issues relatively local ta the
state.
And on that basis, the con-
sensus is that barring some
unforeseen unfavorable de-
velopments in the next month ,
Saltonstall should be re-
elected. So, too, should Gov.
Christian Herter, who also
shuns any statements anent
McCarthy and sticks to his
home state knitting.




edesday, Oct. 6, 199 TIrE NWS Pape


For Your Comfort...


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.. .^V enitce, Florida: -
Directly On The GuHl


Now Fully Eqped With..


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Crane Radiant Baseboard Panels introduce an even distribu-
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with heat.output. Crane Radiant Baseboard Panels are mod-
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eliminate the streaking of walls caused by concentrated heat
sources.
Crane Radiant Baseboard Panels may be used on either hot
water or steam systems. Because when installed, they are


pan els


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distributed over a great area 1, 2,3 or 4 walls they pro- -
vide an even distribution of heat and eliminate "hot spots"
in the room. i
With Crane Radiant Baseboard Panels installed, the dif-
ference in air temperature from floor to ceiling Is often no
more than two or three degrees even in zero weather, and.
they show excellent reaction to. rapid changes in outside
temperatures.
The flexibility in design of Crane. Radiant Baseboard Panels ':
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?age 6 T~1 NEWS Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1954


Bee Ridge


Frulavuls


U1 V TCI


Church Holds
Annual Meeting
The Rev. Joe Hinton, pastor
if the Bee, Ridge Baptist
S burch, presided over the an-
iual business meeting of the
S:hurch at which officers for
: he church year of 1954-55 were
Selected.
Mrs. Mildred Taylor was
elected church clerk and other
officers named were' Hampton
Moore, treasurer; Eldon Mes-
ser, Ezra Taylor and Dozier,
Corbett, song leaders; Harry
Robbins, music director; Mrs.
Ola Messer, Miss Morena Sal-
ter and Mrs. Bonnie Phillips,
pianists,
Officers were also elected for.
Uiion, Wo me n's Missionary
Union and Brotherhood.
LaCount Lowe was named
iSunday School superintendent
'and other officers elected were
Mrs. Alma Taylor,. general
secretary for Sunday School;
'Quentin Loor, Training Unipn
rector; Mrs. Newton Cain,
general secretary for Training
Union; Mrs. Gladys Taylor,
Women's Missionary Union su-
perintendent; Eu g e ne Sim-
Smons, Brotherhood superinten-
dent, and Phillip Allard, chief
Susher.


PAINTING
- walls in every room


IS EASIER
and more economical

.THAN EVER
'4bfore'n possible

wrrH DUPONT


new, washable

FLOW KOTE
*I. LI. IW. os.
: ie rubber-base WALL PAINT
Downs Paint & Glass
SA 1529 STATE ST.
PH. 2-2311-3-7311
7 r 6"DEAL WITH DOWNS"


Mrs. Poteet Bee Ridge
News Notes
S O Ored gus Harris, Jr., is recuperat-
ing at his home after spending
Miss Marena Salter, Miss two weeks in St. Joseph's Hos-
Jean Logston ndMrs. Lucy pital, Tampa, where he under-
Jean Logston and Mrs. LucyP ta, atin un
Williams were hostesses at a went an operation for cataracts
stork shower given in honor of on both eyes. He is reported
Mrs. Pete Poteet at the home recovering satisfactorily.
of Mr. and Mrs. Hulon Taylor.
Mrs. Poteet was tie recipi- Mrs. Frank Armstrong, Or-
ent of many gifts. Games ap- lando, visited here with her
propriate for the occasion were daughter, Mrs. Lita Pearce and
played, with Mrs. Annie Laurie her granddaughter, Miss Mar-
Taylor wining the prize. lene Pearce.
Refreshments were served to M. ad M T
the followi:. Mr. and Mrs. Ted Gancia
the following: Mrs. Poteet, havemoved into their new
Mrs. Lucy Williams, Mrs. home on Clark Road in the
Marie Sheppard, Mrs. Sam Clark Lake subdivision. Mr.
Sheppard, Mrs. Roland Taylor, and Mrs. Herbert Brown have
Mrs. Laura Mae Winters, Mrs. moved into the former Garcia
Ena Salter, Mrs. Leafy Benton, home, where they now operate
Mrs. Ivey Taylor, Mrs. Annie the Brown Grocery.
Laurie Taylor, Miss Clarice
Taylor, Mrs. na Peters, Mrs. Log-Time ROident
Janice Martin, Mrs, Clara Tay- Long-Time Resident
lor, Mrs. Peggy Winters, Miss Honored On Birthday
Jean Logston, Mrs. Newton
Lane, Mrs. Irene Hawkins, Mrs. Ross Drigger, one of Bee
Mildred Taylor, Mrs. Gladys Ridge's oldest settlers, was the
Taylor, Miss Marena Salter and guest of honor Sunday at a
Mrs. Hulon Taylor. birthday party given at the
Mrs. Poteet, who has been .Tatum Place by his daughter
visiting with her parents, Mr. and husband, Mr. and Mrs.
and Mrs. Hulon Taylor, left Herbert Brown.
with husband for Charleston, The 50 guests attending en-
S. C., where they will make joyed a barbecue diner.
their home. Mr. Pdteet is serv-
ing in the armed forces and is Mrs. Lesley Hugo has opened
stationed in Charleston. the first business of its kind
in Port Elizabeth, South Africa.
Lima, Peru, plans to buy 40 She will translate anything in
diesel buses, probably in the three languages, English, Afri-
United States. kaans. nd Nederlands.


ONE HOUR DRY CLEANING
AT NO EXTRA CHARGE

GULF COAST CLEANERS
FEATURING
ONE HOUR MARTINIZING
"THE MOST IN DRY CLEANING"


539 S. PINEAPPLE


Cash & Carry


6-9291


Fruitville Civil Defense

Chapter Fully Stafed


FRUITVILLF-"We hope we
are never needed but if we are,
we want to, be ready", is the
motto of the Fruitville Civil
Defense chapter which goes un-
der the code name of Hotel
Nectar 31 Red.
Russell Avey is post super-
visor of this group which meets
on Thursday at the Friendship
Church. Lester Price is chief
observer and Mrs Clyde Sim-
mons is assistant chief obser-
ver.
This group is now participat-
ing in two very important
phases of civil defense. One of
these is the Ground Observer
Corps. This group is the civil-
ian auxiliary of the Air De-
fense Command and its duty is
to supplement the radar screen
of the Air Defense Command
by using civilian airplane spot-
ters located at strategic points
throughout the nation.
These spotters, or observers
as they are called, work in
teams of two. They serve two
hour watches each day or if
the group is large enough the
watches are shorter. When
they spot a plane, large or
small, the information they
gather is relayed to the nearest
Air Defense Filte'r Center.
The information is then fed
jnto the huge Air Defense or-
ganization. If the plane cannot
be identified the Air Defense
Command orders out the jet
interceptor squadrons which
are ready 24 hours a day for
just this purpose and they in-
tercept the plane and either
identify it or eliminate it.
This sound .like a very
simple procedure but it actu-
ally involves hundreds of rpeo-
ple. Many of these are civilian
volunteers who are giving their
time without cost to the gov-
ernment.


Many ask why it wouldn't
be.simpler to have more radar
unis around the country' and
eliminate the need for all the
civilian workers. Jn the first
place the cost of the necessary


equipment would be prbhibi-
tive. In the second place even
with more of such equipment
the civilian volunteer would be
necessary. Radar is ineffective
at certain altitudes and this is
where the ground observer
steps in.


NAOMI CLARK

Cold Wave
Special-
Regular
$10 Wave for


Assistant Agent
Moves This Week
Frank Polhill, assistant coun-
ty agent, with his wife and two
children, Libby and Smitty, of
Richardson Road will move this
week to Bunnell where Polhill
will be county agent of Flag-
ler County.
Polhill came to Sarasota two
years ago. on graduating from
the University of Florida.


h... I


MARION DAVIS
end-of-summer

BARGAIN

$7.50


CLARK'S BEAUTY CLINIC
24 King's Court-Phone 4-9111


"Glenn Miller
Limited Edition
Vol. 2"
60 fabulous performances never
before heard on records.
Cppltely different from
Vol. 1 Editiop No duplication of records
,-avKL:ble in 33 1-3 and 45 r. p. m.


1New P-vailkble
I-N


MUSIC Co. INC.


134 S. Pineapple Ave.,
Phone 4-6161


~'~~~s~----------!I 4-


/


7 i'cti front
4!


&NOW/
Each account is in-
sured up to $10,000 by
an agency of the
Federal Gov-
ernment. A husband,
wife and two children
may 'have i4 ac-
counts, insured to
$140.000.00!
Dividends are paid
and compounded
twice a year at
the end of June and
December
Its' our policy to hon-
or payment requests
immediately!.....
Directed by qual-
ified, intelligent
S a r a s o t a County
businessmen wit h
your interests at
heart!


Your money invested
in sound first mort-
gage loans on im-
proved property
helps Sarasota grow!'
Folk seem to like the
warm friendly feel-
ing at Sarasota Fed-
eral. Everyone is so
courteous and eager
to serve you:
Listen to" "Showcase
of Melody" e a c h
Tues., Thurs., Sat.,
8 p. m.,t WSPB.
Broadcast with o ur
best wishes.


Money in Tomorrow


EARNS BI


(current rate
per annum)

FOR ALL

OCTOBER


g *


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S' -A R

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Heavier coils across vital em
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Double cover. Taped seams
add long life.


(UIITOMWDISNID TICKING
Dilstinctive colotinX. High
quality fabric assure lons


- 10 YUR WRITTE CUmUfm
iUfetone Finorite is guuamns
teed against defctive saterd
wne workmanship.


MINER'S FURNITURE
for the best values


1534 Third St.


Phone 6-2301


ROUGE


IN THI AREA ELL PACKAGE
IN THIS AREA-A SELLS PACKP.GE


LIQUORS


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WE MEET ALL LOCALLY
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FREE PARKING

IN'SHORTY'S PARKING~ LOT
DIRECTLY BEHIND OUR STORE
BETWEEN LEMON & PINEAPPLE

"Compare Prices Before' You Buy'

VISIT OUR


BARGAIN CORNER


FOR BIG SAVINGS


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LARGEST TELEVISION SCREEN


In Town Featuring Netion!il


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LOANS

MONDAY SERVICE

S25.00 To $300.00

EE

Ji McFADYEN, MGR.
AT


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s S. PINEAPPLE AVE.

"Locally Owned & Managed"


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FEATURING MICHELOB
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THE ST. AUGCSTINE


UINDAT, JULY 4, 1937


RECORD 14
.. .v


Davis Fans 11 Islets As Saints Score Fourth Win In Row


rancismen Take On


Orlando In Holiday


A Start to the Major .Lagur


Tilt Here Tomorrow


Play at Daytona Today; Home Club Sweeps Sanford:
Series; Starr Turns in Twelfth Win, 3-2; Early,
Attack Gives Home Club 4 to 2 Win Yesterday
Byi Harey Lr*
Almost overnight, ince Frd Frannu got b ck oo Uw fir be
to b *xaet. the St. Aauutine Saints have become th most fed club
in tke Florida State Laaaue.
Ytelrday the Francimen hbnl
S their fourth straight win behi nd : c Rdmgem. Dou
W national strnkeout hurltng C*ry to Rggerio to P d.
of White Davis. who whif~ld I Let on bhas" S Auguntwe 10;
ma in tunrgag back the Daytona Sanford 6. Base on balls: l
Crisafild 3. Starr 1. LBaimrd 0.
_! Poah .t I n Slr-.< out: by CrudadM Brat-*
T" Fourth. of July wil be rd 3, Sutrr b. HCias o C. Brai
elrated at Lwori PNt tomor- Lanut aitd 3 re',; ao
row aflteraon wlth a lorida Brainr-n to 2 Pnn9a n 3ad 0 ruso;

OrlSdo Gulls. i by potherll: hy Sar. ttug Pr I )
TI holiday contest is eated f hall: Had. Winning pit-
to begin at a o'clok.r ae Stil. ApaS pulr ad crts.
TIw oamagmneat of the local h. Lumpn rf: Pr read Mc.
club pointed out that tomorrow .5 qIla
wil not be ALatdW DDy.- Be. 8.4On'y & A W A
ag Monday b celebrated as ihe Dayto"a ANB N fB POI A X
onklth. Idw wlU bave o py Grant. rf ...... & I I 0 o
to #e# the contest. AU other Walk. ..... 4 0 0 0 0
Monday' during the y w) rU w artwn. ,c ... 4 1 1 S a
be d.krwo as-Ladi*' Nt7." anbdrv. ef *.... a 3 t 0
Wb thr Saitnt rtdintg toP h ,lb....... 3 0 1 a
of asmatoatnl winunaw break. Hold fckI ... 4 0 a I 0
a btitmcrd 4 s0*iA lo t W # U4 2b 4 0 0 3 3 0
thre, ,t a. Put, 3.b.. b.......2 0 0 0 1 I
toaIrrow Jacka*. .... 2 0 0 I
Chart, P 4 .... 2 0


Bscr landmers, 5 to I T *** TaI Total* uA i : d It S'
club wdU cwikbrate th Ye othb ot, t Auguual w ASl R fl P0U A I
July y trav Ieltago Daytonaeach St k. .. 4 I 1 1 1 0
tod11 fora Waturna ma e t t Emt rmtagrIal f .. 4 1 t1 1 0 0
Ute at 3 o'lock. (;Gofrtk, f ... 40 I 1 *
Gair Starr t arud in h Sw dell.t r .... I 1 I *I r
twel-h wi ofr the rts -r Cat... ..... 3 0 t aV It e H
at afolr Frday ta ha .t" ffOnh.e ...... 0 IM l r 0 ei<
tals staged a thwe-run rally to Zepa-tI. It ... 3 *- 1 4o1
... *r...... ........... ............a : : .. P avfg k

a es of the rsM s with theIy p ......... 0 a P aytd -or w
Saw. d seu pl .......or. 8t .aAuV... *a s r p
b to Ceowr cy woo bter. ii 4 for X nh MIer 10 1
d by the blo od Sain Hta .Uh sd y Iit:o* --
D^r "",T4ra" '.".Os ..::... S.T**- Gam Stalued for Lwljt
d ..dM I ..wiq... rtwt air M ottied .a4s... .eww-. Park; G e City Ha
&a tie aftsemam. He aimedug ib CA Cates. Phaek traded T.
the o. "t-ui"al wnwcd byt Io.,f b*u CG -.nir... (ss, unL. Str O Club,
hkIa i~m..: o.mth-a. ..ft. OL""
aml Cbwkla mUMlmd'.w" 't A. u t** ,.. *W *a*
do .asps a bad ho lr ai Wre ehks *FO ** h won
1*1fi. 6at e ea .1 t t r5.1 At1 Awtnwa e 23.. t aft Ms h.
wma 'a his, o o. ctie aa 60h 1.n- 09. 's t
ue I a ow n. three ri. OW- I. "- L t
m I lhM e I brn-Iam. I, a tdwhI V p. u ,i,, d.Cows TWe




.... ,. .... . s t 0. c .,iA
ate in Cthe pec4eW a s a"", ab "4111 a oln 01 is".
dan l "" SNWp.al sa CI e. e. IL e' n oimis .
sLt a p. a l t o 4 Fy rt S Nhehe a M as baes's e. .6i
a mIssr d rase wl '* Of IMa Atre OteOrd I F.rna of loy t "e4.a
Jrogy oe 'l a l U sI mW Bu I- get, S irnit
a o this to 'a Mhend bosthd hBly ipwh.ockbth P ty a "- S o OK ma 'a SttUert ow*
-s ..ru hea IdAndl tGs -.. O.t... a'the. ie W al al
*he a but wt the fw 1weSwr.o tneP* am*
IeBl. 80 I ada a ls a ra Ie ft A s ie, As ar* d ob a M

Ir Sthend"..'. eer 9w Ce ,Ud i saaa hMe T. hs rwo r






,l" J"..I". ,, COVl- 12"O10"wwto as.






_- o. M an C y.. c.. r *,** ***r M,.n.l u.* *
-ea G mif J* I I I S aSvo o tU con+s 1a.y.ft Cas U bse* b" a"-ft
IM 811 0a0 to mar. Jcrk Ow baeS IM nba *#* eMae 1a0 am fso for h gow o's*yt wa
" t rL a rafty by pr tt0 a tb a *ow toh fr" t ao ee* Iw W


bit a
es 1,00 as a" M w I ay* sm be shwr d Of wby"a toMain mo t hs
ft.W'"" Aeeds Mccii r to T itn Orhr Totw pli Itins he o *N
OJw loftgw he*, Ot op-trin y whe, he u tso0 A 'a t a saw* 4 a0t ~i
.. a-11 x de. h.. Fac t ate .. Ba -g S
M sIn hirn n Uthemo w. t A Mr be vow it MA | 1 v
Zrl ese at e pimlr. *tti rs a s thasa0 fa.f Ah t.ow Stt so- r04 is f.
(r M bit th pe dunr sa d oumwamteat be vosd reed no e Mu* *e0"O t -4 Is4

wlt B- n 4 bow* -b am so i s ---o v "M

A mr 1040&1r s todesell Uin or the
w laneb" md4e e, wiso a lab "a1hed W" o e5 yL 3t
=or l th lrr w Ut*tw. bo aA o hegsoe o atmi. I* a toe: -: o-
Daob"l S Mu Ur I S Joe. to fo r *r a im eao o"sa *
Vow a d bi guumde, 'a eber t far

Wad1 am sO111 *6 GO WO th w r eyej w to as I* D -< '
mrrt k.d ^p J J..re I ab A bJeaga s the -* tur


San te it d r desal. d 'a t hud Plush owe t
=7y Nsw M f19 bo am



&larr 0 r ep rtb biew 11wrl-tan H uni
fMM UAW irn w Uw ito.


No sr saomas IoorI 0* w
rr -- thei .7ml, r iij a j



dL 6 0teg fr & a psef*u Oo.& tHo plowl iM bboo' w"

sk i se 'a a ou a tt
ears l tl a adt okr. + so ttlh b theo 4.... wlu

urn sh"rktwoh ta&M a eat e fw n
_a_ ___ tel ed* It T* th; fntuo 4 hw e

hYI < rbw L b lr ctl owft" at bwofa
Pu st llste _P___ hun bi u hue.%

A" 0 "ItpMt AK anom threI.. % tm
'g i ~ y fc r t j "Y %my b j Mo ck
90*au' ff..... t I t I it 'athe J r*AW I a BJ (

me 4 M t I0 0lb 1,0 4 I U A HOTIt ABrDT 04
Stanlte ..I 2 I 5 5 t5 MI t4-
-4 saw sW d4 w Mt Nrog__AM
bamy4 .45504** Taa lined tohe o al sh
-O i i 2 he 't -, -i
Q*i- 2Bk-tfcAt....( *tif 16L-&o..- ,... B


WA rO $& % s 1 4u w 6v6 W4
AlS IR P AP O Ae9 atm twie
,Cla T .. 4 I MI Ie O Of w6m T& 4WI
.rgi. .. 40... j at th e tao" s a

i tk ....4 t1 Il m f J .

e.......e ::t O: : I U wl. nl
TN .o. ..M.. N t r t I 1 1 A ee- Mw rl .
-d .. .- a* W '
.30 t ty itn I OTWNe* --o &M mom )VIA wM
OMnI al. The
Stl A usaisebme oe a ..5 f|40wopeow' aees M Reqtta *
SfO t6 ta ft-t aMI slthew AP I t Il the 4 of C
sl.g.m*'( r tWe'm ".t-* l>, nd the J*i.e tI*sl be he o a.,
fate. aff.iI Two%- %fhah. Pw*bwa# u t I42 's 004 fK.
Plarl, T. *a. hi% Ma0 *earn i**m*y tmhe*, l*at Iof 0J Iba.,
ad"*sf laCtoet. Ci e-. 1da. 1 4v uame.oe t


IU ine Skeet Shoot




to* V r
'Champ Bu e ""wT mt *w
C % oIr t A. JBio" .a *b.i
Cla* A Budo' *M t ** a 0 n
Gains Added b e.. .hw. s.t ,

STenni is i r v i w a


wfu ame een sra, July 1
Ar) -I tbi* t a mt*r4hte tho



*'e A* Mab IIu- he le>< t



a semi **b*,4 lastesa yResDet
3I *t*i<" o* **tk p NaUm..#
ftlMPi v i off P WM*A. A*
4,S. a wiS V&!. tie nos
aw Iit**e* taiuw Iu*. L'au i

v*i ** ta. te *1*. VW*4'*



lhe *n-tw a u f". Mswr at,
4 Iata.. wi's* a A i '*r.*p 'ram
.e!p t44, 4 rtiM 1(m4M takMw
fNu ee.4 *e. 1 *Ilat Mlan. t I-
*... *v the eC-.tam* 4WMF The
>** -Ma ^ 3Qa Is~I~l


roe s*M rW* *I"A I l *Nu'
*'Ap a of oitw""twasa tu

at tond to i n #*i* inr*
aqmuW.u. 4'a tsore ni*t* a tev


0*ut* -I.- lb -
FTld Hsam I..


if 0t*1 ad istois -uft,4 POS
GAS '!|A aes if ae'twinp-
Tonaee.. teas I.t.a., few ifm e
S'twe'l. uaMO. *%eOft I e MW-%
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Pep 8: THE NEWS Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1954


New Newspaper Greets Sarasota Today


(Continued From Page 1)
perienced jAwspapermen and
women in, the editorial, adver-
tising, classified, circulation,
#utnneps and mechanical de-
.. prft~ients.
It a brief and informal cere-
Smony,, Ma. McKinley pushed
b button- which started the
ess rur~tr the first edition.
the firibcopy came off the
sn, Mn-* McKinley turned
presented it to his charm-
wife, Mrs. Marjorie Mc-
.1. ill be sent to the
Mbid Stata. Library of Con-
ess whqw America's out-
ding .papers are kept

irfc will be flown
shis evening
aboard Natinal Airlines Flight
Number 2 leaving the Sarasota-
Bradenton Airport at 8:34 P.M.
Presentatlea of the copy to
Library of Congress officials
,will be made Thursday morn-
ing on b6alf of THE NEWS
Sby Alexander G. Hardy, vice-
prebident of National Airlines.
LAUDS EXECUTIVES
Mr. McKinley voiced tribute
to General Manager C. R.
Duke Richrdson for the ex-
pert manaL* in which he had
organized -IlE. NEWS, and to
the staff4,.or ifs efforts in
putting t9other the first edi-
tion of the newspaper..
He also singled out for spe-


cial credit the key executives senting the ideals and policies
of THE NEWS who are: Man- of the paper. Foremost, THE
aging Editor Arnold Burnett; NEWS will not compromise it-
Advertising Director E. L. self in any manner or for any
Cartlldge; Circulation Direc- person, group or political. org-
tor Robert C. Burns and Me- anization.
chanical Superintendent Har- Mr. McKinley announced
old Shorman. that THE NEWS would report
"THE NEWS will grow to all the news and never devi-
be the best newspaper on the ate from the cardinal prin-
West Coast of Florida," pre- ciple of a good newspaper-
dicted Mrr McKinley. that of printing the facts.
In a page one editorial, the Expressing a belief that the
publisher made a pledge to growth of Sarasota will be
the readers, subscribers and greater than anticipated, Mr.
friends of THE NEWS that the McKinley said THE NEWS
paper would be "your family will be a dignified guardian of
newspaper, and yours alone." the people's interests during
MONTHS OF PLANNING the coming days of economic
Actual publication of the growing pains in this area.
first issue culminated 10 PA TO EMP
months of planning, hiring of SPEAKS TO EMPLOYES
personnel, purchase and in- After the first edition of
stallation of equipment. The THE NEWS had been "put to
first decision to publish a bed," Mr. McKinley spoke
paper in Sarasota had been briefly to the employes gath-
reached by Mr. McKinley in ered in the city rooom.
1952. "We are proud to be a new
Early in 1954, when Mr. Me- public servant in Sarasota,"
Kinley activated THE NEWS he said, "and we shall carry
as an operating concern, the out our duties by offering first
property at 1045 N. Lime Ave. of all complete cooperation to
(the old Dude Ranch) was the public and city, county
purchased and became the and state public officials. We
home of THE NEWS. A mod- are a newspaper, not a weap-
ern newspaper office, includ- on. But we will bring to the
ing a Mesker type steel build- public the facts and if the pub-
ing housing the mechanical lic feels something is wrong
departments, was erected.
Today's first edition of THE
NEWS carries a story pre- a.


we will work with those con-
cerned to correct it."
Invited to witness the initial
press run of THE NEWS were:
Mayor Ben H. Hopkins, Jr.;
Vice Mayor John D. Kick-
lighter; City Commissioners
Dare W. Davis, J. H. McArthur
and Jack Toale; City Manager
Kenneth Thompson; Police
Chief R. N. Wilson; Fire Chief
James R. Cowsert.
Also County Commissioners
Edwin F. McCann, J. F. Baum-
gartner, E. T. Denham, Sr.,
W. S. Harris and Glen R.
Leach; Sheriff Ross E. Boyer;
County Judge John D. Justice
and Carl C. Strode, superin-
tendent of Public Instruction.
Also Congressman James A.
Haley; State Rep. Henry S.
Bartholomew; City Judge Gale
K. Greene; John O. Binns,
president, Sarasota Chamber of
Commerce; Tod Swalm, secre-
tary-manager, Chamber of
Commerce.
Also Rev. A. A. Koestline,
president of Sarasota Ministe-
rial Alliance; Rabbi Joseph
Asher; Monsignor C. L. Es-
lafider; L. A. Dodson, presi-
dent, Sarasota Merchant's As-
sociation; John Browning of
WSPB and A. G. Fernandez of
WKXY; Mrs. Edward B. Toole,
president, Sarasota Garden


New York

Native Dies
Mrs. Sebastinia Anna Ran-
dazzo, 54, of 121 Conrad Ave.,
died Tuesday morning at Sara-
sota Memorial Hospital. A na-
tive of Bronx County, N. Y. and
a former New York City resi-
dent, Mis. Rndazzo had re-
sided in Sarasota for three
years.
Surviving are her husband,
Salvatore Randazzo of Saraso-
ta; a son, Stephen of Jamaica,
N. Y., two daughters, Henriet-
ta and Patricia Randazzo of
Bronx, N. Y., a brother, Tony
Maronie, Bronx, N. Y. and two
sisters, Antienette Scanelli, and
Bronx, N. Y.
Interment will be in St. Ray-
mond Cemetery in Bronx Coun-
ty, N. Y.


Clu; Mrs. Sherrel D. Patton,
president, Sarasota Hospital
Auxiliary and Mrs. Harry D.
Saddler, president, Sarasota
Woman's Club.
Also T. J. Bel, president,
Citizens Bank; Herbert W.
B o o t h, president, Sarasota
Bank and Trust Co., and Benton
W. Powell, President, Palmer
National Bank and Trust Co.
India's 10,000 high schools
now employ 200,000 teachers,
New Delhi reports.


Pfc. L. L. Martin
Gets Army Transfer
Pfc. Larry L. Martin, 20,
whose wife and mother, Mrs.
Winona R. Martin, live at 3221
Bay Shore Dr., Sarasota, has
been transferred from the 2d
Infantry Division to the 25th
Infantry Division, which is now
in the process of leaving Korea
for Schofield Barracks, Hawaii/
.The 25th "Tropic Lightning"
Division, which has seen more
combat in Korea than any oth-
er American unit, arrived on
the peninsula in July, 1950,
shortly after the Communist in-
vasion.


Camera Club

Meets Thursday
The, Sarasota Cameya Cub
'will open its second year of
programs by presenting an
evening of color-Thursday eve-
ning,; Oct. 7, in the judge's
chambers in the east wing of
the County Building.
The first part of the evening
will consist of an illustrated
lecture on "Tips on Koda-
chrome and Kodacolor." This
will be followed by an exhibi-
tion of p r i z e-winning slides
loaned by the Chicago Color
Camera Club.


S. N. SPARKMAN

CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT


ANNOUNCES


Removal Of His Offices

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S. -.a-YW --La .V ,


the


news


Remembrance of Things Past
Oh! to picnic in Myak&a, now
that autumn's here!- (with apol-
ogies to Robert Browning)
Good fortune and progress,
hand in hand, have worked
magic in tie Myakka area. The
meadows-as we knew them
in years gone Sy--are now filled
with the popular, ranch-t y p e
houses, properly- landscaped.
'The air is filled with prosperous
scents of citrus and celery. The
sad, emaciated cattle of yore
are in a state of euphoria over
their reincarnation: They look
so beautiful and ileek.ftoday.
And, no*d.ithere is a new, in-
teresting place. for. picnickers
with buiIb4n .grilles and fire
places, t*sMa. and benches all
spic auidj anj. ,very conven-
ience B~k, *inader, is there
the old jooyiajb thrill of doing
picnics s we did them when we
were young and gay+
Whenever I think of Myakka
primeval, I see Cow Pep Slough
as of yesterday. A s.iall river
flowing lazily imrog. a .vast
green meadow, cabe ge pdlman
squatting profusely .a oaks.
Sand water oaks wi .t' tei~ ubi,
quitous hanging mos giving















MRS. LOUISE WHITAKER
E DMOND SON at "Deep ,
Hole." Her mother, M.a r y
SWyatt Whltaker,' aq first
white child to Jida-.Mn-
atee County., The:Wtt. Mrs.
Edmendson & the mother of
the late Mrs. Harry N. ligel
and Mrs. Earl White, and the
grandmother of -'enevieve
(Mrs Voltaire) Sturgis, MIss
'"- Louise Higel and Postmaster
Gordon Higet.
kindly shade, the birds, prolific
cardinals, blue birds,- mock-
ing birds, all lifting their
voices to high heaven. There
were native iris, white, yellow
and purple, and ja the ,pring
the lovely white plum blossoms.
The fall days brought a riot of
lilies, yellow and red potted
Tigers. Hundreds of sun flowers
sprang into being, offering
their homage to old Sol.

No signs of the civilising in-
fluence which, was soon to in-
vade the meadows sanctity had
yet appeared.. Often to this
peaceful ikven came people
who lovedthe simple life which
the old Myakka lands afforded.
They liked to picnic for a long
day. Sometimes stating ovet
the winding trails at dawn and
returning happily under the
stars. Stetlmew camp was
set up for.the night. The woodsy
trail home was long and tor-
tuous. No glistening highways
to speed us along. But it was
all great fun. Making the fires,
putting the grilles in p la c ,
catching and frying the fish,
shooting and broiling the quajl,
and never lacking for salad
with the ..aughty "heart of
Palm." It was such a simple
matter to wield an axe and
with one swoop fell a cabbage
palm.

Now and then a macabre
touch crept into this paradise..
Perhaps a..lazy old alligator
would crawl up the river bank
for a sun bath or a harmless
snake would go slithering by.
L Once there was a real panic
over a big rattler-g iris
screaming, men going into ac-
tion, and a quick demise for
the poisonous monster. Early
spring and late fall were ideal
- months for picnicking in My-
Akka. The weather was kind


Then. Usually cool with a com-
plete absence of the little pets
which so love to invade the
Florida scene.
After the supper chores were
finished, bonfires built, blan-
kets whisked from the cars, the
best time of the evening was
at hand-to sit around the glow-
I.


Il~j~a:d~r~ ~t~57~ l~atf. 3'NLY!


ing fires and sing the popular
songs of the day to the accom-
paniment of Dolly Crawford's
ukelele. The voices of E llen
Caples and Edna 'Halton will
never be forgotten. Nor will Jo
Halton's vibrant tenor, ringing
out in "Apple Blossom Time
in Normandie" and "A Long,
Long, Trail a Winding." The
voices of both the Haltoris-Jo
and Jack, Harold Hall, Edson
Keith. Hal Yohe and Carl
Thompson, many others-a I] 1
of the Yacht Club Minstrels
will, I am sure, bring sweet
memories of a by gone era
that lives on in the hearts of
many Sarasotans.
Souvenir of a
New York Holiday


Who should be lunching in
the Metropolitan Museum's new
restaurant but Mr. and Mrs.
John Browning and John's sis-
ter, Helen Johnston. The lat-
ter in the throes of ecstacy
over the advent of her new
grandson, Richard O'Connor,
iOn of Mr. and Mrs. John
O'Connor of New York City.
am. O'Connor is the former
Miss Anita Johnston. Doubtless
'the. Browning will agree with
.i 'that the restaurant, built
,ar6ud "the fountain, with de-
tor by the skilled Dorothy
Draper is in every way delight-
ful. The Wall size picture, win-
dow through which one gtimp-
'ses Central Park and N w
York's qky' line is something to
remember. Indeed, there are
exciting changes at every turn
in the Metropolitan Museum of
Art. In .the picture, galleries
;now exists a new type of light-
ing, most satisfying.- Paintings
are hung, widely spaced, on
ceiling to floor wall coverings
.of beautiful Fortuny f I b r i c s.
The Rembrandt collection for
aIiapfle i most. impressive
-against a luscious shade of dark
red.4-


* *


Rosa -Bonheur's monumen-
tal Horse Fair which created
such a furore j0 odd years ago,
but later thought to be passe
and old fashioned was unjustly
relegated to storage. No w
brought to light again after
many years in slumber, it
reigns supreme on an entire
wall in one of the new galleries.
Sarasotans will be interested to
knew that Vincent Andrus, son
of Mrs. E. W. Pinkham of Bay
Island is prominently connect-
ed with the Museum's Amer-
can wing.
The marked interest shown
in a small, 13th century, carved
wood Madonna is well de-
served. J. P. Morgan, one of
the Museum's greatest bene-
factor's bestowed it as a gift
in 1917, It is very charming.
The figure otly 12 inches high
stands on a pedestal in a new
room to the right of the'main
lobby. The artist is unknown
but many are the inquiries,
which dilly are answered at
the information desk, "J us t
where is the little Madonna to
be found?"
*
But there was no question in
locating Marilyn Monroe in
New York. Traffic was tied up
for four blocks the day she gave
her skirt-blowing performance
for Hollywood's forthcoming
film, The Seven Year Itch. The
mob of autograph-requesting
bobby-soxers at the entrance of
the St. Regis Hotel was just as
amazing. Sad for me to lose a
much loved earring and endure
such a buffeting just before
making a luncheon date.
The all time high in this
year's Broadway musical pro-
ductions, is. in my humble es-
timation, Kismet, starring Al-
fred Drake whose acting and
singing are something that must
be experienced. Of special in-
terest of Sarasotans is the fact
that his wife is the daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Bache Brown
of Longboat Key. It is re-
ported that Soon the Drakes will
be leaving for a limited en-
gagement in London. If Kismet
is tops in the musicals on
Broadway, The Tea House of
the August Moon is the bright-
est And cleverest comedy of
the season.
I strongly urge all theatre-
minded persons who visit New
ous shows.


S. : .


about


Bom-, en


He has done i
sketching for Pigue
fashion illustrating
beth Arden in New
a fashion designer
and has created
fashion material i
South America, Fra
leading style magaz
country.
Three rules he
serves in his coum
He subjects a new'
his own taste and ji
an artist and design
confirms his theoi
which fashion will I
suiting leading ma
about their produce
(3) He rejects any
does not combine b
usefulness and prac

TAO IZZO'S

Be Sm


SiBe th

Betty: Burket


CsOL oy con-
nufacturers
tion plans.
style which
eauty plus
cticality.



art.


fl


NEW HAIRDOS ALLOW you
NEW HAIRDOS ALLOW you


to wear important earrings,
and the sparkle. of jewels is
very flattering to your face.
We like a heavy chandelier ef-
fect to top a simple neckline.
Or a pair in gold and pearls
with a matching brooch is just
apde for candle light.


Wy r4.-


4 ,


i


Juniors


Follies I


For Tal1

Anyone interest
in the second Juni
Club Follies (sch
Nov. 5 and 6 at th
Auditorium) should
tend a Talent Party
man's Club Oct. 1
General chairman
lies this year will b
Kelleher who pla3
portant part last
Follies setup. Othe
announced today, in
Ralph Wenzel,
Mrs. Warren Beall
Mrs. Leroy Browi
ing: Mrs. Donald
publicity; Mrs. Ha
parade and stunts;
erick Mahle, ticket
ing assisted by M
Heller (outside tic
John Burgstiner,
and Mrs. Chares
trons).
Chairman of the
per to be held afti
performance of thi
be Mrs. Larry He
David Roberts, ta
Ted Clark, cost
Frank Stroud and
Jahn, Sultan Con
Jack Gray, concesi
Al Zable, finance;
Glasgow, ushers;
Gault, stage manag
Lucille Heintz. mak
Mrs. Robert (
president of the cl
nounced that ticket
able from member
time and will lat
downtown from a bc
Points. Sarasotans
able to vote for the
Sarasota" (a repi
from last year's Fol
ularity voting which
successful "candid
one of the men's c
city several prizes.
be set up down towl
street voting at a pe

BE SMART

Artist-Desig

To Be Feat
Every day will
Day in THE NEW
appearance of Be
guide to the'right
wear written and ill
Tao Izzo. famous
artist.
He has been
associated as a
costume design-
er for Dolores
Del R io and
Waldeen Ballet
of Mexico as U
well as design-

Russe de Mon-
te Carlo in col- -
laboration with
Castillio. l


Slate cs rn

3art y During a candlelight service
in Cobbleskill, N. Y., Methodist
St Churqh, Miss Joan Frances
entL Frosell, d.nl'itr of Mr. and
d in b .Irs. Herbert C. Frosell, Cob-
Id in being
or Woan's bleskcill, became the bride of
eduled for Philip Schuyler Jr., son of Mr.'
and Mrs. Philip Schuyler of.
Ie Municipal Pine Lake Farms, Cobbleskill,
Plan to at- and Sarasota.
and Sarasota.
y at the Wo-
SThe double ring ceremony
8. was performed at 7 P.M., Sept.
1 of the Fol-
e M John 25, by Dr. C. W. Kessler of
e Mrs. John
First Methodist Church, Pitts-
Sfield, Mass., assisted by the
year in the
yr chairmen, Rev. Dale D. Russell, Cobble-
Sclude: 'Mr skill Methodist Church and the
clude: Rev. Robert G. Fields, St.
production; 1
Sprogm; Luke's Episcopal Church.
l, program;
n, a i Mechanicville, N.Y. Altar bou-
J Sith- quets, of 'wh i t e chrysan.the-
rold Crai mums were illuminated by ca-
Mrold Cra thedral candelabra. Nuptial
who is be- music was provided by Richard
rs. Rudolph Bump, Cornell Glee Club solo-
ckets) Mrs. ist. accompanied by Miss Edna
M(ereness, organist.
(members) Given in marriage by her
Early (pa-father, the, bride wore an im-
ported Italian silk taffeta gown
buffet sup- with full cathedral train. The'
er the final fitted b odi c e featured long
e play will
e py wl pointed sleeves and was-
ri; r trimmed with Alencon lace and
lent; )trs. pearls, forming an off the shoul-
mres; Mrs. der neckline. Her silk illusion
Mrs. S. H.),
teMrs S. veil..triple tiered and finger tip
tns; Mrs. length, fell from a 'eweled
Mrs; Earl Juliet cap. She carried a cres- I
ir s s r i cent bouquet of Vanda orchids
Miss Doris
e rs centered with a white orchid.
er and Mrs.
keup., Attendants
Glendinning, Maid of honor, Miss Julia
ub, has an- Mary Corrigan of New Hart-
s are avail- foid, Conn., wore ruby red silk
rs at this taffeta with matching halo and
oth at Five veil and carried a crescent
will also be bouquet of yellow pompoms.
S"Sultan of Bridesmaids were Miss Ann
eat contest Baird Schuyler, Miss Sara Beth
lies) a pop- Schuyler, sisters of the bride-
h gives the groom; Mrs. Paul Frosell, sis-
late from ter-in-laW of the bride, Ledge-
lubs in the wood, N.J.: Miss Sarah Jane
Jars are to Johnson, Binghamton,' N. Y.,
n for on the Miss Sally Ann Van Voris and
nny a vote. Misd Helen Irma Pease. They
wore mint green silk taffeta
SggWhs with matching halos and
Scarred bronze pompoms.
|ner Jean Owen, flower girl, wore
ue, a full length dusty pink taffeta ,
ured -, dress with a -white pompohi
tiara and crescent bouquet.
be Fashion- Ringbearer, James 'rankli N
S-with the Holreq, wqsw oiinmal evening
Smart, a attire and carried the rings on t
things to a heart shaped pillow edged'
ustrated by with. lng white satin stream- 8
designer- ers.

Ushers -
Paul Andres of Chatham,
N.Y., was best maii. Ushers
were Richard B. Alison, An-
drew B. Craig, William M. 9
.* Robey, Leigh Durland, Carl
Young, fraternity brothers of
the bridegroom, and Richard
SFrosell, tedgewood, N.J., t
brother of the bride. a <
W Mrs. Schuyler attended i
. Cobbleskill Central Schpol and
i. recently was graduated from
professional University of Rochester. Mr.
*t in Paris; Schuyler, a graduate of the
for Elita- Manlius School and Cornell
York; was 'University, is a member Of Phi
in Paris,, Kappa Sigma fraternity. He
magazine received his commission as a a
in j Mexico, -secohd lieutenant in the Army
nee and for at commencement. '
ines in this The couple new is at .the ,
Schuyler home here. Later,
rigidly ob- Mrs. Schuyler will return fqor
n are:: (1) further studies at Strong Me- ]
fashion toi *morial Hospital of University
judgment as of Rochester, and Mr. Schuyler
ner. (2) He will report for duty Dec. 2 at
tries iAs ito Fort Blils, El Paso, Tex. t
a..4 1..." v


Sarasota Women Begin

Activities For The Season
After a summer of informal meetings, Sarasota women
have a bu;y schedule of social and civic clubs meetings lined
up for the coming month. Today found the Sarasota Hospital.
Auxiliary _members meeting again at the Recreation Club for
coffee at 10 a. m. after which the regular meeting gets under-
way with Mrs. Sherrel D. Patton, president, welcoming both
old and new members.
The Sara de Sota Chapter of new officers at the Masonic
the Daughters of the American Temple and a report from
Revolution began its 29th year Helen Holt is scheduled to high-
in Sarasota at 2:30 this after- light t h e business meeting.
noon with the resolutions which Helen, one of 14 national pages
were passed at the 63rd Con. selected to attend the National
tinental Congress this summer Convention in Akron, Ohio, this


to be read and discussed.
Lions Auxiliary
Special .guests are',.slated to
attend"the atras6ta Lions Aux-
illary dinner meeting tomorrow
evening At the Lions Pen with
Mr. and Mrs.: John Clark and
Mrs Gordon Norman invited to
the program m e e i i n g The
Clarks are a blind couple,
Sarasotans know Mr. Clark
from seeing him .at the Post
Office Newsstand which heop-
erates daily.
A film. "Having Fun in Sara-
sota" is to highlight the pro-
gram with a travel film about
Puerto Rico also scheduled to
be shown.
Mrs.. Al Miller, chairman of
the Oct. 16 card party, wil lead
a discussion on the final plans
for the party which is to be
held to benefit the welfare fund
pf the auxiliary.
Sweet Adelines
The'first and .third Mpndays
of each month are set aside by
members of the Sweet Adelines
for practice meetings at the
City- Trailer Park- Auditorium.
The women begin their meet-
ngs at, 7:30 p.m. and are al-
ways happy to greet other
women who want to join the
"singing' group."' The next,
meeting is Oct. 18.
Samoor Caldron
Friday evening, .members off
he Samoor Caldron will elect


Rules For Women's News


Your news items for. the
woman's department
whether they be Weddings,
club 'notices, or personal
mention-should be in the
office by 2 p.m. the day
before your iterm is to be
published. Stories t o be
published in the Saturday
edition should be in by 2
p.m. Thursday.
Office hours are from 8
p.m. to 4 p.m., and such
items as personal mention
and club meetings may be
called to the office after 10
a.m. Calenda, notices also
may be telephoned. The
weekly calendar starts Sat-
urday and information for
the calendar must be in by
2 p.m. Thursday. !
It also is possible to call
for coverage of special
events or meetings. As
much advance notice -as
possible would be. appre-
ciated if there is to be a
photographer at the event.
THE NEWS telepho ne
number is 4-8511.
Blanks for wedding and
engagement stories will be
mailed upon request, or
may be picked up at the


* I
I





l r


office. It is not necessary
to write the wedding or
engagement store y, since
the blanks are merely form
questions for information.
We will write the story.
If it is desired that a pic-
ture be used, a glossy
print is preferred. We will
run studio portraits of the
bride alone, or picture of
the couple. Wedding and
engagement pictures will
be returned. If the couple
would like to have a wed-
ding picture published, but
has none, we will send a
photographer to the. wed-
ding when at all possible.
For those who are new
to club publicity work, we
will be glad to write the
story if the publicity chair-
man will give us the facts.
If possible, notices should
be double spaced and type-
written.
Anyone who is interested
in discussing a publicity
program, or who has some
question is invited to visit
THE NEWS Woman's De-
partment, 1045 N. Lime
Ave..


summer, will tell the members
about her trip and especially


about the convention.
: New Sarasotans


"To acquaint people with Sar-
asfa and to help them make
new friends" is thl tiipoi~ of
the New Sarasotan Club which
will hold its first meeting at
noon, Oct. 20' at the Orange
Blossom Hotel. A luncheon and
card party is planned for all
new residents of Sarasota who
are cordially invited to attend
the meeting.
A brief business meeting will
proceed the luncheon toA in-
troduce plans for the coming
season's program and will be
directed by the club's president,
Mrs. Alfred E.I Bitlib. Mrs.
P. A. Barnhardt and Mrs. R.
R. Meeks will be in charge of
the programs.
For reservations, its been
suggested that any of the fol-
lowing members will be',glad to.
reserve, a place for new reSi-
dents or members: Mrs. Robert
Duncan assisted by Mrs. Earl
E. Annis, Mrs. W. L. Gilgis,
Mrs. Harvey Da vie s, :Mrs.
George Shevlin, Mrs. James
Pace, Mrs. R. H. Butterwick
and Mrs.H. F. Jackson.,
Mrs. Gloria Dunn, Mrs. Pace
and Mrs. Mary Schaefer will
be welcoming all residents Who
wahit to join the club since
they're to be .in charge of new
members, this coming season.
Publicity for the club is to be
under the direction of Mrs.
Harold Stippich.

"Learning to Invest Wisely"
is to be the theme of the Sara-.
sota Businessr and Prfessional
Women's Club Education and
Vocation Committee, accord-
ing to Mrs. Evely' Santana,
chairman. '
Edwin V. Mack, trust officer
of the Sarasota Bank and trut
Co. is to speak to the group,
Nov. 16 at 7:30 p.m. at the Red
Cross Headquarters with mem-
bers and friends invited to
attend. Mr. Mack has cho8 e
as his subject, "Trusts, How,
They Operate" and "What a
Trust Department Can Do For
You."
The Hobby Group of the club
(which has proved to be a most
popular new feature of the
club's diversified activities for
business women) is planning
to resume golf at Par 3, Oct.
18 at 5:15 p.m. This group is
trying to interest new golferS
who will be instructed by
Bonnie; Sharpe. Members who
cannot play golf on Monday
may contact other members
and arrange playing time dur-
ing the week,


Wedding anniversaries are irkg celebrated tis. o'
by popular Jack and Gladys Cam ell on Oct. 12 d
amid Hazel Menk on Oct. 15. Happy birthday greetings
be the order of the day on Oct. 7 for Irene Su
whose pleasant personality is a constant pleasure. for
folks who drop in the First Methodist Church office.

Speaking of anniversaries, Mr. and Mrs. Harold 4or-
man of 21st St., will be marking their 31st anniversary'to-
day. The Shormans came over to Sarasota from Ft.- .ie'ce
where they had lived for the past two years. The couple
have two sons, Harold and Norman who live in the Shor-
man's former hometown. Waukegan, Ill., and Harold is the
father of Diane Marie and Dale Edward, the couple's onlj.,
grandchildren. Mr. Shorman is mechanical superintendent fbr
THE NEWS and plans to transfer to the local Elli Lodg :
while his wife hopes to be attending the meetings of tt-
Anna Miller Circle and the American Legion Auxiliary. T
Shormans are members of the First Methodist Church ad -
Mrs. Shorman recently joined the Martha Circle of the Wom-
en's Society of Christian Service.

Mrs. Alexander C. Eastman has returned from a summer
spent in New England. She is now occupying her attractive
iew home At 1OU4 Seminole Dr. -
.- ~ ~ ., v


Sc it- e Y
W@^slzi I^@ Yorkg


SARASOTANS ARE SAYING


Observing their birthdays today with THE NEWS ar-'-
realtor R. H. Fye and his four-year-old-today son John. Littl.-
John is well known to Sarasotans as the "little boy" whol '
decorated his daddy's ads for sometime.

A letter from Mrs. Max Elkes from the Blackwood HoteF.""
in Chicago, Ill., tells that she'll be back in town about Octi -'
11. Mrs. Elkes is president of the local Hadassah and wil-be-
kept busy this season with her Hadassah work which will Th- ""
elude the Donor Dinner held the first of the year.

Mr. and Mrs. Weyman Carroll have returned to their um-i-
mer home in Norwich, Conn., after a several weeks sojoura--
in Europe. They will arrive shortly in Sarasota to open tWi-t..
newly acquired home at Point o' Rocks. Miss Sally Carre"4 -
a former student at the Out-Door School has entered Wept,-
over School at Westover, Mass.

The Nelson Stevensons of South Palm Avenue, have left,
en famille, for the north. Eleanor will join Nelson in t? .
York City. Virginia will enter Skidmore College at Sarata q7
Springs, N. Y. for the beginning of her senior year. And FrEt .;i
will continue his studies at Virginia Military Institute .at
Staunton, Va. The many friends of Mrs. Frederick StevepgAM, o'.
Olive, are grateful to learn that she is recovering frosM ap-;-
cent critical illness which she suffered in Buffalo, N. Y. 41.M :,
ing the month of August. .

Mrs. Frederick DeLaute of Cherokee Park has ti. "2
to her home after a summer spent in Bay View, Mi ah. W
___ ._ ..g
Mrs. Carl Sturhahn is back in her attractive In" dian ta;
home after an interesting suaimer spent on Isug SMi1.r:;'
Princeton, N. J.; Washington and Asheville, N. C. .,

The Donald Forgans of Ocean Blvd, Siesta Key hiavew i
by plane for a several weeks stay in California.
----, .", ,
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Stokes of Siesta Key a ] .:'
lands, N. C., the summer mecca of many Sarasetma, 'l"'
a fortnight's stay. Clarenoe and Elese have burned lup -'.'
highways between Sarasota and Highlands several tiV *1
summer. This will be the final trip as they are clsiu Y ."
attractive mountain home for the winter season. Zi J

Mrs. James W. Crawford of Shore Oaks,*.tL ;j ::-
accompanied by her son, James W. Crawfo 14mrI& lK
by motor for a visit with Mr. and Ms. E, I at
their summer home on Chesapeake Bay.

Back from a vacation at Alder Creek, N. Y., A n 6
Adirondacks where they spent the summer are Mts. Jo JO.
Eaton and daughter, Mildred. The summer wasn't :glia-.
tion since the women also toured the East buying anti~Mialbler
Mrs. Eaten's shop on South Palm. .

Mrs. Paul D. Brown of Miami Circle has left for a trip
of several weeks. She plans to visit inI New yiq, 3., 'a,
Philadelphia and Worcester, Mass. '

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Hughes of. Harbor Acres l. be
attending the 50th anniversary of the University of Olhi in
Athens this month. Mrs. Hughes was fterly apiCftde y to
the president of the university and secretary to the efteasila
bureau at the university. Later she served as assistlat : upe
visor of the bureau of appointments.
-_ .>.,,-, :1.- -
John Sprang of Lockwood Ridge Road has a new grad-
son name for him, bore Sept. 29 to daughter Mrs. Fra~
Clostermas t Cinclnnati, Ohio. The new baby, Jh4"q aivo .
will bepersonally supervised by his proud VpapA4st
John Sprang, who WiH stay with her daughter in 0
the end of October.

Coming back to Sarasota around Oct..8 will -be'i .
Kitty Gilbert of 7th Street who has been on a South AmerIc*r
Cruise. Kitty always adds something to the e4itt0A t ai4. .o
asota during the season as she dashes about having a awondBip'
ful time with her many friends.
'' "~~~----'-er' n'
Been hearing that Valla Walker is opening a day aseh"
following a successful summer with her campers out
peering Sands. Valla's son, Ford.Odehe, is at Mboli r-
year, a freshman studying on an honor scholarsh p
ed to the former Sarasota High School student. .

Mrs. Una Carr left the first of September for a i .t :.
in the New England States. W'll probably hear l '
she's back in towa for the beginning of Sa 's .b
vmle.

Among the recent business women pturing to
were Mrs. Maigaret MicRae M^her l*tlki t
weeks vacatiOnig in Atlanta'. and *.eo*r J ,
visited relatives.. ... ""

SMrs. Grace Whitman is vacatlioping p'.tA
Mich., and sent back, word to her Saraotal .
going to be home soon and her letter mqjd add.-i
been having a memorable time up them t-i> e.. .

The Daniel F. Turnbulls have retu .' t.-th* ,
'Indian Beach after a summer i.A.i4evi ,. .
Park Inn. During September, Jeau visited he4
in-law, and two interesting yaug grande, flya4
at their new home in South Bend, Tad. f.-,Bw, b
per Betsy Burgess, is one of 'Sarasota's favo$ t g
Everyone loves Betsy. In fact the l.pverbl i.
laid down for the Cutler family wi~rlp they aMy.( .
in the Turnbull home.* ..

A group of popular Sarasota couples, IA
ry Taylors, the WHliam L. Adam.i. Geti. ad !
:Funk and the A. C. Maxfield Jr.'s attended, a l
dinner party given recently by Mr. and Mrs. Peter 6
of Davis Islands, Tampa. The Sones lived in Sarasoda-
the last war years and are pleasantly remembered bt'-."-
number of friends. '


," :', v "8 ,"



N4


Mrs. Philip Schuyler Jr.
.- eE .. ,.
.;. :
.~ ~ ~~I .' .,- .
Is.Phli Shule Jr


I


Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1954 THE NEWS Page


CLUB ROUNDUP'


co


P


I


ovr 4 *i





Pa ge.1o IHE NEWS Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1954


EEN TIPS

Scribe Frowns

On 'Sly' Dating
-, by Elizabeth Woodward
.It's silly to let yourself in
f something that's goiflg to
Cause you nothing but woe.
And; though they say you can't
tll 1fom where you sit how
your photograph is going to
turn out, the fate of some of
your plots is is clear as crys-

ijou know yQuP parents don't
want, you to date yet, for in-
sat ce. Yet you encourage a
boy you like to think you can.
You know your parents won't
.le you ride home in some-
!odv's car, yet'you half-accept
a lift.
You know the sky is going
to fall on you-so why do you
permitt yourself to get deeper
iito a situation that means
nothing but trouble?
'Here's a girl whose eyes are
Wide open, yet she refuses to
believe what she sees. She
Writes:
'qDear Miss Woodward: I met
d boy about a month ago and
h~ is just starting to notice me.
Th!6owy-trouble is that I have
to'to everything on the sneak
S.jecause my parents disap-
lrove of my dating boys that
e much older than I. He's
and'I'm 14. IHe's very nice
a. d he thinks a lot of me. He
d. to quit school so he could
hlp out at home. His poor edu-
cation is something else my
fimAily have against him. How
cn. I explain to him abbtt my
pIrents' attitude? What can I

i.This brand inw'friendship of
yburs has star f, under a
cloud. He just don't fit in
aiy- detail the pattern your
parents have chosen for boy
filepds. He's older, he's-out of
School your parents aren't too
k en on him. So you've been
getting acquainted on the sly.
You've been with proceeding
yo u r relationship just as
tl4gh there 'weren't three
saikes against it. You've let
SA'urself like him more, and
1ace-,-as though that would
straighten out the situation.
you've encouraged him to'like
yJu--as though you had high
lbpes it would all turn out
i~ t'h.
You know it won't. The deep-
. e~ you get into this situation,
tzie more explOining.you'll have
", do. Flagrantly disobeying
6ur parents is Iad enough,..
"I t doing it on the sly will
hlrt them more. You'll have
lnty of trouble when the day
Reckoning comes--as it's
nd to.
Show can you explain to
tS~ boy that you flirted with
10m and led him on when you
khew in your heart nothing
quld come of it? Why bother
t y plin anything to him?
ot back out quietly before
yu get in too deep.
a'


$


Places

Tb Go


Rainbow Girls Start Their 20th


With Public Installation


Miss Ann Franklin, past wor-
thy advisor and a past grand
representative-of the Grand As-
sembly of Florida was the in-
stalling officer at the'Sarasota
Assembly Order of Rainbow
for Girls 20th public installation
Saturday evening.
Assisting Miss Franklin were
Miss Beverley Tiffin, Mias Jean
Hardinson. Miss Carol PaLrick,
Mrs. Mildred Durst, Dr. Elbert
C. Prince and Mrs. LeVitae
King.
A rose ceremony by the re-
tiring officers of the assembly
opened the impressive meeting
and retiring worthy advisor
Beverley Tiffin presented each
of her officers with a gift and
a red rose.
Taking office were: Jill Ever-
ett, Ginger Ritchic. Mildred
Durst, Frances Ballard, Jan-
ice Renick, Fran Bryan. June
Buckelew. Gretchen Scherbert,
Marilyn Miller, Beverley White,
Jill Toler, Doris Brower. Eun-
ice Ferreira, Barbara Burns,
Barbara Yarger, Nancy Dye,
Emmie Martin a nd Charla
Banta.


A gavel made by the new
worthy advisor's uncle, was
presented to her following in-
stallation and al: new officers
were introd,-ed to the capacity
audience of friends and patron-,
attending the event.
Mrs. Brent Livingston, moth-
er advisor of the Sar-.scia As-
sembly. presented Beverlcy
Tiffin with her past adv;ior's
pin and the white Bible used
by candidates during her term
of office. Members of the Past
Advisor's Circle conducted a
Rose Addenda in honor of Bev-


erley who was then announced
as ae new member of the
circle.


The awarding of the service
bars concluded the ceremony


with Mrs. Livingston in charge
of this part of the program.
Thirteen Rainbow Girls receiv-
ed these coveted service bars
including Toni Simonsen, a past
worthy advisor, whose accu-
mulation of 1200 points for
more than three years' service
made her eligible for the final
award. Toni is attending col-
lege and accepting the reward
was her mother, Mrs. 0. K.
Simonsen of Venice.


r


-. - c


SchOOL SHO$S

^ FROM TOT'S
TO TEENSTER'S
PERFECTLY fitted for
S classroom or after
school play.


Many handsome
(dlnrds styles-


All sizes for


"'


boys and girls.


JUVENILE SHOE SHOE
Exclusively For Children
137 S. MAIN ST.


4'
4'
4'
4'

4'


4'


I
1:
i-


Problems which seem
minor to adults are all-im-


portant to teen-agers. For
advice they turn: to Eliza-
beth Woodward, nationally
k no w n ad-
visor and ex-
pert on teen-
a g e affairs,
whose column
| y^ 3 appearsin
The News, an.1
many other

throughout the
country.
In private
life she is Mrs. Phillipe


Masdelain, mother of two


young- sons and resident of


Year


Ceremonies


t .-t:
4r


,.
/*


This season-spanning cotton with its lovely gleam-line
plaidjs one of L'Aiglon's smartest fashions. Neat-waisted,
big-skirted, with white pique at the neckline.
Red or blue on black.


6-


N1

4,... -


JILL EVERETT, new worthy advisor and her associate
advisor,.Ginger Ritchie.


Justin McCarty uses a
white f e c k e..d woolen
tweed, warm and luxurious
for this wonderful skirt.
Focal point is the big
cuffed pocket with a gold-
en and bamboo pin. Ste.,
8-18.


#. :n er.


The perfect strapless bam.


* No Srap


e No Binding


in WARNER'S A' Lure
Sizes 32-3&


5.95;


Searsdale, N. Y. She talks to
teen-agers straight from the
shoulder, and in their lan-
guage. They may not listen
to mother, but their ears\
perk up when Miss Wood-
ward advises.


She started working, with
youngsters, when the mag-
azine which employed her
began a department for
juvenile readers the first
of its kind with Miss
Woodward as headan d s-
sociate editor of the publica-
tion.


Juvenile delinquents?
"Nonsense", she declares,
"There are 14 million chil-
dren who aren't."'


Mary and Preston, lall present

Treasures from Spain


No castles but delightful wrought irons
done bylcraftsmen with the hands of
artists. Shipments have just arrived.
Our detailed announcements will follow -
or drop in now for a preview.


THE GIFT BOX
49 South Palm Phone 2-6301


TODAY
10 a.m. Sarasota Hospital
Woman's Auxiliary meeting at
$irasota Recreation Club. Cof-
Sfee hour at 10 followed by reg-
plar meeting.
S12:15 p.m. Alta Vista P.T.A.
meeting, Alta Vista School.
2:30 p.m. Sara De Sota Chap-
ter, D.A.R., meeting at the
loman's Club.
~' p.mn. Women of the Moose
s the new Moose Lodge Hall..


STURSIAY
Sa.m. .First Ladies Day
Tournament, S arasota Bay
Country, Club; followed by in-
formal luche.on and business
meeting;,
:2 p.nm. St. Martha's Sewing
Sosiety"Q'td Parish" Hall.
2:30 p.m; Bee Ridge Wom-
an's Club, Clubhouse.
6:30 p.m. Harmony Rebekah
Lodge banquet, Orange Blos-
som Hotel.
7t: p.m. Lions Auxiliary din-
ner meeting, Lions Den.
7:30 p.m. Bridge party, p.lio.
benefit, Sarasota Recreat$di
Club.
8 p.m. Insurance Women of
Sarasota, Red Cross Head-
quarters. ;
8 p.m. Sarasota County Men-
tal Health Society, Sunshine
Kitchea.
S FRIDAY
8 p.m. Samoor Caldron elec-
tion of officers meeting,' Ma-
sonic Temple.
SATURDAY
1 p.ni. Entertainment Com-
mittee meeting, Sarasota


Yacht Club.


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Business Women

Hear 'Fernandez
Tony Fernandez of radio sta-
tion WKXY spoke on Publicity
last night when he addressed
members of the Sarasota BPW
who met in the Lions Den.
Mrs. R. J. Roy, membership
committee chairman, and Mrs.
Hazile P. Arlott, news service
committee chairmen, and their
committee members were hos-
teases.
Reports were given by Mrs.
Roy and 'Mrs. Hattie Murphy,
who announced that the bosses'
Dinner would be Oct. 12, 7 p.m.
in the Lions Den, asking for
early reservations.
She also announced that Na-
tional Business and Profession-
al Women's week will be
opened with a breakfast in the
Orange Blossom Hotel at 9:30
a,m. Sundai, followed by at-
tendance at the 11 a.m. serv-
ice at the Episcopal church.
Following the program, Mrs.
Dorothea M. Huey, director of
district 9, conducted an obliga-
tion ceremony in which the fol-
lowing new members partici-
pated: Meadames S. H. Jahn,
Marie Langer, Dorothy Rus-
sell, Shirley Johnson, Helen
Hargen, the Misses Marion
Killburn and Welthea BeVier.


Julia Adams, Parents

Ann unce Engagement


;r~Sa-. ~1 '~'


\
\


*" A1 %31


Social


2. ; r" Rush parties are first on the
,, season's agenda of Sarasota
sorority chapters, with most of
.' the events scheduled to start
this week.


Nu Phi Mu
Members of Nu Phi Mu -
girls between 17 and 21 who
later transfer to Beta Sigma
Phi-had a Coke 'party last
night to honor 15 rushees. Oct.
12 will be the model meeting
for the girls, and initiation is
scheduled for Oct. 20, 8 p.m.,
in the home of Mrs. Herbert
Braren, 455 Poinciana Dr., The
Uplands.
A bazaar to be held jointly
with Beta Sigma Phi members,
will be Nov. 12 and 13, the
place to be announced. Part of
the proceeds from this will go
toward the Happiness House
building fund. During the year,
Nu Phi Mu members plan vari-
ous sales to raise money for
charity.
Beta Sigma Phi
Beta Sigma Phi, Alpha Eta
chapter, also has rushed activ-
ities scheduled this month, in-


Sororiies


Start


iall


eluding a dinner, model meet- Gamma Phi chapter of Beta
ing and tea. Mrs. Claudelle Sigma Phi held itsfirst regu-
Huff, vice president, is rush lar meeting last night to plan
captain, the program for the coming
During the year, plans are year including working during
being discussed for the French the year with various charity
Cabaret, tentatively scheduled drives and plans for the Foun-
for January, and a fashion der's Day in the spring:
show in December, as well as Epsilon Sigma Alpha
the bazaar Nov. 12 and 13. EPion a Al
Proceeds from these affairs Members of Alpha Omicron
will be for Happiness HoIse chapter of Epsilon Sigma Al-
and payment of cancer clinic pha have had their first rush
bills. Meetings are held the party and plan the model busl-
first and third Wednesdays at ness meeting Oct. 12, when
8 p.m. in the Red Cross hut. rushees will have the,opportu-


"WE MAKE OUR OWN"


S- REAL
Sk ICE CREAM


SNACKS CONES PACKAGES
& SPECIAL ORDERS
NEXT TO POST OFFICE
ORANGE AT GOLF ........ 6-4673


2~t12


Plans for the year include a
family Christmas party, Dec.
14, when gifts will be brought
to be distributed to underpri-
vileged children a theatre
party March 22 and spring
rushing the following month.
Alpha Iota chapter of Ep-
silon Sigma Alpha, starts rush-
ing activities with a backward
party at 8 p.m. today in the


Partlie


Rushing

see how a sorority meet-
conducted. Installation
Nov. 9.


~ V~
'r --- v<


WILLIAM H. STOCKHAM

Attorney-At-Law

Announces the removal of
his offices for the General


Practice
1952 GOLF ST.


of Law to
TELEPHONE


.Miss Julia Made Adams


The


la Mar
Farrin
today 1
Mr, an
of Aver
idents
are pi
tober
dence.
Miss
the F
School
Junior
She wi
the Ou
Gulf a;
ently


w, r W r "- s
Children al set for school? M ay
you are doing everything possible
for life.
But wait a minute, mother. Ian'
living as important as preparation
is there anything that adds more
for living than the ability to play
meat? Think of the advantages:

IC HELPS TO 10UILD EA
S AND ERECT ODIE001
A9SIC PROMOTES LIFtONG P
MUSIC FOSTERS WHOLESOME CO
SHIP AND CONSTRUCTIVE ACTI
MUSICAL TRAINING OPENS THE
A LIFETIME OF PLEASURE, REl
INSPIRATION AND SELF-EXPREI

The beginning of a new school sea
time for a friendly discussion of
place in the life of your child. Th
us today may mean much to th
youngster whose future means mu
be looking for you,


I


1323 MAIN A
SARASOTA. FLA.


engagement of Miss Jul- NEWS as a stenographer-book-
rie Adams to Thomas C. keeper.
gion Jr. was announced Mr. Farrington, son of the
Thomas C. Farrington Seniors
by Miss Adams' parents, of Boston, Mass., was educated
id Mrs. Roger W. Adams in Massachusetts and served
nida Messina, former res- four years in U. S. Navy and
of Kentucky. The couple is now employed at the Hotel
planning a wedding Oc- Sarasota. His father has been
associated with the Statler Ho-
28 at the Adams resi- tel in Boston for the past 25
years.
Adams is a graduate of
ankfort, Ky., H ig h Children's Dieting
and the William Woods
College in Fulton, Mo. Needs Psychology
as formerly employed at
t-ef-Door School and the By Ida Jean Kain
nd Bay Club and is pre- O, I'msure Mrywill ot-
associated with THE
grow being a fatty," is not an
uncommon remark from par-
ents of overweight children.
But, whether the child outgrows
the excess weight or grow up
to be an overweight depends to
a considerable extent on how
the problem is treated in child-
hood.
S In an article "Treating Obe-
sity in Children," appearing in
a recent issue of the Journal of
the American Dietetics Asso-
Sliation, June Morris Norman
tells of the interesting results
and evaluation of a nutrition-
ist's work with overweight
children for a period of a year.
Throughout the program, the
word "diet" with its unpleasppt
connotations of hunger and re-
striction was taboo. Rather, the
term "food plan" was used.
In the majority of cases, the
food plan was looked upon as
Sa game or even "more than I
have been eating." Of particu-
lar significance, -where the
overweight child looked upon
the weight control food plan as
punishment or deprivation, the
plan usually led to failure.
When it was felt that the child
was really interested in losing
weight and was old enough to
cooperate, usually at the age of
9 the food plan was worked out
with the child alone. In other
be, then,you ol cases, the plan was discussed
to with the child in the presence
Sto Pfepaoe thp of his parents. Emphasis was
placed on the foods a child
t preparation for could have, not on forbidden
on for life? And foods.
to a child's zest "Treats" played an impor
a musical Instru. tat role in maintaining mor-
ale. A 14-year-old, for example,
S was permitted one treat a day,
r, mimr either in the form of a between
meal snack or dessert. Psycho-
logically the most popular treat
IPAIUNe i was the soft drink with the
gang. Of underlying import-
EPANIOK ance, this treat enabled the
IVITY teen-ager to remain part of his
I OOR or her group. The study re-
vealed that not only did the
AXATION, youngster seem fairly well sat-
1SON isfied with the one indulgence,
but often such "treats" were
son is a perfet voluntarily limited to every day
f music and its or only on weekends.
ei visit you pay Parents have to be well in-
e future of the formed and willing to spend the
ch to you. We'll effort involved in making, sub-
stitutions and keeping the food
tion In All Instruments plan interesting.
Conditioned Studios St. Martha's Schdol

Inway, Chickering & Mrs. Thomas Holleran was
wurlltzer Pianos chairman of hostesses for the
get-acquainted reception at St.
Hammond Organs Martha's School held' Tuesday
evening. Parents w e r e the
L Orchestra Instruments guests of the Parents Club and
visited the schoolrooms, met
the faculty and enjoyed a social
hour.
Assisting Mrs. Holleran were
Mrs. John Mikes, Mrs. William
Geschke, Mrs. Jack Campbell
(wife of the Parents Club presi-
r. dent) Mrs. Ray Coons, Mrs.
3-321 J. B. Clarken, Mrs. William
Steiner and Mrs. J. R. Coxe.


i


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now into fall


with


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Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1M54 THE 'NIEg ]tge t-
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home of Miss Eve J. Barry,
2519 Central Ave. thi 10
rushees will be honored' irr
with a model meeting, '08t.12i
in the Sunshine Kitchen;
ferential tea,' Oct. .20, lf
joint initiation of jewQl'i1i
members and pledges, Oft.'
at Bobby Jones. Mrs. DoWaf I
ton is rush chairman. ''-
Proceeds from the smeaas
projects will be sent' t1 t
Florida State School for' e
and Blind children al t VA t
Augustine. 107 '.ot
r, .





Page 12 THE NEWS Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1C54



I designing Woman


By Elizabeth Hillyer
THE- HARLEQUIN THEME
The 'harlequin theme-color-
ful diamonds in bright colors-
.speads to every type of fur-
*ishipg for the home. In the
*-ttting below ,from the recent
~estival of California Living
show, draperies and a pillow
are harlequin patterned, and
even'the trimming on the chair
suggests the jester's cap and
)~a. Color contrast is spark-
.i~g"the draperies citron yel-
low-d white; the pillows em-
erald," pumpkin, and turquoise
.against white walls and car-
pet; and the chair. in white
*ith emerald.
V'he many harlequin fabrics
1 wallpaperses now arriving
Y te scene have diamonds
ta are large or small, two-
QP, any-colored, partly shaded
or?-3h some additional draw-
"-ded. There are re'ady-
like the harleq u n
S-44h *.


spread sketched, which tal.,.
either draperies or caie cur-
tains to match, and a few res-
train:ed harlequin designs in
small rugs, lamp bases, aud
ceramics. A harlequin pattern
can do much .to spark a room
to attention-even a single wall
in a harlequin paper, or dra-
peries cn tall windows.

BPW Hobby Group

Plans Golfing Party
In January, the Hobby Group
will hold a Golfing Party for
members and their husbands.
Among the members now par-
ticipating in this program are
Jean McKelvey, Jeanne Mc-
Kinney, Mary Hirleman, Lydia
Brummer, Maude Danovsky,
Charlie Hagerman, Irene Roy,
Bonnie Sharpe and Gerry Pad-
dock.


4'' '


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ft
of
Yi
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4, T~EEKL


.at the new season's
most exciting Christmas Cards

you'll be thrilled, as we are, with the


Card Center Presentations


created expressly for those who appre-
ate originality, sparkling color and
cquisite beauty.
ur collection is filled with all the wonder-
ul things that make-Christmas the season
f jo and good cheer.
ou.'ll' joy selecting your cards NOW so'
iat the can be personalized in time for
ddressihg at your leisure.


1


NOW'S THE TIME .
TO GET YOUR CLOTHES READY FOR FALL


We have the finest, most modern facilities in fown
... ready to put your wardrobe in clean, fresh shape
for the fall season.


0
*


CLEANING MENDING
PRESSING ALTERATIONS
GARMENT WATERPROOFING


FREE PICK-UP AND DELIVERY SERVICE

TROPICAL CLEANERS
2053 RINGING BLVD. PHONE '2-12?


III
Salon Tina

on St. Armands Circle


** .
Miss Tina will open(for fhe fall
season next Monday a$'9 a. mi Her
salon hours will be 9 to 4 o'clock ,
Monday through Friday.


Naomi Nolan .
fbials 'exclusively


*


.Why No

SAt The




,;.
-.-


t Spend


Art


Food Tips
Cream to be used for ship-
ping, should contai- at least
twenty-five per cent butter fat.

Spread thin slices of veal
with bread stuffing, then roll
the meat around the stuffing
and fasten with toothpicks.
Panfry in hot fat, then add a
little liquid, cover and simmer
for about three-quarters of an
hour. The gravy in the pan
may be thickened, if desired,
before serving. Add any sea-
sonings you prefer at the time
you add the liquid to the stuffed
veal rolls. -


-I1


i I ~~ L~r


Teenie
r


Belle Lee


Kitchen Showeii Idea
The highlight of every show-
er party is that moment when
the gifts are presented, and the
excitement is doubled when the
presentation is ade 'in a, dif-
ferent way.
A good idea is the kitchen
bride, built o0 c clothes tree
with a broom for arms, tied
securely across it. The face is
a small pillow covered with a
new kitchen towel on, which
roguish features are marked
with colored crayon. A lace
curtain makes a realistic wed-
ding veil. A 'new pair of col-
ored rubber gloves transforms
the ends of the broom handle
into hands, while goloshes are
used for feet.
The presents should be tied
onto' the strong wooden arms
with gingham straps of carious


Your Leisure
., : *!


Time


s & Crafts

Colony


You have an opportunity to learn


i Yo u Will, Enjoy Shopping Here
*- *


COSTUME JEWELRY of real distinction

Men and Women's GOLD AND S I L V E R JEWELRY

We SERVICE the jewelry we sell

American ALLIGATOR Handbags and Wallets
GIFTS-Wedding. Silr]r and Gold Anniversaries and for all occasions

DINNERWARE and GLASSWARE for Floriday

Homes -Authentic Imported French Milk Glass.

You Are Assured of Courteous Interested Attention in This Store
LAY-AWAY Now for Christmas and Birthdays. ,


1336 MAIN ST.


one door from Palm Ave.


F''.


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SCeramics

Enamel

Clas

SRI 5-3088


* Jewelry

* Metal

Wood


SSW
*


Profitably,


44
4;'



~44

'4

.4)

4
44


Now Forming.

42nd and N. Trail


- -- Iia


Says


lengths. If there: is not space
for all the gifts, pile some of
them at the kitchen bride's
feet. Packages that need wrap-
.ping should be covered with
brhwn. paper ,and tied with
strips of the gingham.
Bdfore guess arrive the com-
pleted dummy should be con-
cealed in a closet or behind a
door so that the.' bride-to-be
can be sent on an errand that
will lead her to it, unsuspect-
ing.
Decorating Booths
Already preparations are be-
ing made for the annual Hallo-
ween carnivals here are
some ideas for decorating
booths.
"Babes in Toyland" booth
may be decorated in red and
yellow displaying inexpensive
toys.
'"Lullaby" both may be
trimmed in pink and blue,
offering all sorts of dainty arti-
cles for, babies.
"Schooldays" booth may be
trimmed in red to suggest the
little- red school house, where
school supplies may; be sold.
Novelty Dances
Dances are fun and they're
even more fun when one or
two novelty dances are in-
cluded on the evenings pro-
gram.
A ghost elimination dance
could be used for around-Hallo-
ween time. Before the dance,
a good-sized number attached
to a ribbon, cord should be
given to each couple to be worn
around the man's neck so the
card will hang down his back.
After a few minutes of danc-
ing, the orchestra leader should
call two or three numbers and
a sheeted ghost should dart
from, another room and try to
tag the numbers.


Ua~annq Ia a~rrllraa nam


FROM


One Newcomer


To Another

LETS KEEP SARASOTANS
.WELL DKtSSEU & INFORMED

YOU FURNISH THE LATEST NEWS

WE'LL FURNISH THE LATEST STYLES


GERTRUDE


DEAN DRESS SHOP


FEATURING JUNIOR :& HALF SIZES


29 S. PALM


PHONE 4r4411


As Halloween draws near,
p-la-:s are underway for the an-
nual carnivals held by PTAs of
th!i e I; mentary schools through-
out the city.
Central
Central School has named
Nov. 5 for the first informal
get together of the season, a
fall roundup of parents, teach-
ers and students. Festivities
will start at 5:39 p.m., with
some activities outside, "on the
midway," where refreshments
will be served, and other ac-
tivities in the school.
There will be- movies and
special entertainment for the
children through the evening,
as well as a country store,
games of chance and a fish
pond. Any donations for the
country store' or fish pond may
be left at the school, according
to Mason Baldwin, PTA carni-
val chairman. He will be assist-
eds by 15 representatives of the
various homerooms, with each
grade having a responsibility
in some phase of the carnival.
Southside
At Southside, Mrs. Gerald
White and Mrs. William Rob-
erts are co-chairmen of the
carnival scheduled for Oct. 30.
Serving will start in the school
cafeteria at 5 p.m., and the con-
cessions will open at 6:30 p.m.
Concessions planned will in-
clude a country store, -grab-
bag, bake sale (for which don-
ations will be accepted), gas
balloons, refreshments, movies,
games, side show, hobby horse,
a doll show and cotton candy
and candy apples supplied by
Sarasota High School.
Phillippi Shores
Phillippi Shores PTA also is
scheduling its carnival Oct. 30.
Complete plate dinners will be
served in the cafeteria at 75
cents for adults and 50 cents
for children. There will be three
servings-5 p.m., 5:30 and 6
p.m.
Concessions will include a
cake booth, games of skill and
grades; refreshment booths,


doll show, a magic show, for-
tune telling, circus novelties,
electric train display, fish pond,
movies and hobby horse ride.
Mrs. Rolland King and Leon-
ard Burch are co-chairmen of
the carnival.
Osprey
Oct. 30, from 6 to 9 p.m. is
the time scheduled by Osprey
School PTA for its carnival
which will take place in the
cafeteria, school rooms and
back court. Refreshments
(hamburgers, hotdogs with all
the trimmings and beverages)
will be served at 6 p.m. in the
cafeteria.


LY OP FRANCE LC

THE" CRSCT SHOP
1634 MAIN ST..


*' j


Intr Oducig- e ig litai



ri vi. .s er .s .Ij 4
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tie first alR Daeror high -waist gwItr ,-
-only 2Younces Waveviwve inceJ ^


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Buf, darling if weighs only 2/2 ounces
How can a girdle that weighs so little do
the job you need? Seeing is believing .
and you'll believe it' when you wear
PROMISE D9. It's a dream of sheer
weightless comfort and control. It's the 4-
inch-above-your-waistline smoothie, it's a
21j: ounce of powerful Dacron fabric.and
elastic strongie: and it's a never-stretch-out-
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clusive patented BIABAND (R) control
keeps your shape in shape, takes care of
hips, 'thighs,"seat, abdomen without a roll
or bulge, a pinch or a-poke. Yes, my dear, $16650
it's really a wonderful world that we'live in
when you can find a girdle that goes as far
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(h1 b
A'% f)w


DRESS SHOP
1909 South Osprey


i


Ca rnval Plans Set By PTAs


Open Evenings Until 9 p. m.


"


m


~BlileFlrwm~h~


I


Miss' Turner .
body massage
Phone 8-3191
for appointments

Fully Air Conditioned


NEW PANHELLENIC PRESIDENT Mrs. V. Morris (Betty) Smith and the new
vice president, Mrs. Kenneth Danner (seated left and right) look over the com-
ing season's program with the other new officers. Mrs. Smith was installed at a din-
ner held at Martines this week and taking office with her were (standing left to
right) Mrs. Jack Heritage, Mrs. Richard Newman, Mrs. Charles Deming, and Miss
Ellen Harmon. Following the installation and dinner, bridge was enjoyed by the
group.


Entertainment will -include
boxing- for the boy s-if sec-
onded by their parents-coun-
try store, fortune telling, a
regular side show, game room,
refreshments booths, doll and.
hobby show, hobby horse ride,
games of skill, treasure hunt
and marionette show.
Mrs. J. '. Smih is carnival
chairman.
No carnivals have been
planned by Alta Vista or Bay
Haven Schools, since.Alta Vista
PTA is just being formed and
Bay Haven will have a oar-
nival in the spring.


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ASIGNMfT MECA
familiarr


By PHYL~S BATTELLE
NEW YORK -(INS)- In the
old days when grandma latched
onto the old man,-it was be-
lieved. that, a man and wife-
to be bubblingly haplr-should
be separated by nothing short
of death or a monthly fling at
chess for papa.,
Today the outlook on mar-
riage has chan ed:
"Don't see your wife (or hus-
band )any more than is abso-
lutely necessary,' say the mod-


'ity Breeds Divor
ernists. "Familiarity brees di-
vorce."
One of the chief proponents.
of this theory is a. Broadway
star named Scott McKay, a
man who is heartily in love
with his wife and sees very lit-
tle of her.
"When we met, it was won-
derful," says the 'fair-haired,
boy of the drama critics and'
"The Teahouse of the August
Moon." They were both appear-
ing -in New York in the play


ce


Says Happy


Spouse


"Born Yesterday" and it was together on anything again, and
love at first competition, so to got married."
speak. Now Scott sees Joan (profes-
"But as the play progressed," sional name, Joan Morgan)
says McKay, "and we began less than he saw her during the
seeing each other in the eve- courtship. And it's great. He
ning'as well as all day, I could can tell her he's a veritable
see the thing was going to die god and she believes it not
out like a slushy tomato. We having been on hand to observe
did the only thing we could do him flub a few lines in rehear-
under the circumstances. sal. She can maintain the aura
"We left the play, promised of a goddess he not having
ourselves we would never work seen her at 3 p. m. when she
hit that haggard mid-afternoon


7(k


I
I


-A


SHOP
ANNOUNCES THE ARRIVAL OF
SOME NEW EXCLUSIVES
VBY SUCH DESIGNERS AS: -


PAUL PARNES
DAVIDOW
'* NETTIE ROSENSTEIN
ED GARRICK
SALTA
* 'McMULLEN
DAVID GOODSTEIN
*. SPOi RAFT
SJr,.E DERBY
S... MRIDCAN GOLFER
PRINGLE OF SCOTLAND
ADELE SIMPSON


W,4


A~~ PAUL ARNE


A PAUL PARNES
,EXCLUSIVE
"THERE IS NO SuBS a u &iu FOR QUALITY & GOOD TASTE"


HOTEL MIRA MAR ENT E


slump.
One of the most solid reasons
men and women shouldn't see
each other more than a dozen
hours a day ("15 hours is the
absolute maximum," stresses
Scott) is that women are gen-
erally smarter than spouses.
"I've got a good friend,"
says he, "who worked in the
same division of a large com-
pany with his wife. There was
a shakeup in the outfit. Friend
was fired.'Wife was promoted.
Six months later, friend and
wife were divorced."
For instance, Scott's wife is
currently on tour with the up-
coming Eartha Kitt musical,
"Mrs. Patterson."


wiami .Desne

Miami .Designers


By Paula Clark
The wandering waist-
line pauses at various parts of
the anatomy in Marjae's resort
collection of carefree cottons.
Although Marjae concedes to
the long torso look, this house
continues to Accent the positive
with the help of shirred bodice
inserts and other devices de-
signed to make the most (with-
in the limits of good taste) of
pretty curves.
At the other extreme of the


,dnesday, Oct. 6, 1954 THE NEWS Page 13


Suit The Nation


fashion pendulum, Marjae
swings to tailored and tucked
shirtwaist separates, under-
stated but interpreted in ele-
gant polished cottons for late
day drama.
Bows, ties and tucks, com-
bined with the exciting prints
that are the signature of this
house, add up to fashion news
in Marjae's new designs.
Combination of plain and dra-
matic printed fabrics in patio


cottons, the use of black as a
recurring accent, and the off-
beat combinations of prints in
contrasting colors in one cis-
tume mark the new carefie
cottons.
Marjae's resort cottons re
designed with an eye to casal
country club life all over te
United States. That may be one
reason why these carefree cot-
tons show up at fashioalgle
spots on three continents..,


i A

SA BIG YEAR
Sfor
S-herwin's Stork Club
-- -- .- A Big
If you don't have some other I T
cold dry place to store a bottle v
or can of olive oil, put it in f -$ ,
your refrigerator. The oil will f or
solidify, but if it is placed at t t
room temperature a short time C, customers


before it is to be used, it will
melt.


Final 3 Day
SUMMER

Dress Clearance


1/2 OFF


JUNIORS
MISSES
and
HALF SIZES


ONE TABLE
BRAS 4 FOR $1.00

MADAME'S SHOP
Ladies and Children Apparel
1929 S. Osprey Shopping Center
Phone 3-8934


, I ...., ,1, m -,- -__I_ __lK R&m_ IK_ __ll ENT_ __ __l
_W


0


a
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FREE
ini the Lucky Drawings
on October 13. 20, 27
Values
1. Deluxe Plexitone
Lullabye Crib .............. .$49.95
2. Fold-A-Rola
Stroller .... $16.95
3. Trimble
Bat iinette .................... $19.95
4. Storkline
Fold-A-Way Table ..... $34.95
5. Trimble,
Toilet Seat ... ......... $ 5.95
6. Kantwet Deluxe
Crib Mattress '. ........... $24.95
7. Kantwet Car Bed ....... $ 9.95
8. Childs
Nursery Chair ............ $ 4.95
9. Thayer Hi Chair ......... $12.95
10. High Style 3-pc.
Corduroy Suit ........... $10.00
11. A Tene' Original
Dress ............. $10.50
12. Luxurious Crib
Blanket ........ $ 8.95
and several more valuable gifts.


-4.,
Sherwin's Stork Club gets all Tn a
dither over birthdays so excited


that we start giving things away.


Look over the list-on the left.


Each'?


item will go, during October, to some


Lucky Ticket holder.


All. you have:


to do to get in on the fun is stop


in and register at


. Sherwin's Stork Club


1296 First Street


We rent baby furnRltre


"We deliver everything but the baby" !


UPTO .


I


MAKING ROOM FOR NEW MERCHANDISE


RACK OF DRESSES
VALUES 12.95 TO :1.9.95


SALE PRICE


5.95


RACK OF DRESSES
VALVES 16.95J TO 49.95


SALE PRICE




RACK OF DRESSES
VALUES 26.95 TO 89.95


SALE PRICE
1~5 0


WED.


THURS.


... :..* .


25


/


SKIRTS
I(LINEN) I
SIZES 10 TO 20
COLORS -


NAVY-NATURAL-BLACK-RED-AQUA-
WHITE-BROWN-BEIGE-YELLOW

REGULAR 12 95 .95
SALE PRICE \ Ir




EXTRA +


+++ SPECIAL
/ .,


17


SKIRTS


ORLON NYLON BOUCLE LINEN


REGULAR

SPECIAL

SALE PRICE


8.95 TO 22.95




5000


RACK OF DRESS
VALUES 13.95 TC


SALE PRICE


4.,e
\-'


SSES


) 22.95 .



7.95.
. *


_".4
RACK OF4DRESSE


RACK OF .DRESSES
VALUES 18.95 TO 65.00


SALE PRICE 1I C


A


ILA]


15


-VK
%., r.


SALE PRICE 15.00 to 75.00


1332 MAIN ST.


SAI


444. '


~~" k ,..9E~ I '


~ 4..
4..


- -.I.";


4.

. .4,
* Ib*.
S. "
* *'A-

0


.ALL SALES


COCKTAIL

5 .
S.. FORMALS:*
VALUES 29.95 TO 159.50


FRI. SAT.
FINAL NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES


P:CP LOVELY LADIES'
LASOTA 4-2251


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PI e 14 TWE NEWS Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1954


Venice-Nokomis


-y
TC
OUl
0)
C


Vw
Veni
*58


Venice

Coha

t
d


mmittees Selected

Chest Campaign
e area participation in 18 to 31, and will have a goal
nual Sarasota County of $68,900. This is $1,500 more
ty Chest drive will be than last year's goal, and some
ge of Louis Suter, Art $10,000 more than was actually
and J. T. Blalock, ac- collected, since the county-wide
to an announcement efforts fell short of the quota
today by Mark Woods, at that time, Woods said.
campaign chairman. Woods stated that the Venice
[ive will be from Oct.
ive will be from Oct. area had received direct as-
sistance in the last year from
m m at c* six of the eight agencies that
s O a c are members of the chest.
Woods said these included the
typng enter, County Welfare Home; where
fastw, hefer 11 of the 33 inmates are from
the Venice area; Happiness
House, the crippled children's
hospital, where 20 local young-
sters and adults received treat-
nient this year; the Gulfside
Area Council of Girl Scouts,
which maintains a full program
for local troops; the Sunnyland
Area Council of Boy Scouts,
which assists Boy Scouts, Cub
700 U Scout Explorer troops here and
OU ARE INVITED in Englewood; the Salvation
) EXAMINE & TRY Army, which has sent blankets
R NEW PORTABLES and food to destitute peo-
ROYAL ple here several times, and
STEMIHTON the Visiting Nurses Association
tliaseT Bacded Up By which has done some work for
. Complete Service local residents.
Department A canvas of the area will be
nice Stationers made. Those willing to donate
c Sa iher their services for the Venice
3ce, .Fla. Ph. 6201 area are asked to call Art Hig-
o. Tamiami Trail bie, Venice area Chamber of


Commerce, or send eontribi
tions direct t6 J. T. Blaloci
treasurer of local donations.


f To WELCOME
a : To the Blessed Event
f Sarasota County's Newest Baby


'I TheNews

from the
S Gulf Breeze Hotel, Venice, Florida

CYPRESS DINING ROOM
featuring
A simply grand Prime Roast Beef Dinner with all the trimmings for 1.75
As for 1w5t
A deluxe Dinner with your choice of Seven entrees, including Club 1.50
SIRLOIN STEAK 1.50
SA wonderful surprise DESSERT served COMPLIMENTARY with all dinners In
,. _. honor of the Blessed Event Taste this-suggest a name for it and win TEN DOL-
LARS. Judges are announced in another column. Five consolation prizes of Din-
ners for Two!
SHOURS: Luncheon 12 noon to 2 P.M. Dinners 5:30-8:30 P.M.
Sunday Dinner 12 to 2; 5 to 8 P.M.
Owner Management: The Zichecks. Your Chef-Paul Newell.
S The Cactus Room is available for Private Parties. Cocktail Lounge with Gordon
1 Gaskin at the Piano. Jack Carroll, your Mixmaster with King Size Cock-
tails-your choice-50c; from 11 A.M. to 2 A.M.
,> SUNDAYS 1 P.M. to 2 A.M.-Phone Venice 4111.
L ~ ~~~~~~~~ ~ ~~ -JJ -- L


W/ecome


'I




















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to Ie


new afternoon paper,


TheilNews


J/


I..
l


Sa aot


County!


The Breezeway Suprex Mariet brings to the Venice area shoppers
new conveniences in time and distance to residents and
visitors alike. The Breezway parking facilities will "Serve MORE
people BETTER" and we greet the new paper as evidence of
the great growth .of our area.

Air Conditioned to provide shopping comfort


Pet"


AlUigator


New Nurse

Joins- Staff

At Vepice
The Venice area gets its first
fulltime public health nurse
with the establishment of Miss
Jean Vistrand, R. N., in the
Venice Civic Center office
with Charles Holmes, sanitar-
ian with the Health Depart-
ment.
Miss Vistrand joined the staff
of the South Sarasota County
Health department Sept. 1. She
is a graduate of the Warren
General Hospital, Warren, Pa.
She received her bachelor of
science degree in public health
nursing from the University of
California, Los Angeles. She has
had experience in hospital, pri-
vate duty and public health
nursing, and served in the
armed forces from 1942 to 1945.
.Miss Vistrand will carry on a
health program increasing the
public health services which
will cover the south county sec-
tion of the Venice area'start-
ing below Stickney Point Road,
and south to Englewood.
Included In the program will
be the control of communicable
diseases, infant and pre-school
health and others.


Many Vacationers

Return To Osprey


Missing In Venice
VENICE-"George," the ed-
ucated alligator and a featur-
ed attraction at the MacArthur
Beach Hotel here for many
months, has apparently had
the urge to travel since he has
not been seen in his familiar
haunts for several days.
"George" made his home in
the murky depths of a canal
near the hotel and few guests
would leave without a trip to
feed the star boarder.-
ANSWERS TO NAME
A notorious free-loader,
"George" us u a 1 y appeared
promptly when his name was
shouted in the vicinity by
George Lee, MacArthur Beach
manager.
Biscuits seemed to be his fa-
vorite fare, but:he .was not ad-
verse to accepting anything
which looked like it might be
edible.
"George's" whereabouts is
still undermined, but Lee still
makes daily trips to the canal
hoping he has reconsidered and
returned.


CHOOSE


FROM THESE


OUTSTANDING VALUES

Ladies Cotton Dresses (small to large)
$2.95 to S14.95
Ladies Shorts -large selection -1.19 to 4.95
Special on Sweaters Vicara & Wool
MfenU. S. Keds
SPECIAL On all Mens Shorts Shirts and
Briefs (National Name Brands)
Walking Shorts Hobby Jeans & Slacks
Pepperell & Springmaid Sheets & Cases.
(Percale & Cotton)
Pepperell Wool Nylon Blankets
Pastels Colors
Ladies Shorty large selection 1.19 to 4.5


' /


.


CY BLUE


GIL WOLF


CY BLUE PLUMBING
Bonded Plumbers

SALES & SERVICE
24 Hour Service
Phones
4-5692--4- --4-6927


APPLIANCE CLEARANCE

WE naven'One Each Of The FroowIg


FRYRYTE DEEP FRY .........
KNAPP MONARCH AUTO.
COFFEE MAKER ...................
ARVIN ELECTRIC
IRON .. ....... .................
BLACK ANGUS
ROTISSERIE ....................


$20.00

$45.00

$5.69

$24.95


Barber


Shop


5762 Hollywood Blvd.
Oliver J. Gordon. Sr.


Hamilt0n
n extend-
i, W. Va.
n are the
ey Food
.ey Ryall
ome here


I


OPEN AGAIN


Fred Donnely and daughter
Martha, have returned to their
winter home. They have spent
the summer in Ohio.
Many winter visitors and
vacationing Osprey residents
have returned to their homes
with the beginning of the fall
season.
Mr. and Mrs. William Haase
of Casey Key have returned to


Lorena is moving ..


Swatch


Lorena's
1501 Cross St.


We'll tell you our new address mi
a,.ew days. In '"i&iean't ~ieie,'oihe
Sto '


'Beauty


Salon
Phone 3-5451


Your Neighboly...


a-
k,


RAIL


SHOPPING


R MERCHANTS

Are Here To' Serve You


MEATS
PICNIC FRESH auON 3m
HAMS ........ ....... b. .39 WicSmnN BEEF .... .


GEORGIA GRADE A
FRYERS ... ....


39c


FROZEN FOODS:
BIRDS EYE PEAS 4 -
10-oz. 2 for
SWANSON'S FRIED "O:L:
CHICKEN DINNERS
One Free With Each Purchase
DULANY FORDHOOK LIMAS'
10-oz. T.~
OrntATLn T TCXKV 2Uc!


TANGERINE JUic
6 Cans For


DAIRY
PRODUCTS
Tru Flavor
Amer. Cheese 70.
2 1b. pkg. 'I7C
Wilson's
Butter .... lb.6 c


SWIFT'S. PREMIUM. ,
WIENERS ......
FRESH FANCY PRODUCE


TOMATOES M :
2 Its.d#

3 for
CUKES
3 for


129



10s


MCELERY f
E 79c for'

GROCERY ITEMS
Diamond White Napkins (80 cunt) ...2 or 25c
Reechnmit Strained Baby Foods ........ 3 for 29c
Beechnut Junior Foods ....................... 2 for 29
Hellman's .oaronailse 16-oz. ....................,.. 41c
Fanning's IBread & Butter Pickles 15-oz.... 2
Hunt's Catsup 14-oz.. ... .;..r............. 18
Peter Pan Peanut Butter 12-oz........ .... ...35
Pard Dog Food ........ .............. for 29
Real Prune Juice 12-o. ....... .......... .13
Super Suds (1g. sie) ............................
Smuckers Apricot & Pinpapple Preserves .... 27c
-- ,*. ii .


Full Line of ITALIAN FOODS
MOZZARELLA CHEESE '
PROVALONE CHEESE
RICOTTA CHEESE
PEPERONI
LA ROSA SPAGHETTI & MACARONI
Home Made ITALIAN SAUSAGE
LOCAL BEER
In Throw-Away Botteles
6 FOR 99 -


5;"- ..


Thursday
Friday
and


Saturday
Specdile


Barton's Corner Sundries
Complete Line Sundries
24 HOUR PHOTO FINISHING
PATENT MEDICINES MAGAZINE
FOUNTAIN SERVICE
Phone 4-5693


their home, after spen
eral weeks with their
daughter in Oak Ridg
Mr. and Mrs. John
have returned after an
ed visit in Huntington
Mr. and Mrs. Hamilto
owners of the Ospr
Mart.
Mr. and Mrs. Barn
are in their winter he


New Ways with Flowers
can give a dramatic new look to your home. Come,
in to see us! Let's plan a personal approach to living
with flowers tha is yours alone.


Saraoita i/owe Spop
202 N. Tamiami Trail Phone 3-1251
SARASOTA, FLORIDA


SOUTH 1


CENTER]


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RIZZOTTO'S MARKET
A FROG STORE
South Trail Shopping Center Phone 2-0828
i_________i___.


Dave & Ozzie Hardware
Phone RI 4-5697


Ospre-luMrel
after an extended visit with
relatives and friends in Ohio.
Mr. and Mis. John Koheler
have returned to their home on
Casey Key. They spent the
sumnler visiting friends and
ding sev- relatives in Massachusetts and
son. and Minnesota.
ge, Tenn. Mr. and Mrs. Robert Ague


I


____~_


-


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i
I


The HOLLYWOOD SHOP
5766 Hollywood Blvd.
(S. Trail Shopping Center)'


For "he
'ii j,_ New Season

ST. ARMANDS KEY
| 3q'a r
Ieiaske
a -f'-


Gordon's


11


are at their h here, having
returned from a visit of several
weeks duration fin Arkansas
and Massachunetts.
Mrs. James Williams is re-
cuperating in her home from a
recent illness. he had been in
Venice Memorial Hospital re-
ceiving medical care.


* /


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P~lr~~W'~.~:'EliJ .n-~C~7.'~'~~iZ~? .' WI P' ~'~'s-lu': ~ 1
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S*


New Format

For dFlorida

Magazine
A new format and new ed-
itoral content emphasis will
greet readers of Florida
Speaks, quarterly magazine de-
voted to Florida living, when
it makes its appearance Oct.
23, according to Publisher Lou-
is 3J Roeri.
The October 'ssue will also
mark the end of the quarterly
publication of the magazine
which will become a monthly
publication with the January
issue, Boeri disclosed.
Founded in 1948, the maga-
zine has concentrated primari-
ly on selling Florida as a place
to visit, establish permanent
residence and set up new busi-
ness and industrial enterprises,
but in the future the magazine
will stress ways and means of
getting the most out of living
in the Sunshine State, Editor
Warren H. Pierce, former as-
sociate editor of the St. Peters-
burg Times, disclosed.


SarasotOc Memorialized


By New Hybrid ,Orchid


By LOU DURKIN deeper purple bell, or throat,
News Staff Writer is so new it has not even been
The c r ,d registered in the hybrid re-
The color eautyan growth sister of the American Orchid
of Sarasota are nowbeing me- Society which keeps a record,
morialzedin a new hybrdr- of all new orchid develop-
chid bearing the completely ments.
stable name, Lc Sarasota, a
development of Alberts and Pelot, a native of Bradenton,
Merkel Bros. Inc., Mandarin came to Sarasota in 1903 with
orchid growers. his father, who followed the
first railroad into Sarasota, and
The new flower,, one of the has lived here since that time.
most exciting orchid develop-
ments in recent years, has not SOUGHT RARE PLANTS
been placed on the market as A cabinet maker until he was
yet, but John and Helen Pelot, forced to retire seven years
Glengarry Rd. orchid growers, ago, he worked closely with -his
have obtained one of the stid wife, Helen, in developing their
plants from the east coast firm hobby to the commercial stage.
and have it on proud display in Before the hobby grew into a
the-living room of their home. business s the Pelots travelled
The beautiful flower is the re- throughout the state visiting
sult of the crossbreeding of a 'nurseries and "jungle gardens"
Cattleya Atlanta and LcVal- in a quest for rare and unusual
encia and is now being used in plants of all types and then pro-
the development of other hy- ceeded to raise them.
brids. Their yard on Glengarry Rd.


HELPFUL HITS BEGAN AS HOBBY
HELPFUL TS The Pelots, who started col-
The change in emphasis electing and growing orchids as
which became apparent in the a hobby 20 years ago and saw
summer issue of the maga- their hobby develop into a full-
zine will be reflected in articles scale commercial enterprise,
dealing with Florida homemak- were allowed to purchase one
ing, gardening, workshop pro- of the new plants with the
jects, recreation and sports i understanding that they would
Florida, and travel in the state understanding that they would
not sell it or use it for repro-
land the Caribbean area. duction until they were given
Many of the articles will con- permission by the developers.
tain helpful hints on do-it-your- The plant, which has
self. smooth-edged violet leaf and a
The change in emphasis, ac-
cording to Boeri, was decided .
upon because of the tremen-
dous influx of new people into
the state as permanent resi-
dents who will need hints on
adapting themselves to the new
style of living which is as much ?
a part of Florida as the cli- .
mate. :
"As the nation's only sub-
tropical.state, Florida is unique
in its living problems and by I
concentrating on these topics
we feel that we can be of real
help to Floridians in enjoying.
life here," Boqri said
The magazine will continue
to devote increasing space to
Cuba and Central, and 'South
America with, emphasis on
trade and commerce, between
the Latin American countries
these countries, and the travel,
and Florida, the gateway to
recreation, and business p9ssi-
bilties in these nations.
Eire's new census of distri-
, butio. shows the, county has he
e The Orchid


COMBINATION r
The precision built reef, the
"know how" of the fisherman. *
Precision and "know how"
in tIhe making of heating
equipment gives you the
right combination for qual-
ity.


7 GENERAL ELECTRIC
I'EML3Yl3 HEATING
;- installed with the
G. E. Oil or Gas Fired Furn.e\


J. M. Rhoades Co.
347 So. Pineapple Doy, Phone 2
Night Phonk 4.0351


AA"


U. aB


See The New

1954 TRAILERS
(26 to 42 Foot)
Your Mobile Home Is Available
In Many Luxury Models

ON DISPLAY:

Aluminum Room Awning
And Cabana


WHITLEY
Mobile Homes of Florida

225 N. Washington Blvd.
Neear The Courthoue
SARASQTA, FLORIDA


is a miniature jungle of rare
and colorful plants with names
as bizarre as the color com-
binations.
Unlike most orchid-growers,
Mrs. Pelot frankly scoffs at the
general belief that orchids are
tender, hard-to-raise' plants and
insists, in fact, that, a little
suffering is good for he or-
chid."
PLANTS "HUMAN"
She regards the plants as al-
most human and claims that


they will grow in practically
any surroundings where hu-
mans live comfortably, even in
northern apartments as long as
there is plenty of air and sun-
shine.
A hardy, long-living plant de-
spite its fragile beauty, the or-
chid is rapidly gaining in popu-
larity among amateur garden-
ers and many Florida rooms
are being converted into orchid
rooms.
The Pelot greenhouses and
slat houses are jammed with a


wide variety of orchid plants
in various stages of develop-
ment from seed flasks to
blooming potted plants.
A wide variety of plants
ranging from the tough, hardy
cattleyas, the m o st popular
type and the one most often
found as corsages, to the new
and rare Sarasota are found in
the green houses while specie
plants cling to the trees in the
yard.
.In addition to the plants in
various stages of development
which will be sold wholesale to
florists as blooms or plants or
to individuals, the Pelot nur-
sery also houses the orchid
plants of many winter time
residents.
In her "orchid rooming
house" Mrs. Pelot takes care


of the pl~ats of the season visi-
tors and has theA in good con-
dition when the owners arrive
for the winter. :
Among the orchids being
boarded at the present time is
the Fred Albee orchid, a new
strain developed by the Alberts
and Merkel firm and named
and registered by the Pelots in
honor of the late Dr. Fred Al-
bee, noted Venice surgeon and
bone specialist.
As close to the hearts of the
Pelots as their orchids are the
crotons which they produce,
many of which bear names
given by the Sarasota couple.
SA new strain now being de-
veloped will bear the name of
Sar Sota, but they are waiting
to make sure that it lives up to
its early promise.


I t
4- \


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r


- R. T. FREEMAN


40c Suppositeorles


25c Zinc Oxide Ointment _g 1
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100 Vitamin .1 Tablets 00 m g 4
(Save 2.00)


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REAL ESTATE
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... and we'd like to suggest that you inspect available
properties with several Realtors before coming to a de-
cision.

Naturally, we hope you'll call on us for assistance
since our listings are many and varied in homes, home-
sites, rentals, commercial and income property.

At the friendly Gill-McCully office you'll find a staff
of experienced, conscientious sales people who believe in
making every effort to find what you- want in your price
range without any high pressure or "pestering" at any
time.

If you have property you would like to sell or .rent
may we invite you to list it with us.




Any Time


Is A Good Time...


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Gill-McCulley, Inc.


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Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1954 .THE NEWS


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250 Brewer Yeast Tablets --.. ..,
$1.25 Absorbine Jr..........


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and other leading Domestic and Canadian Exchanges


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6 TIHE NEWS Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1954


keyser

Doubts GOP

'GiveAways'
yMerryle Stanley Rukeyser
laternational News Service
Economic Commentator
Sometimes in an election
Year, politicians, vying for!
Votes, create popular miscon-
ceptions about the economic re-
allties.
It is important for business,
executives, investors and spec-
ulators tomundertake to separ-
ate fantasy from truth in mat-
tes relate to te''ecooii mic
te d i ....................... ...
Thau those who are trying tc
wret control of -the Congress:
from President Eisenhower's
Admthitration 'have been ex-
ploiting the allegation that this
h i'abeen 'igive-away Aduin'-
Sy way of proof, the. critics
referto Mr. Elisenhower's cool-
m a to public power, to his
seeming willingness to let pri-
votb enterprise participate in
the peaceful use of atomic en-
'ogy, and to the President's
Stdland oil policy. In- order to
4p1t emotional strain behind
such comment, the critics try
to overstate the depths of the
economic readjustmet 'which
took place between the sum-
mer of 1053 and that, of 1954,
sad they' charge that the Ad-
amilstration was calloused to-
,ward aueh unemployment- as
*deIeoped, ''" "
Implicatlons
rom a. non-political stand,
point, it is pertinent to seek the
lobg implications of the attack
based on th. concept that Pres-
idept Eidehbwer and his ad-
visers are: genuinely devoted
tol the free enterprise, pkijate
property system. The criterion
for averse comment is the;
background of the New Deal
aa4 the Fair Deal, which blend-
ed free enterprise with increas-
lag governmental participation
ina economic affairs, and called
the resultant amalgam a mixed-
economy.,
TM, proponents- of more' col-
leciviration argued that the
aew plannitig Wbfld utilize and
blend the best aspects of free
Enterprise and Socialization,
;but the fallacy lay. in .trying to
'tse mutually exclusive eco-
.*mic recipes. Irrespective of
I(h' immediate political cose-
qu.encs, Presaieft Eisenhower
should plead "guilty" to the
charge oft being devoted -to'
the AmLerican economic system
based o freedom of choice for
workerss and customers.
TfADITIONAL VIEW
R ut: what, about the specific
'Sharge that the Administration,'
.*faeoring special interests, such
as businessmen and investors,
have been "giving away" na-
ional assets including atomic
research data, power re-
etureel, and tideland oil?
What is really significant in
udih vituperation is the frame
f jreferieace of the critics. They
evidently, after the corruption
of standards of free enterprise
wonder the New Deal, and the
fair Deal, have forgotten thbt
"nder the American system the
production and distribution of
wealth is supposed to be han-
dIed by individual citizens and
-' agtegates of men (corpora-
tlons) acting independently of
government.
T'adltionally, this view that
lovermUent was to foster free
:Witerprise was expressed in
tand grants to pioneer railroads
and the granting of free home-
seads to individual rural set-
'tler. The social warrant for
snel giving was the belief that
individuals and companies thus
tainudated would contribute to
(he common good' by building
up the national economy.
Nowadays, with the Federal
kqroresment a silent partner in
y successful private enter-
-prlC there is more justifica-
taon than ever in governmental


:atio which promotes the ma-
Ierial wellbeing of the people.

Georgia Counties

Got Drought Help
' AI*ANTA (INs) -' ..rty.
-'thrf more Georgia Ointies
'hav been made eligibW for
Irewuht relief today.
This brings the total number
I ceuties to 141 receiving
an. through the Farmers
.jae Administration, the loans
3ing repayable at low rates.
sen. Walter F. George wired
yov. Herman Talmadge of the
additional counties that had
Aen designated by the acting
secretary of agriculture.
)' M. Guy Puckle, 56, wife of
v' London stockbroker, who
a had six husbands, is term-
ed a likely candidate for the
mythical title of Britain's
"moet married wife."


Football


"~ia~m-~ -c--- -

..., .


N'' <. -
1'IMS. FANNIE CROCKER CJRTIS, oldest native born
resident of Srrasota, signs up for home delivery rf
THE NEWS. Mrs. Curtis has lived her entire life in the
house near the corner of :Osprey Ave. and Bee Ridge
Rd., where she was born on July 7, 1873.-NEWS Staff
Photo.


News Of Record Mrs. Beaman


,MARRIAGE LICENSES 3
Martin Albert Sekulski, 36,
and Elizabeth Mary Mahoney,
24; both of St. Petersburg, Fla.
Raymond D. Gambacorta, 15,
of Sarasota: and Emily 'Willis,
23S, of Knoxville, Tenr.essee.
Byron G.'Giltz, 50, of Ma-
deira Beach, Fla. and Frances
Mhr 'i 1nl'ar 4'. 1 t.l f P' -!r".-


Dies At 69


Mrs. Josephine V. Bcaman,
69, of 1716 North Tamiami
Trail, died this morning at
Saracota Icm:orial Hospital,
She had been a Sarasota res-
ident since 1492, coming to
this ci:Ly from Tcaneck; N. J.


bu Sli is survived by her huc-
bu- "' band, G-eorge B. Beaman, two
Robert Thomas McMillan, Jr. sons, J. B. Beaman of San
20, of Miami, Fla. and Ida Lou- Antonio, Tex. and George B.
is6 -GInden, 18, of Sarasota. Beaman, Jr. of F!'l.adelnhia,
Suits Filed In Circuit Court Pa., two :'.t cs iE:~s Mary'
J. W. McDonald vs. Ethel O'B''ri', ad'' .-d. 7- .rc.
Maed conald,IDivorceiadMri. .rc
M. :McDonald, Divorce. Rosenfield, both of Chiago and
A. Edward Krieger, Jr. et al five grandchildren.
.vs. Meredith Krieger, a mihor, Requiem mass will be held
et al, Bill to Set Aside Will. at 9 a, m. Friday at St.
FINAL DECREES Martha's Catholic Church, Rt.
Bobette McCormack vs. Qil- Rev. ,Msgr. Charles E!slandcr
bert R. Herringtdn et -x, et al, officiating. Interment Will be in
Certificate of Title to lot 5 of Manasota Cemetery.
block 11. Sarasota Beach sub.


Arzie Floyd vs. Ernestine Ligrht Poles
Floyd, Final pecree for Divorce
after Decree Pro Cbnfeszo.*
LydiaW Wra y. v,. Clifford 1 eit
Wray, Final Decree for Divorce
after Decree Pro Confesso. Workmen this week began
Venice Nokomis Bank vs. planting the new aluminum
Earl Acree et ux, Summary Fi- poles and fluorescent lighting
nal Decree 'luminars at the west end of
John W. Summers vs. James Main Strcct.
R. Herrington et ux, Satisfac- The new lighting system,
tion of Lien on lots 2 and 4 which will be turned on for the
block J La Linda Terrace sub. first time on Oct. 21, the 75th
. In Re: Connie Lee Bacon, a anniversary of the discovery of
minor, Final Decree of Adop- incandescent lighting by Thom-
tion by Raymond Lee et ux. as A. Edison, extends from
In Re: Infant Cheshire, Final City ,Pier to Orange Avenue
Decree of Adoption by Teo Zac- along Main Street.
chini et ux. Fluorescent lighting is being
State of Florida vs. Nancy used on the Main Street stan-
Caudill, Termination of Pro- dards for its decorative value
bastion. and because it will blend more
State of Florida to The First readily with the neon lighting
Congregations C h u r ch of on downtown stores.
Sarasota Inc., Charter. Another phace of the overall
State of Florida to Sports- long range street lighting plan
men's Club of Sarasota Coun- will be the erection of mercury
ty, Charter. vapor lights on main highways
COUNTY COURT (PROBATE) er nd leaving the city.
In Re: Rowena A. Blcackley, BEST TYPE
deceased, petition for letters The mere-ry vapor luminars
ecesed, pt e are considered the best type for
c Re: Howard C. Rudder- illuminating heavily travelled
ham, deceased, petition for let- greater lightng.
ters testamentary. greater lighting.
ters testamentaryhe long range lighting plan
In Re: Theordore Hartman, also provides for the installa-
no administration. tion of incandescent lights in
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS residential areas to illuminate
(TAX STAMPS INDICATE dark stretches and at dangerous
SALE PRICE) intersections.
C. H. Gay Sr. et ux to Rich- The downtown lighting sys-
ard K. Warner lots 9 and 10 tem will be completed next
block 15. Peat of Nokomlis sub., year, according to City Man-
$700. ager Kenneth Thompson when
King and Smith I n c., *to it is extended to Washington
Harry Berk et ux lot.13 block B. Boulevard and the other por-
Forest Lakes sub., No. 1, $5,000 tions of the project w ill be
i R. 'E. Coons et ux to Walter completed over a longer pcr-
Reid et ux replat Dropertv lo- iod.


cated in Carver Park Unit No.
2. $4,000.
R. E. Coons et ux to Buster
James Cohen et ux property lo-
cated in replat of Carver
Park Unit No. 2. $4,000.
R. E. Coons et ux to Joseph
Anderson et ux property lo-
cated in Carver Park Unit No. 2
replat, $4,000.
R. H. Lppshire et ux to Sam-
pson Mays at ux lot 191 replat of
Carver Park No, 2. $400.
Charles H. Lowry et ux to
Earl E. Striplin et al lots 16
and 18 block A. Nacirema sub.,
$1,500.
0. W. Caspersen et ux to Dun-
bar C. Gordon et ux lot 81 Gulf
Shores No. 1 and Lot 1 Gulf
Shores No. 3 $2,400,
Eastern States Realty Cor-
poration to Russell O. Estle et
ux lots 50 and 51 Sunset Beach
Unit No. 1. $1,000.
HarveS W. Buckmaster et ux


FUND SET UP
GAINESVILLE, Ga., (INS)-
The Gainesville,-Midand Rail-
road has established a $2,500
furid to provide scholarships for
students in poultry husbandry
at the University of Georgia.


to Erwin Harrison et ux lots
1 and 2 and NI/ of lot 3 block
3. Mira Mar Beach Extension
sub., $8,000.
Robert /E. Hunter et ux to
Robert E. Hunter and Mildred
J. Hunter lot 29 block 1. St.
Armands Division, $100.
Edward J. Killingbeck et ux
to H. M. Ledbetter lot 20 block
1. St. Armands Division, $100.
Edward J. Killingbeck et ux
to H. M. Ledbetter lot 13 block
2. Pine View Terrace sub., $200.
Lee W. Gould et ux to Dallas
E. Bever et ux lot 2 block A.
Hartland Park sub., $100.


I j


S`oar


Injured In Fall
A former Sarasota High
School fOothall star was injured
in a fall today while working
on construction of the addition
to the Sarasota Memorial Hos-
pital.
Donald Pike, Aloha Trailer
City, fell from the third to the
second floor, a distance of about
12 fct. He was admitted to the
hospital where X-rays showed
no fractures.
Pike was employed as a
plumber by subcontractor Jack
Perez. A 1952 graduate of Sara-
sota High School, he starred in
the Sailor backfield during his
junior and senior years.

Hospital News
Sarasota Memorial Hospital,
Oct. 5, 1954.
ADMISSIONS: Mrs. Myrtle
Cooper, 238 S. Links St.; Mrs.
Annie J. Dingwell, 1675 Haw-
thorne St.; Mr. Bert E. Dixon,
117 Oak Terr.; Mrs. Margaret
Estridge, 411 Pearl Ave.; M,.
George Hennigar, 2200 Mietaw
Dr.; Mrs. Ruby L. Long,
E. Bahia Vista; Mrs. Edna
Matthews, 134 Roselawn Ave.;
Mr. Emile Monjo, 1469 Shade
Ave.; Mrs. Mary Esther Moyer,
265 Gulf Dr.; Mrs. Mary M.
Oakes, Rte. 4, Box 917; Mrs.
Kate W. Privett, 630 S. Orange
Ave.; Mrs. Gena Waldrop, 2441
Hickory Ave.
DISCHARGES: Mr. Donald
A. Gray, Twin Shores Trailer
Park; Mr. William M. Turner,
2370 Waldemere; Mrs. Ruby
Wehder, 5231 Riverwood Dr.;
Mrs. Rit a Whiteman, 1853
Grove St. Births: Mr. and Mrs.
George H. Spanos, 524 Edwards
Dr., Uplands.

Sewing Society
,eeLs Tomorrow
St. Martha's Sewing Society
will hold the season's first
meeting tomorrow in the Old
Parish Hall from 2-4 p. m.
Mrs. H. Melsin, chairman of
the society,' has extended an
invitation to all former mem-
bers and to new members to
attend the opening meeting.

Chicago Cattle
CHICAGO (INS) -Cattle.
salable 11,000; strong; calves;
salable 500, steady; choice to
prime steers 25-2925; common,
to choice 16-2450; yearlings
2850; heifers 14-25; cows 7-14;
bulls 10-1525; calves 14-23;
feeder steers 15-2275; stocker
steers, 15-23; stocker cows and
heifers 10-19.


The sentence, meted out by
Judge Ben C. Willard in crimi-
nal court, was the first prison
term ever drawn by Fulford
despite 43 previous arrests.
The admitted "cop-hater"
had been convicted only once
-on a misdemeanor charge.
But yesterday a six-man ju-
ry, after three hours of deliber-
ations, found hom guilty of as-


THE SMOKEY MOUNTAIN BOYS, who will appear at
the Florida Theater tomorrow.


Roy Acuff, Capitol recording
artist, will make a personal
stage appearance in Sarasota
at the Florida theatre tomor-
row with a matinee and two
night shows. It will be a full
stage show with over 20 per-
sons on stage.
Acuff's added attractions will
be the Cedar Hill square danc-
ers, Mother Maybelle and the
Carter sisters, 'nita and
Helen.
One of the top record sellers
in the country Roy Acufz has
a long list of big hit records
and in true Acuff fashion his
latest release on Capitol Rec-
ords Streamlined H e a r t
break" and "I'm Planting A
Rc3C" is moving towards the!
top of the hillbilly hit parade.
Roy Acuff himself an out-*
standing artist, is quick to see
talent in others and so has sur-
rounded himself with a group
of entertainers of outstanding
talent and personality. His fast
moving and highly entertaining
show presents the best in mu-
sic, comedy, and singing and
is the real down to earth kind

Georgia Cattle


ATLANTA (INS)-The North
Georgia Cattle Market w as
steady to 50 cents higher with
calves fifty cents to $1. higher.
Good slaughter steers, heifers,
and yearlings brought $17. to
$20. Good and choice slaughter
calves brought $13. to $19.


EEACHCOMBER RESTAURANT
I'ORTH TRAIL AT *HITFIELD ESTATE
SEAFOODS STEAKS CHOPS
DINNERS
Open Sundays Closed Mondays
Hours 8 A.M. fo 9 P.M.

We Received Favorable Menfion In
"Business Week" of Sept. 11fh


OPENS SATURDAY

* HALLOWEEN SUPPLIES A
* NEW JOKE ITEMS .
* LATEST MAGIC TRIX, *
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for your money today
awyf amoui ap t $300



COMMUNITY
FINANCE SERVICE, INC. OF SARASOTA
1529 Main Street Phone: RIngling 6-6091


of show that everyone from
the youngsters right up to the
old folks find to their liking.
Featured with Roy are: The
Smokey Mountain Boys,. Pap
and his jug band, bashful
Brother Oswald, Pete Kirby,
Joe Zinkan, Jimmie Riddle and
his harmonica, Curley Rhodes,
Big Howdy Forester and Jerry
Johnson-girl vocalist.
Big Howdy Forester and Jerry
Job:.". .."-"... 1 Vo-*vC" r .'?.


Walk
In
Seats


.. 3 on
U.S. 41
DEAN JERRY
MARTIN & LEWIS
"SAILOR BEWARE"
Sh


1 I...... (, o. ia a on
U.S. 41
FIRfT RUN SHOWING
'THE HITCH-HIKER"
EDMOND O'BRIEN
FRANK LOVEJOY
WM. TALMAN


saulting M i a m i Policeman
Raymond Parker on June 14
with intent to commit man-'
slaughter.
Parker was wounded in the
legs and chest by blasts from
Fulford's 12-gauge shotgun.:
The 21-year-old youth was
tried on a charge of assault
with intent to commit murder
but the jurors found him guilty
on the lesser count.


SHANGHAI'
Coming Sunday:
Oct. 10th,
See Saturday NEWS


" ; '. ,


.3 Miles North On The Trail
Venice, Fla.
Open 7:00 Show Time 7:30
FAMILY NITE $ per car
WEDNESDAY

R ROBE T MITCUM R. : -
JAiA SIMMONS maw

~ma -


Students ..... ..........$ S .
Children ........... .... 25c
Matinee or Evening
Including Tax


COURSE "

COUNTRY DINNERS $2.00
CHILDREN 12 & UNDER $1.25 UNDER,5 FREE


"ALL YOU CeA EATRT
FROM APPETIZER TO DESSERT
THE ONLY PLACE ON THE WEST
COAST THAT SERVES COUNTRY STYLE


Siesta Key,


Open Everyday From 5 to 9 Sunday 12 to 2 & 5 to 9


DON'T


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Show Bar

Cocktail Lounge

featuring

CHARLIE DAVIES
at the Piano every night except Sun..


Where Friends Meet


MIDNIGHT PASS RD.
At Crescent Beach
PHONE 9-3022


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VC IKIKEATRE


~----~


_ __ ---


--- -


1


I

Miami Gunman Given,

Lengthy Prison Term


i:ii .
i I
* I
i
j


i


MIAMI-(INS)-"Long John"
Fulford, the "Bad Boy" of Mi-
ami's ;notorious Cash Brothers
gang, has been handed a 10-
year term at hard labor for
assaulting a- Miari policeman
with intent to commit man-
slaughter.




Page 18 THE NEWS Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1954


.Ms. Mary C. Woodham and and F. O. Hanshaw, also of
I.Irs.'Fred Rich of Saraoc'0.a 'ot Sarasota, who brought in Five


a redfish, five snapper and two
grouper. Yo,-.:r" arrell Jack-


Sarasota


Initial


Session


Of Year
The Sarasota High School
"B" team will battle it out with
the Arcadia "B" team Thurs-
day afternoon in Arcadia. It
will be the opener of the season
for the junior version of the
Sailors.
Game time is 4 o'clock.
The "B" team is sadly lack-
ing in experience this year,
according to coaches Dick Ed-
wards and Jack Betz.
"The team is more inexpe-
rienced this year than any other
I have coached the 'B' squad,"
Edwards said. He pointed out
that most of the players are out
Sfor their first year.
"They have fine spirit," Betz
added. "They should give a
good account of themselves."
There isn't a single regular
back from last year.
The "B" team play is pat-
terned after the varsity
Sailors.
Bill McGinnis and Joe Bush
are expected to share honors
Sin the kickoff department while
Bill Hicks will do the punting.
The line will average about
160 pounds and the backfield
about 140 poeugps.
The probItble offensive start-
ing team wilrTihd Ed Doran at
left e n d, Ray Thacker, left
- tackle; Gary McKay, left
guard; Sonny Sears, center;
Joe Bush, right guard; David
Hurkett, right tackle; Bob Pres-
ton, right end; James McGee,


S:'. .. . .. .. ..r.i .
Sparetime


Whiteside Appliances led in
high team score last night in
the Bobby Jones Women's
Bowling League. Whitesides
piled up 2,649 in a game against
Plaza Restaurant. Plaza rolled
2,508.
Modern Cleaners was next
high with 2,595 and Lorena's
Beauty Salon was third with a
team high of 2,547.
Fran Mettie took off f i r s t
place honors with a high single
of 181. Lucille Higham and
Mary Harris tied for second
and third with 179's and Doro-
thy McGuckin was a close
fourth with 178.
Lucille Higham bowled 490
for the tops in three games.
Mary Harris was second with
a 469 and Brownie Earl was
third with 463.
The Elbow Room, leading in
the standings, copped only one
point last night. Lorena's Beau-
ty Salon and Modern Cleaners
are tied for second in the stand-
ings. Lorena's picked up three
points last night and Modern
Cleaners came through to cap-
ture four points.


Here are the
BOBBY JON
Whiteside


Sres
rES
App
1st 2


D. McGuckin 178
Mae Diehl 157
M. Hathaway 151
Jean Cannon 123
Fran Mettle 181
Sub Total 790
Handicap 158


quarterback; Jim Eadens left ;otal a41
halfback; Donnie Burquest,
right halfback and Bill Hicks Ginnis and Lloyd
at fullback. will replace Doran
On the ,k ick of f, Bill Mc- Bill Barton will all


'TEEN-AGERS'

F6r A Complete Line Of
PLAY EQUIPMENT
GENUINE LEVIS
H. S.( SWEATERS
AND ACCESSORIES
ITS
TUCKER'S
SPORTSMAN'S. CORNER
STATE AT PINEAPPLE


ults:
LEAGUE
liances
2nd 3rd Total
136 146, 460
144 158 459
139 150 440
157 138 418
93 124 398
669 716 2175
158 158 474
827 874 2649


and Preston.
ternate with


McGee at quarterback.
On defense, the probable line-
up includes Ken Chapman,
David Bartok, Bill Coutour,
Bush, Thacker, Hurkett, Doran,
Harrison, Eadens, McGee anC


H. Whit
G. Speic
B. Albrit
J. Hobd
Brownie
Sub Tot


Handica
Total


Plaza Resturant
1st 2nd 3rd Total
taker 147 139 153 439
cher 143 124 131 398
tton 103 130 139 372
y 123 145 154 422
Earl 151 150 162 463
:al 667 688 739 2094
ip 138 138 138 414
805 826 877 2508


Jimmy Gardner
1st 2nd 3rd Total
D. Harbert 119 144 135 398
H. Murphy 150 157 140 447
Ann Werren 98 116 124 338
M. Weirauch 152 137 126 415
M. Conklin 124 131 102 357
Sub Total 643 685 627 1955
Handicap 182 182 182 546
Total 825 867 809 2501
Elbow Room


Janet Burke
Sally Peek
Ruth Wilson
M. Hurkett
A. Mueller
Sub Total
Handicap
Total


R. Marie
Ann Kra
Irene Ch
Betty Sc
M. Quest
Sub Tot,
Handica]
Total


1st 2nd 3rd Total
129 122 157 408
148 148 147 443
143 94 105 342
150 158 115 423
138 149 130 417
708 671 654 2033
142 142 142 426
850 813 796 2459


E. J. Bacon Co.
1st 2nd 3rd Total
e Piper 142 147 160 449
aft 164 168 129 461
mase 114 147 124 385
>wers 134 122 123 379
tionati 170 137 144 451
al 724 721 680 2125
p 118 118 118 354
842 839 798 2479


Modern Cleaners
1st 2nd 3rd Total


E. Wardell
Louise Ulmer
Muriel Keck
J. Wilson
L. Higham
Sub Total
Handicap
Total


119
114
121
128
179
661
192
853


119
148
159
101
172
699
192
891


119 357
107 369
165 445
129 358
139 490
659 2019
192 576
851 2595


Gus' Bar


Fran Moon
B. Schermer
Ruth Brim
(Blind)
Beulah Lieb
Sub Total
Handicap
Total
Lorena's

Irene Komo
Lorena Dick
V. Evans
AmyElliott
Mary Harris
Sub Total
Handicap


McGinnis. Total
Sarasota "B" team will play STAI
Fort Myers at Sarasota, Oct.
13; Fort Myers there, Oct. 20; Elbow Room
Bradenton there, Oct. 26; Ven Lorena's ty.
ice there, Nov. 6; Bradenton Modern Cleane
at Sarasota, Nay. 10 and Ar- Plaza Rest.....
cadia at Sarasota, Nov. 16. E. J '1con Co
All are night games except WI J es Ap
the opener. Gus jar ........


1st 2nd 3rd Total
118 146 155 419
67, 85 103 255
123 145 106 374
116 116 116 348
169 130 146 445
593 622 626 1841
219 219 219 657
812 841 845 2498


HERB SJOLAlHEEL'S




Fis .h ,
, ii


A standard day for most folks, but here, a new paper,
a new fishing column and frankly I'm a little scared. It
has been a lot of fun helping to keep you abreast of the
local fishing over the radio and I hope this new column
will be an additional help. So here goes -


301 Victories For
Willie Shoemaker
SAN BRUNO, Calif.-(INS)-
Wee Willie Shoemaker stands
alone today as a record-break-
ing winning jockey with more
than 300 victories to his credit
this year.
"The Shoe" booted home four
winners yesterday at Tanforan,
the San Bruno horse track,
south of San Francisco.
With the four victories his


NEW PASS CAMP-Opens to-
morrow. The trout are hitting
well in the bay up that way
and it should be a good spot to
fish, daytime trout fishing in
the bay and nighttime snook
fishing off the bridge.
R. M. McFarland, Sarasota
landed a two and three quarter
pound pompano which he en-
tered in the Sarasota County
Anglers' C 1 ub tournament.

Ch1tev PrwO 11 SOf


mark for the year reached 301. before he landed it. Donald
SAN FRANCISCO -(INS)- Groff, Lancaster, Pa. had eight
Hank Sauer Sees Gigantic Charley Powell gets snapper, a sheepshead and a
his first chance tonight to bluerunner. Mrs. Kruger, Bra-
Trade In Offing show the nation's televiewers deton, had 11 reds and three
LOS ANGELES (INS)-Hank if he's as good a fighter as snapper, while Mark Carter
Sauer, the CHICAGO Cubs slug- he was a professional football Sarasota, caught 15 reds and
going outfielder, said last night end. 18 snapper. Fishing in the bay
"There is a possibility" that he Powell, unbeaten in 12-pro by boat, Mr. and Mrs May,
might be traded to another fights, takes on experienced Sarasota and Floyd Dewey who
Baseball club, but he refused Charley Norkus in a 10-round works at the Post Office, the
to give the reasons why, bout. day before yesterday caught 38
. He denied the report that he .......... nice trout weighing between one
had said he or teammate Ralph and a fourth and one and a
Kiner might be traded to the a, r half pounds apiece. Yesterday!
SPhiladelphia Phillies. '& Mrs. Mary Heinrich and Mr.
; Dswey got three reds off the
Purdue Fears Letdown. ANSWES bridge.
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. STICINNEY POINT -Sheeps-
(INS) Purdue's undefeat- (Hoohee: Sammy White.) head and snook catches.
ed football squad was 1--At the age of eisht years. Two boats went out yester-'


Beauty Salon warned of a letdown today -The finish line. The eighth- day.
1st 2nd 3rd Total by -head coach Stu Hol- Te s in the course who
162 119 149 430 comb while the Boilermakers m p distance
117 n/ i7 3a aare called by their distance
117 114 137 368 prepared for Saturday's game from the finish line
121 135 127 383romthens ne
121153128 402 amped Pennsylvania and 3--es. Infractions of buffalo-
179 134 156 469 Duke team. hunting laws were punishable
700 655 697 2052 Purdue has defeated Missouri n
165 165 165 495 and Notre Dame while the Blue by whipping.
865 820 862 2547 Devils of Durham, N. C., have
NDINGS against a powerful Duke team. After defeating Tom Heeney
Won Lost Total edged Tennessee in their two in his second defense of the
10 13 games. heavyweight crown in July,
..1923, Gene Tunneyretired and
9 6 12 Saturday's contest looms as 1928, Gene Tunney retired and
rs 9 6 12 a show of strength between never competed again.
.. 8 7 11 the Boilermakers' brilliant,
7 8 10 passer, Len Dawson,- and Ted Lennox, member of the
p. 6-2 8 1-2 1-2 Duke's Jerry Barger, out- Michigan State varsity wrest-
...... 4 11 4 standing split-T quarterback. ling team, is totally blind.


Joseph Natato, Sarasota,
brought in 32 sheepshead,


Best TV Pix
in Town-

and ice-cold beer
to make you
appreciate it.

HiER-ew Tavern
o. Trail at Hillview
- -- r- --a ,. ..-s .s'


To


9-I"~~~, .l i~% .. , ---,--,--.--r-,,,_~3~~4~
'=mQW'-

:- .'~- .. --*-
A 1.. .



14 kli -y
.:' ,"__"


Welcome


The


FROM



BOBBY... JONES GOLF CLUB















Cccl al L .g;e

Grill

Dining Room
^l-T'^^'s C ~ y
> .


7 --- Pcur.2c~!s





,1 -W .Y._,: & "h'c Carts Available

Lu:ast Sportswear and clubs for your golfing
pleasure
E nt Sets- Used Clubs


VISIT THE GOLF STORE


f


*v, V I q<,


I


....... -- ---- --


r
1
ar IE~1~;o~


'B' Team


/


I


SPECIAL


SHIRT LEAlANCE


Values To

$3.50



Short Sleeves-
Cottons Rayons

Values To

$4.50


E@ S1C


Z~ e


c~kr


1935 S. Osprey Ave. Shopping' Center


^ws


Bob
IAqp,~


Lee
Poumder
Pro


, ,4 T -
., + ^,9 6


con caught two large snapper.
Jack Bishop of Atlanta, Ga.
and Harold Harris, during the
day caught 30 trout, fishing in
the bay, and last night Jack
landed a 16 poundsnook off the
bridge.
POP JANTZEN'S C A M P-
Reds, s n a p p e r and grouper
were the catch yesterday.
Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Gruben,
Morristown, N. J. on their
first trip caught 15 redfish, four
snapper and three group e r.
John Blue of Sarasota got a
redfish, four snapper and two
grouper.
SPORTSMEN' REST, End of
first Ringling Bridge-Reds and
snapper.
Bill Irish got a grouper and
three redfish. Elizabeth King,
two reds. Otto Olson, five reds.
Emile Sermet, 22 snapper and
two reds. And Edith Browning
got five snapper and a sheeps-
head.
DEMUS HART, first Ringling
Bridge-Lots of redfish and a
20 pound shark on spinning
tackle.
Ben Eisenstein and Mr. Cohn,
Sarasota, caught a large num-
ber of redfish while using spin-
ning tackle and Ben fought a
20 pound shark for 45 minutes


snook.
MIDNIGHT PASS CAMP-
Bait was running in through
the Pass last evening in solid
masses from two in the after-
noon until after dark. Keep your
fingers crossed for the mack-
erel and bluefish. Right now
there are large reds caught by
the bottom fishermen. And
please, release the small reds
under 15 inches. It's against the
law to take them and the Flor-
ida State Conservation officer
is going to crack down accord-
ing to Mr. A. F. McFadyen,
Sarasota County Agent.
Claude Severs, Lido Shores,
and William Ingler released the
small reds and kept ten which
weighed up to 81/2 pounds. They
also released eight small trout.
The limit size is 12 inches for
trout. They .kept five nice
sheepshead and three grouper.
Mr. and Mrs. R. Dotson, Potts-
town, Pa. got seven nice reds
weighing up to 9 pounds plus
four sheepshead, largest 51
pounds and four snapper and a
flounder. Ralph Spoor, Jo h n
Darcey and Ed Miller, of St.
Louis, got 11 reds, two of them
9 pounders, six sheepshead, two
bluefish and a bluerunner. They
trolled the mouth of the pass for
the blues.
NORTH VENICE JETTIES-
The first kingfish was caught
yesterday and,on spinning tack-
le. Boat fishing topped the rocks
for catches. 0. D. Hampson got


1 -M-9


TUC KER' S
DAILY REMINDER
SHOP EARLY

Nationally Advertised
Toys For Xmas
Now Arriving
Use Our Luyuwru -
Plan
STATE AT PINEAPPLE


[

i
I


I


/


OP


/


6


I





*i


the kingfish, plus two nice blie
fish. The Ed Parrents, Sftr
asota, and the Balbos, :of
Crown Point, Ind., in the
bay got three snapper, fi v e
sheepshead and five redfiih.
Mrs. Anne Glover and Mrs.
Ruby Jean Betzner, in the bay
got 33 reds, five sheepshead
and two snapper.
Doctor Bake Biddle, of Cas-
ey Key, was loyal to fishing
the rocks and got two reds, six
black grouper and two snap-
per.
TIDES
Wed. High-9:24 p. m. sun-
set-6:11 p. m.
Thurs. High-7:09 a. m. and
9:21 p. m. Low-1:18 a. m. a d
2:30 p. m.
Sunrise-6:26 a. m. Sunset---
6:10 p.. m. Moonrise 3:08
p. m- Moonset-1:23 a. m.
Listen to Herb every morn-
ing at 8:40 over WSPB, 1450 on
the dial.








Clemson Needs


King To Perk

CLEMSON. S. C. (INS) of those trick knees you never
Clcm:on Coach Frank Howard know about. But when I was
is in the aggravating situation getting the blazes beat out of
if a man with & brand new, me I put him in there. I had
'gh pov.crcd Rolls-R o y c e to."
.;ick on a bn-': country road Howard, whose Tigers lost to
cause his s: k plugs failed. Georgia by one touchdown with-
Howard said he knows he has out the services of King, broods
a football team that could take over his unhappy position. He
:n "just about anybody," but said:
*.n't explain why his grid-ma-i "You know, it isn't helping
'::ine stalls when injury-ridden me to grow any hair, this sit-
..ar quarterback Din King is nation. If King's in there, I'm
on the bench. He said: pretty sure I can win. Without
"I never built a teath around him, I might just as well not
a star. I just can't explain it, have a team. But it makes me
but the team doesn't seem to feel pretty darned good when
click when he's not in." he's okay."


Howards statement, if any-
thing, was conservative.
The Clemson Tigers, in losing
to V.P.I. looked sandlot without
King, championship with him.
. King went into the ball game
in the third quarter, after the


Howard has a tough one com-
ing up this Saturday with the
rampaging Florida G a t o r s.
Coach Bob Woodruff's Gator
team, perhaps one of the most
underrated squads in the South-
eastern Conference, is fresh
i G,


Gobblers had scored their """ r, upe win uvcl r -U-
game-winning 18 points. gia Tech and Auburn.
The 20 year old jupior y
sparked the Tigers to 21 first S r cuse
downs and 327 yards on the ,
ground and through the air. He W
passed 39 yards for the lone Ws 0-3
Clemson score.
Until King went in, the Tigers LOUISVILLE (INS) Syra-
had not made a first down, and cause of the International
their total offense was limited League won a rain shortened
to five yards. game from Louisville of the
Howard explained why he American Association, 6 to 3,
held back on King soy h last night to capture its first
held against the Gobbln r. HeKing so long game in the Little World Se-
against the Gobblers. He said: gmi


"I didn't know whether he
was ready to play. He's got one

Hudock Starter At
Center For Miami
CORAL GABLES -(INS)-
University of Miapmi football
coachh Andy Gustafson today
lamed sophomore Mike'Hu-
lock as the starting center for
'riday night's battle with Holy
Croas in the Orange Bowl.
Hudock will replace the in-
jured Ernest Tobey, who was
an all-state selection at the
-niddle spot last year and the
Hurricane's most valuable
, layer.


Tobey is nursing a leg in-
jury and may not even be
available for relief duty.
But they also will be up
against a two-y ear jinx
against teams from the north-
east. Two years ago Boston
University beat them and last
year it was Fordham.


The zNlews

CLASEFfieD
ADVERT SV
PHONE 4-8511
Charge- nrccounta nacpted if you
are listed In the Sarasota tele-
phone directory. 2c- per line dia-
tmiunt 1f p::Id within 7 days fol-
lowing first Insertion.
LLNE RATI:S:
I time, per line 15c


3 times, per
6 times, per


line
line


I month, per line


14c
13c
I Ic


DOWNTOWN OFFICE
Crees News Stand
1383 MAIN
DEADLINES: Line ads accepted
until 9 A. M. day of publication.


-----------------


1. Real Estate For Sale


Oyster Bay
Beautiful two bedroom, 2
.bath home. Living room
with natural fireplace.
Large screened enclosed
patio. Very well furnished.
Total price $26,500.00
with terms. For rent 6
month season at $1,600.
Exclusive
Contact Annaly Billib
with


Joseph E. Harriman
Realtor
75 So. Palm Ave. Ph. 2-7431
ATTRACTIVE t wo bedroom
home furnished in good taste
and surrounded by many beau-
4fitl kR &r 1nrte.d4 in of\es


1. 1:22 I~ EIL' tc- :'ie


SEE THIS
New 2-Bedroom Home
Terra:zzo 'loors
Jnaou:i:'d \Vindows
Lnrcg Kiicieln
L;:rge Drccze\vay
Panelrany HIlat
Ceramic Tiled EFIth
Carnort and extra shower in
utility room.
SOUTH SIDE LOCATION
AND LESS THAN
$10,000 with low down
Payment
Cobb Realty,
Realtors
1385 Main St. Ph. 63181 .

$9,950

New Ranch Home
Three Bedrooms, stone patio,
100' lot. South side edge of
City. Select your own colors.
ALMOST NEW CBS HOUSE
with breezeway and car port.
$5,500 full price on one acre
close in.
NEW TWO BEDROOM, close
to High School, Junior High
and grade school. $7,500
Terms.
MUDD-FULTON
Real Estate Phone 6-7401
"The House of Service"
412 South Washington Blvd.

2 HOUSES close in furnished.
For quick sale $9,800. Large 3
bedroom h o m e breezeway,
closed in garage 100 ft. lot $12,-
000. Pullins Realty. Phone


Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1954 THE


S1. Eral Estate Sale


7..... Ti -, Lrand new $.,Q 5 tile TIIR- E Dcdroom, two bath; 1. eal Estate Sale
:a'h 2 bccrc-c's Jaou''Co win- two fireplaces, on waterfront.
dw.-s, screened parch. Phone '11,530. Phone 9-1052. MODEIIN House on corner ac-
-.E Fe before you se or re. 4 bedrooms 2' tile bats
Houses ,, nr ore iu s ain 3 car ports. WEorksoyp complete
Houses For ale be. Fye Realtor, 1316 Main 3 ar pors. Works complete
WV:.Iin Dl:ance St. ,srvant quar:c's. reened bar-
bp~rnip Attic fan S29.500-7359'


THREE Ecd Room near Bay --
an.d Auditorium. Older house HOME and 5 acres few miles
h;s fireplace. oak f!co-:, ga- from city. $5,000 terms. Howard
rage fully furnished $10,500 D. Goehring, 4 Commercial Ct.
Owner 1224 6th. Tel. 45211
CLOSE IN- THREE small homes under
$8,500 $3,000 each. Howard D. Goeh-
NEAT 2 bedroom--sun room- ring, 4 Commercial Ct. Tel.
breakfast nook-dining & living 45211.
room-corner lot 1 car garage Real Fstate For Sale
stucco trees can arrange A NEW 3 bedroom CB house
very good financing-will take w n 15 m s of
car lot boat or what have in n5 minutes of re-
you for part down payment. cent Beach. 1 mile East of
Move right in Call owner SIESTA Drive-In. Phone 2-0742
after 5 p. m.
A REAL buy--one bedroom,
bnf, I .... ,u...... frnnt HEALTH'N HAPPINESS


and back porch 2 extra lots -
one with, fruit trees near bus
line north side for quick sale
all for $6500.00. Phone 2-6121.
1315 First St.


GOLFER'S Special. Lovely 2
B. R. 1 & 1/ Bath. Cypress
Home. The golf course is your
back yard. Unfurnished $19,500.
BERTHA M. FRANCKE,
REALTOR, 1363 MAIN ST.


TAKE
ADVANTAGE
of our
FLORIDA CLIMATE
THE purchaser of this new
house 2570 Davis Blvd. can en-
joy the casual living this mo-
dern house offers. Designed to
take advantage df our climate,


rles. u 2- 351 63 Was hington lne to blend the nside house with
Louisville's Colonels lead the desirable northside neighbor- 3-0351. the inside house with
best out of seven series, two hood a very comfortable small the outside planting, to give that
games to one. home. Asking price $10,750. NEW Duplex. 2 bedrooms, each extra quality we all enjoy.
The series now moves to Jerry Van Orden unit, carport between. Owner There is a 178 x 178 FLORIDA
Syracuse where the teams wil 12 S. Pineapple Ave. living iq one unit until sold. ROOM opening off 17' x 16'
meet tomorrow night. Phone 2-2261. Price $13,900. Easy terms can LIVING ROOM and 9' x 12'
John Meyer of the Syracuse be arranged. 1160 Guilford Lane DINING ROOM, giving a large
John Meyer of the Syracuse Here 'Tis' Ph. 5-2833. living area with big jalousied
Chiefs hurled two-hit ball but YOUR Future Home-it has windows, excellent cross ven-
was relieved in the seventh in- every south side location, BEAUTIFUL HARBOR ACRES dilation an plenty of light.
ig by Ken Pe EStilNtion and plenty of light.
ning by Ken Peterson. CB construction 3 large bed- EXCLUSIVE LISTING ... Three bedroonis, two tile baths,
The game was called on ac- rooms, 2 baths, livingroom with 1347 HARBOR Drive. This at- doAble car port.
count of rain with one on and fireplace, dining T, m o d e r n tractive ranch-type home, 4
one out in the first half of the kitchen with nook, j a lo u s ie years old, can be used as 3 bed- Price $22,500 Unfurnished.
eighth. The umpires waited 45 porch, 2 car garage, set on rooms, 2 baths, or 2 bedrooms Liberal financing. Complete-
minutes for the rain to stop but 100foot lot. All this for $22,500. and den or home office. Auto- ly decorated by Kane's.
when the downpour continued L. C. Siver natic heat, attic fan, perfect Exclusively Listed
they reverted the score to the Realtor kitchen. Large jalousied porch- STUART-EMBRY
end of the seventh inning. IFlorida Theatre Bldg. 6-141 es, 2 car garage. Kitchen equip- Real Estate
Meyer was the winning pitch- ment included. Quick sale de- 1771 Main Street
er and George Susce the loser. 'WORTH our ad ve r t i sin g; sired. Asking $27,500. Shown by NEAT and attractive new C. B.
Syracuse. 200 031 0-6 9 0 Worth your time to investigate; appointment' home. 3 bedroom, 1/2 baths,
Louisville 020 000 1-3 2 3 Worth the asking price of $12,- GILL-McCULLEY, INC., double carport. 70 X 138 ft.
(Game called at end of 7 in- 000. A completely and picely REALTORS landscaped lot. 1 mile from
"angs on account of rain.) furnished modern 2 bedroom Phone 6-6291 gulf, $10,900. Phone 3-5983.
SMeyer, Peterson (7) and Er- home in the city; includes 2
autt beautifully landscaped lots 75 NOW in your hands an easy IF INTERESTED in 3 bedroom
iSusee, Fowers (1), Herrin x 150' each. way to fill needs: The Classi- 1 bath frame house, high lot
F, Freeman (8) and Holton Palm Real Estate Co. 1582 Mr-' .:d section! See the Want Ads near school, shopping center &
W.' Meyer LP Susc 'St. Ph. 4-4281. 'W for whatever you want. bus. Call 4-7647-1009-23rd st.


1! t! 'L
0. ^^ L ^j


AND plenty of room for that
growing family living in this
excellent country home located
only two minutes from beach-
es. Very roomy two bedrooms,
11/, baths, 5 large closets; 22'
x 18' living room, dining room,
dandy all-electric kitchen and
two screened porches; car port
and utility room. Completely
furnished including T. V. Can
be purchased with small down
payment, balance at $75 per
month, Call 2-0742 after 6 p. m.
owner.


Ideal For One Person
Or Couple
LARGE livingroom, one bed-
roonm kitchenette and bath.
Comfortable modern furniture.
Terrazzo floors. Convenient to
bus and North side shopping
district.


See
Point
Blvd.


Price: $7,500


Elizabeth Moore With
Realty 1927 Ringling
Phone: 3-2171.


HARBOR ACRES
WATERFRONT
Seawall Cypress Dock
118 Feet On
Protected Yacht Basin
Solidly constructed two bed-
room, two bath home of
cement block with tile roof.
Spacious rooms. Living room
with two large picture
windows.
Unsurpassed View
and
Beautiful Location
Shown by appointment only


Shepard St.
Sarasota's Finest
2-Bedroom
2-Bath Home
Durable and Lovely
Large bedrooms 2 closets in
each. Living room with fireplace.
The two baths have electric wall
heaters. In 'addition there is a
complete and efficient oil heat-
ing system for entire house.
Custom built kitchen cabinets.
Sliding glass doors b tween
dining room and screened porch.
Oversized enclosed garage. Love-
ly landscaping. Owner has given
his personal attention to every
detail of this delightful home. It
is of the very finest construction
throughout lifetime roof, ter-
razzo floors, and furred walls.
Very reasonable terms,
$20.500
GRANT
REALTY


53 S. Pineapple Ave. Ph. 6-0241
S HARBOR ACRES
A Beautiful Home
2 Large bedrooms, 2 tiled
baths
Large living room
Dining room
Large kitchen with dining
area
Florida room off living
room with door to kitchen
*Utility area with laundry
tray and washing machine
connection
Large 1 car garage with
storage space
Concrete construction, ex-
terior stuccoed, interior
furred and plastered '
Barrel type concrete roof
Central hutoniatiC oil heat
on a Beaudiful lot
118' on yacht basin, with dock
100' street frontage
327' average depth
Landscaped with palms,
fruit trees and tropical
plants
PRICED WELL BELOW
REPLACEMENT COST
$34,500.00 Terms
Archer Vandervoort
Associated with
Joseph -M. Edwards
Realtor
1400 State St. Ph. 6-7042


3. Lots Acreage Sale ,


BEAUTIFUL Woo40ded Lot.
North Sid- t-i t nvitqidp nitv


JNrU e^Je'J. iJ.--jus oU.sJk Ce IT y
GRANT REALTY limits, near Bay. $2,575. See
53 S. Pineapple Ave. Ph. 6-0241 Maybelle S. or Fred W. Johns-
ton with Bertha M. Francke,
WISE buyers shop Classifie! Realtor, 1363 Main St.


ecue. AUK; ,dUl O.vluvv 6ur


Fye Realtor
1316 Main Ph., 6-1201


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* FRESH CCOKED CRAS IET -- Cw


* FRESH BiLUEFSH


9 FRESH 5
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3ce lb.
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63c Ib.

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3. Lots Acreage Sale


Worthwhile Investments
This newspaper is a tribute
to the growth of Sarasota.
Our building permits are
ahead of last year. We
have listed several proper-,
ties that can also help you
participate in the growth of
Sarasota and, make your
dollars grow:
No. 1. We have 22 lots in a
rapidly developing area in
the City of Sarasota. This
is a real buy for Developers
and SpeculatorsiThe lots in
-this area are now selling
for $500.00 a piece. This
group of lots is offered for
a total price of $5,500.00
No. 2. One of the choice
beach front tracts in Sara-
sota County. All cleared
and ready to build. It is of-
fered for $16,500.00.
No.. 3. We have a delux new
motel with swimming pool
and Gulf front privileges.
This property consists of 8
units, well furnished and
completely air conditioned.
It is well constructed and
has a beautiful apartment
for the owner. It is offered
for $65,000.00. Terms.
No. 4. A group of lots in the
Las Lomas Subdivision,
which is one of the highest
tracts of ground in Sara-
sota County. 15 -houses
are already under construc-
tiori. Street lights are in.
Swimming pool just com-
pleted. Docking ,privileges
for the development. These
lots are selling for a mini-
mum of $1,500.00. The prop-
erty is just outside City
limits (low taxes) close
to new school '- close to
beach. There are still a few
desirable lots available to
responsible builders with-
out any initial investment
until the house is sold.
Noj 5. 320 acres in Sarasota
County adjacent to large
tract of 72,0, acrere cent
ly sold *or- development.
This property has fronting
on the highway has a
well and small building -
ample shade and water. It
is offered for $49,00 an,/
acre. Terms. --c ,
No. 6. We have a new 3
bedroom waterfront home,
with servants' quarters, i
just completed in one of
our best subdivisions ln
Sarasota. We consider this
well worth your investiga-
,tion and under-priced at
$30,000.00.
No. 7. We also have sev-
eral new waterfront homes
in choice locations com.-
pletely air conditioned -
that are a pleasure to show
and worth the pribe asked.
We will be glad to make
Arrangements for you to in-
spect these bomes and be-
lieve they represent some
of the greatest values,._l-,
Sarasota County.
Seb Fye Before You
Sell Or Buy


I


/


Cf a
s


I


1


I I --- --






I


S. t *.Areage For Sale


j SUabDvlSION
ORiNGE GROVE PARK
LO* $0 20.00 DOWN
$5.80_MONTH. EAST ON
WEER. PHONE 2-74.


CLO 'in lot zoned for busi-
neuss )ley in back. $2,500.
How*ad D. Goehring, 4 Com-
merca, Ct. Tel. 45211.


4. Riiaj.Jltate Exchange


*


EXAGE or trade two bed-
rpon4:depez and beautiful lit-
tle bomIeAdditional property
for _t.& lon. Will trade for
two i-etm home, good loca-
tion, :dptIx rented 'for $2,400
per fear. James S. Simons
Realtor, 49 So. Pineapple.
Phonm 4-3171.


- e6.t Furmled
A V DIeirable TWO BED-
ROO$f jo.me on the South side
between the Trail and Osprey
Ave.,i practically new and in
perfect .condition. $115 per
- month Eugene M. Martin,
RealtPr, '26 Washington Blvd.
Ph. 3-9141.


COMPLETE six toom Spanish
type home patio, carport gar-
age and beautiful landscaping.
$1,000 yearly. Call Evening
56 Frank Greisiger 2521
Cental.


WANTED-Rental listings for
season d'year. Two and three
bedroormhouses furnished. Gulf
s Realty C 166 Main
treet. Phone 6-M.


'UIRISED bedroom or 2
edrdom. and one efficiency
me ow to school, shopping
utl its available Oct. 15,
usdo J. W80. all 4-1962 be-
ore i: 3 a. m. after 8 p. m.


.Loaded


1Pontiac 9
Cat in 9d
m Loaded
Loadudson $1495

195Packard


0y $1495

Delliy $695
Delljery

s2-1 3645
My other Makes &
Mooel_ o choose from
SPackard
sota Co
"YuPealer With A
| is ence"
.,q70Qingling Blvd.
I 'AL4-2311


6. House Rent


12. BusIness Opportunities
DOWNTOWN small retail store
that nets about $6,000. Sell less


1954 FORD V-8 ranch wagon.
Cannot be told from new. Pric-


gene M. Martin, Realtor, 626
S. Washington Blvd. Ph. 3-9141.


awap or hire, dial 4-8511.


FIr'ICluNCY apts. for rent.
Seasonal or yearly reasonable
rent 636 S. Osprey Ave.


SMALL apartment, cool and
quiet, separate unit. $50 yearly.
1863 Prospect St. Phone 6-3575.


17. Trailers For Sale Rent


COZY furnished one bedroom than cost on terms. Consider ed at only $1,875. Come see it
apartment 2039 3rd Street. trade for home. Phone 3-1893. and you'll buy it at this low
Phone 2-0121 or 3-4962. price. Whitley Mobile Home of
FURNISHED T w o Beom 14. Stores For Rent Florida. 225 North Washington
FURNISHED Two Bedroom Blvd. Phone 4-9161.
home 1 block from beach & Blv Phoe 4-
shopping. Phone -9552. STORE OR OFFICE 1950 JEEPSTER sportscar lots
15'x60. 408 S. Washington Blvd. of extras, good condition $595.
7. Rooms For Rent 1 to 5 yr. lease Reasonable M. E. Schott 2481 Milmar Drive
rent. Will be newly redecorated Ph. 4-6692.
Phone Clark W. Fulton, owner -
A REAL home away from home 6.7401. FOR Sale 1941 Studebaker
Large, airy room, next to bath. --Champion $35. Cash-152 01-
Located two minutes from bea- NEW office Bldg. now underentar Rd
ches. Call 2-0742 after 6 p. m. construction 25' x 60' u ltra a
modern with sky dome lighting. 16 u -
8. Apartments For Rent Ideal for doctors or attorneys. Autos Financing
office. Will partition to suit ten-
EF1 Y at 3 ant. Ready for occupancy. Jan. LOW BANK RATES
ICINCY apartment 3 lt. Located 1900 Bock Hillview NEW cars-Late model used
rooms by month or yearly. 2361 Ave. K. G. Townsend. Phone cars will finance your insur-
10th Street. 9-3191. ance.
FURNISHED E FFICIE N- PALMER FIRST NATIONAL
CY APARTMENT, 2112 Phillip- YOU'RE paid off pretty through BANK AND TRUST CO.
pi St. For rent, $60 month. Ea- Classified ads I To sell or rent, Installment L o a n Dept.
16 4- 1 A i Q--^ O2) KOl1 I


THE NEWS Wedneeday, Oct. 1954


n e s t- I
needs FAST.
tU


Start your own Business in attractively designed
building in the new Englewood Shopping Center.


16 ft. 8 in. x 60 ft. units or larger only $8,950.


$1,500.00 down the balance like rent
absolutely the best location in town


1. Income Property


10 ATTRACTIVE Units plus
Owner's quarters. C. B. con-
struction. Priced at only $50,-
000. Shows top return for your
investment. Eugene M. Martin,
Realtor 626 S. Washington
Blvd. Phone: 3-9141.


STRIKE IT RICH
22 PNIT Motel with owner's
separate home. Top down-
town location near restaurants,
theatres, and shopping centers.
Attractively furnished rooms
and T. V. too. C. B. construc-
tion. This Motel is an income
producer. Inspect it now, buy,
and be ready for the coming
tourist season.
Price: $145,000
Eugene M. Martin, Realtor
626 S. Washington Blvd. Phone:
3-9141.


12. Business Opportunities


WANT Business deluxe restau-
rant & liquor $29,500. Sundry
store, $12,000. Gas station, $11,-
000. Men's shop at inventory.
Beer-grill, $8,800. Gift s h o p
$10,500. Seed & feed business,
ice cream business, traile- park
motel and other income prop-
erties. Pullins Realty Phone
2-3351. 636 S. Washington
Phone 3-0351.
RESTAURANT FOR SALE
BY OWNER
DUE to health and other in-
terest, must sell immediately,
"The Little Chef," Main and
Wash. Blvd. Positively best lo-
cation in City. Room for expan-
sion and Drive Inn. Full in-
vestment should be returned in
21/ yrs. Long term lease. Books
open only for qualified buyer.
For appointment call 3-6241.


1953 STUDEBAKER Commander V-8, 4-door
sedan, automatic transmission, radio and
heater, seat covers. An extra nice now milage
car for only -

1953 WILLYS Aero hard top coupe. Overdrive.
A real economical car. This one books for $1665.
OUR SPECIAL PRICE FOR MONDAY AND
TUESDAY ONLY ---
1951 HUDSON Hornet club coupe. Hydramatic,
radio, seat covers, sun visor -
1950 STUDEBAKER Champion Regan sedan.
Radio and heater, overdrive, seat covers. 2 to
choose from -

1950 PACKARD Clipper 4 door sedan. An extra
clean car inside and out. Automatic transmis-
sion, radio and heater. this one for only -

1949 MERCURY 4 door sedan with overdrive
1948 STUDEBAKER Commander convertible.
New top and paint, overdrive. An exceptionally
good car for only -


$1695



$1045

$ 895


$ 595


$ 695

$ 595


$ 445


SARA-SUNSHINE MOTORS
INC.


2036 Main Street


Phone 2-6151


i


ORANGE GROVE PARK
SUBDIVISION
LOTS $690 $20.00 DOWN
5.00 MONTH. EAST ON
WEBER. PHONE 2067f4


B. EDWARDS OFFERINGS

Bu in 'selling and developing land in Sarasota and
Saje as^ County continuously since 1903.

If eo B ant to sell list your property with us. If you
wa4t buy we can supply your needs from our of-
feir n of Sarasota properties at conservative prices.

SPECIAL
E ellent value in completely furnished South-
:side home near school. Two bedrooms, bath,
Ili'lg room with lovely fireplace, dinette, and
alfrtlectric kitchen. House is constructed of
bdck with lifetime rpof. Well landscaped lot
6.By 165. :...
.- *.
Y. u will get value received at $13500.
Terms if desired

W seeicialize iM suburban acreage in small tracts
raigigfrom One to Three Acres; also in 40, 80 and
10P A.re'parcels of virgin land at reasonable prices.

Le us share with you our intimate knowledge and long
ye rs perience in real estate in theSarasota Bay Dis-




A. B. EDWARDS


1367 Main Street
Si.


Phone Ringling 2-2151


Jcee


cancerr r


KRealior


Phone 2074 or 2351


PRICES


Stock


15. Autos For Sale


I


Both modern, fairly new, partly furnished, side by side
Live in One, Rent the other
BOTH $19,500
will sell separately
The above is an example of our many
excellent listings.
Whatever your needs in
SARASOTA REAL ESTATE
To Rent: Apts., Homes, Estates.
Day, Week, Month, or Seasons
To BUY: Homes, -Homesites,
Duplexes Apt. Bldgs., or Motels.

SEE OR PHONE

PREW LUDDEN


77 So. PARM AVE.


PHONE 6-8291


Write for a Free Copy of our Real Estate GuMle


SLASHED


Reducing


Sale


All cars have been reconditioned in our Shop for performance, safety and for value are
thoroughly inspected and honestly described. ..


Compare Our Prices

.7 Through 9th


COMPARE OUR CARS With Any Dealer


Thursday


1953
No. 367 1953 Chevrolet 210 2 Dr. Two tone green
& Cream. New Taylor made plastic seat
covers, directional signals and rear fender
skirts sharp was $1645 ....... is $1375
No. 381 1953 Chevrolet 210 2 dr. Light Green plastic
seat covers, directional signals was
$1595 ................. .................... is $1375
No. 385 1953 Chevrolet 210 2 dr. two tone blue and
and gray, directional signals --- was
$1595 .............................................. is $1395
No. 447 1953 Plymouth. suburban station 'wagon.
Light blue, directional signals and deluxe
heater was $1795 .......... is $1495
No.. 450 1953 Willys Falcon 4 dr., dark blue, over-
drive, a small car, easy to park with a lot
of economy was $1395 ............. is $995


No. 476

No. 478




No. 371


1952 Chrysler Windsor

Deluxe $1495
4-Door Sedan, radio, heater, Solex glass,
nylon upholstery. A car that shows the
stamp of quality.

1951 Chrysler New


Yorker


$1495


4-Door Sedan, radio, heater, seat covers,
two tone paint. Plenty of zip in this 180
hp. Baby.

1951 Chrysler Imperial

$1695
4-Door Sedan, Power steering,. radio,
heater. A beautiful family car.

1951 DeSoto Custom

4-Door Sedan $1095
Radio, heater, seat covers. Bring the
family and try it for size. Many other fine
cars to select from, moderately priced.


Ben Hopkins Motors
CHRYSLER-PLYMOUTH r,
Across from Post Office. Phone 2-4461 3-3151


1953 Chevrolet Bel Air 2 dr. Two tone green
& cream. Radio, plastic seat covers, group
accessories was $1695 ................ is $1495
1953 Chevrolet 210 2 dr. Two tone green &
beige plastic seat covers & overdrive was
$1595 ................................. ......... is $1345

1952
1952 Chevrolet Deluxe Convertible. Cream
body with black top, radio arid heater. A
sharp car was $1495 ............... is $1095


No. 392 1952 Chevrolet styleline deluxe 2 dr. Two
tone green, radio, heater and plastic seat
covers, power glide transmission.- was
$1295 ..:........................................... is $1095
No. 407 1952 Pontiac 8 deluxe 4 dr. Tutone green.
Radio, heater and seat covers. Hydro-ma-
tic trans. was $1495 ................ is $1195,
No. 444 1952 Chevrolet Fleetline deluxe 2 dr. Light
blue, radio, heater, plastic seat cover and
group of accessories was $1395,.. is $1095
No. 461 1952 Nash Rambler hard top. Tutone grey
& red, radio, plastic seat covers and over-
drive. A smart car was $1295 is $1045
No. 473 1952 Chevrolet styleline deluxe 4 dr. Two
tone green. Radio, plastic seat covers and
group accessories was $1295 .... is $1145


Friday


Saturday Afternoon
Till 5:30


1951


No. 353 1951 Chevrolet stylrliie deluxe 2 dr. Tutone
grey, radio, plastic seat covers, power Sglf
trans. was $1095 ...... ....... .......... i h 5 '
No. 423 1951 Chevrolet Styleline deluxe 2 dr. Tutofie
green. Group of accessories. A clean car --
was $1045 ................ ....... ................95
No. 443 1951 Pontiac 6 chieftaih deluxe 4 dr. Light',
green. Radio, seat covers, group accessorieS.
A clean car was $1145 ......... is $995
No. 456 1951 Chevrolet Styleline deluxe 2 dr. Tan-In
color, radio and plastic seat covers, low
miles. A clean car was $1095 ....... i. 7M95


No. 432
No. 453
No. '462
No. 464
No. 465
No. 475
No. 477


No.
No.
No.
No.


383
391
445
468


1950
1950 Plymouth special deluxe 4 dr.
1950 Chevrolet Styleline deluxe 2 dr.
1950 Chevrolet Fleetline deluxe 2 dr.
1950 Chevrolet Styleline special coupe
1950 Buick Super (Riviera) 4 dr.
1950 Ford V-8 Custom 2 dr.
1950 Chevrolet (steel) station wagon.
1949
1949 Oldsmobile 76 deluxe 4 dr.
1949 Dodge Wayfarer 2 dr.
1949 Plymouth special deluxe 4 dr.
1949 Mercury 4 dr.


1948
No, 431 1948 Plymouth special deluxe 4 dr.
No. 474 1948 Oldsmobile 76 4 dr.
1947
No. 445 1947 Chevrolet Fleetline 2 dr.
No. 459 1947 Pontiac 8 Torpedo 2 dr.
1946
No. 479 1946 Dodge 'custom 4 dr.
No. 467 1946 Chevrolet stylemaster 4 dr.
No. 470 1946 Buick super sedanet 2 dr.
PRE WAR
No. 466 1940 Plymouth 2 dr. rung .......................
No. 451 1937 Chevrolet 2 dr. Clean, one owner $80
TRUCKS
No. 133R 1945 Chevrolet 11/2 ton stake ........... $150.00
No. 259 1953 Chevrolet 1/2 ton pick up ........ $1095.00
No. 321 1949 Dodge /4 ton dual rear ................$495.00
No. 314R 1947 Chevrolet 2 ton, 2 speed axle LWB
steel flat dump, 8:25 tires ... ........ $139500
No. 472 1953 Chevrolet Y4 ton pick up ............ $1095.00


All we ask you for is to come in and look over our cars and a chance to do business with
you. Call us.

Sam Sheppard Ralph Wolfer Vernon Bush
R. B. Sternberg Used Car Mgr. F. M. (Red) Prince


ALTMAN

S45 CENTRAL AVE.


CHEVROLET


y ,


PHONE 4-8311


f


I


N.'


'.N


FOR Sale-26' all-steel trail-
*er. Complete facilities, excel-
lent condition. New cypress Ca-
bana 9/' x 17', surf-wood pan-
els, large landscaped lot. Ohio
Trailer Park, 5th St. Lot 2.
LARGEST selection of new
Trailers on the West Coast.
Also many reconditioned and
sanitized Trailers. Pre-owned,
mobile Homes. McDonald for
Trailers at the entrance to City
Trailer Park.


r


18. Boats Marine 19. Pets Livestock 19. Pe
NEW & Used 14-15, 19-21 foot SELLING out 40 Pair Virgin HIGH
Kristal-Kraft, Fibre glass. Breeder Parakeets $6 pair. 2149 3 mon
Kristal-Kraft, Fibre glass. Wisteria St. after 3 p. m. ed! 2
D. P. Sutherland 6536 Ave. E. r
-off Stickney Pt. Road. Phone: SPOTTED Shetland Pony. Wes-
6-1tern saddle and bridle $175. 20. Ho
Call K. L. McCandless. 2-4004.
19. Pets Livestock
BUCKSKIN Gelding 6 years old BENI
FOR sale: Black female toy very gentle. $100. Call 4-3634. new.
Dobermann Pincher, 2 months
old. Call 3-8381 or 3-8644.
YOU'RE steered to what you 2 SOUTH SIDE
want through Want Ads in THE West o{ Trai
JNE7WS. Rera Classified to fill


HOMES
il


SWAP anything fast through
Classified ads- Dial 4-8511 for
an ad-writer.


I


;


a I


Its Livestock
breed dachshund puppies
Lths old A. K. C. register-
761 Bahia Vista Street
4-4656.

usehold Goods
)IX Automatic Dryer like
Make offer. Call 6-331.
I


rUtu; L ^-IOJA


:



: .""8-m~


"'i


I


i


;


I"~'h~Jt~ ~


/ ,qe3


;


k.





I23. Sale Miscellaneous


VACUUM C I e an e r -Sales, PANORAMIC Skyway chart in
Parts Repair on all makes color $1.00 p .p. Picnic Pantry,
new and used from $14.50 up.
Alert Vacuum Co. 701 Central Longboat Key, Sarasota.
Ave.
K-22 SMITH Wesson Revol.New
SPRING Air Mattress single condition. Cost. $71.90. Will sell
bed asiso .00 PRone 2-2872. $50. New condition Astatic
Booster. $15. Phone 9-1920.


U. Heme Repair


WE FINANCE Home Repairs,
Alteratons, and Additions. No
down payment-up to 36
mouths to repay.
PALMER FIRST NATIONAL
AND TRUST CO.
Intallment Loan D e p t.
Phone 2-811.


U. SaeI. helk m


WINE Colored woman's coat,
saie 15. Also small electric
heater. Phone 4-4577.


MARY Carter Paint. Every 2nd
Quantity Free. Direct Factory
Prioae, Eglewood Trading


TO FOLKS returning from
their vacations and to those in
the process of building new
homes, many of whom are
flower and shrub growers.


'3. For ,'ne Iis-c!l;nto:us


LU. ooem oM Goods


: IRROi2.S
MANl' FACTURIING
New and Rc:ilvcrrd mirrors.
gia-s tops for furniturrc. i ruit-
vilc. Phone 4-19:i1.


.T. t or Female Helpc


LOCAL man with fishing ex- 2 CG:LIEMCPLOY MEANT
..OS L l)'ElMi,-RCJjI' Court BIdg.
pcricncc and knowledge of fish- 9 to 5 wcck d y,L 9 to 1 Sat.
ini; tancle. Steady position. Ap-


plY in pcr-on. Ta::lor's Sport-
i:n Coods SLorc. 1G58 Main


WIOASTER. Evcrhot electric in S
g o o d condition. Reasonable.
Phone 3-4753.


GIRLS clothing size 6'thru 14.
Phone 6-7972.
USED household furnishings,
tools, boats, motors, guns, ap-


Before purchasing your pot- plianccs.
ted plants, come and see our Buy- Sell Trade ......
stock. All kinds at reasonable Englewood Trading Post .
prices..
Royal Poincianas, 4 to 6 feet 24. Will Swap
in height, the famous Japanese
plant, C rotons, Hibiscus, WILL accept a house trailer
Bougainvillea, Poinsettias (or on a Garage Apartment. Large
Christmas flowers) and hun- lot ideally located 3030 Haw-
dreds of other plants and thorne St.
shrubs, all potted and ready to
plant. This is the time to ENGLISH Pram, cost $85. Sale
plant! Full directions will be or exchange for girls bike good
given on how to plant and thus condition. Also crib for 6-year-
insure a beautiful yard. old. Call Englewood 2553.
Maintenance men extend you I


a cordial invitation to come
out and ee and buy.
Floyd Street Nursery, 600
yards West of Tuttle Ave., in
rear of 2670 East Floyd.


Combination motel, gift shop
and restaurant is offered by
owner at a reduced price of
S2,500 for short time only.
Located on main highway in-
side city limits on plot 170x
300 including four buildings.
Will gross between $8,000.00
to 10,000.00 this year. Summer
business averaged $450.00 to
$500.00 monthly. Excellent
opportunity for increased
business next year.



Atlas Hertz Building
1311 Main Street Ph. 4-5441


INCOME 'PROPERTY


Ellmqt hime and Income besides 3 Bedrooms. 2 Baths, Ter.
ra m flos throua hout. Three, one bedroom apartments ad-
SJ ~dlm-.le-u,than two yeam eld. Residential section-reason-
alr psed. TeOm


ALSO

wur two bedroom apartments, all rented-exclusive neigh-
batoo d.outhalde. Large landscaped- grounds-Reasonable


S. EXCLUSIVE WITH


GULF COAST REALTY CO.


i IM Ir,.


Phone 6-5541


p WANTED
EXHAUSTEDD HOUSE-IhurfmnS
W h haven't been able to find what they want! This
vey well might be the end of your search. Three bed-
rooM, two eramnic tile baths, Terrazzo floors.
Beautiful locOtion
,.Pk note again the number of bedrooms
and bath. If this Ion don't delight you -
we give upl
11U 0. Eeellent terms


JANE HOPKINS REALTY
Rb. Tesrb Wdg, s.11
mebt of Sarasota srd e anltom
Dee "uig Versa Alln
Blaneh Brew netrry Pacddek Jan" 14opiimk5


QDON BOOMHOWER


mp:


,IT'


Let us show you the best


Sarasota has to offer


Don Boomlower Real Estte


im MNin Street

Phoge RlnUgg 6-8931


Sarasota


ORANGE GROVE PARK
SUBDIVISION
LOTS $690 $20.00 DOWN
$5.00 MONTH. EAST ON
WEBER. PHONE 2-0674.


DO INVESTIGATE
THIS HOME...
AND INCOME
NEW DUPLEX
Each side 2 bedrooms
Atlic Fans
Carports
Built in Features
Terrazzo Floors
$17,200
Automatic Oil Heaters
Ceramic Tile Baths
lot 82x100
Tile Sills
Screened Porches
with $12,500 first mtg.
available
Exclusive with
Ed Younker
Real Estate
Associates Kathleen Wright
Anthony J. Van Hartogh'
Ph. 4-0511
1292 Palm Ave.


B UICK

Our Policy is still to bring you top quality
at the lowest possible price.

Darby Buick, Inc.
Open Evenings 6 to 9
Phone 3-7341
2199 Ringling Blvd.


WHY BUY FROM A REALTOR?
A REALTOR is a member of a Real Estate Board, associated
with the National Association of Real Estate Brokers. His
membership in that body vouchsafes-for him a standing in
his community.
Stanley L. McMichael, in his well-known book "HOW TO
MAKE MONEY IN REAL ESTATE", says:
"He is to the real estate business what the minister, priest
and rabbi is to the church, or a Qualified lawyer is to a
bar association. Successful real estate operators and invest-
ors make a practice of dealing through a REALTOR When
acquiring or selling their holdings."
Consult us today; our advice is free. ,"-imf

.N.-
-n


Atlas-Hertz Bldg.


Phone 4-5441


1311 Main St.


Twenty-Fifth Year of General Real Estate Practice.


HAZEL T.


ELLIOTT REAL ESTATE

REALTOR


I


1258 First St., Sarasota P.O. Box 1008

Phone RIngling 4-3381




NEWS FLASH!


BRAND NEW WATER FRONT HOME

ON BAY ISLAND FOR SALE!
We just received the sad news from Northern owners that
due to serious illness, they will be unable to come down to
occupy their beautiful new three bedroom two bath home on
the yacht basin on Bay Island.
Therefore, they have regretfully directed us to put it on the
market. It was specially built for the owner, and because
of the intriguing floor plan and the inspired ideas of the
decorator, it was "The Talk Of The Town."
A beautiful "show-off home" for entertaining, and an equally
delightful home for ordinary comfortable living. If you crave
a waterfront home, call us immediately.

$29,995.00



JANE HOPKINS REALTY
Fla. Theatre Bldg. 6-7211


"Deal with a Realtor"


I


GULY EMPLOYMENT
GOOD people for Good Jobs
Phone 6-92:1 or 2-6521.
BABY sitting by middle age
white lady. South side prefer-
red. Has own trans. Phone
4-6989.


w--mm-


PALMISTRY books. Want to
locate authentic and informa-
tive used books on techniques
of palmistry Phone 2-1592, even-
ings.

30. Bicycles Motorcycles
GIRLS schwin bike 24 inch $10.
Also tricvcle.almost new $7.50
address 2846 Michael St. Phone
6-9511.


EMPLOYMENT wanted. Eve-
TOO much room? Rent the sur-
ning work. typing; bookkeeping
& cashier work Call days 6-6391 Plus through For Rent ads; get
evenings 2-7613. steady income! Call 4-8511.


Dear Mr. Eads:
Of course I don't know if you were able to go out and
look at the house, or were even able to find it.
But I do want to say this-Joe Lovingood is the builder,
a peppy fellow most active in Junior Chamber of Commerce,
and all sorts of civic work. He would like-very much to meet
you.
He will be starting this week a house just across the
street from the house I told you about-and said he would
be glad to build it with the correct width doors all through,
ramps and grips, etc. and would do the whole job for $11,-
500! Could have it completed in six weeks!-
This I think would be an excellent decision-for then
you could get the wallpaper you wanted in the dining area-
and also other colors throughout the house.
But frankly, Mr. Eads,--considering the excellent closet
space, and size of the rooms, that is quite a deal. In building
he could without a doubt, add one of those "screened cages"
for outdoor living, or anything you wanted changed.
It would be a nice community In which to get acquainted.
Nice for entertaining with the swimming pool, and as I
pointed out to the point of being most boring, the other day-
this community is going to be very good and will have an en-
hancement value. Lots have just gone up $800.00! That's
what happens as soon as folks move in. I
There is also a lovely home across the street from Joe's
in the event that the six weeks dismays you (although we.
have qny number of places we can put you cheaply till then)
-$13,500-fireplace-and that sort of thing. Mr. Lissau is
also a young builder, and they put their own work and labor
into it, and thus are able to beat the price of a big-time con-
tractor.
We would be delighted to take you out there, any time
you called. If I shouldn't happen to be in the office, one of
the other girls could oblige-or if you wanted to talk to Joe-
be coul& take you out.
Let us know if we can be of any help to you, and please
rest assured it would be a "letting-alone" .policy, and- we
won't bother you further-in the event you don't call us.
But we know the town, and sleepers and have exclusives,
and it might be we could be of real help.
But a house built with your special requirements with 3
bedrooms, two baths for $11,500-golly, don't overlook it!
Sincerely,


Jane Hopkins


__ __ __ __ _ U.
I- '


'29. Wanted To Buy


':5. llelp Wantcd Male


TO OUR NEW PAPER
THE NEWS


REGISTERED REAL ESTATE BROKERS
SALES RENTALS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT


WOOD & THOMAS
ANNA L. SCOBIE, ASSOCIATE
1587 MAIN ST. PH


WI~~


L-4


YOUR. SARASOTA HOME

Mt BAUTIFUL
A cement tile roof, attractive exterior design, with wide


overhanging eaves and a slump brick planting bed will. ap
peal to the eye as you approach this charming home. The
big L-shaped living-dining room has sliding doors opening
^ -t, 1i l^irtajl hIrah. rwnv '.'::-


Those 2 lovely bedrooms each have large sliding-door
clothes closets, excellent wall space and cross ventilation.
You'll like that colored tile bath with that large mirror a0d
tricky medicine cabinets. That marvelbusly efficient
kitchen has wrought iron hardware and abundant cupboard -
and counter space. You'll admire the'soft coloring of the
decorating, and that oversized enclosed garage housea'.li,
laundry and utility space.
It's all yours for $16.500 and $5,000 down payamoat
is required.

J.H. McARTHUR. Realtor
Mrs. Walter Thompson, Realtor


613 Palmer Bank Bldg.


I


I


Phone 3-34s


1954 Dodge V-8 Convertible, radio, heater, power- 4
flite transmission, 5 year Nylon top,' W.W. tires.
Less than 1000 miles. Save $700 ................................
1954 Dodge V-8-Sierra Station Wagon, 3000 ,
miles, Powerflite transmission, 2 tone paint -
green & ivory, nylon & plastic upholstery, safety
rim wheels, heavy duty oil filter, oil bath air I
filter fully insulated top, large chrome hub. caps.
Mr. Shay's demonstrator. Save $600 .....................
1953 Dodge 6 cylinder Suburban Station Wagon,
radio, safety rim wheels, oil bath air filter, heavy
duty oil filter, 2 tone paint dark green &
ivory. Standard transm mission ..................................
1952 Plymouth Cranbrook, 4 door, overdrive, a
tires very good, original lustrous paint, interior
spotless
1952 Chevrolet Styleline, 2 door, Standard trans-
mission, new paint, tires excellent, ,clean and'
well kept.
1950 Dodge Coroneet, 4 door, radio, heater, color
black, fluid drive, new seat covers, rubber good.
1949 Buick Roadmaster, 4 door, Dynaflow, radio,
heateer, 2 tone paint, practically new seat covers.
1949 Nash Super Ambassador, 4 door, overdrive,
radio, heater, new seat covers, low mileage .......
1948 Chevrolet Fleetline, 2 door, radio, heater,,
new paint, new seat covers, godd tires ................
1948 Dodge 2 door, new paint, new seat covers,
Fluid Drive. Body sound ...................................
1948 Lincoln, 4 door, radio, heater, Overdrive,
g ood tires ...:.......................... ............ .............................
1948 Hudson Super 6,
4 door ......... ..........
1946 Ford V-8 Club Coupe-
Very good condition ................ .
1946 Hudson
Super 6, 2 door ....
1941 Dodge,
4 door..
1939 Chrysler,
2 d o or ........... .................. .. ....................


1936 DeSoteo
C ou pe -T ru ck ............. ............ ............... ...........

TRUCKS

1951 International 1/2 ton Pickup ...


$395

$295-

$195

$345

$150

$125

$100

$50



$695


1949 Dodge Route Van ... $595

1948 Dodge 1/2 Ton Panel .... ................. $495

SHAY MOTORS INC, i
Your Dodge-Plymouth Dealer
Main & Wash. Blvd. Phone 6-7451
Open 8 A.M.-9 P.M.


[ONE 44Mt


WELCOME


Conservative values in Homes. Lots and
Investment Properties.
Sales and Rentals. Business Opportunities

JOSEPH E. HARRIMAN, Realtor
Main Office: 75 South Palm Ave., Sarasota. Tel. 27431
Branch Office: 3604 Manatee Ave., W. Bradenton
Tel. 38842
Associates
Annaly Billib Barbara. Blair
Ralph E. Hill Lloyd W. Gooppert


For Best Buy In

Low Cost Homes
Se W. Allen Robbins,
General Contractor

* LMetime Construetlon
Cement Mock. fund
ajd plastered.
* Aeabtos oot.
*2 bedrooms.
SCwamte Tile Bath, Tub
iad shower, plus 1-2
bth In large Utility

* T aam Floors.
* Puel-Bay Meat.

7410 on your lot

W. Allen Robbins
AM il11v1w St. Ph. 2-6646


Mr. Boat Owner!

This Is Your Dream

Come True
A lovely two story, modern home on
Big Pass. 50 feet on water with
capped sea wall (cost over $1500.)
The downstairs has enclosed do.ckage
for up to 30 foot cabin cruiser plus a
huge storage room. Upstairs is a
beautifully furnished one bedroom,
very large living room, kitchen and
bath. Included are twin beds, Davero,
TV set, pots, pans, dishes, linens, sil-
verware, (drapes alone cost over
$400.) hardwood floors all pegged,
and a view that is magnificent!
Priced complete at $15,000. With lib-


eral terms.

Henry S. Bartholomew
Realtor Insuror
105 Central Ave. Ph. 4-9491 Deal With A Realtor


Beautiful Home with a View of the Bay


3 bedrooms, 2 baths, living room with double fireplace, a


Florida room, dining room, kitchen, large closets, storage


room. Patio. Garage. Lot size 120x165. Located 2 miles from
town one bus line near school and shopping center. At $18.-


S500 it is one of today's best buys.


EXCLUSIVE LISTING BROKERS PROTECTED


ROGER V FLORY
REALTOR


Tel. 6-141


37 S. Palm


--


------- ---------~ ~~~


*


mmmmm
mmmm


MOM"
Now


41 I


,-Mf* r


M'JB -J



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Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1954 THE NEWS Page SO


&
*m


:: 3. Situal I s 1 u d


/.


I?


-1


I


I


*


IH





0 17f


Page 22 THE NEWS Wednesday, 03t. 6, 1;54


MIRROR OF YOUR MIND

'ag '7 /I/


Answer: No! Very often peo-
ple eagerly pursue some desired
goal and lose interest when it is
attained, but their interest was
in the pursuit, not in the quarry.
Men sometimes seem madly in
love with a much-desired female
and suddenly cool down if the
young lady returns their interest.
There is no love lost in such
cases, for none existed in the frst
place. Individuals who derive sat-
isfaction from such transitory
pursuits would be just as happy
big-game hunting.


Why are some people
ever-critical?
Answer: Usually because they
are envious. Such individuals be-
come dissatisfied with themselves
and with their lot in life, and


3. Joining rope
4. Tree
5. Southeast
by south
(abbr.)
6. Soap
substitute
7. A great
Dutch
painter
8. Spanish
general in
the Nether-
lands
9. Nee
12. A marshal
of France
16. Man's
nickname
18. Not '
touched


By JO-:*- ?r'ZT^''';

search for imperfcction in others
to prove they, themznselvc, ar .s
gocdas a anyone eIlc. They cdcry
the one weakness o: an outstand-
ing citizen, the one bad pass in a
football game, the one wcalh char-
acter in a stirring book. T;:is is
a trait that can be put to good
use by a critic or an editor, but it
is neurotic in the average citizen.


Can you make a good parent
Sif you dislike children?
Answer: No! However, people
sometimes thoughtlessly feel they
dislike children without really
knowing whether they do or not.
Also, there is such a thing as re-
covering from your dislike of
children after having one or more
of your own. Even so, unless both
husband and wife sincerely want
children, they are not good risks
for parenthood. Their marriage
may beqpme unstable if they have
have children, with accompanying
danger to the emotional health
of their offspring.


(Copyright, 1954, King Features Syndicate. Inc.)


Horoscope

By FRANCES 'DRAKE
MARCH 21 to APRIL 20 (Ar-
ies)-There are few dissenting
elements in your way today,
so you should make a big stride
forward. You have the capabil-
ity; don't let anyone, or any-
thing .sidetrack you. Give your
beit;sid you will reap reward.
APRIL 21 TO MAY 20 (Tau-
rus)-Any disturbing occur-
rence can be handled by good
direction and discretion. You
can really do big things now if
you try hard enough, forget per-
sonal desires and knuckle down
to it.
MAY 21 TO JUNE 21 (Gem-
ini)-You should enjoy yourself
today. Plenty of opportunity,
action, and maybe some adven-
ture. However do n't overtax
S your vitality. There is a reason-
Sable limit.
S JUNE 22 TO JULY 23 (Can-
cer)-It shouldn't take you long
to get into the swing of this'
stimulating period. Get to the
core of important matters,
i- -avoid wasting time and energy
and you will truly achieve.
JULY 24 TO AUG. 22 (Leo)
-Control emotions; they could
be troublesome. Promote only
your better self and you can
gain appreciably. Domestic re-
ations, heart interests share
the spotlight. Stay clear of fool-
ish outbursts.
AUG. 23 TO SEPT. 23 (Virgo)
-Influences good, indications
excellent; There is little more
than 'normal opposition. It's up
to you to listen, heed; don't be
afraid to try something new.
Express yourself.
SEPT. 24 TO OCT. 23 (Libra)
-When you have done a good
job, attended to duties, relax,
'njoy some time with loved
ones, good friends. Give normal
thought to health, the food you
eat and rest to replenish lost
energy.
OCT. 24 TO NOV. 22 (Scor-
pio)-See that.your schedule i1
well planned, make no unneces-
sary moves, waste no time, and
you can turn in a fine day's
report. Stars favorable to sound
operation; use sensible pres-
sure to gain.
NOV. 23 TO DEC. 22 (Sagit-
tarius)+-With h op e, ambition
and work, you can have rea-
sonable success now. Adapt
yourself to prevailing conditions
and things should move along
progressively. Few contentions.
DEC. 23 TO. JAN. 21 (Capri-
corn)-If you are alert and rec-
ognize real openings you can
achieve much now. Be awake to
advantages, realize that oth-
ers' opportunity is often yours,
too.
JAN. 22 TO FEB. 20 (Aquar-
i us )-Auspicious vibrations
most of the day.'*Ake careful
stock at intervft. and don't
take things for granted. Think
before acting and be honestly
ambitious. Stay with your en-
deavors.
FEB. 21 TO MARCH 20 (Pis-
ces)-A good day, but you may
overtax yourself if you take on
more than you can handle.
Avoid hasty decisions, also tak-
Ing the easy way. News could
change outlook; be alert.
You born today are amen-
abld, kindly and often overgen-
erous with- your money and
time. Efficiency should be up-
permost in, your thoughts. Re-
member that in any task prep-
Sartion -is important. Don't ne-


DAILY (
ACROSS
1. Measures
of medicine
6. Native of
Arabia
10. Fleshy
Fruit
11. Gourd-like
fruit
13. Soothes
14. Old card
game (var.)
15. High priest
16. Capital
(N. Y.)
17. Player at
curling
20. Think
22. Ship of the
Argonauts
26. Small
depressions
27. Slink
28. Therefore
29. Cheeses
(Du.)
30. Overturns
33. Blanket.
like
raincoat
36. Away
39. State in
the U. S.
40. Mistake
(slang)
42. Cheat, in a
paltry
way
43. Rugged
mountain
crest
44. Be conveyed
45. Gave over
DOWN
1. Small,
fresh-water
fish
2. Precious
stone


19. Prop- A
erty M
(L.)
20. Poem
21. Through
23.Thought i
out N
logic- E
ally
24. Herd
of
whales
25. Signs as
correct
27. Look
31. Short for
telephone
32. Thus
38. Short for
picayune
34. Smell


IPAC lAFjT
& A S' kMO|TARi
IAPJORAM*I S
mNV RUS g
TR PEE Op EN
&IES 5PA.RE
SFAUN GP
mU RI IoLY
ELAI 0 L
E|EDEASPS-6
10-6


Yesterday's Answer
35. German
National
Socialist
37. A festival
38. Man's
nickname
40. Ferry-boat
41. Coin
(Swed.)


A Fu-nny



EY DO7 THiY KILGALLEN
Eroadwav y Cr povine
Sid Casar's best-guarded se-
cret: He has bcon emoting fur-
iously on the New York docks,


filming a hilarious satire of
Marlon Brando's "On the Wa-
terfront" performance, to be
telecast on a future Cae-
sar Hour.
Funny Bit: Police from the
License Division are visiting
nightclubs these evenings and
asking the bartender to read
Nick Kenny's column aloud. If
the hapless daiquiri shaker
can't comply, the cafe is given
summons for violating the law
providing for sufficient light. A
West Side jazz joint was slipped
a ticket the other night-the
bartender wanted to put on his
glasses before reciting the Pat-
ty-poem but the cops wouldn't
let him.
A batch of RKO films are
being sold to a syndicate head-
ed by Elliot Hymen and Ar-
thur Krim. Hymen will dis-
tribute those slated for televis-
ion, United Artists those des-
tined for movie theatres. Static-
ticians say $8,000,000 is the
sum changing hands.
Bingo has resumed,' quietly,
in many spots in Brooklyn.
Roy Rogers and Dale grew
so lonesome for their children
they ordered two-year-old Do-
die flown into New York with
a nurse.
The Winter Garden has a new
spellbinder for the, tourists, al-
though it isn't making a dime
for the management. Pedes-
trians gather in droves to gawk
at' the painting of the huge,
block-long sign atop ,the thea-
tre, which will carry a giant
ima.e of Mary.Martin as "Pe-
ter Pan."


George Shearing's "Lulla-
by of Birdland" is now the sec-
ond most recorded jAzz tune of
all time, with 28 versions on
wax. Champion is the national
anthem, "How High the Moon."


^e~y-a^ I


RULES: Using the following 16
letters in the blank squares below
Show many words can you form
either vertically or horizontally?
Use same word only once and no
plurals please. To assist you, we
have inserted a few clues, which
include additional letters.


ODD 4


Barclay On Bridge

BY SHEPARD BARCLAY "We could have taken the same
'The Authority on Authorities" ten tricks on the defense if you
DOUBLE PAY YOU BEST had doubled East's crazy 1-No
Trump. Neither he nor West'
A KEEN rubber player has could have takenut the double
one principal hope when theinto a suit. We would have set
auction begiris. It is that anthem f o u r tricks for 1,100
opponent will stick his neck points if we played right. Even
out with a bid which can be if we had botched the defense,
doubled successfully, thus pro- we would have beaten him
ducing a score larger than we w hv b him
during a score larger than three for 800 points. With an!
could be made through any original bid opposite your own
contract by his own side. Al- hand of at least that strength,
ways remember that idea. Awe would have ruined him. You
double will pay 'you best if a didn't even have to fear a solid
hostile bid finds you loaded long suit that he might run,
with plenty of strength to pun-
ish an opposing suit call sub- as you had them all stopped."
stantially enough. Don't go a- Indeed South should have
head with a bid of your owv.n doubled without any apprecia-


until you have


weigh


.AK
qQJ8
*A654
4742
4532 1
9732
*102 W E .4
SK986
SQ J106
VA64
*KJ8
*QJ3
(Dealer: West. Both
nerable.)
'West North East
Pass 1 4 1NT
Pass 3 4 Pass


ghed tb r




6974
SK105
*Q973
. A 105


Tomorrow's Pr *
Tomorrow's Problem


4A7
VAQ74
2
*AQ7
+A65


sides vul.

i


oVUUL
24
3NT


probable gain from aw doujic.
Very pleased through taking
ten tricks, with four in spades,
two in hearts, three in dia-
monds and one in clubs from
playing East for all imporiaa'
honors, after the club 6 lea&
South considered his job wel
done. But North took a differ-
ent view.
"You sold our birthright fo
a mess of pottage," is who
South heard his partner say

glect the little t h i n g s; the
could lead to big opportunities
You are innately just in deal
ing with- others, those undc:
you, and with loved ones; yo-
like harmony and peace; are c
good reasoner, able at de-
bating, but dislike plain discord
or contention.
Birthdate of: James Whit-
comb Riley, poet.


498642

4K2

9 3
S 10652
S 410QJ987
4
4K1053
vJ9
*KJ983
S103


Ill


LL M P RR
S T

T EE





E




E'33*


Authority: Merriam-Wcbster dictionary
lHow AUTIIOR
SCORING: SCORED
YESTERDAY
letter words....5 pts. 4 4 4
4-letter words... pts. o_'N 5'
3Vletter words....3 pts. A A 5
.?-tter words....l pt. Y EST 4
Highest possible 53
score is 50 pts. TOTAL 42
Copyright 19B4, John Manninrg
Distributed by Xing Features Syndicate.

ble debate with himself. A
sound competitor would have
done so with high avidity.
Tomorrow's Problem
(Dealer: West. Neither side
vulnerable.)
Should East bid after West's
L-Heart is passed by North?
What should determine his an-
swer?
Distributed 'by King Features
Syndicate.


[ WISHING WELL
Registered U. S. Patent Qffice.
6 4 8 2 8 3 7 5 .8 2 6 8 3
H S G Y O' H B V L O N O E
5 2 6 3 8 4 6 2 7 6 3 5 4
I U E A W Q S R E T L T U
3 6 5 4 7 2 8 6 3 8 4 7 6
T P A A A I I R H N R U A
2 8 6 3 5 7 4 8 6 5 3 4 2
D G I D L T E L S V E D E
4 5 2 6 7 8 3 6 4 2 7 5 6
E I A E Y O L F AL J C R
3 6 4 8 5 6 2 7 6 3 4 2 5
I O L V T M H O B G I O O
2 5 6 3 7 4 6 8 2 5 6 3 4
P R O H Y N S E E Y S T G


:ROSSWORD


RpANCE, YOU FOLLOW
TONTO WHEN HE LEAVES TOWN.
FWN OLrT WHERE HE AN' ITE
LONE RANGER ARE CAMPED,
ThEN LET ME KNOW. -


H ERE is a pleasant little game that will give you a message every
day. It is a numerical puzzle designed to spell out your fortune.
Count the letters in your first name. If the number of letters is 6 or
more, subtract 4. If the number is less than 6, add 3. The result is
your key number. Start at the upper left-hand corner of the rec-
tangle and check every one of your key numbers, left to right. Then
read the message the letters under the checked figures give you.
Copyright 1954. by William J. Miller. Distributed by King Features. inc.. j0-


,4


I m


r


/


DOTTY DMIPPLE


d


I


9


1
(





RIP KIRBY


WINK-TV WSUN-TV
CH.II CH.38
v v


Test Pattern
Test Pattern
First Show;
First Show

First Show
First Show
Lazy Bar Eleven
Lazy Bar Eleven

Lazy Bar Eleven
Lazy Bar Eleven
Lazy Bar Eleven
Lazy Bar Eleven

Junior C'roads
For Ladies
Adventureland
Adventureland

World News,
Weather
Guest Book
Sports

The Visitor
The Visitor
Stu Erwin Show
Stu Erwin Show

Boxing
Boxing
Boxing
Family Theatre

Family Theatre
Family Theatre
Family Theatre
Sign Off


Big Payoff
Big Payoff
Date with Fran
Date with Fran

Brighter Day
Secret Storm
H. Smith Show
H. Smith Show

Tip Top Kapers
H. Smith Show
Eddie Fisher
H. Smith Show

T. Eynon, News
Adventure Trail
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Weather, Sports

Amos Andy
Amos 'N Andy
Rocky King
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Wrestling
Wrestling

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Touchdown
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Two for Money
Two for Money
Foreign Intrigue
Foreign Intrigue

News, Home
Theatre
*


Wednesday, Oct 6, 1954 THE NEWS Page .;


WEDNESDAY RADIO LO G :.


9 3



S15
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45



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00


o 15
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45
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o30

45

00
015
o30
2 45


o15
o30
'12 Dos45


WSUN WFLA WSPB WK)
620 970 1450 154
V V V V


News
Martin Block
Martin Block
Martin Block
Ernie Lee
Ernie Lee
Ernie Lee
Ernie Lee

Musical Express
Art and Dot Todd
Roger Bennett
June Johnson

News
Sportscast
Temple Vespers
Temple Vespers

News
Bill Stern
You Were There
Rainbow Rendez.

.Jack Gregson
Jack Gregson
Jack Gregson
Jack Gregson

Sammy Kaye
Sammy Kaye
Paul Whiteman
Paul Whiteman

News
News
T. Williams
Sleepy Serenade

Sleepy Serenade
Sleepy Serenade
Sleepy Serenade
Sleepy Serenade

Sign Off


M. M. McBride
Woman in Love
Pepper Young
Right to Hap'ness

Back Stage
Stella Dallas
Widder Brown
Woman in House

Just plain Bill
'Lorenzo Jones
Allen Roth
World News

News
Sports
Melachrino
3-Star Extra

Alex Drier
Music of Manh'tn
Morgan Beatty
One Man's Family

Dinah Shores
Frank Sinatra- .
Walk A Mile
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Grbucho Marx
Groucho Marx
Big Story
Big Story

Fibber McGee
Gildersleeve
News
Sportsreel

Danny Daniels
Dance, Music
Pat Chamburs
Pat Chamburs

News


IPeggy Lee
House Party
Mike and Buff
Mike and Buff
nie Rice
Connie Rice
Connie Rice
Connie Rice
Connie Rice

Hack Swain
Hack Swain
Hack Swain
Manhattan


Allen Jackson
News, Sports
Sarasota Speaks
Guy Lombardo
Tennessee Ernie
Hollywood Time
Choraliers
Edw. ,.. Murrow.,

Curtain, Call
.Curtain Call
:21st Preciict
21st Precinct

Perry' Como
Bing Crosby
Amos 'N Andy
Amos 'N Andy

Eileen Barton
Dance Band,
FBI Drama
'FBI Drama

World Tonight
Invite To Musid
Invite To Music
Invite To Music

Invite To Music
This I Believe
Sign Off


News *
Club Kohli'er
Club Kohlri 'er
Club, KohlMiter

You Win
You Win
Red Ermis
Red Ermi

News
E. Cote GI. Club
Chas. Fernndez
Sports Page

Sign Off ,



3*.<


.- -







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- '* "'A t i


'.4,, 5 .



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,.- ,
i, .

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OPPOSITE CITIZEN B N :Z

POST OFFICE C IT I .AWINDO,




THUfUSDAY
Morn Ja boe .!.;'^6


C'


THE MAGICIAN


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Breakfast Club
Breakfast Club
Breakfast Club
Breakfast Club

Ernie Lee
Ernie Lee
Sunshine Theatre
Sunshine Theatre

Sunshine Theatre
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Welcome
Travelers

Valiant Lady
Love of Life
Search for T'mor.
Seeking Heart

News
Sugar 'N Spice
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Sugar 'N Spice

TBA
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Garry Moore'
Robert Q. Lewis


00
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2 W


Revival Crusade
Percolator Patrol

Percolator Patrol
Percolator Patrol
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News

Roger Bennett
Roger Bennett
Record Review
News

Breakfast Club
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My True Story
My True Story
Whispering Streets
A Girl Marries

Modern Romances
Ever Since Eve
Neighbors Voice
3-City By-Line

Valentino
Luncheon
Keyboard Console
Keyboard Console

Paul Harvey
Tunes
Devotions
Garden Man

Barbara Young
Charles Antell
Sheila Graham
Martin Block


Morn. Jamboree
-Morna Jamboree
Gulf Coast Sere.
Gulf Coast Sere.

News
Gulf Coast Sere.
Vep Ellis
News:


News
Melody Time
Gulf Coast Sere.
Gulf Coast Sere


Gulf Coast Sere.
Gulf Coast Sere.
Gulf Coast Sere.
Gulf Coast Sere.

Bob Smith Show
Bob Smith Show
Bob Smith Show
Break The Bank

Strike It Rich
Strike. It Rich
Phrase That Pays
Second Chance

News
Farm Hour
Dixie Rebels
R.F.D. Florida

Red Skelton
Red Skelton
Penthouse Party
Penthouse Party .

Homemakers


Forum
P. Frederick
Marriage Pays


Sign On, News
Bandel Linn

News
Bandel Linn
News
Bandel Linn

News
Miles of Melody
Club Note RBook
Herb Sjolander

News -
Sightseer ,
Sightseer
Dottie Mead

News
Keyboard Concert
Arthur Godfrey
Arthur Godfrey

Arthur Godfrey
Arthur Godfrey
Ginger Rogers
Dick Powell

News, Weather
Melodies
Helen Trent
Tello-Test

Road of Life
Ma Perkins
Dr. Malone
Social Security

Mrs. Burton
Perry Mason-
Nora Drake
Brighter Days


News, Music "
Sarasota Sunrise

News, Music
Fisherman .
Sarasota Sunrise
News

Sarasota Sunri s
Sarasota Suprise
Shopper's Guide
Saras6ta Sunfriu.

Mobile Show '
Mobile Show "
Red's Show
Red's ShoW

Music For Days
Music For DaVy
Haroionies ,-
Milk Time ,-

News
This Is The :1oriU
This Is The HI
This Is Theelrl r

Newsw-
Frankie Care I
Swap Shop ; ,Z
Russ Morga' "'m

News, Musfd "s
M u s ic a l R o u 4l4
Musical 'Rounftp
Shep Field5 ,, ,

.News '
Musical Acadei
Musical Acade it
Musical Acad-


CUTIES


0-6


10-6


34M MMuW WUAI UTUM U., UUB UU EU f 2... m WO"_ _n__v_ __


"You don't have to act like that! All I said was, 'I
wonder what the McDermotts are doing in Honolulu I
tonight'"


London Zoo aquarium ac- Western Samoa, whose bad
quired six Red sturgeon-well, roads and reckless drivers are
from Russia, anyway-when known through the South Pa-
Jon Miller brought back the cific, is revising its traffic
young fresh water sturgeon laws in a move toward safe-
from Moscow. ty, Apia reports.


"Excuse me while


India's Education Commis-
sion aims, in the next seven
years, to see that every high
school is able to teach general
science, social studies and
crafts, Calcutta learns.


I go change into .omethifng *mm '
competitive!" .
at< ."i 5 Ai'


Scotland's new national p4rk,
between Loch Lomond and th
famed Trossachs, in the 4-
Roy Country", has been' nam
"The Queen Elizabeth PFVr~t
Park".


MANDRAKE


OZARK IKE


7


00


.


,, -j-,


t ?".2t I


1


I




Page 24 THE NEWS Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1954


Chamber Plans


The annual membership drive
of the Sarasota County Cham-
ber of Commerce will be
launched with a special dinner
meeting tentatively set for the
Lido Casino, Nov. 5.
The tentative date was set
yesterday during a meeting at
the Orange Blossom Hotel and
the election committee was di-m
erected to make definite plans.


Winds Hamper


Arnn ?~2c


ke b 1e;fshiip D r;ve


Serving on the committee are Ads will be placed in the the advertising committee.
Ben H. Hopkins Jr., Emmett travel sections of 18 newspapers The billboards will be de-
Addy, and David B. Lindsay, which produced the best results signed to attract visitors to Sar-
Jr., outgoing directors. last year, with two ads slated asota via the new bridge span-
Browning, chairman of t he for each paper.
advertising committee, dis- Browning also reported that ning lower Tampa Bay.
closed that a newspaper ad- proposed layouts for 20 bil l- Plans for the construction of
advertising committee, dis- boards on highways leading to two showers on City Piers for
Sarasota has been adopted and the Sunshine Skyway and Sara- the use of boatowners are un-
a budget of $1,060 set for the sota will be submitted by three derway, M a r t y Paver an-
program. sign companies for approval by nounced.


Experiments
On Tide Control
High winds have hampered
red tide control experiments,
according to Joseph Bell, of Ft.
Myers, fishery research biolo-
gist, with the U. S. Fish and
Wildlife Service, who was here
yesterday checking on t e s t s
made off-shore Friday.
During the test Friday 600
pounds of copper sulphate were
spread over concentrations of
gymnodinium brevis, the red
tide orgnism, and Bell's check
yesterday indicated that all red
organisms were killed.
Further tests will be made to
check the concentration of the
chemical in the. water and the
lasting effect on the brevis.
Previous tests by the federal
government have shown that
the chemical will kill the brevis
and experiments are now being
conducted to determine the best
and most economical method of
sowing the copper sulphate.

Postal Hours

Back To Normal
The post office returned to
normal operating hours today,
ending the summer Wednesday
afternoon shutdown.
Postmaster G o r d o n Higel
said the only change would be
that the post office would re-
main open Wednesday a f t e r-
noon until the regular closing
time of 5:30 p. m.
Higel explained that stamp
machines are available in the
post office lobby at all times
and persons with postal boxes
may get into them anytime.


J. M. Rhoades Co.
347 So. Pineapple Ave.


COMPLETE


COMPLETE
ruuN-tAL SERVICE

ROBARTS

FUNERAL

HOME


22 S. LINKS


6-8391


-News


Drainage District


Names New Officers


A whole new regime of of-
ficers was swept into control
of the Sarasota Fruitville
Drainage District at the annual
meeting of the political subdi-
vision yesterday.
Property owners in the 25,000
acre district elected S. R.
Blackwell, operator of the Clov-
er Bar Ranch, and Otis
Howell, of Fruitville, as super-
visors of the district.
Blackwell, who was named to
succeed Charles Dempsey as
supervisor and as president of
the board, was elected to a
three year term while Howell
will serve one year to complete
the unexpired term of J. E.
Pace.
The new supervisors met im-
mediately after the election
with holdover supervisor Henry
E. Schnell, Debrecen Rd.,
rancher, and' named J oh n
Houle, a warehouse manager,
as secretary of the district. A
new treasurer and attorney will
also be named, Blackwell in-
dicated.
Houle succeeds T. R. Taylor,
who is expected to continue
serving until the new tax rolls
are prepared and until the
books of the district are in
shape to turn over to his suc-
cessor.
This year the supporters of


Headquarters
For
Western Wear
Riding Equipment
Wall Paper
Levis

DRAPER'S
WESTERN STORE
1525 STATE 4-0121


CUSTOM FLOORS
-- OUR SPECIALTY

DeSOTO
TERRAZZO
CORP.


1031 N. Orange
SARASOTA


2-6451


Howell and Blackwell stated
working weeks in advance to
line up proxies for the annual
election and succeeded in get-
ting more than half of the eli-
gible voters to side with them.
Each acre of land carries
with it one vote and the Black-
well group received more than
11,000 of the 16,000 votes cast
yesterday.
One of the first moves con-
templated by the new directors
is the shift of the offices from
space provided in the Palmer
National Bank building by the
Palmer-Florida Corporation to
a site closer to the district,
most of which lies outside of,
the city.
Blackwell said also that he
wants to investigate immediate-
ly the possibility of calling in
some of the $115,000 in out-
standing bonds.


Democrats Set

Meeting Dates
A meeting of the County
Democratic E executive
Committee has been slated
for Thursday evening at 7 p. m.
in campaign headquarters on
Pineapple St., next to the First
Federal Bank, according to
Chairman Gale K. Greene.
Other meetings, Wall at cam-
paign headquarters include:
Steering Committee tonight and
Friday night at 7 o'clock.
Sarasota County Women's
Democratic Club Monday at


8 p. m.


I


THE PRESIDENT and Secretary of Defense Charles E. Wilson, left, conferred yes-
terday at the-summer White House in Denver. Secretary Wilson told newsmen
progress is being made steadily in weeding out security risks in the defense depart-
ment. (International News Photo).


A DEADLOCK WAS BROKEN when Premier Mendes-
France signed for his nation a nine-power agreement
which restores German sovereignty. The agreement im-
poses controls over German arms production. (Inter-
national News Photo).


ANGRY PASSENGERS on the Holland-American liner, Maasdam, are staging a sit-
down strike aboard ship. The liner collided with a French freighter and was forced
back into the Hoboken, N. J., port. Passengers refuse to leave the ship unless their
hotel bills are paid until they can make new travel arrangements. (International
News Photo).


RETURNING PROM LONDON. Secretary of State
John Foster Dulles, left, is shown as he was met at
Washington National Airport by Walter Bedell Smith,
who has resigned and was succeeded yesterday by
Herbert Hoover, Jr. :(International News Photo).


THE BIRTH OF PRESS rnkubOM in America is re-enacted in New York as a fea-
ture of National Newspaper Week by creating a replica of the print shop of John
Peter Zenger, fearless colonial journalist. Zenger waged and won an historic fight
for the right to print the news. (International News Photo).


Headquarters


Cypress


-ROCK LATH
-SHEET ROCK
-METAL LATH
-CORNER BEAD
-CORNERITE
EXCEL BUILDERS
SUPPLY CO.
1049 N. Orange 8-5471
Sarasota 4-5241


U


CONGRATULATIONS-




ThelNoews,




FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
104 South Pineapple Ave.


SERVICES -


TWO MORNING SERVICES
8:30 and 10:55

EVENING SERVICE '-


7:30

BIBLE STUDY 7:30 P. M.
Every Wednesday

SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:45 A.M.
A Class For Every Age


A WELCOME TO

ALL SERVICES


U


It







The Policy Of THE NEWS And Its Bole In


THE NEWS is- purely what
thename implies. It is a news-
pa r dedicated to reporting
the news in good taste.
This,in the words of its Ed-
itor and Publisher Kent S. Mc-
Kinley means all the news.


an as Sarasota passes through
a period of economic growing
pains.
NEWS TARGETS
Get-rich quick artists, crook-
ed politicians, shysters, trick-
sters, drunken drivers and


newspaper considers 'itself a
public servant, we will cooper-
ate to the fullest extent to-
wards continuing and further-
ing good government in Sara-
sota.
POLITICALLY, BI-PARTISAN
V^Iifina-i rT47 rnTiU c '


A .As an integral part of Sara- other menaces to the physical rouCtLy,
sota's life, '0'E NEWS will and financial well being of our
seek to serve the public by commu-.ity will be everyday
'printing the, facts Smpartially targets for THE NEWS. We
'and will n6tj compromise itself will print their names, their
in. any aner for any indivi- deeds, and if the facts and pub-
dual, group or political organi- lic op i n i o n warrant, THE
:B atioa. NEWS will editorially urge le-
STHIE NEWS feels that Sara- gal action.
Sota's growth, will be larger THE NEWS will be the
thai prtdidted. Thus it will friend of le'ery honest, well
i 'Pforam &i the role of guardi- meaning public official. As this SPECIAL SE

.ew 'n4iepr Name Appears On Florida's West Coast



Oajr Ltd., Makes I
A' : t


-r I"""~~T~


..
$114 -PUBLISBJ



tt e Etor


'Pb er-He is a-man
a Cheonvictiop
r erhaps the. greatest tr-
be to him is
Leader whp .ad-
es only to the loftiest, of
.ciprnles and never has he
known to compromise
ti principles.','
n Tht tis Kent McKinley, un-
S -,et whose leadership Te E
E .' has been born and will
g to ithe' benefit, not 'of
t McKinley, but of the
eple of this area.
The foregoing descriptive
paragraph of this energetic ed-
itr' was taken from the hon-
.. i*S degree of Doctor of
4wa given to him recently by
flrida Southern College.
S It was because of a princile
that McKinley decided to found
tHE NEWS.
After a suceesful, business
career and a not so successful
venture in the legitimate
theater, .McKinley and his
charming wife cast their lot
with the promising future of
Sarasta
s3ED *OR THE NEWS
. The MoKinleys settled here
in 1947 and within six months
were taking an active interest
in civic affairs. Then in 1951
something, happened which
f a '.t e e. for THE

I', cP4 pu a telephone call
firo. a member of the city
commissionn He wanted to
know if McKinley was aware
of .a,.move coming before the
commission within a matter of
days concerning Sarasota Bay.
The commission would vote
the following Monday night to
fill 290 acres of the bay for a
housing development.
SMcKiiley admitted complete
ignorance of the matter. He
had neither read nor heard of
It. Karl Bickel, the grand old
'man of the United Press Asso-
ciation got on the telephone.
He urged McKinley to do some-
thing.
STEPS IN
Admittedly caught with his
'news down," McKinley
grabbed the ball. He was able
to buy a page ad in a newspa-
per on Monday, the day of the
-city commission meeting. In
the ad he showed what would
happen to the bay if the plan
' won out. He contended that
Sqrasota would be losing one
3f its major attractions.
McKinley telephoned the
mayor, suggesting removal of
the commission meeting to the


Helm


Is Born
i'vic Auditorium. -The mayor
disagreed. Seven hundred peo-
ple tried to attend the session
at City HalL The nkayor re-
lented, re-scheduled the meet-
ing at Civic Auditorium and
the bay fill plan was reduced
to a reasonable amount of
acreage.
Today's editor and publisher
of THE NEWS had stuck by a
principle. A principle of think-
.ing about and acting to pro-
tect the welfare, concern, and
rights of all the people, not
merely a few.
That principle, that partici-
pation in a civic matter, was

the Iseed from which this news-
paper has been born.
In 'spite of his successes,
McKinley has retained the God
'given quality of being an h'on-
estly down to earth person.
His sense of humor contains
the elements found in those
laughable paragraphs contain-
ed in Grit and the New Yorker
magazine.
DECISIONS STAND UP
His actions are impetuous,
but a full life has provided the
degree of experience required
t? make his ddbisions stand up.
Like all men, Kent McKinley
has, at times, disregarded the
advice of his mother. He had
the occasion in 1952 to do just
that. Now 84, his mother at her
home in Three Mile Bay, near
Watertown, N. Y., urged her
son not to enter politics.
But the die had long been
cast and he advised her of his
decision to run for Congress. In
the son to mother tongue, he
confided a major worry. A
damnyankee running in Florida
might not do so good. A bit of
Southern blood would help, he
concluded.
The 84-year-old mother dug
deep into the well of wisdom.
True, son Kent McKinley was
related to President William
McKinley.
SOUTHERN LINK
However, it would be advis-
able for him to look up the
biography of one John McKin-
ley who also was an ancestor.
The newcomer to the field of
politics returned to Sarasota.
Taking Webster's Biographical
Dictionary from his library he
turned to John McKinley and
discovered why his mother had
made the reference. "John
McKinley, 1780-1852, American
jurist and legislator. Born in
Gulpepper County, Va. U. S.
Senator from Alabama (1826-
(Continued On Page 31)


T.UHE NEWrVVO uasa


ACTION


t Bo


'


established a strict bi-partisan
policy. We intend to support po-
litical candidates who are best
qualified for the offices they
seek without regard 'to party
affiliation. Honesty, intelli-
gence, a true spirit of civic re-
sponsibility and a desire to
serve are basic qualifications.


SBelieving that Florida's gov- practical approach to prob- terept to THE NiEWS, and we
ernment badly needs modern- lems in this field. will work towards continuing
izing, THE NEWS will be a We will cooperate with all improvement of our schools.
leader in fighting for the suc- churches to the extent of our The reporters of THE NEWS
cess 6of the two party system facilities, will intelligently write about
in this state., all city, county and state gov-
Likewise, THE NEWS' en- POLICY TOWARD bCHOOLS arn ent county and state gov-
dorses the theory of states' The Sarasota school system reporters are not beginners,
rights, and will urge a more is a matter of particular in- bt know government inside
out and are qualified to earn
the respect and confidence of
? public officials.


SARASOTA, FLORIDA:


SCommercially, THE NEWS
Swll provide its advertisers
with a chance to reach the
V s consuming public with legiti-
mate products.
Civic organizations and en-
terprises will find a ready
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 1954 friend in THE NEWS.


Kenmar Ltd. A new business
name appears in Sarasota to-
day, bringing with it fTHE
'NEWS, the most modern daily
newspaper in Florida.
The operation associates as
general partners, Mr. and Mrs.
Kent S. McKinley, 203 S. Wash-
ington Dr., St. Armand's Key.
A combination of the McKin-
le~'s first names, Kent and
Marje, the partnership focuses
the talents, time, 'and energy
of two Sarasota, civic leaders
in a concentrated effort to give
,Sarasota an outstanding news-
paper, THE NEWS.
Known in the Sduth and East
for their philanthropic projects,
the McKinleys are a respected
Christian family who have
never sought the public spot-'
light for the sake of publicity.
ACTIVE POLITIALLY
Politically they have been
active as Republicans intent on
peeing a two party system in
Florida.
Civic responsibilities have
been accepted and carried out
by the, McKinleys without
thought of personal publicity.
7Now in their new veintuxce,
Kent and Marje McKinley,
with their newspaper, THE
NEWS, become public' servants
in their own right.'
Since taking up permanent
residence here) in1947 the
McKinleys have shown that
they believe in Sarasota and
it's future. It is their Aim to
have THE NEWS grow with
Sarasota.' "
WORK AS TEAM ,
Already' they hAve assisted
in establishing the Little League
in its own ball park and turned
a helping hand toward the Girl
Scouts, Happiness House and
their own church.
SWorking as a team, Kent and
Marje McKinley find strength
in the Scripture as contained
in the 14th chapter of
Ecclesiastes: "Do well unto
thy friend and according
to thy: ability stretch out thy
hand and give,to him. Defraud
not thyself of a good day, and
let not the blessing of a good
desire pass thee by."

Old Dude Ranch

Only A Memory
In a far corner of THE
NEWS building press room
stands a faded sign spelling
out the name. The Dude
Ranch. This is the only recog-
nizable mark of the former
restaurant and rest home
which once stood where THE
NEWS is now published.
A year after World War H
ended, John Reynolds, former
owner of Sarasota's Cypress
Inn, purchased a parcel of land
on the west side of Lime Ave.
between 11th and 12th Sts. and
moved in a four room log cab-
in.
First used as a residence the
building -as enlarged and yon-
v3rted to a restaurant a year
(Continued On Page 31)


Impact Good For Everyone -


NEWS Brings Sarasota A Shot In The Arm


What' happens when TIE
NEWS hits Sarasota?
Like the tremors from an
earthquake, the impact of this
newspaper on Sarasota travels
in many directions and is more
felt than seen. While a large
number of people will recog-
nize the direct effect which
THE NEWS has upon them,
an even larger number will
directly or indirectly feel this
impact.
Establishment of THE NEWS
brings to Sarasota two direct
types of stimulus. The first can
be measured in terms of the
new money which is injected
into circulation by the news-
paper and its staff. The second
type is the stimulus of new
people and new ideas.
First returns from THE


NEWS came in several
months ago when plans were
first laid for the building which
serves as its home. Attorneys
were needed to make all title
proceedings legal. They were
followed by architects who
planned the building and after
the architects came a long pro-
cession of Sarasotans who were
called in to sell either goods
or services to THE NEWS.
A partial list of the categor-
ies of individuals and firms
who profited by the newspa-
per's "Buy Sarasota" policy,
are as follows:
Builders, electricians, plumb-
ers, carpenters, landscapers,
furniture suppliers, glaziers,
air conditioners, office equip-
ment suppliers, wallpaperers,
masons, steelworkers, welders,
9


mechanics, truckers, photog-
raphy stores, hardware stores,
paint stores, automobile agen-
and the light company.
The money spent in provid-
ing a home for THE NEWS
started a new flow of money
in Sarasota, and since there
will be a steady need for goods
and services as the newspaper
continues operation, there will
always be a business stimulus
from the Lime Ave. address.
In addition to the money be-
ing spent directly by the news-
paper itself, there is also the
steady spending generated by
the hiring of a large staff to
operate the publication. While
many of the staff have come in
from outside Sarasota, a large
number of local people have
been hired, adding to the exist-


ing spending power of the pop-
ulation.
Those who have come in
from other parts of the nation
to settle in Sarasota and work
provide probably one of the
largest spurts to loc1 activity
seen in some time. Purchase
of new homes is estimated to
,run at approximately $250,000
and this is supplemented by
additional rentals of homes,
apartments and rooms.
Not only will these new peo-
ple create an initial impact of
land, home, furniture and sup-
plies buying, but they will re-
main as a constant market for
goods and services by Sara-
sota -merchants and entrepre-
neurs. These newspaper folk
need food, clothing, entertain-
(Continued On Page 31)


The Comi


nager Duke Richardson

land With Newspaper#


General Ma

w To Sarasota Is An Old T

General Manager C. R.
.. Duke Richardson. A man
who sat in on the planning and
start of 21 daily newspapers
has been the~ guiding land be-
hind the thousands of technical
i details which attended the birth
bi THE NEWS.
S A newspaperman whose hob-
Sby is newspapers, Richardson
Shas chalked up a successful
career almost as long as the
j man himself. He's recognized
around Sarasota for his Liin-
Scoln-like stature and his neigh-
borly 'conversations.
As the first person other
Than the McKinleys to be as-
sociated with THE NEWS
Richardson has today several
more grgy hairs, but a tre-
mendous feeling of satisfac-
tion at a unique job well done.
4"F. BUILT MODERN SHOP
S It took a man like Duke Rich-
S. ardson, with 12 years of assoo-
iation with King Featutz3 S -
dicate, to put together the t-ost
modern new daily newspaper
in the country. Having travel-
S', ed in 33 states as a business
representative for King Fea-
.c tures, Richardson has person-
ally conferred with editors of
.J 1,000 different newspapers.
In 1952, after Richardson had
VICE PRESIDENT MRS. MARJORIE McKINLEY taken up permanent residence
in Sarasota, he was introduced
Mrs. Vice President to Rent Mc inidy by mutual
ra-a*n Wt -:w -friends. Thesq friends knew that
S, Kent McKinley wanted to start
Tak e newspaperr' They also knew
,=6 I10tht a-Due Richardso had the
SJtob.' d"enoi' "iiirwJy a rt~ a" =a _.' experience necessary to start
vice President s. Marjo- a chapter of td w me lonal oy the bsll rln1 .
i oe McKiziey, Anyone admhires Club of America. The two men saw eye to
&,-woman, who can keep her h 1' ;i said:
a wproman who can' keep her HER CONt U rION eye on the subject, and things
friends calling her Marje" All-this is not a hobby. It started to happen at 1045 N.
when she has reached a point i rje cKinley's contribu- Lime Ave. For. 10 months
in the business world equaled tion to a better way of life in Richardson sweat out the de-
by but few American Women
by. but few Ameican women. her community, state and ha- tails of building a brand new
Born into one, of America's tion. She takes her iivie duties newspaper.
prominent newspaper'families, seriously. They become respon- His photogenic memory
Mrs. McKinley today, reaches sibilities. served him well as he.worked
the high point of her business Her personal pleasures find with carpenters building a new
life. She becomes vice ps- their rightful place in member- plant; argued over where to
dent of two daily hewqpapers, ships in such organizations as put what; purchased press,
THE NEWS and the top rank- the Founder's Circle of the Sar- INTERTYPES, desks, pencils,
ing highly respected Buffalo asota Garden Club. and interviewed the many per-
Evening News. With this background, one sons seeking jobs on THE
Yet she is "Marje" to the can readily understand\ why NEWS.
switchboard operator at THE Mrs. McKinley looks upon Throughout all of this he
NEWS who is a fellow member THE NEWS as a' public perv- maintained a quiet air of calm.
of 'the Women's Republican ant., When the first desk was moved'
Club. Her residence in Sarasota into the building, he perched
GOP LBDER has given Mrs. McKinley a his feet atop his commaihd
Sreo gnPied.. le"der of chance to become a part of the post, and ami& the clatter of
Republican Party, one who community. Her fondness for carpenter's hammers and with
Republican Party, one who people and Sarasota's climate, his Hoosier optimism said:
started ly ringing doorbells as all blend into a mixture where "This is going to be a real
a precinct worker, a womna friendly attitudes prevail. newspaper."
known for her exquisite tastes, LIKES TO DO THINGS Duke has known all kinds of
Marje McKinley is, above all; "I like Sarasota and here I newspapers in his time and
an unselfish woman.
have a chance to do things, now, as general manager of
Because of this virtue, un--not just sit around and talk THE NEWS, he is seeing a
selfishness, Mrs. McKinley as about it,!' Mrs. McKinley re- dream come true. A real news-
a good Christian every day marks as she relates how THE paper, one where brains, brawn
offers a helping hand in the NEWS will become a part of and horse sense are the major
way of time, knowledge, effort, the community. ingredients.
and money to public service At times she has a bit of
activities. She is not one to trouble keeping her politics out SCHOLASTIC AWARD
merely send a check to a "fa-o of business. When it was sug- Born in Indianapolis, 'Rich-
vorite, charity." gested, that. at THE NEWS, ardson started in his iiewspap-
As such, Mrs. McKinley is she be referred to as "Mrs. er career early as a paperboy
known for her working knowl- Veep," the native Republican for the Indianapolis News. His
edge of hospitals, clinics, the ruled no, that nickname re- father, Robert Richardson,
Community Chest, "and the lated to a Democrat. On see- spent a wonderful '42 years.
Boys Club. She formerly was ond breath, however, she re- with the same paper. 'At
the only woman president of (Continued On Page 39) (Continued On Page 31)


There's no need to squint at
stories in THE NEWS, since
copy is set in the largest type
used in any daily newspaper
in Florida.
All type faces used in the
newspaper were chosen for
their legibility, style .and har-
mony after careful study of
the many type faces available.
For reading matter, Ideal
type was chosen in a large
size to facilitate easy reading
by avoiding small print. Ideal
type was designed by the In-

NEWS To Follow

The Golden Rule
Who? What? Where? When?
Why? How?
Those are the ingredients of
a newspaper story. The author
of this recipe has been lost in
history. And this is too bad,
for he contributed perhaps the
strongest yardstick applicable
to-a good newspaper story.
'This week, newspapers from
Maine to California via Florida
observe National Newspaper
Week. It is a time set' aside
for newspapers to blow ttheir'
own horns a little bit louder
than usual.
Perhaps, amid all the clam-
our designed to tell you, Mr.
and Mrs. Reader, that you
can't live without your riews-
paper, we, the newspapers will
forget to tell you a bare fact.
GOLDEN RULE
And that essentially is this;
No newspaper, no newspa-o
perman or woman can carry
out the responsibilities as-
signed by tradition unless the
golden rule of who, what,"
where, when, why and howis
followed diligently.
When a newspaper takes this
rule to heart, it can demand
respect, for it will be fulfilling
its obligation to the readers.
Any deviation from present-
ing the facts to comply fully
with the yardstick is a devia-
tion from the principles of
good journalism.
A reporter, Whether he be
the youngest or the veteran
cannot in good conscience turn
in a story that falls short of
the' six elements.
INTEGRITY A MUST
If his story fails to cover all
the points, then he by human
error has failed. Or, perhaps
he has missed because he is
biased. Or, further still, it is
conceivable that his e d i t o r
(Continued On Page 27)


tertype Corporation after con-
ducting its own legibility ,t id-
ies and is now one of the "sId
widely used newspaper type
Yaces in the country. .
HARMONY STRESSED ,
Headipgs for news stores
are pet in Karnak and Cairo
type, while advertisements will
be printed using the Vojit ,
series of type. Karnak d
Cairo were picked to harmo
with the Ideal type while
Vogue series of types
ads is aimed primarily
beauty of design.
Reader habits and pre%,la
ence figure largely in the ..
election of type for a newqs ,.
per. One factor influenig b M
selection of the large site t p "
in use in THE NEWS is tLh
"desire to perform a public ,
service through readability4g;.:.
Ideal type is known 4ri
clarity of impression on iBqwx
print, a leading factor in leg
ability according to- typograpl:
experts. Clarity is achieved' r
type by designing components
of each letter'to avoid type
breakdowns andd" ink smears '
during press runs. &:'
THE NEWS also uses :tAW-
wide column (nd free i~ps6c
to further increase readabP=j'
by opening up the read:
matter.


NEWS To Feature

Realty Secti6

THE NEWS will have a- 6
of its many features a 16-page .
tabloid section each Satur- d '
votedtd to news of real estsdt
building and allied businesses
In addition to news storit
there will be features and poI.
tures. The stories and feature. ,
will relate to developments #K
interest in, the various angjpq
of real estate in SarasotaianM
this area as well as natioally,
There will be picture6,i
new developments' interest 7
homes both big and little, ad
of people who are making l-f
news in the real estate and ca-
struction fields.
As Sarasota is a tourist area
real estate naturally is one, i'it
the largest of the businesswta '
tivities here. As land is sold, ",
cleared and developed the onq-
struction men come in building
new homes for the people w "
are moving here in inc
numbers. '
BRING EXPANSION
New homes and.
(Continued On Page 31'
].


nunity

THE NEWS detests and will
fight communism with all its
power. No witch hunts will b" i~
conducted, but THE NEWS
will help expose any person or
group considered subversive by
law enforcement agencies.
We recognize the many at-
tractions Sarasota has for the
tourist world, and will promote
these features.
It is the aim of THE NNWS,
as a family newspaper, to
bring the people of Sarasiii
and Sarasota County closer, J
their government, closer -to
their neighbors and to pto-
mote Sarasota as, a wide a-
wake American city.


I .


I i


GENERAL MANAGER C. R. DIKE. RICHARrw-.


Big, Readable Type


Used- In Yout--EWS+


/




I,


e 26 THE NEWS Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1954

, ', a ,

Editorial Department

/*-* k ,c^ -^ ^ M Y


Managing Editor Arn


On The Following Pages You Will See Pictures And News Stories


9


Of The Men And Women Who Daily Prepare Your Copy of THE NEWS


old Burnett Is A Crusading Newsman


I.-.
















N"i-- EDITOB- RENNETI
6YO 'dw people can. boast
S'Ahave bee workiNOL D
a thi tidead, since (hey were
1in ea"'p ts but' News E dito
K nieth' Iayo dould, for he
rt out helping around h
,i;<\ /M"BWS EDITOB,.,ENNETI




S her. weekly pe ple cancer boas
.;. ,.. th't i,y have been workiri



S' abo and he's been in wen
,..'. llnepants, 'buf News Edito:
., Kenneth Mayb dould, for h<
: :. trtrted out helping around hii

i. 'a flher'B weekly newspaper a
a boy' and he's been in th<
g ngs field eVer since.
-,..ot only have' these yean
-bden crammed with working
around newspapers and press
a.4ociations, but they've beei
Syt 4rs of covering top national
-.'...Ws stories and working
: alongside- some .,of the mosi
Sfatqi. -aames in journalism.
;Ken brings this lifetime ol
#: 'perniqce to his job as news
e' lor. of -IHE NEWS where he
-will. direct 'all newsgathering
Sad. edit all news copy.
.-ehna newspaper experience
a 'd btes back to his childhood in
St. nne,a small community
S*Othu of Chicago, where his
father published the town's
r. pekly newspaper.
SSET TP'E BY HAND
S.As a youngster, Ken took
easilyy to the newspaper busi-
ness. and he tells of how he
cbAld set a line of type when
Other kids were learning how
Vtoa Make slingsh ts. On
g anllU town paper .e !earn-
..4' b fundamentals of the
I"9-w apr trade, filling in at
I' .-rhZtever job w a's needed.
Ai. Arter two years at Lake For-
st College,.north of Chicago,
I' Ken.'follo ved his natural bent
and- got; p job with the Asso-
ciated Piess bureau "in the
'Windy City.
Young Mayo.went to work in
an atmosphere that contained
all the hardy traditions of the
newspaper world. For 15 years
he thrived and grew with AP,
covering 'news stories all over
the country and occupying
desk' positions for the news
service.
COVERED COOLIDGE
S Among the stories which the
news editor recalls vividy
covering was one Florida hur-
-eane, the political caravans
of Huey Long and Gene Tal-
madge, -two of the South's
most colorful politicians, and
even of beihg a part of the
news train 'that reported on
President Coolidge's Christ-
mas. vacation trip to Sea Is-
land, Ga. in 1928.
Ten years later a little tired
of a stint at picture editing,
Ken left AP to join the Chicago
Times, only to find himself
bac' .in' .the familiar role of.,
picture editor. A year later he'
gdt his chance to get back to
writing .when he took a job do-
Sin' features and rewrite for
Cof Robert McCormick's Chic-
ago '.'Tribune.
After two years with "The
SWorld's Greatest Newspaper"
Mayo headed for Manhattan
and a job with the 'New York
World-Telegram.
That the slim newsman did
well in this toughest of all
newspaper towns is evident
from thb fact that when he
left the Telegram he held the
important position of night city
editor.
_.LONG-TIME VISITOR


Florida had long held a fas-
cination for Ken, beginning
years before when he had liv-
ed briefly, in Hollywood and
continuing during his periodic
visits to see his parents who


,r Mayo


'Native


I


r f
o r -:'. !
', '1 ,..:.,- -- .
.KENNETH MAYO.


Ford Know.


His Photos
Photographer Bob Foi
Three trademarks make NEV
photographer Bob Ford one
the most recognizable men
Sarasota. First is the bri
pipe. Second is his ever-prese
smile, and third is :the b
black press camera he carri
with him.,
This young Navy veteran
father of a 10-day old daughter
Karen Lynn, has crammed
lot of activity into the thr
years since he finished college
In that time he has sold new
paper advertising in Oklahon


zt. Managing Editor A r n o d with THE NEWS' managing old Washington Herald,. Bur- pointment as assistant profes- of months later, Burnett learn- given a 1953 Christopher
'. Burnett. A newspaperman's editor. nett moved to a similar job sor of journalism at Bradley ed the Army was taking down Award.
newspaperman.. Boss of the ed-NAI on the United States Daily University in Peoria for two the white crosses in the na-
Sitorial staff of THE NEWS, NATIVE BROOLYNITE which printed all government years. tional cemetery at Hawaii's PLAYS BAGPIPE
: Burnett has, in 27 years, earned Born in Brooklyn in 1908, news. Finally in 1953 Burnett de- Punchbowl. High maintenance THI N~EWS' ,managlg edi-
: a highly respected reputation Burnett at the age of a college From the steaniroom climate cided that after seven years on costs was given as the reason, tor is a member of. the Axmer-
Sas a managing editor. freshman decided not to be- of Washington, Burnett switch- the Journal he had to have a OPENS CAMPAIGN ican Society of N, wspaper Ed-
With mannerisms and ap- come an accountant like his ed to the opposite elements of real vacation and a much .
pearance more in line with father, but to study English Malone, N. Y., and the Malone needed rest. Feeling that Ernie Pyle itors; Sigma Delta Chi, t he
those of a college professor, aAd history. He did this at Telegraph. As is the way with It was impossible to take a would think that his buddies newspaper fraternity; Associat- .'
Burnett is a newspaperman Long Island University. mot newsmen, Burnett did a lengthy leave of absence at the had been slapped in the face, ed Press Managing Editors As-
to 'Burnett personally took it up- sciation tnd the Sersnee. .
basically because he likes pe6- Hankering to be an Egyptol- tour of duty on various papers tinle so. Burnett resigned. Of rnett ersonlly t t sociation and the Srine.He
plie. ogist, Burnett changed his including publications in Con- to Europe with Viola on a lux-n hsef tandMrBurne are C hit '-.
He feels that no other job mind when in his college soph- necticut and New Jersey, then ury liner to'Holland, and then journeye several times to and Scientists. a
puts one in such intimate con- moree yar he was an eyewit- went to the Daily Oklahoman an unplanned auto trip to many I Washington and succeeded in nett cas t
tact with eole and their nunes to an automobileaccident of Oklahoma City, Oka. Later countries. In Scotlan the Bur- getting the proper legislation Burnett calls av
mtat rou popblems. Also heir He was greatly impressed by. he migrated to the BAltimore Inetts saw. the old MacDuff introduced in Congress. hobby. He also plays So :
merous problems. Also he en- He was greatly impressed by bagpipe, attributable' to I
joys .the intellectual stimula-' a reporter who arrived at the Sun, and then the Miami Her- Castle, a homestead of his ma- Since Hawaiian statehood EnrSc tch aneeetiy
Stion of conversation with his scene and began questioning ald, where he served a Sun- eternal grandmother. After was under consideration in glish-Sco
colleagues. This is because those involved inthe fatalac- day editor and in'several other three months of just driving Congressional committees, The managD editor ba
newspapermen, are of neces- cident. At that point, Burnett capacities. around, Burnett checked his Burnett's cemetery bill has not dog-it's a Scotie, aturaln'l
sity, well versed on many top- decided he, too, would become KOREAN CORRESPONDENT dwindling finances and booked been acted upon. However he Burnett is knowh to friend-
ics. a reporter. In 1946 Burnett moved to the passage home for himself and is sure some day ,the. :white and associated throughout tb?-.
CRUSADER In an almost fitin-like epi- managing etrsip of the wife aboard a freighter. crosses will be returned to the world as A. B., andA B;..a
CRUSADER In an almost fiction-like epi- managing eorip of the graves, including that of Ernie Viola" are a 'widely-Anown
The desire to see life, to live sode, Burnett merely walked Peoria Journal. During the Ko- GOES TO HARRISBURG Pyle. couple. They ,eiv gh
it in various nooks and. cran- into the Brooklyn Standard- rean war he spent nearly three Stopping off in Carlisle, Pa., For this effort, Burnett was home at 2183 patt a. ,
nies of the world has turned Union and announced that he'd months in -the front lines as to visit his mother, Burnett a
Burnett into somewhat of a like to be a vacation time re- a war correspondent. ,He stuck drove over one day to Harris-
nomad. Yet he has a stern side porter. The edito;, to his sur- to the Ernie Pyle type of cov- burg to see his editor friend,
to his makeup. This quality prise, immediately offered him: erage. Jim Doran, on. the Harrisburg .
3 caused him, as 'managing .edi- a job. Burnett later discovered On his first visit to the front Patriot. He left with a job asT
Store of the Peoria, Ill., Joirnal that the.,paper had just been lines ,Burnett, when he discov- wire editor and editorial writer.
to direct a campaign ridding purchased.by Paul Block, a n d ered that the enemy was shoot- The Burnetts planned to stay W E :;
the city of the famous Shelton was in the process of expansion, ing directly at him, decided in Harrisburg one year and
gang and the outmoded alder- and therefore hiring everyone then and there that warwas a then' go back to Hawaii. ButELL T
manic type of city government. who came along! darn personal thing. IHe. got before the time was up he was II
The Journal led the drive .to FIRST FULL-TIME JOB angry, and carries deep ani- engaged as managing editor of
successfully install a city man- His first full time job came moity for those who rd this newspaper and came to .
ager system. when, after graduation, he wars. Sarasota Instead,' to THIlE ''r
agr system. when after graduation, he Back from Korea, Bumett NEWS. He and Viola are hap- PREbSTRESSED CON "
On the other hand, a senti- joined the editorial staff of the sta rted' a special column i uhe pyS and especially so because
mental streak, attributable to Nyack Evening Journal. Peoria Journal-on his obser- Sarasota does look a bit like .
Shis love of peopled caused Bur- Burnett's assignment in Ny- vations. He made talks--before Hawaii. They pIan to really. BRIDGE BEAMS '
nett to personally start a cru- ack called for him to cover all civic groups p.nd his frank ap- 'stay put' from now on. .r '
sade for the replacement of stories in a complete township. preach to the Korean situation A civic leader by occupation '. '
J white crosses on graves of serv-' Thus, ,as a young reporter he caused an awakening of pub- and choice, Burnett is probably ROOF BEAMS
: icemen and Ernie Pyle in Ha- became thoroughly familiar lic interest in the war. As a re- best known for the campaign "
waii's Punchbowl national with life, politics, government suit he made -many talks atid to obtain white crosses for the AKI ""
. cemetery. and death. continued his personal column, graves of servicemen and F- AND E IN
He is married to a girl he As in every newspaperman's enlarging its scope to include nie Pyle in Hawaii. Having
"grew up with," the former life, the big city beckoned and a variety of interesting topics,'known Ernie Pyle, Burnett and .:
SViola Elsebough who isknown Burnett, in the days when Her- thoughts and recomnpendations. Viola visited the grave of that FLOOR BEAMS .
t a thousands of Burnett's read- bert Hoover was president, left His desire to help young beloved correspondent while in .
ers as "Viola,'' and who has for Washington, D. C. After a people interested in journalism Hawaii enroute home from Ja- AND ECKlNG .' -
travelled all over -the world period on the copy desk f tHe Icaused him.to accept an ap- pan. Back in Peoria a couple AND D

State Editor Green Realty BSeat FAST LIT

Directs Stringers' .: For McNeill CRANE SERICI
State Editor iark Green, ortr Alex ReNeU, ,
Sr. A rare combinationn of Soft-spoken Alex McNeill, a -'
down-to-earthness and tenacity native of Atlanta, is the busi-"
belongs with this 44-year-old ness, building and real estate M.
S veteran of Midwest newspap- .expert on THE NEWS and will ''
ers. As state editor of THE keep readers up to date on the ev '-
NEWS,. Mark is responsible growth. and development of
for gathering news* from the the growth and development
communities within the four of the Sarasota area. ,,. S' EPTIC TANKS
rd. county area served by THE The 40 year old veterannews- .EB W -
WS NEWS. mae Ilunched his journalistic
of To help him in, this .asak l .career on the Atlanta Journal ..~ .
in Green has signed a fine crew after graduating from Vander- '
ar of county correspondents or b. hilt .University, Nashville, TV ,," :.
ant "stringers" as the trade calls enn. e XA1n 3100 'o '
ig, them. Af. ter getting a solid news WASHINGTON BOau VAn '
ies The one thing that a cracker- background covering police O WAS T U VA
jack state editor needs is an city hall, and other beats, he ALEX McNEILL
m, over-the-fence attitude in deal- moved to the Louisville, IKy have purchased a home at ones R. 5 1 r R ', .
er, ing with his neighbors. And bureau. of the Associated 2717 Martin Ave. where they fOnesI 1. -I01 or L.
a Green considers his "stringers" Press. live with their two children,
ree his neighbors. T While in Louisville McNeill Paschall, 12, and Alexa, 7. '_'"_ '_ __
1- RK C_ GEEN


ge.
as-
na


ROBERT FORD
and Florida, served as a staff
pJotographer for a local news-
pAper, and even taken a year
-off to build a complete two-
bedroom house without help.
' Bob is a longtime resident of
Florida. He moved to Lakeland
(Continued On Page 27)
had retired and moved to Sara-
sota in 1942. It was natural.
therefore, that when the hectic
pace of newspaper operations
in New York began to pale,
Ken pulled up stakes and mov-
ed to Sarasota.
A job as news editor of the
Sarasota Herald-Tribune kept
Ken busy for several years,
and then he moved on to do a
stint as managing editor of the
Lakeland Ledger before he re-
turned to Sarasota and picked
ip the reins of his new job.
He resides with his mother,
Mrs. Lydia L. Mayo, at 1622
Pine Tree Lane. He is a mem-
ber of the Presbyterian Church.


This land of Lincoln news-
man has done one thing which
almost every newspaperman
dreams about. He lias owned
and edited his own weekly
newspaper. That, as he puts it,,
is "living." ,
"I have always thought that
William Allen White hit the
nail on the head with his cardi-
nal principle of 'names makes
news' and what people want to
read in a paper is their name,",
remarked Green as' he remi-
nisced about his previous jobs.
PLUGS FOR STORIES
"Now, I'm going top plug for
plenty of stories from my cor-
respondents about peop 1 e,"
concluded Green.
Mark picked up his first
piece of type in Highwo6d, Ill.,
and did a complete about face
on normal child-parent proce-
dures. He followed in the foot-
steps of his mother, not his


father. For when Mark was
born his mother worked in the
print shop of a weekly news-
paper. His father was a motor-
man on the interurban between
Chicago and Milwaukee.
After business college in
Illinois, Mark / found, not a
job as an accountant, but that
of a "spinner's helper" in a
local textile mill. The big de-
pression patterned the come-
down. Next the same depress-
ion closed the mill.
SHarking back to the words
of wisdom from his mother,
the next step for Mark was a
logical one to a newspaper.
He braced the local publisher
and signed on as the one and
only sports reporter.
As it sometimes happens ,the
back shop of the paper offered
an outlet to Mark's miehanical
S(Continued On Page ) 3)


covered me Harlan County
coal strikes in 1939 which.
rocked the state of /Kentucky
with their violence pnd law-
lessness and was on hand to
see control of tle coal mining
area shift from the operators
to the unions.
McNeill was also on hand in
Louisville for the great Ohio
River floods in 1937 which in-
undated most of the' city and
caused millions of dollars
worth of damage to property
there.
After eight years with the
Associated Press in Louisville
he was transferred to the New
York office where he handled
the foreign news wire desk.
In 1946 McNeill returned to
Louisville as night city editor
of the Louisville Courier-
Journal where he remained
until joining THE NEWS staff
of reporters.
McNeill and his wife, Dawn,


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Many Years Local Experience


C. L. THOMPSON & SONS

Lawn irrigation systems

"Pumps and Repairs"


All Work Guaranteed


1223

27th Street


I,


Rlngling




5-2191


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bl..Esc~ha ~ 1-


Liz Covers


Ladies' Beat

Reporter Liz O'Brien. A na-
tive, /ot East Orange, New
!Jersey, Liz O'Brien first came
South in 1949 to St. Petersburg
after :she graduated from
school at Bridgeton, N., J.
In 150, Liz went to work for
the St. Pe'te i sb u r g Times
where she did general report-
ing. In March, 1952, Liz jour-
S'neyed to Columbia, 8. C., to
work for The State, the morn-
ing newspaper in the Capital
City. But in July,: 1953, she re-
turned to the St. Petersburg
Times where she remained un-
til coming to work for THE
NEWS.
While on The State, Liz help-
ed report the activities
several special sessions of the
South Carolina legislature in
addition -to her regular duties
on the City staff. At St. Peters-
burg, Liz spent most of her
S.4 A T: ..r7 --- --r'--- ...


time in the women's. depart-
nient working on' feature sto-.
ries and reporting the work of
women's organizations.
.A quiet, brown-haired girl
.with bangs," Liz likes to read
and listen to Dixieland jazz re-
cords. She also is interested in
amateur theatricals.
On THE NEWS Liz will be
in the Woman's Department
where she will write news for
and about women. The depart-
ment will include interviews
with and feature stories about
women who have done some-
thing that will be interesting to
other women.


Herb Writes

Of Fishing
Fishing Co I u m n ist Herb
Sjolander. To thousands of
Sarasotans and winter visitors
the word fishing is spelled
Herb Sjolatfder. For Herb is the
fisherman's guide throughout
the year.
Sjolander, a member. of the
Sports staff, will write a daily
Fishing column for THE NEWS.




; I _
I . .


. *.. .


HERB SJOLANDER
'is will be in addition to his
1ly fishing newscast over ra-
Sstation WSPB at 8:40
0ock e.ch morning and his
seeing suggestions at 9:15
a9 weekdays.
Broadcast will originate
fS the office of THE NEWS.
Sa boy he fished many of
t WliWisconsin and Michigan
- l~ and streams. He also
fiiad the lakes of Minnesota
a; u the Canadian border


Betty Vance

Edits News

Of Women
Woman's Editor Betty Vance.
Betty Vance, editor of the Wo-
man's' Department of THE
NEWS, is no stranger to the
residents of Sarasota and to the
winter 'visitors who. have
flock&, here in recent years.
For the past five years,
since coming here from her
native Washington, Pa., Betty
has been/ society, editor' of the
Sarasota Herald-Tribune. In ad-
dition to recording the doings
of society and worpen's organ-
izations Betty wrote a food
column. .
And it was this column
"Kitchen Talk" w hi ch ,has
brought honor and a great deal
of p e r s o na satisfaction to
Betty. This summer the Na-
tional Fed e r at i on of Press
Women awarded first place to
Betty's column 'in' competi-
tion against. all types of col-
umns political, educational,
fashions, child care, and what
have you, The award was the
first to a Florida newspaper
woman.
OTHER HONORS
In addition to the national.
award the column took first
prize at the Florida Press
Women's Club in 1953. At this
meeting Betty also won first
place for front page layout and
first place for a review. At the
Florida club's meeting. Betty
also took second place, in com-
petition for general excellence
for a Sunday women's section.
Again this year, on Septem-
ber 18, Betty won the first
place award for Pictorial Lay-
out at the fall conference of
the Florida Press Women. A
second plac' ^in general excel-
lence for a Sunday society sec-
tion was also presented to her.
Betty is not a competition
enterer. The awards this sum-
mer were the first since 1933,
when 17 years old,' she won
first place with a high school
*paper colutin called ."Safety-
Pins." The award was' made
by the National Quill, and
Scroll, high school journalistic
fraternity.
Betty 'says her column "Kit-
chen Talk" is written in the
same style as her earlier col-
umn. ,
Betty started her writing in
Sarasota with a half page sec-
tion, gradually building it up
until she' put out an all-local
Sunday section in wh ch
she did all Of the type and pic-
ture layout and makeup and
most of ,the time all of the
writing.
SHE'S FRIENDLY
In addition to writing Betty
likes to meet and talk to people
and with her quiet charm and
manner and her easy friend-
liness she has no trouble in
making countless friends. But
Betty says the "friendliness
and cooperation of the people
of Sarasota" has made her
work much easier and enjoy-
able.
Today th e activities of,
women of Sarasota are not
confined to a few crowded
months during the winter but
continue on through the sum-
mer with more and more wo-
men's organizations expand-
ing their summer activities
and it is Betty's job to keep
up with their' doings .
All Betty's newspaper and
writing activities, however, do
not keep her from watching
after her four children. Her
oldest boy, David, entered the
'University of Florida this fall.
Daughter Litty is a junior at
Sarasota High School and an-
other son, Jim, is a Freshman.
The youngest box, Alex, is in
the sixth grade this year at
the new Alta Vista school.

around Ely and p o r t a ge d
through the Canadian National
Forest lakes.


Sjolander 'has bait fished
commerically in Sarasota wa-
ters and knows the feeding
grounds of this area well. He
also has done charter boat
guiding as well as sail boat
guiding.
Herb entered investment bus-
iness in Chicago after gradua-
ting from the University of
Illinois. With the outbreak of
World War II, he entered the
United States Army. He saw
overseas duty as a battalion
supply officer of the 100th In-
f a.n tr y Division throughout
France and Germany.
STAYED IN GERMANY
After VE Day, he stayed in
Germany with the United States
Office of Military Government
and served as comptroller of
the German railways until 1949.
Sjolander came to Sarasota
in. 1949 to work for WSPB as
Herb, The Sarasota Angler. He
is a director of the Sarasota
County Anglers Club, president
of the Sarasota Spinning Club,
a member of the Outdoor Wri-
ters Association of America,
and a members of the Elks..


D... Bill Wilson


:.r- r


BILL WILSON


Eddie's L

Is Basebc


That personable six footer
who is on the scene at prac-
tically all Sa r a s o t a sports
events is Eddie Hamilton, as-
sistant sports editor of THE
NEWS.
And while Eddie covers all
sports with equal gusto, his
specialities are college wrestl-
ing, golf and baseball.
As a matter of fact, it was
his love of baseball that led
Hamilton into the news writing
field. His father, Edward Sho-
well Hamilton, was a well
known baseball administrator.
To some extent, young Hamil-
ton followed in his father's
footsteps. Eddie was business
manager of the Bristol, Va.,
baseball club for two seasons
and was business manager of
the Burlington, N.C., club for
a year.
It was during his years at
Bristol "and Burlington that
Eddie decided he wanted to
write sports. He received va-
luable training and tips from
sports writers around the base-
ball circuit. The, elder Hamil-
ton, who was a winter resident;
- -- .. --


.- -

ED HAMILTON '
in Sarasota for several years,
died in 1952 and Eddie decided
to make Sarasota his perma-
nent home.


He went to work for Mac
Harmon, also an ardent sports
booster. 'Eddie was in one of
Sarasota's s p o r t s gathering
places. He loved it. He talked
baseball, golf, sailing and foot-
ball at the same time he was
selling suits. When the assist-
ant sports editor's job opened
on THE NEWS,, Eddie went
through torture he didn't
want to leave Mac Harmon's,
but he wanted to get back into
sports.
*Finally, he went to Harmon,
told him he had the opportunity,
to get back into sports and
Harmon gave him his blessing
"I hated to lose Eddie," Mac
says, "but THE NEWS certain-
ly picked a winner."
Eddie is a West Virginian by
birth, but ,has travelled the
world. He attended Oak Ridge
Military Institute in North Car-
olina and>went to Lehigh Uni-
versity where he was graduat-
ed with an A. B. degree in
International Relations.
Hamilton also attended Flo-
rida Southern College
Pearl Harbor Day found
Hamilton a supervisor in the
copper mines in. Rancagua,
Chile. A year later he was a
second lieutenant and on his
way to Alaska as assistant
theater censor. He went to the
European theater where he
served as executive officer of
civil censorship training camp,
then with the Third Army in:
intelligence and finally with'
Group A in administration,
headquartering in Munich. By
this time he was a major.
Hamilton was in an army
hospital for two years and it
was there that he met an
Anderson, S. C.rgirl, Margaret
Jordan, an army nurse corps
captain. She spent 30 months
in the China-Burma-India the-
ater. They. were piarried in
1946.
Hamilton is a member of the
SarAsota Elks Club, the Alpha'
Chi Rho Fraternity and the
Sarasota Yacht Club.
,The Hamiltons live at' 175
Island Circle, Palm Island.


I


Eyes City's

Sport Scene


S < SSports Editor Bill Wilson.
A newspaper career spanning
more than two-thirds of his
life is the background of Wil-
liam (Bill) Wilson, sports edi-
tor of THE NEWS
Bill started his career as a
S newsboy in his home town of
S Wichita Falls, Tex., at the age
of 12 and now at the age of
40, can look back on more
than a quarter century of news-
papering from his home town
to the Far East.
As a United Press correspon-
e ,dent Bill landed with the in-
e vision force at Arawe, New
Britain, and marched shoulder
all to shoulder with the First
Marines, The First Cavalry
Divisinn: and other famed


Army and Marine units in the,
South Pacific.
SHOT DOWN


I


Ford Knoi


(Continued From Page 26)
in 1941 from North Branch,
Michigan, and finished his high
school education in that inland
city.
Out of high school in time
for World War II, Bob enlisted
in the Navy and graduated
from the naval school of pho-
tography. at Pensacola.
During his four-year hitch
with the Navy, Bob served as


BANDEL LINN


Linn Draws

Cartoons
Cartoonist Ba ndel Limn.
Readers. of such well-known
national magazines as Colliers,
Saturday Evening Post, Busi-
ness News and Country Gen-
tleman, who have enjoyed the
cartoons of Bandel Linn,. will
now have a chance to enjoy
them in 'THE NEWS .
Linn, a virtual native of Sara-
sota, having lived-here for the
past 15 years, has been a free
lance cartoonist since coming
here and his work has appear-
ed regularly in many of the
nation's leading publications.
Prior to coming to Sarasota
he lived' in. New York City,
where his reputation as a car-
toonist and ,practical joker
grewv apace.
Linn is also a prominent
target for practical jokers and
one concocted by Joe Stein-
metz,.noted Sarasota photogra-
pher, -has become a classic.
BOOKS, BOOKS, BOOKS
Steinmetz \bought up scores
of old books including the
Bobbsey Twins, Rebecca of
Sunnybrook Farm, virtually the
entire Tom Swift series, an 4
many other childhood classics
along with some of a more
colorful nature and, after put-
ting Linn's name and address
on the fly leaf, scattered them
about Florida and much of the
United States.
For weeks afterwards Linn
was plagued with telephone
calls and letters advising him
that his book had been found.
His.delightful sense of humor
has made him a Sarasota fav-
orite on his early morning radio
show on WSPB and he will
continue his edfry risers'
delight.
The 43-year-old Crawfords-


L..


ville, Ind.; native served in the
Army Air Corps during World
War I, and through hard work
and steadfastness of purpose
rose to the rank of corporal.
A graduate of Wabash Col-
lege, he is married and has a
daughter, 19 and two sons aged
11 and 6.
'Linn's cartoons in THE
NEWS will not only serve to
illustrate human foibles and
weaknesses, but to highlight
political and civic activities in
the area -..



SILCOX PRECAST
PRODUCTS
One Piece Precast
Lightweight Lintel Beams
Precast Lightweight
Window Sills
Piers & Bases
Flue Block
Slump Brick
Clothesline Posts
Coping
Mail Box Posts .
Driveway Curbing
Estimate' Cheerfully Given
Phone 4 1841
A.c.L. RLR.R A th


His exploits as a combat
correspondent, which earned
him a special Navy citation,
included landing on a ,Pacific
isle four days ahead of the in-
vasion forcesand six months
later, while on one of the first
of the daylight aerial attacks
on Rabaul, he' was shot down
on the same island.
He was among the first of
the correspondents to e n t e r
Manila while fighting was still
,in progress there and he re-
established United. Press
service from the Philippine
capital and later re-established
service from Hong Kong
Shanghai, Singapore, and the
East Indies.
Returning to the States in
1947 he was assigned to south-
ern division headquarters of
the United Press in Atlanta and
it was here that he met his
wife, Marjorie, a newspaper-
woman and radio news direc-
tor.
Their four-month-old- daugh-
ter Jan Marie already has been
given a job on the Winston-
Salem,, (N.C.) Journal-Sentinel
beginning in 1974.
Wilson, w h o s e background
includes sports, labor news,
amusements, and features as
well as combat reporting, also
served in the Chicago and
Omaha office's of the United
Press and covered the nation-
al Democratic and -Republican
conventions in Chicago in 1952
for the wire service.
While in Manila he became
a member of the Manila Polo
Club.and is one of the founders
and first president of the
Manila Overseas Press Club.
.As sports editor of THE
NEWS Bill will concentrate on
local Sarasota sports news, in-
cluding all high school sports
with a good balance of sport-
ing news from the rest of the
country.
Wilson graduated from Ogle-
thorpe University, where he
was a member of Kappa Alpha
fraternity.
,'He and his Phi Beta Kappa
wife and their daughter live at
2173 Bay St.


It's Variety

For Barbara
Copy Girl Barbara Anne Win-
slow. In the good old days it
used to be "hey boy," when a
reporter or deskman needed a
story carried to another desk
or an errand done. Today on
many papers, including THE
NEWS, the copy boy has been
replaced by the copy girl. The
Ittrend started during the war
due'to the manpower shortage,
and the fact that newsmen dis-
covered the .copy girls were


0e, Rubbermoid

WSqTTMrIHOTTTSE o


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WE HELP YOU STAP' RIGHT WHEN YTO


Build, Modernize, Repir


lvisorySevie!
ee M ,WI-.' *..- ,
to1
...




Our congratulations to a new-
compr. For tiventy-eight years we
have h e I p e d newcomers start...
right when they build,modernize
or repair.


West Coast Lumber Co.
Tommy Gilmier,- Mgr.
1126 Central Ave. ,, '
Phones 2-1401
27331..
2--x


tOrt **."ECLIPSE" TRUE TE



"PITTSBURG ".AGO


Revere


You'll Find Them All At


BARBARA WINSLOW
just as capable as copy boys.
Barbara, 18, was graduated
from Sarasota High School
last June. She came to work
for THE NEWS because the
job offered plenty of variety.
Born in Cleveland, Ohio,
"Bobbie" is 'the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Morton G. Win-
slow of 3007 Arlington St. Her
father is a retired commercial
artist.


", nAile W H v .
"If kt A iable We It"


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Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1954 THE NEWS Page 27
w.
ws His Pictures
a staff photographer with the home at Fort Myers Beae: I
rank of Photographer's M a t e and offered their son the chaince-"
Second Class. One interesting to build it. Bob avows that he: .'
assignment took young Ford to always wanted to build a house-
Puerto Rico where he photo- from foundation to roof p
graphed the testing of new bat- and he set out to do it. Wi
tie weapons. On another oc- no training or experience,
casion he studied color proces- completed a t w o
sing of photographs at a labo- house in less 'tha a
ratory in San Diego, California. working alone except for
Returning from the wars, Bob latter stage help from a,
entered the Institute of Design penter.
in Chicago to combine the study The house completed, .
of photography and. art. After moved to Sarasota as a st
a half year in the Illinois photographer for thd He
school, he returned to Florida Tribune, before taking a sia
to enter the state university at lar job with THE NEWS.'
Gainesville, and completed four In addition to finding. jol
years of study in psychology, in Sarasota, Bob also found
sociology and art. his wife, Dottie Voe,'ere. he
After finishing his education, is a native of Hamilton, %Ohio,-
the young photographer took a and came to the cify about th -..
job with the Ponca City, Okla., same time as her husband.
News in the heart of the oil What time is not ta.W"
country. His experience here by his young daughter,; lis
led him back to a job as ad- and his hoifte, is spet. in4l a,
vertising manager of the Col- darkroom at/his home -th
lier County News in Naples in Panama Drive,.or in. WhiW
1952. inboard motorboat. NEI i a ,
A long suppressed desire di-' tive member of the ,Natib4i:
averted Ford at this point, for Press Photographers ABsodt .
his parents decided to build a tion.

1 r 4


~


____ ___ ___ ___ __


NEWS To Follow

The Golden Rule
(Conftinued From Page 25)
doesn't want all the ingredients
printed in his paper.
If this be so, then the edior
has failed, not through human
error but through choice. When
this point is reached the edi-
tor is no longer serving his
public honestly.
Integrity in journalism is as
necessary as apples to an ap-
ple pie.
Thus, in observance of Na-
tional Newspaper Week, we on
THE NEWS would like to blow
our'horn a little louder than
usual, for we subscribe to-
who, what, where, when, why
and how.


li 1


I





S- 28 THE, NEWS Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1954
: *


V ARWOOD RUTTENBER


SBrud Works

SOn Features


jIteporter Furman C. Arthur.
: varied a life as .possible
.ias been packed into "Brud"
Arthur's 31 years. From re-
eJ d "huckstering" on New
.York City's Madison Avenue
S.alley to public relations and
publicity people to teaching
journalismm at Syracuse Uni-
versity. He's run the gamut
aiind decided to settle in Sara-
sota for reasons of "a pretty
gal and an up, and coming
.' newspaper "
Add to this his feeling that
S :"Sarasota certainly has a big
~ifture." Likewise ..the situa-
,-' tion of having ~hatiffered his
'mother, two sised"'' and a
:brother-in-law to Sarasota and
have' them become permanent
Residents.
: Although/ a New Yorker by
-'blrth, Arthur has given up the


/


.'. JOINS BUFFALO NEWS
In 1945 Ruttenber became a
member of the staff of the
I Washington bureau of.The Buf-
,:* falo Evening News. In addition
to covering the Capitol and the
White House for The News,
"a Ruttenber made a weekly ra-
dio commentary on the happen-
iFURMAN ARTHUR ngs in Washington which was
I1 broadcast by The News' radio
bright lights of Broadway for station WBEN at Buffalo .
the last time. He initially fled During this time Ruttenber
the big city when as a lad was assigned by The News to
,his" family relocated in write a series of special ar-
Qakmont, Pa., near Pitts- tides on the part the Navy Air
burgh. After high school, Force was playing .in the war.
"Brud" spent two and a half He visited various Naval air,
y9ars at Fenn College, Cleve- training bases and aircraft car-
land where he studied busi- riers. He wrote and filed the
ness administration. first story from a B-29 while
n-i_ M__ -j r ftc / f\/j-4-j nm- .4 ---


MEETS THE AIR FORCE
In i943, with a good know-
ledge of business administra-
tion, "Brud" encountered mil-
#- itary administration. Logical
result-the Air Force assigned
him to the job of bombsight
mechanic on the, famous Nor-
den bombsight.
With his usual amount of re-
tentiveness Arthur tells how
he serviced the bombsight and
automatic pilot for the ,first
Bj ;-29 to fly over Japan on ac-
tual bombing missions, by the
iWentieth Air Force.
Out of the Air Force in early
1946, Arthur turned to the
\ study of journalism at- Beth-
any College, Bethany, W. Va.,
where he, was graduated in
1948. His degree in journalism
came ,two' years later at Syra-
cuse University. After teaching
the subject at Syracuse for a
year Arthur returned to Beth-
any College as public rela-
tions and publicity man.
GOTHAM BECKONS
-The bright lights blinked
44d off went Arthur to New,
Tbrk City to fill out his ex-'
triences in public relations
'Mtth the Cities Service organi-
zation. He worked on the com-
pany magazine which ranks
a-. ong the best in the house
organ field.
'As a bachelor in Gotham,
'"rud" lived near Gramercy
'PArk. He made good use of his
;off hours by dating a girl from
no less spot than sunny Sara-
sota.
Needless to, say the young
lady was .sufficient attraction
to. cause a trip to Sarasota in
1951 and the resulting en-
coUnter with sand stuck.
Arthur's mother, Mrs. Nell .
SArthur and,younger sister Fay
'- reside at 1623 Floyd St. His
other sister, Mrs. Jean Mc-
Kawn is asapciated with her
husband H. L. McKown in the
operaticn of Stuckey's Store on
the North Trail.

.riaiti i


liymig at ou,uuu ieet .me story
was sent by radio to Washing-
ton and thence to Buffalo..
.Another special story by Rut-
tenber uncovered the espionage
activities of a high-ranking
Russian air officer who had
been at the Bell Aircraft plant
in Buffalo during the war .He
also helped expose as a Com-,
munist a well-known western
New York labor leader.


ARGUES SITE CASE
The late Connecticut Senator
.Brian McMahon selected Rut-
tenber to represent him before
the United Nations Prepara-
tory Site Committee in tondon.
With only a few days prepara-
tions and having never seen the
proposed site- in Connecticut,
he flew to London and argued
the case of the.New England
state for half an hour before
the committee almost result-
ing in Connecticut being se-
lected as the permanent site of
the UN. For his efforts he was
commended by the then gover-
nor of Connecticut Raymond
Baldwin.
.Back in the United States
;?Iittenber jumped into New
Y""Yrk state politics becoming
director of Public Relations for
the New York Republican State
Committee during the cam-
paign of John Foster Dulles for
senator and later when Thom-
as E. Dewey successfully ran
for re-election
While in this job he was
closely associated with James
C. Hagerty, President Eisen-
hower's press secretary and
Thomas E. Stephens, appoint-
ment secretary for the Presi-
dent. Ruttenber was associat-
ed with the Eisenhower-For-
President movement since its
start.
ADVISED IVES
During the' 1950 guberrator-
ial campaign Ruttenber set up
a political intelligence system
throughout the state for Dewey
and wrote a daily analysis of
the progress of the camMgn


Ruttenber

To Write

On Politics
. Political Reporter Arwod J.
Ruttenber-Backed by a thor-
ough knowledge of the national
political ,picture, Arwood J.
Ruttenber will report politics
for readers of THE NEWS.
A native of Jamestown, N.Y.,
Ruttenber has, spent many
years doing political writing in
Washington, and New York
State. He came to Sarasota
from. the New York, State De-
partment of Commerce where
he was public relations' con-
sultant in the Washington office.
Ruttenber'first began his
newspaper writing while in
high school at Jamestown .He
conducted a column for the
school paper and was high
school correspondent for the
Jamestown Evening Journal.
After high school he attended
Alfred University Junior Col-
lege but quit to take a full
time job as a reporter for the
Jamestown M o r ni n g Post.
When the Journal and Post
merger in 1941 Ruttenber was
named chief reporter for the
combined papers.
MARINE CITATION
While still with the newspap-
ers, Ruttenber directed the
Jamestown recruiting, c a m-
paign for the Marine Corps and
as a result of his work was
cited by the Marine Corps.
In 1943 Ruttenber became
Night Bureau Chief of the
United Press at Buffalo. Short-
ly afterwards he went to Kear-
ney, Neb., where he was tele-
graph and sports editor of The
Hub. He returned East where
he was editor of a weekly news-
paper at High Bridge, N. J. He
went back to the Jamestown
Post-Journal for a brief time
but then moved in on the Wash-
ingtod scene .
Joining the Bulkley S. Grif-
fin News Bureau he was Wash-
ington correspondent for a
number of leading New Eng-
land newspapers, including the
Boston Herald-Traveller, the
Worcester Gazette, the Hart-
ford Times and the New Haven
Register.


S,4/


City Beat,

SPolice, For

Lou Durkin
Reporter Louis J. Durkin.
Waukegan, Ill., produced Jack
Benny, and Lou Durkin, a po-
lice' and city hall reporter.
Benny no doubt could use
a pun on how in Waukegan
they called the police reporter,
"Killer." But to Lou Durkin
it .was a nickname that he
couldn't duck. About the time
he was playing basketball in
high school' there was in Chi-
cago a mobster by the name of
Durkin.
Thus Waukegan's Durkin
could threaten to call in his
uncle, Killer Durkin from Chi-
cago if and when he tangled
with anybody bigger than he
was at the time. The non-exis-
tant relationship became a bit
embarrassing a few years later
when Lou was covering the po-
lice beat for the Waukegan
News-Sun, Chicago's Durkin
had objected when, while be-
hind bars, the story of his
life was done on a radio show-
without his permission. A Chi-
cago paper carried the head-
line "Killer Durkin Protests."
Lou Durkin spent considerable
time answering those who
wanted to know what he was
protesting.
ENTERS NAVY
After high school, Durkin at-
tended Michigan State College
for two years. Then in 1940
he, like thousands of others,
became a census taker while
awaiting a chance to break into
the newspaper game.
About the time that Durkin
was getting started on the Wau-
kegan News-Sun, he faced the
major decision of the day 'and
entered the midshipman school
of the United States Navy at
Abbott Hall, Northwestern Un-
iversity.
Aboard his first ship, the
destroyer Flusser, Durkin
learned of the bombing of
Pearl Harbor. As officer of the
deck he received the messages
informing all ships that Pearl
Harbor- had been bombed. At
first Durkin thought it was a
mock drill, but a second mes-
sage verified the fact.
CORAL SEA BATTLE
Later he was aboard an es-
corting ship which, when spot-
ted by a Jap task force, pre-
cipitated the battle of the Coral
Sea. Durkin took a crack at
flight training but decided it
would take too long for the
Navy to change the way of
flying to suit him. So he went
back to sea. He served aboard
a destroyer which escorted the
cruiser' Augusta carrying Cor-
dell Hull to Casablanca. He
was released from active duty
with the rank of lieutenant
commander.
Back to Waukegan and the
News-Sun and a beat w h i c h
included the courthouse, city
hall, politics, the state legisla-
ture and features. Top stories
included coverage of the still
unsolved Ruth Peterson mur-
der and national political con-
ventions in Chicago.
Favoring a warmer climate
than Waukegan, Durkin is set-
tling in Sarasota with his wife
and their two children, Mary
Lynn, 4, and Gregory, 5. They
reside at 1920 Coconut Ave.


as gleaned from reports f his
correspondents. Later he be-
came public relations advisor
for U. S. Senator Irving M.
Ives, GOP nominee for gover-
nor in New York.
In 1951 Ruttenber became
public relations consultant for
the New York State Depart-
ment of Commerce.
Ruttenber is a former mem-
ber of the National Press Club,
the White House Correspond-
ents' Association and the
House and Senate Press gal-
leries. He is an ordained dea-
con in the Presbyterian Church
and a member of the National
Council of Presbyterian Men.
He is married to the former
Mary Ruth Powell of Fitzger-
ald, Ga., and the couple have
three boys-Jeffrey. Timothy
and James.


I I L I- IL-a


'r


Venice increases


E


~e~i~Q!


Mrs. Penney

Seeks Out

Those Typos *
Proofreader Mrs. Lucy V. .1
Penney grew up in Sarasota If-
and then moved away for 14
years, returning to her child-
hood home a year and a half l ...
ago.
Born in Savannah, Ga., she
came here during the boom
year of 1925 with her family
and attended grade school and
high school here.
Her talent as an amateur
song writer and poet gained MRS. LUCY V. PENNEY
her s o m e prominence
in Daytona Beach where she Neo Tubin
lived prior to returning to Sar- o'l n u mg
asota. Lights NEWS
A former millinery saleslady, L ht N
she is a member of the Metli- Not one light bulb is visible
odist Church. in the offices or plant of THE
She and her husband. Cecil NEWS. All lighting is neon tub-
E. Penney, and her teenage ing or indirect reflection.
daughter, Virginia Merry Pen- Business office, news room
ney, live at 2074 Princeton Ave. and mechanical plant are light-
where they recently purchased ed by several hundred feet of
a home, while her son, 19-year- neon tubing providing simulat-
old Robert Francis, is a cadet- ed daylight without producing
school at Kessler Field, Miss. much heat.


Proofreader

Is Amateur

Camera Bug
Proofreader Mr s. Martha
Van V!eck, a trim, young,
blonde native of Greenfield,
Mass., is one. of the proof-
readers with THE NEWS and
will be responsible for catching
the inevitable typographical er-
rors which crop up in the daily
production of a newspaper.
Mrs. Van Vleck moved to
Sarasota last November to live
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
SAnselm Frankel, of Whitfield
Estates.
A graduate of the School of
Journalism at Boston's Sim-
mons College, she is making
her newspaper debut with THE
NEWS, but her first publishing
experience was gained with the
Houghton Mifflin Publishing
Co.
Prior to joining THE NEWS
staff she was employed at
Sievenson's Dress Shop here.
An amateur painter, she has


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S T'S a big moment when a new buslpess is
launched... big for those starting the busi-

ness, big for the community.


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EACH fresh enterprise in Sarasota mecas
more consumers, inazeused payrolls, stepped up

prosperity. The new business signals the begin.
of growth.


W E, at Orange State Lumber, have t ot
sights on continuous growth. To keep pace wi
Sarasota and our many customers throughoWu

the area, carry on ever-exxlxitIg l vendor
That means that coiniLrclors and builders can

rely on Orange State Lumber for almost all their
supplies and enough of everything to complete


the job.


Our regular customers know we carry enough to meet their needs. We invite all builders


to cme in and look over our BIG inventory.


Orange


State


Lumber


Co.


Central Avenue at SAL RR Phone 2-1381 or 2-3111


We were pleased to add THE NEWS to our list of new customers.


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MRS. MARTHA VAN VLECK
recently branched out into col-
or photography and finds her
art training an important asset
in her camera work.
She is also an ardent sports-
woman and e n j o ys riding,
swimming, fishing and golf.
A member of Frist Church
of Christ, Scientist, she has a
daughter, Muffie, aged 5, who
is attending the Out of Door
School.


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155 Per Cent
VENICE-The population of
Venice has increased about 155
per cent since 1950, according
to the most recent unofficial
census taken last winter by the
Venice Area Chamber of Com-
merce.
The chamber was assisted by
the civic classes of the Venice-
Nokomis High School.
The statistics ,compiled by
students and tabulated by the
chamber showed 2,207 persons
resided in Venice, with an ad-
ditional 1,060 in Nokomis, 359
on Casey Key and 226 in Laurel.
The federal census for 1950
showed Venice with a popula-
tion of 863.

NEWS Darlkooib
Most Modem
Photographers f or THE
NEWS work in air conditioned
comfort with the most modern
photographic equipment avail-
able.
All equipment for'the dark-
room, in which' the photogra-
phers process their own nega-
tives and make tlieir, ow
prints, is new.


I


School.




Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1554 THE NEWS


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in- well4


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W. A. "Pep" Dhigwen
A Carpenter and Builder for
65 Years


G general


W. "DBi" i-nweI
A Contractor and Builder for
20 Years


Contractors


Builders of


*. S .


.The


Buildings


New, ModeIr Newspape Plant In Which The News Is Puhpawcl4
Nw M o N


0


ALL .TYPES OF

COMMERCIAL AND

RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS


Builders For 33 Years!

Six Years In Sarasota


We'ro Proud Of Theme Jeob
* Nestlewood Shop, Venice, FIs.
* Monterey Village addition, North Tra
9 Wayne Hibbs Residence, Harbor Acres
e K. G. Townsend Residence, Coconut Bayoi
o Leo Brennen Residence, Harbor Acres
6 C. B. Duke Richardson Residence, Paradise Shores
* Edward Kalin Residence, Lido
. P. W. Olson Residence, Harbor Acres
* Charles Taft Residence, Harbor Acres
Plus 38 Other Coetruclem Joe


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DINGWELL


1505 MALLARD LANE


SON


Telephone 6-0671


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tAiglewood

Reporter

SVeteran

v Willard Willmntt, En-
S'd correspondent for THE
o is a veteran of many
"- of /i'fctical newspaper


She was born in Dover
Plaits, N. Y., the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Franklin H.
Co an, and attended the
p c schools in White Plains,
N. After graduating there
Attended Teachers College
lumbia University in New
City. She holds a bache-
of arts degree and a
aater's degree in education
Columbia.


'employed on newspapers in
New York City, Chicago and
Cleveland. Her father was an
-enineer and his work took him
to mnt cities. in the country.
DuringWorld, War .I, Mrs.
Wifllnott.worike'di n 'a news-
paper ii.'/e.uston, Tex., while
-.hr, husband was stationed
there with the United States
Air Force.
Deciding to move to Florida
after the war. to -be near. Mr
Wihnott's father, they moved
first to Arcadia and later to
Englewood where Mr. Willmott
is engaged in the maintenance
i _" siness.
Englewood is making rapid
progress in both real estate'
development and as a resort
center and the correspondent
for THE NEWS hopes to aid
in its; growth'by reporting the
many news items in that area.
\ She has asked that anyone
;t w news items for the paper
telephone her at 2791 at Engle-
wood.


Jerseyite

Is Reporter


lMRS. E. IHEILAND
Uplands Correspondent Mrs.
Etrest Heiland. i
SRepresenting the 'Uplands
community as correspondent
for THE NEWS is Mrs. Ernest
Heiland, who'resides, with her
-"Wband, at 539 Edwards Dr.
Mrs. Heiland, the former
Irene Winand, was born in
Rutherford, N. J. She attended
the schools there and is a grad-
uate of Rutherford High School.
Mr. and Mrs. Heiland have
made their home in Sarasota
for.-two years and a'-year ago
'moved to Uplands.
-*-This will be her first atteinpt
at -news writing but Mrs.
SHeiland is confident she can
Sender a real public service in
,,helping publicize the activities'
vQof her community.
Anyone with news items of,
tnerest may call Mrs. Heiland
at her home. Her telephone
Number is 55413.


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MRS. RICHARD SEELEY

Mrs. Seeley


Has Osprey
Osprey correspondent Mrs.
Richard Seeley. Although she
is extremely active m many
fields in Osprey, Mrs. Seeley
is finding time to become cor-
respondent for that community
for TIHE NEWS.
Mrs. Seeley is the former
Vera Blessing, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Louis E. Blessing
and was born in Manteno, ll.
She received part of her ed-
ucation in Manteno and grad-
uated from the high school at
Joliet, Ill.
Mr. and Mrs. Seeley moved
tp Florida from Illinois six
years ago and have made their
home in Osprey since arriving
here from the' north. Her hus-
band is it( the,building business
in Osprey and vicinity.
They have one daughter,
Mrs. Richard J. Watters of
Oswego, Ill., and one grandson,
'Richard J. Jr.
CIVIC LEADER I
In the six years since their
arrival in Osprey, both Mr.
and Mrs. Seeley have been ex-


* THE NEWS Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1654


'Mrs. Vice President' Takes Job Seriously


__II_ I_


tremely active in many civic '. "'W *.H1 -uBaffalo to serve in the dual
affairs. .. role.
She is a member and former MRS. J. BBRqW ELL In Buffalo, known as a good
officer of the Osprey PTA, sery- town for politics, Mrs. Mc-
ing last year-as,historian of the and Danny, 1. They make Kinley cut her political eye-
local group. their home at Fruitville. teeth. Now she gets an impish
Osprey has been growing at Mrs. Brownell is enthusiastic gleam in her eye when saying
a rapid rate in recent years about her new position as cor- 'that her political' life dates
and Mr. Seeley hopes to .be respondent for THE NEWS.
able to render a valuable public 'he told a reporter recently she S rasota/ G.
service in reporting for THI '-loped lodal -churches, clubs, Sarasota Gets
NEWS, thus aiding in promot schools and other organizations
ing many worthwhile activi- would aid her in her job of Shot In Arm
.ties for that community. gathering the news by 'phoning
Her many friends in Osprey' her regarding any items they (Continued From Page 25)
and vicinity can aid her great- may have for publication. Her ment and all of'the products
ly by phoning news items to phone n u mb e r is Sarasota and services of a community.
her at her home. Her number 3-7924. In fact, for the people in Sara-
is 6-1928. sota, it is as though a small
r .community had suddenly been
Si dropped into the midst of town,
See- Rid eL ready to be absorbed into the
S- normal life of the larger com-
U W n .-' 1 munity.
Ias Veteran Monetarily, the impact o'f the
opening of THE NEWS starts
Bee Ridge correspondent a,chain reaction which-actual-
Mrs. Grady Taylor. Although ly knows no end. Money spent
a veteran in newspaper cir- by the newspaper, and its em-
culation work, Mrs. Taylor is ployes provides additional in-
taking her first "fling" come to others, which is either
at newspaper reporting. used to hire more people for
Mrs. Taylor, the former Mil- newly created jobs, 'or is in
dr d Curry, was born in Ven- r turn spread in other directions
ice, where her parents, Mr. and throughout Sarasota. As the
Mrs.'Claude Curry, still make new infusion of money begins
their home,' to find its way around the
She has spent her entire life city, there is more buying by
in Sarasota County, at Venice, / those who receive any part of
Sarasota and Bee Ridge. Mrs. it, which gives a secondary
Taylor attended schools in Ven- benefit by stimulating addition-
ice and Sarasota 'and is A 'k- ... al demand.
graduate of Sarasota High MRS. ALEAN ROSS Direct employment will also
Schobl.. R be an effect of the establish-
For many years Mrs. Taylor M rs ROSS ment of THE NEWS. In every
operated a long local motor department of the newspaper-
circulation route and has.a wide business, editorial, circulation,
acquaintance in this county. JtO' f mechanical Sarasotans have
Mr. Taylor is the owner and In been hired to fill openings. The
manager of Tayjor Hardware Newtwn orrespodent Mrs. mere fact that there are more
in Venice and commutes each Nen resondent than 50 -new job situations in
in Venice and commutes each AleanRoss. In an effort toe arasota is of consequence.
day'to his work in that city. of service to the Negro ou- Sarasota is of consequence.


They are the parents ofone
daughter, Patricia, a graduate
of Sarasota High School and'
Stetson University at Deland.
She is now in her first year as
a teacher in the public schools
in Orlando.
Mrs. Taylor told THE NEWS
she will appreciate greatly any
help'she. obtains on, news tips
from residents of Bee Ridge
and Icommunity.
Her telephone number at Bee
Ridge is 4-3059, Sarasota ex-
change.
A "CTWBO


MRS. GRADY TAYLOR


nation of Sarasota, THE NEWS
has made arrangements to
print daily, a section of social
activities, deaths and funerals,
club meetings, civic improve-
ments and all other news of
general interest.
Mrs. Alean Ross, 2167 Orange
Ave., a resident of Sarasota for
the last six years, will repre-
sent THE NEWS as reporter
and has already started on her
duties.
Mrs Ross is a native of
Arkansas, and was born in
Cotton Plant, in that state.
SCHOOL REPORTER
She is a graduate of the
Presbyterian Academy in Cot-
ton Plant and during her high
'school days was a reporter for
the school newspaper.
For some time, Mrs. Ross,
was employed as a secretary
and was engaged in interview-
ing work with the Sarasota
Housing Authority.


Anyone wishing to aid Mrs.
Ross in her work in gathering
material for THE NEWS carn
help her by phoning her at her
home. Her telephone number
is 5-3896.
The representative of THE
NEWS is anxious to provide as
much news of her area as
possible and will appreciate all
help sh'eoan receive.


NEW IDEAS


A second stimulus to Sara-
sota resulting from the found-
ing of ,THE NEWS is, that
of new people and new ideas.
Staff members have come from
all parts of the nation, bringing
with them the customs, man-
ners and habits of Iowa, and
New York, Texas and Michi-
gan, California and North Car-
olina. -
Children in schools will bene-
fit from contact with these
children from other states who
offer simple lessons in national
geography and profound lessons
in the sociology of getting
along with peoples with differ-
ent habits and customs.
Sarasota citizens will benefit
from the ideas of these people
as expressed through the news-
paper. New editors and re-
porters, some of them strange
to the city, will have different
viewpoints on the news in Sar-
asota and being new, will de-
velop their own way of looking
at the city.
Through all of these stimuli,
Sarasota, its people and its
business are bound to profit
handsomely. The impact' of
THE NEWS on this commu-
nity, derived from cold mone-
tary facts alone, sustains this
conclusion.


Fruitville

Reporter

Experienced
Fruitville Correspondent Mrs.
J. B. Brownell, lifetime resi-
dent of the Fruitville commu-
nity, will serve as NEWS cor-
respondent in herarea.
Mrs. Brownell, the former
Norma Tucker, has had many
years of experience in business
and various phases of news-
paper work.
She is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. J.. H. Tucker, also
lifetime residents of that com-
munity. Mr. Tucker, now re-
tired, is the founder of Tuck-
er's Sporting Goods in Sarasota
and a former postmaster at
Fruitvillei
After graduation from the
local high school and business
college, .Mrs. Tucker entered
the business world and for 10
years was manager 'of the
Florida State 'Employment
Service office in Sarasota.
EDITED AIRPORT NEWS
During the war years, 'she
edited the.Bradenton-Sarasota
Airport News and was USO
reporter for Carlstrom Air
Field at Arcadia.
Mr. and Mrs., Brownell have
two children, Catherine, 10,


times her stabilizing influence,
her leadership and insistence


(Continued From Page 25),
-membered that THE NEWS is
bi-partisan, and declared the
nickname therefore would be
okay as it followed policy.
'Born in Buffalo, N.Y., Mrs.
McKinley was introduced to
the Fourth Estate when, as a
child, she watched The Buffalo
Evening News go to press,
Her parents were Ada Butler
and Roscoe Rowland Mitchell.
Mrs. Mitchell was the daugh-
ter of Edward H Butler, found-
er of The Buffalo Evening
News. Mr. Butler's brother
Ambrose was a.partner in the
venture, but being public re-
lations minded, spent most of
his time representing the news-
paper at its New York City
advertising office.
JOINT OWNER OF NEWS
The Buffalo Evening News
today is jointly owned by Mrs.
McKinley and )her uncle, Ed-
ward H. Butler, a, son of the
founder. He is editor and pub-
lisher of the newspaper.
Mrs. McKinley attended the
Park School in Buffalo, of
which her father was a found-
er, and boarding schools'in the
South. In 1927 she made her
first trip to Europe and has re-
turned there several times.
Mrs. McKinley first became
active in civic affairs when she
was 20, as a volunteer worker
at Buffalo's Children's Hospi-
tal, at Red Cross headquarters
and in Community Chest cam-
paigns.
Being a member of a family
whose ties were close, Mrs.
McKinley found, that in civic
work, she could be independ-
ent. Her early hospital activi-
ties led to the presidency of
Buffalo G e n er al Hospital's
Junior Board, and vice presi-
dent of a similar organization
at Children's; Hospital. Her
abilities found still further rec-
ognition, when she was selected
to serve on the senior Board of
Directors of both hospitals and
became the second woman in


back to "before Landon, and
for that matter practically to
Hoover."
PRECINCT WORKER
Actually she became a pre-
cinct worker at the age of 21.
Running for public office be-
came a must with Mrs. Mc-
Kinley when she discovered
that political harmony was
needed in Buffalo's First As-
sembly District. So she ran as
state committeewoman, was
elected and restored harmony.
The next episode in her po-
litical. experiences happened
because she, a woman in po-
litics, dared talk up to the
boss. Those familiar with New
York State politics wil know
what this meant. For the boss
was the famous Ed Jaeckle,
one of Thomas E. Dewey's
closest advisors.
As chairman of the New
York Republican State Com-
mittee for years, Ed Jaeckle,
when Mrs. McKinley first met
him, had already forgotten
more about politics than many
of today's newest public offi-
cials can ever hope to know.
EXPANDS THEORIES
And to this man, Marje Mc-
Kinley expounded her theories
on what ought to be done, why
and how women could be used
to greater advantage in poli-
tics. Mr. Jaeckle agreed and
to prove his sincerity, paved
the way for the election of
Mrs. McKinley to the State
Executive Committee.
Naturally, in this role, Mrs.
McKinley came to. know Gov-
ernor Dewey. She adopted the
same attitude as had prevall-
ed in her contacts with Ed
Jaeckle. Thus, while Mrs.-Mc-
K i nle y supported Governor
Dewey, as she believed him to
be an excellent administrator
of good government, she did
not always see eye to eye with
him.
The decision of Mrs. Mc-


I S P U
* You have read about thi new and different "System" of
plumbing repair service,. in the Saturday Evening Post. that


enables me to deliver a beer job-in less time-at less cost. Why not try It?
* Next time you need a Plumber for any type of repair work, tsopped-up
drain, nolsy toilet, drippy faucet, leaky pipe...'phone e.,


J. M. RHOADES CO. 347 So. Pineapple


Day Phone 2-2361


Night Phone 4-0351


on party harmony had been the
guiding light to successful set-
tlements of party problems.
SARASOTA GAINS
It was a' distinct example of
Buffalo's loss and Sarasota's
gain.
Her entrance into Sarasota's
public life was according to
her character, quiet and digni-
fied. Her neighbors and friends
soon found out about her phe-
nomenal memory. For Marje
McKinley, upon greeting a
newly acquired friend, imme-
diately recalled something of
likeable personal knowledge
concerning the individual.
Her fondness for flowers re-
sulted in membership, then the
vice presidency of the Sara-
sota Garden Club. Mrs. Mc-
Kinley today is also active in
the Women's Club and in the
Community Chest, Visiting
Nurses Association and Happi-
ness house.
Also she devotes quite a bit
of time to duties as a board
member of the Silver Hill


All Canvass Sewn Wm


Orlon Thread At -.


ANDREWS
Awning & Cmnva ,CCo.
-sarasota-Bradenton
Airport '
Phone 5-1001
For Free EsUi.mte


MIXED TO STRICT
LABORATORY STANDARDS

DELIVERED IN BIG 7 YARD TRUCKS
LARGEST IN THE STATE

BIG LOADS MEAN FEWER JOB
INTEauFrTIONS AND MORE
UNIFORM CONCHt; c


Saves You Money On .The Job'


*


.


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helpful to have a Women's
Division of the Sarasota Cham-
ber of Commerce. This harks
backs to the days she served
as chairman of such an organ-
ization in Bufalo. She also fa-
vors the programs outlined by
the National Recreation Asso-
ciation of which she is a mem-
ber.
Politically, Mrs. McKinley is
president of the Women's Re-
publican Club. She resigned as
vice chairman of the Sarasota
County Republican Committee
in 1952 when Mr. McKinley be-
came chairman, believing that
in this case she had better take
a back seat.
Her experience in women's
political groups is highlighted
by the fact that she is one o
two honorary members of the
Erie County Frontier Club.
This is a nationally known
women's political unit in Buf-
falo and her honorary mem-
bership was voted when she
left Buffalo after many years
of faithful work in the ranks
of the group.
FOUNDED BOYS' CLUB
Nearest to her heart per-N
haps, is the Butler Mitchell


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.Ready-Mix Concrete


CONCRETE STEEL MESH


BLOCKS 'RODS BRICKS


__ MORTARMIX


thodnC

BUILDERS SUPPLY


17th and A.CL RR.


Kinley to move to Sarasota Foundation at New- Canaan,
permanently, came as a blow standing psychiatric clinics. -
to several top Republican lead- As a new project, Mrs. Mc-
ers in New York State. Many Kinley believes it would be


I _


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Boys' Club of, Buffalo. She
founded this club in memory
of her brother and thus became
the first woman president of a
Boys' Club affiliated with the
National Boys' Club of, Amer-
ica.
She isa member of the Epis-
copal Church,of the Redeemer'
and the Woman's Auxiliary,
Music plays ,an important,
part in her life, particularly
when one takes into consider-
ation the fact that a husband
and wife piano duet is proof of
mutual interests. These duets
are very frequent at the Mc-
Kinley residence on St. Ar-
mand's Key.
SAs to her role as a news-
paperwoman, Mrs. McKinley
puts it very bluntly. Admitted-
ly she has written but a few
articles for The Buffalo Eve-
ning News. Her knack seems
to be that of providing ideas
to the editorial department.
'And this will be her role on
THE NEWS in Sarasota.
"My job will be that od the
wife of the editor, which mean
I'm behind hinr in everything
that he and THE NEWS dot"'
Mrs. McKinley concluded.


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4.! 2. LSZA .Iw 4. ..-*
*r.- had .refused to
11U t t 4 se aker's 'friend
01 f tbe ingenue.
( Z d, McKinley, unhappy
v .the crop of actors who had
tp as prospects for the
,, levyied his own method
S 1-il the main role. He
'" V/alked down Broad-
Sitil he spotted a dizzy
SW.ho looked the part. The
Stor- followed the blond to
'- i.ag.nt's -office where he
'W li. af introduction a n d
'sie d her up on the spot.
''.W er' inchell, a close friend
Sinley soon heard of the
... ~ and told the world,

&: l summer' stock theater in
.:':-Y e.i'housand Islands with the
', My Irwin as one of the
.:-,''.-iaponsors proved far more suc-
'...ueitito all concerned.
VA9I P)UTY
i -Pearl Harbor day found Mc-
. l' ,:Ki4ey" hitting with Corey Ford
S.' at The. Players in New York
.i .ty- discussing the situation.
S' Action ~ras called for and so
S to .Washington they went,
S, seekingg active duty in the
a vy.
Previous to this McKipley
had spent considerable time in
S Europe participating in a vol-
Sutary ,unofficial hush-hush as-
'iignment. Now he was certain
'pf getting at least two and a
half stripes. But a salt crusted
Navy captain saw it in a dif-
ferent light and the would-be
:ATayal officer became a civilian
procurement specialist.
The assignment took him to
Buffalo's Bell Aircraft plant,
where Niagara Falls' influ-
nces were soon to be felt.
SOne evening 'McKinley was
introduced to Marjorie Butler
3aird, a newspaperwoman in
S ler own right. As part owner
S .f The Buffalo Evening News
he took an active interest in
S.- .'ae paper,-edited by her uncle,
:dward H. Butler.
Newspapers were nqt the
S:opic of conversation that first
evening McKinley and his new
friend took'over a piano and
played one Ouet after another,


much to the surprise of their
friends.
BACK TO CIVIL LIFE
Eight months later the couple
was married. At war's end,
McKinley completed his as-
signment at Bell Aircraft and
took over the Muzak franchise
for the Niagara Frontier. As
if *one business enterprise
wasn't enough, McKinley as-
sumed the family coal, ware-
house and trucking business in
Watertown which dated back
to 1872.
In 1946 he published his first,
newspaper, the weekly "Water-
town News." Later whei doc-
tord advised a trip to warmer
cclimatei, he turned the paper
over to the employees.
A logical move then "was to
Sarasota. McKinley, as one, of
his sidelines, developed .with
four friends the Florida Trava'
tine Marble business in' Bra-
denton. For a short time he
managed the plant which sup-,
plied the stone for the Sara-
sota post office, along with 34
other postoffice buildings.
Thus his connection with
.Sarasota dates back to 1930.
,A small town lad to start
with, McKinley has Waintain-
pdi the touch that goes with
such a character. His political
life 'has suffered at times be-
cause of his insistence' that
government is for the average
person, not the special interest
groups.
SEEKS TWO-PARTY SYSTEM
SAs the Republican piadidate
for United States House of
Representatives from the Sev-
enth Congressional District in
1952, McKinley came close to
breaking the Democratic
stronghold but fell short by a,
few thousand votes. Convinced,
however that he fia4 cracked
the one party system, he de-
cided to' continue his fight fpr
.a two party system in Flor-
ida.
SUnlike some newspaper pub-
lishers, McKinley has a golden
rule-that his newspaper is not,
to be used to further his per-
sonal ,political ambitions, buit
that all regular party officers
and.candidates are to be given.
equal treatment.
A staunch. Eisenhower sup-
porter, McKinley was asked to
run for Congress in 1952 by the
Eisenhower leaders. One of the'
,reasons he accepted was the
eiar that the 'United" States
Government was costing t lh-
taxpayers entirely too much
money. i
The cost of big government,
thought McKinley, would even-
tually mean an across the
board sales tax. This would be
unfair to small wage earners
and* those on .retirement who
already. are paying more in
taxes than is fair, the would-
be Congressman concluded.
SEEKS SENATE SEAT
Feeling that the population
of'Sarasota is in a sense bi-
partisan, McKinley hopes. to
see in his time improvements
in local government. These
improvements, he argues, must-
be made for the benefit of the
average resident.
And to carry it one step fur-
ther, Kent McKinley sincerely
would like to represent the peo-
pie of the 36th Senatorial Dis-
trict in the Florida State Legis-
lature, '
During the summer of 1953
McKinley found himself in a
complicated situation when he
accepted the task of heading up
the Sarasota Foundation Inc.,
the group which sponsored the
Sarasota Festival of Arts, Con-
fusion had played havoc with
what looked like a natural pro-
motion idea for Sarasota. Mc-
Kinley revamped the show,
calling upon such personal
friends as Jane Pickens to
come down from New York.
For his efforts he won both
praise and criticism.
He is a man who takes his
civic responsibility seriously.
And from the beginning he
was a man destined to be a
newspaper publisher. For, as
the great Joseph Pulitzer found
out, a newspaper is a mighty


weapon if used for the benefit
of all. And that is the pur-
pose to which Kent Schuyler
McKinley has dedicated THE
NEWS.


JAMES BATEMAN


Business


Manager


businesss Manager James A.
Bateman. Ranking in impor-
tance with the other depart-
ments of a newspaper is the
business office which is
charged with the responsibility
for collecting and disbursing
money for the. other depart-
ments. In charge of this phase
of THE NEWS operation is
James A. (Jim) Bateman, a
transplanted Brooklynite.
Bateman, a 59 year old vet-
eran of endless struggles with
figures, tax forms, and reports,
came to Sarasota in 1946 after
25 years of accounting' exper-
ience. .
He served with various firms
in Sarasota including Adams
and Houser, hardware retail-
ers, -and Loma Linda Homes
Inc. before joining THE NEWS
staff. :
WITH CAN COMPANY
Prior to moving here he was
connected& with, the Continental
Can Co, for 15 years as an
accounting troubleshooter and
later as district accounting
officer witl headquarters in St.
Louis, Mo,
SBefore joining the canning
machinery firm he worked as
a public accountant for 15
years ... / ,
:'.For; .elaxation :Jim likes to
putter around the houai .but
has a knack for ignoring :the
jobs his Wife, Gertrude, wants
-done in favor'of those that of-
fer more appeal at the moment.
I His principal hobby is spoil-
ing his grandson Robert, who
lives in Tampa with his parents,
Mr.and Mrs, aaltom H. Stuart,

NEWS To Feature

Realty Section
(Continued From Page 25)-
plants mean expansion of pow-
er and transit facilities. In ad-
dition the new homes mean ad-
ditional taxes for city and coun-
ty for expansion of police and
fire protection, sanitation a.n d
-other civic needs and improve
ments. .
In addition to. news 6of new
homes and industries the spec-
Ia section of THE NEWS
.will carry stories and pictures
of remodeling and repairing of
old homes and plants. A story
of what John .Doe is doing to
make his home or plant up to
date might get John Smith to
thinking and planning about
what he could do to make his
home or plant more attractive
-a new room, an: enlarged
front office, better lighting, 'ai
conditioning or more storage
;space.
The Saturday real estate sec-


/


AcKinley At Helm


ii :NEWS Is Born


tion of THE NEWS also will
carry classified advertising list-
ing rooms,- apartments and
houses for rent or sale. Also
the home owner fill find ads
for furniture and 'equipment
for sale or trade. Thus the sec-.
tion will be a' handy 'buyer's-
guide which the reader will
have for easy reference over
weekends.
The, first issue of the tabloid
section will .be this Saturday
so be on the lookout for it then
and each Saturday thereafter.'


State Editor Green

Directs 'Stringers'
1


(Continued From Page 26)
adventures and soon he was
pounding a linotype -instead of
a typewriter.
Like 'all newsmen, Mark got
around. When the Japs pulled
their Pearl Harbor blunder
Green was publishing his first
possession, a weekly in Bowen,
Tll


Luckier than most news-
papermen, Green carried his
pencil and paper into battle as
a Navy combat correspondent.
His initial assignment was
the landing at Guam. Next on
D Day Plus one he moved in


at Okinawa with Admiral
J T Halsey's Seventh Fleet. Action
S n Ony Trace followed at Iwo Jima, Saipan
and Tinian.
Of Dude Ranch A great believer in Navy
tradition but not wanting to
(Continued From Page 25) make it his career-Mark went
later when zoning laws.chang- all out and returned to the
ed. It was called the Dude United States via a round-the-
Ranch. world route.
Reynolds continued to oper- Green 'usted off his tool kit
ate The Dude Ranch for sever- and returned to his trade in
al years. For a short time after the mechanical department of
the restaurant was closed, the the Davenport, Iowa, Times
building was used as a rest and Democrat.
home. But the writing bug, and
With the construction of the most of all, the desire to work
new building, all marks of The with and write about people,
Dude Ranch have disappeared got the best of him. With his'
except for the weathered sign wife Mabel as a partner, Mark


purchased a county weekly in
Wapello, Iowa.
Success of the weekly could
be attributed to a technique
that economists might frown
on, but not a practical guy like
Mark Green. As he puts it,"
*"I just hiied the whole family.
The wife was the advertising
director and the three kids
worked at jobs they liked. Re-
sult-I paid them and they paid
their own way in life."
It worked and today Mark's
three grown children have ad-
apted- themselves to life with
vigor. The youngest, a 'daugh-
ter of 19, works in the adver-
tising department of a big out-
fit in Fort Wayne, Ind. Next is
a 21-year-old lad in the Navy
and' doing duty aboard the
cruiser' St. ;Paul. Oldest, is
Mark, Jr., 25, who is a me-
chanic with THE NEWS.
What brought Mark Green
to Sarasota?. The same good
story. Sand in his shoes. He
'and his wife were staying for
a spell in Venice with intent-
ions of continuing to California.
But the sand and Sarasota's
air conditioning won out.
And so the Greens are re-
siding, appropriately enough,
in a nice green house at 2793
Bahia Vista.


Richardson Brings

Experience To Jol

(Continued From Page 25) and thus Richards
Broad Ripple High School, to prove' a point. He
Richardson ran up the highest. went ,into partnere
scholastic average record dpr- made a deal where
ing his four years there to win Features handled ''
the coveted James Whitcomb Then Richardson
Riley award. and sold the comic
Richardson attended Purdue suit-today "Gran
University where he was a Phi pears in more than
Kappa Signia. Upon leaving papers. And so Duk
Purdue he went with the Pfaff son has a personal
and Hughel company. in Indian- the comic p a g e
apolis, selling stocks .and NEWS.
bonds. He soon gave up this COMES TO SARAS
field for a berth withthe A. .was a
V. Grindle Advertising Agency. .Alw ys prac
Then, in 1934, he left the home Richardso agr
ton: to op hswn ad gen- wife, the former
n to ope 1,1 Ellis, when) min Ju
y i Danville, Ilthey visited Sarasot
Broadening out into other tion and she re
fields, 'Richardson proceeded would be nice to li
to- interest th'e. Danville sota.
Comrmercial-News -in building On the way back
a radio station. When, in 1938, Richardsons ma
the.Richardsons mac
the Commercial-News received
a construction permit for the return to Saraot
station, Richardson was hired the net uRicar

to build and operate the' new ing Features,
venture. r King Features, n
venture. great reluctance, a
JOINS HEARST the car south. The.
Then, in 1941, Richardson edd o-er maps of Sa
made his big move. He joined decided to stay nea
King Features Syndicate, of Pads for a while as
the, famous Hearst .organiza-' ed ,o get in some gi
tion, as a business representa- 'Spotting the.; S.u
tiv_. In this capacity he helped Apartments, the I
21 newspapers to get started, pulled in and, sta
giving them, expert advice on'week. .Then they
what type of features to use. other two Weeks, a
Working out of .New' York ing was good. F
City, Richardson came to 'be Richardsons faced
friends .with some of' King lived at the. Su
Feature's outstanding writers Apartments.for six
whose columns he sold.i'Inchid- In the meantime,
ed in his long Ais. of acquaint- 'a lot and built the:
ances .are 'WaiteV Winchell 2250 Oriole Drive,
George Sokolsky, Fulton Le.is Shores.
Jr.,; Dorothy: Kilgallen, Bob Recently Richards
Considine,' Inez Robb, Bugs opportunity to she
Baer, "Walter Kieran and"the year-old randmotl
late Robert (Believe-It-Or-Not) THE NEWS. She
Ripley. down, her first air
He recalls how. he and Mrs. to rack ,up another
Richardson attended 'one -of swim in salt water
Ripley's unique. cocktail par- Grandmother rea
ties in New York City. Living grandson and. is'
up. to his reputation,I Ripley mined, to return, a
served among other delicacies, Sarasota.
snake canapes. The Richard- While Duke has
sons,' needless.to say; w e,n t for hobbies,; he does
hungry. Incidentally, the af- tain that he, and 1
fair was' the last time that old, son,. Mike, ge
Richardson saw his friend Rip- fishing trips. Mike
ley, for the famous man died enth grader at Sar
a month later. '. School.
SPLUGS "GRANDMA",. Richardson agi -
the Saras~ta MZonk
Duke Richardson has': a a ieat b ooster of.
uniquee. connection with T HE .g t b r of
ne~ o n--w th.NoW he's the leac
SNEW& When&ou open today ofHeNEWt ad
issue tp the" comic page yon ent McKinley Wil
Swill find the fam us com K e
strip "Grandma. co place of civic respo
the life of Sarasota
Back during his King Fea-
ture days, Richarfson noted
that 'a comic strip, "Grand-
ma," drawn by Charles H. *
Kuhn of Indianapolis, wasn't
selling. Duke studied the fea-
ture and for the life ol him,.
couldn't figure out what was
wrong.
S.He read" '"Grandma" as aT
real down to earth story. Per-
,h .aps. it was too true to. life,


;ical man,
with his
Hillis Ann
ne of 1952
;a on vaca-
marked it
ve in Sara-

to Indiana,
de plans to
permanept-
'. When thd-
dson le ft
ot without
nd. pointed
- had- look-
irasota and
ir Midnight
they want-.
ood fishing.
my Beach
Richardsons
yed for a
stayed an-
.s the fish-
'inally the
facts a'nd
ny Beach
: months.
they found
ir 'home at
.Paradispe
'.
ion had the
ow his. 92-
her around,
had flown
adventure,
, first a
r
actedd li k.e
now- deter-
mnd live ,/in

little- time
s make cer
his 16-year-
t in some
is an' elev-
*asota High

member of
Club and is
Sarasota.
dI3g, booster
along with
I. assume a
visibility in
iL '


JULIA ADAMS

Julia's Our

Girl Steno
Stenographer Julia Adams.
Every 'office needs a touch
of glamor to bright~ n it up and
Julia Adams, stenographer-
bbokkeeper, provides the glam-
or for the business office of the
THE, NEWS. .
The attractive 23-year-old
brunet came to Sarasota three
years ago after graduating from
William Woods Junior College,
Fulton, Mo. -
A Kentuckian by birth, Miss
Adams lived in Cincinnati, 'O.,
before moving' here with her
parents, Mr. and Mrs. 'Roger
W. Adams, of 95 Avemida Mes-
sinia.
Before: joining the staff of
THE NEWS Julia worked at the
Ot of)Doors, School a n d the
Gulf and Bay Club,. where her
sister, Jean, is still employed
during the season.
She is engaged to be married
and is planning an October wed-
ding, but in the meantime she
is living with her, parents.
Her father is vice-president
of the Palmer National Bank
and was formerly president of
the Citizens National Bank.
Prior to coming to Sarasota
he was connieted with banks
in Lexington an d Fraskfort,
Ky., and Cincinnati.

,Although the ~ ce Age con-
tinued, f o t about a'; million
years, the periods. during this
time when ice covered large
portions of the earth were short
compared to those in which the
earth's climate was relatively
w'irm. '

The French Catnergons in
Africa are, larger than Calif-
oknia (about 166800 square
miles). .


N


ALLI


R S I OS., -ILE !


New Cycla-matfic

FRIGIDAIRE:
,i ., "*





" ': ~' I' -


Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1954 THE NEWS Pl


I -- I


on set out
s, and Kuhn
rship And
eby King
Grandma."
went. oit .i'
strip. Re-
dzha" ap-
275 news-
e. Richard- -
interest in '
of today's
; "^ % ": ...


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Makes YOU the


Another great football season is on 'ts 'Wa.ti
600 college, teams are swinging into. action
the bigr questions will be:


"Who's best?":


f,"How do they eomponi6
I 7-


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Big Twin Hydrators Powered by Meter-Miser
Bunt and Backed by General Motors


*


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323 Central Avenue Phone 6-6731


J. H. Cobb wired The News


I


"Who ought to whn?'
Dick Dunkel's College Football Power'irindeK heps'ti
you the answers at a glance! It presents 9 eapsule
story about each team summarizing its oet.QefQMa
compared to all others.


You be the forclasteir You pfhA-'


Maximum Acturacy!


.Oldest Analysis!

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THE NEWS Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1954 ,


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Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1954 E NEWS


Letters


Pour


Into


The


NEWS


Many Leaders


9e s,


upe rent S
p. ar** bssher
aasota pO
ear Kent,


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S' ne. '
no' ~ br .t of your

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7EWS Newcomer Finds An
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:[-[ %By LOU DURKIN that and last August 30 I sud- of the traffic lights at Five
News Sta Writer denly discovered myself cross-Points.

















: quality that eems tobe the state line from Georgia Despite having been slightly
e l la ot" a a .nithew mer oFrida oversold by friends at home who
I- 4. our Oee.mg a ew o er. ..























S squires i a.rema b My frst iew of Florida fell had visited here, and by

























: Imove front-his lifetime h me and I was tempted to turn, first contacted me, Sarasota
onwra




























nhie man hoiddthi aroud and head northr e as tme" media ande


















S citing place in which to live The arrival at Sarasota was The feeling that I "belong"
d o artly b use co w more encouraging can also be raced to t mo


















Sing from a family that had because by that time we were leisurely pace here, a pace that
planted its roots in the com- feeling the breeze from the I had a head start in achiev-
S unity three generations ear- and the gulf and found it ing because of a rather notice
.lier, I was well acquainted in possible to go'on living able inability to recognize the
. .the city and the su'rounding My first weeks in Sarasota need for speed and to "get it
.' area. My work as a reporter were filled with a succession done yesterday."
made it easy for me to meet of pleasant surprises from the Welcome calls by our neigh-
people, and things were hap- people I encountered who acted bors, a pleasant home in which
opening there, as though my arrival was the to live, and a quick adjustment
I enjoyed my work on the finest thing that had happened to new friends on the part of
paper and my association in to the. city since the arrival of our two youngsters made it
.,1 Waukcgan and had looked for- the first real estate promoter, easy for us to make the change
ward to many more years there Everywhere we encountered to Sarasota.
when I was suddenly con- a friendly spirit of helpfulness Of course, I also found plenty
_, "fronted wi a the possibility of and cooperation even from the to complain about like streets
moving to Sarasota to work on traffic officer who patiently, that start nowhere and end no-
aCo to









































Ba new daily paper here. and possibly a little despair- where, flooded streets, a lack

SEveh me vede swiftly after ingly, explained the operation of parking places, congested
ureoar
*k see p rrdw
























miiuny three a geions the "ar iat Fan






a new Ily p.a perern po l a l de r e de s ,


-leo CD. 4D Ul
our*"....


September.
'221 951,


Sai edmoni : ned to dia -
re "the ten wthirOf thr .e s R9~
Treetl,,, tsof '98__ o mal,. :I~ a
m @with theaa To all of those a
t h e h i g h c a u l s ur e c r9 id Y O U ,Ien d as i s o i a t e d
".'y nau h iae1ece th.at y uffao ...
Sundertakn.- ou as, Send
*so


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The *Z~~
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Ols.ofr1-


Yours,
8.



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'Spr IG
sePt 82.
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'N^ttee


It Home' Feeling In Sarasota
streets and other sources of Ir- slip my feelings took the cor- I would make to whoever coined
ritatioi, but these annoyances plaints personally, but were in- the slogan, "Sarasota, The Air-
only served to make me feel lined to agree with me, hasten- conditioned City.", The slogan
more at home inmg to add, of course, that should be changed to something
more at home. things would get better or worse that more clearly points up the
And strangely enough none when "THE SEASON" starts. friendly atmosphere encoun-
of the residents to whom I let There is only one suggestion tered here.


NEWS Teletypes Never Sleep


At the White House in Wasl-
ington, the President announ-
ces an important decision af-
fecting the entire nation. Within
a few moments this news is on
its way all over the country and
within a few hours, Sarasotans
are reading all about in the
front page of THE NEWS.
This modern miracle of news
distribution is accomplished
through the development of the
news services and their use of
the teletype system.
Newspapers owe their timely,
hour-by-hour coverage of na-
tional and world events to the
noisy, b 1 a c k-cased boxes in
their newsrooms, and the great
news-gathering systems which
lie be-d .them. '


Two great news services pro- events come over these wires,
vide coverage for THE NEWS: but also feature stories, col-
The. Associated. Press and In- umns, and even Hollywood gos-
ternational News Service. All sip.
over the world,' their repre- Without the wire services and
sentatives are Working night the teletype circuits, there
and day to provide American would'be little news on the front
newspapers w-i't h complete page except that of local origin.
news. Straight telephone coverage
Wherever news occurs, there wold be too expensive and
are men to cover and to write telegraph coverage too compli-
it for distribution to newspa- cated and slow.
pers everywhere. Teletype machines clatter on
Steadily, 24 hours a day, the all day. with almost no atten-
machines in THE NEWS office tion except feeding blank pa-
clatter, providing what might per and removing printed pap-
be considered the pulse of the er. Their steady noise is as-
newspaper. surante that no matter where
News services and teletypes in the world people are making
give any newspaper the chance, news, it will quickly be ready
to spice their pages with new for reading by the people of
flavors. Not only do news Sarasota.


Voice Interest
The advent of a brand new daily newspaper, starting
fror scratch, has resulted in many letters of congratu-
lations to THE NEWS from leaders in the fields of
journalism and public service.
Just a few of these communications, of which T!E.
NEWS is proud, are presented on this page.
Acting Governor of Florida,
the Honorable Charley E. Johns' -__
terms the beginning of a new rP pulatlon:0
daily newspaper in Sarasotatas -
"proofof the rapid growth of Bo
the West Coast area. As the Boom Seew
growth of the area increases,
so will the responsibilities of T F
the newspaper-the respoasibil- r 01r COUn.t
ity of serving the people, which
I am confident your paper will Sarasota County is in
do." thumninrw 7 ,. marl'-,


BUTLER'S GREETING
Greetings to THE NEWS
came today from an editor
known and respected the world
over for his integrity. Edward
H. Butler, editor and publisher
of The Buffalo Evening News,
and presently in Paris, pointed
to a great reason why respon-
sible newspapers are needed to-
day as he sent a congratula-
tory message to THE NEWS.
"In the present conditions of
immense confusion in national
and world affairs it is most
necessary and important, to
have all the news printed ac-
curately, fairly and without
bias," Mr. Butler .declared.
"For this great reason," he
continued, "there can not be
too many fine newspapers ed-
ited carefully knd honestly,
realizing their responsibilities.
It is therefore a matter of sat-
isfaction to welcome THUE
NEWS into the journalistic
field.
"My heartiest good wishes to
the editor and publisher for a
successful career.
"Myr THE NEWS' prosper
and grow in importance a n d
value to the people of Floilda
"aoh year -'
.rufler it the san of the
late 'vward H. Butler, found-
er odi. The. Buffalo EveMing
News, W hiA is considered one
.of the west edited.n newspapers
ti eMtce rs. Marjorie


TEUWPMWB IW a niece of Mr.
Butl,. Her mother, Ada But-
ler Mitchell, was a daughter
of tha fIouder o The Buffalo
Evening .News..
CANHAM'S' LETTER
Editor of The Christian Sci-
enae Monitorl Erwin D. Can-
ham says: '"As everybody
knows, there aren't many.'newi
dailies coming into existence
currently, and the- birth of a
new newspaper is a great'
event. It certainly indicates the
growth of Sarasota and the
West Coast of Florida. I send
youw confident best wishes for
great constructive service. No-
thing Iis more important in
these days -than that the people
should be accurately and per-
ceptively informed."
As THE.NIUWS is bringing to
its readers the latest world
wide coverage provided by an
outstanding wire service,. the
International News Service, a
welcome to the "family of cli-
ent newspapers" comes from
Seymour B e r k s o n, general
manager of INS. "We know that
it is going to achieve an out-
standing success and win a
wide audienCe of loyal readers
in the Sarasota community,"
"aid Mr. Berkson.
"That i a bold venture, but
I wish you much luck.," com-
menrs Gardner "Mike" Cotles,
president and editor, of Look
Magazine, in a letter declaring
that he will follow the progress
of THE NEWS from month to
month.
From A. H. Kirchhofer, man-
aging editor of The, Buffalo
Evening News and a recognized
leader in the Fourth Estate,
comes the message: "It's tre-
mendously important that the
American people have the ben-
efit of adequate news reports
and the informed interpreta-
tion which throws light upon
their significance,"
GREENE'S MESSAGE
\*Ward, Greene, general man-
ager of King Features Syndi-
cate says: "As an old visitor
to Sarasota, I appreciate that
one of the finest communities
in our country. You are to be
congratulated, and so are the
.people of Sarasota. I am sure
you will give them an honest,
interesting newspaper, and I
hope they will give you their
appreciation and their, warm.
support." A- \
From Robert J. Sudderth of
the Chattanooga Times and,
secretary of the Southern Cir-
culation Managers Association
is this message: "It appears


,. -. P
fr*-.,. ,,


(


t


crease in population by'
a careful survey made -eFa '- A l
Florida Power COrp.9FE;'
Petersburg, has deterniined .
The 10-iounty survey as ;
made by First Research (~op.9 "
Miami, at the request' of 'th
power company to detenim
what additional facilitiedie '
be needed to care fotMfI
growth expected in Wesat-l-
da as the result..of the opgem
ing of the new Skyway idge
across lower Tamtpa B a,
BIG INCREASE SEEN .,


tourist' acco
all shoiw heyBihy h
The estimated popi
Sarasota Co-atyr 4 1
39,700, the' survey sh i s.
will inaetdreq to 55,0
search co0iiation. i
and retail ales
$49,500 195 in, tp0 or
in six years. a jump
Contie ed pros ty
county-i eems ajuareda
estimied 43.4 s p er
crease in ba deposits
fast ik the .nWrey.
bank deposibiht 1953'
$40,574,000 o.' ,

have $58,2M000 on depi d;
county. .,-y-, .
A slightly smaller Incle a y--
is expected in automobile.,' '
gistrations. An increase otiS r. r,
percent, from 25,627 In 9 ito if
35,700 inm 1959 Is forecast'if
survey. ten ;
More business, activity
bring a 32 per cent cr s
n o n-farm employment i'
mearst, from 10,eeM to fr m ,
The n10ber of u tourist .S Y
available in the county Ist-i' V '
in for a sharp 37.6 pr ce
create from 10,840 to 14Bu.
during the same period. .
Retail sales will show ,a'31f.i
per cent increase ~p~b -
$39,500,000 to $52,100,000; t'wai


tags, 39.2 per cent from'2as l'*
to 32,500 non-farm mploy-
ment, 32 per cent from 12,509
to 16,500; tourist rooms C83.
per pent from 5,915 to
POPULATION GROWTH grd
Thefirst federal census
the county. was taken in pff
and 'showed a population" a
,12,440 The 1940 county .
sBus showed 16,106 residents /
a state census in 194
the population as e19,202. T
19o0 federal census showed a
population gain to 28,827. Shrlk
sota city showed a popup i icAs
of'18,896 in 1950. ,
The new Skyway W11*:'
expected to be. one of thea r
important factors in ftev
growth of this area. Howsverja
continued rise In the rta' ,
normal growth, and continued
high level of prosperity are ;n
pected to be important coiet
tributing factors in theldevebo" p
meant of this county.

Tropical Shrbnt

Shade Buildisnh
Flit's natural shruhba .
purrojseds the offices and p
of THE NEWS, brought t;et .
from the estate of the pSi U "
er and from various local
eries.
Much of the shrubbery cati
directly from Melody Pa a
home of Kent S. *7
editor and publisher.

that all executives are *i0
versed with many years ott*
perience." T h i said 76
Sudderth, "will greatly hslpto '
make THE NEWS a mostlT '
cessful newspaper ventun;jk' ;
"Ienvy you the priW
running a daily
Sarasota," writes Uerle ds; VWI
ell of Reader's Digest, 0,
added: "It's a grand cU.S\,'.<:
Ir sLj ~ .V1 7 -


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Pamel4 Wliu INEWS Wedneisdiy, Oct. 6, 1954

THE NEWS Is Fortunate In The Experience And Calibre O Those

Advertising Departm en't: Who Sell, Design And Lay Out Its Patrons' advertising Programs


loge:

The


-- A

'.. "KING ROGERS


Bqb Ralston

"iHd Ad Diet

.A I e rt.I s 1 n'g Salesman
,RoWe B.B Ralston, -is a man
whIo i1o0Ws where. he is going.
Sike. J) father' before him, he
ihas .s.eered a steady course
throu .the advertising world.
'.'Ad artising talk -.as a
-steWde diet at our table," he
a- d .nd recalls that. even- in
summiner' vacations from
schol,. he worked for thre ad-
Svertising department of a
wee5l,, newspaper ..in his home
to.Wn heai Pittsburtgh" .
S p. began his actual prep.-
Stio4 'for an advertising ca-
'iee .kat Ohio Wesleyan, grad-
itating with a bachelor's de-
gree in business administration
-and advertising, in 1940.
WWA SERVICE
"Then," he recalls, "I took
a year off before settling down
r and got my hands dirty work-
ing 'in a defense plant in'
MiChigan." .
'Back from the service in
1 145, Bob went to work for the


- ROBERT B. RALSTON.
advertising and sales promo-
tion department of Goodyear
Tire and Rubber Company in
":Akron, Ohio.
, After five years, Ralston
moved over, to the General
Tire and Rubber Company
where he piled up further' ad-
vertising experience.
MOVES TO CLEVELAND
In 1953, Ralston moved to
Cleveland to join the advertis-
ing dency Wof Meldrum &
Fewsmith, Inc.
Bob grew up in Pittsburgh,
Pa., where his father served


'' Advertising Director E. L. Cartlidge came to Sarasota
S''- Cartlidge. E .L. Cartlidge, ad- 13 years ago after tours of duty
vertising d i r e c t o r of THE in Bartlesville and Tulsa, Okla.
gj ''- : -' NEWS, brings more" than a where he Was advertising man-.
.quarter century of newspaper ager of newspapers. He has
experience to his important been advertising manager and
post on the new publication, was at one time business
I In addition to his experience manager o fthe Sarasota Her-
as an advertising salesmail and aid-Tribune since coming here.
^ '- : '.I advertising department direc- At the present time he is
Store, his thorough knowledge of serving 0as president of the
S.. business a n d commerce in Florida Newspaper Advertising
S. "' Sarasota and the. surrounding Executives Association, com-
Sterritory through his long-time posed of the advertising dir-
S membership in the, Sarasota ectors' and managers of all'
County Chamber of Commerce Florida daily newspapers.
and the Sarasota Merchants Cartlidge was a member
:,;.:. .4 Association make him invalu- of the board of directors of the
able in his new post. Merchants' Association here, a
S.BEGAN AS REPORTER former director and chairman
.. Born in Mexico City, the 53- of the publicity committee of
year-old advertising director the Chamber of Commerce and
S. launched his newspaper .career p. member of R o t a r y Inter-
as a cub reporter with the national.
Dallas, Texas, Dispatch 32 He and his wife, Dorothy,
S. ., years ago a ft e r', attending make their home at 3819
S. ', ..' -'- 4 Missouri Military Academy, Camino Real. Their son, Jack,
.4 "'' Cartlidge, or "Ed", as he is an artist, also lives in Sara-
'"'' known to his. many Saraasta sota. .
friends, entered the adve=is- Heading a staff of experienc-
ARTLIDGE ing field while with the Black- ed and trained advertising
AR T well, Okla. Tribune, rising to specialists, Cartlidge planhp to.
the post of advertising manag- work closely with local merch-
er before moving to Miami, ants, in planning advertising
rsI CareerL Okla., where he was advertis- campaigns and programs and
ing manager of the\ Miami developing business and \civic
Continent News-Record. promotions.

- "-, Promotion Manager Kingi. I Ad A rt
Manager King -Edith Post
S Rogers.,A creer in adveltis-,'
ing- and promotion spanning ':.
the continent and a quarter of Is A d A rtist
a century are behind K ig igas .. d rti
SRogers, 55-year-old circulation Artist Edith Pond Post,
and advertising. promotion brings an outstanding back-
Smanager of THE NEWS. ground in advertising layout
Rogers, a jovial, balding, and illustrating, magazine il-
young-at-heart salesman, en- lustration, and art teaching to
termed the field -of advertising -her post as advertising and lay-
and promotion in 1921 after '. out artist for THE NEWS.
serving overseas in World War '',-. Born in Massachusetts, the
SIwith the Royal Munster Fusi-". on i o t he
h" Ari"y" spent most of her early years
'hers, a sineo e disbanded Irish n n mot of tw crl e
Regiment of the British Army in Sarasota and returned here
His first venture w.as with five years ago after attending
e hj T.Lo Angeles 'amniner


where he- sold display adver-
tising. .
Terminating his association
with the Examiner after two
years Rogers spent tbhe next
nine years in a variety of en-
deavors including the sale of
outdoor advertising, working
on other West Coast papers, a
brief stint in an advertising
agency and a fling at working
in California oil .fields.
WENT EAST .
In :1932 'he reversed Horace
Greeley's admonition and head-
ed east to join the staff of the
New York Herald' Tribune. ,
Except for a World War H
stint ona civilian construction
project in Greenland, north of
the Arctic Circle, he remained
in the promotion department
of the Herald-Tribune until
1949 when he hearkened to the
siren voice of Florida and
moved to St. Petersburg.
The next five years were
spent in the circulation sales-
promotion department of the
St. Petersbdrg Times.
A native of Racine, Wis.,
Rogers attended the University
of Wisconsin before embarking
on his journalistic career.
His principal hobbies are
: fishing, gardening and painting
and while in St. Petersburg he
was a member of the Board
of Directors of the St. Peters-
burg Symphony Society and
the St. Petersburg Ad Club.
Married for the past 22 years
to Emily Rogers, he has one
son, who is'manager of a Las
Vegas, Nev., television station,
and two grandsons.

as advertising manager of the
Westinghouse Air Brake Co.
and also maintained an interest
in a small weekly newspaper.
IN PIJOESTI RAID
Bob joined, the Air Force in
1942 and after training as a
navigator, was assigned to fly
in B-24's with the 15th Air in
Italy. -It was his 13th mission,
Ralston recalls wryly, that did
the damage. Flying in the his-
toric Pboesti oil field raid, he
was shot down, captured add
interned in a prisoner of war
camp 'in Bucharest, Rumania.
It was six months before
Rumania capitulated to the
Allies, and Bob .was released
and awarded a Purple Heart
arid Air Medal for his flights.
After his release, he was re-
tu'rned to the United States and
served as an intelligence of-
ficer with a B-29 squadron in
New Mexico until his discharge.
In 1946, he, was married and
made his home in Akron. The
Ralstoris have no children. Bob
calls himself a sportsman, but
qualifies this to mean that he
likes sports as a spectator.
Besides enjoying watch-
ing baseball and football


I


ADEN WAID

Aden Waid

Old Hoand
Advertising Salesman H.
Aden Waid, 61, made his first
visit to Florida seven yeafs ago
and was so impressed with
Sarasota that he determined
someday to return here perm-
anently and the opening of
THE NEWS has made' this.
dream a reality. .,
He and his wife,. Zora J.
Waid, have already purchased
a home at 2488 Davis Blvd.
Born in Wauseon, Ohio, Waid
entered the newspaper business
in Terre Haute, Ind., 30 years
ago, working in the advertising
department of,the Terre Haute
Tribune-Star.
After remaining in Terre
Haute for 23 years he moved
to the Indianapolis Star-News
where he worked for seven
years before 'accepting an of-
fer to come to Florida.
While with. the Star-News he
concentrated on national auto-
motive advertisements.
During World War I Waid
served in the Navy as a
QMI-c aboard a destroyer\and
was one of the Navy's first
"submarine listeners operat-
ing underwater sound gear for
the detection of U-boats.
Waid was stationed in
Queenstown and Livetpool for
six months, escorting inbound
and outgoing convoys in the
Atlantic Ocean.
Active in the Masonic Order
Waid is a\ meinber of Blue
Lodge 19, Terre Haute, a nd
Scottish Rite and Shrine Murat
Temple, Indianapolis.,
He has a son and grand-
daughter living in Indianapolis
and Mrs. Waid has a daugh-
ter, Mrs. Duane-Roberts, and
two granddaughters living in
Sarasota.
Mrs. Waid's son-in-law, Du-
ane Rpberts, recently joined
the staff of the Sarasota Cqunty
Chamber of Commerce as as-


art school and working as an
artist in New York City.
While working in New York.
she did free lance art work and
also worked for A~Aertising
agencies 'as an illustrator and
doing sketch work:
'ibr "ads ah'di illustrations
have appeared in such publi-
cations as Esquire Magaine,
NeW Yorker, Better Homes and
Gardens and in New York
newspapers.
Since her return to Sarasota
she has been teaching art at
McClellan Park school and, has.
volunteered to do art work'
and posters for'the community
concert series.
A member of the Sarasota
Art Associatioi, she is co-
chairman ,and co-founder with
Miss Elizabeth Menke, art in-
structor at the Out-of-Doer


' ET\ODPS


- EDITH POND POST
School, of the association's
junior group.
After graduating from Sara-
sota High School Mrs. Post at-
tended the famed High's Mu-
seum of Art school in Atlanta,
and then returned to Sarasota
to study at the Ringling School
of Art.
She later continued her ar'
studies at the Boston Museu.
and Grand Central School c
Art, New York City, and toc:
special instruction with Har.
vey Dunn.
She is still a regular staft'
contributor to Child Life mac


sistant manager. azine and recently illustrated
S, three books published by Gar-
games, he's and avid swimmer den City Press.
and reader. Her daughter, 'Brooks, 14, i1
The Ralstons are happy to be following in her mother's foo:
in Sarasota. Bob admits that steps in the field of art an<'
his wife influenced his move literature and has already
to the city, but he says that had articles published in a na
he always wanted to live in tional children's magazine.
Florida,. Walter Post, her 13-year-ol(
Bob and his wife are plan- son, has followed his mother
ning to build their own home to THE NEWS and is a car-
here, but until plans are com- rier for the new publication.
pleted they will live with' Bob's Mrs. Post and her children
parents, Mr. and Mrs. James live at 2041 Main St. in a
A. Ralston of Coral Cove on house adjoining that of her
the South Trail. mother, Mrs. Bernice B. Pond.


Sarasota's

Theater Ads

For Rivers


'Advertising Salesman
William J. (Curley) Rivers,
has a varied background that
includes theatre advertising
and promotion and welding in-
struction in a New Orleans,
La. shipyard during World War
II.
A native of Columbus, Ohio
Curley came to Sarasota a
year ago when he felt a twinge
warning him that his arthritis
was making a come-back.
Prior to moving here he was
sales -manager in charge of
construction sales for the Paul
J. Filing Co., Columbus home-
building contract firm.
DRY CLEANER
His background also includes
operation of a string of three
dry cleaning plants in Colum-
bus and a one year tour with
the Army.
An ardent fisherman, Curley
insists that the best fishing is
done with a spinning rod and
plug, which probably gets him
into no end of arguments.
A member of St., Martha's
Catholic Church, he has three
children enrolled at the Paro-
chial school: John, aptly nick-
named "Butch", 13; Sharon
Ann, 12 and Mary Jo, 9.
Rivers, his wife, Josephine,
and the children live at 2040 E.
Grove St.


The Post Office department
is the nation's largest real
estate operator and operator
tenant. It leases 22,800 build-
ings. In all, the department
maintains more than 40,000
post offices.


Our obligation begins-wh v



your job is completed

S, .-,
4.


t


Ed. Cartlidge Heads

This Veteran Group


ED (


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$p^ians

?"' r .


^ "i.': 44.

,""

V^


John J.


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'1 '


SWednesday, Oct. 6, 1954 THE NEWS Page.5l,..


Classified


A dvertisin g:


Manager Bill Best
HeBs


This Group of NEWS People Prepares And Advises Advertisers

On Use Of Want Ads In The Paper With The Big, Readable Type.


I


w. aratrooper

Starting Ad



""Ad*4 "


JACK EADS

n ,T Sharp

Is ASailor
.-;j taker Jean Sharp. Read-
'., er'.o4 the classified ads like
'. i th.. because of their variety
i,:1' ahA 1hterest. Mrs. Jean Sharp,
h" itindles the classified ads
"'..fqrlE NEWS, fits into her
',-p~tOto easily for hr life has
begn fll of 'variety and inter-
t,, ,.i.' .,,. '-
S or' years, as a resident of
S: Buffp, N, Y., Mrs. Sharp was
d ..- O the 'community's out-
standing. volunteer workers,
ipticiAzi ng in cerebral palsy.
I he was elected a life member
'-.oth Cere'0ral Palsy Assoc-
t iaW of Western New York for
iher work -as a volunteer wor-
ker &a0 as a board member 6f
the association.
One of the outstanding works
i. of Mrs, Sharp was the estab-
i*. timet, under her direction,
.of the first young-adult cerebral
palsy recreation center in Buf,
Sflo .


Besides her work in cerebral
pa .ay,. Mrs. Shap found time
to. be .active as a board mem-
.ter of the Volunteer Service


JEAN SHARP


Bureau In Buffalo, the Com-
munity Chest and the women's
board of the Buffalo Symphony
Orchestra.
-It is said busy people us-
ually find time to do more,
and Mrs. Sharp lends credence
. to this, for in addition to her
household duties and volunteer
work, she also found time to
author a cook book, ouild up
Sa large collection of classical
records'for her prized high fi-
delity phonograph, and still
i


Jack Eads

Career
Classified Ad Taker Jack
Eads, 24-year-old Korean war
veteran, does not let a war in-
jury interfere with his work at
THE NEWS, nor has the crip-
pling injury dimmed, his sunny
disposition.
Born and raised on a Tarm
near Oakland, Ill., Jack came
to Sarasota' in June after long,
dreary months in Army and
Veterans Administration hospi-
tals in a hopeless effort to ef-
fect a cure for his battle-par-
lyzed legs.
A firpt lieutenant in t he
Army paratroops, the stocky
youngster was making a com-
bat jump near Pusan, his sec-
ond of the conflict, when trag-
edy struck.
'CHUTE FAILS
Failing out of the plane at
about 500 feet, Jack plummet-
ed to earth when his parachute
collapsed.
Eads suffered a severed spi-
nal cord and other injuries
which left him permanently
paralyzed from the waist down
and started him on his tour of
hospitals .
During his stay at the Vet-
erans Administrafion Hospital
at Hines, Ill., Eads played on
the hospital's wheel chair bai-
ketball team and was a mem-
ber of the bowling team which
topped all other veterans hos-
pital wheelchair bowling teams
and took second place in the
VA's nation-wide general clas-
sification bowling tournament.
FORMER JOCKEY
Eads attended the Universi-
ty of Illinois for a brief time
before going into the Army
and then completed his studies
at the university after being
invalided home from Korea at
the expiration of eight months
of combat duty there .
Before going into the Army
he was a jockey riding in
races in California and Flori-
da and his brother, Wendell
Eads, is rated as one of the
nation's top jockeys.
Although confined to a wheel
chair Jack drives his own car
and lives a full and fun-filled
life, maintaining such a cheer-
ful outlook that people around
him completely overlook his
disability.
Eads has thrown himself
into his new job of writing and
selling classified ads with en-
thusiasm and high good spirits.
At the present time he is
living in a bachelor apartment
at 1785 Sixth St.


find time to become a skilled
Great Lakes sailor.
Mrs. Sharp is a native of In-
diana, born and brought up in
La Porte. Married soon after
receiving her Bachelor's degree
in psychology from the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin, Mrs. Sharp
lived in Brooklyn, N. Y. for
several years while her hus-
band studied for the opera.
ENTHUSIASTIC SAILOR
When the Sharps moved to
Elmira, N. Y., Mrs. Sharp had
already acquired a reputation
as an outstanding cook and par-
ty hostess. Friends urged her
to put down her recipes and
ideas into a book, and she did,
to the delight of 500 people
who bought out completely the
first and only edition.
While living in Buffalo, Mrs.
Sharp took to the water aboard


las Varied Experience
Classified Ad Manager Wil- circulation, before going into


liam H. Best. Mention horses
to William H. Best,' classified
advertising manager of THE
NEWS, and a gleam comes in-
to his eyes, for horses are im-r
portant in his life.
Not only are Bill and his
wife horse owners and goodl
riders, but they hope someday.
to go into the business of
breeding and raising purebreds.
Bill, born and raised in the
Hoosier 'country of Indihn-
apolis, Ind., owns a piece of
property out near Fruitville
and he hopes pto .enlarg% his
present day stable of two
horses into ,a much larger op-
eration.
Following hi s graduation
from high school, Bill entered
Butler University in Indian-
apolis for a )year's study of
business courses and then went
to work fdr P. R. Mallory Co.
He remained with Mallory
for six years, working with dx-
pensive platinum materials in
the manufacture .of delicate
electrical contacts. During the
war, part, of their 'work was
in the making of the fusing
mechanism for high explosive
shells.
Bill next joined the staff of
the Indianapolis Star and
worked with them for two
years as a district manager of


EVELYN BLOODGOOD


Shes AnOld

Sarasotan
Ad Taker Evelyn Bloodgood,
transplanted New Yorker, and
a childhood resident of 4Sara-
sota, is a' member 'of THE
I': ws classified ad department.
Mrs. Bloodgood, who lives- at
Colonial Terrace with her five-
year-old daughter, 'Bonnie Sue,
- .me to Sarasota two years
ago. .


Prior to returning to "ara'
sota where she had lived with
her parents for two years in
the middle '20's, Mrs' Blood-
good lived in Syracuse, N. Y.
CIRCULATION MANAGER
In Syracuse she became one
of the few district circulation
managers in the country, tak-
ing over the rural circulation
of the Syracuse Post-Standard
and boosting its circulation an
astounding 4,000 copies per day
in only two years.
Before launching her news-
paper career in Syracuse she
worked as a final tester on the
television assembly line of the
General Electric co.
Before ,her husband died
about the time of the birth of
their daughter, she was active
in Syracuse bowling circles,
but now finds her activities
confined largely to being a
career woman and mother.


the family boat, a 34-foot Alden
Cutter, sailing mostly .in the
Bay of Quinte and around the
Thousand Islands. Because of
her varied duties on board,
ranging from steward to helms-
man, she quickly earned t he
title of "The Skipper." I
Mrs. Sharp has been a Sara-
sota resident for two years and
resides at 1136 Patterson Drive.
Musical sounds issuing from
this address are a result of her
chief hobby, collecting and lis-
tening to classical records. She
has been a high fidelity fan
ever since a, friend of the fam-
ily, an engineer, put together
a custom set for her.
Mrs. Sharp shares this musi-
cal fascination with her son,
James, who lives in St. Peters-
burg.
Since arriving in Sarasota,
Mrs. Sharp has served as sec-
retary to t h e managing di-
rector of the Sarasota Summer
Festival and as receptionist and
secretary for Key 'Realty.


These Girls

Punch Tape
This line of .type was set by
a young lady who had' never
seen a typesetting machine
until a few. days ago. .
Miraculous? No, for auto-
matic typesetting service,
part of the' new equipment in
uE pon'THE NEWS, makes it
possible for unskilled young
women to' operate machines
which, automatically handle
the ',difficult and complex
typesetting job.
Heart of the system is the
teletypesetter room, situated
adjacent to 44u wA aom. +1
news" stories coming in from
correspondents, reporters and
wire services are first edited
by the news staff and then
shuttled to the female op-
erators of .the keyboard per-
forators. ,
HOW IT WORKS
' By' the use o f these ma-
chines, women can transcribe
the written word into a spe-
cial code which is perforated
oi a paper tape. ,
Completed tapes are fed in-
to operating units attached to
the three new Intertype type-
setting machines in use on
THE NEWS. On these mach-
ines the perforations are
translated into lev er opera-
tions which control the Inter-
type mechanism 'to produce
finished type.-


I..





,X"L i
.- '- :* "'l. ''* ; .
\ .." / ,;; ^ : .*?


i.








HEt
by
insi


business for himself.
This venture took him
into the coin- operated ma-
chine business for five years.
In 1950, following an opera-
tion, Bill and his wife came
to Sarasota for a vacation and
decided to move to this city.
, The Bests returned home,
finished building a home they
had started, sold their busi-
ness and came to Sarasota.
Bill purchased an automo-
bile agency in town and op-
erated this for a year 'and a
half, meanwhile building his
own home here.
* The Bests gave\ all of this
up to go into real estate.,when
they purchased the Terrell
Apartments at 1637 Oak St.,
which now'serves as their
home.
But for both Bill and his
wife, the country is. the only
place. As soon as possible,
they want to sell their apart-,
ment holdings and, move out
to their 'ranch together with
their son, Gary, 9. 1
Bill is active -in club and
civic affairs in Sarasota. He
belongs to the Ibions Club, Ma-
sonic LOdge, Scottish ]kite,
Sahara Grotto and the Sara-
sotaa County Cattleman's As-
sociation.


.. .



y Sarasotdns, as it looked when it wasr purchaue4








OUdly Announce.
. ddi in of a new







ARTM .NT .


ems and'Designs

'aly adapt le to .. ... .',.'

LORIDA HOMES




SS ESTABLISHMENTS .


*1 -


,r 'A.

pa intsa
Household
I Hardwme


Lucille Cox


CO]


Pr

'the


WAL


DEP


Pat

espec

-PF




BUSIHE


*, ,,. ;* o -. *- f-


'.4


No Kitchen!

It's Stereo
A stray visitor to the stereo-
type room of THE NEWS
might mistake it for some
'strange/'sort of kitchen on see-
ing a /huge boiling, cauldron
and. hearing men talking about
turtles and plates, but this
room. houses machinery vital
to the. printing of a modern,
multi-copy newspaper.
High speed' newspaper press-
es such as are in use on THE
NEWS, must print from a re-
volving cylinder, and the flat
type.'which is produced by
typesetting machines must be
so transformed that it fits
around the curved surface of
the printing press rollers. This
is the job of the stereotyper.
THE MATRIX
As each page of type comes
from the composing room on its
rolling table or turtle, it is
placed in a rollipg machine and
covered with a heavy, pliable
heat-resistant paper -:heet call-
ed ;a matrix or mat. When
pressure is applied by the ma-
chine the impression of the
type reproduces permanently
in the mat, making it much
like the negative used in pho-
tography.
The mat is then dried, hard-
ened in a heating machine
called a scorcher and is fitted
-into a casting box which' is
semi-cylindrical in shape and
the same size as the roller in
the printing press.,
THE PLATE
Boiling hot type metal is tak-
en from a cauldron and pour-
ed against, the matrix mounted
in the casting machine. When
the metal cools, the casting box
is opened, the mat. removed and
there remains a duplicate of
the flat'page of.type, but now
in the form of a curved- plate.
This is the printing plate.


F


fent our floor sanders, edgers, pollah, portable 4ndma"
and paint sprayert


____ __ I


Kem-Tone


Quality Homes


Call For


Quality Plastering



Lots of beautiful houses continue to
be built in Sarasota and-Surgnier
& Waldron, do nearly all the big'
jobs.


We just finished The News, a, Cath-
olic School and the Margaret Ann
Super-Market in Bradenton, and


the


Bickford Motel


Gulf did t he

road signs for

THE NEWS ;.


SIGNS


I -. -


I i I U


that SkLL,.


This shop'has been in business


'V


at the same location for twenty
years. Each year we add new
-'friends, new customers, be"
cause we serve them well. If'
you need signs, of any kind,n s-
call 3-7321.


on Eighth


Street.


We will be glad to make a -free estimate on your
next job.


Surgnier & Waldron


- 4
I .1


GULF SIG NS


1556 STATE STREET

AD-VER-TIS-ER


Bradenton


RE IS THE OLD DUDE'RANCH, well-remembered by man
Kent S. McKinley as the site for THE NEWS' newspa per pl
de as well as out!


,- ~-.1.


"I




'1
-


1815 Second Avenue East


Wallpapers
Keys Duplicated
Waxes
Do-It-Yourself
Accessories


I-I 1 T


COX PAINTS.

42 WaMnmLWt,


Phone 3-7231


w


'- '/


7


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Zage 8. .TE NEWS Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1954



Circulation Departrent:
1 V T/ A


These Eight Men, Each With A Separate Section Of Sarasota,

Keep Your NEWS Coming Daily, In Sunshine And Sh! Rain


Robert Burns Bosses

District Men, Carriers


ROBERT C. BURNS.

Phil Lauth Is Aide


To Director
Assistant Circulation Director
:fli F. .Lauth is a former.
cago policeman who retired
S tbo Sarasota after 10 years on
-the police force and s 'now op-
erating the Sunny Beach Ap-
artments, Siesta Key, at Mid-
night pass. '
S"'*husky, balding 50, Lauth's
.jfMfAry bearing goes well with
the dapper gray mustache he
sportss to give him the appear-
-3mce of a retired British col-
Although a newcomer to the
newspaper field, Lauth has had
experience in public relations
aid -selling as president and
co-f: -ider of the West Side
; 'a" 'acy Ho -.tal As:ociat-
.1. a CY- 4-o health and med-
ical Ilan that was a forerunner
(Continued On Page 40)


Burns'
"*RERS ^'^"-


IN


Circulation Director Robert
C. Burns. Probably the busiest-
mian on the staff of THIENEWS
in recent weeks has been am-
iable and capable Robert C.
Burns who began his duties as
circulation d i r e c t o r of the
newspaper Aug. 30.
Moving to Sarasota in July,
he purchased a home and im-
mediately plunged into the
many and complex problems
involved in the su c c e s s f u 1
launching of a new newspaper.
To Burns fell the' task of
building a staff of capable dis-
trict circulation men, inter-
viewing prospective c a r r i e r
salesmen and their parents,
mapping routes for delivery
trucks and keeping in almost
constant contact with everyone
in his department..
Bob Burns almost rates as a
native Floridian since he
moved to St. Petersburg from
Cleveland, Ohio when he was
14 years 'of age .He attended
schools in Cleveland and com-
pleted his education in St.
Petersburg.
STARTED AS CARRIER
The circulation department
of a newspaper is Burns' natu-
ral' "beat" since his first job
was as a carrier boy for a
St. Petersburg newspaper in
1927.
Continuing in circulation
work, he became a district
circulation manager for the St.
Petersburg Times in 1927. In
1940 he succeeded Floyd E.
Weidmnan as circulation direct-
or of that paper.
After'14 years with the same
paper, during which time he
compiled an impressive rec-
ord, Burns resigned in June
of this year to take a well-
earned vacation.
The circulation director is
married to the former Caroline
Caldwell of St. Petersburg and
they have four children, one of
whom is with the United States
Army in Korea. Their new


home in Sarasota is at 2084'
Hibiscus St .*
Burns is a member of the
International Circulation Man-
agers Association and the
Southern Circulation Managers
Association.
Building a carrier system
second to none is the immedi-
(Continued On Page 40)


North Side

For Taylor
District Manager William TJ
Taylor. William T. Taylor,
husky, red-faced native of
Gloucester, N. J., is the District
Circulation manager for Dis-
trict 1 for THE NEWS.
The' 47 year old Taylor's
district extends north from
27th St. to Bowlee's Creek and
from the bay east and he has
15 boys under his control to
service the sprawling area .
Prior to joining THE NEWS
organization Taylor spent three
years with the St. Petersburg
Times and a brief stint in the
(Continued On Page 40)


WILLIAM T. TAYLOR


t7 -'9


I

.....
OSBORNE SMITH

Old Story

For Ozzie
Osborne Smith, 29, District
Two Circulation Manager for
THE NEWS, is a carrier circu-
lation man who started at
street level with a paper route
and has served as district cir-
culation manager for the past
four and a half years.
Like other district managers
with THE NEWS, Smith follow-
ed Circulation Director Robert
Burns here from the St. Peters-
burg Times.
A native of St. Petersburg,
Smitty started his newsboy car-
eer with the St. Petersburg In-
dependent and moved to the
Times later, carrying papers
throughout his. grade and high
school days.
SERVED IN PACIFIC
On graduation from St. Pet-
ersburg High School he joined
the Marine Air Corps and ser-
ved overseas for 15 months
during World War II, taking
part in the Guam and Okinawa
invasions.
While serving as a turret gun-
ner in a Marine TBF torpedo
bomber he earned the Air Med-
al during aerial supply oper-
(Continued On Page 40)


Crenshaw

Has Area Of

South Trail
Art Crenshaw, district circu-
lation manager for THE
NEWS in District Four em-
bracing the South Trail area
south of Waldemere St., is a
32-year-old native of Trilby,
Fla.
Crenshaw is one'of the crew
of district men who came to
THE NEWS from the St. Pe-
tersburg Times.
While working in .the circula-
tion department of the St. Pe-
tersburg paper Crenshaw was
in charge of the largest district
in the city with a regular cir-
culation of 5,700 papers.
The husky University of
North Carolina alumnus got his
first taste of newspapering as
a re-touch artist and cartoon-
ist with the Times before go-
ing to college.
While a student at the uni-


ART CRENSHAW


versity he worked for a chain
of North and South Carolina
theaters, as an assistant man-
ager and later as a projection-
ist.
A football star and all-around
(Continued On Page 40)


i
I
a


t
I

S
C


Siesta Key :

For Du Tilly e
William Du Tilly circulation
Manager in District Five for
TIE NEWS, has 13 .news boys
under his supervision serving
the beach areas, Siesta Key,
Nokomis, Osprey anl Venice. p
The burly 59-year-old ex- 0'
college baseball and' hockey
player was' in the circulation
department of Phe St. Peters-
berg Times for eight and a
half years as a carrier, super-
visor and district manager and
before moving to Florida in
1945 he was in the circulation
department of his home town .
paper, the Providence (R.I.)
Journal and Bulletin.
Between his newspaper jobs
Du Tilly worked as a night
foreman in the Pratt and
Whitney airplane engine plant
in Providence and operated a
taxi and livery service.
After attending LaBalle
Academy in Providence Where at
he played baseball and foot- t'
ball, Du Tilly matriculated at in
Brown University and after
two years transferred to li
LaVal University, Montreal, it
(Continued On Page 40)


Circulation.

Not New

To Holler
Walter Holler, News 'Olrcu-
ation Manager for District
Three in mid-Sarasota, comes
here from Toledo, Ohio, with
stop-offs in Cleveland, Ohio,
nd St. Petersburg.
Holler's nine years as a cir-
culation man were divided be-
ween six years with the St.
Petersburg Times and three
years with the Toledo Blade,
Born in Toledo, he moved to
Cleveland with his familt-vIile
still in high school apd gru-
Lted from school in Cleva --
Prior to entering- he i
paper circulation field-. lh' o
rated a building contraotng
irm in Cleveland.
Holier moved to St.
urg nine years ago and oper-


WALTER BXLXL
ted a lauiy Owin ou
turning to nwmpepm
Ad aniedat
kes to fsh and l
a staunch t o
(Continuied u Paug


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Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1954 THE NEWS Page 37

These Operators, Make-Up Men, Compositors, Printers And Pressmeth

anicalD epartm en t Set Into Type And Print Your ew Daily Newspaper Each Day


HAROLD SHORMAN
!


Mark Green, Jr. Keeps

NEWS Machines Going


Machinist Mark Green Jr.
Newspaper work just comes
naturally for Mark Gree4 Jr.,
.25, machinist for THE NEWS.
H- grew up in the country
newspaper. business and began
making "pigs," the metal in-
gots used. in typesetting ma-
ch4ies a'out the time he start-
ed to ec-3rl.
All during his school years
h < -. -,ed with all p:laes of
r. "c-zr work during his
.. t e and upon gradua-
i f" i the bhgh school at
U.. he entered the
;,. i.-per business on a full
time basis.
For more than six years he
was shop foreman of the Wa-
.pllo, Iowa, Republican, and
for the last year has been night
(Continued On Page 40)


MARK GREEN, JR.


Harold Shorman Bossesl

Newest, Modern Plant
Mechanical Superintendent printing equipment necessary,
Harold Shorman The final in the publication of a news-,
success of any newspaper de- paper.
pends to a large extent on the He was also instrumental in:
speed and accuracy with which recruiting the mechanical de-i
the stories written by the re- apartment staff on which the
porters and the advertisements operation will depend.
ea- f innrin otni t +ad thfana. -r


are seOin pr.in. anu e papCer
rolled from the presses and
THE NEWS is fortunate in hav-


Sing a high-caliber mechanical
Department superintendent who
Scan deliver.
Shorman, who is 48 years
old, comes to THE NEWS with-
33 years of experience in all
.phases of the mechanical pro-
duction of a newspaper and is
qualified by experience and*
i training to' head this important
Department.
FROM WAUKEGAN
A native of Waukegan, Ill.,
Shorman went to work in the
composing room of the. former
Waukegan News in 1921 and
was on hand to get the first
edition on the street.
He remained with the late
Frank H. Just, publisher of
Sthe Waukegan News, when the
latter purchased the Waukegan
Sun and for many years
was in charge of the "ad al-
ley" on the Waukegan News-
Sun, setting up in print the
display advertisements.
His oldest son, Harold Shor-"
man Jr., is still with that pa-
per in the engraving depart-*
ment.
Shorman retired from the
News-Sun in 1952 and moved
to Ft. Pierce where he intend-
ed to take life easy, but soon
felt the urge to get back in
harness and took over the me-
chanical department of the
Ft. Pierce News-Tribune.
His success in developing
the mechanical department of
the News-Tribune attracted
the attention of the organizers
of THE NEWS who persuaded
him to take over the press-
room and composing room of
the new paper.
One of the first men hired
by the new organization,
Shorman's first task was to
purchase the wide range of


Copy from the editorial de-
partment, News service, fea-
tures, classified ads, display
ads and all the other printed
matter which goes into a news-,
paper flows across the me-
chanical superintendent's desk.
and its passage through the
Intertype machines, the mat-
rix, lead plates, casting mach-
ines and finally the presses, is
checked carefully by him to
avoid errors.
The acceptance of a new
paper by the general public
depends to a large extent on
the number of typographical
errors and bonerss" which ap-
pear in the paper and Shor-
man is determined that his
department will be an impor-
tant factor in the ready ac-
ceptance of THE NEWS.
The genial, stocky plant su-
perintendent is on hand for
the birth of his third news-
paper. He has two sons, Har-
old Jr., and Norman. He and
his wife, Margaret, celebrated
their 31st wedding anniversary
on Oct. 6.

Remember NEWS

Correspondents!
News items and tips received
by all correspondents for THE
NEWS will be greatly appre-
ciated and handled just as rap-
idly as possible.
Readers can greatly aid cor- 1
respondents in all communities
by contacting them as soon as 0
possible with any items they
may have for publication. P
THE NEWS has hired a very
able group of correspondents
in the various communities to 1
be served by this newspaper,
but a great many tips for news
stories must come from the (
readers themselves.


Pri

Is.

Brc
Opera
er, a tr
virtually
of ink


-a- up mi
weekly
his fath
He c
from
working
at Shel
In ad
ii. ..... father,
ORVILLE M. ESPEY printer'
owned

Espey Sets weekly
During
News Heads Spap
true to
Operator Orville M. Espey, he has
29 year old native of Birming- past, a
ham, Ala., became a printer in Douj
in 1944 and his first. job with An ai
a newspaper was on the St. came a
er to r
Petersburg Times. e o
Just before he came to the wa aB
was a i
composing room of THE the E
NEWS, where he is working Church,
as a machine operator, Espey the Kni
He a
put in one year in the compos- Hea
ing room of the Miami News. are noi
He left the St. PetersburgLinda
Times in 1950 and moved to
Ann Arbor, Mich., where he
worked for a time in the stu-
dent publications plant\at the
University of Michigan.
SAW SERVICE
Later the same year he
moved to Waukegan, Ill.,
where he worked in the plant
of the Waukegan News-Sun
under his present boss Harold
Shorman, plant superintendent
)f THE NEWS.
Espey saw service in the
Navy during World War II and
was stationed aboard the
battleships USS Texas and
JSS Iowa in the European .
Theatre. -
He received a medical dis- ';
charge after more than three j..--.L .
years of service. LOU


nt Shop

Home To

>dhecker
itor Lou Allen Brodheek-
ansplanted Hoosier, was
y born with the smell
in his nostrils and grew
the print shop of a
newspaper operated by
Ler in Brownstown, Ind.
comes to THE NEWS
Greenville, Ohio after
g on dailies there and
byville, Ind.
edition to working for his
where he learned the
s trade, Brodhecker
and published his own
paper in Middletown,

ig most of his news-
career the 50-year-old
e operator remained
the printer's trade, but
one dark chapter in his
brief stint as a reporter
glas, Ariz.
ardent fisherman, he be-
in amateur photograph-
ecord his catches.
e moving to Sarasota he
member of the Board of
Brownstown Methodist
the Lions Club and
rights of Pythias.
nd his wife, Blanche,
w living at 1646 Loma
it.


IRVING APGAR

Apgar Sets


NEWS Ads


Printer Irving
year-old 'Navy
World War II,


Apgar, 2'-
veteran 'of
began his


career as a printer eight years
ago and is now working on his
third newspaper.
Apgar, a slender, blonde na-
tive of Bloomsbury,'N. J., was
introduced to the printing trade
while a student at Phillipsburg,
(N. J.) High School where the
print shop students printed and
published the school paper.
During World War II he en-
listed in the Navy .and served
aboard the USS Selfridge, a
destroyer, for two years, dur-
ing most of which time the
ship was assigned to convoy
escort duty in the Atlantic
Ocean.
GOES TO ST. PETERSBURG
Following his discharge from
the Navy he turned to printing
as his trade and worked in the
mechanical department of the
St. Petersburg Times for six
years.
Returning north he worked
for two years on the Clarks-
burg, W. Va. Exponent be-
fore coming to THE NEWS.
Married and the father of a
six-year-old daughter and a
year-and-a-half old son, Apgar
is now living on Arlington Ave.


jMr. Heon

SMade Up

This 'Page
Printer George Hen,. 33
[year-old New Hampshire na-.
Stive, is one of the page make-
up men in the composing room
of THE NEWS and will be re-
sponsible for seeing that stories
and ads are in their propel1
places in the page forms be-
fore they 'Are released to the
stereotypers.
A veteran of 16 years in the
printing trade Heon worked in
-nh orintin shor n he fore taJir-


ing his first job on a newspaper
in St. Petersbirg 10 years ago.
In St. Petersburg where he is
still living, he worked in the
composing : room of the "St.
Petersburg Independent for
eight years and at The Timtes
for two years. :
During World War II .'ie
served in the Navy as a gun-
nery inst-uctbr .
Since moving to St. Peters-
burg he has been active in the:
Cub Scout movement and was
also a member of various vet-


erans organizations and the
Loyal Order of Moose. .
,Hebo, "his wife Beatrice and
their nine year old son Larry'
expect to move to Sarasota in'
the 'near future.
et-r n vi


S.


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Chilled water eouinment.


,, .."
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DONALD S.
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See below; The attractive restl
dence of Mr. and Mrs. Ben J.
Drymon in Harbor Acres. Built
in 1950 and' equipped, this
Spring, with Chrysler *Airtemp
Air Conditioning.


a


ir Comfort,
KILBY, President HERBE]
'hone RIngling 4-0151 1934 Hillview St
We Have Our Own Co mplete shop f<


RT F.
reet
acilitii


New Sarasota Memorial Hospital
The Episcopal Church of The Redeemer
/The Orange Blossom Hotel
The News
The De Sota Bank, Arcadia, Florida
The Dick & Meadows Rexall Drugstore
Venice, Florida


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Churches
Offices
Stores of all Kinds
Manufacturing Plants
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Inc.
ALWARD, Vice President

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The home of Mr. and Mrs. John H. Kauffmas
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Page 3s THE NEWS Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1954


THOMAS TAYLOR HOOD


I Tom Hood

iSets Type
: peratre Thomas .Taylor,
Hood, 19, pf Harris County,
Ga., works on: the battery of
Intertype machines in the com-
posing room" of THE NEWS,
and will share responsibility
for the accuracy and appeaik-
', ance of the new paper.
SBoIrn hi Harris County the
Slim, dark-haired o'p e r a t o r
grew up in Troop County, Ga.
where he participated in the
county 4-H Club program while
in high school .
His first newspaper job was
in the circulation department
of the LaGrange (Ga.) Daily
News while still in school and
three years ago he moved into
the composing room of the
paper where he learned the
printing trade.
SH and his wife, Sarah, will
celebrate their first wedding
anifiersary Dec. 6.
The Intertype machine oper-
ators set up. the perforated
tape punched by the teletype-
setters and also set the copy
for ads, headlines, and other
copy that is not set up on the
tape machines.


Maynard's

A Devil


Apprentice Jerrold John May-
nard. The smell of printer's
ink, which first entered the
Snostrils of Jerrold John May-
nard as a print shop student in
high school, has led him to the
composing room of THE NEWS
'where he is employed as a
printer's apprentice, 'or, in
' composing room language,
"printer's devil.'
The 19-year-old Sarasota
High School graduate moved to
the "Air Conditioned City" a
S year ago, with his grandpar-
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles
Mayiard and lives with 'them
at Colonial Terrace 'Subdivi-
sion.
:The job of printer's appren-
ticeembraces many duties, not
the least of which is being the
target of pressroom and com-
Sposing room practical jokes,
. many of which are legendary
in newspaper circles.
The post will also train the
youngster for a lucrative and
interesting profession.
Like many of his fellow
workers on THE NEWS, Jery
got his first taste of newspapei-
ing as a newsboy in ,his home
town of Newark, N. Y., the
"Rose Capital of the World."
Jerry has his eye on ing to
college,,. but' wants to 'et a
taste of working before he de-
cides when and where he will
go.
Gasoline does not have a
chemical formula. It is not a
fixed, stable compound-it, is a
c combination of them--and so
has no chemical formula,
'The port of Vladivostok is
Frozen about three months of
the year, but can be kept open
by icebreakers.
The United States post office
has some 41,000 branch offices.


~t 4 A' '-'..t.wrw"" ~


ROBERT H. HILL


develop his hobby of tinker-
ing with radios ,into a part-
time sideline occupation.
Active in athletics in high
school he is still interested in
sports and hopes to be able
to play baseball, -softball; and
basketball with some Sarasota
team.


Bass JoiIs


Press Force
Pressman Vernon Lee Bass
Coin-collecting is the principal
leisure activity Uof the 27-year-
old pressman in THE NEWS
mechanical department and
one of the few native Sara-
sotans on the staff.
The Korean and World War
II veteran's collection of old
and rare coins got a substan-
tial boost during World War II
when he obtained the personal
collection of a Japanese officer
who had been shot and killed
by Bass' buddy.
Bas joined the Merchant
Marine early in World War II,
but switched to the Army after
his ship was torpedoed and
sunk off the coast of Alaska.
SARASOTA ATHLETE
His Army career in. World
War II and the Korean con-
flict took him to 43 states and
18 foreign countries and he
saw action in the South Paci-
fic carrying wounded from the
beaches to hospital ships and
in the fighting in Korea.
An all-around athlete at


VERNON LEE BASS
Sarasota V vocational High
School, he was Southern Flori-
da Conference Boxing cham-
pion during his senior year.
A machinist and mechanic
by training, he is trying his
hand in the'newspaper field
for the first time.
,Bass, his wife, Elosia, whom
he married two years ago, and
their one child live in their own
home in Osprey.


Bob Hill

A St. Pete

Compositor
Compositor Robert H. Hill,
a native of St. Petersburg,
reached the composing room
of THE NEWS by, way of
Hastings, Mich., and Detroit,
Mich.
A compositor, the 26-year-old
Hill will concentrate on setting
up the display advertisements
in the new publication under
the direction of Plant Superin-
tendent Harold Shorman.
After graduating from St.
Petersburg High School he
moved to Hastings, where the
family of his wife, Donna,
lives.
STARTS IN JOB PLANT
While in Hastings he launched
his career as a printer on the
Hastings Banner and then
moved to Detroit where he was
employed in the print-shop of
the Michigan Rotary Co., a
job printing plant.
His wife and their two
daughters, Susan, 9, and Me-
lissa, 2, are still in Hastings,
but plan to rejoin him shortly.
At the present time Hill is
taking a course in radio' and
television repair and hopes to


Pressroom
Head Pressman Philip C.
Eaton. Philip C. Eaton, 27,
press department foreman for
THE NEWS, is in Sarasota by
a sort of accident.
Coming to Florida last
spring, he looked the state
over carefully and decided to
locate in Sarasota whether or
not he could continue in his
favorite occupation of printing.
Soon after arrival here he
heard of THE NEWS and im-
mediately contacted. officials
of the newspaper. He went to
work Aug. 2, helping with the
erection of the 24-page Hoe
press.
Philip is iparried to the for-
mer Roberta Waldorff of Fre-
donia, N. Y., and they have two
children, Douglas, 5, and Cris-
tine, 3. Their home is at 1245
32nd St.
Eaton, lived in or near Dun-
kirk, N. Y., for 18 years. He
received his education there
and is a graduate of the Fre-
donia High School.
SERVED VITH 'NAVY
During World War II, he
served with the United States
Navy aboard the aircraft car-
rier USS Princeton. A pump
room operator aboard the, big
ship, Eaton served in the Navy
from 1944 until his discharge
in 1946.
Eaton learned. his trade in,
the commercial printing plant
of the Great Lakes Color Print-
ing Co. in Dunkirk, where
multi-color printing jobs were
every-day routine.
His main hobby is hunting,
a sport he enjoyed in New
York state every season. He's
looking forward to the coming
hunting season in Florida, al-
though he admits he'll have to
learn the ropes down here.
"I like this section of Florida,
Phil told a reporter, "and am
certainly proud to have had a
part in the launching of this
new newspaper."


r 14 -*:' .- ,,.

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LAWRENCE BASS

BassGuards

NEWSPlant
WATCHMAN -Law-
rence Bass, 49 year old night-
watchman and general main-
tenance man with THE NEWS,
is a member of one of the fath-
er-son combinations on the new
paper.
His son, Vernon, is a print-
er in the composing room and
he also has another son and a
son-in-law in the production end
of the Orlando Sentinel-Star. A
third son is a carpenter in Sar-
asota.
Born in Sylvester, Ga., Bass
came to Sarasota almost 30
years ago, accompanying his
father who travelled as a rail-
road cross-tie sawyer.
BECOMES PAINTER
After an early career on var-
ious jobs he became a painter,
retiring from this line a few
months ago except for special
jobs for old customers.
Bass and his wife, Essie, own
their own home in Osprey where
they are members of the Bap-
tist church.
He is an ardent fisherman
and strangely enough prefers
fishing for bass .


JOSEPH JOHN MARCO
JOSEPH JOHN MARCO


Coliseum here and in fights in
Miami, West' Palm 'Beach,.
Tampa, and Ft. Myers.
Sinbe his retirement from the
ring he keeps in shape, by
weight-lifting and by working
out on the horizontal and par-
allel bars.
The stocky general handy-
man and his wife, Frances,
live at 1817 E. Sixth St. with
their sons, John Joseph, 12,
and James Allen, 10, and their
daughter, Julie Ann, 11
months.
He is a member of St. Mar-


that's Parish.
The Brazilian bellbird, a
white bird about the size of a
pigeon, derives its name from
the sound it makes-like a
hammer on an anvil.
There are a hWt V000' min l


ranches in the United States


Engineer

A Former

Fighter
Building Engineer Joseph
John Marco, 41-year-old for-
mer professional fighter, is
responsible for the general'up-
keep and maintenance of the
plant.
Born in Philadelphia. Marco
came here more than 20 years
ago to visit and has remained
ever since.
A veteran construction work-
er Marco has a variety of
skills to-'bring into play in
keeping the plant in operation.
FOUGHT, PROFESSIONALLY
As a youth he fought pro-
fessionally as a welterweight
and lightweight and was fea-
tured at the American Legion
... .. .. ..... .. I-- ..


I
PHILIP C. EATON

Phil Heads


ALL OF THE


MASONRY WORK


0


and the

artistic


Reid Works

On Press
Pressman Kenneth Herlin
Reid.
Like most newspapermen,
Reid, pressman and stereotyper
for THE NEWS, got his start
in the business as a newsboy
and graduated to driving a
circulation truck in his home
town of Norfolk, Va.
A 32-year-old veteran of
World War II, in 'which he ser-
ved as an aviation engineer,
Reid tried several other lines
of work before and after service
but always returned to his first
love, the newspaper business.
WORKED IN BRADENTON
On completion of his tour of
duty at the Air Force Tactical
Training Center, Orlando, in
1946, Reid went to work for the
Orlando Sentinel, remaining
there for three years.
From Orlando he moved to
the Bradenton Herald for a
brief period and then went back
to his home town to take a job
as an aircraft engine mechanic
at the Naval Air Station, Nor-
folk.
The young father of two boys
moved to Sarasota ini 1951 and
worked in print shops here.and
on heating and television in-
stallations before becoming as-
sociated with THE NEWS.
. During his Air Force service
he spent two years in Iceland
and Greenland.
As a pressman and steroty-
per he will take the pages'set
up -ipprint by, the printers, roll
them out on a matrix sheet
and then cast the lead plates
whick go on the press.


_____,____ ______"_______--_______________ .'
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FOR BEAUTY AND PERFORMANCE!


See Us For


''9







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*y


Ornamental Iron Work Of All Types And Designs


wI;( h:A S;JA t L&' J


rorcn ouppor
Wrought Iron Railings
Room Dividers
Custom Furniture Peices
Ornamental Planters-
Inside and Outside Grills


SPECIALIZED WELDINH
AiIIlinitm
Cast Iron
Stainless Steel
Brazing
Silver Solder


Are and Acetylene Welding


WE REPAIR:
Trucks
Tractors
Trailers
All Types of Automotive Welding


CONSTRUCTION WORK:
Portable Equipment
Emergency Work
Shallow Diving Equipment
Service Day and Night


Ornamental stair railing just recently7installed in the beautiful home
of Mr. and Mrs. Martin S. Nadelmanr on Benjamin Franklin Drive in Lido
Shores.


1201 NORTH LIME AVE.
Corner of Lime Ave. and 12th Street .


Business Coals -,6-7461
Emegeeu..r Calls -0301


- a.


WE OFFER -A COMPLETE WELDING SERVICE:

"We Mend Anything But A Broken Heart"

W. R. Barr, Mgr..



SARASOTA WELDING & SUPPLY CO.


NEWS Plant Completely Modern
Newspaper plants today are plants in the country, moderning room all news matter is
a far cry from the crudely and mechanized in every re- converted into type and gath- .
equipped and inefficiently run spect." ered into pages. Next the stea-
shops of a few years ago. Mod- All mechanical equipment of eotypers take over and from
ern machinery and methods THE NEWS is housed in a the flat type make semi-cyliaU-
have invaded the stronghold large hangar type building drical forms to fit onto the ro-
of the individual printer, turn- connected to the Lime Ave. tary press. Then the plates afp
ing today's newspaper into an editorial and business offices. fitted onto the press and THI-
efficiently and swiftly pro- Here news is converted to NEWS is ready to roll.
duced operation, type, processed for the huge Here in Mr. Shorman's me-
By planning THE NEWS presses and then printed at re- chanidal world are found not
mechanical plant from blue- markable speeds on the ro- only the newest in machinery /'
print to finished installation, tary press. but also many of the innovr
Mechanical Superintendent The mechanical plant is tions resulting 1rom his 3t-,-
Harold H. Shorman has built broken into three main parts: year association with t-he .
what he calls "one of. the fin- composing, stereotyping a nd Waukegan Ill., News-Sun, and '
est newspaper mechanical press rooms. In the compose the Fort Pierce News-Tribumne..',


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KENNETH REID


The New Building of
MARDone By




Ph ne- -.8
CRAFTSMANSHIP K'~:




The New Building of


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Done By ._ ., .



HARRY D. ALBER ^'




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Tiyesetter

Supervisor

RiVeteran i
S'p.'.'BrvIsr 'Thelma, Virginia i,
I, JiBtra~p. Thlelma Virginia Ben-
'tiRi; it 25 years experience
'Qn pwa, loaers and a$ a press .
;ir..' rator, is the super- :
"t iia ".' "the battery of tele-.
tye .et .ii operators of THE

l' Bentrup, a native of i
'~ep.s her newspaper.'
d ieotree with' the Portland n d
i 19* ip~l9;~ s the .
P'' 't. woienan press wire oper- ..
,_f hirq Mon tme Pacific Coast MARY JANE HENRY
.9 ., Associated Preps. Prior
i .tha t :she' had been a' West- !
-k aer Mrs. henry's
arn Teeii'P ion; operator. oer s
'r .fraeir.eer includes stint
-tbe. United. Press, Inter- H t, o
'al \ews Service, and e .. L e .I I
art newspa"sps in addition ,
o thie .Oregonig d he lalsoI Mary Jane Henry, Teletype-
Sbrliefly as a tel grapiher setter, a New Hampshire lass
Missouri Pacific Rail- who first "saw, and was con-
quered by Sarasota in 1943, is
e'nthrele came to Sara-eone of the attractive array of
.three ,and a half years teletypesetter operators on
St..Iois,' Mo., with teletypesetter operators o n
foa -St.. Lois,o Mo., with
THE NEWS.
Although this is her first
newspaper job Mrs .Henry has
an office background, having
worked ~s a bookkeeper for
the Gulf, Coast Gas Co., and
the Sarasota Flower Shop.
She made her first visit to
Sarasota in 1943 to join her
father who was stationed with
the Army Air. Force at the
Sarasota-Bradenton Airport.
She fell in love with the
town, returning to the White
'Mountains of her native Clare-
mont, N. H. only once since
that time.
%! She and her husband, Sara-
sota native William H. Henry,
who operates a ceranric tilet
.:' business with his mother, were
V. RUP married here in June, 1948 and
V R have two daughters .
Harty Bentrup, Although her daughters keep


MARIE E. MUEL'.ER
V '*,.- ..' '*"- ',".




i. -.- .




















Sypesetter
...Teletfpesetter Mrs. Marie E.
Iteller, ,is one of those people
W hd have had the opportunity
o a resident of both Cali-
tfoi ia and Florida, but she's
i'hlectant to draw any com-
iadson. -
'. (uardedly, she admits that
thereee are things I like about
alifornia' and things I like
_bout Florida."
Mrs. Mueller is neither a
Califorpian nor a Floridian,
though, but a native of Akron,
SOhio. Here she spent her child-
hood and worked at her first
job, as a stenographer for the
aircraft division of Goodyear
Tire and Rubber Co.
Before she was 20, she trav-
eled with a girl friend to Cali-
fornia and there worked for the
'Pinkerton Detective Agency.
She soozi made the acquaint-
anice of Detective Fred C.
Mueller and although it was
against*the rules of the agency
" for detectives and office staff
to mingle, Marie and Fred
carried out a secret courtship.
When they were married, Fred
%was promoted to assistant su-
perintendent, because he had
kept his courtship a secret
from his fellow detectives.
Marie went to work for Good-
. year Co. in California after she
was married, and worked for
them for five years. During this
period she left to have her
first child Karen in -1948. In
August, 1952 her second girl,
Lori, was born.
The Muellers moved to Sara-


her busy, Mary Jane still finds
time to go swimming frequent-
ly and also spends as much
Lime as, possible watching tele-
vision.
She and her husband are
planning to .start construction
soon on their own home here.


Julia Runs

Perforator ,
Teletypesetter Julia Broad,
28-year-old North Carolinan
who has been' in Sarasota for
the past two years is one of
the battery of young ladies who
set the type for THE NEWS.
This is. the attractive dark-
'skinned brunet's first experi-
ence on a' newspaper, but be-
fore coming to Florida she
worked as secretary for 'the
mayor of her hometown, Dunn,
N. C.
Julia and her husband, Dan,
a construction worker, came to
Sarasota on the advice of Army
medical men after he was
given a medical discharge
from the Army.
They now own their own
home at 1810 Fruitville Rd.,
where Mrs. Broad spends her
spare time preparing unusual
and exotic dishes as a pleasant
and, for her husband, very sat-
isfying hobby.,
Teletypesetters o'p e r a t e
special machines which punch
out on perforated tape. the
* '


Pentagon

Typist N

Typesette
Teletypesetter Lyn
Lyn Morris, 23-year-ol
typesetter, is a nat
Alexandria, Va., and c
Sarasota.' with her hi
Jack, who is attending
Ringling Art School un<
GI Bill of Rights.
Before coming .to Sa
Lyn was employed as
at the Pentagon build
Washington.


)W


An ardent outdoor gi
attended Syracuse Uni
where she majored in
and television.
As a teletypesetter, L
punch out copy provided
porters and THE NEW

r ta ..


LYN MORRIS


ices on a special tape.
then run through the in
machines and cast int
She and her: husba
living at 1183 Virginia D
the art school.


She Joinm


Glamor R
Teletypesetter 1 Ki
Palmer, a Texan by. bi
a Sarasotah by choice
member of ."lamor s


or-he teletypesetter staff as
it is more normally known on
THE NEWS...
Born, in easf Texas, Mrs.
Palmer came 'to Sarasota eight
years ago.: nd -nw makes her
home at' 279' Proeect Ave.
with her seven year old son'
Michael Duane.
Trained in secretarial work
and a former employee of the
city water department she is
making her debut in the news-
paper field as a teletypesetter
operator.
A, willowy redhead, Mrs.
Palmer is an ardent outdoor
enthusiast aiid. "loves to hunt
anrhing that moves and is
legal 'to hunt."'
She also goes in strong for
fishing and during the seasodi
she bowls a very strong game.


Everyone who visits THE


r NEWS composing room is in-
terested in the way that type
Morris. is cast for each issue. Without
d tele- modern equipment it would be
ive of almost impossible to produce
S this issue of THE NEWS.. '
ae, to The L.udlow enables us to
isband, produce our paper more rapid-
g t he ly, and to give our readers and
der the advertisers a more interesting,
easier-to-read newspaper.
Lrasota, We doubt ii any one sub-
I typist scriber to THE NEWS reads
ring in every word of our paper. Of
course, different peop read
rl, Lyn different things, and every
diversity issue of THE NEWS is -very
radio well read,,, considerably more
so, in fact, than many metro-
,yn will politan newspapers, for THE
I by re- NEWS is the Sarasota home
S serv- 'newspaper.
In order that our readers
may choose what they want to
read, we' us6 headlines and-
,captions in 'type larger than
S that used for reading matter
to call attention to particular
Features in our paper. Large
Stype is the flag that indicates
That here is something 'that
may be of interest. It saves an
untold amount of time and ef-
fort for our readers.'
EMPHASIS
All-important em phasi s,
which helps THE NEWS read-
er is obtained by using dif-
: ferent kinds and 'sizes' of type
The machine which casts slugs'
for this large type is the Lud-
low machine. Although this
machine occupies but a few.
square feet of floor space, the
Ludlow operator can produce
in a remarkably short time
that is almost any kind and size of dis-
Ltertype play type in solid lines ready to
d print. be used. The Ludlow machines
nd are now in use are for this reason,
)r. near' perhaps. the m mo S t useful
machines in THE NEWS conm-
Spsing room.
SIn the early days--even now
in unprogressive plants-single
types were set ond by one. Thi
OTW is .' slow and tedious process.'
With the Ludlow system of
athrlne producing printing material,;
rth and the Ludlow* operator, instead
Sis a of setting type, assembles only
lerv" th6 bra s, molds for casting a.


solid line of letters on a slug. know it is a matter of selecting
When he has enough molds for the right kind and size of type
a line of reading matter, the lines for proper emphasis to
molds (or matrices) with m a k e attractive advertise-
spaGes between the words are ments. Our composing. room
placed in a special older cooperates ,with advertisers
which is inserted in the Lud- and gives them just what they
low casting inachine. A lever want, largely, because we'have
is pressed and out comes a the Ludlow system which pro-
shiny, mint-new slug, ready for vides almost any conceivable
instant use. kind of letters, in the desired'
SIMPLICITY size, without depriving one ad-.
Be eof the ity of vertiser because th e typeface
tBe ause.of system, sandpit had been used somewhere else.
the Ludlowsystm, .d the The full facilities of the com-
ease of changing from one size
or kind oftypeto another, this posing room are available to
method of producing typelr, ines each and ever customer an
method of roducingtypelines our advertisers appreciate this
is fast and very flexible. This atre
ear 4. i I feature.


feature makes it possible to
have interesting and inviting
pages of reading and. adver-
tising in THE NEWS.
THE NEWS advertisers are
enthusiastic boosters of our
composing room where' 41 the,
type for our paper is set. They


Papers


Home A


Beehivei
Editors often speak in fancy
of "putting a paper together"
when in fact it is the men.,in
th'e newspaper composing room
who do the real work of con-
verting 'a. welter of paper-
bound words into hard type.
The, composing room of THE
NEWS is a .hive of craftsmen
running a variety of peculiar
inachines and organizing type
-into orderly newspaper pages.-
Their entire job is. t make
printable what newsmen or ad-'
vertisers have written.;
Logically speaking, the type-
setting machines arb the be.
ginning of the composing room.
All- news stories and advertis.-
ing,material coming from 'the
writers and reporters are sent
to the five Intertype maachines,
which' resemble nothing so
much as wierdly overgrown
typewriters. Three of these ma-
chines 'a. run, automatically
by perforated tapes, producing
10' lines of type each minute-
without an operator. The other
two machines, are operated
manually, and are'used chief-
ly to-eet advertising material"
As the lines of type are .et4
by. the machines they are
gathered together into metal
trays, called galleys, and de-
livered to a dump, or gathering
table.
Here from specially designed
storage cabinets are brought
together all printing material
for the newspaper reading
matter, headlines, pictures,.
cartoons and advertisements..
When each page is completed
it .is locked inside, an iron
frame, or chase,- on top of its
turtle and rolled to the stereo-
type room where the actual
printing plates are made.


GOOD PAVING '

Is q


GOOD INVESTMENT


S DENNIS KIGER
PreJden


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stories produced by the re-
porters and other copy which
goes into' the newspaper.
This tape is then run through
the Intertype machines which
set the taped copy in print.


sota in 1953 and joined Marie's
sister and brother-in-law, who
were already established in the
city. They are currently living
on Swift Rd., Phillipi Creek,
but have their own home al-
most completed.
Mrs. Mueller keeps busy in
her spare time as secretary of
the Colony chapter of Kappa
Delta Phi, a club group de-
voted to charitable work.


t Us Pave"


-YOUR Way"


with the fiest qlity of

workmanship and materials

* STREETS, ALLEYS

* DRIVEWAYS

* SERVICE STATIONS

* PARKING AREAS.

Come in and talk over your
Paving Problems with Us!


/
-.


I ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ U ...' *a ~~ .. :....C. x ',.. ..o.U


BLACKBURN PAVING
INCORPORATED

Plant & Office:1310 Central Ave. Ph. 3-2221 Sarasota

v .


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Few outside the composing
room realize the importance of
spacing material. When it is
realized that all the white
space in the newspaper, be-
tweeh the lines of type, and
everywhere else with a few
exceptions, such as margins,
has to be filled with\ spacing
material, the. importance of an
ample supply for this purpose
is readily apparent. This is es-
pecially'true in the, building of
advertisemeflts.' -
MEASTRE1ENTS ./ '
Printers' measurements are
figured on the point -system, 'in
which an inch is divided into
72 parts, each part represent-
ing one ,point of space'. Metal
strips of different lengths and
of ,various point-thickness are
used for spacing. The Elrod
machine installed in THE
NEWS composing room now
makes these strips of material
in various thickness, such as 2-
point, 6-point, etc. Before the
installation of the E]rod ma-
chine, spacing material and
rules were purchased outside
the plant, so it is easy to see
the economy and convenience
of having a machine capable
of makifig these materials
right under our own roof.
In addition to furnishing
spacing material in endless
quantity, the Elrod machine
produces rules of various
kinds, which are used for bor-
ders around advertisements,
for column rules, and for other
uses throughout the paper. Aft-
er the paper is printed, the
whole page of metal-Ludldw
type lines, reading matter,
rules, spacing material, and
all-is dumped into the melting
pot. This method of operation
in more economical than sort-
'ing materials for re-use.
COMPACT
SThe Elrod machine is a com-


Wednesday, Oct. 6, 1954 THE NEWS Pag^ 3S


NewDevices Save Workmen Time And


pact, self-contained unit, five
feet long, three feet wide and
about four feet high at the high-
est.point, At one end, there is
a large crucible, in which type-
metal alloy is melted for gas.
After the metal is molten, a
plunger forces the metal into
a water-cooled mold. Strips of
spacing material and rules are
made simply by pulling a con-
tinuous strip from the mold as
the metal cools and takes on
thd contour of the inside of the
mold. An'attachment on the


Announces that Mr. Rdbert E.

Engel has joined the staff-as sales-"

man. '
.i.. .,,

rhis addition to our pers"irnelwil l

prove an ini.portunt forward step 3


in our 'service to couaiu-brs b cmd., :
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inaividaul noome DuUaers.
.

Each new person affiliated with -

us is a symbol of growth-i rowt b,

made possible by consistent high i.,

quality worklmirqhip, &keked by -'

unlimited service to the co4hlbt.. 2
". '' -. / *, .-' .
"a
Mr. and Mrs. Terrnio.::'
Ielen and St'ealyW"I:



We were pleased to add .
The News to our 'list tf :: .
c so.. ,- ''
customers. ,. .3 ,'


We Move the Earth



to Make Progress


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We are equipped to hancmle thi ;

big jobs-and are as pleased -,:

to bid on the small ones. '


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Dragline and crane service, eartli

moving equipment, a fleet of

trucks-- yours to command. In

eight years we have built up the

efficient service that comes from
/
highly trained personnel
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Call us for fill dirt


.. op sil.. shell


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Phone 4834-


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Steps '
machine cuts the continuody
drawn material into conv.enMit
lengths and delivers, tl q,'-h
trial on a table. The ~i;p4
is motor driven, and once stait-
ed almost automatic in opera .
ation.
The equipment in'the..coni-
posing room of THE NEWS is
as modern as the lages if iet-
ropolitan newspaper. We giv.-
our readers all the advantages
of attractive reading. imt~e,
produced economicallyy by'e .e
most up-to-date prodfl.etf ''
methods. ..


Free estimates on all jobs. :.
on, :.J'-


Sarasota Excavating & Haulin


4OHN TUNSTALL, Prop
.{


115 West Glengarry Rd.


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