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!-- St. Augustine record ( Newspaper ) --
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OCLC 08807289
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ISSN 1041-1577
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mods:languageTerm text English
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mods:location
mods:physicalLocation University of Florida
UF
mods:note additional physical form Also available on microfilm from Bell & Howell, Micro Photo Division.
dates or sequential designation Vol. 42, no. 29 (Nov. 24, 1935)-
numbering peculiarities Vol. 44, no. 7 also called "Historical restoration issue."
Vol. 49, no. 258 also called "Service edition."
Published by: The Florida Pub. Co., <1988>- .
funding Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
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mods:dateCreated April 25, 1943
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mods:caption 1943
mods:number 1943
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25
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1943
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lccn 93063908
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mods:titleInfo
mods:title St. Augustine evening record
mods:subject SUBJ651_1 lcsh
mods:geographic Saint Augustine (Fla.)
Newspapers
SUBJ651_2
Saint Johns County (Fla.)
Newspapers
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The St. Augustine record
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00048662/00002
 Material Information
Title: The St. Augustine record
Alternate title: Saint Augustine record
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 59-68 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Record Co.
Place of Publication: St. Augustine Fla
Creation Date: April 25, 1943
Publication Date: 1935-
Frequency: daily[<1995>]
daily (except saturday)[ former 1935-<1947>]
daily (except sunday)[ former <1986>]
daily
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Saint Augustine (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Saint Johns County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Saint Johns -- Saint Augustine
Coordinates: 29.894264 x -81.313208 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from Bell & Howell, Micro Photo Division.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 42, no. 29 (Nov. 24, 1935)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 44, no. 7 also called "Historical restoration issue."
Numbering Peculiarities: Vol. 49, no. 258 also called "Service edition."
General Note: Published by: The Florida Pub. Co., <1988>- .
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000405755
oclc - 08807289
notis - ACF1998
lccn - sn 82014947
issn - 1041-1577
System ID: UF00048662:00002
 Related Items
Preceded by: St. Augustine evening record

Full Text

*


Service


*


Edition


*


---


*


Three


*r


Sections


*


m m I


48


*


Pages


*


ST. AUGUSTINE SALUTES OUR MEN AND WOMEN IN UNIFORM


WEATHER TIDES (At Inlet)
St. Augustine and Vicinity: TODAY
Little change in temperature today.
The mercury has ranged from 59 Morning Evening
to 74 degrees. High Low High Low
(Full Report on Page 14) 12:50 6:45 12:59 6:51

ST. AUGUSTINE... FOUNDED IN 15 65...THE NATION'S HISTORIC TREASURE &
VOL. XLIX, NO. 258 ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA, SUNDAY MORNING, APRIL 25, 1943 t PRICE TEN CENTS
VOL. XLIX, NO. 258 Est.blish ST. AUGUSTINE- FLORIDA, SUNDAY MORNING, APRIL 25, 1943 WhileItse PRuCj TEN. rJN1S


. S.


troops Are


losing


In Bizerte


Future Sea Fighters Moulded Here


a


Coast Guardsmen


'Undergo Training


In All Branches


Station
Station


COMMANDING OFFICER


1Yh. 4e E'


Based At Ponce de Leon


Commanded By Captain Scamnell


Right here in St. Augustine
from every state in the latio:
future officers and men of th
Under the watchful, critical bu
Scammell, commanding officer


Germans Give Up

C r A c

InKuban Sector

Futile Thrusts Cost NaAsn
Many Troops, And
M .. ateHri1.
B, i ...." --e (
SW rbOW, April 24 (P) r-
ps .have given'.iiii
^^Tneratt act.Saithe 'Sa
ba4 If ueasus, frunt
dispatches sai 'today, ending, fors
the time being a~ least, what had.
been expected to ,'ivelop int&.ia
large-scale offensive 'to force the
Russians back and enlarge the
north Caucasus bridgehead.
While theie dispatches gave nb
reasons for the sharp reduction
of ti. Curious Nazi attacks, it was
pointed, out that the futile thrusts
of thi past few days cost the Ger-
mans thousands of troops and
heavy losses in planes, tanks, guns
and munitions.
In less than a week, the Ger-
mans lost nearly 5,000 men and
about 290 planes in their unsuc-
cessful charges against the Rus-
sian lines from the Black Sea
coast near Novorossisk through the
Kubail Delta to the coast of the
Sea of Azov.
Aerial warfare in that area Went
on unabated. Red Army planes at-
tacked a German airdrome, caus-
ing explosions and large fires, fol-
lowing one of the heaviest blows of
the war.Thursday night and Friday
'morning when more than 200 Rus-
sian bombers pounded Insterburg in
the fourth raid of the month on
east Prussian cities.
V

Explosive Laden

Vessel Is Sunk

NEW YORK, April 24 (AP)-An
explosive laden ship was sunk in
the Hudson River off Bayonne, N.
J., tonight after it had caught fire
and the police department broad-
cast a request that waterfront
residents of Brooklyn, Staten
Island and New Jersey keep their
windows open.
Acting Police Commissioner
Louis Costuma requested the
warnings be given after the ship
had burned for some time and had
been towed from its mooring at
Jersey City to a point between the
New Jersey and New York shores.
Fireboats and police launches
meanwhile had been sent to the
aid of the boat. At 9:15 p. m., East-
ern War Time, the New York Po-
lice department announced that the
ship had been sunk.
Further details were withheld.
-V
BOND SALES
WASHINGTON, April 24 (RP)-
As the Second War Loan rolled up
a total of $12,014,000,000 in bond
sales, Secretary of the Treasury
Morgenthau urged today that the
drive's $13,000.000,000 goal-now"
nmre than assured of success-be
topped.by the widest possible mar-
gin.


e, men from every walk of life,
n, are being moulded into the
.e United States Coast Guard.
t friendly eye of Captain W. K.
of the St. Augustine United
iStates Coast Guard Training
Station, and his administra-
tive staff and officer person-
nel, both enlisted men and
commissioned officers are un-
dergoing vigorous preparation
for their pait in the second
world conflict,
Birthplace of.American- history,
ancient St. Augustine has become
more than a tourist mecca. It has
become a vital part, and is play-
pig an important role, in the Va-
tion's "all out"; %ffo;t for victory
in the global war unparalleled in
Ii lkooy pagesof. htory,
e.i'the city's own colorfu-puest.
Here, in the Hotel Ponce de
ljeon, fabulous structure created
by the millions of Henry Morri-
.ddn Flagler, developer of Florida's
East Coast-and it seems rightly
so in these troubleous times-is
the very core of the local United
States Coast Guard Training Sta-
tion. Here, in a palatial hotel
which has sheltered Presidents and
celebrities without number since
its portcullis was- raised to admit
its first guest in 1887, are
housed today the "boots," or re-
cruit trainees. Here, too, is the
Gunnery School personnel.
On the Bayfront, in the shadow
of Castillo de San Marcos, at
Hotels Monson. and Bennett are
centered the schools for indoctrina-
tion training for newly appointed
officers in this branch of-the Naval
Service, and for advanced study.


Transition Period
Within the walls of the Ponce
de Leon, on its surrounding land-
scaped grounds where the rich
were wont to vacation, and "off-
campus" if the need arises men go
through that bewildering transi-
tion period from civil life to mili-
tary life. To the majority, it
means five weeks in which to ac-
quaint themselves with as much of
the fundamentals of their new job,
as Captain Scamme* phrases it,
as can be acquired in that length
of time. And that's no small or-
der, either, as this and other ar-
ticles will testify.
For instance, after a new "boot"
receives his clothing and stencils
his name on each article, obtains
his identification card, his "dog
tag," is interviewed, undergoes an
I. Q. test so he won't be "a square
peg in a round hole," goes through
the medical lineup and gets his
"shots," he's only just started out
on his new career for home and
country. Among other'things, he
must learn deck seamanship, sig-
nalling, gunnery, knot tying, ord-
nance, Coast Guard customs and
traditions.
Find Niche
From that recruit training cen-
ter, a certain number go out to
(Continued on Page 3)
V
Twin Boys Are
"Lightweights"

CINCINNATI, April 24 (AP)-
Birth in a Cincinnati hospital of
twin boys, believed by doctors to
be the smallest to survive in medi-
cal history, was disclosed today.
Each weighed one pound, 14 ounces,
and, said Dr. H. F. Conwell, in at-
tendance, "they have a fair chance
to live-one in partic,,"'r."
The twins we ture by
two and onc-hel' Con-
well reported. r
Ira Morris. .


CAPTAIN W. K. SCAMMNELL


Commanding Officer of the United States Coast Guard Training
Station in St. Augustine,'is veteran Captain W. K. Scammell of
Washington, D. C. Captain Scammell graduated from the United
States Coast Guard Academy at New London, Conn., in 1910. The
genial "skipper" has had over 24 years' sea duty on all oceans except.
the Antarctic. He served aboard the Coast Guard cutters Thetis,
Tahoma, Acushnet and Bear.. He commanded the cutters Yocona,
Cummings and Seminole and the transport U.' S. S. "Wakefield."'
He was former Chief of Staff with the Seattle and Jacksonville
Districts of the Coast Guard. He also was in command of the
Jacksonville District and the Fort Trumbull Training Station. Cap-
tain Scammell was awarded the Victory Medal for service rendered
in the first World War. He came here from New London, where he
was in command of the Coast Guard Merchant Marine Officers
Training School. He is married and has one son and a daughter,
both of whom are married. Captain and Mrs. Scammell are residing
at No. 297 St. George Street.


"Strikers


"Decide


To Return To Jobs


Roosevelt's Threat Of Government
Intervention Brings Quick Action

By The,Associated Press
Members of the United Mine Workers at:the Newark, N. J., plant
of the Celanese Corporation of America decided last (Saturday) night
to end their two-weeks-long strike a few hours after President Roose-
ovelt threatened government inter-
vention unless they returned to'
work by noon Monday.
Big J n Hoard Gill, president of UMW'
ig Japan e Local 12666, announced in Newark
that members of the union voted
I .lConvoy Raided unanimously to go back to their
jobs Monday morning "at the Pres-
ident's request." The President
telegraphed union officers that the
ALLIED HEADQUAR- government would take steps to
TERS IN AUSTRALIA, protect "the rights of the patriotic
Sunday, April 25 (AP)-A workers who desire to work" and
large convoy of Japanese the company's legal rights.
ships has been attacked by Gill,'reporting that picketing had
Allied Liberator bombers been halted, said Mr. Roosevelt's
northwest of Wewak, New telegram assured union members
Guinea, during which 5 Ja- that the President would "see that
panese Zeros were shot the proper agencies give the proper
down, the high command hearings that are necessary. That
announced today. is all we wanted in the first place."
The communique also re- The President did not say, in his
ported the dropping of 21 telegram to John L. Lewis and of-
tons of bombs yesterdayrin. ficials of District 50, United Mine
a raid on Kendari, which is Workers (members of which walk-
a raid on Kendar, which is ed out at the Newark plant) what
on the southeast coast of ed out at the Newark plant) wha
on steps the government would take.
the Celebes approximately The implication was, however, that
900 miles northwest of Dar- the Army or Navy might take the
win, Australia. situation in hand if the men did
Five enemy planes were not call off their picket lines and
destroyed on the ground in return to work. Both services have
the Kendari raid and six war contracts with the Newark
probably were shot down. plant.


U. S. Soldiers

Will Remember

Easter Sunday

Special Services Will Be
Held In England
For Doughboys
BY E. C. DANIEL
LONDON, April 24 (AP)-Under
the same sky which two springs
ago was filled with the German air
force's roar of destruction, United
States soldiers at dawn tomorrow
will commemorate the Resurrection
of the Prince of Peace.
Observing its second Easter in,
Great Britain, the.American ex--
peditionary force will be host to:
thousands of British comrades at'
a service in Hyde Park-ap Ameri-
can custom new to the playground
and forum of London's millions.
On the dazzling, green 'lawns.
where Londoners later In the day
will. gather Lo hear an Easter conl-
cert by the renowned band of the
Grenadier Guards, voices typical
of all Americ& will be lifted in
'j'iu y-.,and sung..
'hopsands of these soldiers, with
a sprtlhlirug of actorss, thronged
London's lioliday-crowded streets
today for.a day of sightseeing on
Easter eve.
Men stationed elsewhere in Brit-
aid, while awaiting.the call to bat-
tle for the liberation of Europe,
also will commemorate the day.
To the men already engaged
against the enemy over France and
Germany, Methodist. Bishop Adna
Wright Leonard of Washington, D.
C., will deliver a morning sermon
at arn outdoor service at the Eighth,
Air Force headquarters.
At one station hospital, Lieut.-
Col. William Q'Connor, Catholic
chaplain, will celebrate Mass in a
Rock Garden, using the same mis-
sal, vestments and chalice he had
in France in World War I.
In an open field at a division
headquarters, soldiers will bare
their heads before a large altar'
banked with vines and Easter lilies.
Chaplains James R. McAllister of
Boydton, Va.; Maurice A. Kidder of
Durham,'N. H.; Charles A. Reed of
Cleveland, Ohio; Asa Gardiner of
Baltimore, Md., and Robert H.
Poole of Elizabethtown, N. C., will
participate.in the Protestant serv-
ice. Chaplain John Griffey of Col-
lingswood, N. J., will celebrate the
Catholic mas and Chaplain Gerard
Taggart of New Rochelle,, N. Y.,
will preach.


Sweden Threatens


To Turn Her Navy.

.Jnnn NanI Forces


Svfrw.w %W lI


STOCKHOLM, April 24 (P)-Sw
would take measures against any
Swedish territorial waters or again


America's War

Casualty List

Reaches 78,235
""@St 5


WASHINGTON, April 24 (9Pi-
The Office of War Inforination an-
nounid today a war casualty total
of 78,235. This figure, representing
an increase of 12,855 since the last
OWI report Feb. 20. apparently
did not include some of th aq.st
recent Tunisian losse4- T iiQW T
explained that .he figures were
only for casualties whose. nest. of
kin had been notified as bf yester-
day. ..
SThe latest list included 12,123
deid, 15,059 wounded, 40,435 miss-
ing and 10,628 prisoners.
Army casualties'totaled 53,309,
including 4,976 killed, 10,304'
wounded, 27,321 missing, and 10,-
628 prisoners of war. Of tbe
wounded, 1,058 have returned to
active duty,
Navy casualties total 24,986,
made up of 7,147 dead 4,665 wound-
ed and 12,114 missing.
V
Vice President'
Wallace Returns

MIAMI, Fla., April 24 (P)-Sun-
burned and genial, Vice President
Henry A. Wallace returned from a
tour of seven Latin American coun-
tries today with word that he found
some fear there that the good
neighbor policy would not continue
after the war.
There is more talk of post war
plans in the southern nations than
in the United States, said Wallace.
The people of the countries visited
showed unfailing faith, in democ-
racy and are doing everything pos-.
sible to help win the war.


Yanks Shift

To. Northern

Battle Area

BY WES GALLAGHER


S.. ALLIED HEADQUAI.
TERS IN NORTH AFRICA,
eden announced today that her navy A 24 (AP) American
GerMan forces laying mines in April 24 (AP), ,
ist ships firing on Swedish vessels. troops who sped secretly to
o The government presented the battle from southern Tunisia
warning to Berlin in announcing and French forces on the
the discovery of German mines northern coast were closing on
within territorial waters and de- Bizerte from three directions
handing assurance" of the Nazis today and the British were
tb*t steps would be taken to pre- overrunning strategic Long
vent a repetition of such incidents Stop Hill in their push toward
as the attack on the Swedish sub-. Tunis against the rapidly
marine Drken. shrinking Axis siege line.
The Draken was fired upon by In tte midst of this sudden out-
an armed German merchantinan, burst of fierce fighting for the
the Altkirch, April 16. Swedish re- prinl renmaining objectives in
Africa-tie great iival -base and
ports said the attack occurred in the capital- t was $i, ,
Swedish territorial waters out t' e German comr.ander,
t$,;teburg Archipelago. in Roal, had disappe
Od- themesae day, the ,~Sye4dii 'tair HtI&old Alexander's 18th
submarine Ulven, h'cil had been Army 'Grp -headquarters n-
on.- inneuvers in. the same area, nouiited the capture of a do u.
0diapceared with 33 men aboard. ment dated March 19 which indi-
Swedish newspapers said Ger- cated that Rommel, who led his
warplanes were seen circling over Africa Corps into Tunisia after the
the area two days later. The papers long retreat from El Alamein, no
termed the Draken, ii ident a longer is in Africa.
"bold violation" of Siedn's neu. The document was signed by Col,
trality. Gen. Jtirgen Von Arnim as gen.
The Swedish government lodged eral officer, commander in chief,
a protest April 19 and the German and not by Rommel.
radio announced yesterday that the There have been numerous rea-
:Brlih government had rejected it ports recently that Rommel had
as "unjustified." been spirited out of Tunisia to or-
V ganize Axi.i defenses along the
S* southern European coast. Other
DiW m n mrL's arJc ,reports have hinted that he had
:i) iU J ShijUpy d fallen into disgrace with Hitler and
^ v onbeen removed, while still others
said'he was recovering in Germany
iv en Cforom an attack of malaria.


WASHINGTON, April 24 (tP)-
Southern shipbuilding yards were
awarded construction contracts for
291 merchant ships out of a total
of 460 announced today by the
Maritime Commission.
.Included in the' total are 220
new-design Victory ships which are
slightly larger and' faster, and
eventually will replace the Liberty
type ship which the. commission
has been building by the hundreds'
The contracts included the fol-
lowing:
St. Johns River Shipbuilding
Company, Jacksonville, Fla., 52
Liberty.


a


MARCHING FEET AGAIN RESOUND AT OLD FORT,
,


F-L- ,'1 <.T ..'. u ai" r in I 'u4 m
Over the moat bridge of St. Augustine's ancient Castillo de San Marcos, a crack company of U. S.
Coast Guardsmen marches for a review on the Fort Green. The fort, oldest of its type in the United
States, is now serving as a center for training classes for trainees of the St. Augustine Coast Guard
Training Station, one of the Ave such stations of its kind in the country. (U. S. Coast Guard photo.)


Mote Swiftly
Shifted from the south' swift-
ly and secretly, American troops
in the north have launched a
full-scale attack against Axis
troops, front dispatches said,
and after a six-mile advance are;
fighting their way from hilito
hill within 30 miles of Bizerfe.
(A French communique, record-
ed in'London frcm North African-
broadcasts, said French forces had
advanced more than 12 miles in the
Cap Serrat area. This would place
them at least within 23 miles of
Bizerte, since Cap Serrat is only
35 miles from the big naval base.)
,The British First Army, striking
hard on the Western side of the'
enemy's defense line, was reported"
to iav\e captured the German "Ver-
duin" stronghold at Long Stop Hill,
only 28 miles from Tunis and the
key to the Tunisian coastal plain.
Long Stop Hill, which has been
fiercely defended by the 'Germans,
for months, guards a pass leading,
from Medjez-El-Bab to Tunis.
Move Seven Miles
While -o n battle-tempered
American unit fought its way
toward Mateur, important traf-
fic junction between Bizerte and
Tunis, another force of Lieut..
Gen. George S. Patton Jr.'s Sec-
ond Army Corps was reported
to have hacked its way through
stubborn enemy opposition for
seven miles northeast of Beja
and to the north of the Beja-
Mateur road.
An announcement, from Gen. Sir
Harold Alexandel's Allied ground
troop headquarters. highly praised
the speed and secrecy with which'
Patton's American troops were)
transferred from the El Guetarn
sector' in southern Tunisia to fall
on the enemy in the north.'
While the Americans J.oined in
what General Alexander'ermed the
"final phase that will see the an-
nihilation of the Africa Corps, Von
Arnim's army and their, Italian
allies in Tunisia," the veteran Brit.
ish First Army seriously threaten-
ed the entire western side of the
enemy's mountainous defense are
by gaining six to seven miles in
the Goubellat-Bou Arda sector.


*


*


Rommel Is Reported



To Have Left Africa


~ r~Z:


, k





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LOVELY YOUNG BRIDE-ELECT


Hastings Annual

Potato Ball Is

Planned May 13

County-Wide Event Takes
Place In Community
Center Building

The annual Potato Ball, :which
is a big .county-wide everrt, is to
be held Thursday, May 13th, at.the*
Community Center in Hastings, ac-
cording to an announcement made
yesterday by H. H. Bailey, of the
Potato City..
Mr. Bailey said that the ball is
being held this year, in answer to
numerous requests. Proceeds from
the affair are used annually: for!
civic and patriotic work in Hast-
ings.
Attendance at the affair usually
means the entire county is repre-s
-sented. Mr.' Bailey adds that -he
expects as many as possibly can
get there, under present conditions
of gasoline rationing, etc., will
attend, and help to make the 1943
event a great success.
Hastings' potato season is late
this year, and digging and shipping
will be under- way in a big way
by .the middle of next month, when'
the Potato :.all is staged, it is.ex-
V

Visit Hastings

Red Cross Rooms

Hastings women are doing spleri
did work in the Red Cross rooms,
in the Community Center, where'
they are making surgical dressings,
says Mrs. Reddin Britt, director of,
the surgical dressings rooms at
Kirkside for the local Red Cross.
Mrs. Britt ,and Mrs. E. J. PVa
cetti were guests of the'-Hastings
group at a luncheon Wednesday,
which was enjoyed with the Wo-
mian's Club, and found the work of
the Hastings.women inspiring. Mrs,
Gordon Stanton is chairman of the
Hastings Surgical Dressings Com-
mittee.
The 'local women also had an
opportunity to pay a .short visit
to the work rooms of: the Paatka:
Chapter of the, Red- Cross, and see
what is being done there.
The trip was made with Mis0
Anna E. Heist, county home dem-
onstration agent, who is covering
the county just now in nne A
\ith her home garden and.cJ
ovation work, including cain.


I


='


Colorful Easter Party Enjoyed

By Those Attending Pre-School

Class Of irs. Edward R: Joyce

An Easter party wase enjoyedd found many shared theirs with the
by the children attending the Pre- less successful ones. Readie Mof-
School Class of Mrs. Edward R. fet found the large colored duck
Joyce, Thursday morning, no egg and it was his for keeps.
classes being held on Good Friday. The refreshment table was placed
First they made lovely Easter' in the yard and about this the chil-
cards to take home to their parents', dren gathered, holding up their
using double folded colored paper pretty baskets while Mrs. A. D.
and decorations of cut-out flowers. Winters took colored pictures of
Then they sang all their Easter and the class. Fre sh fruit punch and
Spring songs learned recently and "chicken" and "rabbit" cookies
pfvyed a bunny rabbit game., were served.-. At each place was a
ap the living room, there were large candy Igg and a candy bou-
large Easter baskets of various quet. The centerpiece was made
colors with an Easter card, bearifg of toy bunnies, nests and colored
their name, tied to the handle.'Each eggs.
had fun finding their own basket. Present wqre 'Camellia Kurt,
Nests for the baskets were yellow, Jane Kehoe, Audrey Hammond,
purple and gold strips of crepe Sally Hyde, Gay anid A. D. Winters,
paper, which the children had cut Wesley- Carter, Peter.-Jpe Menten,
and saved days before, for they DaVid Hobbs, Bobby. Cairi, Buzzy
knew the Easter bunny was com- Nikhols, Billy See, Frankie Bray,
ing, Bob Harris, Karl Rohnke, Readie
Most exciting of all was the Moffett, Sandy Alexander and
Easter Egg Hunt. Those who Wayne Morehouse.


Kit Bags Party

Is May 8th At

Castle Warden

The St. Augustine Chapter of
Bundles ,for America will spon-
sor a Kit Bags Party, Saturday
evening, May 8th, at Castle War-
den Hotel, from 9:30 until 2
o'clock.
The Jubilee Hillbillies will
play for the dancing and for
other entertainment. Those in
charge state, "you must wan-
der around and find out what we
will have to, offer you for fun
and amusementt" '
SThose desiring to attend may
secure tickets by phoning Castle
Warden, No. 1707. The proceeds
from this affair-will make it pos-
sible jfor more. Kit Bags to be
made and sent to service men.
V
Captain R. K. Nuzum
And Mrs. Nuzum Visit
Relatives In City
Captain and Mrs. R. K. Nuzum,
Jr., arrived yesterday to be the
guests of Captain Nuzum's par-
ents, Mr. and Mrs. R. K. Nuzum of
No. 10 Cincinnati Avenue.
Captain Nuzum, who is on leave,
has completed a. course in tropical
medicine at an Army Medical
School in Washington, D. C. Be-
fore returning to his regiment in
Boston, Mass., Capt. and Mrs. Nuz-
um will go to Miami where he prac-
ticed medicine before entering the
service.
V


Local Artist

Has Prize For

Block Print

The Jury of:.Selection and
Award for the twenty-third an-,
nual exhibition of the Southern
States: Art League has awarded:
the Edward S. Shorter prize :for
the best block print to C. Cregor
Reid of St; Augustine.
This exhibition is now in the
Brooks Memorial Art Gallery in
Merhphis, Tenn.
Mrs. Reid's picture is a wood-
block entitled "In Old St. Au-.
gustine"' and shows a view of St.
George Street. It will go on tour
of museums, colleges and :art
galleries all. over the south dur-
ing the coming year with the
circuit exhibition of the South-
ern States Art League.
.Other woodcuts of Mrs. Reid's:
have been showing recently in
northern galleries, including :the
famous National Academy of De
sign in New York City.
V


GSO Girls Have
Business Meet At
Home Of Legion

The GSO girls met Thursday at
the Legion Home on the Bay and
Mrs. Estelle Wells, club hostess.
reports a successful meeting. A
number of matters were decided
upon, one being that any girl who
misses three successive dances will
automatically have her card re-
voked.
Decorations for Easter have been
done by Miss Lillian Fagen, and
Miss Martha Westberry, the latter
having cleverly created the at-
tractive bunny which adorns'.the
mantel at the Legion Home. Ferns
and various cut flowers help to
make a festive atmosphere' too.
An informal dance for service
men given by the GSO girls will
take place at the club tomorrow
night from 8 until 10, it is an-
nounced.
V
C. D. Of A. To Meet
In Special Session
Tuesday, April 27
There will be a special session of
the Catholic Daughters of America,
Court No. 23, which will be held
Tuesday, April 27th, at 8 p. m. at
the CDA rooms on King Street.
The purpose of this session, it has
been announced, is to make plans
for the State Board meeting. Mrs.
W. W. Waite, the grand regent,
urges a full attendance at this
important gathering.
V
Past Matrons To
Meet On Tuesday
The Past Matrons Club will meet
at the home of Mrs. W. M. Davis
at No. 30 Hildreth Drive, Tuesday,
April 27th, at 7:45 p. m.
V


WOMAN'S EXCHANGE

MANAGER'S .TEA
AT THE OLD SPANISH TREASURY
SATURDAY, MAY 1st, 3:00 TO 5:30 P. M.
Exhibition of Brass and Copper and Spanish Work
Admission 50c
Which includes- Afternoon Tea and Music


"COLD RAY" WAVES,


- ---- -- --


4., 1


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PERSONAL


' I~'


E I I


MMIMMIMIMIMillHigin


*AKRAS
166 ST. GEORGE ST.


-


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I


SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1949,


THE ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD


I
0*


ADELAIDE SANCHEZ
Editor '
Telephone No. 51


*


St. Augustine and was among
thos4 who were instrumental in.
forming the Union Young People's
Group, in which the various local
Protestant churches have repre-
sentation. For two years, she
served as president of that group.
She is the twin sister of the late
Miss Louise Shepherd Cooksey,
who passed away several years ago.
The bridegroom-to-be now is re-
siding in Eharhardt, S. C., where
he is pastor of the First Methodist
Church. He also is a Floridian,
'his birthplace being St. Petersburg.
He was graduated from the Orlan-7
do Senior High School and received
his M.S. degree from the Conserva- '
tory- of Music at Rollins-College,.
Mr. Norton also is a graduate of
the Florida Southern College, where ;
he received his B.S. degree, and in .
1942 he was graduated from Emory 1
University with: fis Bachelor of!
Divinity degree..
His father is pastor of the First:
Methodist Church of St. Augustine.


Mr. and, Mrs. William, Lemuel
Cookl'sey, Jr., announce-the engage-
ment of their daughter, Eloise
Shepherd, to the Reverend Marvin
Chancellor Norton, son of Dr. and
Mrs. Marvin H. Norton of St. Au-
gustine.
Their wedding, in which cordial
interest will center, will be an
event of June 6th in St. Augustine
and will be solemnized in the Cal-
vary Baptist Church.
The bride-elect was born in Tal-
lahassee, but has made her-home
here for the past 16 years. She
attended local schools and was
graduated from Ketterlinus High
School. Miss Cooksey'received her
religious education at Stetson Uni-
versity and also attended Massey's
Business College in 'Jacksonville.
For some time, she has been emrn
played by the Office of. Price Ad-
ministration, in Jacksonville.
Miss Cooksey is active in the
work of Calvary Baptist Church of


"MENTION


Mr. and 'Mrs. Russell Ruhe, of.
No. 28 Waldo Street, have as their
guest, Mrs. Lela Ploughe, aunt of
Mrs. Ruhe. Mrs. Ploughe, former-"
ly of Alton, Ill., will go to her new
home in Phoenix, Ariz., after leav-
ing here,


Abbott Street, to. John B. Marinzulich, of St. Augustine and uerto
Rico, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Marinzulich of this city. The, lovely
EverglAnnouncede on Easter Seday is the engagemennt of Miss Paticiaunced later
Claire Kennedy, daughter of Mr and Mrs.C.J. Kennedyof No. 40
Abbott Street, to John B. Marin ulich, of St. Augustine a Puerto
Rico; son of Mr. and Mrs. John Marinzulich of this city, The lovely
young bride-elect at present is making her home int Fort Lauderdale,
being employed by the Florida East Coastt Railw y Company atPort
Everglades. Date of the Wedding Wvill be announced later,

Miss Mayme Leah Snyder Bride Of

jBenamin Karno; Ceremony Event

Of ..April 9th In New York City


Lieutenant and Mrs. Robert Max-
well Brown are here from- Cherry
Point, N. C., spending about a week
with Mrs. Brown's parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Warner Brashears. They are
being: extended a cordial welcome
by their many local friend.
-0-
Spending the Easter week-end
at her home here is Miss 'Ielen
Cook, who is located in Tallahassee
during the present session of the
State .Legislature, serving as see-
retary to Representative PF Charles
Usina of this city.
-0-
Friends will regret to learn that
Clinton Pacetti is a patient at Flag-
ler Hospital, where he recently
underwent -an emergency : appen-
*dectom y .--. -.-... ... .. ...--
-o-
Mr. and Mrs. R. S. Slhingler, of
St. George Street, have as their
house guests for the week-end, Miss
Edith Johnson and Miss Mary
Elizabeth Murphy of Jacksonville,;
who aire spending their Easter, va-
cation here. ,
--0
Mrs. Ibbie Drummonds, of Grove
Avenue, has, been called to Mem-
phis, Tenn., because of the critical
illness of her\brother, J. W. Good-
w in.,, ', >
First Lieutenant F. ,W. Rollins,:
Jr., of the Finance Departmeiit at
Fort Dix, New Jersey, is visiting
his parents, Brigadier General and
Mrs. Francis W. 'Rollins,: wh" re-
side at ,the Iakeside Apartments. :
-o-
Clifford Athey of the Univer-
sity of J F lorida is viiting' his
mother,- Mrs. Julia Athey. '
j ,-u-. *
Mrs. E. H. Bennett of Brunswick,
Ga., formerly of this city, is visit-
ing- friends and relatives here.


VADA MARION HARTLEY
Mr. and MU, Alvin J. Hartley, Sr., announce the engagement of
their attractive daughter, Vada Marion, to Staff Sergeant Joseph
Kovalski, of ,Simsbury, Connecticut, arid Camp Wheeler, Georgia.
He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. MichaeLXKovalski, of Simsbury, Con-
necticut. : ::; -, '.


-O


SRobert James Shingler, son, of
Mr. and .Mrs. R. S. Shinge'r of No.
312 St. George, Street, will, leave
Friday, April 30th, for, Parris
Island, S. C., where Ihe will be
inducted into the Marines.,. He
left Junior. College in St. .,Petefs-'
burg in June and worked, at the St.
Johns River Shipbuilding Company
as a ship-fitter until recently.
SMiss Edith Hubbard of Pough-
keepsie, N. Y.. is the guest of Mrs.
M. E. M. Evans, and family, having
arrived to attend the Gehmari-
Husson wedding, an event of Mon-
day in Trinity Episcopal Church.
Miss Hubbard is a, cousin' of the
bride-elect, Miss Mary Elizabeth
Murrell Husson. ..

Corporal V. C. Neville-Thompson,
is here on furlough from Colorado
Springs, and is visiting in the
home of! Mrs; M. E. M. Evans.

,,,Mrs.,A. P. Bennett, 'er,,son,i
Carnell. and her daughter, Mary
Gwen, are visiting Mr. Bennett,
who is engaged in warwork in
Brunswick, Ga.'
Friends of Frank T. Piet Jr., AIS.,
*will be interested to know that he'
now fis in trade"school, at the
Jacksonville Naval Air Base, hav-,
ing been selected to study: radio.
His new address is: Unit -lR-9-W,
Barracks 3, U. S. Naval Ait Tech-
nical Training Center, Jacksonville,


Of cordialinterest to friends in For her w
St. Augustine is the announce- a becoming
melt of the marriage of Miss worn with
Mayme Leah Snyder, daughter of of biown '41
Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Snyder of St. Her flower
Augustine and Benjamin Karno of roses, arran
Waterbury; Conn., sdn of Mrs.n
Morris Karno and the late Mr. Kar- Mr. Karno
no of Waterbury. Augustine "
nTheir wedding was solemnized at in defense
4:30 p. m., on Friday' April 9th'in His bride,
the Minorah Synagogre ron Fifth xpels to j
Avenue in New- York City. Offi- t'ord.to mak
citing vwas Rabbi Alfred H. Kahn.
This was a simple but impressive
ceremony, the traditional marriage
rites of that faith being perfo rm-
ed,. includingthe holding- of the
canopy and the stamping of the ,
glass;
Miss Helene Glickstein of New
Haven,) Conn., and Henry Sachs of
New York, attended the bridal
couple.,


wedding, the bride chose
Spring suit of beige,
contrasting accessories
nd a brown fur coat.
s were lovely yellow
nged in a corsage.
o, who has visited in St.
on several occasions,' is
work in Hartford,,Con,
ho, now is in the city,
oin hilm later in Hart-'
:e their home.


/r *-i' -


Sylyia Ann Todd >
Celebrates Her
Fourth Birthday
Mrs. J. H. Todd honored her
daughter, Sylvia Ann, with a
birthday party at their home No.
27 Francis Street, the little girl
being four years old. The chil-
dren played with toys and later en-
joyed an Easter Egg Hunt. Dorothy
Ann Edwards received the prize for
finding the most eggs.
After the hunt, the children were
invited indoors where Sylvia Ann
opened her lovely gifts. A pretty
pink and white birthday cake cen-
tered the little table where the
children were gathered. When the
last package had been opened, cake
and ice cream were served.
Present were Betty Jo Andrews,
Dorothy Ann Edwards, Donna Lee
Bennett, Sue Alice Lindsey, Verna
Lindsey, Alva Lee Barnhill and the
following adults: Mrs. Terrell Bell,
Mrs. L. G. Bennett, Mrs. Cecil
Lindsey, Mrs. Alva Knight and
Mrs. E. H. Bennett,


Past Noble Grands $
To Meet Tuesday
The Past Noble Grands will meet
in regular session Tuesday night
at 8. o'clock at the home of Mrs.
Frankie McKeever, No.l:;46 Cin-
citinati Avenue.


Mrs. Louise Briggs
Weds J. H. Chason
Of New Smyrna
Mrs. Louise Briggs of this city
and J. H. Chason were married
April 9th, at New Smyrna Beach.
Mr. Chason is an employee of the
Florida East Coast Railway, and
they will reside in New Smyrna
Beach.
Both have many friends here and
elsewhere,, who are interested in
news of their wedding.


Philatheans Will
Have Supper Meet
The Kathryn Bigler Philathea
Class of the Memorial Presbyterian
Church will hold its regular meet-
ing and supper at 6 o'clock to-
morow night in the Church House.
Members and their guests are cor-
dially invited.


Dance Proceeds Are
Given As $154.27,
By Drivers' Group

The McQuaig group of the De-
fense Council Drivers" Corps, re-
pdrts that the proceeds from the
dance, given on April 15th, amounts
to $154.27, and will be used to help
equip the First Aid Station, and
buy uniforms for the members.
A spokesman points out that
when the Drivers Corps was form-
ed there were seven groups, but
now the McQuaig group is the only
one with- a leader. She urges the
other groups to join with this one
soon, so that the First Aid Class
may be started.
Members are reminded of the
business meeting which is held
every Thqrsday at the Rink on
Masters Drive at 8:30 p. m.
------v--^---
LiutenRant Briggs
Weds Miss Potter
Of Jacksonville
Many in St. Augustine are inter-
ested in the announcement of .the
marriage of Miss Abbie Louise
Potter, daughter of Mrs. L. C. Pot-
ter of No. 1274 Talbot Street, Jack-
sonville, to Lieutenant Louis D.
Briggs, Signal, Corps, of the U. S.
A., Tampa.
The wedding was an event of
Saturday, April 17, at'Riverside
Presbyterian Church, Jacksonville,
at 5 p, m.
Lieutenant Briggs is a son of
Mrs. J. H. Chason, now of New
Smyrna Beach, and has many
friends in this city, his former
home.


Surgical
Room
For


Dressings
Supervisors
r Week Listed


Exchange Photographs

With "HIM"

PLEASE CALL FOR APPOINTMENTS



F.Victor Rahi r |
PHOTOGRAPHER
12 Fort Marion Circle Phone 857
S* --_ n. i-*u--w u s-


Supervisors in charge of the
Surgical Dressings Rooms at
Kirkside for the week of April
26th are:
Monday, April 26, morning, Miss
Mena Oliveras; afternoon, Mrs.
J. C. Windsor; night, Mrs. H. K.
Jackson.'
Tuesday, April 27, morning, Mrs.
J. D. Ingraham; afternoon, Mrs. C.
W. Isaacs.
Wednesday, April 28, morning,
Mrs. Ted Pomar; afternoon, Mrs.
N. H. Harrison.
Thursday, April 29, morning,
Mrs. A. C. Walkup; afternoon, Mrs.
E. J. Pacetti; night, Mrs. A. C.
Walkup.
Friday, April 30, morning, Mrs.
A. L. Joynes; afternoon, Mrs. Wil-
liam Hutson, Jr.
An appeal is made to all women
in the community, including wives
of men in service living here, to
send several hours this coming
week at the Surgical Dressings
Rcoms, and help the local Red
Cross Chapter achieve its quota.- .


Alathean Class Of
Baptist Church To
Have Meet Tuesday
The Alathean. Sunday School
class of the Ancient City Baptist
'Church will hold its monthly busi-
ness and social meeting Tuesday
night, April 27th, at 7:45 at the
home of Mrs. C. E. Russell, the
president, at No. 56 Aabbott Street.
An interesting program has been
planned which will be in the form
of a Bible quiz. Group No. 2 will
be in charge and all members are
reminded to attend, since a good
time is in store.


An Entirely New and Different Permanent. A Triumph of Modern
Science. THESE ARE THE MIRACLES OF COLD RAY:
COMPLETE CONVENIENCE; In COLD RAY, we offer you a
heatless, machineless wave which takes no longer to give than an
ordinary heat wave. And long after you have your COLD RAY,
you'll be ever. so grateful for its convenience, for it leaves your
hair soft and manageable beautifully easy to style for ayY
occasion.


FLORENCE'S

..BEAUTY SHOP -


-----V---
.Republican Women's
Club Will Meet
Thursday, April


29


The St. Augustine Republican
Women's Club will hold its
monthly meeting Thursday, April
29th, at the Old,Spanish Treasury
at 3:15 p. m. Mrs. Alfred 1ous-
ton, the president, urges a good at-
tendance ..


T.


PHONE 1214


How much are you doing to "out- 103
fit the outfits" fighting for you? ? ^.


---


A


PAGE 2


All items for this depart.
.....-nt mist be inby .
S 9:.30 A. M. Daily j oc ty


..Club News and Other Events of Local Interest


Managers' Tea,

i At Treasury Is

! May Day Event

Unusual Exhibit Being
Planned For Spring-
time Affair
Next Saturday, May 1st, from
3 to 5:30 o'clock, the Managers'
Tea, which marks the fifteenth an-
niversary of the, Woman's Ex-
change, will be held at the Old
Spanish Treasury. Tea will be
served in the picturesque garden
of the Old Treasury, and there will
be a fascinating exhibit of Spanish
work, brass and copper.
Table reservations may be made
by telephoning the Woman's Ex-
change, No. 492.
Are Invited
Members of the military and na-
val .colonies, as well as local resi-
Sdents and visitors, are invited to
attend this affair in a quaint set-
ting, furnished by an historic Span-
ish house, and an old walled garden,
bright with ,old-fashioned flowers,
and shaded by fine old trees.
General Chairman
Mrs. C. C. Spades is general
chairman for the Managers' Tea
on May Day. Various committees
have been named as follows:
Flower and Vegetable Mart:
Mrs. George W. Jackson, Mrs.
Graham Bigelow, Mrs. Vivian Col-
lins, Mrs. F. W. Golden-Howes,
, Mrs. F. W. Manley, Mrs. H. E.'C.
Hawkins.
Afternoon Tea: Mrs, Elbridge G.
Snow, Mrs. J. D. Ingraham, Mrs.
A. C. Walkup, Mrs. H. C. Farrin,
Mrs. C. C; Spades, Mrs. Vernon
Lockwood.
Collection of Exhibition Pieces;
Mrs. R. N. Dickman, Mrs. C. C.
Spades, Mrs. C. Ray Vinten, Mrs.-
!Elbridge G. Snow, Mrs. C. G.,Hen-
ninger, Mrs. Sargent Tate, Mrs.,
Walter D.,Webb.
Exhibition Arrangement: Mrs.
Ohas.' W. Isaacs, Jr., Mrs. T. M.
-Livesay, Mrs. T. A..Mellon.._ -
Spanish Work: MAr. Reginald
White, Mrs. Wm. F. Stewart.
Admission: Mrs. J. S. Rayburn,
Mrs. L. Fitz-James Hindry, Mrs.
W. A. Seymour, Mrs. E. J. Shef-
field, Mrs. L. C. Frohnan.*
Shop: Mrs. F. S. Vaill, Mrs, Ben-
oni Lockwood, Mrs. Vernon Lock-."
wood, Mrs. F. J. Buchanan.
Here will be offered articles fromt.
the Woman's Exchange Shop,
including hand work and baby ar-
ticles. I
V


ENGAGEMENT IS ANNOUNCED


loise Cooksey:Betrothed

Reverend Marvin C. Norton; .

Wedding Planned For June 6th


Miss E

To
















































































































IT'M


S A PRODUCT OF



CITY


BAKERY,

St.*Augustine, Fla.


MOELLER'S

Cor. San Marco and Rhode Aves.


AMAVON


DRESS SHOP


Rationing Makes Professor Eat His Hobby


I I ~ \L 1


Atco Floor and Deck Enamel
Use Inside; ori Outside-A $3.25 Value-- $2.87
Per Gallon ..... ........... ......*2....
Monad Flat Wall Finith
Very beist,-rashable anid-sanitary-a '$2.85
product--for; a gallon ........................
Monad, Semi-Gloss Wall Finish
,(Washable and sanitary. Will stand ink or iodine $3.15
test. A $3.60 product for, per gallon ...........
Atco 4-Hour Floor Varnish
Waterproof-walk on it in 4 houirs-it has lasting $2.
qualities. A $3.25 product, per gallon ............. .W6


mwmw


Monad cWaterproof 4-Hour Enamel
For furniture, floors or anywhere you want to $ 1 rq
,use it-a $1.50 itein---for a quart ..............w$ 1.*2
Aluminum
In Five-Gallon Cans-a $3.75 Product- ,
Per Gallon ............, ...................... $3,39 1


SCREEN WIRE,, WATER HOSE, ETC.
S AERO WAX--No Rubbing-Qt. 556; Pt. 306
St. Augustine Paint & Hardware Co.
Ask for Our Pairit Specialist for Any Paint Question or
Problem--Use Only A Good, First-Class Painter
'121 St George Street Telephone -229


= imom


I~IIY~vll~s~,ulisrt LCICII~~i.~E=T~:~LI~lr==~~(===i


N E


I'


BUY WAR BONDS!1


R III BIC~ Il~bl Ilr I r II'


*


OT-MTBAIV 'AlMYDVT Off II~


I


THE ST AU G USTINE RECORD


Executive Officer
l wif..


I


the like but a genuine puzzlement how many.' He actually doesn't
will overtake him if you ask him know.,


AP Features
CHATTANOOGA, Tenn.-Point
rationing of food meant a little
more to Dr. Irving' Grote, Chatta-
nooga research chemist, than to
most other people. It put an abrupt
end to one of his many hobbies.
A chemist of national repute
who turned his back: on lucrative
commercial offers to accept a fac
ulty position at the University of
Chattanooga tor the pure love of
teaching, Dr. Grote for many years
collected unusual food products in.
cans, as much for a hobby as for
consumpti64.
He has been known to give com-
plete dinners of exotic foods from
cans and one friend accused him
of being a .magician because he,
could always produce a can of any
food mentioned from, his well-
stocked shelves.
Now, that ration points mean
provision for' everyday foods, the
professor has emptied his shelves,
of foreign delicacies and turned.
his attention to other, avocations.
For instance, there is his collec-
tion of 'Vicitraii paper weights,
or the number of volumes by
Henty, or his collection' o -16th
and 17th century tomes on herbs
and animals.
He has a complete laboratory--
r 4,000 chemicals are neatly cata-
Slogued there----where he dabbles,
i less frequently now, in- research
work for local commercial firms
or in crime detection work
He has -been issued several
patents on chemical processes and:


spondent.)


A SOUTH PACIFIC BASE (Delayed)--"Sweat now will
save blood later." ...
Under this injunction from their commanding officer, the
Marines in this area are'toughening their, muscles for jungle
warfare and sharpening their wits for maximum combat
efficiency. Physical condi-o
tioning and night operations -
are emphasized, with 20-mile Commands Group
hikes in the dark to accustom
the Marines to operations in ere From Army
the gloom the Japs prefer for
their offensives and infiltra- .'
tions. i Such hikes are silent, OutpostS troops
officers give their orders in .
hispes, s king is ph.- Making his headquarters at the
ited. Captain of the Port's office 'here
The Jap's bag of tricks in jungle Hotel Marion, is LieutenantJ.
fighting, opened for inspection, by B. Johnson, who is in command of
the intelligence sections of Marin the group from the Arm Outpost
units which engaged the enemy:i Troo ps.
the Solomons, has been, turned in- Lieutenant Johnson is a Regula
side out, and the Marines are mote ieutenant Johnson is a Regula
certain than ever that American Army officer and has been in the
fighting men can- and have ou- service since November 3, 1939. He
fought their wily Japanese enemies. was a reserve officer until 1940,
An the "dn'ts" dinned into when he received his regular com-
taonges "b heir -offi" e mission. His home is in Olympia,
the Maheir officers are Oregon, buthis military career has
these commandments: taken him far afield.
Don' get chummy with stran- Re was attached to one of the
gers in, dark places just because first Army outfits stationed ia
they apea0 English; lots- of Japs Alaska, serving in that arctic land
went to, American schools. Keep for nearly a year. Until recently,
silent if you're uncertain; let your all of his service has been on: the
new friend talk himself to death. Pacific coast, for three years his
Don't run out to pick up leaflets duty stations ranging "up and
a Jap drops from his plane. The down" that coast.
English is terrible and, besides, Lieutenant Johnson has been ir
he's probably coming right back Florida since the first of the year,
to shoot the place uIp. coming to this state clear across
Don't try to start a hock-shop in the continent, from California. He
the jungle by picking up Jap was on duty in Miami for a time
watches, fountain pens, flashlights, and then was transferred to St
and other trinkets that may have Augustine.
mines of bodby traps" attached. Lieutenant andl Mrs. Johnsor
You don't care what time it is, make their home on San Marc<
you're mostly too busy to write, Avenue.
-and you're safer in the dark.
Don't walk up whistling when
you kill a dozen Japs with that
ftlt grenade. Japs like to. play
dead so. they can sock you, when
your back's turned.
Don't get careless when, you're
out walking at night. You think,
iti "Mac" alongside you, but t /
may be Hirohito.
The Marine s- not: undererti-
mate the Jap, or doubt their abili-
ty to match him trick for trick and
defeat him. Their attitude is well
illustrated by paragraphs from the
pamphlet %on jungle waaru m which
is read to every man. in training c
l for the South Pacific fighting:
"The Jap jungle. soldier has ,
a proved himself to be a thoroughly
competent and effective enemy. His
tactics and equipment are designed r / I
for use ,in that most difficult of i
f terrain, the jungle. He knows the
I jungle and knows how to use it
* to the best advantage. He is a
ruthless and&i often fanatic' foe.o -
t He gives no quarter and expects
Snone. He wquld rather die than
surrender. We must not make the
- mistake of underestimating him-. 1
"That is fatal ..but he can be
' beaten and has been beaten by men
r determined to win."


Commander W. W. Kenner,
executive officer of St.' Augus-
tine's Coast Guard Training Sta-
tion, is a native of Front, Royal,
Virginia and a 1924 graduate of
the Coast Guard Academy. :His
sea duty has been on both the At-
lantic and Pacific Oceans and in
Alaskan waters. He has served
on the Destroyers Ammen,
Trippe, Fanning; Cutters Seneca,
Northland, Ingham, Pamlico,
Atalanta, Calypso. In addition
to many shore stations, he was
on duty at the Coast Guard Mer-
chant Marine Training Station.
'He is married and has two chil-
dren.


Odd Fellows Are
To Celebrate Their
124th Anniversary
Palmetto, Lodges No. 25, iooF,
will celebrate its; one, hundred :and
twenty-fourth anniversary tomor-
row in the Fraternal Building on
Charlotte Street*
A short business -session will be
held firstby- the Rebekah Lodge,
after which the Lodge. Room will be
open to all members and their
friends.
All visiting Od4d Fellows and Re-
bekahs are cordially invited to at-
tend.


/


UNDAY, APRIL .25, 1943 .


i
j


191 ST. GEORGE ST.


'9 .


jrjlux J ri


29


Just an apron hanging on a hook? Not Not if the woman
who wears that apron is making sure her family eats good,
nourishing food every day! Then it becomes a uniform to
be proudly worn. For, serving nutritional food is part and
parcel of the war effort.


Grieg's Music Used
As Quisling's March
STOCKHOLM (P)-Vidkun Quis-
ling at last has found a "Fuehrer
March"' in imitation of Hitler.`
Various composers tried, t pro-
duce a march which would satisfy
Quisling when played as he strode
into rallies, party meetings or re-
ceptions. All failed.
Nasjonal Samling, Quisling's
party, finally decided to revert to a
master's work and selected Edvard
Grieg's famous "Sigurd Jorsalfar"
as Quisling's "Fuehrer Maroh." At
the same time an order was issued
forbidding anyone to play "Sigurd
Jorsalfar" except in Quisling's
presence.


BUTTER-KRUST Enriched Wite Bread is the kind of white
bread Uncle Sam recommends richer in vitamin Bl,
iron and another B vitamin called "niacin." These factors
are needed in sufficient amounts to maintain normal health.
BUTTER-KRUST Enriched :White Bread is a wonderful way
to get more of them ... a DELICIOUS way.


Fry In Deep Fat
It's a good recipe for food.
It's just as good a recipe for
the enemy.
Save the fat from deep-fry-
ing. Sell it to your butcher.
Waste kitchen fat makes it
hot for Hitler and Hirohito.
IT MAKES EXPLOSIVES!


4-






INVEST IN VICTORY NOW



VISIT






The Kenwood





A MODERN HOME-LIKE HOTEL


OPEN ALL THE YEAR




Corner Bridge and Marine j



g~X,


Remember-bread is basic. Give your family the EXTRA benefits
BUTTER-KRUST Enriched*White Bread.. Start today*


U.S. NEEps US
INrlDCf WNK M(ADO
R COMMNDED IN THE
NUrITON FOO luRs ES


ANY

SERVICE

MAN'S

HEART
Hubby or Sweet-
heart-you'll find the
dress or hat to suit
his taste at the
Amavon.


VI
;:'.".;..

-. ;


DRESS BL AND ECONOMICALLY AT
DRESS BEAUTIFULLY AND ECONOMICALLY AT


*


*


991/V ST. GEORGE ST.


MARIE NADER


PAGE 3


Marines Compile


Mayor 0. D. Wolfe Says He Feels

Pleasure And Pride In Part That

St, Augustine Is Playing Today
City's Chief Executive Extends Cordial Greetings
To All Service Men And Women
In This Community
As mayor of a city in wartime, which has felt the im-
pact of war through the training here .of large groups of
men in different branches of the service, Mayor O. D. Wolfe
of St. Augustine, expresses#
pleasure and pride in the way many service men have headquar-
inwhchte cit andre itshe '-ters' here, addeai a 'word of wel-
in which the city and its peo- come for visitors, of whom St.
ple have' responded to: the Augustine has So many from near-
challenge presented in assume by camps, air, stations, etc. He
tig various responsibilities, declared that this Oldest City al-
Mayor Wolfe points out that the ways will try: to do its best to
advent of such large groups of offer, accommodations ando euter-
people, including service men, of- tainment; that if accommodation
fliers, and their families might and transportation facilities are
have disrupted niany communities, not sufficient to take care of every-
and upset established customs and body, regret is deep and sincere,:
modes of living, but that life flows but that everything humanly pos-
alonzg smoothly in St. Augustine. sible has been done and will be
He declares this is not only a done.to nmake this community ac.
tribute to the people of this corn- cessible for men a-id women seek--
iunity, but is an indication of the ing relief, release and change
high calibre of the officers and from camp life.
men located here, who have adapt- Mayor Wolfe's associates on the
ed themselves to circumstances, city commission who join with him
devoted themselves to the business in this word of greeting are Com-
in hand, and shqwn patriotic fer- missioners A. K. Sessoms, Frank
yor and devotion to country by J. Tart, W. B. Fraser, and Charles
their wholehearted concentration F. Peters.
In the job they have to do. V
Welcome For Visitors The bison served as food, cloth,
Mayor Wolfe, in expressing ing and shelter to the American
pleasure over the fact that so Indian.


Do's And Don' ts


On Jap Fighting

(The following story was written by Sergeant Samuel Shaffer,
1709 H Street, N.W., Washington, D. C., a Marine Combat Corre-


Special

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FUTURE FIGHTERS

MOUOLDED ,HERE
(Continued from Page 1)
general duty; others who have
shown a particular aptitude along
a definite line Zv on to the more
advanced schools for further, spe-
cialized- training. Men who were
leaders in civilian life are apt to
find themselves assigned to bos'n
mates schools. Those who develop
a marked mechanical bent are or-
dered to mechanists schools; and
so on.
The Gunnery Training School is
part of the advanced training of
the enlisted men, and originally
was planned as a one-month course.
Formerly housed in the Bennett, it
was transferred to the Ponce de
Leon with the expansion of the Of-
ficers Training School in late No-
vember.
That expansion, which more
than doubled the capacity of the
Officers Training School, necessi-
tated utilizing the Bennett, for
this training activity, along with
the Monson, used only for that
purpose in the initial set-up. Of-
ficers undergo an indoctrination
course of two months and an ad-
vanced course of an additional two
months. The'indoctriniation course
primarily is for the purpose of ac-
quainting new officers who have
just come into the service from civil
life, with the customs and tradi-
tions, the various phases of service
life they ultimately may be called
upon to perform.
Officer Leaders
And in charge of all phases of
training activities in the local
Training Station, under the com-
mand of Captain Scammell, are
some 50 commissioned and warrant
officers, who comprise the adminis-
trative staff of the three schools.
Commander W. W. Kenner is ex-
ecutive officer of the Station. Com-
mander A. W. Davis is the training
officer for the recruit and gunnery
schools and Lieutenant-Command-
er O. C. Rohnke, the officer in
charge of the Officers Training
School.
Regular Coast Guard officers
these four men assumed their pres-
ent posts backed with years of ser-
vice, experience and fine records
VBUY WAR BONDS
BUY WAR BONDS!


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It's washable--one coatdoes the job. Covers 1,000 Q
square feet per gallon. A regular $2.50 product for $ 2a I1


PAINTS- WALLPAPER
ALL KINDS OF HARDWARE

COMPLETE LINE OF FISHING TACKLE


ST. AUGUSTINE

PAINT & HARDWARE CO.


BUY WAR BONDS


supplied by


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ENRICHED

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Yourgrocer has it fires


DRESSED TO THRILl





I '


ST. AUGUSTINE, THE 'OLDEST CITY
Founded in 1565
By Pedro Menendez de Aviles


A. H. TEBAULT, Publisher
NINA HAWKINS, Editor
National Advertising Representative?
Theis and Simpson Co., Inc.,
869 Lexington Ave., New York City.

Entered in St. Augustine. Post Office as see-
ond-class mail matter.
Published Sunday morning and every after-
noon, except Saturday.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Per Week Per Month 3 Months 1 Year
20 cents 85 cents $2.50 -$10.;00
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for publication of ll news dispatches
credited to it or not otherwise credited in this
paper, and also the local news published here-
tn. All rights or republication of special dis-
patches herein are also reserved.
In case of error or omissions in advertise-
ments the publisher does not hold himself liable
for. damages further than the amount received
for such advertisement.
THE ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD
TELEPHONES
Editorial and News Departments ......... 51
Advertising Department ................. 52
Circulation Department .................. 52


BE


FLORIDA

REALTOGRAM





fact that the Oldest City of St. Augustine
has its part in training men for Uncle Sam's
fighting forces. Many have known in a
casual way what was going on, but printer's
ink is a forceful and potent factor, and here
it is, put down in picture and printed word
for all to see,
A salute to our men and women in the
Armed Services, who are training here,,arei
stationed locally, or who come as visitors.
The Oldest City bids you welcome!
V
THERE'S NO USE FUSSING
TO be sure, it takes longer to get waited on
in stores than it did formerly. And why
shouldn't it? Store owners and clerks have
twice as much to do as they used to have.
They have to keep numberless records and
reports and statements. They have to keep
rationed goods separate from other goods,
and know all the point values, to say nothing
of collecting the stamps, and accounting for
them to the government.
Much of the hiredlielp has g6ne off to fight
or work in war plants. So the work is piled
on those who are left, and the new, inex-
perienced folks who are hired to help; out.
Tempers are short, sometimes, and you
can't always get satisfaction out' of your
.grocer and butcher.; That's not surprising,
with people lined up" three deep at the count-
ers, .and all asking questions. Perhaps the
butcher shows you a piece of meat you don't
like and you want, to see something else, and
then something else. With people piling up
behind you, trying to get his attention, and
secure service, is it any wonder if he, is
snappish? Those who can should do their
shopping in off hours, Remember, it's no
use fussing. Those are hard and difficult
times for a host of folks, and among them
are listed our merchants.
V
A GROWING VOCABULARY
OUR vocabulary grows and grows, with the
war adding daily to the stock of new
words with which an increasing number of
people are becoming familiar.
One of the new words we came across the
other day is aviationon" It means, as its
form suggests, the art of navigation in the
air, and is going to be heard more and more.
Dictionaries and their editors have a big
responsibility in keeping up with the times.
We hope they will not be as slow in accepting
'and including new words as they have been
in the past. The "Oxford Dictionary," the
largest compilation of English words, was
published gradually. 'As the letter "A" came
out in 1888,,for many years this elaborate
work did not contain the word "automobile."
The automobile and the airplane have
brought us hundreds of new words. Certain-
ly the puzzled layman should have some place
to wlich he can resort for information, and
which he can rely upon for authentic details.
V
Some people get sharp by keeping their
noses to the grindstone,
V
A train a4 thought often, gets on the wrong
track. .

Not Hearing From Home
Can Get Soldier Down
Quicker Than Anything
BY JACK STINNETT
AP Features Service Writer
WASHINGTON -- On a recent Saturday, while,
milling among the boys scuttling the free hot dogs
and beer at the National Press Club Canteen, I came
upon a fellow I had known in Texas. He .was a
sergeant in the Marines. He had been overseas.
He "used to be a newspaperman himself."
We got onto a subject that has been often talked
about, but not much by the soldiers themselves.
When I asked this chap if I could quote him, he said
"Gosh, don't use my name; it might sound maudlin,"
The subject was "mail from home."
"There's nothing that gets a soldier down quicker
than not hearing from home," he said. "I've seen
them and I know. The army knows it too and APO
is doing a whale of a job in getting the mail through
to places that up to this war didn't get a mail
packet every six months.
"If the boys in my outfit are a fair cross-section,
a guy can stand it about a week. Along about the
fifth day of no mail from home, he begins to droop
and grouse more than usual. In a week or ten days,
he's really in the dumps and that's no place for a
fighting man. But you ought to see the change of
face when the letters roll in.
"I don't know what it is, exactly; Sometimes it's
relief at knowing things are.all right with tee family
or the gal. Sometimes, it's assurances of affection
from a wife, or sweetheart, or mother. But mostly,
I think it's just that reestablishment of contact.
It's like thinking you are all alone out in a foxhole
at night, under fire, and then discovering your outfit


is all around you.
'These marines, soldiers and sailors we are turning
out are tough when there's fighting to be done, but
when it's over they're just like any other kids.
"Let me tell you about one in my outfit. We had
just answered mail call, when all hell started to
bust loose up front somewhere and we were ordered
into action pronto. The rest of the day the going
was pretty thick. The Japs still were breathing in
our faces when we dropped back to a ridge to hole
up for the night. We hadn't any more than got
settled when I noticed that one of my outfit was
missing.
"About an hour later, he came scrambling back
from the Jap lines. I asked him just where in thun-
der he had been.
"He said: 'I dropped a letter from Ma out there
that I hadn't had time to read. I had to go back and
get it.'
"Say, if you are going to write about this, there's
one thing I wish you'd stick in. Soldiers don't like
mail from people they don't know. They not only
don't like it, it makes them mad. They figure it
just takes up space and who cares anyway," he
.coniclded.
So there you are--a fighting.man's ideas on mail
from home.


LONDON (AP)-Britons who have
displayed growing interest in Bra-
zil will be able to learn more about
their South Ameridan ally through
the newly-formed Anglo-Brazilian
Society, whose purpose i to stim-
ulate still closer cultural relations
between the two nations.
Brazilian Ambassador Senhor J.
J. Montz'dhe Aragao is president of
the, organization and Lieutenant-
Colonel Sir Thonbis Cook, vMP;,
grandson of the-founder ofthe Cook
Travel agency, is chairman.


One Minute With Florida Associa-
tion of Realtors.
VIOLET DUNHAM,
Executive Secretary.
The National Association of Real
Estate Boards and the National
Bar Association last year entered
into an agreement as to what con-
stitutes the practice of law and
what the practice of real estate.
This was signed by the President
of the 'National Bar Association
and the President of the National
Association of Real Estate Boards:
and approved by Realtor boards;
over the nation. Florida Realtors
are somewhat surprised to note
proposed legislation in Florida
which would seem to abrogate this
agreement. Florida Realtors are
reminding their senators and rep-
resentatives of this agreement and
urging them to abide by its terms.
Booming real estate business
throughout the state is now gen-
erally conceded even by those who
were erstwhile pessimists. Real-
tors feel that this healthy condition
of the market is due in no little
part to the efforts of the National
Realtors Washington Committee,
which was able to secure some
modification of the first drastic
regulations of OPA, as well as fif-
teen other victories, recorded in
April 10 issue of Headlines, for
the benefit of real estate and propl.
erty ownership.
.Everything seems-to go up but
.rents, according to WPB statistics
published by OWI and which should
be enlightened if taken to heart
by OPA. This shows in two years
from January, 1941, to January,
1943, food prices went up 36 per
cer cent, clothing 25 per cent, house
furnishings 23.6 but rents only 2.9.
In 1942 alone food prices rose 14.5
per cent, clothing 8.4 per cent,
house furnishings 4.7 while rents
went down .4 per cent.
Victory gardens continue to in-
crease as timely, patriotic and prof-
itable war activity of the Realtor
in many communities. Florida had
the start on victory gardens begin-
ning last October, and while the
north is just beginning to stir the
soil, Florida Victory gardens are
starting third and fourth plantings.


r


.


/!


CASTILLO DE SAN MARCOS
NATIONAL MONUMENT, April
25-James Auchiah, a Coast
Guardsman now stationed in St.
Augustine has a real interest in
the Castillo.
In addition to wearing the shield
of the Coast Guard, Jimmy is a
Kiowa and an artist, a descendant
of the same western Indians who
were brought here to Fort Marion
by Capt. Richard Pratt in 1875.
When they learned he was
coming to St. Augustine, Jimmy's
folks told him about the place and
gave him a list of questions to an-
swer when he got here.
Our study collection contain
several drawings made by the In-
dians here some three score years
ago. We spent a good hour lis-
tening to Jimmy explaining the
details which the artists had put
into the drawings.


"
X
Ih I
II


WORDS OF THE WISE:--"Happy are the people whose God is A ll-in-all, who ask only to be judged according to their works, wh o live to love."-Mary Baker Eddy.


SUNDAY, APRIL l, 1504

The things you don't see in the Is there a squander bog in ywou
stores have gone to war. Send pocketbook? Put Bonds at ,h4
the money you don't spend on them top of your budget, and st"Ore
to the same place. Buy Bonds. him out.


THE ST, AUGUSTINE RECORD


PAGE 4


Let's Hold This Battle Line, Too


BUY WAR BOND


A BIBLE THOUGHT FOR TODAY
DON'T LIMIT YOUR KINDNESS TO
PEOPLE WHO ARE WELL RECOM-
MENDED. THERE ARE TIMES WHEN
HUMAN NEED IS A VALID CREDEN-
TIAL: Let brotherly love continue. Be not
forgetful to entertain strangers; for there-
by some have entertained angels unawares.
-Heb. 13:1.
V *
EASTER IN WARTIME
)EATH and destruction, and the appalling
waste in human life, and the tragedy of
Suffering weigh heavily upon us in wartime.
The United States was aa comparatively new
participant in the world-wide holocaust. last
April. We had seen things grow progressive-
ly worse as the war spread and spread, but
until the Japanese struck at Pearl Harbor on
1iDecember 7, 1941, we still seemed to think
that disaster, which had engulfed other lands,
could not touch us.
: Since. lasas waste niany of our brave '
American boys have fought the good fight,
and laid down their lives on far-off battle-
fronts; died in sea disasters, or in the air.
The sufferings of many of our people, due to
death, and the temporary loss of loved ones
listed as missing or prisoners, have been very.
great, We would not minimize those suffer-
ings, but we would emphasize that what we
have begun to experience has been the lot of
tqome nations and. some peoples for almost
,four long years. Iii the case of the Chinese,,
4it has been far longer than that. ,We cannot
-ven. bgin to vsagze vfiat co-t&A ies have
Undergone that have been bombed, invaded,
robbed, and conquered. Their losses in hu-
man life are counted in the millions. And,
,things are not any better. Those people face
starvation, torture, terror, death,
Hope is the only sustaining force.in these
Uands where there is so little, to encourage
the people.
Easter is the season, of hope. It is the
Festival which marks the transition from
despair to rejoicing; from darkness to light,;
.from tragedy to, joy. "He is risen"; "He
,that was dead is alive again"; "I am the
Resurrection and the Life"-these were the
messages given at that first Easter dawning.'
Before another Easter dawns,:we hope and
pray that the great weight of sorrow which
,now rests' uponi the world may be lifted in a
-measure; 'that the dove of peace may have
found a.resting place; that mass destruction
may have ceased; that the armies which fight
for the preservation of human rights and
dignity and freedom may be supreme; that
stricken peoples now in bondage all over the
world may find promise of a brighter, better
day, freed from the horror which now sur-
rounds them.
V
WITH A FEELING OF PRIDE
IT is with a feeling of great pride that the
A St. Augustine Record offers to the people
of St. Augustine, the service men located
here, and other readers of this newspaper,
scattered over a wide area, itsI Service Edi-
tion, dedicated to the men training in this
Vicinity. .
The Service Edition appropriately is spon-
sored by the Ladies Auxiliary of the Regular
Veterans Association, and the women, who
have been working in the community for
several weeks, contacting merchants and
business men generally, have met with a re-
markable response. Interest has been genu-
ine and heartfelt, when it was found what
the intent of the edition was, arid that the
sponsors would devote monies they receive
from the edition for added recreational and
entertainment features for service men in
the community.
Special editions of newspapers are of ne-
cessity rare now, due to curtailed supplies of
newsprint, metals for the making of cuts,
and shortage of other materials.
But a Service Edition such as that offered
today has a fine patriotic purpose. It is
published primarily in order to give citizens
of this community, and others who will read
the newspaper, some idea of the intensive
training being given to men in this Oldest
City, and also some conception of what is
being done for service men and women who
come here on leave from different camps and
stations in the Florida area, as well as else-
where.
None can read the various news stories in
the Record and see the numerous fine pic-
tures offered, without a thrill of pride in the


* FROM THE i ^ *
:HOME FRONT W
Q.-Can I sell human hair to the
government for war use?
A.-No sale. Human hairis used
in making a few navigation instru-
ments but the manufacturers have
a surplus.
Q.-My sweetheart,, Lieutenant
in the Navy, gave me an overseas
cap. Can I wear it?
,A.Yes, but take off any insig-
nia and braid it may have.


Britons Forge
Link With Brazil


DA VIS S HORSES


Filling Station


Let's Make ItA








MILL OLN!


Already OurBank Alone Has Sold





$951,9925.00


DURING THE



2nd WAR LOAN DRIVE



$508,000 was the quota set for St. Joins County to be raised dur-
ing the Second War Loan Drive, but at the close of business on
Wednesday, April 21st OUR BANK ALONE HAD SOLD AL-
MOST TWICE THAT AMOUNT.
When we advised the State head of the Victory Drive of our sue-
cess he replied "unbelievable." We thought so too, but the good
people of St. Johns County and our visitors have shown their
colors and even surprised our expectations... now anything can
happen and we feel sure that they will


MAKE IT A MILLION

BY WEDNESDAY, APRIL 28TH


With' the
Park
Ranger


7 Exchange



= Ban-kEE CUdI&










































































































a tasty Ice Cream Soda,or a Gift for Your Girl Friend you'll
Touchton's the store for economy and variety. Oh, yes, you'll
find food like mother used to cook ... and all of the other odds'
ends you'd expect to find in a thoroughly modern drug store.


N


PAGE 5


")Our Band" Rates


High At Station


And In Old City

18 Young Musicians Have*,"name" bands. They have a stand-
Revealed Jekyll And ing agreement, however, to forget
Hyde Make-Up this for the duration in interest of
i harmony and their devotion to duty
Ask the average Coast Guard as Coast Guardsmenm
boot what rates high among the Versatile Talents
th he lik best at the St. Au- But when the boys mount the
things helikes best t the St. Au- stage of the Lyceum for the Fri-
gustine Training Station and he day night Recruit Shows, their
will probably go into a shag step versatile talents have an enter-
and intone: "Our band." taining wav of nnnnpng out for
aii wiw. i anu ^ ainng way of popingit out. fvr


GLIMPSE OF WEEKLY RECRUIT SHOW AT LYCEUM


USO NCCS Club Has Been In"

Operation Since April, 1941


WELCOME


-.. OUR BEST

WISHES TO

:t THE MEN

WHO ARE

BEING TRAINED

TO MAN GUNS

ON OUR

FIGHTING SHIPS
..........."...' ......... .
22"C~lsgllgl l8 f ....


LETS ALL BUY MORE WAR BONDS TO BUY MORE SHIPS


BUILDERS' SERVICE

COARD LUMBER BRANCH CORDOVA HARDWARE BRANCH
50 BERNARD ST. 51 CORDOVA ST.


MEN

AND

WOMEN


TOUCHTON'S

THE REXALL DRUG STORE


47 KING ST.


PHONE 38


BUY WAR BONDS


h


III I I --


Don't Stop Now-Buy Another Bond
AND ALLOT A CERTAIN AMOUNT OF EACH PAY CHECK
FOR BOND PURCHASES


Lnm77


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of
st
y-
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of
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of
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1


a I--~- -~L L I _, I I


01
C,
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SERVICE FAMILIES
WELCOME TO


Pinkoson's

92 ST. GEORGE ST.
PHONE 356


class, piano; George Peranich (
New Orleans, La., musician, firs
class, drums and vibra harp; Ray
mond Potts of Houston, Texas, mu
sician, second class, bass viol, Bo
Pandy of Cleveland, musician, see
ond class; bass viol; Milo Neff o
Columbus, Ohio, seaman, fir
class, guitar, and Emil Bogatay o
Detroit, musician, second class, ac
cordian.i


FULL LINE OF

| PIECE


GOODS


ALSO
WEARING APPAREL,
FOR


I


I


SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1943


THE ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD


nery training officer at the station
here.
The band moved with the station
to Algiers, La., and thence to its
present location in St. Augustine.
Always, Comdr. D'avis has watched
over them and given them encour-
agement.
Daily -Routine
Its daily routine includes a con-
cert each noon in the mess hall
and on Monday, Tuesday and
Wednesday evenings before the
station's showings of motion pic-
tures, when no other program is
scheduled.
With scarcely time out to rest a
lip pucker or an aching bow arm,
the boys frequently turn out for
dances at the Lyceum, the YMCA
'service men's center, the Civic Re-
creation Center or the Officers Club.
During the recent illness restric-
tion at the station, the band did a
bang up job of helping to prop up
the sagging spirits of the cooped
up trainees.
All this does not include those
extra jobs of playing for reviews,
parades and countless other mili-
tary activities demanding a musi-
cal accompaniment.
Chief Bandmaster
The aueit is headed by Chief-
Bandmaster John H. Sugdenf of
Akrca, Ohio, a veteran musician,
whose ambition is to boost the
organization's manpower to 25
men to create a military band
that will have St. Augustine tap-
ping its foot to, the rousing
strains of regular patriotic con-
certs. ,
For its dance work, the band:usu-
ally plays under the baton of Stan-


Big Lyceum Building
On St. George Street
Is Headquarters,
St. Augustine's USO -operated
National Catholic Community Ser-
vice Club, which is housed in the
Lyceum building on South St.
George Street, was officially inaug-
urated in April, 1941. Operations
were initiated with the cooperation
of a nuclear body of volunteer
workers. Today, that number has
been augmented to the round figure
of 300 workers and approximately
250 junior hostesses. ',
Joseph R. Regna is i':dc'tor of
the club, which has enjoyed the
representative cooperation of the
following organizations in the
prosecution of its activities: the
Catholic Daughters, the Catholic
Woman's Study Club,. the National
Council of Catholic Women,. the
National Council of Catholic Men,
the Knights of Columbus, the
American Legion and its auxiliary,
the Veterans of Foreign Wars and
its auxiliary, the Elks, civic officials
and others, including members of
the Fire Department.
Beach Project
Among the outstanding activities
is the Beach Project, operated last
year under the joint, auspices of
the. NCCS and YMCA USO'A and
which will be resumed this 'sum-
mer. This proved a popular and
successful outdoor activity in whictn
hundreds of service, men partici-
pated, they being transported free
to and from the local beaches.
Bathing suits and towels were fur-
nished without charge.
In the Lyceum auditorium, Coast
Guard trainees assemble each Fri-
day night for the weekly Recruit
Shows, staged and produced by and


for t'he men. Through the courtesy
of the NCCS, the shows are pre-
sented 'from the Lyceum stage.
Part of the programs go over- the
air.
A notable entertainment feature
which scored a big hit last summer;
was the local Minstrel Show which
toured the camps and bases in this
area and was previewed by a St.
Augustine audience.
Regularly scheduled 'wepekly pro-
gram includes: Sunday, open house
all day with dancing instructions
in the, afternoon; Monday, at 7:30
p. m., meeting .of the Catholic Ser-
vice Men's' Study Club with the
Reverend P. D. O'Baien, club mod-
erator, leading the discussions;
Tuesday and Wednesday, en
house; Thursday, dance with music
by Coast Guard Band; Friday,
'USCS Recruit Show in auditorium;
Saturday, dance, with music by Nat
Small's colored orchestra.
Club, facilities available free at
all times are: library and writing
room, pool. ping-pong, music by
records, basketball; equipment for
baseball, soft ball, tennis, horse-
shoe pitching, and .other outdoor
games; radio' and record player,
showers, towels and hotel water,
shaving and pressing facilities.
Carriage rides and trips to points
of historical interest are arranged
free ofcharge for the service men;
also beach excursions and boat
rides. Fishing tackle also is obtain-
able and cameras are available for
use.
In addition to Director Regna,
the NCCS Club. staff includes 'Vin-
cent Lipsio, assistant to Mr. Regna,
and Miss M. K. Murphy, secretary.
The Club Moderator is the Rev-
erend P. D. O'Brien, pastor of the
Cathedral.


view. A hand stinging applause
proves that, individually and col-
lectively, they have what it takes.
There is Jock Robertson of Ot-
tumwa, Iowa, who plays a caress-
ing first trumpet-Tall, lanky Ce-
cil Brower of Fort Worth, Texas,
and his Charlie McCarthy-like vio-
lin-George Peranich of New Or-
leans, La., who beats a set of drums
into submission and strokes the
vibra harp-Little Raymond Potts
of Houston, Texas, with his base
fiddle, and dead-panned Emil Bo-
gatay of Detroit, who stops the
show with an accordian.
The boys first got together more
than two years ago at the Ellis Is-
land, N. Y., training station at the
suggestion of Commander A. W.
Davis, at present recruit and gun-


"Our band" is a force of 18
young musicians with a Jekyll and
Hyde make-up that enables them to
whip up a corking good traditionalI
march for parade purposes, or
swing into a brand of boogie woogie
that would cut grooves in the decks.
Providing sharps and flats for
marching and dancing feet keeps
the hard working musical Coast
Guardsmen on a constant merry-go-
round of activity.
Despite, a full daily routine of
playing as a military unit for sta-
tion reviews, parades, mess hall en-
tertainment and .other musical du--
ties, they turn out many a night on
a double header schedule for dance
'engagements.
Almost all the members have had
long experience.in civilian life with


Seaman, second class, Jack Thompson, of Kansas City, Mo., entertains a Coast Guard audience with
one of his monologues at a Friday night Recruit Show in the Cathedral Lyceum auditorium. Through
the courtesy of the local USO NCCS Club, the Lyceum auditorium is made available to the service men
for this\ purpose. In the background in the picture above is' the Coast Guard Training Station's highly
popular orchestra which, plays for Thursday night dances at the NCCS Club, as well as, fulfilling a
variety of other duties and engagements for service personnel.


Tourist Club Closes
Season's Program
With Dance, Party
The dance which marked the
closing of the St. Augustine Tour-
ist Club for the season was held in
the club rooms this past week.
Friday the final game party was
held. The prize winners were: at
bridge, Mrs. I. T. Smith of Little
Falls, N. J.; Mrs. H. Connell of
Pontiac. Mich.; and Mrs. C. E.
Lamson of St. Augustine; at 500:
Mrs. W. E. Smith of Ohio; at
pinocle, Mrs. May Perpall of this
city and at Chinese Checkers Mrs.
Ethel. Clark and Mrs. Fern Parks.
Most of the club members have
left the city, or will leave this
coming week. ,All feel that they
have had a very successful year,
club officers say.


ley Ellertson; musician, second
class, of Aurora, Ill., who is also a
vocalist.
Tied in closely with the band in
the entertainment end of its baili-
witk, are the men and officers who
plan and stage the popular Recruit
Shows each Friday night at the
Lyceum.
Recruit Shows
This job falls largely on the
shoulders of William O'Neil, sea-
man, second class of Whiting, Ind.,
who is master of ceremonies; Ed-
ward Godin, seaman, first class, of
New York City, who is over-all pro-
ducer, and John Thompson, seaman,
second class, of Kansas City, Mo.,
who is musical director.
This trio combs the station for
talented recruits, writes scripts and
novelty songs and coordinates the
music and skits. They have the ad-
vice and counsel of the Catholic
chaplain,, Lieut. (j.g.) F. J. Till-
man,, and the Protestant chap-
lain, Lieutenant (j.g.) B. F. Janes.
That they work well together is
testified to by the enthusiasm with
which the Coast Guard audience
greets each show-an enthusiasm
that would be conspicuously absent
if the shows were poorly and shod-
dify done.
Give a St. Augustine Coist,
Guardsman a trumpet he can
-blow, a fiddle he can scrape or a
song he can sing, and he'll show
in no mean musical terms his
pride of service.
The complete roster of the band
members follows:
Complete Roster
Brass section-Jock Robertson of
Ottumwa, Iowa, musician, first
class, trumpet; Art Webster of Chi-
cago, apprentice seaman,, second
trumpet; Jack Laur of Bridgeport,
Conn., yeoman, second class, third
trumpet; Wally Wilson of Val-
paraiso, Ind., storekeeper, second
class, trombone, and Jim Mahaffey
of Dallas, Texas, apprentice sea-
man, French horn.
Saxaphones-Harold Nelson of
Ames, Iowa, musician, first class,
first alto; Jim Gerard, of L'Anse,
Mich., musician, second class, fourth
tenor; Joe Barbara of New Orleans,
La., musician, second class, third
alto, and Jim Holyfield of Law-
rence, XKans., apprentice seaman,
second tenor.
Violins-Cecil Brower of Fort
Worth, Texas, musician, first class,
first violin; Karl Johansson of
Natchez, Miss., musician, first
class, second violin; Jack Mahaffey
of Dallas, Texas, apprentice sea-
man, third violin, and Bill Stark of
Miami, Okla., apprentice seaman,
fourth violin.,
Rhythm--Roy Zimhmerman of
New Orleans, La., musician, first


Canned liquids are chilled with-
ut refrigeration in Africa. The
ans are buried in the sand and
gasoline poured over the spot. The
apid evaporation of the fuel low-
rs the temperature of the cans'
contents.


All the Southland joins today in remembering the men who went
to heroes' rewards in a,war that now seems long ago. No better
tribute could be paid to their memory than to pledge today our
full support to their grandsons and great-grandsons who are now
fighting another war on battlefronts that are farther flung and
,still more deadly!

Let's cherish the past by assuring the future! Translate your
reverence for heroes that are gone into total backing for the
heroes who now are fighting! Stand shoulder to shoulder with
our country's fighting men today-keep them equipped and ready
by buying'War Bonds! Transform your idle dollars into fight-
ing dollars-buy War Bonds and then buy.more War Bonds--
do YOUR share in the mighty offensive our armies now are wag-
ing around the world.


THEY GIVE THEIR LIVES ... YOU LEND

YOUR MONEY




Pape's Gnifts and Jewelry

57 KING ST. PHONE 878





a


For
find
also
and





_nl _


27c 27c
Plus Plus
Tax Tax
NOW SHOWING


I -- I


i


''


1.


r-~ ---- ---- ----


I I


Former Estate of Henry M. Flagler now Extension University and
Southern Headquarters for American Theological Seminary. Major
Spence receives honorary degree of Doctor of Literature


How did you learn of this institution? ............................................
(If through a publication, be sure to give its name)
IF YOU ARE A PROSPECTIVE STUDENT also answer the following:
Age? ........ .Color? ... ..... .. Religion? ...... ..... .. ..................
Occupation? ... ...... ... ........................ ..... ........ ..... .
Former Training? ...................... ................. ......... .... ...........
Print
Name .................... ........... .............. Date.............. ....
Print Print Print
Street ............... .... ........ City ................... .State ................

CUT OUT THIS BLANK AND, MAIL TODAY
ii


_


THE ST ... AUGUSTINE RECOR..D


PAGE 6..


Hedy Lamarr And Walter Pidgeon
At Their Best In "White Cargo,"
Smash Drama Opening At Matanza

Hedy Lamarr and'Walter Pid- ows of a jungle deep in the Da:
,geon provide a dynamic combina- Continent.
tion in "White Cargo," film version
.At The Jefferson
-of this famous stage play, opening
,today at the Matanzas Theatre
plays today: with "PARDON M
with Miss Lamarr as the glamor- STRIPES" on the fine double b
ous Torndlayo, native charmer, and at the Jefferson tells the story
Pidgeon. ais the two-fisted driving how the German Gestapo seeks t
rubber plantation supervisor Wit- death o:f an American Naval e
"zel. The story of the African rub- pert as. part of the Nazi scheme
ber jungles is one of stark, elemen- world conquest. It is an exciting
tal drama, played by a faultless melodrama by Orson Wells as
cast arid directed with. deft skill by stars Jogeph Cotton as the Ame:
Richard Thorpe. can a(4jelores Del Rio as a danc
Action is laid in a steaming rub- who fagls.in love with him. T
ber jungle. As the story opens picture has-it's setting in Turkey
Bramwell Fletcher, playing Pid- "PARDON MY STRIPES," sta
geon's'assistant, has been driven ring Bill Menry and Sheila Rya
almost insane by the jungle, and is a slapstick version of life in a b:
!leaves on the river boat which penitentiary. It is thekind of lig
brings Richard Carlson in, to re- entertainment guaranteed to plea
place him. The dark-skinned Ton- every type and age of filmgoers.
delay displays her charms but,: V
warned by Pidgeon, Carlson: at first: iiRemember fish 'loaves cry for
Shuns her. Later she fascinates iash' of.lemon. 1 teaspoon for ea
him, which precipitates a tense ata- 2 cups of mixture is a good la'v
matic situation ending in his fiery mixer. Finely chopped swec
sweetheart's attempt to poison him. pickles are also good in fi
Throughout, the story is played blends. Such special flavor ti
against. the drab cabins of the rub- show..the difference between ju
her workers and the sinister shad- food and really good food.


peoples-not governments said
Mrs. Stearns. "After all, it
is the people who make their gov-
ernments in this hemisphere. Once
the people understand each other,
the governments will follow suit."
V
John Barry was the first com-
modore of the United States navy.
., il lllllllllll llllll lllllllllllllllli
Double Feature Every Day


AP Features
MIAMI, Fla.-Thirteen years
ago, when the good neighbor policy
was still a gleam in the nation's
eye, the welcome mat was spread
here for South America by Mrs.
Clark D. Steams, wife of a retired
naval captain who had been sta-
tioned in various Caribbean coun-
tries. She watched the Latin tem-
perament through two incipient
revolutions, sitw that little love was
lost between the two continents
and decided something must be
done about'it.
Mrs. Stearns has developed over
those 13 years the international
Pan American League, an institu-
tion reaching via 225 chartered
ime1mber groups to 32 states in the
United Staes and most of the coun-
tries of Sou0th America. :Its mem-
bership lists about 20,000 men,
women and children, all dedicated
to developing more cordial rela-
tions among the peoples of the
western hemisphere.
Through its language institute,
the league has sponsored free
classes in Spanish and Portuguese.
In South America, it encourages
classes in English.
Through its 200 student leagues
in high schools' and colleges,
hundreds of English text books
as well as fiction have been sent
tb South America. Correspondence
between league members in the two
continents is- encouraged, North
Americans writing to: pen-pals in
Spanish, and receiving their an-
swers in English.
"The league is a movement of


MOVIE

s PREVIE WS
rk
Synopsis Of This Week's
Pictures At Matanzas
ich Theatre Here
lY SUN D.AY-MONDAY
)ill
of April 25-26
he Hedy Lamarr-Walter Pidgeon
,x- in WHITE CARGO, (Drama).
of As a stage play "White Cargo"
ng could always be relied upon to
nd bring out sensational attendance.
ri- As a screen play, with Hedy La-
2er marry in the seductive role of the
he temptress, TondeleYo, the picture
y. comes with a glossy furbishing and
ar- a marquee cast. The basis theme-
an, the degeneration of a young Eng-
big lishman on a rubber plantation in
*ht Africa-brings the victim into con-
ise flict with the climate, and a native
siren who is only prevented from
riakilng him her victim by the
a timely'; interference of the hard-
ch bitten plantation overseer, excel-
mor lently portrayed by Walter Pid-
eet geon By and large, however,
ish it is Hedy Lamarr's picture. She
ps is physically as enticing as Ton-
ist delay was meant to be, and ini
movement, voice and dramatic in-
terpietation she leaves nothing
wanting. Her rendition of the
jungle dance with modern inter-
polation, to the music of an old
battered phonograph, is something
to write home about. White Cargo
is an opportune type of entertain-
ment for the present-day movie-
goer, but is not meant for children
or adolescents.

TUESDAY, APRIL 27
Bargain Day
THE AVENGERS (W a r
Drama) with Ralph Richardson-
Deborah Kerr.
Historically. accurate, stranger
than fiction, and embellished with
P newsreel shots of the Commando
raid on Vaagsoe this picture is ex-
citing entertainment, which aud-
iences will enjoy thoroughly, AND
Jane Frazee-Ritz Brothers in
HI YA CHUM (Comedy).
This is a Ritz Brothers comedy
that will keep the customers
laughing. The gags come fast
from the Ritz boys, and others in
the cast help keep the story moving
happily-Exceptionally fine Bar-
gain day program.
WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY
April 28-29
Andrews Sisters Robt. Paige
in HOW'S ABOUT IT. (Comedy
plus Tunes).
AXromance of Tin Pan Alley
against ag background of singing
and comedy supplied by thle An-
drews Sisters, Buddy Rich, and
band, Shemp Howard, Mary Wickes


See Welles and Del Rio Together
as Mystery Man and Leopard
Woman










AND
The Wackiest Comedy of
the Year!


Major Max S. Edelstein, commanding officer of the Camp Blanding Army sub-post in St. Augustine,
is shown (to the extreme left) inspecting an M.P. detail for town duty, in the post area on. the Civic
Center grounds. Also facing the detail in the above picture is Sergeant Robert R. Tidmore.


and others. It is designed not to
set house records but to reap some
more of the rewards which have
been accruing from these musicals
trademarked Universal. The An-
drews Sisters sing in characteristic
fashion five songs, from as many
sets of tunesmiths, using for the
finale "Here Comes The Navy."
Reviewers' Rating VERY GOOD.
FRIDAY-SATURDAY
April 30-May 1
Betty Hutton-Mary Martin-
Eddie Bracken, Rudy Vallee-Dick
Powell and others in HAPPY
GO LUCKY. (Musical Comedy
in Color).
Technicolor-Here is pure, un-
adulterated, down-to-earth, enter-
tainment which will appeal to the
eye, to the ear, to the basic ro-
mantic instincts, and will tickle the
,funny bone. As a production it is
rich in spectacle, embellished by
gorgeous "Technicolor. The locale
of a Caribbean Island harks back to
a day when you could take a lazy
cruise to an island' far from the
na:1 a romantic triangle, which encom-
passes those elements of comedy,
song and story, which for a better
word must fall back on that apt
term known as "escapist," is set.
Happy Go Lucky, with its spirit of
abandon, its music, color, beauty,
romance comedy and bright dia-
logue, provides a type of enter-
tainment which will be welcomed
by patrons of both sexes. Classi-
fication by Reviewers Rating EX-
CELLENT.


Billy Henry


Sheila Ryan


nd Wae Forgot

During peace, the island's main
industry is catering to holiday-
makers, receiving about half a
million, annually. At present it is
being used by the British as a
prison for enemy aliens rounded
f up on the mainland.
t The island usually pays $40,000
annually to the British government:
as "contribution to expenses,"'set-
tled for $3,000,000 as its share to-
t wards the cost of World War I, has
, paid over $4,000,000 already to
, help with World War II.
The thousand-year-old House of
Keys was established on the
i island when the Vikings captured
it in the 9th century, and has re-
mained the Manx parliament ever
since.
One rule of -behavior for the
.House of Keys-if any member
comes in drunk he is fined a, dol-
lar. Buk if he can still say "Yea"
or "Nay" he gets his money back.
V
A dash of horseradish put into
egg yolk mixture used for stuffing
- hard cooked eggs gives extra pep.
Stuffed eggs with peanut butter or
t with diced celery put-into the filling
make nutritious lunch, box fillers
I for the children, office or defense
. plant workers.


Matinee 31c Now
Evening 36c O A WlFA,
Plus, Tax ^ l Showing

TODAY and MONDAY
The most talked-abdut enchantress in history
*, *becomnies the screen's most unforgettable
Siren !


PLUS CARTOON-NOVELTY-NEWS


C\ .I




TO


'i


NEED


T RETURN THIS INFORMATION BLANK
IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN RECEIVING, WITHOUT OBLIGATION

THE QUARTERLY BULLETIN


AMERICA'S EDUCATIONAL NEED

()nly 3% of the population are college graduates, more than eight million
have had some college education but have been unable to graduate, and at
least 65,000 clergymen have not completed both college and seminary.

There is no recognized university in this country that will permit this
worthy group to complete their education by Home Study, write examina-
tions under supervision and graduate with degree. Certain degree courses
of a questionable type have been offered, especially to ministers, but these
courses cannot meet the need since they do not provide the full standard of
training in.absentia.

THE UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION and the American Theological Semi-
nary were established to meet this need. Like the University of London,
we offer you the opportunity to prepare for the supervised examinations
by Home Study and graduate with diploma or degree. Prepare TODAY
for TOMORROW'S success. Begin at once by writing for information.

WHY NOT AN EDUCATIONAL VACATION NOW?

If you plan at some time to enroll for one of our Home Study courses lead-
ing to regular graduation, you will receive, without extra charge, the serv-
ices of an educational counselor while at St. Augustine, who will help plan
a Home Study course to meet your particular need. You need not begin
your course until you are ready to do so.

This will enable you to know the institution personally and examine its
methods thoroughly before beginning your course*of study.


NATIONAL BOARD OF REGENTS

To Approve Standards and Methods

Rev. George J. Apel, Jr., S.T.D., President of The Foundation
Rev. Henry G. Brubaker, M.A., D.D., Dean of the Division of thi4merican Theologi-
cal Seminary for Southern California; former president of Beulah College; pro-
fessor of Psychology and Speech Education in Beulah College, Upland, Calif.
Rev. Clinton J. Bushey, M.A., Th.D., Head of Biology Department, Olivet College,
Kankakee, Illinois.
Rev. Edward J. Braulick, M.A., S.T.D., President, Wartburg College, Waverly, Iowa;
President, National Lutheran Educational Association.
Rev. Otha L. Clark, B.D., Ph.D., Dean of the College at St. Augustine, Florida.
Rev. Alvin J. Cook, Th.D., D.D., Dean of the Evening College of The Foundation at
Wilmington, Delaware.
Rev. Percival Cundy, M.A., Th.D., Dean of the Evening College of The Foundation at
Philadelphia, Pa.


In view of war time conditions our mailing list is being revised to include all interested
persons. This blank is to, be filled in by all who desire to be on our mailing list
and mailed to
THE UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION,
ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA
Please send me, without obligation, the quarterly BULLETIN regularly and the new
catalog.
NOTE: The catalog will only be sent to those who-fill in and return this blank.
I am interested in information about the items checked below:
O Resident College, Saint Augustine, Florida. Four-year liberal arts education with
special training for business, industry or Christian'work. 'MAY BE COMPLETED.
IN TWO YEARS under new plan for Individualized Education with supervised
resident private study under college tutors. TOTAL COST $1400.00, payable
$70.00 a month, includes reference library, instruction, room and board for two
school years during which the four-year course may be completed.
] Evening College, St. Augustine, Florida.
D College Education by Home Study leading to graduation.
] Graduate Home Study Course of the American Theological Seminary.
O Seminar Courses at Saint Augustine during a vacation period followed by Home
Study leading to graduation.
nO St. Augustine Summer School, JUly 20 to August 16.
D Wilmington, Bible College, Wilmington, Delaware.
D Philadelphia Evening College, Central Y. M. C. A., Philadelphia, Pa.
NOTE: Students may enter any month for the resident courses at Saint Augustine or
for Home Study courses. The evening colleges accept students in September
and February for courses in the Humanities and Christian Education.
I am interested--


[]
O
O
D]
D]


As a prospective student. :
On behalf of a prospective student.
As a friend desiring to know more about the work and its needs.


Rev. David Hutchison, B.D., Ph.D., Lecturer in Jurisprudence and Political Science,
Union University, Albany, New York; formerly Head of Department of Political
Science, State College of University of the State of New York.
Honorable Elmer H. Webber, M.A., member of State of Maine House of Representa-
tives; former superintendent of schools, Mapleton, Maine.
Rev. Samuel M. Zwemer, D.D., LL.D., S.T.D., F.R.G.S., Professor Emeritus of History
of Religion and Missions, Princeton Theological Seminary; Editor of THE
MOSLEM WORLD.


SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1942


-At-Home

Ambassadors


FAMILIAR SCENE AT LOCAL ARMY SUB-POST


Stay


The Isle of Man Hailed


As Isla

Is Not Subject To Ra-
tioning Laws of
British
By EDWARD ROBINSON
AP Features
LONDON--- Britain's Isle oJ
Man, out in the Irish Sea about
forty miles away from the Cumber-
land coast, is something of a
dream isle.
For 70 cents you can still sil
down-if you are hungry-to steak,
eggs, sausages, ham, peas, onions
fried potatoes, roll butter and cof-
fee.
The island is not subjected to
British rationing laws. It also has
its own, income tax ranging from
four cents on the dollar for in-
comes up to $2,000, to 13 cents on
the dollar for those over $20,-
000 yearly.
Man was bought by the British
in the early 19th century, but the
islanders still defer to the supreme
authority of the British govern-
ment only when the island is
named specifically in British en-
actments.
There is a Manx language, but
only 500 out of the population of
50,000 stick to their peculiar brand
of Gaelic. They all speak English,


"PARDON
MY
STRIPES"
'illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllll'1


tamina,




I

AMERICANS
HAVE THE STAYING
POWER TO FIGHT
UNTIL' THE WAR IS
WON


BENNETT


HOTEL


ON THE WATER FRONT


NEW


UNIVERSITY


MEET


NATION AL


SPEAKER AT DEDICATION FEBRUARY 11TH
MAJOR HARTZELL SPENCE, Editor of YANK,


r,


AND THE NEW CATALOG


























COAST GUARD-ARMY

NAVY- MARINES
WHETHER YOU ARE STATIONED IN THIS LOCALITY
OR A WEEK-END VISITOR WE .WISH TO ADD OUR


---- -L -r -L


'SAVE THIS PAGE
LEARN TO RECOGNIZE THESE INSIGNIAS
STUDY THIS PAGE-THEN YOU WILL
KNOW "WHO IS WHAT" AMONG THE
SAILORS


M- '*


I;.


--- ---e -- -- -----~- '-i


~eP


V


CKGE. ~~


SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1943


THE ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD


i


WITH THE MEN AND WOMEN OF THE
ARMED SERVICES LOCATED IN THIS AREA


-*UNNER MATE.


* TURRET CAPTAIN


. *SIGNALMA


superior "Rates" High with Civilians To

S Drink MILK-that's one of America's- strongest weapons to win the war! You'll find Superior milk richer
and creamier than any other you've tried. Above all, it provides the food essentials your body needs every
day to maintain good health-not just ordinary amounts but also the all-important EXTRA vitamins, min-
erals and proteins. Superior Milk is produced on our own two modern dairy farms right in our own county
of St. Johns, bottled under the most sanitary conditions at our up-to-the-minute plant at 276 San Marco Ave.
We would like to take this opportunity to thank the other dairies in this community for their cooperation in
helping to conserve delivery and other dairy equipment. Yes, St. Johns County Dairymen are doing their
share to help win the war.

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WAR


RED RYDER


I


___


- BABSON'S

Authentic Statement


---
- ---


for now taking what you are no
getting; but you can do these thr
things which will help you a
your family after the war ends:
1. You can do more and betl
work every day. This will ke
down prices and make it unnece


- ---- -- -- ----


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---


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SUfNDAY, APRIL U, 190


THE ST. AU USTINE RECORD


td return to their old jobs; but they
have been given no promise about
wages. This is another reason why
the present employers paying high-
er wages for war workers will be
compelled to let these war workers
go after peace is declared. The
only way most employers can take
back former employees, who were
drafted into the services, will be
by discharging those who have
stayed home cashing in at high
wages, while their brothers suffer-
ed hell in the South Sea Islands
for fifty dollars per month.
Higher Wages Now Mean More
Grief Later
I repeat that all you war workers
are now living in a fool's paradise.
No labor leaders nor politicians
can prevent a terrible crash in the
labor market after World War. II.
Furthermore, the higher John L.
Lewis and. the Railroad Unions
push up wages now, the greater
the fall will be and the more grief
after peace comes. Will the United
States, after peace comes, use any
more ,coal than was used in 1939 ?
No! Miners must again then go
back to three days a week. Will
the railroads, after peace comes,
haul any more people or freight
than they did in 1939? No-not
so much! Hence, after World War
H great unemployment will exist
among' coal and railroad workers.
I believe in labor unions the same
as I believe in corporations. To
have workable unions, they also
must have well-paid officials the
same as do successful corporations.
My: message this week is simply
this: These union labor'officials are
as blind to present wage conditions
today as were the corporation offi-
cials blind to business conditions
in 1929. These labor leaders are
leading their union members for a
terrible fall and disappointment
the same as the corporation officials
led their stockholders to disaster
in 1929. I hope every war worker
now getting high wages will cut
out this article and paste it on his
wife's mirror to read from now
until the war ends!
What War Worker Should Now Do
What can you as a war worker
do about it? You.can't be blamed


JABBING THAT BAYONET HOME


BABSON PARK, Mass., April 24-In 1929 when stocks
Were selling eight times present prices I told investors that
These prices could not possibly hold up and that a price
collapse was ahead. It surely*
oame with a bang. In a few of job troubles. Moreover, this
months prices dropped 80% labor panic could take place with
and in two years all the banks increasing commodity prices, great-
were closed with ten million er real estate activity and even
Unemployed. higher stock prices.
Wage Markets Like Stock Markets The politicians may say this will
. Today the, situation is exactly not happen. They may say that
reversed. It is true that the stock the government will give employ-
marketr has gone up a little since ment if private companies will not
1982. The averages, which then do so., Rerhaps this will be tried;
stood at 27, now are about 80; but but i.fe* the government will not
this is far from the high of 265 in pay thi.wages-no, nor half the
1929. if, however, the newspapers wages-that war workers are now
would publish the wage averages, getting. No government could con-
te same as they publish the stock tinue in office which paid any spe-
awerages, what would they show?' cial groupof ex-war workers more
is tell you they should scare every than letter-carriers, policemen and
manition worker stiff, other government employees get.
Hence, now I want to talk to This averages $35 per week for
sanbers of the AFofL and the CIO men and $25 .per week for women
ae same as I talked to investors as "tops." Union war workers are
10M9. You munition workers now having a reckless, riotous and
re today just where your employ- crazy honeymoon..
an mwe in 1929. You are headed Beware of Political Promises
Jor just M much of a licking as Then think of this: If the gov-
they got. Your labor leaders are ernment takes over factories to
blinding you to the real facts now make shoes, or textiles or motor
the some as Wall Street bankers cars so as to give ex-war workers
bibaed your employers fourteen jobs, how is the government going
T's ago this very month and day. to sell the shoes, clothing, textiles'
HMions Will Be Unemployed When or autos? There is only one way
War Stops and that is by cutting prices below
Twaby million people are now what regular manufacturers" are
eagaged im war work. Some day charging. This would mean that
thi war will suddenly stop. Ad- these private manufacturers would
naral Halsay is reported to have need to shut down and throw their
said it wM end this year; but I employees out of work. Hence# the
don't beHe it will end until after "cure" would be worse than the
eleetione in november, 1944. When- disease. .The politicians would only
ever it doe" and there will be an be "robbing Peter to pay Paul."
awful wash in the union labor For every vote they might get
market, ie same as there was in from the war workers, they would
the todk market in 1929. Millions lose two votes' from peacetime
ot union labor will quickly be workers and returning soldiers.
thrown oat otwork. Those getting In the above calculations I have
the highest wages will be dropped said nothing about these ten million
first. There wil then be a job panic soldiers who will be returning
and a job depression and all kinds home. They will have sixty days


VAUGHN


IN,


With a fierce grimace, Coxswain Herbert Robinson, of Chicago,
runs his bayonet into a burlap-covered dummy during bayonet drill.
It helps a Coast Guardsman to put steam into his bayoneting if he
imagines the dummy to be a'Jap or maybe a Nazi.


sary for the government to borrow
so much money.
2. You can stop asking for high-
er wages and thus avoid making
the returning soldiers any uglier
when they do return than they
would be if they came back now.
3. You can save every cent pos-
sible now for the days-after the
war-when you'll be out of work.
The cost of living has not advanced
more than 20 per cent. Keep your
expenses down to what they were
before the war, plus 20 per cent.
Save the rest by putting it in the
savings bank or War Bonds. I
say this as your best friend.
V
YWCA GIRLS OF
FLORIDA NORMAL TO
PRESENT PAGEANT
The YWCA girls of the Florida
Normal and Industrial Institute
present an Easter Pilgrimage, a
pageant play in two parts on
Sunday, April 25th, at Zion Bap-
tist Church at 8 p. m., of which
Rev. M. B. Britton, is pastor. This
is one of the well known colored
churches of the community. Mar
jorie Joyce Shell is president of
the YWCA of the Florida Normal;
Anna F. Harvin, vice president,
and Amy Joyce Demistorn, spon-
sor. The program will feature
much beautiful music. An invita-
tation is given all interested to
attend.

G ^^ .^f-5 -A--


t /


i


go/-


Waiting at her County Donegal,
Eire, home while her son makes
history in Africa is Lady Mont-
gomery, 'mother of famed Gen.
Sir Bernard 2 1.Sdtgonxya,
By FRED HARMAN


Our Service Men need ammunition to secure their home-coming,
Let's go "all-out" for Victory.


COSMIC'S READY-TO-WEAR
WHERE YOU CAN BUY YOUR NEEDS ON TERMS
TO SUIT YOUR INCOME.




COMIC K'S

READY TO WEAR


,A


199 W. KING ST.


MUIR'S CHINESE SHOP
132 ST. GEORGE ST.
WILL CLOSE FOR THE SEASON
SATURDAY, MAY 1ST


War Bond Sales

Maintained At

Spirited Pace

Hopes High Now For
Trebling Of Local
Quota
The buying of bonds continues
at a spirited pace, say Frank F.
Harrold and J. B. Dod, co-chairmen
of the Second War Loan Drive in
St. Augustine and St. Johns
County.
They have high hopes for treb-
ling the quota, which is $508,000.
The quota was exceeded almost as
soon pas the drive opened. It is
now more than doubled, .
In fact, Mr. Dodd said Saturday
that the Exchange Bank alone, of
which he is executive vice presi-
dent, had sold $951,925 worth up to
April 21st.
The point is made that"many
places cannot and some will not
reach the quota, so every com-
munity which can and will buy
bonds to the utmost is being urged
to do so.
Notable Upswing
A notable upswing in bond buy-
ing has been recorded all over the
country, it is stated; since the news
was given concerning the execution
of American fliers by the Japan-
ese.
In Emphatic Terms
It is evident, local officials of the
drive say that there is a determina-
tion in most places to help make
the Second War Loan such an :over-
whelming success that it will speak
in emphatic terms of the determi-
nation of the American people to
finance the war, and raise colossal
sums of money for such financing.
War Bonds are a good'invest-
ment, it is emphasized-an invest-
ment in American safety, and se-
curity-an investment designed to
help our fighting men--and an in-
vestment which will serve as a fi-
nancial protection for the individ-
ual and his family in post-war
days,
V
St. Augustine'si Men's
Shop Has Official ,
Navy Appointment
The St. Augustine Men's Shop,
owner, Harry Rice, hasjust re-
ceived appointment by the U. S.
Navy as official distributor of the
new regulation uniforms for Naval,
Commissioned and Chief Petty Of-
ficers, under the Navy plan.
Mr. Rice stated he considered
this appointment a great honor
and that he is proud and happy to
be able to serve the U. S. Navy.
V
It is not so much a question of
saving for a rainy day. The rainy
day is here. It is rather a question
of saving for the day to come when
the sun shines again.


VILLA

189 SAN MARCO AVE.


WELCOMES


1. 4, se


ALL SERVICE PEOPLE

WITH

COMFORTS OF HOME


VAUGHN VILLA
IS UNDER THE OWNERSHIP
AND MANAGEMENT OF ITS
BUILDER.AND DEVELOPER

MRS. J. R. VAUGHN
-*& *


IN THE WEST IT'S


GRAND


CANYON





IN THE EAST ITS


NIAGARA


PASS THE AMMUNITION!

INSURE YOUR FUTURE


FALLS






SOUTH IT'S





SPRINGS


orene ffMciHier


IN THE S(


SILVER


FLORIDA'S UNDERWATER FAIRYLAND
PROUDLY SHOWN THRU ELECTRICALLY DRIVEN GLASS BOTTOM BOATS


Open Daily-Sunrise Tc




SEE IT NOW!


Sunset




*


WITH


BONDS





BRIG. GEN. VIVIAN COLLINS
tions and weapons; in maintaining
transportation, power, and other


--


40 Million Housewives Can't Be Wrong--
If they save all their waste kitchen fats.
American soldiers need explosives to shoot at the Axis.
Fats make glycerine, vitally necessary for making explosives.
Uncle Sam asks every housewife to save, strain, and sell every
ounce of waste kitchen fat.
mmmumum m


L IA P J|AM|B BB]E T
ERR RAR AIR A LA
51 ~E RJAjA VSAETjA R
TAR APIAI E5GO"
_EONWAR A S Ar
EI- ATI ONMAI AD
DAT I VE FU1T L 5s
E V E.M Lol0|A OSE
REIS OIN pHIP
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ADON I STIR U EI -
NA P |0 ENIeT E RJAP
PD E1tB NloloPDis P1u
Solution To Prwvions Puazle


rp~f~a~lls.l~rr Itr


1


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8" 4* // "- '-/ 5 17

jr. .8
332 43
A4 44




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Warning that. grave problems lie
ahead as manpower shortages in-
-crease, Brig. Gen. Vivian Collins,
State Director of Selective Serv-
ice, said local boards soon will be
forced into a category of regis-
trants of a high degree of domes-
tic dependency and responsibility
-the registrant with wife and
child or children.
Therefore, he reminds employers
that physically fit military age
registrants who are not. eligible
for dependency deferment must be
released from industry at an early
date. In the future, Local Boards
must be satisfied by appropriate
evidence that industry has made
a reasonable effort to secure and
train replacements before consid-
eration will be given to further
deferment of men in this category,
"The one resource that is a
common requirement in every
phase of our war effort," says
General Collins, '!is manpower. It
is the essential ingredient. It is a
prime factor in producing min-
erals, metals, lumber, and raw
materials; in fabricating muni-


essential services; in producing
foods and fibers as well as in act-
ually fighting the enemy.
"For several years now the
transition from a peace economy
to defense economy, to war eco-
nomy has resulted in serious.dis-
locations in the economic life of
our Nation and the utilization of
our productive manpower.
"Early in'1940 we began the
greatest "rearmament and defense
progress in our history," he con-
tinued.
"Increased strength quotas for,
the Army, Navy, Marine Corps,
Air Forces, and Coast Guard in-
augurated high pressure r-ecruit-
ing drives for volunteers in the
armed services.
"In September of that year, the
Selective Training and Service
Act was passed.
."1941 was a period of spirited
competition between the armed
forces and expanding defense in-
dustry for the cream of America's
manpower. During that year
about two million people, previous-
ly not engaged in productive work,
were added to our working and
armed forces-an increase from
54.2 million in December, 1940,
to 56.1 million iit December, 1941.
"Those who went into the armed
forces and 'mushrooming' indus-
tries were almost all healthy
young men-quick to. learn new
techniques and not hampered by
dependents or other attachments.
The. flow of manpower from one
activity to another was uriregulat-
ed except by Selective Service.
"During 1942, three million peo-
ple, previously not engaged in
productive work, were added to
our working and armed forces--
an increase from 52.3 million in
December, 1941, to 58.8 million
in December, 1942."
The State Selective Service Di-
rector further explained that' the
*rigors of service in the armed
forces make it necessary to draw
men of certain physical require-
ments and within certain age
groups for use in the armed forces.
"Information received from re-
liable sources," he said, "indicate
that there were in 1940, only four-
teen million men in this country
,who could qualify as to age and
physical requirements for entrance
into the armed force.: From this
group the total strength, of the

armed forces, ten or eleven mil-
lion men must be drawn. Many
of. these men are now occupying
essential positions in industry


STATE SELECTIVE
SERVICE DIRECTOR


In this historic old building,
the State Arsenal on Marine
Street. whose Parade Grounds
overlook Matanzas Bay, are cen-
tered the Military Department
*of the -" "')rida and the
State's Selective Service Head-
quarters. Presidin:: over both is
Brig. Gen. Vivian Collins, Ad-
jutant General of Florida and
Director of Selective Service for
this state.
Its historic walls have with-
stood fire, shot and shell. Origin-
ally a Franciscan Monast y, it
later became St. Francis Bar-
racks. For years 'past, it has
been known as the State Arsenal.
It is one of the city's oldest
landmarks, records of the build-
ing showing it was partially de-
stroyed and rebuilt several times
before Florida was ceded to the
United States in 1821.


2 after Florida ? came a part
of 'lhe States, the building serv.
ed for a time as a jail; later, in
1832, Congress passed an act
setting aside the Military Re-,
servation if St. Francis Bar-
racks. During the Seminole In.
dian wars, 'his post was head-
qua .-.., for troops operating in
south and central Florida. Until
some time after the Spanish-
American War, it was occupied
by the regular army. It was first
leased to the State of Florida,
and later an act of Congress
transferred it to the state for
military purposes. In 1915, it was
gutted by fire. It was not re-
built until 1923.
First records of this property
as verified from old Spanish
documents relate that the Fran-
ciscan Monastery Neustra Senora
de la Concepcion originally oc-
cupied the spot, having been.


built of logs in the year 1588.
The convent and fortifications
were destroyed by fire in 1599.
Three years later the King of
Spain sent 800 ducats to restore
them, and in' 1610 selected the
newly built convent as the Cap-
itular House of Santa Elena de
la Florida. /
On August 1, 1907, the then
unoccupied reservation was leas.
ed to the State of Florida for
the use of the National Guard,
and the Adjutant General's of-
fice changed, to St. Augustine
from Tallahassee.
It was in the Fall of 1940, that
it became also headquarters for
State Selective Service.
The adjacent Military Reserva.
tion extends southward to the
National Cemetery, both build-
ings and grounds. being beauti.
fully kept.


A
FAVORITE
WITH
THE MEN
,IN
UNIFORM


Cops Hold a Heel
To Catch a Heel
ARKANSAS CITY, Kas, (AP)-,
Police believe they have a pretty
good clew with which 'they may
trap a burglar. The fellow left his
shoes, on a porch,'apparently when
he fled in terror after being inter-
rupted in his burglary job. The
officers are keeping an eye on the
shoe stores hoping to find a sus-
picious-appearing fellow, cashing
his No. 17 ration coupon.,
V
Bison meat was a main item in
the diet of gangs building the
early railroads in the West...


while many others have been de-
ferred from service as fathers.
"To obtain the required num-
ber of men for the armed forces,
it is evident that many of these
men now deferred must be releas-
ed for induction. Men who are
above the age group for service,
who have disqualifying physical
defects, and women, are urged to
make plans to become engaged in
essential occupations in order that
those men now occupying these
essential positions may be releas-
ed to the armed forces."


FOR A TASTY SNACK STOP AT



POP'S
A. N. FOMINICH, Prop.
75-A St. George St.


ACROSS 88 Lump' ot earth
1. Determine 39. Wedge-shaped
7. Oppose 41. Older people
13. King of the 44. Literary frag-
Vislgoths ments
11. Wears away 45. Faint
16. Stickler for per. 47. Parcel of
feet English ground
16. Metal 48. Planet
17. Concerning 0. Secure
18. Exists 62. Singing voice
19, Climbing 83. Former spelling
21. And: Latin of yew
28. Aquatic 54. Humblest
animal 57. Article
24. Resinous sub- 68. Sun god
stance 69. Worthless leav-
26. Trangresslons ing at a meal
27. First woman 60. Roof of the
28. Marry mouth
30. Female ruff 86, Melodious;
1L Fish which at- musical
teaches Itself 64. Eloquent
to other fish speaker
35. Treats with 65. Searcher
nitric acid 66. Upright parts
17. Pagan god of stairs


DOWN
L Steward
king's
hold
3. Baffling


of a
house


S. Elevator ear-
riage
- 4. Pertaining to
8 Down
5. Flat circular
piece
6. Outer
1. Reserve In
speech
L The Emerald
Isle
i. Vocal compo.
sltions
10. Small fish
11. Calmer
12. African flies
20. Statute
23. Group of
advanced
students
26. Early Supreme
Court justice
29. Kind of Pickle
32. Poem
33. Highway
34. Aquatic reptile
36. Bushy clump-
39. Photograhle
Instruments
40. Not cognizant
42. Screwlike part
of a shlIp' log
4$. Devices for
removing
fruit pits
46. Chess pieces
49. Smoke: Scotbch
51. Gentle heat
52. Book of maps
55. Gaelic
56. Hindu woman's
garment'
61. Corroded
63. Diminutive '
ending .


,--
Here You Will Find. Everything..for Your Children-and' Such a
Nice Selection to Chdoose From. May We Serve Your Little Ones?


JEFFERSON BUILDING


PHONE 476


AP fltoures


z h*''
9:;


Tempting Seafood Dishes for which we are famous-also delicious,
steaks, chops, etc., supply limited of course, but still thebest in
town. You'll like the food at The Neptune Grill.


I .].


I l


THE ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD


PAGE 9


WKCNDAY, 'APRTL 25, 1948


Seventy Ce n t s will
run a twenty-word
Want Ad tor three days,


Increasing Manpower Shortages

To Create Grave Problems Warns

SState Selective Service Head


This County

Has Over 1,200

In The Service

Up to March 3lst, St. Johns
County, mother county of Florida,
had seen 1,211 of her men off to
war. Of that number, the Army
claimed the greater portion, 766
in all. To the Navy went 333 more;
to the Marines, 42.and to the Coast
Guard, 70.
According to figures released by
Brig. Gen. Vivian Collins, A.d-
jutant General of Florida and Di-
rector.of Selective Service for this
state, St. Johns County's volun-
tary enlistments through March
31st, inclusive, total 665. There
have been 546 inductions, out of a
total of 2,448 white registrants and
1,498 negro registrants.
Included in the 1,211 men from
this city and county who have
voluntarily enlisted for service or
been inducted under the Selective
Service Act, are 984 whites and
227 negroes, the breakdown of
figures shows.
Serving on all battle fronts, on
land, sea and in the air, St. Au-
gustine and St. Johns County have
good reason 0 hbe proud of her
gallant sons.
V
Army Sergeant Has
His Brother's Number
SAN JUAN, P, R. (P)=--This ar-
my APO system has its points when
you can remember the right num-
bers.
Sgt. Stanley Salamon, of Arch-
bald, Pa., a member of. a bomber
crew enroute to other sectors,
landed at an air base in the Carib-
bean recently., When the ground
crew approached, Salamon asked
what the base's APO number was.
i' Well, I'll be doggoned," he ex-
claimed when he heard, "I've got a
brother stationed here." So for the
first time in more 'than a year, Sgt.
Salamon saw his brother, Peter
Salmon, technician fifth grade, al-
so of Archbald.


State's Military Headquarters In This City


BEST


WISHES


And A



CORDIAL :

WELCOME

To The -


SERVICE,,

BOYSl,


THE LITTLE..'




AND




-H


ORIGINP'S
ORIGINAL


HAMBURGERS


105 ST. GEORGE ST.


THE HOME

OF

UNUSUAL

GIFTS


Service


Wives


AND FAMILIES OF



" Service Men


To-













YOU WILL ENJOY

THE PLEASANT

ATMOSPHERE AND

COMFORT AT THE








MARINA


CAPO'S

CORSET AND CHILDREN'S SHOP


They Welcome



GOOD FOOD

"We Welcome Them!

SERVICE MEN---ALL BRANCHES


CASI


INVEST .IN WAR BONDS.--A PATRIOTIC DUTY


HOTEL


NEPTUNE GRILL


St. Augustine, Fla.


34 Marine St.


"ON THE CORNER"-ST. GEORGE & CATHEDRAL STS.


SPERO ZEPATOS














SIH CRlIRCT SRIF


Easter's Message Today


M
li
10
O'
al
th
b
o
s
L
b
C

a


Grace Church To

Have Elaborate

Easter Program
At the morning service at Grace
methodistt Church, which starts at
0:45, the pastor will speak on
Different Kinds of R'surrection,"
nd the choir will render two an-
hems, "The Lord is Risen Indeed,"'
y Billings, and "Christ Our Pass-
ver," by Schilling. The offertory
olo, "I Know That My Redeemer
Aveth,"" by Handel, will be sung
y Mrs. J., W. Fox. Mrs. T. C.
)'Steen, presiding at the, organ
console, will play for the Prelude,
A Psalm of Praise," by Rogers,
and for the Postlude, "Silver Trum-
pets," by Durand.
The infant baptismal service and
exception of .members will be held
t the beginning of the service at
0:45. Special attention is called
o the change of time from 11:00
o 10:45 for this special occasion.
The- bus schedule is therefore
changed from 10:45 to 10:30 for
his service.
At the evening service at 8
o'clock the Rev. Dr. Geo. J. Apel,
r., of the University Foundation,
Kirkside, will bring' an Easter mes-
sage oh "The Importance of Resur-
rection." The junior choir will
sing "Praise Ye the Lord," by
Wilson, and the organ numbers
will include the Prayer from "Fin-
andia," by Sibelius, "We Thank
Thee," by Hopkins, and "Postlude
:n B Flat," by Dale.
The public is, cordially invited to
enjoy the Day of Triumph and Vic-
tory in Grace Church today. "Since
Easter comes near the close of the
Church year, it is the annual cus-
tom in Grace Church to finish pay-
ment on' our benevolent budget
that day. This has been the hap-
piest year of my.ministry in St.'
Augustine, and God has richly
blest our efforts," reports the pas-
tor, Rev. T. C. O'Steen.

License Plate House
Torn Down for Scrap
IDAHO FALLS. Idaho (RP) -
Charles H. Williams' children have
lost the cunning little playhouse in
their backyard, but they don't
mind too much. It's to help Uncle
Sam.
The house was built from 500
automobile license plates that went
unsold several years ago. The Wil-
liams children donated them to the
scrap drive.


Bishop Hurley

To Celebrate

Easter Mass

The celebration of Solemn Pon-
tifical Mass by the Most Rev. Jo-
seph P. Hurley at 10 o'clock this
morning will climax a week .of
sacred age-old ceremonies in the
Cathedral here in observance of
Holy Week and Easter.
Other Easter Masses in the Ca-
thedral this morning will be cele-
brated by parish priests at 6:30,
8:00 and 11:80 o'clock.
Service men and women are ex-
tended an invitation by Rev. Fath-
er Patrick D. Q'Brien, pastor of
the Cathedral, to join the Catholic
congregation of the parish in at-


I,


PLANNING SPECIAL

EASTER SERVICES

Easter will be observed at the
First Methodist Church. The pas-
tor, Dr. M. H.: N'orton, will preach
this morning on the theme, "What
Is Easter?", and the text is taken
from, Psalms 11-24, 'This Is thie
Day Which the Lord Hath Made;
We Will Rejoice and Be Glad in it."
All who wish their' infants and
children baptized, are requested to
have' them at the church at the be-
'ginning of the service, and the re-
ception of the new members will
follow the baptismal service. The
Church Choir has arranged special
Easter music for the service.
For theeevening service at 8
o'clock members of the" Masonic
Lodge have been invited to -worship
,at First Church, 'and a service ap-
propriate'for the occasion has been
planned. The public is invited'to
attend these services.
.Outfit' your dollars:, in military
dress. BUy Bonds.


PLANNED MAY 2 AT


BEST WISHES TO THE
{ SERVICE MEN




I The ModelI "T"


PELLICER CREEK


Store

74 St. George St.

St. A ugustine, Fla.


THEY'RE FIGHTING FOOLS--


EVERY BOND YOU BUY


^SM. ^M^/Km^-~.


HOWARD'S





SEABREEZE





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.ON


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1/2 MILE FROM BEACH.


ELECTRICALLY

EQUIPPED


PRIVATE BATHS


RADIOS


LET'S NOT DISAPPOINT




TOKYO or BERLIN



THEY ARE EXPECTING MORE SO



Let's Give it To '"E!


THIS AD SPONSORED BY THE



St. Johns County


Bar Assoietation


QUALITY DRY CLEANING


1


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DUBBS' CLEANERS
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PAGE 10 THE ST. AUGUSTINE k RbuViij



Easter Services Are Planned In Local Churches. YouAre Invited!

a I w elm


2 Or r *n T


The Resurrection


By The RT. REV. this sacrifice is limited to the pre-
HENRY ST. G. TUCKER, D.D. servation of our heritage for our-
President of The Federal Council selves, we cannot expect God's
Of Churches of Christ blessing upon us. The supreme
In America sacrifice, will fail to confer full and
Written For AP Features permanent benefits upon one's own
He is risen! This message country unless it includes in its
which brought joy, hope, courage aims the welfare of the whole
and power to the early disciples is world.
still the basis for our Easter greet- Easter is a promise of victory
ings. The Resurrection of Jesus for the cause of righteousness in
Christ gives meaning and power to this world. It teaches that the
all our other beliefs. It changes a sacrifice of the loyal follower of
wistful hope of immortality into a Christ isnot simply a martyr's
sure hope. protest against a wrong which
The Easter message brings us cannot be remedied here on earth.
more than the assurance of life It is rather a guarantee that the
with Christ after death. It opens sacrifice of love arid loyalty is the
up to us the possibility of life with sure means by which the Victory
Christ here on earth. of the Right can be attained here
We are engaged in a struggle on earth.
to preserve the way of life; the Christ'4 final words tie .together
principles of freedom, justice and irrevocably the assurance of'power
righteousness. Victory in this con- with the responsibi-'ty of using it
test is conditioned upon strenuous for world-wide :betterment: "Ye
effort and unlimited sacrifice. If shall be witnesses unto me .
----- -- unto the uttermost part of the
HOMECOMING DAY earth


ST. AGNES CATHOLIC CHURCH GCAACE METHODIST CHURCH
Sunday Masses at 9 a. m. Corner Carrera and Cordova Streets
.Rev. T. C. O'Steen, I'astor
SEVENTH DAY A.DVENTIST Worship" Services, 10:45 a.'m.,
CHURCH 8:00 p. m.
Robert J. Wieland, Pastor. Church School, 9:40 a. m. Sunday.
Services each Sabbath at 9:30 Methodist'Youth Fellowship (Ep-
a. m., in the Fraternal Hall on worth League, Intermediate and
Charlotte Street; Young People) 6:30 p. m., Sunday.
7n-- .. N -j *i, Q. M r -r _-


Prayer Meeting, &:W0 p. m.
Wednesday.
Junior Choir Practice, 4i00 p. m.
Tuesday.
Adult Choir Practite, 7:30 p. m.
Friday.
Troop 67, B. S. A.,7,:30 p. m. Fri-


THE CATHEDRAL
Rev. Patrick D. O'Brien, Pastor
Rev. Charles Moore, Assistant
Rev. Joseph Devaney; Assistant
Rev. Donald Dailey, Assistant
Sunday Masses at 6:80, 8, 10 and
11:30 d *m.
Beneaetiron, 7:30 p. m.
Week-day Masses, 7 and 8 a. m.
Tuesday, Information Class,
open to Catholic and non-Catholic
adults, 7:30 p. m., Cathedral Par-
ish School, with Father Moore, in-
structor.
Saturday, confessions 4 to 6
and 7:30 to s P. m.


MEMORIAL PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
L. E. Brubaker, D. D., Pastor.
9:30, Church School. Classes for
every age; well equipped in every ]
Department.
9:45, Men's Bible Class in Church ,
parlor.
S 11, Morning worship. Special ,
music by the choir under the direc-
tion of Lorenzo Pratt Oviatt, min- ,
sister of Music.
7 p. m., Young People's Society 9
meets in the Church House. Miss
Grace Rowley, sponsor.
Wednesday 7:30 p. m., Mid-week
service in the Chapel, an hour of
worship and spiritual help.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Corner King and Riberia 'Streets
Rev. Marvin H. Norton, D. D., Pas-
tor.
Church School, 9:45 a. m. E. G.
Hood, general superintendent
Morning Worship, 11 a. m.
Epworth League, senior and in-
termediate, meet at 6:30 p. m.
Evening Worship 7:30 p. m.
Mid Week prayer service,
Wednesday 7:30 p. m.
Choir rehearsal every Thursday
7 p. m.
Strangers are cordially invited to
worship here.
CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner Riberia and Saragossa Sts.
i"And He is the head of the Body,
the Church."
10 a. m., Bible School.
11 a. m., Morning Worship. Top-
ic: "A New Day Dawns."
7:30 p. m., Weanesday, mid-week
prayer services.
A friendly welcome awaits those
who worship at this church.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
15 Carrera Street.,
9:30 a. m., Sunday School.
11:00 a. m., Sunday morning
service.
8:00 p. m., Wednesday evening
testimonial service.
Reading room, 15 Carrera Street
Open daily, including Sunday, from
3 to a p. m.
The public is cordially invited to
attend these services and enjby the
privileges of our reading room.
ANCIENT CITY BAPTIST
CHURCH
Corner Carrera and Sevilla Streets
J. L. Rosser, D. D., Pastor.
9`45 a. m., Sunday School. L. O.
Davis, Superintendent. Classes for
all ages.


ay.
Official Board Meeting, First r
'uesday, 7:30 p. m.' a
Tuck-a-Bache Class; Second Tues- 1
ay, 7:30 p. m. t
WSCS General .Meeting, Fourth t
Tuesday 3:00 p. m. .
The public is cordially invited to c
11 of these services. t
TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Rev. Frederic W. Golden-Howes, J
Rector I
Easter Sunday
,7:30 a. m., Earny Celebration of
the Holy Comrmunion. :
9:30 a. m., Young Churchmen's s
Service and Church School.
11 a. m., Easter Sunday festival
service of Holy Communion with
sermon by Bishop Juhan.
4:30 p. m., Evensong and Con-
firmation Service, with Bishop Ji-
han officiating.
All are invited to worship at
these services.
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF
LATTER DAY SAINTS
102 Charlotte Street. ,
Sunday School at 10 a. m.
Evening Service at 6:30 p. m.
PENTECOSTAL HOLINESS
No. 34 Leonardi Street.
,Reverend Loran V. Hall, Pastor.
Phone No. 385J.
E. N. Johnson, superintendent of
Sunday School.
9:45 a. m., Sunday School.
11:00 a. m., Preaching Service.
630 p. m., B.Y.P.S.
7:30 p m.. Preaching Service.,
7.30 p m.. Wednesday, Prayer
Service.
PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH
Corner Whitney and Anderson Sts.
West Augustine
Rev. W. C. Stanaland, Pastor
Services held fourth Sunday et
every 'month.
11:00 a. m., church series.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH .
HASTINGS
Reverend R. A. Kelly, Pasart.
Sunday Worship-ll:B00 a. m,
and 8 p. m.
Bible School--9:45 a. m. .Train-
ing Union-6:50 p. m.
Prayer Meeting Wednesday,
8 p. m.
Brotherhood -- First and tdrd
Thursday, 7:30 p. m.
'Missionary Society-Second and
fourth Tuesday, 3:00 p. m.
Lord's Supper--Fit Sunday in
each quarter.
UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH OF HASTINGS
Reverend J. P. Gaines, Pastor.
Sunday Worship Servies: 11 a.
m. and 7:30 p. m..
Church School, 10 a. mt.
Young People's .Meeting: T:00
p. m.
Mid-Week Prayer Services: Wed-
nesday, 7:80 p. m.
ST. AMBROSE PARISH, NLKTON
Reverend Patrick J. BrisnahaB, in
Charge.
Sunday y s: Mass at Moccasin
Branch, 8 a. m.; at Bakerville, 10
a. m. (Except on Fourth Sunday
of month, when Mass is at 8 a. m.
at Bakerville and 10 a. m. At Moe-
casin Branch).
Special devotions at MooeaMc
Branch, Fridays and Sundays, T:80
p. m., with Prayers for Peace.


tending Easter Masses at the old "w ....
Cathedral toay. H Rev. Donald Dailey, Director
The somber liturgy' of. Holy er al Noveia to Our Lady
Week began in the Cathedral on Perpetual NoveFia to' Our ad.
Palm Sunday. O o Holy Thurisday, of Sorrows, every Friday, 4 P. m.
Solemn Pontifical Mass was cele-
brated by fhe Most Reverend Bish- MEMORIAL LUTHERAN
op, who also was the celebrant at Riberia and Saragossa Sts.
solemn services on Good Friday and Dr. G. F. Snyder, Pastor.
,Saturday Morning Service at 11:00 a. m.
V Holy Communion. Subject, "The
Seventy Cen'ts will run a twenty- Meaning of Easter."
word Want A.d for three days. No Evening Service.


':. .. .......,


On May 2d, Homecoming Day
will be observed at the Pellicer
Creek Methodist Church, (some-
times called the Cartersville Meth-
odist Church.) Dr. J. H. Daniel,
district superintendent -of the Jack-
sonville District, will preach at
,11 a. m. Dinner will be served on
the grounds immediately after the,
morning sermon; There will be
services in the afternoon.
A cordial invitation is extended
to the public to attend Homecoming
.Day, an annual affair, which has,
always been such an enjoyable af-i
fair. V
Trinity Children
To Bring Flowers
Children attending Trinity
Church School are reminded
to bring their small bouquets of
flowers with which they make the
floral cross on Easter Sunday. This
cross is part of the special floral i
decorations in Trinity Church on
Easter Sunday and the children
enjoy placing their floral offerings
upon it. Trinity *Church School
,pupils also are reminded they are
to bring their Lenten offering this
morning to the 9:30 o'clock service.


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GIVE 'EM THE BEST YOU'VE GOT!

On land, at sea, in the air, the U. S. Armed Services can beat
the life out of our enemies! And every one of us at home can
help by putting our dollars into War Bonds! Think it over-are
you doing all you can to back up our fighting men? Remember,
Uncle Sam isn't asking you for a gift-he's asking you to loan
YOUR dollars to save YOUR Freedom and YOUR way of life,
and he promises to pay you back with compound interest!


JOHN BRUER'S
BILLIARDS SMOKES BEER
i ST. GEORGE ST.


I -


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11:00 a. m., Morning worship.
7:30_ p. m., Evening worship.
6:30 p. m., Baptist Training Un-
ion, Mrs. S. S. Chapman, Director.
7:45 p. m., Mid-week Prayer Ser-
vice. r
8:00 p. m., Friday, Choir rehear-
sal. Mrs. Elizabeth Archer Manucy,
organist. Mrs. R. E. Bosworth and
Charles E. Richey, USCG, vocal.
soloists.
The public is invited to all ser-
vices.
JEHOVAH'S WITNESSES
KINGDOM HALL
58% St. George Street.
Watchtower, Sunday, 8:00 p. m.
Service meeting, Thursday,, 8:00
p. m.,
CHURCH OF CHRIST
No. 38 Masters Drive,
Sunday services:
10 a. m., Bible Study.
11 a. Mn., Preaching.
11:50 a. m., Communion.
8:00 p. m., Preaching.
Wednesday, 8:00 p. m., Bible
Study.
Visitors are welcome.


*


40 GRANADA ST. PHONE 1376


SUNDAY, APRIL "', 1943

















T


Everywhere all over this country, voices are being raised today:in
Easter music, which is a solemn and beautiful part of the worship
service in most churches.
Churches of St. Augustine invite service men and their families
and other visitors in the city to attend the church of their choice, and
join in the Easter worship.


VISIT WILLIAMS'


Holy Communion
This Morning In
Lutheran Church
Holy Communion will be ad-
ministered at the Memorial
Lutheran Church, Riberia and
Saragossa Streets, this morning
at 11 o'clock. The pastor, Dr.
G. F. Snyder, will preach a ser-
monon the subject' "The Mean-
ng of Easter." Coast Guards-
man Wallace Brusky will sing a
solo appropriate to the occasion.
Service men.and their wives and
visitors will be welcome to par-
take of the Sacrament, the pas-
tor announces, the Confessional
will immediately preceded the
Sacrament.


NowI


b~


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mmm


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BISHOP JUHAN
IS AT TRINITY
CHURCH TODAY
Today the Rt. Rev. Fraik A.
Juhan, D. D., Bishop of the Dio-
cese of Florida, will preach the
sermon at the 11 o'clock Holy
Communion and Choral Festival
Service at Trinity Episcopal
Church.
Rev. Frederic W. Golden-
Howes, rector, announces also
that Bishop Juhan will officiate
at the Confirmation and Evea-
song service this afternoon 'at
4:30.
Celebration of the Holy Com-
munion will take place at 7:30
a. m.
Special Easter music will be
in charge of T. Guy Lucas, or-
ganist and choir director.


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SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1943


THE ST. AUGUSTINE


REC RD


VOICES RAISED IN EASTER SONG


VESPER SERVICE
WILL FEATURE
EASTER MUSIC
The Vesper Service at Memorial
Presbyterian Church this. after-
nobn-at 4:30 o'clock will feature'a
program of lovely Easter music.
Mrs. A. T. Stegman and MissMary
Spainhour will be the vocal solo-
ists.
Lorenzo Pratt Oviatt, organist
and choir director of Memorial
Presbyterian Church, will play the 1
four following numbers, "A Song
of Triumph," by Diggle, "Interinez-
zo," by West, "Cypress Groves of
Lebanon," by Shure and "Toccato,"
by Biggs.
The public is cordially invited to
attend.
V


Sermon,

In

Tabloid
Zy JOHN BRITTAN CLARK, D.D.
"He that heareth my word
and believeth on him that sent
me is passed from, death
unto life."-John 5:24.
Easter celebrates the "resurrec-
tion of Christ. Of His resurrection
there can be no justifiable doubt.
By every, historical test it is the
most proven thing in the ,world.
It is the foundation of Christianity
anrd the Christian church. On it
is based the fact of personal sur-
vival after death. 'These two great
truths, like the Christmas star,
glorify the dark sky of human life.
The New Testament mentions
another resurrection, different but
none the less real. We all have
a kind of life we want to live,
feel we should live, but are pre-
vented by many things from living.
This suppression of the yearned-for
life is what the Bible calls "dying
unto self;""
Christ had many deaths before
He died on the cross. No life mod-
elled after Christ's can escape these


2,991 LICENSED TO
PRACTICE MEDICINE
IN THIS STATE
JACKSONVILLE-Florida has
2,991 men and women licensed, to
practice medicine, it is announced
in the sixth edition of the Florida
Medical Directory. just released.
Of this group, .965 doctors who
are licensed to practice in Florida
live in other states : of the United -
States and 21 others live in foreign
countries.
A copy of the Directory is being
sent to each of the licensed medical
men, it was announced by Dr.
Stewart Thompson, managing di-
rector of the Florida. Medical Asso-
ciation and, compiler of the Direc-
tory.


deaths. One, for the sake of his
spiritual self, gives up his cher-
ished sin. He dies unto his lower
self and rises from that death into
new life. One for the sake of an-
other gives up his cherished plan.
He dies unto self. For the.sake
of right one swallows his pride
and is quiet. He dies. All this is
far from pleasant. It is a real
crucifixion of self. Paul found it
so. He said, "I die daily."
The Easter vision is to see that
life does not end with' death and
crucifixion; that these are preludes,'
only, to richer, finer, diviner life
here and now as well as then, and
there. Do you see this ? Then you
have the Easter vision.


Season's Series Of
"Tabloid Sermons"
Concluded Today
The St. Augustine Record has
carried again this season a series
of "Tabloid Sermons" by the Rev.
John Brittan Clark, D.D., retired
minister. Doctor Clark has con-
cluded his seasonal stay here, and
the final "Tabloid Sermon" for this
year appears today, conveying an
Easter message.
Many readers of the Record have
stated that they found these brief
messages helpful, and that they
have preserved them in scrapbooks
for future reference. This is pleas-
ing to Doctor Clark, who for so
long filled a pulpit in a large
church, and who is glad to continue
to have a. congregation, reached
through the press.
V
Mrs. Enid Hardee
Dies; Service Is
Held At Sebring
Funeral services were held Fri-
day at Sebring for Mrs, Enid
Broward Hardee, Florida National
Democratic Committeewoman and
daughter of the late Governor
Nalopeon Broward, who died
Wednesday. The-service was in the
Presbyterian Chapel by the Rev. L.
IL. Price, assisted by Capt. V. H.
Warner, chaplain at Hendricks
Field. Mrs. Hardee was known to
many in 4t. Augustine.


I


FOR A
GOOD
SELECTION
OF

Novelties

Cards

Toys

Etc.


I


U'


HORSE DRAWN

CARRIAGES.
For Sightseeing


AT WILLIAMS' YOU'LL FIND EVERYTHING
A MODERN 5c & 10c STORE OFFERS


WILLIAMS'


L


TeXti, John .90:I'7


r ,
BY WILLIAM E. GILROY, D. D. gratitude and intensity, who
Editor of Advance love Him so deeply that she;
had come early in the morning
ALL four gospels tell the story ,to visit His tomb. When she
of the resurrection of Jesus, found the stone rolled away;'
and thoughtful readers of the from the mouth of the sepulchre,
Scriptures should not read ar the was full of surprise and she'
study any single one without *came running to Simon Peter
comparing it with the others, and to "the other disciple whom'
An outstanding impression will Jesus loved," evidently the apos-
probably be of the variety in tle John, greatly troubled, and
detail, although all the accounts telling therm that he Lord's body
agree on the central fact. The, had disappeared.
differences in the stories are Peter and. John ran quickly to
important because they entirely the tomb. John stooped down
dispose of the idea that the story and looked in, but Peter with
of the resurrection could have his impulsiveness went into the
been invented or could be the sepulchre'and found the linen
figment of anyone's imagination. cloths lying there and the nap-
Peter says in his second kiq that had been about the
Epistle (1:16): "For we have not 3daster's head wrapped in a
followed cunningly devised fa- placee by itself.
bles, when we made known unto The record of the action of the
you the power and coming of our two discicles is somewhat puz-
Lord Jesus Christ, but were eye- zling. We are told that they be-
witnesses of his majesty." lived, though they had not un-
One thinks of that in connecderstodhe syig of Jesus that
ion with the story of the esurHe must rse again from the
reaction, for if this triumphant ed.. they weut f r s ome strange rea
story of the. rising of Jesus from although Mat remained at the
the dead had been-in any sense a tdoor of the tombweepn.ed Wh?
"cunningly devised fable," surely 6f the tob, weeping. Why
those who invented or recorded id 'dete yanti.n go. home?
it would have been very careful de Mathey tartipatie meetg with
to have told the story with corn* the Msterthere? t is quite pos
plete identity of detail. living, He would make we
living, He, would make His way
Of the account of the resur- to their dwpellin. "
reaction in John's GoSpel, which Ma y, with her love and loy-
constitutes our lesson, it may be alty, could not so easily leave the
said that it is very rich in its place, and stooping down to lo6k
record of personal experience .into the tomb, she was rewarded
and in the vividness with which when she hid the vision ;of the
it narrates the effect of the angels,, and as she turned she
resurrection upon the early visi. saw Jes.us - sel, standing
tors to the tomb. there, although. she did not know
It is predominantly the story Him. It was when He spoke her
of Mary Magdalen, the woman name, Mar Ihat He was re-!
who loved her Master with deep vealed to hi.


ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA.


.. 5c & 10STORE
164 ST. GEORGE ST.


SMART HOUSEWIVES VISIT


FLORIDA'S FINEST CITRUS

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JUICY AND DELICIOUS
SEE OUR DISPLAY "

JOHNSON'S

FRUIT MARKET
40 San Marco--Next to Banta Bros.


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SANITATION FIRST!

BARBER

SERVICE


At Weinstein's you'll find everything
to complete your meal. It is true, we
specialize in fresh Fruits and Vege-
tables and we pride ourselves on our
wide variety, but shoppers will also,
find a complete line of S. S,. Pierce
fancy groceries, imported goods, and
, a modern meat department. May we
serve your


Servicemen


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TOPS With Service


THE



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Two experienced barbers
to serve you-stop at the
Ideal for Haircuts, Sham-
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IDEAL BARBER SHOP
CHARLOTTE ST.


WEINSTEIN

1888-1943
COR. ST. GEORGE & HYPOLITA STS.


ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA.


Just Off Cathedral Place Opposite YMCA-USO Club


PAGES it
A large part of the Nova Scotia There are 1,000 time as many
catch of tuna fish is marketed in red corpuscles in the blood as white
the United States. cells.


EASTER SERVICES
ARE PLANNED AT
BAPTIST CHURCH
The Easter season will be ob-
served at the Ancient City Baptist
Church today. The pastor will
preach at the 11 o'clo-k hour n-,
'The If and Is of the R-su-rec-
tion." The choir will render Eas-
ter music. 'is includes Wci ro.u
morning service:
Solo-Chas. E. Richey: "The Holy
City" .... ....... .Weatherly
Anthem-Choir, "The Wondrous
Cross" ..............Woodbury
.In the evening the music will be:
Solo-Chas. E. Richey: "Come Un-
to Him" ............... Handel
Anthem-Junior Choir ..Selected
The pastor will preach on "Pro-
gressive, :Relationship Between
Christ and the Twelve." There will
probably be a baptismal service aft-
er the evening service.


BUY WAR BONDS


eal Estate Values in
St. Augustine are Ris-
ing Select your
property from the
Want Ad page.


AT YOUR SERVICE


You can help the Armed forces of



the United States by buying War



Bonds. They give their lives! You



give your money!





MARION HOeTEL

.On The Water'fromt"


SINCE 1881


TAXI CABS
AND


Study of the Four Gospels Indicates'
Truth of Story of the Resurrection


PHONE 39


ST. AUGUSTINE TRANSFER CO.


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St.






12 14

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COAST GUARD
a wammSw a


AK~Y '


NAVY

MARINES
All Branches Have Our Sincere
Compliments and Best Wishes!


-2.


PHARMACY:

40 ST. GEORGE ST.
PHONE 71


re Quality Counts"


BR 0 S.






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AiON PROGRAM MS
STATION WFOY --- 1240 KILOCYCLES


LEARN HOW.TO ADDRESS
YOUR WAAC OR WAVE
Wide World Features
TT WOULDN'T be polite to hem and haw when you meet a
WAAC or a WAVE, so you'd better know how to address her,
correctly. Here's how the girls rate as compared to the men in
the services:
WAACS
An auxiliary is equivalent to a private. You address her as
"Miss Smith"; she reports to her officer, "Auxiliary Smith re-
porting to ."
NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS:
Junior Leader is equivalent to a Corporal. She is addressed
colloquially as "Corporal," but officially written, Junior Leader.
Leader is equivalent to a Sergeant. She is addressed colloqui-
ally as "Sergeant," but officially written, Leader. 1st Leader
is equivalent to a 1st Sergeant. She is addressed colloquially
as "Sergeant," but officially written, 1st Leader.
COMMISSIONED OFFICERS:
3rd Officer is equivalent to a 2nd Lieutenant. She is addressed
colloquially as Lieutenant, but officially written, 3rd Officer.
2nd Officer is equivalent to a 1st Lieutenant. She is addressed
colloquially as Lieutenant, but officially written, 2nd Officer.
1st Officer is equivalent to a Captain. She is addressed colloqui-
ally as Captain, but officially written, 1st Officer.
WAVES-(Same classification as Naval Reserve)
Ensign is addressed and written Ensign.
Lieutenant (J.G.) is addressed as Lieutenant and written Lieu-
tenant (J.G.).
Lieutenant is addressed and written Lieutenant.
Lieutenant Commander is addressed and written Lieutenant
Commander.
Apprentice Seaman is addressed as Miss and written Miss
A.S.
Yeomanette is addressed and written Miss.


and it will take more than just a
desire to win. We must take care of what
we have, do not buy needlessly, share
with your neighbor, do not grow over-
optimistic at each battle we win BUT BE
PREPARED TO FACE MORE DEPRI-
VATIONS NOW SO THAT WE WILL
HAVE A BETTER WORLD IN WHICH
TO LIVE AFTER WE'VE PUT THE
ENEMY AWAY I

WE ARE IN IT!

SO LET'S WIN IT!




C. F. HAMBLEN

HARDWARE '.

3-5 KING ST.

re e--I


*


SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1943


SERVICE SCHEDULE

AT SYNAGOGUE IS

GIVEN BY RABBI

The schedule of services at the
Sons of Israel Synagogue ohn Cpr-
dova Street for the last two days
of the Passover period will be as
follows: today, April 25th, at 8
p. m.; Monday, April 26th4 at 8
a. m. and 8 p. m.; Tuesday, April
27th, at 8 a. m. and a memorial
service at 9:30 a. m.
Rabbi Samuel S.'Lerer will offi-
ciate at these services and, A" cor-
dial invitation is extended: mem-
bers of the Armed Forces,
Service men who cannot attend
these memorial services and wish
to mAke the memorial for their-de-
ceased parents, or other close rela-
tives, are asked to call Rabii -Lerer
at Phone No. 689-J.

Cops Catch
Thief Panting


S.


----- I-.- ..-~.. --- Ir,


THE 8 T AU G 0 9 TINE


RECORD


UOllcCOr oJi tiirnal i J. VCIu,
Jacksonville, Florida on or before
April 30, 1943, accordingto a re-
minder from headquarters there.
This is a new tax which became
effective January 1, 1943. It is a
5 per cent levy on all income over'
$624.00 per year ($12.00 per week).
The withholding provisions re-
quire that the tax be collected by
the employer on all wages and sal-
aries papid in excess of $12 per
week. Th&eemployer is required to
pay the tax withheld over to the
Treasury Department, quarterly.
Men in the Armed Forces, domestic
servants in a private home, farm
labor and casual laborers are ex-
empt from deduction at the source.
These employes will, however, be'
required to pay the tax at the close
of the year.
Those. individuals following an
independent trade, business, or pro-
fession and who are not regularly
employed by one employer, are
.considered independent contractors
:and are exempt from the withhold-
ing provision on their earnings.
Their liability will be declared and
paid at the close of the year.
Employers who have not received,
tax blanks should immediately re-
quest from the Collector, Treasury
Form V-I.


The story of a 23-hour swim in
shark-infested waters off Guadal-
canal following the sinking of his
ship, the MISS Little, was told by
Chief Boatswain's Mate Vernon
A. Suydam, U. S. Coast Guard, of
Sayville, Long Island, upon taking
up his new station at Toms River,
New Jersey.
Suydam, who spent several weeks
recuperating from his ordeal, in
base hospitals in the Pacific, was
one of 12 Coast Guardsmen assign
ed to the Little, and was handling
small boats during landing opera-
tions off Guadalcanal -immediately
preceding the attack in which his
vessel was sunk
"I was at my gun post when two
Jap cruisers and three destroyers
came, upon as," said Suydam. "The
Little andr the Gregory were: on
patrol around Guadalcanal that
night. The Japs let loose with all
they had. They blasted out our
stern rear and bridge, and knocked
out our controls. When the aban-
don ship order was given, the Little
was zigzagging all over the place
at full speed ahead."
Suydam, wearing his life jacket,
leaped off,the bow,.wrenching his
back as he hit the water.
"There were seven of us group-
ed together is the water' when
one of the Jap.cruisers came by,"
he continued. "It picked us up with
its searchlight and peppered us
with machine guns. Four of the
men were killed and one was
wounded. A Navy lieutenant and I.
were the only ones unharmed'.
"I took one, of the wounded men,
also a Navy lieutenant, in tow,
picking out the right directionto
swim by the position of the great
dipper. It was the darkest night
I've ever seen."
Suydam then told how he swam
for six hours with the officer' in
tow before discovering that- he had
died, .
"It was ,dawn by this time,"
Suydam continued.: "I could see
land ahead, but it was still a good
distance off. Twice during the day
American planes flew over, but
missed seeing me. I fired a pistol
I had, taken with me, but they
couldn't hear it, and I threw it
away-it was too heavy."
All that day and well into the
next night, Suydam managed to
keep afloat. Finally, 23 hours after
leapingfrom his ship, he stagger-
ed ashore, his body a mass of
blisters from third-degree sun-
burn. Crawlingup on the beach,
he slept till dawn.
"It was awakened," he said, "by
the sun, and figured my location
to be the northwest tip of Guadal-
canal. I started to walk east along


the beich, but the coral was too
rough onmy bare feet and I made
my way through the jungle. It was
about "20 miles to the American
lines,I but I. made it by dusk. Al-
though I was in enemy territory
during most of my walk, I didn't
see a single Jap."
After ,a day and a half in the
Marine hospital on Guadalcanal,
Suydam was transferred to a hos-
pitl. on another island, where he
stayed month before being trans-
ferred to the United States.
Suydam's father is a Chief
Boatswain,in the Coast Guard, and
he has a brother who Is a Lieute-
nant Commander in the same serv-
ice;
e V
Joseph L. Foster
Sends Greetings


COLIN KELLY. JR.
Captain, U. S. Army


1


GEORGE COX
Ensign, U. S. Navy


NOEL A. GAYLER
Lieut.. U. S. Navy
s-- ......,


Joseph L. Foster, a third class CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (P) -
carpenter's; mate in the, Navy's The police department's latest nom-
Seabees, wishes to send Easter nation for the town's meanestn man
G reetings to all his friends "back is the fellow who stole a"frienld's
home" and is sorry that he can- trousers while the friend was re-
not, write to each one personally., cuperating from an operation in a
Joe,, who is' somewhere in the Pa- local hospital.
cific,' appreciates the numerous Detedtives caught the thief, re-
greetings sent to him. He is a turned the pants and are waiting
son of, Mrs. Joseph Foster of No. 15 on the patient to recover sufficient-
Saragossa :Street. ly to testify in court.


!
!


* T-O, == -






1DON'T
\ S + .... : m..... '* VIS IT ,', ... .


FRUIT ,TOWN

149 SAN MARCO AVE CORNER OF BALLARD
ENJOY YOUR

FA YORITE JUICES
ORANGE JUICE PAPAYA JUICE
GRAPEFRUIT JUiCE PINEAPPLE JUICE
"COCONUT MILK
ALSO ALL KINDS 'OF FRUIT, FRESH COCONUTS %': \
NOVELTIES AND GIFTS
.... M I '


HEWITT T. WHELESS
Captain, U. S. Army


It's a proven fact, that a
stored car deteriorates
faster than one that is sen-
;sibly driven every day.
Keep. your car running--
but remember drive fewer
miles and sensibly!
I,


Greetings

to

SERVICE

MEN


BOYD D. WAGNER
Lt.-Col. U.. S. Army


r


i


JOHN D. BULKELEY .JOSEPH LOCKARD LEIF ANDREWS JOHN S. TH'ACH 0
Lt.-COMDR. U. S. Navy Lieut. U. S. Army Major, U. S. Air Corps Lt.-Comdr. U. S. Navy
Scouting is the youthful background of each of these men who: have been decorated for bravery by
a grateful nation. As boys they shared in the character-building and leadership training program of Scout-
ing. Today more than ever these qualities are recognized by military leaders as essentials of a good soldier.


12:00 Little Country Church
12:15 Big Sister, CBS
12:30 Front Page News
12:45 Our Gal Sunday, CBS
1:00. Life Can Be Beautiful, CBS
1:15 Ma Perkins, CBS
1:30 Dixie Farmn Club, CS
1:45 The Goldbergs, CBS
2:00 Dr. Malone, CBS
2:15 Joyce Jordan, OBS
2:30 We Love and Learn, CBS
2:45 Melody Time
2:55 News
3:00' Crumit and Sanderson, CBS
3:15 Joe and Ethel Turp, CBS
3:30 Lest We Forget
3:30 Eyes and Ears of Air Force
4:00 News, Elizabeth Bemis,
CBS
4:156 "1240" Club
5:00 News
5:15 Mother and Dad, CBS
5:30 Telequiz
5:45 Keep the Home Fires
Burning, CBS ,


Sunday, April 25, 1943
6:30 Easter Sunrise Service
7:30 Knights Templar Sunrise
Service, CBS
8:15 Navy Sunrise Service, CBS-
8:30 Leiand Evangelistic Hour
9:00 News of the World, CBS
9:15 Missa Brevis, CBS
9:45 WAAC Recruiting, CBS
10:00 Church of the Air, CBS
10:30 Wings Over Jordan, CBS
11:00 News, Warren Sweeney,
CBS
11:06 First Methodist Church
12:00 Transatlantic Call, CBS
12:30 Salt Lake City Tabernacle,
CBS
1:00 Parade of Bands
1:30 Quincy Howe and the News,
CBS
1:45 Telescopic Show
2:00 Those We Love, CBS
2:30 News Roundup
2:45 WFOY Showcase
3:00 Old Fashioned Revival
4:00 We Cover the Battlefront
4:15 Treasury Star Parade
4:30 Pause That Refreshes, CBS
5:00 The Family Hour, CBS
5:45 Col. James H. Reynolds, Jr.
6:00 Edw. R. Murrow, News, CBS
6:15 Today's News
6:30 Sergeant Gene Autry, CBS
7:00 Chips Davis, Commando,
CBS
7:30 We, the People, CBS
8:00 Corliss Archer, CBS
.8:30 Crime Doctor, CBS
8:55 Eric Sevareid, News, CBS
9:00 Radio Reader's Digest, CBS
9:30 Fred Allen, CBS
10:00 Take It or Leave It, CBS
10:30 The Man Behind the Gun,
CBS
11:00 News of the World CBS
11:15 Tommy Tucker, CBS
11:30 Glen Gray, CBS
Monday, April 26, 1943
7:00 World at War Roundup
7:10 On the Farm Front
7:15 Sacred Heart


7:30 Good Morning Neighbor
8:00 The World Today, CBS
8:15 Breakfast Rendezvous, C:
8:30 Coffee Club, OB S
8:45 Organ Reflections, CBS
9:00 News of the World, CBS
9:15 Light of tile World'
9:30 Lonely Women
9:45 Guiding Light
10:00 World News in Brief
10:05 Women in the News
10:10 Telescope Show ..
10:30 WFOY Showcase
10:45 In Movieland
111:00 News
'11:05 Melodies in Miniature
11:15 Uncle Sam
11:30 Morning Melodies


BS
\


/


10


If you are not in the Service, in War Work, or Essential Industry
then the least you can do is BUY BONDS--whatever your job be
sure to give at your ALL and let's get this war over with







BOND HOWELL


LUMBER CO.


PAGE 12


Local Council Of

K. Of C. Working

For Bond Sales

It is reported by Rondal Bennett,
chairman of the bond committee of
First Florida Council No. 611, K. of
C., that this Council's quota of
$6,000 is assured, if the members
and their friends continue to buy
War Bonds during the remainder
of the campaign as they have
bought them during this first half.
The purchases to date are report-
ed as $3,525, with many members
not as yet heard from.
It is pointed out that the cam-
paign has now reached the final
stages, the last day of the drive
being April 28th. Grand Knight
L. B. Reilly and the committee are
working hard to insure this Council
of a place at the top of the list of
Councils having attained their
quota. Therefore, all members
who have not as yet purchased
their bonds during this drive, are
earnestly requested to do so. at
once.
As our President has said, "We
must, we can, we will buy bonds."
All members who, have purchased
bonds are requested to turn in to
the Council their names, the. se-
rial number of the bonds, and the
denomination of each, says Grand
Knight Reilly.:


VICTORY TAX7
RETURNS ARE EVERY ONE A HERO-EACH A FORMER SCOUT
PAYABLE NOW ....

The attention of all employers is 'I
called to the due date for filing
their first Victory Tax Returns for
the quarter ended March 31st, 1943. ..
Returns should be forwarded to the i


Reaches' Guadalcanal


After 23-Hour Swim


& SAM FORTER
Lieut., U. S. Navy
. ; J. NN&-


C. R. GREENING
Captain, U. S. Army


SEGUI'S

SERVICE STATION
E. A. SEGUL Mgr.


1 118 SAN MARCO AVE.


PHONE 9125


IT WILL TAKE


MORE THAN


HEY YOU!


CHOOSE



YOUR



WEAPONS



THEN


FIGHT



TO WIN!


TO WIN!


ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA.


140 RIBERIA ST.




































































































GOOD VALUES



of



Homes For Sale


GOOD
WISHES
TO THE
MEN
IN

SERVICE


SODAS


POLAR WATER


26 H


NORTH END CLEANERS
ELMO POMAR.


PHONE 120


YPOLITA


4"


PHONE 1056-W


PAGE 13


In Canada's early days rewards When George Washington be"
ere offered to men who married came president of the United
18 or younger. States, the nation had no navy.
--r


NDAY, APRIL 25, 1943 .


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THE ST AU G USTINE RECORD


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Project Endorsed By*
National Officers And
Supported By Public
Backed by the endorsement of
Ite national president and secre-
tary of the National Ladies Aux-
liary of the Regular Veterans As-
Nociation and with the support and
cooperation of the city at large,
the Ladies Auxiliary of St. Augus-
Mne Post No. 316, RVA, sponsored
ihis special Service Edition of the
Record, to raise funds for increas-
%ag recreational and entertainment
facilities for the service men,here.
The Ladies Auxiliary of the RVA
ras organized to cooperate with
the Regular Veterans in efforts to
secure justice for all Regulars,
their wives, widows, mothers, chil-
bren and other dependents; also to
promote unselfish loyalty to the
United States.
Locally, the RVA Auxiliary was
formed just three days after Christ'
mnas, last year. Its officers for the
most part wives of Coast Guards-
men, are:
Viola M. Dolan, president; Kath-
erine Johann, senior vice president;
iMary Broughton, junior vice presi-
dent; Eleanor DiPietro,. secretary;
Zauretta Barrow, 'treasurer;: Eth-
el Day, chaplain; Edith Hafe-
Ineister, historian; Mae Stewart,


judge advocate; Margaret Guyton,
Leonilla Stephens and Helen Land-
field, trustees; Deloris Brown, con-
ductress; Claire Bengeult, guard;
Caroline Krumm, color bearer;
Mary Smith, color guard; Helen'
Deacon, banner bearer; Ethel Euts-
ler, banner guard.
Eligible for membership in the
RVA Auxiliary are the wives,'
widows, mothers, daughters and
granddaughters over 18 years of
age, and sisters of men who have
volunteered for service in the Ar-
my, Navy, Marine Corps or Coast
Guard, who have service or are
serving, who have been honorably
discharged or have been discharged
for physical disabilities.
One of the major projects of the
National Ladies Auxiliary of the
Regular Veterans Association is
the building of the Widows and Or-
phans Home Fund of the Regular'
Veterans Association. From this
fund, there will be started a home
where the dependents of regular
service men may find refuge and
also avail themselves of extensive
facilities for vocational training
of all kinds.
Nationally, the women are work-
ing ini. cooperation with the RVA,
in-order that the thousands of de-
pendents who will need kindness,
assistance, protection ,and under-


Here are pictured the women comprising the solicitations committee of the sponsors of this edition: the
Ladies Auxiliary of the Regular Veterans Association, Post No. 315. of St. Augustine. Seated in the
center is Mrs. Viola M. Dolan, RVA Auxiliary president here and national deputy chief of staff of the
National RVA Auxiliary. Mrs. Frank 'DiPietro and Mrs. Helen Landfield are at her left and right,
respectively. Standing, left to right, are Mrs. Kay Johann, Mrs. Claire Bengeult, Mrs. Leonilla Stephens,
Mrs. Mary Smith, Mrs. Margaret Guyton and Mrs. Lauretta Barrow.


standing guidance in the future
may have it; that the many men
now serving their country who will
probably be called upon to main-
tain the large army required in a
post-war world, will have every
possible benefit secured for them,
and all past gains safe-guarded;
that the many disabled service
men of the past may be looked
after in the future; that the men
who are disabled or maimed in this
war will have every consideration
in the future.


Q-Where does Africa get its
name?,
A--From the Berber name -
Ifriqa or Ifrigia-applied to Tu-
nisia in ancient times.
Q-What is a cartel ship?
A-A ship commissioned in
time, of war to exchange prisoners
of hostile powers or to carry pro-
posals from one to the other. With
the exception of a single gun for
making signals, no arms, ammuni-
tion or materials of war are car-
ried aboard.

Q-What belligerent country has
been kindest to movie stars, play-
wrights, actors and authors?
A-Soviet Russia, which has
not conscripted them, feeling that
their work is important in keeping
up morale, of soldiers and civilians
alike. "
.


VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV'V V v-]

OUR COMPLIMENTS

TO THE


Regular Veterans Association

AND ITS WOMEN'S AUXILIARY

FROM



RUTHANA WEAVERS


GIFT SHOP

22 AVILES STREET
One Block South of Plaza Next teLitbrary

GIFTS THAT ARE DIFFERENT


Q- -What is the longest time ever
taken for a fall in birling, or log
rolling ?
A-Alan Stewart spilled Joe
Oliver after they had whirled a
floating log three hours and 15
minutes in a championship meet
at Chequamegon Bay, Ashland,
Wis.
V
Town Makes Shortage
Of Beef On the Hoof
ELKTON, Va. (IP)-No longer
,will the people of Elkton be able
to look out their windows and see
a potential beefsteak chewing the
shrubbery on the front lawn. The
Elkton town council, aroused by
a complaint over damaged shrub-
bery and lawns, has passed an or-
dinance making it illegal for bossy
to .roam through the town.
Giving up little luxuries is not
so hard'when you remember they
give their lives. Buy Bonds to
"outfit the outfits" fighting for you.


American boys all over the globe are in the thick of this fight--
pitting their strength, their wits and ability, yesi, their very lives
against the unleashed forces of Would-be world dominators. There
are rivers and deserts to be crossed screaming bullets and
fiery bombs to be dodged disease and loneliness to be borne.
You, yes you in the armchair, do you fully appreciate what they're
"going through for you? Then show it! Buy those Bonds and
Stamps every pay day, and in-between until it hurts! SHOW IT!


SBANTA BRRS.P
SERVICE STATION AND GARAGE
32 SAN MARCO AVE. PHONE 468


aImiitiI DIIIliilatH iHilD iiiHniDIamluIHa n imHilHWIillHW





PAFFE'S

55 ST. GEORGE ST.

Greeting Cards for All Occasions I



MOTHERS' DAY, May 9 |



Dolls, Children's Books, Toys I

Games for Young and Old I


THE POPULAR PLACE TO SHOP S
- - - - -- - - - - -


1


Is~c


IZk~


BEST WISHES
TO ALL
SERVICE
MEN


I


r


AND

BEVERAGE CO.


MARY McLAUGHLIN
REALTOR


Phon


e 936-W


131 Cordova St.


78 SAN MARCO AVE.


UTT~TTqtT ,Artb 'ff ftA


Ft


SERVICE MEN'S WIVES SUCCESSFUL IN OBTAINING SPLENDID
SUPPORT FOR THIS SPECIAL EDITION


Entertainment

At Civic Center

For Service Men

Since 1935 Buildin.g Has
Served Community And
Its People Well
St. Augustine's Civic Recreation
Center, located just north of the
ancient City Gates, has served the
community well since its hospitable
doors were opened wide in Febru-
ary of 1935. It houses the office
of the St. Augustine and St. Johns
County Chamber of Commerce, and
until its facilities were required to
help care for the service men sta-
tioned in this area, it was enter-
tainment headquarters for the local
Tourist Club.
Constructed by the old CWA,
FERA and City of St. Augustine
at a cost-of $68,000, it was form-
ally dedicated with a three-day
celebration and program which be-
gan with' special exercises on Feb-
ruary 14, 1935 at which State
FERA Administrator Julius ,T.
Stone was a guest.
Today, the Civic Recreation Cen-
ter is -devoted almost entirely to
the entertainment of service men
and women in their off-duty m-o
ments. Its auditorium also serves
aa a lecture and demonstration hall
for Military, Police training com-
panies.
Each week-end, there is a regu-
lar schedule of 'entertainment,
which is highlighted by the lrge-
ly attended Saturday-night dances
with the popular Coast Guard Or-
chestra providing the musical back-
ground. .On Sunday, informal
dancing usually, is in progress. The
various game facilities and out-
door courts, the writing and read-
ing rooms all are much-appreciated
features.
Especially popular is the recent
innovation of a canteen, where
service men and Service Club host-
esses may secure simple refresh-
ments. This is in operation on both
Saturday and Sunday.
During the week days, civie or-
ganizations are privileged to use
the auditorium, provided'permis-
sion has been obtained in advance
from the City Commission., Serv-
ice men's recreational prograins
there are under the auspices of. the
Recreational Division of the St.
Johns County Defense Gouncil.
V r
Four Officers

Given Sea Duty
Since establishment of the St.
Augustine U. S. Coast Guard Train-
ing Station, four staff officers have
been detached for' sea duty.
They are:
Lieutenant-Commander K.:0. A.
Zittel, of Ridgewood,,N. J., former-
ly on the instructor staff 'of the
Officers Indoctrination School.
Lieutenant E. T. Piner, of Mar-
shallburg, S. C., who was in charge
of the Gunnery School of the local
Coast Gutard Training Station.
(Lieutenant (j.g.), W. H. Maddox,
of Laurel, Miss., formerly assistant
to Lieutenant Piner, has succeeded
him and is assistant to Commander
A. W. Davis, the Station's recruit
and gunnery training officer:)
Lieutenant Earl Phillips, former-
ly supply officer at the station.
Ensign J. D. Ingham, of Rich-
mond Hill, N. Y., formerly on the
instructor staff of the Offiers In-
doctrination School.- *.
*V '"
Helps Build Plane,
Then Trains In It
LA JUNTA, Colo. (JP)-Lt. Al-
vin O. Boden helped to build the
airplane in which he recently won
wings and a commission in the U.
S. Air Force. In 1941 he was work-
ing in the Curtiss-Wright factory
at Lambers Field, St. Louis, Mo.,
and helped to build training planes.
It was in one of these planes that
he later trained at La Junta after
joining the air corps.
V;
Dessertless days on the family
menu save money to lend t XUncle
Sam to feed and clothe his fight-
ing men.


R VA Auxiliary, Sponsors Of'

Edition, To Use Funds For

Service Men's Recreation


WANTED


CASH PAID
FOR USED

FURNITURE

STOVES

ICE BOXES

SPRINGS
Or What HaIve
You?


GOOD
LUCK o.
TO OUR
FIGHTING
MEN


Ogd
CII


WEST SIDE

FURNITURE & HARDWARECO.


L. B. Ruis, Mgr. Phone 179-W
]lt'M .... ... ... -- -: -. .......a-jf


Some Of The Historic And

Picturesque Places To See

In This Quaint Oldest City
Castillo de San Marcos (Fort Marion National Monument), old
Spanish fort started in 1672, is the oldest masonry fort in the United
States.
Old City Gates, with their protecting pillars of coquina stone, have
stood for at least two centuries.
Don Toledo House, in Aviles Street (named for St. Augustine's
founder, Pedro Menendez de Aviles).
Old Spanish Treasury Building, St. George and Treasury Streets.
Treasury of the Spanish kings during the First Occupation. Here you'll
find the ancient strong room and pieces of Spanish money current in
those years-the doubloons and pieces-of-eight for which many a throat
was slit or stretched.
Oldest School House, St. George Street, near the City Gates; Made
of red cedar, with hand-hewn timbers and wooden pegs.
Fort Matanzas, 14 miles south of St. Augustine, on an island in Ma-
tanzas Inlet. It was the back-door defense, for Spanish St. Augustine.,
Originally it was a wooden block-house (about 1670), but in 1737, With
British colonists thrusting ever southward from Georgia, the Spanish
governor had his engineer erect the present structureof native
coquina rock. .
Old Slave Market, at east end of thie Plaza. An ancient landmark'
with a 16th Century background.
The Oldest House, 14 St. Francis Street. Records show it was in,
existence in 1727, the property of Thomas Gonzales Hernandez.
Prince Muratt House, St. George and'Bridge Streets. Here, tradi-
tion say*, stayed Prince Napoleon AchiUe Murat, son of Joachim Murat,
King of Naples and nephew of Napoleon Bonaparte, during the early'
part of his Florida sojourn, in the winter of 1823-24.
Fountain of Youth, about'one mile north of City Gates. -Historic
and romantic bower of world-wide fame. Lovely senoritas are your
guides as you wander through tiis beautiful park and hear the story
of the landing of Conquistador' Ponce de Leon ii 1513 in his search
for the eternal Fountainr.of Youth. ,
Ostrioh and Alligator Farm, on Anastasia Island. Six thousand
. alligators, all size-F-so there's uweally. ome excitement there.' -,,
Plaza of St. Augustine, almost as old as the city itself. Early in
1598, Governor Gonzalo Mendez de Canso created it.
Old Spanish Cathedral, which fronts on the Plaza.
Historic Trinity Episcopal Church, also fronting on the Plaza.
Memorial Presbyterian Church, built by Henry M. Flagler. L. o
Shrine of .Nuestraa Senora de la Leche, where annually on Low
Sunday, the Sunday following Easter, special services are held, com-
memorating the first Mass said on these shores by a priest wh6 came
with Pedro Menendez de Aviles, who founded the city, Septemrber 8, 1566.
Convent and Academy of St. Joseph, and the restored balconied
Father O'Reilly: House on Aviles Street, belonging to the Sisters of
St. Joseph,
Llambias House on St. Francis Street,: for which the Garden Club
of St. Augustine is custodian.
Beautiful Kirkside, on Valencia Street, home of the late Henry
Morrison Flagler, millionaire developer, and philanthropist. The prop-
erty is now headquarters for the University Foundation.
Fatio House on Aviles Street, beloved by artists and others. Re-
stored and maintained by the Colonial Dames of America in the State
of Florida.
Arts Club headquarters, Charlotte Street.
State Arsenal, with long and colorful history running back into
early Spanish times.
Famous Avenues of Palms and Oaks at Garnett Orange Grove.
,Public Library Building, Aviles Street.
There are numerous other historic and picturesque spots in the city,
which one browsing about will enjoy. See the Chamiber of Commerce;
get a guide book, and "Know St. Augustine!"


THERE IS A WAR ON AND

YOU CAN HELP




3)ow~t')<)Jbi


MEATS-GROCERIES-PRODUCE


GRUBB' S
GROCERY AND MARKET


CITY GATES FURNITURE CO.
"'Near .City Gates--Orange St." H. L. Johns, Pro


il__


op.


208 ST. GEORGE ST.,


PHONE 985


GIVE 'EM A HAND
THEY'RE PULLING FOR YOU! '


Here Are The Three Song Titles

Here are the titles of the three songs played over the local
radio station Friday night at 7:30 o'clock by the Coast Gtuard Or-
chestra, as part of the Recruit Show at the Lyceum, and which'
it was announced would be found in today's Special Service Edi.-
tion of the Record:
1. "I Can't Get Started With You."
2. "Body and Soul."
3. "I Surrender, Dear."


v


r

d


rb


9


Take Better

Care Of What

You Have


It's important that you know how
to care for the things you now
have, and one of the best ways is
to have your clothes frequently
cleaned. Depend on us for quality
cleaning always!
Cleaning preserves fabric. Makes
clothes fit better. Helps them re-
tain their shape, last longer.


NU GRAPE


AND


SUN CREST


ORANGE









Flashes Of Life


n


-


COAST GUARD
BASEBALL TILT
IS CANCELLED
The baseball game originally
scheduled to be played between
the Coast Guard All-Stars and
the 3aeksonville Carpenters Lo-
cal 62t-tiMe this afternoon (Sun-
day), has been cancelled.
The next home game at Fran-
cis Field will be played Wednes-
'day afternoon, April 28, between
the Coast Guard team and the
top-notch Jacksonville Terminal
nine, leaders of the Victory
League in Jacksonville. The
game will start at 2 o'clock.


-


I,,,


II I


----


Ar


PAGE 14 THE. ST. AUGUSTINE


RECORD


Cleanup MR. LOPEZ REPORTS
, SAN FRANCISCO--The Bring- ALBUQUERQRQUE,: N; M.-Sai%
back-the-ernpties campaign got a
real boost fromI Mrs. CharlotteLopez drove onto a railroad cross
Baker-and vice versa. ing; a freight train smashed into
She cleared :her basement and, his car....
garage, tairned in h 3,268 empty Escaping injury, Sam reported
mills, calbonated beverage and bee the accident to police.
bottles. the accident to police.
They brought her $93.75-- They charged him with driving
enough for five $25 war bonds. without a ,license.


Venice Bounce


---,I-


1


By The Associated Press
To Remove Body?
WATERBURY, Conn.--Arme d
guards of a factory engaged in war
production, who recently completed
an army course in- plant produc-
tion, were being inspected by an
army officer.
S"What would you do.if you spot-
ted an intruder on the grounds?"
asked the officer.
"I would immediately notify the
main office," was the quick reply
of one guard.

Orchestra Seats
PHILADELPHIA-The stage at
the Philadelphia Naval Hospital
was too smali'for the full Philadel-
phia orchestra, so Eugent Ormandy i
and his musicians perfo-rmed from
the floor of the auditorium while
patients" occupied the stage at a
concert.

Capitolists
HELENA, Mont.-There was I
$70 in the anonymous letter, Secre-
tary of State Sam Mitchell said--
along with this explanation:
"A couple of years ago me arid
my partner got jobs working for
the capitol but we didn't do no
work and got our pay.
"We got good jobs now so are
sending back the money."


c*


in 27 innings of the infant season.
,. Mid-season pitching by Elmer
Riddle, in scattering seven hits,
went for naught, while it was not
until the eighth that the Reds were
able to connect with Harry Gum-
bert, who started for the World
Champions. Then, Max Marshall's
single and Frank McCormick's dou-
ble were enough to brith i--
Krist to the scene and the Rhine-
landers' lone tally came with Mar-
shall.scoring as Eddie Miller bunt-
ed ofit on an attempted squeeze
play.,
The Cards really made hay in
the sixth. Debs Garms flied, Stan
Musial singled and took second as
Frank McCormick fumbled the ball.
Ray Sanders walked; Lonnie Frey
fumbled Ken O'Day's grounder and
the bases were filled; Harry Walk-
er flied and all runners held; then
Musical dashed for home, was mo-
mentarily trapped but, when Catch-
er Ray Mueller dropped Bert Haas'
return, he scored.
The Cards' second run, in the
eighth, was manufactured on suc-
cessive singles, with one. out, by
Musial'and Sanders.

Giants Win, 4-3
S.BOSTON, April 24 (SP)-The New
York Giants hit A1 Javery hard in
the early innings today and whip-
ped the- Boston Braves, 4-3, in a
game marked by two home runs--
the first by Billy Jurges of the
Giants and the second by Chet Ross
of the Braves.

Dodgers on Top
BROOKLYN, N. Y., April 24 (RP)
-The 1942 ball returned to Ebbets
Field" today and with' it a 16-hit
assault' by the Brooklyn Dodgers
that buried the Phillies under an
i:1-4 score.

SCubs Beat Pirates
CHICAGO, April 24 (R) The
'Chicago Cubs: and Pittsburgh Pi-
' rates continued to use the new
194. "dead" ball. today,,but found
it live enough for 20 hits. The
Pirates got 12 of them but didn't
have he pitching or fielding "to
match and lost, 6 to 3, The victory
g-ale the Cubs a 2 to 1 Ileadrl in the


RIVERLAND COPS
$10,000 RACE
NEW YORK, April 24 (fP) -
Riverland, five-year-old son of
Coldstream from the Louisiana
Farm stable, easily won the $10,000
Excelsior Handicap today at Ja-
maica before an estimated crowd of
30,000.


"We A Store, Too!;
BUYING BONDS AND DOING OUR BEST TO SERVE
AMERICA, ITS ARMED FORCES, INDUSTRY AND YOU.


, ----.
S. .. .. The Sower
OROFINO, Idaho-Howard -W.
--- .-. McKeari "of Burley piloted his plane
......... up and down north central Idaho's
What does a war worker do on her day of?'. Well; Shelly Mitchel big-game d areas for 14 hours-
romps in the surf at Venice, Calif., bounces a ball on her head, and dropping 4,000 pounds of rock salt
makes pretty pictures for the newspapers to run. for wild game.
for wild game.


S WESTERN AUTO
ASSOCIATE STORE
KING ST. : V. J; AMATO, Owner


33


By The Associated Press
Florida: Little change in tem-
perature south, slightly warmer


north portion today.
Temperatures
Etation Low
Atlanta .............. 64
Boston ............... 71
Cincinnati ............ 74
Cleveland ............ 72
Detroit ...... .......... 73
Jacksonville .......... 75
Key West ............ 77
Miami ............i.. 82
New Orleans ......... 80
New York ............ 62
Pittsburgh ........... 71
St. Louis ............ 75
Tampa ............... 78
Washington .......... 68


High
55
46
42
41
46
1,60-
68
66
64
44
44
43
66
41


SEP \T SHORE \9 T r-FF
\.?FE 1ER ME,GOoGVE -
-L GOT OTH\^x TO 00
TV L\EO\-M0G VRS, BSW
Es' OO\SE\ LDTR E 5^-

DRE^^V1.~SFf **RT^


)


~1~51
r


4aRO so0\O
SWI Pr Stm .T
t 9^R9^^S /F


/ 3EFj' PUT MY
~LO~~C~~ 7R~\~
F~CH~ CHER~,CW~-
~~L'N\88\-F~ OE~~
\hSH~~N T. ~(E4Ct\ ~5~~
,'UJ\F MY SNODT~N~


0


APRIL TIDES AT '
Morning
High Low
26. 1:31 7:48
27. 2:34 $8:57
!8. 3:41 10:03,
'19 4:47 11:04


THE INLET
Evening
High Low
2:01 7:59
3:01 9:14
4:14 10;25
R5 .i 11 Rn0


series. S 5:48 11:59 6:17 12:27 National League
W. L. Pet.
lim llulla llllliaIIIIInIliIIIIll lllllllDlll lllli lll lil llll llllllll IIIIIIIIIIIiD iI' Brooklyn .. ...... 2 0 1:000
i. Cincinnati ...... 2 1 .667
SChicago ......... 2 1 .667
I New York ....... 1 1 .500
P Fittsburgh ....... 1 2 .333
SSt. Louis ........ 1 2 .333
U.ncle'~' Philadelphia ..... 0 1 .000
.. ...... B oston ......... 0 1 .0 0
Yesterday's Results
1 New York 4; Boston 3.
i Brooklyn 11; Philadelphia.4 s
/ St. Louis 2; Cincinnati 1
IB '-Chicago 6; Pittsburgh 3
Games Today
': PhilaEdelphia Oat Brooklyn
New York at Bostoni
SSt. Louis at Cincinnati
1 Pitts"bhrgh, at ChicAgo
American League
GOOD FOR HIM AND W. L.- Pet.
r3 New York ....... 2 0 1.b00
GOOD FOR YOU!= Cleveland ........ 2 .1 .667
st. Louis ....... 1 1 .500
Uncle Sam provides bowling, alleys Philadelphia ..... 2 2 .500
in camp for regular exercise for our. ChicagBoston 1 1 .500
soldiers. Regular practice is good for Washington ...... 1 2 .333
yeou, will boost your average and add Detroit .......... 1 2 .333
a Yesterday's Results
to your love of the game. 'Bowl a 1New Yrik 1; Washington 0
line today Philadelphia 7; Bostion 6, 12 innings
Cleveland 3; Detroit 2

St. Augu tme Bowlig Center1 a Game'Phi
s ng enter a higton at' Philadelphia (2)
AVILES STREET, JUST OFF KING E Detroitat Cleveland (2)
SChicago at St. Louis (2)
MilIIIIIIIIIlllI~ilMIIIIII IIIMIIIII IIrllIIIIIII nIIIlllIIIIIIIIllnI Boston at New York
OUT OUR WAY By WILLIAMS


2
2
2
2


OF PATSY


SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1948f


New York Yanks

Blank Senators

By 1-0 Margin

NEW YORK, April 24 (P)-
Spud Chandler, 33-year-old right
hander from Moultrie, Ga., pitched
the New'York Yankees to a one-hit,
1-0 victory over the Washington
Senators before a sparse crowd, of
8,157 in Yankee 'Stadium today.
One of the aces of Joe'McCar-
thy's mound staff for several years,
Chandler was nicked for a double
just inside the left field foul line
by the first batter to face him, El-
lis Clary, Senator rookie third base-
man, but thereafter was supreme.
Chandler rolled up seven strike-
outs, getting Centerfielder Stan
Spence on strikes four times in a
row. He was in trouble only-in
the seventh when the. Senators
filled the bases on three of the five
walks Chandler gave up. Here a
fast double play, Bill Johnson to
Rollie Hemsley to Nick Etten, re-
tired the side.
The'Yankees themselves got on-
ly four hits off. Ewald Pyle and
Owen Scheetz but pushed over the
only run of the game in the opening
inning when George Stirnweiss'.
single was followed by a walk to
Charley Keller and. a single into
center field by Nick Etten, new
Yankee first baseman.

Indians Win
CLEVELAND, April 24 ( Jeff Heath singled two runs home
in the ninth inning today, reached
third with the aid' of an error, and
tallied when Catcher Paul Richards,
threw into left field, on, an attempt-
ed pickoff at third base to give the.
Cleveland Indians a 3 to, 2 tri-
umph over the Detroit Tigers.

A's Shade Sox
PHILADELPHIA, April 24 (RP)-
Dick Siebert's fly with the bases
loaded scored Elmer'Valo inthe
12th inning today to give the Phil-
adelphia Athletics a 7 'to: 6 vic-
tory over the Boston Red Sox.
Chicago Triumphs
ST. LOUIS, April 24 ()--Be-
hind Lefty Ed Smiith's six-hit pitch-
ing, the Chicago White Sox
trimmed the St. Louis Browns,: 3 to
1, today. The Sox nicked Denny
G-alehouse for eight hits.


The / .rd

Scoreboard


C ardinas I Triumph


2 To 1 On Errors

.,CINCINNATI, April 24 (YP)-Four errors blew a ball game for
Cincinnati's Reds today as the St. Louis Cardinals won, 2-1, taking
advantage of three miscues in one frame to chalk up their first score
91 n. .--* .c I--._-- -


~-1~~ -


WEATHER


BARNEY GOOGLE'AND SNUFFY SMITH.


By BILLY DE BECIC


By HAMLIN


ALLEY OOP


DONALD DUCK


By WALT DISNEY


DICKIE DARE


By COULTON WAUGH


THE. ADVENTURES





. SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1943


THE ST. AUGPSTINE RECORD


A


Looking For



An Apartment?


Classified Advertising

RATES
ON 20 WORDS OR LESS
1 Insertion .....40c
3 Insertions ....70c
6 Insertions ..$1.00
Cla I el d adverttsemenis
counting over twenty words cost
as follows se per word for one
Insertlcn, A.Te per word -for
three Insertlons. Be per word for
six Insertions.
Advertisements for week-day
insertione must be tn the Record
once by O9tO A. M. For Sunday
Insertion they must be In the
Record oece by 4:80 P. M., Sat-
urday.
All charged classiied adver-
tflements are subject to' c^llec-
tieo on the day of'fIlrt publica-
tion.
FREE!
Adertlsements for t o s
seeking positions will be run
under the Posiltlons Wanted"
column for three insertlonn free
of charge If brought to the Ree-
ord Advertiling Department.


THOMPSON-RYMAN

REALTY CO.
Complete INSURANCE Service
Telephone 500


Market Help Corner of Cathedral Place and
T.ar4 eiIlCharlotte Street

MAN or WOMAN ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA.
Good Salary and Working
"Conditions
Apply
Piggly Wiggly Store 4. -For Sale-Misc.
TYPEWRITERS and ding Ma
SGIRLS, Make Ea chines rented, sold an repaired
BOYS!, GIRLS, Make Easy Now at 56 Charlotte St., Aber
Money! Ask your neighbors nethy-Kitchler, Phone 888.
for old coathangers. We will M2-1mo.-P
,pay you a penny apiece
for all you can get. Service FOR SALE: Paints, $1.60 gallon
Laundry and Dry Cleaners, Hotel dishes cheap. Rocker
14 Spanish St. A8-1mo-c from $2 to $6. Straight chair
A, FIEE TICKET to the Matanzas from 75c to $2.50. Paints an
Theatre goes to Mrs. L-onard, varnishes of any quantity. W
0!'d, Lemon St. -Please call. at Side .Furniture Co., corner: Kin
the Record Circulation Depart- andLewis Sts. A19-6t-
nient. (uptairs FOR SALE:- Twin bed, 1 single
WANTEDM fExperienced waitress- I&ed 1 double bed, dresser, hal
e. Permanent work Apply set, wardrobes. Inquire 114 Sa
castle Warden Hotel, San Marco Marco, evenings. A23-3t-p
ve. A7-tf-c


FREE DELIVERY For Sale
AC ONA In an unusual picturesque loca-
PACKAGE GOODS tion near the water. A one-
PHONE, 1566 story, 7-room house, glassed-in
I porch. Also screened porch.
THE MARINE BAR Beautiful yard.
and Cocktail Lounge $5,000.00
9 KING ST. TERMS


Also attractive 5-room bunga-
WANITED-A colored maid-for low, screened porches. Wired
all day work. Good wages for the for electric stove. Some fruit
right party. Apply upstairs St. trees. Lot 107x100.
Augustine Record. A4-tf-f. $2,300.00
WANTED Colored, short-order HESTER 'W RLEY
cobk. Too much experience not 10 Palietto Ave.
necessary. Good pay. Apply Anastasia Island Phone 478
,Huddle House, 454 San Marco
Ave., Telephone 9103. A22-
A22-6t-e


2. Positions Wanted
WHITE man desires yard work and
repairing work. Write Gust La-
fant, care St. Augustine Record.
A25-8t-f
,3. Autos For Sale

WILL PAY CASH FOR
GOOD USED CARS!
CLEN THOMPSON MO-
TO0 CO., 185 SAN MAR-
CO. AVE., PHONE 905.
F15-tf-c
FOR SALE: Model A Ford ingood
condition. Good rubber, $100
cash. Apply 125 Washington St.
A25-c
A FREE TICKET to the.Matanzas
Theatre goes to Mrs. Welch, 64
I.Pmon St. Please call at the
Record Circulation Department.-
(upstairs).


I /


GET




Mat



fr. orld-
hit comno M
Sthe cr.ee.












TOD
Five names app
of them and, if
to the Record
and you'll receive
POSITIVE
NOTI(


FOR SALE at a bargain. Kitchen
cabinet; Oak buffet. Also Su-
perfex oil heater. Buy now for
next winter. Telephone 1628 or
apply 39 Saragossa St. A25-c


FRYERS FOR SALE-$1 each.
Apply 45 Florzla Avenue. Tele-
phone 402-J. A22-3t-p


5


We will have a number

of very attractive places

available within the

next 10 days.


TV /Lt rl^AJllJlJLJ
NO RATIONING
CERTIFICATE
REQUIRED
PROTECT YOUR TIRES.
HAVE THEM RECAPPED OR
VULCANIZED BEFORE THEY
GET TOO "THIN."
THE ONLY TIRE RECAPPING
ANb VULCANIZING PLANT
IN ST. AUGUSTINE


DADDIqu


Mrs. Housewife knows that
her sheets and linens have got
to last. And she knows too,
that we do a careful, thorough
job that will give you more wear
from bedding. Conserving is an
important part of your war job,
select your laundry wisely.


7. Special Notices
ROUNDWORMS ARE A THREAT
that never should be forgotten.
For roundworming par excel-
lence, Avi-Ton won't be forgot-
ten. Dr. Salsbury's Avi-Ton gets
roundworms and cecal worms;
mixed in the regular mash. Burns
Drug Store, 209' West King St.
Phone 200. AlP-6t-p.
EASTER GREETINGS: Let our
Canaries sing their joyous songs
for you. No finer gift.. eau-
tiful in color. See the .gr An-
cient City Bird Haven,'6& Fuller-
wood Drive. Telephone 997-W.
A21-6t-c


8. Services *


SUITS cleaned and pressed 60c,
Trousers 30c, ladies' dresses 60c
up. I We call for and deliver.
Dubbs' Cleaners. Phone 1378w
40 Granada St. A30-6t-c.
A FREE TICKET to the Matanzas
Theatre goes to Mr. Triay, 75'11
Lemon St. Please call at the
" Record Circulation Departiment
(upstairs).


<


SSEALTEST
For Sale BETTER MILK

Business Block SERVICE
Corner Dixie Highway SERVICE
and King St. ON ALL MAKES
Filling Station OF
Brick Business Building O
and Dwelling CARS
Two-Bedroom
Furnished Dwelling We Pay Cash For
1-Car Garage
Overlooks Water Park USED CARS
PRICE FOR

$4,200 AMERICAN Ke
wit
TERMS HEALTH hu
cos
Eug e L Po d M Produced and bottled under the an(
Eugene Lu Pllrd lotor Co most exact conditions in order be
to merit the Sealtest label. You'll
a s & Son 164 SAN MARCO PHONE 1500 find this milk full of body-build-
Bane & Son ing vitamins a truly health- OU
Approved Sales Broker ful American drink. yol
H. 0. L. C to
R. O. L. C Have You Tried mil
ReaF. t. eLand surance 4. For Sale-Misc. Sealtest Buttermilk tio
~Rel Estate and Insurance
Established 1895 FOR SALE-Two men's spring ANOTHER DELICIOUS Ch
Notary Public suits. Price reasonable. Call DAIRY PRODUCT
Phone 75 65 King St after 4 p. m. Mrs. D. W. Lanier, DISTRIBUTED BY
Aiken St. A22-3t-c

4. For Sale-Misc. McCARTER'S

SFOR SALE-Five room DAIRY

- Park, Anastasia Island. FORL171 San Marco Ave.
"` cotPhone 452

For particulars, call or ne 6.
see L. B. Carnes, Tele-" FOR
n. phone 146-W. All-16t-c. APARTMENT HOUSE 5. Wanted pa
rs ka
rs 50-LB. ICE refrigerator. Red UNFURNISHED RIDERS WANTED Leave St. bk
d Maple Buffet and Upholstered Augustine 7:00 a. m. Leave Jack-
J. Rocker,' Knee Hole Desk. All ONSISTING OF sonville, 5:45 p. in., Monday lin
g practically new. One 3-piece APARTMNTS through Saturday Call Apt. 3,
p Fibre Living Room Suite (used). 22 Central Ave. A23-6t-p FOR
51 Cordova St, over Cordova FURNITURE AND TOOLS nis
e Hardware. A2-t- FURNITURE AND T OOLs
le Hardware. A23-3t-p. WANTED-Will pay cash prices B
n F OR S ALE--Healthy tomato for used furniture, stoves, ice- No
p. plants, 25c dozen. Phone 5122. boxes,, springs and what have
Mrs. Frederick Vaill. A22-3t-p TERMS you. Call West Side Furniture FOR
and Hardware Co., Phone 179-W. roo
ALITL. B. Ruis, manager. A-19-6t-p at'
and VERLE A. POPE u
SERVICE BULK 7.
SEREAL ESTATE SEEDS VAC
Call 740 I NSURANCE (Flowers and Vegetables) let
a INSURANCE FERTILIZERS /U
Superior Dairies FERTILIZRS
n M o A Mardelle Larsen, Manager FEEDS BABY CHICKS
San Marco Avenue
-Approved Sales Brokers, .HOLC GROCERIES -- MEATS LET
no
Billy Park. Life Insurance Evergreen Grocery so:
Phone 1016 55 King Street Albrittone 27 F0-J
2 Masters Dr. Phone 270-J ca
Cash and Carry St


N' S ET S A WANTEr: Late model automobile
.SHS .HA V or station wagon with good tires.
SS AV Will pay cash. Give description
and price in letter to Box XL,
S GOT TOLAST St. Augustine Record. A21-6t-c

DR. R. C./CONLEY
/ ANNOUNCES THAT
S 'Because Bay Street Is Closed
Sfor the Duration
TIRES ENTRANCE MAY BE MADE
TIRES TO TIE

RECAPPED DRUGLESS CLIN-IC
,OR A From
OR t \ 35 CHARLOTTE ST.
VIi r C n C I Telfphone 47 ,


w. Prices cheaper than Jack-
nville. 14 years experience.
tee demonstration from large
talog. R. N. Benet. 28 Cuna
. Phone 212-W. A25-6t-p


Morris Plan
Loan Application Blanks
May Be Obtained at'
54 CATHEDRAL PLACE


Phone 1


T. R. Lewis


SEEDS -FEEDS
FERTILIZER
Also Baby Chicks
Open Sunday Mornings
SEALS
Feed & Supply Co.
140 W. King St. Phone 1137


P









p


-'55'


SERVICE STATION' Or Or nZWior.,
166 SAN MARCO
PHONE 6 ovrAKs WORTHY OF TRUST.


I -


anzas Theatre GOAT'S MII
50c Quart
_Telephone 71
IFOR INFORMATION


THE
BRIN
Put two c
tures the
you month
SERVE]
St. Georg


Families come to us in comn-


'plete cpnfidence-in moments
X 5. Wanted of. deepest grief. Our kindly
WANTED-5 H. P. 1942 helpfulness is implicitly ac-
Johnson Outboard Mo- cepted. Our practical under-
tor. Will pay cash. standing of the bereaved ones'
Write to :Box TH, c/o needs, is widely .recognized.
-' this newspaper.
A13-tf-f. T
WOULD LIKE 3 or 4-room fur- BENN
nished apartment within walking
distance of Post Office. Rent FUNERAL
$35-$40. Address Post Office Box
1267, city. A23-3t-c.
WANTED: Adding machine. Write HOM E
Bok Z, care St. Augustine Rec-
ord. A16-tf-f. RONDAL L. BENNETT
43 Cordova St. Phone 3
WANTED: Rabbit-Hutch. Apply _
26 Pine St. Telephone 1313-W,
A23-3t-c. BUY WAR BONDS!

WALLHIDE B ELV I
"VITOLIZED OIL" PAINT THAT
GS YOU ONE-DAY PAINTING! ONE COAT FLAT PAIN
coats on your walls and hang your pic- PEELING, AND NOW V
same day! Covers better and saves MAKES 1V'/
ey. St. Augustine Pa
ICE PAINT & GLASS CO.
ge and Treasury Phone 504 121 St. George St.


I


Sip & Bite

Hut
CATHEpRAL ST.
Save your Gas! 4at uptown at
the Sip & Bite where the tasty
food and service will call you
back again and again.
No Alcoholic Beverages Sold
or Allowed in Our Place.

HOURS
Daily 12 Noon Until
'- Midnight
Sat. Night Till 1 a. m. Sun.


U3


< ..apter, 17
SO Tubac told the marshal that
he was the man who had put
the bum money into Hi Grab's
bank. "But how did I know it was
bum money" he growled. "I toolk
it in payment of a debt-an' I
supposed the guy was a gentle-
man."
Jinx Mueller eyed him dubious-
ly. "Lack of knowledge is a poor
excuse," he said grimly. "You
had quite a real pile of jack, an'
you ain't got the look of having
forty-five cents..What would a
man be owin' you all that money
for? I'm not promising anything.
but if you don't come clean, by
the gods you'll stay here till hell
freezes! Now what about this
money? Who's the guy that owed
it to you? Aun' when did he pay
you?. An' Why?"
The way Tubac told it was quite
an involved story. Boiled down it
summed up to just this: Two-
three -years ago he had a small
spread in Texas, close to the
Border; had been raising horses
for the army-and doing well at
it, too, until one night his place
had been raided and half his best
stock- run off. Revolutionists fromp
across the Line, he'd guessed, ani
a couple hours later he'd had con-
firmation when a bunch of Rur-
ales had come up, hot on the trail
of the bandits.
A hard looking outfit and eager
for the kill; and their Captain-
a great ox of a man with a fierce
mustachio-had demanded he give
them fresh horses. Though not too
keen on the notion, a number of
considerations had swayed Jones.
The Rurales' mounts had been
pretty whipped out, but they'd
been first-class broncs in anyone's
language; and besides, though
Jones knew the company had
been out of boutids, he had
wanted the horse thieves cap-
tured. So he'd nodded agreement
and the Rurales had cleaned out
the last horse he'd left and gone
off driving their own broncos.
"W~THAT!" exclaimed Mueller in-
V credibly. "You let 'em clear
out with nothing to prove-".
"Well, they seemed to figure
they'd ought to have remounts
and the Captain, he give me his
note fer the stock-said if they
didn't git back to return it he'd
send me the money next day."
"But you still ain't, explained
how you got that fake currency.'
Mueller said.
"If you'd shut up a spell 1 could
git to it. Like I was fixin' to tell
you, before them Rurales gal-
loped off with my stock this Cap-
tain feller he give me his note,
an' when he seen me next time he
paid me off.
"How' much?" said Jinx Mueller
"Five thousand bucks!"
Jinx whistled. "An' you expect
me to believe you hung onto that
money all this time?"
"He only give it to me two
months ago."
Muelle jtst stood there and
gaped. ..
"Well, its the truth." Tubac
grumbled.
"An' you're claiming' this queer
you been shovlh' is the dinero
this Captain give you?"
"Honor bright," Jones muttered.
"Hmmm. What did this Rurale
bird look like?"


EEP ENGIl

TUNED

ep your engine in "t
th the times-if it
mming smoothly,
sting you precious
d money-gas that
conserved, money
lid go into War Bo
r men are trained to
ur engine exactly rig
help you get maxi
leage from your "i
n car. We use gen
evrolet and Buick p


Fort Marioi

Chevrolet C
TELEPHONE 896
123 SAN MARCO
r


FURNISHINGS


Prices
e. We Buy and SelL
PERSON 67 St. Ge


orge


St.


: 1^ ,c
pp-w COsIJ


"I'd say he was tall gaunt an'
some quick. Dark an deep-set
eyes. Square chin-waa in need
of a barber's services last time I
saw him across the line. below
Naco."
"Below Naco, eh?" said Jinx
thinly. "An',what'd.you say his
name was?" '
"Chacon- Tubae stopped
short.
"Yeah,' snarled Jinx andr
started swearing. "You've sure
played hell all round, you have!
Augustine Chacon! You bone-.
head! That guy's no more Rurale
than you arel Next to Joaquin
Murrieta he's the toughest Mex
who ever went bronc! There's
twelve thousand reward on that
hombre's pelt an' you give him
horses to ride off onl"
"But-" protested Tubac, "he
was dressed like a Rurale an' the
rest of 'em called him Captain..
How was I to know different? An'
all them 'others was dressed like
Rurales-"
"In stolen uniforms prob'ly
stripped off their owners' carcas-
ses," Jinx Mueller came back at
him caustically.
"Well, I guess your yarn's
straight," he said dourly. "I don't
hardly guess no man would make
up a spiel dumb as that is."
But Tubac said nothing., There
was nothing to say. He'd been
taken in like a booby.
IT was a greatly sobered Tubae
Swho 'turned into the Charlston
trail that night; once again
headed back toward Horse Prai-
rie. He felt lower than a centi-
pede's belly.
But where had Chacon got hold
of that counterfeit money? If re-
ports of th? wily outlaw held
truth he had been much too busy
hiding his trail to have any tirfe
left over, for turning out counter-
feit currency. So it must have
been given him-or else he had
stole it- from someplace. There
were a lot of real likable things
about Chacop; there was a lot of
Robin Hood in the bandit, which
inclined Tubac to think he had
worked for that money hadl
earned it for satisfaction ren-
dered. ..
But to hit on the name of the
outlaw's employer was a deal too
much like hunting the proverbial
hay-hid needle. For all Tubac
knew the spurious money might
well have been printed in Mexico.
He rather inclined to the belief
that it had.
With a scowl Tubae dismissed
the whole business and turned his
mind to thoughts of Su-e. Not to
say that his thoughts were seri-
ous. He might be the boneheaded
yap Jinx had called him, but his
head wasn't solid ivory. There'
were not going to be any gal's
apronstrings hitched onto Tubac
Jones. by grab!
But she was a dang nice critter
just the same, but'he wasn't going
to think of her serious. Too many
guys had got hooked in ;hat
fashion-and some of them right
good poker-players, too. Girls
were all right if you just kept
your head; too much girl- Well,
anyway, she was handsome as an
ace-:ull on kings, and the pros-
pect of taking her horsebacking
some night was nothing to ,get
the creeps about.
To be continued


-~---~\5


1. Help Wanted


PAGE it


p


The

Graham House
279 St. George St.
21 fully furnished rooms
for renting. Steam heat,
hot and running water
throughout. 9 baths.
Modern, comfortable. Ap-
ply on premises. No
phone calls.


i


U _


FREE TICKETS
TO THE


AY and MONDAY
,ear inserted between the' ant-Ads. Read each
yours is present, then bring this page, in person,
Circulation Dept. (upstairs), within three days
e a complimentary ticket to the Matanzas Theatre.
ELY NO TICKETS GIVEN AFTER 5 P. M
GE rickets MUST be called for by person
S whose name Is listed for free pass.


DERE
NT OVER CALSOMINE NO
WASHABLE. 1 GALLON
SGLLONS
int and Hdw. Co.
Phone 229


=NomeU


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NE


COMFORTABLE, refined home
une" open to paying guests. Excel-
S lent meals. (Miss) Mary Ker
isn't London, 4 Charlotte St. Tele-
it's- phone 402-M. A25-3t-c
gas
must~ A FREE TICKET to the Matanzas
that Theatre goes to Mrs. Alexander,
69 Lemon St. Please call at the
nds Record Circulation Department.
.tune (upstairs). *
rht-
mum AGENTS: Earn easy money. Sell
dura- Brassieres, Slips, Panties. Free
nine outfi Good commission. Man-
earts. hattan Mailorder, 1133 Broad-
arits. way, New York. A25-p.
POULTRY LICE just don't have
n a ghost of a chance when Dr.
Salsbury's Nic-Sal is given a
crack at them. Nic-Sal is 'the,
0,. simplest thing to" use just
apply to roost poles; delouses
whole flock at one time. See
Burns Drug Store, 209 West
Kineg St. Phone 200. A25-ft-n


THE HOME FRONT is very. imu
portant. Don't neglect plumb-
ing and heating 'equipment,
Phone 30, Bernard Ginty*.plumb.
ing and heating. A25-6t-e


12. Lost And Found
L OS T Handbay, Rust leather.
Lost Tuesday afternoon, M e.
Crory's 5c and 1Oc store, contain-
ing eye-glasses, money, Finder
please return eyeglasses to 'S,.
Augustine Record inimediately.
Can keep money. A22-3t-p
LOST: Ration Book No. 2 lost
Wednesday. Mary Mauilng.
Finder please return to local Ra-
tioning Board. A23-6t-p.
LOST: Eugene Ferrell lost his ra-
tion book Tuesday. Finder please
return to 14 Pine St. A25-p


LOST: Ration Book No. 2. Lost
down by Lincolnville. Finder
please return to Jackson McGill,
112 King FerrySt. A25-3t-p
,OST: Lady's Ballinor Watch be-
tween Post Office and Bennett
Hotel. Finder please write P. 0.
Box 752 or call at 80 Cedar St.
Reward. A25-8t-p
LOST: On Dixie Highway, south of-
Berg's Station, lady's pi:rso con-
taining A and B gas ration books.
Also, sugar ration books for Mr.
and Mrs. Dale Umbreit and point
books for Mrs. Umbreit and Dale
Umbreit. Please notify F. W.
Umbreit, phone 5115. A2.5-p,


For Rent A FREE TICKET to the, Matanzas
Theatre goes to Mrs. C. P. Town- I
SALE: Small, green house, send, 67 Lemon St. Please call
rtly finished inside on Arpie- at the Record Circulation De-
Avenue, Davis Shores. Can apartment. (upstairs).
seen afternoons until five
lock for a week. (Behind Hol- Read Every Want Ad
gsworth House). A25-3t-p. Carefully
Z RENT: Two completely fur-
shed housekeeping cottages.
available immediately. Apply HOUSEHOLD Ft
ue and White Tourist Court, At-Bargain
north Dixie Highway. A25-6t-p Everything for the Home
RENT: Unfurnished, six- Phone 1353-W R. E. DICK]
om house,, available May 1st,
14 Grove Ave. Telephone R.
Stephens, at 143. A25-3t-c
,Special Notices
CINATE for Foil-Pox. Don't
sorehead ruin your flock. ee
s. Evergreen Grocery, 2 Mas-
rs Drive. A23-6t-c.
ME design your monument P In R


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g CI.SSIFIP HO -^^ 5^7"^^^^^^ ^w4^/


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I


CountyFarmers

And Cattlemen

.Do Their Bit

Cattlemen and farmers of St.
Johns County will provide' during
1943 tons of beef and produce to
aid the nation's war effort.
The demand for 'more food to
feed our armed forces, civilians,
and the peoples of other nations
is being answered by cattlemen
and farmers throughout the county.
For some time, county cattlemen
have been improving and increas-
ing their stock. Pure-bred cattle,
chiefly Angus, have been imported
to improve the stock of native cat-
tle. Registered Angus cows and
bulls are now found' in' herds
throughout the county. This means
better beef to meet the nation's
growing demand. Cattlemen are
busy doing spring branding of-
calves and sending improved stock
to markets.
During the 1942-43 season, coun-
ty farmers have shipped tons upon
tons of cabbage out of the Hast-
ings-Elkton farmlands. Digging
of the county's Irish potato crop
is expected to get under way this
week and continue through May.
The Irish potato crop was damaged
by cold snaps during the latter
part of the winter and the produc-
tion will be short of past years,
farmers say.
A diversified farming program,
which is being encouraged by Coun-
ty Farm Agent H. E. Maltby, will
raise other produce during 1943 to
help the nation's "food war."
V
WM. F. ROLLESTON
HAS COMMISSION
AT CAMP DAVIS
William Francis Rolleston of this
city has received his commission
as a second lieutenant at the Anti-
aircraft Artillery School at Camp
Davis, N. C., according to informa-
tion sent out from Camp Davis
yesterday.
The young man, whose wife,
child and other relatives live here,
advanced to the rank of corporal
after entering service, and went to
Officers Candidate School Decem-
ber 26, 1942.
Before entering the service, Lieu-
tenant Roll'eston was vice presi-
dent and general manager of Ma-
rine Studios, Inc., Marineland,
Florida, closed, for the duration of
the war.
Lieutenant Rolleston was a mem-
ber of the St. Augustine Kiwanis
.Club, and of Elks Club No. ,829,
B.P.O.E., of this city.
V
Dr. H. A. Johnson
Of Palatya Dies
Dr. Herbert Alexandr Johnson,
-3, well known physician of Pal-
atka for 37 years, died Friday in
the U. S. Veterans Hospital at
Lake City after a brief illness. He
was graduated from Hunter Col-
lege, Atlanta, Ga., and the Geor-
gia Medical School, now Emory
University. He started his prac-
tice at Green Cove Springs, and
after two years went t6 Palatka.
He was a partner of the late George
E. Welch. Dr. Johnson was known
, throughout this part of the state.
V
V
A Stamp today? A Bond this
* week ? Talk it over--not with the
woman next door-but with YOUR-
SELF.


Performing Vital War Service
In moving a constant flow of members of the armed forces
"to and from the many military camps and bases now located
on the east coast of Florida, the Florida East Coast Railway,
---- *like other railroads, is making
S... ..'"~-..-.-.... .. -'' "" a vital contribution to the nar
tion's war effort. It is alpo
I D smoothly handling the large
ln quantities of equipment, ma-
terial and supplies necessary
IM EN to maintain and, speed. this
S K ="" ~ military activity.
While meeting these and other
Needs of our gigantic war program,
.1 the railroad has beencalled upon to
handle much of the freight that
formerly moved by coastwise
.. ". "' steamships, and a considerable por-
S.. ...-. tion of the traffic that once moved
RONALD S. BOWE .by highway truck. All of this adds
Ronald ,S. Bowe, AM 2c, U. S. up to near record volume.
Naval Reserve, is in the Navy Civilian travel on the Florida
,Hospital at San Diego, Calif., as a East Coast Railway, due to tire
result, of injuries received while and gasoline rationing, has also
on duty in the Pacific and at- San greatly increased but at a time
,Diego. when a great deal of regular pas-
He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. senger equipment must be' em-
Cyril S. Bowe of No. 5 McWil- played exclusively in moving
liams Street. Those wishing to troops. As a result trains are fre-
write should& address mail as fol- quently crowded and old equip-
lows: ment has had to be pressed into
Ronald S. Bowe,' AM 2c, use.
U. S. Naval Reserve, It is estimated that the railroads
C.A.S.U. No. 5, of this country are now moving in
San Diego, Californisa the .neighborhood of two million
troops a month. Because of more
J. E. ZEIGLER thorough and specialized training,
John Edwin Zeigler, fireman, the men ih, uniform in this war
first class, who joined the Navy on n make an average of six to seven
December 15, 1941, received his moves before they are. qualified
basic training at Norfolk, Va. From for action, compared with an aver-
there he went to tfie Diesel school age of three moves during the last'
in Chicago. Zeigler now is on a World War.
minesweeper. He is the s on Diing car service on theFlr-
Mr. and Mrs. Miles S. Zeigler of ida East Coast Railway and' other
Mr. and Mrs. Miles S. Zeigler f railroads has been heavily taxed by
the Alhambra Htel. the sharp increase .in civilian and
military travel, to which food ra-
OR PARKINSON'S toning has added further difficul-
liMOTHIR nDIFS ties. It is not unusual these days
1 for a dining car to run out offood
Malty in St. Augustine will be before all the passengers on a heav-
grieved to learn ofthe death of ily loaded train can be served. It is'
whi jokingly said that even the dining
Mrs. Walter Parkinsoc, which oc-
curred in Miami Friday morning, ca reguaits now bring of the Officeh.
according to word received here. ADefense Transportation prO-
Her son, Dr. W. N. Parkinson, for of Defense Transportation pr s
merely chief surgeon, at the East nat e tr trainsas s formerly c
Coast Hospital here, and now dean done to accommodate overflow
of the School of Medicine at Temple travel, reservations are sometimes
University in Philadelphia, was difficult to obtain, particularly on
with her when the end came. week-end dates' when travel' is es-
Mrs. Parkinson had been spend- specially heavy. The public, gener-
ing the. winter season in Miami. ally, however, is taking such travel
She had been a frequent visitor difficulties and inconveniences good
here, over a long period of time. naturedly, realizing that they are
In addition to Dr. Parkinson, one of the fortunes of war and that
there survives another son, the the railroad's first job is that of
Reverend Lloyd Parkinson, who re- meeting the military needs of the
i sides in Charleston, W. Va. There nation.,
I also are four grandchildren. Due to the fact that its main
Services will be held in Philadel- line is double tracked, the Florida
phia. East Coast Railway has been in a
1. favorable position to absorb large
traffic increases. Close to 300, or
10 per cent of its 3,000 employes,
*already have entered thd armed
services, many of them skilled tech-
1 r.icians. Like other industries, the
ri A railroad is faced by the growing
ce problem of securing trained extra
Shelp- and. skilled replacements.
Joseph B. Eastman; director of
the Office of Defense Transporta-
d m tion, is currently urging the pub-
lic to refrain from )unnecessary
STINE FLA. travel in order that mounting war
TLY NAVAL SCHOOL requirements for space on trains
may be more readily met.. Non-es-
SOUTH" sential travel is defined as that tak-
( en solely for social, pleasure or
sightseeing purposes.
V
Prepare" youths for Local Banks Will
College, Annapolis, L O
West Point Be Closed Monday
Coast Guard
Banks of St. Augustine will be
closed tomorrow, April 26th, which
3-Year High School is Confederate Memorial Day.
Course for Duration Florida is one of the states where
April 26 is a legal holiday.
Naval and Aviation V
Training A single blood cell makes 3,000
96-Foot Training Ship round trips through the body in
Al- rts a day.
Sailing THIMBLE THEATRE St
Ocean Bathing
Moderate'Tuition i :LISfT" ) s, M'(US-6
.P.P.EE ) DREAM
lC- i- AiA/AA


Naval P

ST. AUGU
"ONLY EXCLUSIVE
IN THE


WAI R V The ]
NIPPLES Perfume
RIC S
Double Duty RIC.O

oR25c 69




tarring ,Popeye


S I


PAGE 16 I I A L u b' I' "" D,- .... .....wm


I


summer xassesc
Limited number of day
cadets accepted.


We Acknowledge-

Our grateful appreciation to all those who helped make this
Special Service Edition possible.
This is the joint expression of thanks voiced by the St. Au-
gustine Record and the sponsors of this "salute to our fighting
men and women," the Ladies Auxiliary of the Regular Veterans
Association, St. Augustine Post No. 315.
Without the splendid cooperation accorded the sponsors and
the Record's editorial and advertising staffs, this printed and
pictorial tribute and welcome from the city and its people to
members of the large military and naval colonies here, would have
been impossible.
Making valuable and much appreciated contributions to the
edition was Yeoman Third Class Jack Anderson, a former news-
paperman who is assigned to the Zon6 Naval Public Relations
Office here. Various other individuals also cooperated splendidly
in this respect, and have our sincere thanks.
In the interests of security, all Naval matter used was cleared
throuIgh the Zone Public Relations Officer, Lieutenant Milton E.
Bacgn, Jr.; certain military articles through the Camp Blanding
PUiMio relations staff; and other data through the proper channels.'


Olafsen Thermometer to
AY-TOL R KEEP CHECK
CAPSULES ON FEVER
Bottle Taylor C
25......1 Bond.9..
Vitamins A, B, Oral or rectal.
D, G
*g SABSORBINE, JR.
$1 .25 size, Baf fle (Limit1l) .... 89
BAIER MEDICINE DROPPER HydSCoea
.3AVER Glass, Regplar s5c value .......V6
Tablets UNGUENTIbNE v. s Qudlty
For Burns, 56c ube ........ 43 P
12c A COHESIVE GAUZE C. 26
I .Inch x 5 rod............ 15s
ABSORBENT COTTON
soc Size Full 4-Ounce Size Package....33" 4-Ounce
PHILLIPS' MILD IODINE 1' JBORIC
Milk of ic't"*ure,- Bsottle........i1 ACID
MAGNESIA CASTOR OIL Powder or Crystals
4-.o Bottle ............... 2 1
34C TRIANGULAR BANDAGE, 1
Standard 40-Inch Size...... 25
MERCUROCHROME
Ph sicians '/ ot e o ......... 30c S13
S S rgeonICA ZINC OXIDE ALA ze
SURGICAL Onmen., I-o Tube.......17ALA
GAUZE SELTZER |
I.Yard Wide SODA BICARBONATE Tqbletr
15 C Full Pound Size ... ....... c
C 9'aterproof Adhesive C 241
TAPE, 1-in.xR yards 20

- Triple -Coated a Olafsen
ENAMELED BETOL
BED PAN CAPSULES
14x11/2" 29 \ J.J Vitamin 09

Tapered back. Month's supply.

RU~ilt~lb~aiWHISppingb~alil~altt~all TITG'!!~Il


*


1.20 S.S.S. SAYBROOK
TONIC Compound
S10oz. 99c16-oz. 9sC
size...99 Herbal98

YEAST-IRON TABLETS Qc
SAYBROOK'S, Boflle of 80....... r*
1.25 NEW PERUNA 89
II-OUNCE Botffe-for only ........
OVOFERRIN 93C
1I-OUNCE Size, Special aof...... .


I I


m TT ,. I TiT


-A TI r- TT Q T T V V R 'R'V O SUNDAY, APII -25,7 19M


FOR FURTHER DETAIL WRITE

LT.-COM. CLAUDE B.
BRUBECK


Florida East Coast Railway Is


Flo


FLORIDA UK

. NAVALACADEMY
0ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA.
4 *-







SECTION B

Special Edition


~LII


faiBu n '


ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA, SUNDAY MORNING, APRIL 25, 1943


Coast Guard s "Recruit"


Training
Training


Here


Centered


In Hotel Ponce de Leon


Two Experienced

Officers Achieve

Excellent Results

Transitory Period Of Boot
Trainees Well-Balanced,
Outline Shows
By ADELAIDE SANCHEZ
Purpose of St. Augustine's
Coast Guard Training Station,
insofar as recruits are con-
cerned, is to assist them in
their transformation from a
civilian to a member of the
U. S. Coast Guard; to outfit
them with uniform clothing;
to give them.a basic course of
instruction and to lay a foun-
dation for future self-improve-
ment and advancement in the
service.
On the capable, broad shoulders
of two men and their staffs rest
the achievement of that goal. Com-
mander A. W. Davis of New York,
N. Y., is the recruit and gunnery
training officer and Lieutenant-
Commander J. J. Hutson, Jr., of
Wilmington, N. C., assistant train-
ing officer.
Formerly commanding officer of-
Ellis Island Training Station in
New Yor k, Commander Davis
moved with that station to Algiers,
New Orleans, where he was C. O.
in 1940-42; then, the station was
moved again, this time t& St. Au-
gustine. An officer of considerable
service, background and ability, he'
is well qualified to be the training
officer in charge of the gunnery
school and recruit training, under
the Station's commanding officer,
Captain W. K. Scammell.
SLieut.-Comdr. Hutson was grad-
uated from the Coast Guard Acad-
emy in 1933 and has had over seven
years of sea duty on the Atlantic
coas.t,.. .ad -on -the .Great -.alee,
where he last served on an "ice-
breaking" cutter. He, too, was
transferred here from New Or-
leans, his wife and son still being
located there. At Algiers, he was
the training officer, a fact which
attests to his capabilities.
Lieutenant (j.g.) John Dalin and
Lieutenant (j.g.) Peter Marcoux
are assistant training officers, they
also coming here from Algiers.
Both have been in the Coast Guard
a long time with considerable ser-
vice and experience. The latter
also is the recruit, gunnery officer.
Duties of an assistant training
officer are defined as: making up
drill schedules for the recruits;
instructing the company and as-
sistant company commanders as to
how these schedules should be car-
ried out; going out into the field
and supervising instructions of
recruits; ascertaining if the re-
cruits are receiving the proper
instruction from their company
commanders.
In addition to being the assistant
training officer, Lieut-Comdr. Hut-
son also is the welfare officer. To
him go the men who need loans
because of financial difficulties or
family troubles, and if upon inves-
tigation and questioning their
problems are found to be genuine,
they are given loans from the wel-
* fare frnd-without interest.
A certain percentage of the prof-
its of the ship's service stores,
which include the barber shop, the
tailor shop, the laundry and the
canteen, forms the welfare fund.
This fund is used for the welfare of
the crew and from it, small loans
are made to enlisted personnel who
need the money for dire emergency.
FROM INDUCTION CENTERS
At the present time, men enter-
ing recruit training at the Ponce
de Leon Hotel come directly from
the induction centers.
.Upon their arrival, they are
given complete physical and dental
examinations, chest X-rays, receive
their typhoid and tetnus inocula-
tions and smallpox vaccination.
Personally interviewed, their capa-
bilities, characteristics and desires
are catalogued. Then come tests--
social studies, arithmetic, mechan-
ical aptitude.
"The Bluejackets Manual is the
recruits' Bible," Commander Hut-
son states, "and this is supple-
mented with our own training
pamphlet compiled and published
at this station for our own use."
Outfitted with uniform clothing,
the "boots" are taught to properly
mark their name on each article.
and how to stow it compactly.


Then they are ready for their
indoctrination course which lasts
from four to twelve weeks, "de-
pending upon the needs of the ser-.
vice." The course consists of in-
doctrination, seamanship, military
courtesy, customs of the service,
basic ordnance, use of small arms.
Physical training is incorporated,


A contingent of new Coast Guard'trainees casts 'curious and interested eyes at the gateway of the
training station in the Ponce de Leon Hotel, their home for the two months they are undergoing the
change from civilians to blue jackets.


and stressed, in the routine sched-
ule. The men are taught signals,
the Coast Guard method of resusi-
tation, infantry drill (which is
highly stressed for disciplinary
purposes), chemical warfare, how
to use gasmasks and so on.
Self-protection. is all-important,
so there's a "get tough" course.
This consists of boxing and judo.
Then there's running the obstacle
course for better physical trim.
In the seamanship course, the
"boots" are taught the duties of
'their rating-seamen. (They come
into the Station as Apprentice Sea-
n%4.. and if their record is. clean,
after "four month$ they are pro-
.~).Stfi ..fSe.Lan, Second Class,
rating. Further promotions de-
pend upon the man, especially in
wartime, when promotions are
made as the individual proves his
fitness for such.)
A first aid course is considered
essential, as are bayonet drill and
exercises.
Under ordnance, instructors
teach the, men how to use all the
firearms with which the Coast
Guard is equipped.
Boat drills, under oars and sails,
are an interesting and required,
phase .of the "boot" course.
For purposes of discipline and
health, the first three weeks are
designated as the recruits' isolation
period, no liberty being granted
until at the end of that time. With
those three weeks behind them-
and to the majority of the recruits,
the days are so full they pass
quickly--they are given liberty
Saturday afternoon to midnight,
and Sunday afternoon to midnight
BATTALION REVIEWS
Regular -attalion reviews for
the senior companies are held, with
the winning company receiving two
hours extra liberty that particular
week-end. Pulling boat races are
staged in the Matanzas Bay, with
the winning boat crews being
awarded prizes for their efficiency.
These prizes usually are cigarettes,
two packs per man for first and
one for second place, furnished by
the Welfare Fund.
Organized athletics, with intra-
company competition in the various
field sports, are a necessary and
welcome part of "boot" training.
The men compete in such popular
games as soft ball, badminton,
volley ball, touch football, basket-
ball and even pitch horseshoes.
COMPANY COMMANDERS
The company commanders are
Chief Petty Officers and the assis-
tant company commanders are
petty officers and selected non-
rated men who are the platoon
leaders. The assistants have been
chosen and trained by the Station
from the recruit ranks in most
cases. These men are the back-
bone of the training station. The
chiefs are all men of long service
and experience and deserve most
of the credit for the success of this
station in turning out trained Coast
Guardsmen in a short period of
time.
These company commanders,
bless them, are father, mother,
brother, sister and instructor to
their crewmen. That sounds like
a big assignment in any language,
and it is. It's also one they set out
to achieve with all the tact, patience
and skill at their command.
MEDICAL CARE
When be joins the Coast Guard,
each recruit is given a clothing al-
lowance to take care of. his uni-
form needs. Recruits with depend-
ends are permitted the family al-
lcwance. At their own request, i


they are issued Government insur-
-nce in amounts from $1,000 to
10,000, and premium payments
are deducted from the man's pay
each month. They are given medi-
cal care at no charge, all service
personnel being taken care of by
the U. S. Public Health Service.
At the Ponce de 'Leon, there is a
complete medical department, well-
equipped and competently staffed,
which cares for every physical need
of the men.
During their training, the re-
cruits are given opportunity to se-
lect certain schools offered to the
enlisted men in the Coast Guard.
If they meet the rigid requirements
and qualifications foir such'schobls,
they are ordered to them upon com-
pletion of their boot training.
ENTERTAINMENT
For entertainment, there are the
regular Friday night Recruit Shows
presented on the stage of the USO
NCCS (Cathedral Lyceum) audi-
torium. These are arranged and
offered by the Station Orchestra
and recruit talent.
The men also have motion pic-
tures. each night, except Friday.
These are shown in the former main
dining room of the hotel.
Also included in the Ponce de.
Leon set-up, where recruit and guni-
nery school training is concentrat-
ed, are the Ship's Service Store
Canteen, a barber shop and tailor
shop-all for the convenience of the
"crew."


ENTIRE NATION
HAS ONLYFIVE
SUCH STATIONS
St. Augustinians will be sur-
prised to learn, perhaps, that in
the entire United States there
are but four other Coast Guard
Training Stations similar to the
one established here last year.
Not only is St. Augustine's
Training Station the only Coast
Guard training base of its kind
in Florida, it is the only one in
the Southeastern States.
One iR located in New York:
a second in the Northlyes. bi the
State of \Vashington; the third,
in California, and the fourth in
Maryland.
Despite the fact the local Sta-
tion is not concentrated in one
spot, its commanding officer,
Captain W. K. Scammell reports


"Always Ready"

Is True Motto

Of Coast Guard

In War And Peace, It Is
Nation's Maritime
Police Force

"Always Rleady" in war and
peace is the Nation's maritime po-
lice force-the United States Coast
Guard.
In peacetime, it performs many
interrelated duties.
It promotes the safety of life at
sea.
It maintains lighthouses and
other aides to marine navigation.
Its ships and shore stations form
a closely coordinated network of
protective and marine observation
stations along all the coasts of the
United States and its possessions.
It:is deeply involved in any na-
tional preparedness taking place
upon our coastal frontiers, through
its enforcement of law and order
and in its constant watchfulness
for maritime disasters.
Declaration of war finds the
Coast Guard in a full state of pre-
paredness and it is necessary only
to accelerate its activities and
coordinate the work of its person-
nel, its ships, its planes, its com-
munication stations, and its shore
stations with those of the other
military services. Its history dates
back to the commissioning of ten
cutters authorized by the First
United States Congress in the act
approved August 4, 1790.
Organized on a military basis
by Secretary of the Treasury Alex-
ander Hamilton for the sole pur-
pose of "securing the collection
of the revenue," this small fleet
constituted the first armed seago-
ing force of the United States.
With 152 years of service to the
Nation behind it and glorious
achievement ahead, the Coast
Guard today sweeps the seaways
of the world on convoy duty,, sub-
marine patrol, troop ship escort
and rescue missions at sea, ashore
and in the air. Along 40,000 miles
of shoreline the men of the Coast
Guard are on the alert against in-
vasion of these shores by the foe.
Its efficient air force cooperates
with Army and Navy patrols in the
coastal Areas.
ach menmbr of the Coast Guard
is trained to handle a threefold job.
He is a seaman, a fighting man.
and a technical specialist. And
today he's one of the highest paid
military 'men in the world.
V


it is working out "quite favor- NAVAL INSIGNIA
ably."
Commissioned officers in the Navy
ITY APPR IATIVE begin with the rank of ensign, des-
CITY APPRECIATIVE ignited by a single stripe. Lieuten-
On August 28, 1942, the City of ant (junior grade) is identified by
St. Augustine adopted resolutions a stripe and a half; lieutenant, two
expressing appreciation to the of- stripes; lieutenant-commander, two
ficials of the Florida East Coast stripes and a half; commander,
Hotel Company for their coopera- three stripes; captain, four stripes;
tion in locating the U. S. Coast rear admiral, one thick stripe (two
Guard Training Station in the inches) and one regular stripe; vice
Hotel Ponce de Leon; and also admiral, one thick and two regu-
thanking all who assisted in se- lars; admiral, one thick and three
curing this project's location here. Regulars. Simple, isn't it?


Recruit and Gunnery
Training Officer


COMDR. A. W. DAVIS


FORMER MANAGER

OF PONCE DE LEON

NOW ON DUTY THERE

It's just a coincident that the
peacetime manager of the Hotel
Ponce de Leon, Bernard R. Howe,
now a lieutenant in the U. -S. Coast
Guard Reserve, is stationed at that
hotel.
As assistant personnel officer, he
is serving in an administrative ca-
pacity under Commander W. W.
Kenner, personnel and executive
,officer of St. Augustine's Coast
Guard Training Station. His desk
is in the original Grand Parlor west
of the famous' Gold Ballroom.
", Lieutenant Howe is a veteran of
the A. E. F., at which time he was
in the Army Air Corps serving with
the World War forces in France in
1917-18. Following the granting'
of his present commission he un-
derwent indoctrinational training
at the local Officers Indoctrination
School, later being assigned to the
post he now fills. /
Because it:was sheer coincidence
that brought him right back where
he was when he received his com-
mission-the Ponce de Leon Hotel
-Lieutenant Howe had no com-
ment to make over the changed sta-
tus of that beautiful architectural
triumph of Henry Morrison Flag-
ler. Rather, he chose to point out
that its present "guests" are
taught to regard it as a ship. To
them. the floor becomes the deck,
the side walls, the bulkhead; the
ceiling, the overhead; the stair-
way, the ladder. When they come
in they are "going aboard" and,
when they go out, they are "go-
ing ashore." When they go to
lunch, they go to chow. The din-
ing room becomes the mess hall;
the kitchen, the galley. At night,
fhey don't go to bed, they turn in.
V
CIVIC HONOR
Ranking officers of the armed
forces assigned to duty in St. Aug-
ustine were honored at a dinner
given jointly by the Kiwanis and
Rotary Clubs, at Castle Warden
Hotel October 19th. The honored
guests on this occasion numbered
23 and they were extended a warm
welcome to the Oldest City.


GATES GUARDING CITY SINCE 1722 WELCOME E MODERN FIGHTING MEN TO ST. AUGUSTINE



.


------------------ --------------~~



- - -
Through St. Augustine's famous City Gates marches a company of Coast Guardsmen to the drill field for their weekly review. The old
coquina rock gates were built by the Spanish in 1722 to protect the city proper from marauding Indians and other enemies. Symbolic of
the protective spirit is the vast number of Coast Guard "boots" now in training at the St. Augustine Training Station. (Official U. S.
Coast Guard photo.)


Municipal Airport Dons War

Garb, Playing Role In Navy's

Flight Operational Training

Like the city proper, St. Augustine's municipal airport has donned
war garb for the duration and is playing a small but important role
in the Navy's flight training program.


Regular Veterans

Association Here

Formed Dec. 17th

Francis J. Johann Com-
mander Of Ancient
City Post 315
The local post of the Regular
Veterans Association-St. Augus-
tine Post No. 315, was formed on
December 17, 1942, by a group of
25 members, of whom eleven ate
life members in the association.
Since the birth of the post, its
membership roll has been greatly
expanded.
The post, in conjunction with
the Auxiliary (sponsors of this
special edition of' the Record)
meets on the first and third Wed-
nesday of each month at the head-
quarters in the Fraternal Building
on Charlotte Street. Prospective
members are invited to attend
these meetings.
The Regular Veterans Associa-
tion-a non-profit organization--
was organized in 1934. It was
created to serve all active, retired,
disabled and honorably discharged
enlisted men of the Army, Navy,
Marine Corps and Coast Guard,
their widows and dependents. Its
officers are elected by the member-
ship.
SLocally, the officers are as fol-
lows:
Francis J. Johann, post com-
mander; Frank DiPietro, senior
vice commander; William Kopp,
junior vice commander; James Al-
ligood, adjutant; John J. Dolan,
quartermaster; Oscar Landfield,
judge advocate; Jesse Barrow, ser-
vice officer; Donald Jordan, chap-
lain; Raymond Eutsler, medical
officer; William Day, W. E. Deacon,
Joseph Stephens, trustees; William
Maddox, sergeant at arms; James
.Guyton, intelligence officer: Steven
Chorvat, historian; Nicholas Bor-
gia and Aubrey Draper. color bear-
ers; Neil Matheson and Albert
Canalize, color guards.
All men who have completed one
year's honorable voluntary service,
or who have been honorably dis-
charged by reason of a service con-
nected disability, are eligible for
membership.
"This organization is approved
and recognized by the Veterans
Administration in Washington,
D. C.," said a spokesman for the
local post. "We advocate a well-
equipped, well-trained, well-treat-
ed and well-paid Army, Navy, Ma-
rine Corps and Coast Guard.
"St. Augustine Post No. 315 is
your local post. It needs you.
Give it your support and serve
your community through it. Every
veteran should be a member of a
veteran's organization."
V

Soldiers Eat

Well AtCamp

And In Field

Menus prepared and distributed
by the sales office of the Quarter-
master at Camp Blanding and cal-
culated to come within the cost of
the Garrison Ration, are served
Military Police companies at St.
Augustine's Army' Recreational
Area.
Typical menus served for one
day at this local sub-post of Camp
Blanding, follow:
Breakfast: oranges, oatmeal,,
fresh milk, scrambled eggs, French
fried potatoes, bread or toast, and
coffee.
Dinner: split pea soup, crack-
ers, soft roast beef, boiled pota-
toes, fresh green string beans,
boiled carrots, celery and cucumber
salad, bread, cookies.
Supper: baked noodles with
diced beef, fried sweet potatoes,
lima beans, sliced tomatoes, bread,
dried fruit pies, and lemonade.
On Sunday, the M. P.'s might
find their mess kits filled with
these tasty edibles:
Breakfast: oranges, dry assort-
ed cereal, fresh milk, hot cakes,
sausage, syrup, coffee.
Dinner: corn chowder, fricassee
of chicken, steamed rice, English
peas, apple and celery salad,
bread, ice cream.
Supper: beef cold cuts, potato
salad, sliced tomatoes, sweet mixed
pickles, hot rolls, apple butter.
V


FIRST WEDDING
First wedding to be solemnized
in the Hotel Ponce de Leon since it
.became part of St. Augustine's
Coast Guard Train:ng Station, took
place at 4 p. m. January 30th.
United were Miss Devel Maxine
Baggett of Nashville, Tenn., and
Coast Guardsman Frank Daniel
Morrison of Clarksville, Tenn.


little high," hence "up the pole."
V
"THE SHIELD"
"The Shield," newspaper of the,
U. S. Coast Guard Training Sta-
tion, which was published .at the
New Orleans station, made its first
appearance here, in mimeographed
form, under date of November
15th.


-


ST. AUGUSTINE

The Nation's Oldest City


* Serving the Navy and the nation
in its wartime function, the air-
port provides an important step in
the operational training of the
Navy fliers as they prepare for
duty with the fleet. The well-per-
forated target "sleeves" the Navy
fliers turn in at the municipal air-
port, one day will be replaced by
Jap Zeros in the South Pacific.
Newly appointed officer in charge
is Lieutenant-Commander Kim-
ball W. Salisbury, 9f Lake Forest,
Ill., formerly' attached to the U. S.
Naval Air Station in Jacksonville
apd to the Eastern Sea Command
in New York. He is a veteran of the
last war, reentering the service
on June .10,. 1942.
He succeeded Lieutenant Kent
Robinson,' a veteran of the civilian
flying business, who has been trans-
ferred to Mayport. Although a
ground officer, Robinson nevertlie-
less has 1,000 flying hours to his
credit. He had been in charge of
the field here since January 1st. His
home is in Portland, Oregon.
Commander Salisbury is assist-
ed by Lieut. (jg) Henry W. Col-
burn, who is gunnery officer. The
field also has a force of enlisted
men, who are quartered in nearby
tourist camp homes.
A Navy crash-boat, commanded,
alternately by Ensigns Paul Himel-
right and Thomas Hopper, keeps
in close contact with the field in
case of possible emergencies.
Pilots using St. Augustine's field
are in the last stage of the training
which prepares them for service
with the fleet. Many of the planes
used are veteran fighters.
One fighter which landed at the
field recently bore seven Japanese
flag emblems on its fusilage, indi-
cating that its guns had accounted
for a like number of enemy planes,
in some fighting area.
Before its acquisition by the
Navy. the field housed two hangars,
one ownied by the city and the oth-
er, by private interests. The field
was built in 1932 by the city with
the aid of WPA funds and labor.
V

"NAUTICAL"

DEFINITIONS r

AHOY: This was once the dread-
ed war cry ot the Vikings-a dis-
tinct nautical hail.
ANCHOR: This term is derived
from a Greek word for hook or
crook. Sailors today say "drop
the hook," or refer to the anchor
as "the old mud hook." The origi-
nal Greek meaning has been lost,
and the word today has only one
connotation-the terminus tech-
nicus for a means of holding a ship
when she is not under way.
,AYE AYE: Aye is old English
for "yds."
BOATS: Derived from Anglo-
Saxon "bat" that stood for boat,
small, ship, vessel.
.BOATSWAIN: The Saxon word
"swain" meant a boy or servant,
therefore, boatswain. The "boat"
refers to the ships and not to her
boats. "Cockswain" has a similar
derivation. "Cock" is .an old word
for a type of small boat.
BUOYS: Floating beacons which
by shape and color give the mariner
valuable navigational information.
The types in use in the United-
States comprise can, nun, spar,
cask. bell, whistle, and lighted
buoys.
COXSWAIN OR COCKSWAIN:
From "cock," a small boat; and
"swain," a, servant. It originally
meant one who had charge of .a
boat and a crew in the absence of
an officer.
GALLEY YARN: A scuttle-butt
rumor, a rumor. In the early days
the cook was usually the origina-
,tor of all startling news passed
on to the crew.
MESS: Mess comes from the
Latin word mensa, meaning table;
Spanish word mesa, table; also, a
Gothic word mes, meaning a dish;
hence, a mess of pottage.
SCUTTLE: This' meant "hold"
in Anglo-Saxon. In reality, to
scuttle a ship means literally to
hole her.
SCUTTLE BUTT: The sailors'
well or source of fresh drinking
water.
SLOPS: A general term for
ready-made clothes and outfits fur-
nished seamen. The name was firzt
used in this sense by Maydman, in
1691. The word is an old one, for
in Chaucer's time sloppe designated
a kind of breeches.
UP THE POLE: Means "on the
water wagon" or not drinking at
the time. It was originally a term
for "a sheet in the wind" or "a



























































































































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K- AILTJ A


Like the blimp in the sky overhead; this German Shepherd dog is
on guard along the coast near Marineland, Florida. His handler,
Seaman, first class, Hilary Hornsby of the Coast Guard, patrols with
him this lonely stretch of the Florida shore.


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ing the Coast Guardsmen need to
place themselves on guard.
Hypothetical Case
To take a hypothetical case--
should a lone enemy be discovered
on the beach, the dog handler im-
mediately unleashes his sentry
dog, who goes streaking down the
sand after the prowler while the
other Coast Guardsman runs to
the nearest look-out tower to sound
the alarm.
If the enemy consists of a group
of men, such as the four Ger-
man saboteurs who landed near
Jacksonville last year, the handler
and his dog go into hiding behind
a sand dune, while the other man
runs to the watch tower.
Of course, if the enemy wants
to fight, the handler has, a pistol
and can turn his dog loose to
harry the intruders until help ar-
rives.
No enemy will want to face a
sentry dog without some kind of
weapon or a knowledge of the
technique of defending himself
with his hands and arms.
Drilled Tn Attack
The 'dogs are skilfully drilled in
vicious attack and the intruder will
find himself well on the way to
being torn to pieces unless the
handler gives the command to
withdraw.,
Each breed of dog has his par-
ticularly good sentry qualifications,
but Marineland's handlers report
that the lithe, and powerful
Dobermann Pinscher is perhaps
the best.
This black canine terror' has a
one-track mind, the handlers say,
that lends itself well to sentry
training. They are fleet-footed, all
muscle and obedient to the finest
degree. *
Dogs needed for sentry work
must conform closely to that pat-
tern. Smaller breeds may be good
for detection, but not large enough
for attack.
Without uniforms, with trick
names, without weapons other than
the elemental ones of sharp teeth,
powerful jaws and a body like a
steel trap, the sentry dog has
given up burying the bone to
help bury the Axis.
SV
ST. CECILIANS HELP
Early last December, three
radio-victrolas and a large number
of records were presented for use
of the Captain of the Port person-
nel by the War Service Department
of the St. Augustine St. Cecilia
Club, as a result of a special musi-
cal entertainment given by the
women for that specific purpose.
These machines and a fourth
bought through an emergency
fund of the Captain of the P6rt,
now are in use in isolated Coast
Guard stations in this vicinity. '


SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1943


THE ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD


ail1al111111111 ullI"lll111111lllllll`lu1111111.111111111111mr L I rll 'l

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THE R. V. A.



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lellllllql llllIIIIII II@ll ll nl~ ~llllluIIIl'


Furry, Snarling, Biting Trouble

Awaits Next Axis Saboteur Who

Paddles Way To Our Beaches

The next Axis saboteur who paddles his wa'y to an Amer-
ican beach on a rubber life raft from some undersea raider
or ship is likely to find furry, snarling, biting trouble waiting
for him.
For this country now has four-legged defenders. They
are the "sentry" dogs, recruit-*
ed from homes throughout the In all, there are stationed there
nation to buttress our home about 18 dogs-German Shepherds,
defenses with animal, as well Dobermann-Pinschers, Dalmatians,
as human and mechanical pro- Great Danes, German Boxers,
section. Airedales and Collies.
With all the scientific ingenuity The pack is under the supervi-
of the airplane, the patrol boat, sion of Godfrey Pomar, boat-
,the coast gun at his disposal, man swain's mate, second class, who has
still finds in his dog the same a force of Coast Guard handlers
keen, alert and faithful protector and patrolmen of 75 men.
,that dogs have been to him for Drawn From Front Royal
thousands of years. The dogs for Marineland are
Today, there are almost 6,000 of drawn, as are almost all sentry
the larger, more powerful breeds dogs now in use, from an army
of dogs, trained, or being trained, training base at Front Royal, Va.
for a part in our war effort, either At Front Royal, not only the
as sentries or for actual combat dogs, but their handlers, specially
.work. picked from each of the services,
The Coast Guard and Navy use receive their preliminary or basic
them for shore patrols; the Ma- training-a course of about 'two
rine Corps and Army for communi- months.
cations, sentry duty or for patrols The dog is taught the cardinal
in which they flush the enemy like virtue of life in the service-obedi-
.a covey of quail, and the air force, ence to orders-just as his master
.for guarding planes or entire air is. When he has learned to respond
bases. quickly and intelligently to the
Typical of the strategic, points slightest, command, his next and
at which these dogs are being used final stage is to learn sentry and
effectively is the Coast Guard Sta- attack work.
.tion at Marineland, 18 miles south The trainers do not pretend that
,of St. Augustine. their sentry dogs are being turned
Before the war, one of the into kindly, four-legged missions
world's most famous aquariums, of mercy after the manner of the
Marineland has returned its fish traditional St.' Bernards used by
to the sea for the duration and the the monks in the Swiss Alps.
grounds have been converted to Furry Whirlwind
.the training and housing of sentry The sentry dog must be tough,
dogs. suspicious, eager to attack, a verit-


able fur-lined whirlwind of fanged
trouble for the enemy intruder on
trouble bent.
They must learn that the care-
free days of domestic dog life end
for them in service, just as hu-
man counterpart must learn it.
There is no romping, no re-
trieving of sticks, no friendly tail
wagging to strangers. The dog
must give up almost all the lovable
canine habits except those of obedi-
ence, blind loyalty and alertness.
The sentry dogs at Marineland,
for example, learn that. any hu-
man being other than the man
holding his leash is a potential
enemy to be barked at and attack-
ed. It makes no difference that
the other man may have been
holding the leash just a few min-
utes before.
Leash Holder Is Master
The holder of the leash is mas-
ter-all others are open to ques-
tion.
What happens when a Marine-
land sentry dog-say, a Dober-
mann-Pinscher, one of the most
reliable of dogs--detects a dark
figure lurking in a sand dune while
on patrol can be well imagined.
The beach is broken up into
patrol stretches with watch towers
at regular intervals. Between these
towers, Marineland's patrols -
consisting of two men and one
dog-walk the beach for six hours
at a time.
The patrolling is done entirely
at night and is broken up into two
shifts, or watches.
The dogs .are walked with leash-
es, since the greater part of their
value is in detection, rather than
sheer attack.
Their sensitive noses, their keen
ears and nervous systems will pick
up a suspicious sound or presence
long before their human compan-
ion.
A series of ferocious barks and
tugs at:the leash are all the warn-


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TO R. V. A.
And Women's Auxiliary

From





LEE S

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Automotive Supplies

175 KING ST.

Phone 1076
St. Augustine, Fla.


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THEY GUARD OUR COASTLINE FROM ENEMY


Drilled To


Fight Fire


AndBombs

Threat of fire holds no terror for
Coast Guardsmen of St. Augus-
tine's training station.
The men and officers have been
drilled so thoroughly, they can Va-
cate the buildings within five min-
utes, or even sooner.
The fire drills, held one or two
times a week, send the station
personnel hurrying out-of-doors to
mustering points on the station
grounds.
While the bulk of the person-
nel is being evacuated, fire parties,
armed with flame-fighting equip-
ment of .all types converge on the
burning area.
A similar procedure would be
followed in the event of air raids.
The difference, however, is that
the men and officers do not leave
the buildings but vacate the upper
floors and-proceed to designated
shelter places on the ground floor.
Bomb and fire-fighting squads
then take stations on the upper
stories with equipment for extin-
guishing incendiaries and clear-
ing wreckage left by explosives.
Lieut.-Comdr. J. P. Crowley,
maintenance and security officer
who directs these drills, reports,
that the station is well equipped
for bringing almost any emergency
of this type quickly under control.
V
Formal Visits Still
Customary In -Naval
And Military Life
Though in civilian life, formal
visits are not so much in vogue, ir
military and naval life, they fulfill
a more useful purpose and still are
made'
It has been long decreed in the
Navy that juniors: and seniors
should meet in each other's homes,
with emphasis that the first call
should be made by the junior on
the senior. In the case of a. late
comer or a newly married couple,
calls are made first by those longer
on the ship or station.
Irrespective of his time in the
ship or at the station, the com-
manding officer always is called
upon first by his juniors.
It has been customary for officers
entering sick bay on inspection
trips and otherwise, to remove
their caps.


2


Teacher Here
Saw Doughboys
Land In Africa

Lieutenant J. J. Shingler, gun-
nery instructor at'. the Coast
Guard Training Station here
since January 1st, was gunnery
officer aboard the Navy trans-
port, USS Leonard Wood, part
of the big convoy landing Amer-
ican doughboys on the North
African.coast last year.
Coast Guardsmen's knack for
outsmarting the surf is credited
by Lieut. Shingler with making
the landings so successful, but
he also firmly believes the inva-
sion of North Africa was largely
a triumph of good navigation.
A veteran of three and half
years of North Atlantic seago-
ing, his experiences also include
an evacuation cruise to India.
He's a graduate of the 1939 class
of the Coast Guard Academy at'
New London, Conn. Ashburn,
Ga., is his home.
V
'HAND SALUTE

The gesture of the hand salute
was borrowed by the British Navy
from the British'Army and the,
American Navy in turn borrowed it
from the British Navy.


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THE ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD


4


RANK VALUE
A captain in the Navy outranks
a captain in the Army and is equi-
valent to a colonel, while a lieu-
tenant in the Navy outranks a lieu-
tenant in the Army and is equiva-
lent to a captain.
V
BUY WAR BONDS e


held with the WAAC's.' Each sta-
tion also has its own athletic- fa-
cilities, its own recreation room
and equipment and the men make
good use of them.
Coming into this, area, too, will
be the blue entertainment unit, a
traveling troupe which stages
short programs and which will
visit each beach unit. Because it
fills a recognized need, it is hoped
this unit's visitations will become
regular events.
During the day, the Beach Pa.
trol personnel mans the stra-
tegically located shore towers,
maintaining a constant watch on
the coastline. Those towers are
so erected they afford the ob.
servers excellent visibility over
the required area.
When Coast Guardsmen report
to the Captain of the Port for
duty, they already have been
through a "boot" camp similar to
the training station here. In fact,
it is interesting to note that the
last draft of men assigned to
Lieutenant Loehr, came from the
Ponce de Leon.
Training Continues
This training gives .them the
rudiments of the service and when
they reach the Captain of the Port
they are on "active duty" status,
though their training still con-
tinues. Classes are conducted there
each day on gunneryM signaling,
small boat handling, seamanship,
Naval customs and traditions,
Marlin Spike seamanship, naviga-
tion piloting, infantry drill.
"Our objective in those courses,"
the lieutenant explained, "is to
give each man a well-rounded
knowledge of the things a sailor
should know."
For officers and leaders, men
assigned to St. Augustine's
Captain of the Port have a num-
ber of real "old-timers" In this
branch of the service.
There's Lieutenant (j.g.) L. C.
Spaniol, a regular in the Coast
Guard for many years, originally
from Ohio but whose family now
calls this city "home." Lieutenant
Spaniol has been pretty much all
over the world in Coast Guard serv-
ice. Locally, he is the officer in
charge of the pay and supply 'of-
fices.
The executive officer is Ensign
Wayland Waters, USCGR, of
Humbird, Wisconsin, who is in
charge of personnel and ordnance.
Ensign Richard High, USCGR, of
Boston, Mass., is guard officer and
communications officer and also is
in charge e of the Beach Patrol.
Both are graduates of the Re-
serve Officers Training School,
New London, Conn.
Also attached to the Port are a
number of petty officers, recogniz-
ed as the backbone of any organi-
zation such as this. Some of these
men are regulars, who have seen
many years of service in the Coast
Guard and some are civilians who
were taken in and given ratings
because of their specialized knowl-
edge along certain lines.
Old Timers
Among the real old-timers, we
mention five:
Oscar P. Landfield of Waquoit,
Mass., the chief commissary
steward, has 14 years in the
Navy and 15 more in the Coast
Guard. He is the man who is
'directly responsible for the prep-
aration of the food and it might,
be noted here that this is served
in the annex of the Marion,
Hotel, formerly known as the
Lucerne Coffee Shop. (Each
Beach Station has its own mess,
preparing and serving its own
food.)
Clinton. Knight of Atlanta, Ga.,
chief machinist's mate, acts as
assistant to Ensign High, as -the
assistant guard officer and also is
in charge of athletics and welfare.
His service record reads: two years
in Army Aviation, four years in
the Navy, eleven in the Coast
Guard.
A Coast Guardsman for 22 years,
Jesse Barrow of Claxton, Ga., is
the chief radio mate. As the name
implies, he is in charge of radio
facilities of the entire Section.
Constant communication must be


DID YOU KNOW?
Did you know it was quite proper
to address junior officers as "mis-
ter"? And that it is incorrect to
speak to or refer to such officers
as "The Ensign" or "The Lieuten-
ant"? It is "Ensign Jones,"
"Lieut. Howard"; "Mr. Jones," or
"Mr. Howard," or nothing.


MBDALS
Custom of ^eailng medals and
decorations, for the, most part, on
the left breast, may be traced from
the practice of the Crusaders in
wearing the badge of honor of their
order near the heart. The left side
was the shield side of the crusader,
too, protecting both the heart and
the badge of honor.


Cutting the water at top speed, this trim patrol boat is ship-shape for any emergency. Ensign Rich-
ard High, welfare and communications officer of the local Captain of the Port's office, stands on the
deck with binoculars to guide the course.


maintained between the Coast Captain of Port
Guard boats at sea and their base,
so he's a busy individual,.too. ,.
William R. Royster of Indiana-:
polls, the chief gunner's mate, has
an 18-year service record. He is'
charged with the supervision of '
ordnance and with the proper in- .
struction of the men in all phases:
of gunnery. In that connection, it .
is pointed out, the local Police'
Department has turned over the
old gun range near Flagler Hos- I
pital, as a practice range for the :
Captain of the Port's men.
Then there's James B. Hurtt of i k
Saulte Ste. Marie, Mich., with 14
years of service in the Coast Guard :
behind him. He is a chief -boat- |
swain's mate and the man in: .
charge of all of the picket boats.
Local Fleet
Speaking of boats, the nucleus
of the local fleet is converted .,
pleasure craft, either loaned to the '
Coast Guard by the ex-owners, or 'St. Augustine's Captain of the
chast ur The -owners, or Port, Lieutenant George R.
purchased outright. They were Loehr, attended Dartmouth Col-
taken in last year when the sub- lege and Ecole Militaire d'Artil
marine menace was at its height lerie, at Fontainebleau and was
and when it was necessary patrol with the Ambulance Service and
vessels be secured immediately. French Artillery from Septem-
They have done valiant service, ber, 1917 to June, 1919. Anative
but now that the Coast Guard and of Cleveland, Ohio, he is married
the Navy have -'had time to get and has two sons, aged 15 and 13.
well uinderway their own ship-Ne Smyrna; an Lieutenant
building program, the former no Let
pleasure craft are being replaced (j) J Minor Ewing, Loehr's
by sturdier ships especially design- immediate predecessor.
ed to fulfill their ultimate purpose In its formative stages, the Post
and destiny. Office Building was the center of
Patrolling this area and guard- activity, but for some months past,
ing the inlet day and' night, these Hotel Marion 'on the Bay has
bluish-gray craft are a familiar been the home of the Captain of
sight along St. Augustine's ,the Port. The Captain's office is
waterfront, for the Municipal in the adjoining annex, overlook-
Yacht Pier long since has been ing the Municipal Yacht Pier, con-
given over to their exclusive trolled by the Coast Guard and
use and protection. from which its picket boats operate.
Their crews not, only man the The hotel lobby is now a recrea-
vessels, they also care for the ship tion room and the former dining
and her all-important machinery room, a storeroom. The coffee shop
and armaments. A little repair is the mess hall. There also is
shop is maintained by the Captain a well-equipped sick bay.
of the Port, with well-trained and
experienced mechanics who are
capable of general repairing and
engine overhauling. There are no
ship's carpenters assigned here,
so ior hull work or other repairs
which necessitate hauling a boat
up on the ways, George's Marine
Shop on the San Sebastian is util-
ized.
Duval to Ormond
St. Augustine's Captain of the
Port was established in July, 1942,
when the -Coast Guard Train-
ing Station was little more than
just wishful thinking on the part
of the local populace. Its authority
extends from the' Duval County
line to Ormond, Florida.
Preceding Lieutenant Loehr, as
Captain of the Port here, were
Lieutenant (j.g.) Clarence M.
Speight (now a full lieutenant and 44
part of the instructor-personnel
at the Ponce de Leon); Lieutenant
C. M. Brookfield, who was made
Section Coast Guard officer at ANT n TRChP'1


6


~Vllll~~~rrr rrrrrrr~rrrr


If you think it downright odd
to see former pleasure craft
here with depth charges and
ugly-looking machine guns on
deck, what will you say when
we tell you their crews include
ex-cowboys ?
To a great extent, the crews
on those boats you see at the
pier or going about their busi-
ness in the harbor, are the for-
mer pleasure craft and charter
boat operators of Florida who
know every inch of the waters
their vessels traverse. However,
included among the crewmen,
are a surprising number of
I Coast Guardsmen who used to
' spend their time in the saddle,
on cattle ranges in Texas or
out in Oklahoma.
And the authority for that
amazing statement is their
present "boss," Captain of the
Port, George R. Loehr.


J "
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PAGE I


Captain


Role


Of


The


Vital


Port


Here


SPerforms


Official Charged

With Functioning

Of.Beach Patrol

Men Assigned To Duty
Under Lt. Geo. R. Loehr
Continue Training
As the name indicates, the pri-
mary function of the Captain of
the Port is the protection of phy-
sical waterfront facilities as well
as the ships in the harbors and
ports, at the wharves, docks arid
piers coming under its jurisdic-
tion.
However, in St. Augustine where
there is ;no ocean-going traffic,i
that phase of activity is more or
less negligible. Here, attention is
centered upon such customary Cap-:
tain of the Port duties as the is-
suance of identification cards and
boat licenses; the promulgation of
local rules within the authority 'of
the Captain of the Port; controlling
of traffic passing through the In-
tracoastal Waterway; the enforce-
ment of Federal laws on navigable
waters, and so on.
Elsewhere, there might be added
such duties as: control of anchor-
age and movement of vessels; con-
trol of the loading and shipment
of explosives and other dangerous
cargoes; control of traffic in har-
bors and channels (special condi-
tions); control of traffic from in-
lets and isolated harbors; pro-
vision for boarding and examining
parties and other miscellaneous
duties.
The man who sees that St.
Augustine's Captain of the Port
is a shining example of Coast
Guard tradition and efficiency,
is George R. Loehr, recently pro-
moted to the rank of a senior
grade, or full, lieutenant.
With the dawn of 1943, Loehr
eame here from Miami (Seventh
Nava 1l District Headquarters)
where he was attached to the Cap-
tain of the Port. A manufacturing
representative in civilian life,
Lieutenant Loehr had entered the
service seven months previously at
Port Lauderdale, where his wife
and two children reside. Cleveland,
Ohio, is his birthplace, but Flor-
ida has been his home for nine
year. He remembers spending a
winter season in St. Augustine, at
the Alhambra, 89 years ago with
his father,' an ardent fisherman
who followed this sport into many
localities with varying success.
Section Coast Guard Officer of
the St. Augustine Section of the
Seventh Naval District, Lieuten-
ant Loehr also is charged with
the responsibility of the Beach Pa-
trol; in this area the Captain of
the Port functions are more or
less of a minor nature, so the
senior officer assumes both roles.
Beach Patrol
The Beach Patrol, function-
Ing under the Captain of the
:Port, actually covers the beach
on foot during the hours of'
darkness, on a 'continuous, un-
lbroken schedule.
In discussing this activity, Lieu-
tenant Loehr said, "We don't have
horses in this section now, al-
though it is possible in the near
future our foot patrol will be
'hanged to a mounted 'patrol. The
inen would like that We DO
have a number of dogs scattered
among the Beach Patrol and if we
do not obtain the horses, it is ex-
pected each patrolman will have
& dog with him during the hoibrs
f his beat."
There are three beach patrol
stations in this area, at Ponte
Vedra, Marineland and Flagler
Beach and the numbers "of men
stationed there are practically
identical. Messing facilities and
living quarters are available for
the men and from these isolated
stations, the entire shoreline is
patrolled.
Regular "liberty parties" are
Scheduled to St. Augustine, or to
Bunnell, Ormond or elsewhere, de-
pending upon the wishes of the
men.
I Via truck, a program of enter-
tainment is supplied under a regu-
lar schedule by the USO, a trained
operator showing pictures at the
beach stations. Dances have been

EX-COWBOYS ARE
CREWMEN ABOARD
PATROL VESSELS


PATROL BOAT IS SEA-GOING TROUBLE SHOOTER


ST, AUGUSTINE

HAS 20 MEN IN

CAPTAIN OF PORT

Did you know there were 20 St.
Augustine men coming under the
authority of the local Captain of
the Port?.
A perusal of the Port's roster
shows there are no less than 20
native, or long-time, residents of
St. Augustine who were assigned
to the Captain of the Port here
following their acceptance into this
branch of the service.
Of this number, 18 have vary-
ing types of duties to perform.
They are: Virgil B. Mathis, Worley
'Mier, Gomer Bray, Sterling An-
drew, Everett L. Solano, John K.
Shugart, Niel A. Mier, Robert J.
Mier, Anthony J. Tringali, Walter
V. Drawdy, George William Zeiler,
Thomas A. Smith, Jr., Godfrey S.
Pomar, Neil C, Miner, John M.
Ryan, Vernon A. Smith, Henry J.
May, and Everett R. Segui.
The, other two men, C. D. Daniels
and David McSwain, are Coast
Guard personnel attached to the
St. Augustine Lighthouse.
V
Ship's Chaplain Is
Called "Sky Pilot"
The chaplain aboard ship is called
the padre or "sky pilot" by sailor-
men. The older sailors had a re-
ligious vein that was mingled with
supersition. The bluejackets of
sail seldom showed any fear for a
hereafter. Their philosophy as
expressed by an old sky pilot was,
that since they lived hard, worked
hard and died hard, they thought
it would be hard indeed to have to
go to hell.


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rAGEU' TU ST AUUTN REOR SU4A. PJU.


Chaplains Fill

Spiritual Needs

Of Fighting Men

Both Protestant And
Catholic Naval Officers
Are Young, Vigorous
RUN GAMUT
Lieuts. Janes And Tillman
Form: Important Hu-
manizing Factors
When Johnnie Coast Guardsman
goes to sea he will make the type
of fighting man this nation needs,
only if he is as well fortified men-
tally and spiritually as he is phy-
:ically.
The task of dealing with this in-
tangible, yet highly important prob-
lem, lies with the chaplains of all4
branches of the service. They are
the humanizing factors in the me-
chanics and regimentation of war.
The St. Augustine Coast Guard
Training Station's, two uniformed
men of God, Lieutenant (j.g.) B. F.
Janes, the Protestant chaplain, and
Lieutenant (j.g.) T. J. Tillman, the
Catholic chaplain, could either of
+them be described as the chap-
lain's chaplain.
They are no cloistered clerics, but
young, vigorous officers who in the
course of a day perform a gamut
ao activities from scrambling
through an obstacle course and ar-
ranging a boxing show, to assist-
ing mentally troubled Coast
Guardsmen and teaching their
'faith.
Both are Navy chaplains, prob-
ably among the first of their separ-
ate faiths to be assigned to a Coast
Guard station. Working as a team,
they supply that sorely needed tie
between the mar. temporarily in
service and the civilian life he left
Behind him.
SChaplain Janes arrived at the
Station first in January after indoc-
trination at the Naval Chaplain's
School, Norfolk, Va. A Presbyteri-
an pastor, he gave up the pulpit of
the First Presbyterian Church in
Santa Cruz, Calif., to enter the ser-
Vice last October.
Almost two months later, Chap-
lain Tillman arrived, also from the
school at Norfolk.
He entered the Navy last Decem-
ber, leaving the pastorate of the
Church of the Holy Redeemer in
the mission district of San Fran-
deico. He was educated at St.
Mary's College at Maraga Valley,
Calif., and attended St. Patrick's
Seminary at Menlo Park, Calif.
Chaplain Janes is a graduate of
Fresno State Teachers' College and
of the San Francisco Theological
Seminary.. He also did post-gradu-
ate work at the University of Cali-
fornia.
S Balanced Sethp
S The arrival of the Catholic chap-
Tlain gave the station a well-bal-
"'anced religious set-up. There still'
I~ no Jewish chaplain since the
numbers of Coast Guardsmen of
That faith here are too few in num-
bers.
However, Chaplain Janes has a
'working knowledge of Hebrew and'
:a familiarity with its religious writ-
ings and ceremony, and he endeav-
ors to fill in for the Jewish faith.
During his indoctrination at Nor-
folk, he'frequently performed a rab-
bi's activity at one of the Naval
hospitals on various Jewish religi-
ous holidays.
S Two Assistants
The chaplains' offices are located
on the main deck of the training
station. They have the assistance
of two enlisted men, John Thomp-
ion of Kansas -City, Mo., seaman,
,second class, and 'Edward Godin of
,Miami Beach, seaman, first class.
Thompson I, director of the
ehoir and prepares the music and
worship numbers for the Piotest-
ant service. Both he and Godin
ready the mess hall for the Sunday
services of both, denominations.
Protestant services are conduct-
ed at 10:15 a. m. and Catholic
masses at 6:16 and 9:80 a. m. Chap-
lain Tillman'also hears confessions
from 4 to"8 p. m. on Saturday.+
Every other week; Chaplain Till-
man conducts services at the Coast
*Guard bases at Marineland and
Flagler Beaeh, and at 8 a. m. on
Saturday at Ponte Vedra.
Good Criterion
But their duties go far beyond
a purely religious function. A
summary of their activities sup-
plies a good oriterion of what the
weli veried chaplain is doing these
days.
They give religious instruction,


officiate at weddings and hap-
tisms, conduct military funerals,
operate a library, act as consultants
in the editing of the station publi-
cation, "The Shield," give voca-
tional advice and guidance, assist
Coast Guardsmen in their home
problems, care for the effects of
men who die and arrange for 'the
transportation home of the body,
occasionally visit the city's church-
es, assist physicians in untangling
the psychological knots which of-
ten tie up service men, arrange for
recreation and entertainment. They
,even help the men to obtain eye
glasses.
As in any branch of the service,
the chaplains are a vital need to
deal with what the Russian writer,
Tolstoi, described as "X," the un-
known and unpredictable human
quantity in the equation of a fight-
ing man.
V
Present idea of a dress parade
is to render a visitor a distinctive
honor. Originally it was a formid-
able display intended to impress
thevisitor with the strength of the
state visited.


A Knotty problem about the editing of the latest edition of "Th
Shield," publication of the Coast Guard Training Station, is ironed
out by Chief Yeoman O. A. Leavitt with the help of Chaplains B. F
Janes and T. J. Tillman, the Protestant and Catholic officers, re
spectively.


e
d
. '
i-;


ST. AUGUSTINE'S FIRST "COAST GUARD SELECTEE"


Two Rich Heritages,
Two High Standards
For Coast Guardsmen
"The late Rear Admiral F. C.
Billard, U. S. Coast Guard, defined
the community of interest with the
Navy and the high professional
standards of his Service when he
wrote:
"Having fought as a part of the
Navy in all our wars, and taking
an especial pride in being fully pre-
pared to perform creditable service
in the Navy whenever called upon,
the officers and men of the Coast
Guard are inspired not only by the
high tradition and fine history of
their own service, but also by the
splendid traditions, history, and
indoctrination of the United States
Navy. They have thus two rich
heritages to be proud of and two
standards of the same lofty char-
acter to live up to."-Lovett's "Na-
val Customs, Traditions and Us-
age."
-V
Weekly dress reviews for ap-
prentice companies of St. Augus-
tine's Coast Guard Training Sta-
tion are held Saturday mornings
on the Fort Green as part of the
routine training.


MOST IMPORTANT
SALUTE IN U. S.
NAVAL HISTORY
According to Lovett's Naval
Customs, Traditions and Usage,"
the most important salute in U. S.
naval history is the first one.to the
Stars and Stripes by a sea power
in recognition of our status ab a
sovereign state.
On 13, February, 1778, John
Paul Jones arrived in the Ranger
at Quiberon Bay, France, and after
learning that his salute would be
returned fired thirteen guns to Ad-
miral La Motte Picquet, which sa-
lute was returned with nine.
At Brest he also received a
salute in reply to his own, for he
reports, "I also demanded and ob-
tained a salute from the flag of
France, both at Quiberon and at
Brest' before the treaty of al-
liance was announced."
In this salute Jones gave one
gun for each American state
(former colony); the nine-gun re-
ply was based on the custom of
saluting Holland, a republic, with
fewer guns than France, a mnon-
archy.


"Shield", Coast Guard

Publication, Is Dream


Of Newspaper Editors

An editor's paradise! A newspaper that can say: "To hell
with the advertisers!" Once the chimerical dream of editors,
reporters and columnists, the Coast Guard is actually now
publishing a number of such* L w
"dream" papers on its own. Leavitt who completes 20 years
Among the most prominent service in the Coast Guard this
are the "Harpoon," of New June, and Sam Chestnut, who has
attracted wide interest with his
York's Manhattan Be a c h illustrations, are the only two left
Training Station; the "Week- of the original staff of The Shield.
ly Log" of the Ellis Island, Responsible officers noting the fa-
N. Y., Receiving Station; "Pa- vorable number of encouraging and
trol," of the First Naval (Bos- complimentary letters that began
ton) Coast Guard District, and to flow in, decided to print the
"The Islander," station tabloid magazine and its first custom-made
of the Alameda, California, edition was issued in St. Augustine
Coast Guard Training Station. on December 1, 1942.
Here in St. Augustine, the Coast A month later the station discov-
Guard Training Station is publish- ered Bill Kastelz, a young Univef-
ing "The Shield," a bi-monthly sity of Minnesota graduate in jour-
news-magazine, "for information nalism, who writes sports for an
and entertainment with a view of avocation as well as professionally.
adding interest and pleasure" to all In addition to reporting sports for
readers. The magazine was first his alma mater publication, Bill
published in conjunction with the has done a large variety of free-
Navy when the Coast Guard Train- lance writing and reporting for
ing Station was tenanted on the papers and magazines. Most of his
Naval reservation, Algiers, Louisi- newspaper work has been through-
ana. out the middle west. Before he
The first edition of The Shield joined the Coast Guard he was on
was issued on July 9, 1942, and the staff of Bill Stern, one of the
consisted of six pages of mimeo- ace sports commentators and an-
graphed reading material, plus a nouncersof the aton
cover sheet illustration donated David M. Scott, a former news-
by local printers and engravers. A paper photographer of long experi-
sheet of cartoons, which was also ence, does the photographic work
reproduced from a stencil, was for The Shield which has contrib-
clipped in with the reading mate- uted a good measure of its success.
rial. Although The Shield is of Only in a few sporadic 'and un-
modest origin, the follow-through successful instances throughout the
entailed considerable planning and peacetime years of the Coast Guard
comprehensive service insight as have attempts been made to estab-
it was the desire to formulate a lish "home" publications. At the
representative publication for the present time, however, there is a
training unit as well as an organ boom of station papers throughout
to reflect the morale, the general the Coast Guard which has resulted
impressions and reactions of the from tremendous increase in per-
Coast Guardsman. sonnel. Many more stations and
imoga i G s an bases have thus become more self-
Mimeographin fifteen hundred sufficient and their publications are
copies of the magazine with colored now warranted if not necessary in
headings and illustrations was la- aiding morale and education.
borious and required much time, _____
but it was a lot of fun. As The
Shield grew in circulation and ex- JUNIOR SALUTES
perience it became more and more IN ADDRESSING,
popular. After a few months. The MEETING SENIOR
Shield became a recognized insti-
tution of the training station and From the earliest days of organ-
began to receive congratulations ized military units, the junior has
from other units of the Navy as saluted in addressing or meeting
well as the-Coast Guard. Those the senior. Today, the personal
who were assigned to the job of salute is a dignified and military
getting out The Shield began to gesture. It is the act of the mili-
like it even more than their read- tary and naval men looking another
ers. They took great pride in it companion in arms in the eye and,
and were naturally enthused with by proper salute, paying due re-
its success. aspect to the uniform and to the
"There was no trick to it," said authority of another servant of the
Chief Yeoman 0. A. Leavitt, The state.
Shield's editor since its second edi- On through the scale, from the
tion "We simply tried to give our "jack of the dust" to the com-
readers what they wanted. You mander in chief, the junior salutes
don't have to be a crack journalist first; but humble and high meet
to do that or even a literary genius, on common ground when the circle.
but you have to find out what they is completed by the respect that
are interested in and that is always. all pay the flag, the symbol of the
what makes good reading." state, and their symbol of duty.


I


PLEASING


YOU


KEEPS


US IN


-USINESS


BUSAM'S
Groceries, Vegetables, Cigars and Candy


PHONE 175-M


ANASTASIA ISLAND


I


le
d



,


MARCHING


k ,, ,










COMES
+ / +


HOME!


"Johnny St. Augustine" has left-our city by the hundreds, heis a hero in the Solomons,
in Africa, in New Guinea ... serving in all branches of the armed services, on land
on the sea and in the air. Yes, boys from St. Augustine are holding their own on all of
the fighting fronts and doing their share in a glorious way, and we, who remain to
carry on at the home front, are proud of those boys! We are proud, too, of the young
men who have recently come to St. Augustine as trainees in the U. S. Coast Guard, the
Army and other branches of the services... they have made themselves a part of our
community and become friends. When these newcomers leave St. Augustine they will
carry the good wishes of all of us ... we hope that when Victory is ours, these men


will again visit our city from time to time.
them here.


THE


ST.


A cordial welcome will always await


CITY


AUGUSTINE,


OF"





FLORIDA


CITY COMMISSIONERS


O. D. WOLFE, Mayor

FRANK J. TART


WALTER B. FRASER


AUBREY K.SESSOMS

CHAS. F. PETERS


LAMAR HARMON, City Manager


U


N
4.


wnen vice Aamiral c. waescne (lett), commandant of the U. S. Coast Guard, visited the St. Au-
gustine Coast Guard Training Station recently during a tour of Coast Guard activities along Florida's
east coast, he paused to chat with Apprentice Seaman Leslie W. Davis,;19, of Plevena, Fla. Davis has
the distinction of being the first man to enter the Coast Guard Training Station here, under the new
Selective Service allocation system. (This is a U. S. Coast Guard photo.)


---- ; --T- -


-


JOHNNY


ILL


___~


FXGE I


THB ST. XUGUSTINB RECORD


SUNIDAT. APRIE M. W9







SUDYARL 5 94 H S.AGUTNhRCR


SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1943


Officers Sc
r' <


Post Of Training


Officer Filled By


Lt.-Cmdr. Rohnke

Veteran In Service Heads Staff Of 21

Instructors; Course Is Concentrated

BY ADELAIDE SANCHEZ


It takes a man to make a man.
It takes a man to lead a man.
And in Lieutenant-Commander 0. C. Rohnke, the Of-
ficers Indoctrination School of the St. Augustine Coast
Guard Training Station has a man and a leader well quali-
fied to hold down the all-important post of Training Of-
ficer. For Commander Rohnke of Jersey City, N. J., who
now calls St. Augustine home, has been on active, duty
with this branch of the service since his graduation from
the Coast Guard Academy in 1932. He came here from
New London, Conn., where he was stationed at the Mari-
time Training School, but in the interim between his
graduation and that shore assignment, he served on almost
too many ships to list. To mention a few, the Pontchar-
train, Galatea, Bibb, Saranac, Unalga.
Indicative of the calibre of the
man who supervises the "training" I Officers School
in St. Augustine's Coast Guard i
Officers Indoctrination School, is Training Officer
his confession: "My hobby is the
Coast Guard right now!"
'The training officer's headquar- -
ters are at the Hotel Bennett, the
southeast room overlooking the
sun porch having been converted
into his office.


Corps of Instructors
SA staff of twenty-one officer
forms the corps of instructors fox
the Officers Training School t<
which come as students reserve
officers who have been in the serv-
ice for some considerable length
of time; men who have been doing
specialized work and come here
merely to be fitted for generalized
duty. Included in the student per.
ponnel also are some specialists
who are attending the Indoctrina
tion School to better fit them for
future daty. Every section of tht
country is represented on the stu.
dent roster.
Heading Commander Rohrike's
instructor-staff are Lieutenant.
Commander K. O. A. Zittel ol
Ridgewood, N. J., also a graduate
of the 1932 Class from the Coasi
duard Academy and assigned here
from New London, Conn., who
*heads the gunnery and navigation
Departments here; and Lieutenant-
Commander L. M. Thayer, Jr., oa
EIelena, Montana, a 1933 Coast
Guard Academy 'graduate whc
came here from Puerto Rico and
who teaches tactics and also is in
charge of all other remaining sub-
jects.
Lieutenant Commander E. F,
Hanks heads the seamanship de-
$artment and serves as personnel
officer at the Officers Training
School here. He's from St. Peters-
burg on Florida's west coast.
Rounding out the list of instruc-
tors and the subjects for which
'each is responsible are the fol-
Slowing:
Lieutenant C. M. Speight (re-
tired) of Norfolk, Va., formerly
stationed in St. Augustine, as
Captain of the Port, teaches Port
SSecurity.
Lieutenant Julian J. Shingler, of
Ashburn, Ga., Gunnery.
Lieutenant W. K. Kehoe,
Swampscott, Mass., Administra-
tion.
Lieutenant George' R. Stock-
bridge, Natick, Mass., Seamanship.
Lieutenant W. K. Earle; Reading,
Pa., Tactics.
Lieutenant (j.g.) E. P. Fitz-
patrick, New York City, Maritime
Law.
Lieutenant (j.g.) Fred W. Lowry,
Columbus, Ohio, Physical Educa-
tion.
Lieutenant (j.g.) Henry D.
Jones, Clemeron, N. C., Communi-
cations.
Lieutenant (j.g.) Walter L.
Kiernan, Brooklyn, N. Y., Mili-
tary Law.
Lieutenant (j.g.) A. G. Alex-
ander, Stanford, Conn., Naviga-
tion.
SLieutenant (j.g.) R. B. English,
Essex, Conn., Seamanship.
Lieutenant (j.g.) W. H. Kopp,
York, Pa., Gunnery.
Lieutenant (j.g.) C. H. Frey-
mueller, Seattle, Wash., Communi-
cations.
Ensign J. D. Ingham, Richmond
Hill, N. Y., Drill Officer.
Ensign T. B. Taylor, Port Wash-
ington, Long Island, N. Y., Statis-
tician.
Ensign H. N. Baruch, Eagle
Point Plantation, Gloucester, Va.,
Navigation.
Ensign W. B. Berssenbrugge,
Manhattan, N. Y., Navigation.
Concentrated Course
The course of instruction at the
Officers Training School is con-
centrated and far from easy, as
any student will vouch. To begin
with, the first two months com-
rise the Indoctrination Course.
hi s is a course required of all
students and its purpose is to
familiarize the student with the
language and ways of the service
and to give him an understanding
of the problems of the service from
#n administrative viewpoint.
'"- During those two months, stu-
ldents spend three hours per week
. studying administration and or-
gainization; another two hours on


'~ j ..


I


s Training Officer of the Of-
ficers Indoctrination School of
f the St. Augustine Coast Guard
Training Station, Lieutenant-
e Commander O. C. Rohnke, is a
t New Jerseyite, his birthplace
8 being Jersey City. He is a 1932
D graduate of the Coast Guard
Academy and has served as line
and engineering officer at Puerto
f Rico, New York, Norfolk and
Galrestop. His sea duty has been
3 principally aboard the Seneca,
Unalga, 'Galatea, Pontchartrain,
SBibb and Saranac. Commander
Rohnke is married and has one
son, Karl Edward Rohnke.

service customs and traditions;
three more on seamanship; four
hours on gunnery; an hour at first
aid; two each at regulations, courts
and boards, port security and
maritime law; four each at com-
munications and navigation; and
eight hours on drills.
Drill Formations
And speaking, of drills, students
are required to make all forma-
tions, unless excused, by proper
authority. These formations are
held outside the hotels, in the
street, with the strictest military
procedure observed and are sched-
uled at 0615, 0715, 0755, 1205, 1300,
1730 daily. However, no formations
are scheduled between 1600 Sat-
urday and 0615 Monday.
Intensified, Practical
An intensified practical course
intended to qualify students for
general service, sums up the sec-
ond two months of officer train-
ing. With the exception of those
who are in the service for special
duty only, students who are physi-
cally and mentally qualified take
this course and in so doing put
in seven hours per week studying
navigation; four hours each are
devoted to seamanship, gunnery
and ordnance, communications,
shipboard administration, and five
each to drills and strategy and
tactics.
At the end of each two months'
term, come examinations. Marks
obtained in these exams and on
daily, or weekly quizzes, are re-
corded and become part of a stu-
dent's fitness report. In turn, that
fitness report, upon completion of
the course, becomes a part of his
official record.
Instead of everyday terminol-
ogy, students are encouraged to
use nautical terms. Thus, the hotel
stairs is regarded as the "ladder";
the floor, is the "deck"; the left
is "port" and the right, "star-
board" and so on, through the
nautical manual.
Students First
They may be officers, but they're
students first, once their period
of training commences. An ensign
rubs shoulders with a lieutenant-
commander and when his turn
comes he's privileged to order
about his superiors-in class-for
rank distinguishing marks are ban-
ned on the reservation. If he treks
to the Officers Club, though, he
must wear his full khaki uniform,
including blouse and rank distin-
guishing marks. During working
hours, if a student must pass
through town for any reason he
must be clad in full khaki uniform
with the proper marks of rank in
place.
Students march to and from


tool


In


Monson,


Bennett


h


HOTEIS NOW OFFICERS INDOCTRINATION SCHOOL


EDNA

SAYS:;


FLOWERS
FOR ALL
OCCASIONS


BONDED MEMBER T.
FLOWERS BY WIR


EDNA'S FLOWER
"It Pleases Us to Please Y
PHONE 1289-J NITE PHONE
101% ST. GEORGE ST.


Hotel Monson (above) ana
Hotel Bennett (right) have be-
come headquarters for the Of-
ficers Indoctrination School of
St. Augustine's Coast Guard
Training Station.


Post Office Of
Station Is At


Ponce de Leon


St. Augustine's Coast Guard
Training Station Post Office is
located at the Hotel Ponce de
Leon, where recruit and gunnery
school training is centralized.
From here, mail is delivered
twice daily-at 1200. and 1630-
to the Monson and the Bennett,
housing the Officers Indoctrina-
tion School.
Sorted into sections, it is left
at the hotel desk, ready to be
picked up by the various section
leaders whose responsibility it is
to deliver it to individual mem-
bers of their particular section.
Noon delivery is made at the
mess tables, after everyone has
been seated.
And if statistics weren't un-
der the ban of the censor, the to-
tal mail received and dispatched
since the establishment here of
the Training Station would prove
a revelation.
---- V- ---
REVENUE CUTTER SERVICE
The antecedent of the Coast
Guard, the Revenue Cutter Service,
was organized under an act of
Congress approved on August 4,
1790, to prevent smuggling. It is
one of the oldest organizations of
the Federal Government.

classes, in charge of section lead-
ers who are responsible for the
orderly and military appearance
of their particular section. They
are held *countable for the clean-
liness and neatness of their re-
spective rooms. They are subject
to the Coast Guard Regulations
and the Articles for the Govern-
ment of the Navy.
Daily Routine
Daily, except Sunday, reveille
comes, to rouse the slumbering
officers at 0600 (6 a. m., by the
civilians' timepiece). Fifteen min-
utes later finds them falling into
formation for physical drill, or
boat drill. Returning to their quar-
ters at 0700, they can take only
-15 minutes for sprucing up self
and room before being in break-
fast formation (to the Monson)
at 0715.
Colors and inspection formation
come next, at 0755, and five min-
utes, pardon me, at 0800, classes
.begin. They're in session until
1150. Lunch formation at 1205 is
followed all too soon by 1300 for-
mation and afternoon classes. 1630
marks the cldse of classes for the
day, bringing with it an hour's
period of liberty and recreation
(1630-1730) before dinner forma-
tion at 1730. Ere the study period
(1980-2200) begins, there's a brief
time allotted for recreation.
"Lights Out" and we mean
just that!-is piped at 2230 (the
cream of the evening, IF you
hadn't crawled out of bed, we mean
bunk, at 0600 and been drilling
and studying most of the day.)
Saturday, with its promise of
liberty ahead, finds the morning
schedule just like any other week
day. After lunch, at 1400, comes
review, followed by inspection of
rooms-but they must be ready
for inspection at all times between
0800 and 1630, so you'd better be
a neat soul-and finally at 1600,
LIBERTY!
"Neatly Stowed"
Speaking of room inspection,
could YOU be this neat?
All articles neatly stowed at all.
times.
Drawers, wardrobe, trunks,
closets and all clothing receptacles
neatly stowed.
Suitcases and trunks neatly:
stowed.
(We rather like those words,
"neatly stowed" and all they must
imply.)
No radios.
No electric irons.
No hot plates.
No electric cookers or other de-
vices (except electric shaving ra-
zors.)
No candy or other food eaten
or stowed in any part of the room.
No intoxicating liquors, beer,
narcotics, or drugs.
And no-but that's enough to
give you a good idea of what Uncle
Sam expects of his men in blue.


Canteen Held


Great Morale

Bucker-Uppei


Ship's Service Store
Supply Trainee
With His Needs

One of the morale bucker-up
pers of the St. Augustine Coas
Guard Training Station is it
Ship's Service Store canteen.
Here, the trainee can buy, a
minimum prices, the little luxurie
and necessities that he needs while
going through the rigorous busi
ness of learnifig the ropes as s
Coast Guardsman.
The canteen, located on a mez
zanine deck, just above the mail
deck of the Ponce de Leon Hotel
can supply him with cigarettes
candy, soft drinks, chewing gum
toilet articles and a dozen ane
one other articles of merchandise
But the Ship's Service Store
which is supervised by Lieut. C. R
Grenager, who is also education
officer, includes a number of oth
er services.
It operates a barber shop, a
contract tailor shop, a contract
laundry and mechanical cold drinl
dispensers. Profits from, these va
rious activities are used to defray
the expenses of the station's mo-
tion picture shows which are stag
ed six times a week, and othei
entertainment.
A percentage of the profits also
goes to the Welfare Fund, which
is for the assistance of men ii
emergency financial difficulties.
Newly arrived trainees whose
first pay day may lie some weeks
ahead, are issued coupon books
with which they may make pur
chases, that will be charged ofi
to them when that first pay day


Everyone

Likes


FRIED


CHICKEN


Next Time Order
Fryers, Roasting
Hens, Etc.
From




JEFF'S


POULTRY

PHONE 904
Foot of Hope St.


r




s
I-

s
it
e


"THREE CHEERS"

When the adjutant commands
"sounds off" at parades and guard
mounts in military and naval ser-
vice, the band plays three chords of
flourishes-known as the "Three
Cheers" -before marching up and
then down in front of the men fn-
der arms. When the band returns
to its position, it again plays
'"Three Cheers."

rolls around.
The canteen is also prepared to
cash checks and money orders for
the station's personnel. This and
other services make it one of the
most popular gathering places in
the entire station.


a


I

I








I


DST. AUGUSTINE







925+ -J". I
ST. AUGUSTINE
---- ---- -- ---


COMPLIMENTS





G. W. WINNINGHAM I



88 Riberia St,


S-***.ll Ii i i Ini Ipl Ipl II l I'

a


hat o Proudly We aid


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d .









n ..!.: .. ..
n ,
On






































.the fox-holes of Bataan. To preserve these . ... ..... -
a r s w p o e o r S A
k
Y











I-














What So Proudly We Hail'd.








| our lives, with the determination that nothing one of us an opportunity to help fight the war
W hat so proudly we hall'd at Philadelphia as well as our armed forces. Americans in
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now. The principles of Freedom and Democ- wartime jobs the same spirit of courage and
racy-vindicated on the wintry fields of Val- unity and heroism that our soldiers are show-
ley Forge-have been challenged again in Ing on the field of battle.
the fox-holes of Bataan. To preserve these
rights we pledge our energies, our resources, WAR STAMPS AND BONDS give each
our lives, with the determination that nothing one of us an opportunity to help fight the war
shall stand in the way of Victory. -an American way to find the billions needed
sw for Victory. Every Stamp and Bond you buy
Ahead there lies hard work and sacrifice will help speed America's Victory. Do your
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Buying an "Occasional" Bond Won't Win the War-But Regular Buying Willl,



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***


PAGE 5


THE ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD


j


NAVY DAY FETE
Highlighting St. 'Augustine's
1942 Navy Day observance was a i
brilliant formal dance at which
the National Catholic Community
Service Club officials of this city
entertained at the Lyceum, honor-
ing Coast Guardsmen stationed
here.

Quarantine Flag
Alphabet flag "Q",,the quaran-
tine flag, is hoisted at the fore
masthead at the most conspicuous
hoist on all infected ships or ships
in quarantine. It is kept flying day
and night and must be carried in
the bow of all boats belonging to
the ship having this flag hoisted.


I


*u




I*


PAGE 6 THE ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1943


BY ADELAIDE SANCHEZ
Here, future gun crews on Naval combat vessels are learning how
to handle ships' weapons with the split-second precision that means
death to the enemy and life itself to the proud craft and her gallant men.
Under the capable direction oft
Lieutenant E, T. Piner of Marshall- I first local structure taken over by
burg, N. C., who is in charge of the the Coast Guard for this purpose.
Gunnery School of the local Coast Lieutenant Piner
Guard Training Station, selected
trainees undergo an intensive six Lieut. Piner is a regular of r-
weeks' course in gunnery and all Guard officer, with 30 years of ser-
that it embodies: operation, main- vice and experience accumulated
tenance, upkeep, repair, safety pre- through assignment to various sta-
cautions, ammunition, aid to cas- tions ashore and at sea. He came
ualties, to St. Augustine direct, from the
l h ed at te H l Coast Guard Merchant Marine
Originally housed at the Hotel Training Station in New York,
Bennett, the Gunnery School now where he was in charge of gunnery
is headquartered at the Hotel Ponce training.
de Leon, moving to that famous r
hostelry to make room for an ex-i After completion of four weeks'
passion of the Officers Irdoctrina- basic or "boot" training, recruits
pension of the Officers o selected for the Gunnery School
tion and Training School.
Lieutenant iner's office is in face six weeks' instruction in all
Lieutenant Piner's office is types of guns, including their ac-
the Ponce de Leon, but that ipdi- tual firing. Once all phases of this
vidual spends many hours away training course have been success-
from his desk, personally supervis- fully mastered and "gun shyness"
ing this vitally important phase overcome, they are assigned to dis-
of naval training. He was the first tricts, for later detaching to vessels
Coast Guard officer to arrive in St. as gun crews in combat service.
Augustine when the good word
came last Fall that approval had To Combat Units
been given the establishment of a Since establishment of the lo-
station here, the Bennett being the cal Station, some of the men who


A Friendly Greeting

To You


MR.

SERVICEMAN


From


ROSS

FOOD MARKET

181 San Marco Ave.
, Phone 606
-A& jak .A Ak A& A. A. & &A& ,&


have completed their training
here have been assigned to com-
bat units; a few others have
been retained in capacity of
leaders.
Manning a gun is no small feat
in itself and because of its dangers
(to a man, we wager the gun
crews speak of their work as thrill-
ing rather than hazardous) Gun-
nery .School students are taught to
KNOW THEIR WEAPONS first
of all. Each must learfi how to as-
semble the various types of guns
in which he is receiving instruc-
tions, and to disassemble them. Be-
cause certain functions must be per-
formed almost without' conscious
thought, each gun crew is trained
'to a fine point, trained so each man
knows every otler man's position
and can take over a fallen com-
:;de's duties without fumbling hes-
itatimn pr lessening the effective
firing of his gun.
Because any weapon- is poten-
tially dangerous, safety precau-
tions are drilled into the men as
strongly as are the parts of each
gun and its operation.
Maintenance, upkeep and repair
of the large calibre guiis are other


GOOD


FOOD


FOR


FIGHTING MEN


AND



Defense Workers


NO ALCOHOLIC
BEVERAGES
SOLD OR
ALLOWED
IN OUR PLACE


essential phases of the six-week
gunnery schooling.
An intensive course also is giv-
tn in the use of all types of small
arms, including pistols, revolvers
and sub-machine guns.


Future Gun Crews On


Combat Vessels Get


Their Training Here


GUNNERY DRILL HIGHLY IMPORTANT


Selected Trainees Must Undergo
Intensive Course Of Six


Weeks


After they have completed the
course of instruction in all of the
subjects mentioned, the men are
sent to the gunnery range, located
on Davis Shores, to complete their
final phase of training, actually
firing the guns on which they have
been receiving such concentrated
teachings. Both surface and air
targets enter into this part of the
training picture.
Gunnery Range
Located on the east beach of
Davis Shores, the gunnery range
is barred to civilians and all but
the actual Gunnery School per-
sonnel and guard detail assigned
there. The area is Government
leased property and as such is
protected from undesirable in-
fringement of the curious. It is
a part of the Training Station-
and therefore no civilians can, or
will be, permitted within its
boundaries, the public being
warned to stay out of that vi-
cinity because of government re-
strictions and as a safety pre-
caution.
Visional training films are used
as an aid to the actual instructions
the blue denim-clad men receive
on their guns and in their class-
rooms and "practice platforms" 're
in a variety of sites, some being lo-
cated on 'Charlotte Street, others
within the grim ramparts of Cas-
t'io de San Marcos.
To handle a gun, with accuracy
and safety, a man must know his
ammunition, so there arp classes
in the different types of explosives,'
their proper storage methods, what
safety precautions should be fol-
lowed for each particular type of
munitions employed.
And we might note here, that live
ammunition's expensive! Each time
one kind of projectile leaves its
weapon, it represents an expendi-
ture of $12.20. Costs vary, of
course, with the gun, shells costing
'anywhere from 23 cents on up,
and up.
Gunnery School-enrolled men are
taught, too, the ship's organization,
for both offense and defense; the
various communications systems
and kindred subjects.
Through the cooperation of the
Medical Department and the use of
visional training films, they are
given lectures in first aid and per-
sonal hygiene.
No "Diploma"
There's no "diploma" awaiting
the man completing the Gun-
nery School course. His satisfac-
tion of being finely trained, comes
later, when his now familiar an-
timaireraft weapon, shooting live.
ammunition, downs an enemy
dive bomber, or his trusty ma-
chine gmun breaks up ,an attack
by the foe. When his nimble in-
gers repair a disabled wedaloii
when his quick toss of that heavy
shell is accomplished without a
lost motion, when he's one of a
crew of several who coordinate
their actions 's one, when his re-
flexes become automatic through
long, tedious hours of practice.
Whet his knowledge of first aid
means saving the life of a wound-
ed buddy.
Assistant to Lieutenant Piner is
experienced W. H. Maddox of Lau-
rel, Miss., who came here last Fall
as a gunner, but now wears the
stripe and a half of a lieutenant,
junior grade. He's had 18 years in
the service.
The instructor personnel comes
from many "ports" and includes
four chief gunner's mates: Ray-
mond Carr of Brooklyn, New York;
Charles .M. Clark of Eminence, Mis-
souri; Oliver E. Christensen, of
Blaire, Nebraska and Francis J.
Johann of Bordentown, New Jer-
sey. Also on the staff, are first
class gunner's mates Stephen Chor-
vat of Cleveland, Ohio and William
J. McLendon of Rockingham, N. C.,
and twelve other assistants includ-
ing one chief electrician, Chester
L. Frodle, and Peter J. Domanski,
carpenter's mate, first class.
V-
FIRST C. G. SELECTED
Apprentice Seaman Leslie W.
Davis, 19-year-old Plevena, Florida
youth was the first man to enter
the Coast Guard Training Station
at St. Augustine, under the new
Selective Service allocation.


You'lU Enjoy


the


CHEERFUL

ATMOSPHERE

of


CHARLIE'S
BAR AND
PACKAGE STORE


Phone 581


When you desire well
prepared, tasty meals
during your off duty
hours, stop at the Sip
& Bite Hut a
favorite with Service
Men and others who
like good food, proper-
ly served.


Etiquette


Governing


Saluting

The salute is rendered by the
junior whenever he meets a per-
son entitled to it: his superiors in
military rank among the officers
of the regular Army, Navy, Marine
Corps and of the National Guard
and Reserves when in uniform. It
also is customary to salute officers
of friendly powers when in uni-
form.
One always salutes before the
person to be saluted approaches
closer than six paces; this gives
him time to return the salute.
A salute is always returned by
all officers present entitled to it,
unless they are in a formation,
when the senior only returns all
salutes.
In civilian clothes, a soldier sa-
lutes an officer when he recog-
nizes him, even if both soldier and
officer are dressed in civilian
clothes.
If the senior remains in the im-
mediate vicinity and no conversa-
tion takes place, the salute is ren-
dered but once. However, if there
has been conversation the junior
again salutes the senior in taking
his leave or when the senior leaves.
In making reports, the person
rendering the report salutes re-
gardless of rank.
On the approach of an officer, a
group of soldiers is called to at-
tention by the first person noticing
him.
The driver of a motor 'vehicle
salutes, unless the vehicle is in
motion. Others riding in a motor
car (and the driver,; if the car is
not in motion) salute without rising
from their seats. The officer or
non-commissioned officer in charge
of a detail riding in a truck salutes
for the entire party.
When the. National Anthem is
played or "to ,the color" sounded,
at the first note all dismounted of-
ficers and men present but not in
formation stand at attention
facing the music and salute, ex-
cept that at escortt of the color"
or at "retreat" they face toward
the color or flag. The salute is
held until the last note of the
music. Those mounted halt' and
salute mounted. Vehicles in mo-
tion are brought to a halt. Occu-
pants of vehicles excdpt the driver
dismount and salute. Drivers of
vehicles sit at attention.
In theatres or other places of
public assemblage, ,or in a public
conveyance, salutes are not ex-
changed.


Assistant Tp


Assistant Tp,
Comdr. Davis

, ..


Seven and a half years of sea
duty on the Atlantic Ocean and
the Great Lakes is the record of
Lt.-Comdr. J. J. Hutson, Jr., as-
sistant training and welfare offi-
cer of the local Coast Guard
Training Station. Born in Wil-
mington, N. C., Hutson was grad-
uated from the Coast Guard
Academy in 1933. He has a ser-
vice ribbon, Coast Guard expert
rifle medal and expert pistol
medal, He is married and has
one son.


St. Augustine's

Modern


BARBER SHOP


Cordially Greets


ALL


SERVICE MEN




Price's Barber Shop

44 Cathedral P1.


-w oM o o ,




























The "Boot"trainees in the various branches now ictqd in St Auo
1 TRAINEES NOW,,








FIG H T R S.., SO O N 4..................



2J nd gustine are the men who will be o the action fronts soon. Will they
W= have proper equipment to meet and overcome the enemy.? You can C
WAR BOND answer that question by your patriotic purchase of War Bonds. Our
|A B N American men are giving up everything, even their lives, to help win
DRIV this war. When they return, be able to face them, confident in the
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With the use of this 3-inch, 50 calibre loading machine, or dummy
gun, this future Coast Guard Lun crew goes through a daily drill until
it can move with split-second precision in preparation for manning
a real gun on board ship. It is an important phase of the training,
men undergo in the gunnery school of St. Augustine's Coast Guard
Training Station.


DAR Chapter Here Devotes Series
Of Programs To Armed Services Of
Nation; Many Speakers Are Heard

Maria Jefferson Chapter, Daugh- win, U. S. Marine Corps Reserve,
ters of the American Revolution, who. recounted the history and tra-
devoted a series of programs this editions. of that famous branch of
year to the armed services of the the service, at the March meeting;
United States. and Mrs. J. M. T. Reid, a volunteer
Because St. Augustine has been worker at the YMCA-USO Club at
honored by being made headquar- the Legion Home who brought the
ters for the Officers Indoctrination series to a close this month with
School, the Gunnery School, and an informal talk based on her per-
the U. S. Coast Guard Training -sonal USO experiences.
Station, the DAR' series was in- Mrs. Harriet Piper, who for 18
augurated last December with a years did occupationall therapy
salute to the Coast Guard. On work in Army hospitals during and
that occasion, the local DAR's had after the World War One, spoke
as their guest speaker, Lieutenant- on the same program with Lieuten-
Commander John J. Hutson, Jr., ant Spofford of the WAACs, in sup-
assistant training officer of the St,, port of DAR work in occupational
Augustine Coast Guard Training therapy in a big Marine Hospital in
Station. New York, for which an offering
Since then. 'the womell have had was received.


as their guesitpeale-rs. Lieutenant
Pauline Eaton Spofford of' the Wo-
men's Army Auiiliary Corps, who
addressed the'eall chapter at its
January meeting; ETuign Bruce
Barfield, naval liaison officer *at the
State Selective Service headquar-
ters here, who-discussed "Naval
Traditions" at the February as-
sembly; Captain Roland D. Bald-


203 King St.


Rector's Cafe


Sip& Bite Hut

CATHEDRAL ST.-NEAR U. S. C. G. TRAINING STATION

HOURS
Daily 12 Noon Until Midnight-Sat. Night Till 1 A. M. Sun.


The Original Sea-Food Platters

'Cooked To The King's Taste'


I CATHEDRAL PLACE


PHONE 652


Officers Here

Go ToSea, Too

Coast Guard officers undergoing
indoctrinational training in St.
Augustine are given more than a
'"book learning"-they go to sea.
The indoctrination school now
has available for its use, several
patrol craft, with more on order.
With these, the student officers
put their class room theory to prac-
tical application.
Averaging about four trips a
week, the students get the hang
of general seamanship, practice
the duties of keeping ship stations,
study their signaling and naviga-
tion.
The boats are entirely manned
by student officers except for a
machinist's mate who handles the
engine rooms.
The sea-going class, rooms are
a vital phase of every potential
officer's training. Every advanced
student in the school is given a
thorough grounding for future sea
duty by means of this small-craft
handling, during the final two
months. f his schooling.
Head of the sea-going end of the
training is Lieut.-Comdr. E. F.
Hanks, who is assisted by a num-
ber of staff officers.
B V
BUY WAR BONDS!
BUYr WAR BONDS!


F


/


~b~L~BB~~


1i


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SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1943 THE ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD PAGE 7


Coast Guard's Protective Setup


In Seventh Naval District Puts


Teeth In Wartime Guardianship


It is said of a certain leading
daily newspaper in Georgia that
it "covers Dixie like the dew," but
that coverage, however extensive,
probably is more like the wartime
skip-stop system adopted by bus
lines in many cities in comparison
with the U. S. Coast Guard's pro-
tective setup in the Seventh Naval
District-which includes all of
Florida east of the Apalachicola
River except Duval and Nassau
counties,
The Coast Guard really covers
Florida's hundreds of miles of
coastline, make no mistake about
that! From the northern boundary
line of the district on the east
coast, just above Ponte Vedra
Beach, to the western limit at Apa-
lachicola on the Gulf coast, there
is not a single mile of beach, nor
any bay, river-mouth, cut or tidal
estuary, which is not under surveil.-
-lance by guardsmen afoot, on
Horseback, in a jeep, or afloat, 24
hours a day.
"Always Ready!" is the Coast
Guard's motto. From district head-
quarters in Miami to 14 captains
of ports (also called section Coast
Guard officers), and through them
to the scores of advance bases,
patrol stations, lighthouses and
other watch towers,' lifeboat sta-
tibns and floating units, go the
serial orders which put teeth in
this wartime guardianship of our
sunny peninsula.
14 Captains of Port
Sooner or later almost every.-
body in Florida must deal directly
or indirectly with a Coast. Guard
Captain of the Port located at:
St. Augustine (Lt. George R.
Loehr); New Smyrna Beach (Lt.
jg. L. C. Poole);,Canaveral (Lt. jg.
H. T. Durkin); Fort Pierce (Lt. jg.
A. E. Hittepole); West Palm


Beach (Lt. M. G. Field); Port
Everglades (Lt. J. T. Nelson);
Miami (Lt. Comdr. R. H. Hunt);
Key West (Lt. Comdr. R. C. Fout-
ter); Everglades City (Lt. jg. C. F.
Preece); Fort Myers (Lt. A. B.
Angle); Tampa (Comdr. P. W.
Collins); Tarpon Springs (Lt. J. T.
Wilhelm); Cedar Key (Lt. jg. H. R.
Smith), or St. Marks (Ens. J. C.
Dickinson, Jr.)
The District Coast Guard Officer
is Capt. J. E. Whitbeck. His head-
quarters staff is replete with vet-
erans of the'service and specialist
reserve ,officers recruited from
many walks of life. An incomplete
roster reads something like this:
chief of staff, Comdr. William
Wishar; aids to navigation, Lt.
Comdr. J. R. Davis; beach patrol,
Lt. Comdr. G. M. Schellenger; boat
acquisition, Lt. Comdr. G. I. Holt;
civil engineering, Lt. Comdr. K. W.
Donnell; communications, Lt.
Comdr. Ole Friis; engineering,
Comdr. E. B. Smith; finance, Lt.
Comdr. R. N. Gillis; inspection, Lt.
L. R. Daniels; intelligence, Lt. W.
H. Brown; legal, Lt. C. A. Carroll;
medical, Dr. (Lt.) T. R. Dawber;
morale and training, Lt. Alex
Waite; operations, Lt. Comdr. M.
D. Jester; ordnance, Lt. H. S. Har-
ris; personnel, Comdr. C. M. Ander-
son; port security,. Comdr. Frank
Kenner; public relations, Lt. (jg)
R. M. Munroe; reserve and auxil-
iary, Lt. J. V. D'Albora; recruiting,
Gunner H. A. Wessel; telephone,
Lt. C. M. Talley; and transporta-
ton, Lt. (jg) J. H. Bell, Jr.
Integral Part of Navy
In wartime, of course, the Coast
Guard becomes an integral part of
the Navy and operates as such,
except that administrative affairs
are kept separate. The Comman-
dant of the Coast Guard is Vice-


COMPLIMENTS



to the



COAST GUARD


AND



R. V. A.



C. C. SKINNER

SERVICE STATION
125 King St.-,Corner Riberia


- -.-.-.-.-.-.--- ----- .- ---


Admiral Russell R. Waesche, the
only three-star admiral in that
branch of the nation's armed ser-
vices. The newly appointed Com-
mandant of the Seventh Naval Dis-
trict, and also of the Gulf Sea
Frontier, is Rear Admiral W. R.
Munroe, who succeeded Rear Ad-
miral James L. Kaufman.
Even to enumerate the Coast
Guard's multiple duties and activi-
ties, military and otherwise, in an
emergency such as World War II
would require more space than the
average newspaper is able to" de-
vote to one subject. Anyway, it
would be something like trying to
answer the celebrated philosophical
query, "How many angels can
dance on the point of a needle?"
Much of it is necessarily restricted
or confidential information.
V-

Proper Titles

Senior officers frequently ad-
dress juniors by their surnames,
but this does not give the junior
the privilege of addressing the
senior in any other way than by
his proper title.
Officers of the Medical Corps
of the grade of captain and above
are addressed by their military
titles-captain, major, etc. Lieute-
nants are addressed as "doctor."
Chaplains always are known as
"chaplain" regardless of their
rank.
Warrant officers are addressed
"mister."
Non-commissioned officers are
addressed by their titles. Officers
address them as "sergeant," "cor-
poral,". etc. Officers address pri-
vates as "Smith" or "Jones." Mas-
ter sergeants, technical sergeants,
staff sergeants, etc., are address-
ed singly as "sergeant."
In the Navy, officers with the
rank of commander and above in
both line and staff are addressed
socially by their titles, whereas
those with the rank of lieutenant-
conpmander and below are address-
ed as "mister."
Any officer in command of a
ship, whatever its size, or class,
while exercising such command is
addressed as "captain."
V.
V--------
OFFICER WRITES
ARTICLE UPON
ICE BLOCKADE
Author of "Breaking -the Ice
Blockade," an article appearing in
the April issue of Popular Mechan-
ics Magazine, is Ensign Warifig G.
Smith, of Cleveland, Ohio, who has
been attending the Officers Indoc-
trination School of the St. Augus-
tine Coast Guard Training Station.
Ensign Smith went on active
duty with the Coast Guard in Octo-
ber of 1941 and formerly was with
the Public Relations office of the
Coast Guard in the Ninth Naval
District. In civilian life, he was
advertising manager for -a chain
of grocery stories in his native
state of Ohio.
BUY WAR BONDS!


OFFICIAL PHOTOS
ARE FEATURED IN
SPECIAL EDITION
Most of the photographs for
this Special Service Edition
were taken by Navy and Coast
Guard photographers.
They were James Oliver,
photographer, specialist, sec-
ond class, official Seventh Na-
val District photographer, and
David Scott, photographer,
third class, of the U. S. Coast
Guard Training Station here.
Oliver was a commercial art-
ist in civilian life, residing in
Miami, where he is at present
stationed in the district head-
,quarters.
Scott is a former photograph-
er for International N e ws
Photos. His home is in Natchito-
ches, La.


TRIUMPHS
Charles E. Richey, 22-year-old
seaman, first class, of the Captain
of the Port's Office here, sang his
way to an appearance on Maj'or
Edward Bowes' "Amateur Hour"
radio show February 25th in
Miami. His rich tenor triumphed
over some 40 other contestant acts,
this Louisianan's participation in
the broadcast being a highlight of
the program.


Wiry Filipino Ex-Boxing

Champion Teaching Boots

"Art" of Human Mangling


Father of Jiu-Jitsu Ex-
pert Was Retired
U. S. Army Captain


That jiu-jitsu champ tried every
sneak punch in the book when we
fight in 1934, and they haven't
changed a bit since."
TDe Oea ir, w nlit di in- thi Co atC


In 1934, a small, wiry 111-pound Guard in Chicago 11 months ago.
Filipino youthwas scheduled to go He traveled from Los Angeles to
six rounds in an exhibition "every- sign up because he had heard that
thing 'goes match with the jiu- recruits from that area would go
*jitsu champion of Japan. At the overseas soon. He was keenly dis-
end of the third round the Filipino appointed when they told him it
knocked his cagey yellow-skinned would be months maybe before he
opponent silly with a right upper- could take a slap at a Jap.
cut- and an apology. c t a
Today, Manuel De Oampo, 34,' "Then they send me to St. Au-
s same Fpino, would like to gustine, and I guess mebbe I am in
this same Filipino, would like to best place to do most good after
knock the socks off the same Jap- best place to do most gome after
This time, with no apology. all," he commented. "I teach boys
De Ocampo, chief officers' stew- how to break armsand legs, and
ard at the St. Augustine Coast not get hurt himself."
Guard Training Station, is now de- It is generally agreed by all who
voting his expert ability to the know him that De Ocampo is apt-
teaching of recruits the art of ly qualified to be a teacher inthe
knocking out-for keeps-the Axis "art" of human mangling.
rodents they may come up against He is a past master of jiu-jitsu,
in the near future. Chinese and American boxing. In
"The Japs fight dirty," says Man- civilian life he was a professional
uel, "And you got to know how to boxer, and chalked up an enviable
fight the same way you meet 'em. record in the flyweight bracket of


59 fights, of which he lost only
three.
His wife, two brothers, a sister
and father are still "somewhere in
the Philippines." He has heard no
word from them since the Japs ar-
rived in Manila.
Manuel is quite familiar with
American military tactics and dis-
cipline. For three..years, while in
the islands, 'h served with the
Philippine Scouts, part of the Unit-
ed States Army. His father was a
retired U. S. Army captain at the
outbreak of the war.
"American Army officers teach


OFFICERS SCHOOL
GALLEY LOCATED
IN MONSON HOTEL

Galley for the Officers School of
St. Augustine's Coast Guard
Training Station, is in the Monson
Hotel, messing facilities for all
students being available there.
Meals are served cafeteria style,
immediately after the meal forma-
tions-in the approved governmen-
tal method.


us how to box," said De-Ocampo. Students quartered at the Ben-
"We teach U. S. Army how to do
judo." nett Hotel, march to the Monson
e O- at each mess.
De Ocampo, who came to this .Each has his own table and seat-
country in 1933, neither smokes nor ing assignment and each is re-
drinks. His one passion is sports; quired to pay a mess bill on the
his second, the movies. first of the month and upon being
When queried as to the agility detached. That's one of the re-
of American boys compared to the responsibilities of the mess officer.
fast, lithe Filipinos, he laughed. He also,presides at a weekly meet-
"American boy plenty fast and ing of the student mess commit-
tough. Holy smoke, I see football tee, when any complaints or diffi-
game. By golly, those American culties can be aired and solved.
boys so fast I hardly see them go. Unless present on authorized
You betcha." business, the galley's taboo to all
De Ocampo, whose home is in students.
Sabuanga, Mindanao, one of the
larger islands of the Philippines, is than everywhere put together," he
anxious to return to his homeland said. "But I want to take vacation
soon. at home. Vacation wherd*I can kill'
"I like the United States better lots of Japs quick-like!"


9


JE


Military authorities have proved
that "sky-glow" is a real aid to these
undersea raiders-as much an enemy
of our country as the subs them-
selves. With this "sky-glow" in the
background, coastal ships are silhou-
etted sufficiently for the evil eye of
the periscope to spot them and to aim
their deadly torpedoes.
If this sky-glow is not immediately
eliminated, countless American boys
will add their names to the list of
those who have already given their
lives to keep these vital supply lines
open. It is the solemn duty of every
citizen to comply with the new dim-
out regulations-effective February
1st in St. Johns County. These re-
strictions a-re not unreasonable. They


still permit the use of lighting in
stores. offices and homes'-but 'on a
controlled basis. Strict compliance
with these rules must bb maintained.
during the hours of darkness,
Our trained lighting men are avail-
able, equipped with the necessary
technical instruments, to assist you
in solving your lighting problems in
your store or other commercial estab-
lishment.
Suggestions to assist you in com-
plying with this new order are given
below. Read them carefully..
Remember, these new lighting regu-.
lations went into effect FEBRUARY
1st. They are very important, and
MUST be complied with; If one of our
lighting representatives can lielp you,
make an appointment with bim today,


MRLOEAI


FOR VICTORY ON THE HOME FRONT -WORK WITH YOUR DEFENSE COUNCIL


\-~\ 1\
~suU E


When you have difficulty in obtaining increases, Tess and less space on our
'a coach seat or Pullman reservation on trains remains available for civilian use.
our trains these days, some young man So if you have to postpone your de-
in uniform may be riding in the space pasture, if your train is delayed by war
you didn't get. traffic and a bit crowded, such incon-
He may be on an urgent military veniences you'll agree are far preferable
mission '.. enroute to a training camp to travel at the point of an Axis gun off
or port of embarkation, soon to leave to a concentration camp or industrial
for some grim battlefront far from the slavery.
comforts of home and native land. Meanwhile, ask our whether
Meanwhile, ask yourself whether or


Thousands of such men are traveling
today up and down the Florida East
Coast Railway. As this military activity


not your trip is definitely essential. If it
is not, avoid occupying travel space
needed to speed vital military operations.


WRONG RIGHT WRONG RIGHT WRONG RIGHT
Stores, Restaurants, Outdoor Lights Lights Visible From
Etc. All exterior lights illumi- Sea


Interior lighting and show
windows should be shaded
or otherwise controlled so
light source is invisible
above horizontal, and light
does not exceed 2 foot-
candles at any point 3 feet
from any building open-
ing. Light source should
be shaded individually or
in groups with, opaque
valances.


nating open spaces, as
parking lots, filling sta-
tions, etc., should be per-
manently shaded so that
no source of light is visible
at less than 45* below
horizontal, and so open
area is not illuminated
more than 1 foot-candle.


Light sources or reflec-
tions through outside
openings in any building
must be shaded or reduced
so light is invisible from
seaward. Shades 4rblinds
should be pulled clear
down at seaward-side
openings of buildings vis-
ible from the sea.


WRONG RIGHT
Homes and
Apartments
jfterior lighting shall be
'shaded or otherwise con-
trolled, either at light
source or at building open-
ings, so that no source of
lght' is directly visible
from any point- outside.
(See also "Outdoor
Lights" which include
porch lights, and also
'Lights Visible from
Sea.")


WRONG RIGHT
Outdoor Signs
All exterior illuminated
signs must be totally, ex-
tinguished except those
that do not exceed 24" x
36" overall and which do
not use more than one
25-watt incandescent lamp
bulb, so shielded and con-
trolled that no direct light
is visible from above the
horizontal.


FLORIDA EAST COAST RAILWAY

VITAL TO FLORIDA A N DT H E N AT I 0ON


FOR SPECIFIC APPLICATIONS, READ THE COMPLETE DIM-OUT ORDER


"SKY-GLOW" IS AN ENEMY!


---- IL'~a I r II
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- -- --
I I' I _-e -- a I L~ --- .1


SUNDAY,, APRIL 25, 1943


THE ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD


PAGE 7


5-





























U









Station And City Host To Dig nitarie:

Since the establishment of a U. other official acts while 'in St. That banner "visiting day" month
S. Coast Guard Training Station Augustine, Admiral Waesche ac- also brought Rear Admiral Lloyd T
here, St. Augustine and the Sta- cepted the review on the Fort Chalker, assistant commandant o
tion have been host to a number of Green, inspected -the local Station the United States Coast Guard
high-ranking and distinguished of- and Captain of the Port, and ad- Washington, to St. Augustine on
ficers. dressed student officers. an inspection tour. Admiral Chalk
It was in mid-February that it Earlier, in the same month, St. er is the nation's second highest
achieved its greatest distinction Augustine was visited simultane- ranking Coast Guard officer. Hi
along these lines, however, for it ously by Rear Admiral Frank J. came here to address the first groul
was then that the highest ranking Gorman, chief of finance and sup- of officers to complete their indoc
officer in the Coast Guard, Vice Ad- ply, United States Coast Guard, trination training under the ex
miral R. R. Waesche, paid an of- Washington; and Rear Admiral panded program. 4
ficial visit here on an inspection Robert Donahue, chief of personnel, Early April found city and sta
tour. United States Coast Guard, Wash- tion visited for the first time by
Admiral Waescne, commandant ington. That occasion marked Rear the superintendent of the Coas
of the United States Coast Guard, AdmiralfGorman's first visit to the Guard Academy, the "Annapolis
was accompanied to St. Augustine Ancient City, but Rear Admiral of the Coast Guard." Thatt digni
by Commander- Frank Leamy, Donahue had been here previously tary is Rear Admiral James Pine
U. S. C. G. and Lieut.-Comdr. in connection with the establish- and he was accompanied here from
A. J. Hesford, an aide. Among ment of *te training center. New London, Conn., by Mrs. Pin


^=


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4~11


1


OTHER NAVAL
ACTIVITIES
IN THIS CITY
Besides the airport, two oth-
er Naval activities are located
in St. Augustine the branch
Naval Intelligence office and the
Zone Public Relations Office.
Ensign G.E. Owen, USNR,
'is in charge ofU'the intelligence
unit, which deals with intelli-
genice and investigative mat-
ters in this area.
The Zone Public Relations of-
ficer is Lieut. Milton E. Bacon,
Jr., USNR, who handles the
liaison work between the Navy
and radio stations, newspapers
and other forms of-informative
media in the northern part of
the state.
Both offices are located in
the Exchange Bank Building.


I






































































r












r


1


II


h
f
I,

t
e
p
C-
K-
I-
y
t

e
e.


Representative

Group Of Spars

Assigned Here

Despite Diversity Of For-
Rmer Lives All Quickly
Find Their Niche
ENTHUSIASTIC
Schedule Of Hours Is
Identical With That Of
Male Qee Gees
Young women, experienced in
practically every field of business
end industry, are enlisting in the
WAVES and SPARS to help win
an early Victory by replacing
Navy men aind Coast Guardsmen
at shore stations.
Here at St. Augustine's Coast
Guard Training Station, there al,
ready has been assigned a repre-
"sentative group of SPARS, includ-
ing two officers, Ensign Coeta M.
Terrel of Austin, Texas, formerly
secretary of the Department of
* Drama at; the University of Texas,
and Ensign Dorothea E. 'Wolf of
* Willianmttown, Pa., an ex-teacher
efx high school English.
First two SPARS reporting for
duty here, were Yeoman Blanche
Speer of Brooklyn, N. Y., and Alice
Lucille DeBarba of Lawrence,
SMass., both of whom had recently
completed four months' training
; with the'WAVES, the sister organi-
z: ation, at the Oklahoma Agricul-
tural' and Mechanical College in
S$tillwater, Okla. They answered
an urgent call for volunteers in the
SPARS, receiving their honorable
discharge from the WAVES so they
might become members of the wo-
meni's reserve of the U. S. Coast
SGuCrd. In civilian life, which al-
ready seems like, a dream to the
girls so eagerly iand readily .have
they gotten into the swing and the
spirit of Navy life, Miss DeBarba
Swas employed by a -New England
chain outfit, as manager.of one of
its branches. Miss Slpeer formerly
was a bookkeeper for a concern in
New York.
Shortly afterward, there reported
seven additional SPARS: Dixie N.
Benson of Tremont, Ill.D Mildred F.
Georgen of Gheen, Mink.; -Flor-
enee B. Grymont of Chicago, Ill.;
Viola J. Goodwin of Richmond, Va;;
Dorothy Beatty of Montclair, N. J.;
Katherine Keeletr f'Philadelphia,
Pa.; and Marianr Nugent of Morris-
town, N. J. All are seamen, second
Flass.
Three,' DeBarba, Benson _and
Nugent have been assignedto. the
personnel office; two, Speer and
Gramont, to the pay office; three,
Weatty, Keeler and Goergen, as
- %p the supply office.
Training L
*'ith the exception ot Beatty
anA Keeler, who got their iindoc-
triniational training at Hunters
'College in New York City, all the,
girls trained at Iowa State Teach-
ers College in Cedar Falls.. Their-
period of -training averaged four
-weeks and upon, its completion,
the girls received ratings as sec-
ond class seamen.
Miss Gramont formerly was em-
ployed in the U.: S. Public Health
Service office in Chicago, and Miss
SGodwin did the same type,of work
in'a civilianl office. Miss Goergen
worked' in a defense factory;'Miss;
Benson was a pottery worker; Miss
Nugent. a draftswoman for,a tele-
phone company. -Miss Keeler did
office work in i department s&ore
and Miss Beatty was/ a .telephone
operator And typist.
Despite the diversity of their ac-
tivities, they quickly found: a niche
in the women's reserve ,t the Coast
Guard which they wouldn't give ub
for; anything, so enthusiastic are
theyover their:new life. To all of
the girls to whom Record readers
are introduced in this article, their
St. Augustine assignment was their
Arst,active assignment. They are
quite delighted, over being, in this


, mShps may change with the years, but there always will be ropes
to handle and knots to tie. Here are Coast Guard trainees at the
local Training Station mastering the art of putting the rope to work.


1I


historic city, thrilled with the op-
portunity of finally doing their job
as Americans and being a part of
that, great, trained body now in
the service of Uncle Sam. r
It was Miss DeBarba who put
into, words what these SPARS
feel: "If we had to do it all
over again, we would do just
that!"
Especially designed by the fa-
mous stylist, Mainbocher, are the
trim Navy blue uniforms, worn both
by the WAVES and the SPARS--
only the lapel insignia and hat bapd
are different. True to their femin-
inity.having received a Florida as-
signment and with Spring in the
air, the girls are anxious to get into
their "summer whites." (By the
time this appears in print, that
cherished dream may have become
a reality.),
Contrary to the opinion held by
persons unfamiliar with the regu-
la4tfons governing members of the
women's reserve, in this branch
of the service, the girls can, wear
makeup, in moderation; They also
can wear their hair in any style
they prefer, providing it is off their
collar.
At present, the local SPARS, both
officer-, and non-commissioned, are
"quartered on the, outside," but
they have their meals in the Ponce
de Leon; chow being served-to them
in the former Spanish Room of the
hotel.
Their schedule of hours is iden-
tical with the male Coast Guards-
men and even an 8 a. m. visit, to the
hotel finds them already hard ,at
work at their appointed tasks.
V-
RESCUE, SHRIMPER
Local Shrimp Dealers Joe Se-
quire and C. Tringali are grateful
t6 Captain of the Port personnel
here for rescuing a disabled shrimp
boat in a choppy sea oif the local
coast, and possibly saving the
lives of three crewmen.
On, the Fourth of July; the Navy
full dresses ship and fires twenty-
-one guns at on;t :


^


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/


0


RED BETHEA'Sg
BAR
42 Granada St.. Phone 412


ToV's, there'fi'a-thrill of pride in those s-inple words above. For we have, in fat,
been honored as the retail stores of this area appointed by the U. S. Navy as
official distributors of the new Regulation uniforms for Naval Commissioned and Chief
Petty Officers under the Navy Plan.

Every'Nava Officerwill be'interested-to'know that the prime purpaoe-of the Navy
., ,
Plani is to make uniforms available to him at the lowest prices consistent with the high
quality standards demanded by the Navy Department

To that end-we, as official distributors,: have'willingly agreed to-seill the new,
U. S. Naval Officers'. Regulation.uniforms.on a profit basis substantially below our
A
normal profit basis.

Moreover,;we have pledged ourselves to render the highest type of service' ith par.
ticular reference to alterations. deliveries and the maintenance of complete stocks not,
only of uniforms, but also of furnishings, caps, braid, insignia and'devices.

In additionour sales personnel has been specifically trained to assist Naval Officers
in their purchases and to advise with them on all details involving regulation U. S.
Navy dress ethics and procedure..We are proud and'happy to serve the U. S. Navy!


PRICES ESTABLISHED BY NAVY DEPAlTaI MENT
Commissioned Officers Service Blue $40
Commissioned Officers Overcoat $50 Aviation Winter Work Uniforms $50 -
Commissioned Officers Raincoat-Overcoat (with removable wool lining) $37.50
Chief Petty Officers Service Blue $30 Chief Petty Officers Overcoat $42.50 *
Chief Petty Officers Raincoat-Overcoat (with removable wool lining) $37.50
No Charge for Minor Alterations-
Other Alteration Charges as Approved by Navy Department

OFFICIAL DISTRIBUTORS OF UNIFORMS
FOR COMMISSIONED OFFICERS, WARRANT OFFICERS AND CHIEF PETTY OFFICERS
BY APPOINTMENT OF THE NAVY DEPARTMENT


\


* '


I


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F~HI~


i


A Diamond

To Thrill Her

We are so proud of our assortment
of fine diamonds--she, too, will be
proud to wear one.


J. DEXTER PHINNEY
JEWELER


I


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SUNDAY APRIL U, 14

TRAINEES FORMING
EATING HABITS
Attention is certainly paid to
eating habits of the Coast Guard
trainees. There is a sign in the
Ponce de Leon that might well be
applied in principle to other young
gentlemen. It says "No Candy
Sold for One Hour Before Meal
Time."
---- v --- .,
Courtesy
Since standing at attention and
rendering the hand salute is the
highest respect one pays the colors
or the commander-in-chief of the
Navy afloat or ashore, it should
suffice for the meeting with gentle-
men or ladies in the open.
V -
Officers are not supposed to un-
cover in the open except for divine
worship, funerals, and other relig-
ious ceremonies.


THE ST, AUGUSTINE RECORD


PAGC ,V


COAST GUARDSMEN LEARN THE ROPES


D


ST. AUGUSTINE


MEN'S


SHOP

TELEPHONE 531


148-150 ST. GEORGE ST.


HARRY RICE, Prop.


96 St. George St.


City Building


















































































g~aP4&PP


MORRISON'S


HARDWARE


219 W. King St.

Phone 1312


SHERWIN-W3 'AI 'LjIAM ^rHSsSiS
Al^^* rs '.^^Hk


These are the men responsible tor the physical ana training welfare or trainees at the Coast Guard
Training Stition here. On the bottom row, left to right, are Chief Specialists Albert Zeretzke, Char-.
les "Chuck" Garrity and Edward Schiewe; Lieut. '(jg) John Dalin, one of the assistant recruit training,
and gunnery officers, and. Chief Specialist Glenn Cooper. Seated above, left to right, are Chief Special-'
ists Steve Vrsata and Roy Crews. Facing the group is Lieut.-Comdr. J. J. Hutson, Jr., assistant recruit
training officer and welfare officer of the station.


... -.I


Vow Has 61 Members
aid ot local citizens is secured to
act as "victims of air raids" andto
call the casualty station.and report
the casualty. In turn, the Ambu-
lance Corps sends out a group con-
sisting of four girls and a driver
in an ambulance to pick up the in-
jured persons. At the scene of the
accident, thq injured are given first


", ---I--I


I -


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'TiDAYT, APRIL 25, 1943


Cee- Gee Athletic Directors Put

Trainees Through Their.Paces To

Ready Them To Meet War's Demands

Sports Equipment Has Priority Rating So Station Is
Completely Equipped

This war requires of a Coast Guardsman--or any member of the
armed services-the maximum toughness and .top-notch physical con-
dition that a thorough, well-guided training can give him.
That's why the trainee at the U.
$. Coast Guard Training Station. superintendent of public instruc-
here scrambles through the mazes tipn.
of the obstacle course, goes through The course is comprised of care-
, daily calisthenics, learns boxing fully'.arranged obstacles which call
and the art of judo, and is encour- for every physical exertion from
aged to participate in as many crawling to climbing. It hardens
sports as he has an aptitude for. the body, strengthens the endur-.
Sport equipment has a high pri- dance and sharpens the mental alert-
-- 1*- L- _L ---" .- .. e


RECORD


THE ST. AUGUSTINE


State School For Deaf And Netherland Women
Organize Corps
Blind Is Located In City A hundred girls in the Nether-
---- lands West Indies have formed a
One of South's Finest, Blind girls are serving as typ- Woman's Auxiliary Corps modeled
It Is Headed By iists. It is interesting to know after the U. S. WAACs. They are
Noted Educator that in the hdme economics'depart. uniformed smartly in green. Their
meat many of the blind girls be- duties are to clean and oil ti%#
One of the finest schools for come expert-seamstresses and rifles of the Home Guard, and
deaf and blind children in the cooks. drve and care for military car
South is located here in St. Au- The deaf have many avenues
gustine. It is the Florida State open to them. Many of the men are helping to solve the man ad
School for the Deaf and the Blind, graduates of the Florida school woman power shortage of the am
and takes care of several hundred are working now in the shipyards, tion.
boys and girls who are deaf or and in other plants where war The Florida ,State School will
blind. work is done. Girls have positions have commencement. exercises st
The blind have their own depart- of various kinds, These trained April 30, at the school, to winkh
ment, and their own staff of teach- young folks have been aided to the public is invited. The sehool
ers and the deaf are similarly, overcome physical handicaps, and will close May 7th.
cared for. rIC---- w ---4'"DifC" .-". --
The president of the school is
Dr. C. J. Settles, well-known edu- NEWSPAPERS
cator in this type of school, and
the plant is beautiful, modern, and MAGAZINES
well equipped. Visitors, including
many service men, are amazed to NOVELTIES
see how admirably Florida cares ,R -
for its handicapped boys and girls. BEER
Many of the graduates go on to WIN
higher institutions of learning. ItWINE
is a tribute to the way in which SMOKES
many of the these youngsters are
trained at the Florida school to
know that numbers of them are6
filling important jobs right now in
connection with the war program.
aid, then brought to the casualty AS
station where a physician, is on
hand to administer further treat-
ment if necessary.
There are five qualified first aid
instructors in the Corps who keep
the members up to date on such i
work.
Corps officers are: captain, Edith
Wbardner; first lieutenants Juanitg
Mier, Kathleen Campbell, Mary HEADQUARTERS FOR
Harper; -second lieutenants, Annie
Nadei,'Vivian Wiler, Zillie Davis;
sergear.ts, Mable Fields, Grace
Mickler, Betty Hamilton; first ser-BEER and W INE
geant, Billye Parks.
The Corps is the proud possessor
of a beautiful silk American Flag, ,
presented by the Women's Auxil- IH. J. USINA
jary of the Veterans of Foreigh 27 KING ST.- OPPOSITE PLAZA
Wars. L: =C C "


orlty listing at the station, anu out
of a quarterly fund set up by the
government, it draws the money
necessary for buying new equip-
ment and replacqehents. Today, the
station is completely equipped for
its important physical training pro-
gram.
Although, like all phases of
training, athletics are under the fi-
nal authority of Comdr. A. W. Dav-
is, recruit and gunnery training of-
ficer, and Lieut.-Comdr. J. J. Hut-
sdn, Jr., welfare and assistant re-
cruit training officer, the program
is under the direct guidance of
ChaplainB. F. Janes, who is ath-
letic officer.
Each incoming trainee, fills out a
questionnaire, which enables the
,athletic directors to determine his
Sftihess for certain types of sports,
over and above the routine super-
vised training.
Thus the station has the nucleus
for. its teams in various types of
sports-soft ball, volley ball, table
tennis, baseball, boxing, 'wrestling,
swimming, badminton and other
types.
Four Phases
The general program is split up
into four phases-the "get tough"
program consisting of instruction in
judo, boxing,,defense and offense
and the, use of the bolo knife; holds
and blows, calisthenic and recrea-
tional athletics,, and boat racing.
The piece de resistance of the
regular daily physical drill is the
station's obstacle course, located at
Valencia Street and Markland
Place on an area of ground loaned
Sor. se by D. D. Corbett, county


ness.
Pleasure Sailing
One of the most popular sports
among the trainees is pleasure sail-
ing on Matanzas Bay,on Saturdays
and'Sundays. The boats used for
pulling races can be fitted with
sails and trainees are not only per-
mitted, but encouraged to try their
hand at sailing.
The entire sports program is
handled by a highly competent
group of chief petty officers, or
chief specialists.
The group includes Edward
Schiewe, in charge; of boxing, ten-
nis and general sports; Roy Crews,
obstacle course; Albert Zeretzke,
obstacle course; Steve Vrsata, box-
ing; Charles "Chuck" Garrity,
wrestling and judo; William Lind-
sey, boxing; Glenn Cooper, base-
ball and basketball, and Manuel De
Ocampo, judo, bolo and boxing.
The athletic program in the
St. Augustine area embraces the
Officers' Indoctrination School as
well as the Training Station. This
phase is under the direction of
Lieut. (j. g.) F. W. Lowry.
V.
Army Nurses-

American Army nurses will have
new uniforms inspired by their
experiences on Bataan, Work uni
forms for the front will be khaki
trousers, shirts, helmets, boots and
mosquito-repelling gaiters. Hos-
pital uniforms will be brown and
white striped seersucker. And
street clothes will resemble
WAACs uniforms.


Months Ago, P


Organized 15 months ago and
at present one of the most active
branches of the County Defense
Council, the Women's Ambulance
Corps now has a membership of 61.
The corps operates under the Di-
vision of Health and Housing and
its members are equipped with
courses in standard and advanced
first aid, taught by Guy Gatchell;
motor mechanics, taught. by M, ,F.
Doyle; map reading, taught by
Colonel H. L. Butler; military
drill, supervised by Pvt. Joe Ervin;
a course in'war gases and treat-
ment by J. A. Crookshank; a gen-
eral course in hdmt, defense work
taught by M. H. Westberry and
Dr. C. J. Settles; convoy driving,
by Major Max S. Edelstein; the
use of gas masks and inhalator by
Sam Masters.
With these courses, the Corps
members are equipped with suffi-
cient knowledge to determine the
extent of an injury and to admin-
ister first aid-the immediate tem-
porary treatment given in cases of;
accident or serious illness until the
arrival of a doctor. *
On the second Tuesday of each
month, the Corps has practice air-
raid drills. During these drills, the









TIMEand,'
AVI U. d N
S law EB OTHERwrr


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PERMANENT That "RATE"-I


SOLANO'S BEAUTY SHOP


208 SAN MARCO. AVE. PHONE 260

EI ;I~illillllsllblD TIIIIialilllll lllllllD lIIllmIIIIlllIlllililg


8


.:.. -


a


I


*


Lend your dollars and dimes to your gov-
ernment there's no safer' investment
in the world and no surer way to buy and
secure. freedom for all, forever. Come if
and buy a bond now tomorrow!


Do you want Nazi boots resounding on
your home street ... or little yellow men
ruling you like tyrants? Of course you
don't. Then do something about it NOW.
... before it is too late. -o


f


PAS


STAFF OF EXPERTS GUIDES COAST GUARD RECRUITS


Women's Ambulance Corps, Part
Of Defense Councit; Formed 15
N


Doughboys Favor
Blondes In Adopting
British Orphans

LONDON The ,ideal daughter'
of the American soldier's dreams
is a cute little curly-headed blonde,
very much like the Shirley Temple
of some years ago.
In an office here are shoals pf
letters .testifying to the fact.
They are from units of the A.
E. F. whose men are eager to
"adopt" British war orphans under
the $200,000 :-goodwill project
launched by the "Stars and
Stripes."
/ The American Red Cross-which
is administering the plan-is, re-
ceiving more and more letters
every week telling of the type of
child the units wish to adopt and
in nine letters out of ten the choice
is a curly-headed blonde three to
five.
The doughboys themselves are
providing funds for the youngsters'
welfare. Red Cross workers trav-
eled thousands of miles in England,
Scotland, Wales and Northern Ire-
land to make sure that the douglh-
bpys' help will go to the most
deserving war victims., This initial
work was done by Miss Ophelia
Tiley of Essex, Conn., who now has
been assigned to North Africa.
Working closely with British wel-
fare organizations, the Red Cross
studies the claims of every child
eligible for the helping hand. Even
the fullest "case-history" is not
enough. The child itself is visited
in its home by Miss Tiley'whose
mission has made her the most
popular woman in Britain.
The Red Cross is careful to ex-
plain that the project is not i n-
tended to take children from their
families nor to support them
wholly. Its object is to pro-
vid 'the children not with luxuries
but with needed things which might
otherwise be out of reach by reason
of depleted income in the home.
V
Honore O'Brien, home service
consultant of the Public Service
Company of NbrthernIllinois, has
worked out a plan to supplement
rationed canned goods by dehy-
drating vegetables from Victory
Gardens in the oven of the kitchen
range.


Our Best Wishes To

The


U, S, COAST GUARD


COAST GUARD


ARMY


VICTORY BONDS BUY FREEDOM FOR ALL


And Other Branches of the U. S. Armed Services


WELCOME TO ST. AUGUSTINE

And If We Can Be of Any Assistance in Making Your.Stay Here
A More Pleasant One, Please Call on Us




SERVICE


Laundry and Dry Cleaners, Inc.


STERCHI'S


119 ST. GEORGE


PHONE 41


14 Spanish St.


Phone 1395












































































Blind Learn First Aid

PHOENIX, Ariz.-A Red G:ross
First Aid Course for the blind, be-


.AVILES BOOK SHOPD

Y aiHftt Ocm d rr


iVomllle vwneuI
And 'Operated


VIEW


BAY


HOT EL


YOURS FOR A QUICK VICTORY

AND A LASTING PEACE


St. Augustine Gas Co.
30 CATHEDRAL PL. PHONE 182


ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA.


11 KING ST.


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'uNORGu .


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Books For Sale and Rent
Gifts, Stationery
and Maps.
ORDERS FILLED PROMPTLY

MAGAZINES FOR RENT

"Come In You Don't Have
to Buy Anything"


Best Wishes to R.V.A. and Auxiliary


Bar ~98 rpr -~II~--- Fe c~-


mI


Officers Club On Bayfront

Proves Popular Rendezvous

And Successful Undertaking
* 4."--. .
Home-LikeAtmosphere Lt.-Col. Robert Gentry White, U. S
Army; secretary-treasurer, Lieut.-
Is Created; Improve- Cormdit J. J. Hutson, Jr., U. S. C.
ments Are Noted G. Comprising the Board of Coon-
trol are: Major Max S. Edelstein,.
So "successful has been the Infantry, chairman; .Commander
Officers Club of St. Augustine W. W. Kenner, U. S. C. G.; Mitjor
that dues have been decreased H. C. Wall, U. S. Army; Lieut. Mil-
by one-third, yet its members ton E. Bacon, Jr., U. S. N. R.; and
and their guests are benefiting Pay Clerk T. Dowell, U.-S. C. G.
by a great deal more than was Mrs. Josephine Patience is the
at their disposal in its formative official hostess. and under her su-
stages. pervision the Club has acquired a
It was on Saturday evening, No- distinct "homey" atmosphere which
vember 12th, of last year,,that the is the object of delighted comment.
Officers Club had a brilliant form al .from member and guest. Improve-
opening and house-Wal'ming. Pre- ments and additions to the interior
vious to that gala affair, which set appearance still are in progress.
a precedent for the club's social Since its opening,. attractive dra-
functions, the club house aiad been peries, rugs, screens, lamps and
open informally for two weeks, articles of furniture. have been
Since last November 12th, the placed advantageously. throughout
club has seen many changes in fuIr- the rooms. There is a particularly
nishings -and arrangements, -the fine choice of reading material and
addition of recreational and enter- a cozy spot to enjoy it. The regis-
tainment facilities, and certain .tration desk and its convenient club
needed improvements and renova- directory, is .near the front en-
tions. The club is a non-profit or- trance.
ganization and monthly dues and Lou Harmon is manager of the
the customary registration fees are club.
turned back into the club in the Purposes Outlined
way, of improvements, or used for Purpose of the Officers Club, as
some worthy cause. Recently, the set' forth in the preamble, to its
club treasurer was instructed to by-laws, is to: bring together so-
pay the sum of $100 to the. Red cially the officers of the Armed
Cross, as a gift from the club. Forces stationed at St. Augustinel
St. Augustine's Officers Club is
located on Bay Street, overlooking
Matanzas Bay, and occupies the
Elks Home,,' St. Augustine Lodge N L A
No. 829, B. P. O. Elks having | SAM W
leased all but a small' portion of UNCLE SA
their, attractive Vbuilding for that
purpose.
S.Taking up the\first floor of the I
three-story structure, are comfort-
ably-furnished lounging and read-'
ing rooms, a pool room, and the
"powderette", the ladies' cloak and. .
powder .room. It is in the down-
stairs lounge, or reception rooms,
where the women assemble on:
alternate Friday afternoons for
bridge parties.
On the second floor are the
drinkersy". (the bar) and the
"neighborly rendezvous" (cocktail
lounge) with a poker room in the
rear, as well as the private office
of the club's secretary-treasurer.
-Both' upstairs and down, there is COMPLETE'
ample space for dancing, one of OUTFITTERS
the club's most popular features FOR CIVILIAN.
being the Saturday night:informal 'AND
dancing parties for which the SERVICEMEN
Coast Guard Orchestra provides
the music. There are radios "d
victrolas conveniently placed, so
club members and. their guests may
enjoy music or dancing, whenever
the mood strikes.
Standing officers who have serv-
ed the past six months since the .
opening of the Officers Club, are: 152 ST. GI
president, Captain W. K. Scammell,
IU. S. Coast Guard; vice president,


v


SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1948


=


AU G USTINE


Public Health Service Men.

Staff Station's "Sick Bay"

Few Patients Are Reported by Commander Chas.
J. McDevitt, Veteran Physician in.Charge
'**''
The trainees of the St. Augus- force consists of three chief phar-
tine Coast Guard Station receive macist's mates, six first class, six
their medical care at the expert second class, and nine third class
hands of one of the most inter- pharmacist's mates and 18 un-
esting, yet little known corps of rated men.
physicians in the world-those of In Southeast Wing
the United States Public Health The sick bay occupies the south-
Service. east wing of the Ponce De Leon
These roving doctors are the Hotel and has facilities for hand-
"shock troops" of this nation's ling the hospitalization of 150 men
medical. service-physicians who at a time, although the average
may be assigned by government to number of patients seldom exceeds
a variety of tasks from cleaning up 50.
malaria infested military bases to There are 65 beds in rooms
medical duty with branches of the broken up into wards, an operating
armed services. pavilion with three operating
The world is their field of prac- rooms, four dental uhits and two
tise. They may be in St. Augus- units for minor surgery.
tine today and in China tomorrow. The station's equipment also in-
The seven physicians and four eludes a photo fluorographic unit
dentists who comprise the staff of for cursory, routine X-ray exami-
the naval-termed "'sick bay" at the nation of in-coming trainees, and
training station are doing a job a more elaborate X-ray unit for
typical of the Public Health Serv- diagnostic work.
ice, particularly in wartime. The sick bay is the medical cen-
The Coast Guard has available ter for all Coast Guard activities
no corpe of its own physicians for in the St. Augustine area-the
staffing the station so the PHS Training Station, the Officers' In-
physicians have, donned the Navy doctrination School, the Captain of j
uniform and are- doing t h e the Port 'division with its bases
work for them. One of the staff here, at Marineland, Flagler Beach
was so recently transferred here and Ponte Vedra.
from duty with" the army, he still Altogether, many hundreds of
wears his khaki army uniform. Coast Guardsmen and officers rely
Veteran Head on Comdr. M6Devitt's staff for
Head of the staff here is Comdr. medical service..
Charles J. McDevitt, a veteran of The Indoctrination School and,
the Public Health Service since the various Captain of the Port
1915, who has seen service for the bases have resident pharmacist's
government from California to mates on duty at all times for the
Alaska to the Philippines. He also treatment of minor ailments.
did a" stint with the Coast Guard Should the ailing man require more
during the last war. extensive treatment or hospitiliza-
He resigned iA 1924 to take up tion, he is referred on to the train-
private practise which he eontin- ig station sick bay.


British Women
British women of the Augxiiwry
Territorial. Service are now serv-
ing the British Army in the Mid-
dle East as military policemen,
clerks, draughtsmen, telephone
operators, orderlies and chirop-
odists. In addition to food,, cloth-
ing and shelter they are Iaid 40
cents a day,
to afford them a ,suitable location
and proper surroundings for pro-
motion of social activities and en-
tertainment for their leisure hours;
and to engender better understand-
ing. and promote good fellowship
between the different' branches.
Membership of the club is open
to all commissioned and warrant
officers of the Armed Forces of the
'United States. Guest membershipS
may be extended to visiting officers
of the regular services and to 0offi-
cers of the armed forces of-friend.
1 powers. Such memberships may
also be extended- to public officials
,upon approval of the Board ,of
Control. Guest memberships, how-
ever, will not be extended for a
period in excess of one month. "
Officers in temporary.duty in, St.
'Augustine pay the full membership
fee, unless on duty of less than two
weeks' duration, and officers main-
taining a residence in St. Augus-
tiine even though stationed else-
where', also pay the full nmember-
ship fee to obtain privileges of t&#
club for themselves or their fami-
lies. Membership of officers in the
club-shall be. considered to'incluhd
"their wives, but discretion: shall be
used by members in bringing chil-
; dren to the club. '"


uea until ne reenere t me service
in 1942.
The members of his staff here
are Lieut.. H. Millen, Lieut.
*.g.) J- A. Finger, Lieut. (j.g.)
W. P. Baker, Lieut. (j.g.) Daniel
Leavitt, Lieut. (j.g.) R. K. Parrish
and Lieut. (j.g.) William G. White,
all physicians.
The dentists are Lieut. H. G.
Trautman, Lieut. (j.g.) E. W.
Denny, Lieut. (j.g.) H. Bobrow and
Lieut. ,(j.g.) J. P. Barker.
" The remainder of the sick baay


Newly arrived trainees at the Coast Guard Training Station here, line up for the first of a series of
inoculations they will receive while in service to protect them from diseases. Their arms may pain them
for a few days, but the inoculation is a long-range insurance against future serious illness.


As Naval liaisn officer at State
Selective Service Headquarters
here at the StateArsenal, Ensign
Bruce L. Barfield not only is ful-
ftlling his duty by maintaining cor-
dia1-relations between the Navy
and Selectivee Service, he, also j
works with the mainpower division
and as such is a "part-time men'-
ber" as it were, of the Selective
Service staff.
Young Barfield, a Miami attor-
ney in civilian life, went on active
duty with the Navy in May, 1942.
He finds his present assignment,
which began in January of this
year, less:hectic than his previous
duty, at a Washington desk., But,
he has plenty to keep him busy,
nonetheless.
His stenographic assistance is
provided by Selective Service, being
Civil Service personnel.
Ensign Barfield works out of
the Bureau of Naval Personnel in
Washington and directly under the
Director of Naval Liaison Selective
Service. Since the creation of the
Selective Service System, the, Navy
has served in a liaison capacity
with, the SSS, Naval liaison; of-
ficers being on duty in every state
headquarters in -the country;
others in Washington in'the na-
tional headquarters, in the Navy
Department and in the Secretary's
office.
In Florida, the Navy has its own
separate recruiting division and
since there are many Naval instal-
lations in this state, a liaison of-
ficer's duties are concerned more
with questioUs ;which .might arise,
rather, than with the procurement
of men.
Represents Marines
Filling a similar post for the U.
S. Marine Corps iq Captain R. D.
Baldwin, who also maintains his
headquarters at the State Arsenal,
He arrived simultaneously with
Ensign Barfield, for duty at the
State Selective Service headquar-


.


General Health Good
Comdr. McDevitt reports that
the general health of the incoming
trainees is usually quite good.
Most of the complaints under treat-
ment at this time, he says, are com-
mon colds or upper respiratory in-
fections.
Fortunately, except for several
gunshot wound cases and appen-
dectomies, no great amount of ma-
jor surgery has been necessary.
There has been only one death


In the- Service and- .i,
civilian life appearance
counts. And more now:
'than ever. It's' your
duty: tbotake good care
.of what you have and
to be, careful in selec-
tion :of new clothing.
You "get o'liy -quality
merchandise at- Ben-


COMDR. CHARLES J. McDEVITT


among the trainees-a pneumonia
case.
Biggest Task
The biggest task yet undertaken
by the staff was to bring a recent
measles epidemic in the station
under control. So prompt and
thorough ivas its handling of the
situation, that a quarantine of only
a little over a week and a half was
necessary.
These guardians of the "health of
the boy in service have their mute
testimonial in the marching col-
umns of husky, superbly healthy
,Coast Guardsmen seen on St. Aug-


L


Released by, U... .Wai: Department
-Bureau of Public Relations
AIR MEDAL-This decoration
may be awarded to any person
who, while serving in any capacity
with the Army or Navy of the
United States subsequent to Sep-
tember 8, 1939, distinguishes him-,
self by meritorious achievement in
an, aerial flight. Pendant from a,
ribbon striped .with blue and gold'
is a 'fleur-dd-lis which surmounts
compass rose. In relief on the rose
is a swooping American Eagle with
lightning bota lutch'ed in his
talons.


jamtin's.


1i ustine's streets and performing
their rigorous patrol duties at sea
i and" on foreign shores.

'OUTFIT THE OUTFIT!










A five dollar noontime shop.-
'ping spree for gloves, hankies,l
stockings, and a new lapel gadget'
could buy your Soldier eight!
ipairg of cotton socks, and a pair
;of G. I. shoes.
You can do without; he can't.:
Get that Second War Loan Bond'
K this noon. U. S. Treasury D*srftef


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lived to be'the only one in the coun-
try, is now being given at Trinity
Episcopal Cathedral, Phoenix. The
class of a dozen men and women
meets twice a week.. Its member-
ship includes Mexicans, Negroes
and whites.


St. Augustine cordially welcomes you
and all of your service friends and
while you are in the city if we can be of
any aid to you please call on us.



THE ICEBERG
74 BRIDGE ST. PHONE 197


ters and was assigned to the co-
ordination section of Selective
Service. -
In being assigned to St. Augus-
tine Captain Baldwin found him-
self close to the city he has called
home for approximately 20 years
--Jacksonville. For 12 years, he
was manager of the Jacksonville
office of Merrill, Lynch, Pierce,
Fenner and Beane, New York
stockbrokers. He's an old-time
member of the Marines, though he
doesn't look it. He first entered
this famous fighting branch of the
service back in 1917 and served
with the Sixth Regiment, Second
Division, in France. It was last
July, however, when Captain
Baldwin again assumed an "active
duty" status with the Marine


Corps. For ten weeks, he was sta-
tioned at Quantico, Va., then he
served three months at the Naval
Air Station in Jacksonville with
the Marine Aviation Detachment
and a month there in the, Naval
Air Free Gunnery School before
being given his present assign-
ment.
Both Captain Baldwin and En;
sign Barfield reported& for duty in
January. There are no Marine in-
stallations here, but 'in Captain
Baldwin that branch of the service
has an excellent representation,
and aman capable not only of
maintaining liaison relations with
Selective Service, but also being
somewhat of a liaison -regarding
procurement of men.


WELCOME



TO SERVICE MENI WOMEN AND:YOUR

FAMILIES AND, FRIENDS



/ When in St. Augustine, whetlier for a day,
week or indefinite stay,you will enjoy stop-"
ping at the Bay View Hotel. The Bay View
is centrally located and convenient .to, allof
the showplaces, waterfront, business sec-
tion, etc. Our rates are reasonable.


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AVILES BOOK SHO
. 1/Y2 Aviles St. Phone 782


RECORD


THE ST


PAGEV 10


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INOCULATIONS SAFEGUARD HEALTH OF TRAINEES


Liaison Officers For Navy

And Marines Stationed Here


Senior Medical
Officer Here


Activities Coordinated
With Work of, State'
Selective Service


ANTS,

JS TO BE NEAT!


"'HI" SAI LOR



Ott"WELCOME

1 -TO

IOUR
CITY


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ARTHUR'S

23 King St.


BAR


nuuoEr


WALTER B. FRASER


Phone 35


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BUY WAR BONDS


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Chief Commissary Steward Dolan Tries To Cater To
Diversified Tastes Of His
Uniformed "Clientele"
Those brawny Coast Guardsmen may chuckle over Popeye, but
they don't care two-bits about his famous spinach!
That goes for broccoli, too.
But set a plate of fried chicken or baked Virginia ham before
them, and it's gone before you know it.
Chief Commissary Steward John J. Dolan of St. Augustine's
Coast Guard Training Station may somehow manages to have a
hail from Boston, but he doesn't somehow manages to have a... proper
exlet "hi boys" to like his fa- calories substitute on their plates.
expect "hi boys" to like his fa- Unbeatable Combination
vorite dishes, nor a native Geor" Amazingly little food is wasted.
gian to prefer a New England For one thing, the men are hungry
boiled dinner to grits and white and the food is good-an unbeat-
bacon. I able combination. Company com-
Keeping everybody pleased all of manders instruct the men before
the time is an out-and-out impos- they enter the mess hall not to take
sibility, but Chief Dolan knows his food they don't like and wouldn't
job, his staff and his clientelee" eat at home or anywhere else.
and complaints are surprisingly There is practically no spoilage of
few. stores, and careful attention is
"We try to cater to the men's given to the utilization of left-
taste," he says. "For those who overs.
tome from the South we try to At the Ponce de Leon, officers
have real Southern dishes, and vice dine in a room to themselves (the
versa for those born north of the former *cocktail lounge) at tables
Mason and Dixon Line." laid with white cloths. Just across
Only well-balanced and nutri- the hall (in the old Spanish Room)
tious meals are served at the Ponce the SPARS have their private mess
de Leon--recruit and gunnery hall. The former Venido Room is
school center-and they are pre- reserved for the chief petty officers
pared in the latest, approved scien- and the recruits mess in shifts in
tific method with the least possible the main dining room. Their tables
loss of valuable vitamins. There have composition tops and no
is sufficient variety so the men can white linens.
select their foods according to in- "Feeding" starts at 6:40 a. m.,
dividual tastes, all meals being and by 8:15 breakfast is finished.
served cafeteria style. Dinner gets underway at 11:30 and
"We give them a plate of food," is over at 1 p. m., and supper activ-
says Chief Dolan, "and if they ity is from 4:45 to 5:30 p. m. ,
want seconds, it's all right." Stainles s steel equipment,
In spite of his multitudinous brought here from New Orleans
duties, he tries to keep an eye on where this Station used to be lo-
the diners to prevent them from -cated, supplements the hotel fur-
eating all starches, all meat, too nishings in the "galley." Chief
many desserts and no vegetables. Dolan is rightfully proud of his
Even then, there. are some who spotless' galley and smooth-func-
conscientiously pass up the green tioning staff which enables him to
vegetables-7they've never eaten keep hundreds of men well-fed
them, so why should they start and within the Navy ration allow-
now ? For these, or others with ance of 79 cents per man per day.
gastronomice idiosyncrasies, he (This allowance may fluctuate a


Here's picture proof of the abundance of deliciously cooked food prepared by these local Coast
Guard Training Station ship's cooks each day for the mess hall where the trainees are served cafeteria
style.


little from time to time; the
cent one has been in effect now
three months.)
Under Chief Dolan are, th
other chiefs: Nicholas Borgia
Everett, Mass., Aubrey Draper
Atlanta, Ga., and Frank DiPie
of Johnson City, Ill., plus seN
first class, eight second class a
eleven third class ship's cooks.
On 24-Hour Basis .


Cooks operate on a 24-hour basis.
They go on duty at 9:30 a. m., and
are not relieved until that same
hour the next day. When one
learns his assigned task thorough-
ly, he swaps with another, until
all can do whatever is required at
any time. They are guided in
preparation of their hearty and
toothsome meals by the U. S. Navy
and U. S. Army cook books-and
now and then by someone's favor-
ite recipe. They do all their own
baking (with the exception of
bread and rolls) and what baking
it is! The other day, they'were
preparing strawberry shortcake for
supper, so for the noon-day meal
the men had to be content with
"just ice cream" (page those who
have had desert disappointments
of late). By the way, ice cream
and pound cake is a frequent and
popular item.
If a housewife had a yen for
some cinnamon buns, she'd plan
carefully to keep within her sugar
and shortening rations and fresh
eggs budget. But when Chief
Dolan writes cinnamon buns on
the day's menu, his cooks must
have enough supplies, for this one
order alone, to overflow a house-
holder's pantry and her kitchen,
too.
Supplies come from the Jackson-
ville Naval Air Station; carload
lots of ,vegetables via Norfolk, Va.;
local !consignees get orders for
fresh: vegetables, fruits and fish.
Potatoes are bought in ton lots.
Instead of leaving a quart or two
of milk on the doorstep, the milk-
man deposits a truck load.
Under Rationing, Too
Better not ask Chief DiPietro--
who does the buying of meat-
what he's up against, for the
station is rationed, too. Just you
try figuring. out if what, meat he
got for giving up thousands upon
thousands of points, was worth
such mathematics! Butter is serv-
ed three times daily now, but for a
time there when supplies failed
to come through on schedule, it,
was eliminated at all but the
evening meal-and like you and


Commissary Officer William E. Spencer is shown seated at his
desk in the Hotel Ponce de ,Leon in conference with his competent
staff of assistants. Shown left to right, standing, are Chiefs Nicholas
Borgia and Aubrey Draper, who are responsible for the galley; Chief
Frank DiPietro, who is in charge of the issue room; and Chief Com-
missary Steward John J. Dolan.


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We all like to hear from our boy, in thei,
service, but many times we are lax in
writing him. May we suggest that we
all give an A-1 Priority on our letters to
the Serviceman-write him first and
write him often.


I, the men didn't like butter-less
toast, either.
If green peas areon the menu,
instructions go out for opening
up cases of No. 10 (gallon) cans;
if bacon, there soon are many
pounds less in the refrigerator.
They grind their own coffee and
this is served piping hot from
three forty-gallon urns, also
brought here from New Orleans.
(The fourth urn is in use at the
Officers Indoctrination School.)
It takes hundreds of pounds of
jam and evaporated milk each day
to keep the men satisfied, too. On
Friday, a good boatload of fish is
required.
Services in general cannot get
everything they demand, so like
any good civilian housewife, they
make the best of what they can
obtain in the way of supplies.
An important part of the galley
set-up is the "issue room." From
this room is issued all the food to
the general mess and out of this
building the Officers Indoctrination
School is supplied with all. its
needs. Everything issued is re-
corded in detail, with the records
being turned over at the end of
each day to the commissary officer.
Typical Menu
The chief commissary steward
makes up the menus. Umm-mm-m,
here's a typical one:
Breakfast: fresh milk, dry cereal,
French toast, pork sausage, butter,
syrup, fresh fruit, coffee. Dinner:
rice and tomato soup, breaded pork
chops, apple sauce, gravy, baked
potatoes, buttered string beans,
beet salad, pound cake and Ice
cream, bread, butter, coffee. Sup-
per: lamb stew, boiled rice, mixed
vegetables, lettuce and tomato
salad, cookies, cocoa, bread, butter.


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WHEN YOU'RE HUNGRY


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THE ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD


SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1948


PAGE 1t


t


Wm. E.Spencer

Is Commissary

Officer Here

Nourishing food is considered all-
important to a fighting man, or one
being readied for active participa-
tion in the Second World War.
Not only is it necessary to his
physical well-being, but it is vital
to his morale.
In his capacity as Commissary
Officer, William E. Spencer of Chi-
cago, Ill., is responsible for
achieving that state of affairs for
the men from all parts of this. coun-
try who have been assigned to St.
Augustine's Coast Guard Training
Station to be moulded into living
examples of the famed motto of
the service-Semper Paratus--Al-
waysw Ready.
Mr. Spencer, who has the rating
of Pay Clerk, has had around 12
years of service in this branch, his
duty being aboard ship and at shore
stations all along the coast.
Directly under him is Chief Com-
missary Steward John J. Dolan,
who on April 30th of this year will
boast a service record of 18 years in
the U. S. Coast Guard, all duty be-
ing in this particular department.
Twelve of those years have been
on sea duty, the remaining six
ashore.:. He's served on the Great
Lakes, and from Maine to New.Or-
leans, to the Oldest City, St. Au-
gustine. Only the west coast has
escaped him thus far.
.Of the three chiefs serving under
him at the local Station, only Chief
Nicholas Boigia, of Everett, Masss,
has a wide service background.
Chiefs Aubrey Draper of Atlanta,
Ga., and Frank DiPietro ofJohrison
City, 111., have just completed three
years of service and they are un-
dergoing training now .for chief
commissary stewards' posts later
on. Chiefs Borgia and Draper are
responsible for the galley here, and
Chief DiPietro, the issue room.

AIRIBRAFT WARNING,
SERVICES FULFILLING
VITAL WAR ROLE
Exceedingly important work for
the army, for civilians, and for the.
nation at large is being done by the
Aircraft Warning Service, of which
Cecil Zinkan is director for this
area.
Hundreds of men and women of
St. Johns County are joining with
the other hundreds of thousands of
patriotic folks over the nation, who
scan the skies 24 hours daily and
report planes.
In scattered communities, where
men and women have to make real
sacrifices in order to maintain, their
watches of all hours of the day and
night, planes are spotted and re-
ported.
Not only are these watchers a
safeguard against any possible ap-
proach of hostile planes, but they
are a safeguard to our own fliers
on practice and routine flights. A
plane may be reported in trouble,
and help will be sent. Should valu-
able equipment fall from a plane, it
can be reported and recovered,
This is a work that is going for-
ward quietly, and in an efficient
and businesslike manner. We pay
tribute to the men and women who
maintain this service.
quet for some time next month.
Then the young folks will enter-
tain as their guests the men and
women who have acted as their
employers this year, and helped
them do useful work that will aid
them as they decide upon a career.


FOOD FIT FOR KING IS SERVED TRAINEES,


Coast Guardsmen Can


CATHOLIC SCHOOLS
HOUSED IN FINE.
BUILDINGS HERE
St. Joseph m Acdemy, where a
number of the children of officers
and service men are enrolled as pu-
pils, is a well known Catholic
school belonging, to the Sisters of
St.0Joseph, educational order.
This convent school, which takes
boarding and day pupils, is beauti-
fully located in the heart of the
city, and is surrounded by pic-
turesque gardens.
Opposite, on the west side of St.
George Street, is the athletic
ground, including fine tennis courts.
Also on the west side of the cam-
pus is the beautiful Spanish type
building, Villa Flora, which is used
for the home economics classes.
In addition to St. Joseph Acad-
emy, there are parochial schools in
different parts of the city which
serve grade. children.


USED
FURNITURE

AND OTHER
ODDS AND ENDS


BUY,
AND:
SELL,

W.F.MANFORD
56 Sari Marco Ave.


Chuckle Over Popeye

But Not His Spinach


HEADS OF COMMISSARY DEPARTMENT


-HIS" LETTERS THRILL HYOU

... BUT DO YOU WRITE HIM!


Schools, Though
Touched By War,
Doing Fine Work
Local schools, like other busi-
nesses and professions, have been
affected more or less by war, but
for the most part school authori-
ties, headed by D. D. Corbett,
superintendent of public instruc-
tion, have carried through this dif-
ficult year in splendid fashion.
Schools of St. Augustine are ac-
credited, and the curricula conform
to state standards.
Teaching staffs include fully
trained and accredited teachers,
who hold degrees from well known
colleges and universities, and are
well equipped to do the work they
have undertaken.
In line with modern trends to
assist young folks in finding their
niche as early as possible, and se-
curing some preliminary training
that will help them, is the Diversi-
fied Cooperative Trainifig, which
is part of the High School work.
Many young folks are doing DCT
work in the community, under the
direction of B. J. Nelms, coordi-
nator. They devote a certain num-
ber of hours of work along prac-
tical lines in the business or pro-
fession in which they are particu-
larly interested, their employers
paying them a stated sum" per
hour. They also put in a certain
number of hours of classroom
work.
The Ponce de Leon Club of the
Diversified Training department of
Ketterlinus High is planning its
annual Employer-Employe ban-


YOURS

--I A


BIG JOB


... BUT ONE WE KNOW'
YOU WILL DO WELL


STANDARD PRINTING
AND OFFICE SUPPLY CO.
Caleb Zim, Prop.


B ROU' DY


B R'OS


Quality Plus Service
PHONES 622 AND 1488

Wholesale Distributors of
Fruits and Vegetables


63 Hypolita St.


Phone 440


DON'T


HE- PLACE: :.

[ERE FRIENDS

MEET.:I


dP Welcome To


THE


TREAT

THEIR FRIENDS


DIANE

COFFEE SHOP
"JUS' LIKE HOME"'
Mildred Chambers, Mgr.-Owner
63 ST. GEORGE ST.

Special Fried Shrimp Plate


Service Men and Women
AND DEPENDENTS OF MEMBERS
OF THE ARMED FORCES


OLDEST SCHOOL FOUNTAIN


TASTY DRINKS IN A PLEASANT ATMOSPHERE


BUY MORE WAR BONDS





SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1943


FLORIDA'S FAMOUS CREATOR WOULD FIND

LITTLE THAT WAS FAMILIAR IN PRESENT

SURROUNDINGS AT HOTEL PONCE DE LEON


0t


IP WE CAN B] OF
ASSISTANCE,. CALL ON -US

TRUCKING
SERVICE



MOVING


FURNITURE
STORAGE


PACKING


SHIPPING TO
ALL POINTS
INu S.



S24 IHR. SERVICE.
Phone 22 or 9146




BUTTERFIELD
AGENT
137 KING ST.
- : .. .


WERE PROUD!


Hotel Ponce de Leon, the massive structure which is the materialization of one of the late Henry Morrison Flagler's finest dreams, has
been the heart of St. Auguistine's social life for more than 50 years. Famous personages from all parts of the globe have been its guests.
A complete list would read like a composite of the social register and Who's Who down through the years. Today, thigh grandiose struc-
ture now houses hundreds of fledgling Coast Guardsmen. After weeks of intensive training here, they will be assigned to active duty on
the fighting fronts of the world.


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WAR BONDS

Will Bring a

Successful Homecoming




WEST SIDE BAR
170 W. KING ST. PHONE 738


THE ST. AUGUSTINE


So They Would
"So you think people are getting
too fat?"
"Yes," replied the movie theater
owner. "If they were thinner we
could put in quite a lot more seats."


BY ADELAIDE SANCHEZ
Shades of Henry Morrison Flagler!
If that famous creator of Florida's famous East Coast
could look down from his life-size portrait which so long hung
in the rotunda of the Hotel Ponce de Leon, he would see little
in the present Coast Guard)
Training Station to remind The wide steps are the same, the
him of his former palatial sur- unusual doorways still difficult to
roundings. I maneuver. But inside!
Unchanged is the original shell,, Barren Space
or structure. But there any sem- So far as the startled eye can
balance to the hotel, as citizens and see, the rotunda and corridors are
tourists knew it, ends. barren, absolutely devoid of fur-
Let's start with the imposing nishings-and women, except for
main entrance on King .Street. No SPARs on duty there-but plenti-
longer is the famous portcullis fully supplied with men and offi-
lifted, signalling another brilliant cers in workaday uniform. Drapes
social season. Instead, a stern have vanished, walls are bare of
armed sentry in the uniform of pictures, the fish-tailed palms so
the United States Coast Guard, much a part of the hotel scene are
bars the way-at least, until iden- missing, no longer are footsteps
tification cards, or passes, are care- silenced in thick carpets. Windows
fully scrutinized. All satisfactory, are naked, without shades. There's
he steps aside to admit you-and not a superfluous or decorative
you squeeze through one narrow ornament in sight.
section rather than strolling The clerk's desk to the right is
through the spacious archway. still a busy site, but it has become
If you've been there in the old the 0. D.'s bailiwick now.
days--even so far back as 1941- Administrative offices occupy the
you'll bring up short, as we did, two Grand Parlors to the west,
at the sparkling frog fountain in and the magnificent ballroom with
the courtyard. For smack in the its crystal chandeliers intact, has
middle is i warning placard: Do become a necessary, if spacious,
Not Throw Things into the Pond. corridor between them. It leads


also to the actual hallway on the
south. To your left, down that
hall, is the office of the Station's
commanding officer. Across the
hall, on the west, the executive offi-
cer has his quarters.
The medical unit, supply and
dispensary departments, occupy the
entire east wing on the first floor.
In fireplace-dominated lounges
where hotel guests were wont to
play cards, or perhaps a more
strenuous game of ping pong, now
only the familiar hospital white
furnishings meet the questing eye.
Identification tag machinery
shares the telephone booth area
and close by, is the Library. In
the "corner on the corridor" pre-
viously allotted to the souvenir
stand, is the Pharmacy with its
white-clad attendants and rows
upon rows of medicine bottles.
Rooms off that corridor are con-
sulting rooms for the medical and
dental staffs.
But all this fails to prepare you
for the hotel's real center of gayety
and color-the main dining room.
True, its magnificent mural ceil-
ings, famous throughout the land,
stand out more strikingly than
ever before because of the room's
unshaded, curtain-less windows.
.Dark marble-topped narrow tables
seating ten or twelve, arranged in
those annoyingly symetrical lines
always associated with the mili-
tary, replace the familiar carpeted
floors, white linens, shaded lights.
No longer is it devoted to dining
and dancing,
Here, it's true the "boots" and
officers eat, in shifts. But here,
they also attend church services
-in the former gay Venido Room.
Here, in the opposite end, moving
pictures are shown five nights a
week. Here, I. Q. tests are given.
Here, the men gather if they must
assemble in any large numbers,
indoors.
More Surprises
Continuing our tour, further sur-
prises were in store, through we
were becoming more used to them
now.
A peep into the kitchens our
first-and we learned modern gas
ranges have superceded the old-
,time coal-burning stoves which
have served the hotel and its cele-
brated clientele so faithfully
through the years. There are other
modern additions, too, equipment
that would delight a feminine cook
probably far more than it does the
.present all-male staff. Electric
potato-peelers (the boys still have
to wield a knife to cut out the
eyes) contrast with the hotel's
massive charcoal burning brick
ovens (proudly bearing the date,
1887) where the Cee Gee bakers
have their highly successful tasty
flings.
There have been several changes
in the meat refrigeration and
storage unit (yes, we even poked
our shivering noses in there, too)
or in the whatyoumay callum
where the slabs of meat are butch-
ered. Charges made were pri-
marily enlarging the capacity of
the unit to care for a large num-
ber of men.
Downstairs, to the north of the
motor entrance, where in olden
days the Gentlemen's Lounge was
located (we're merely quoting the
brass sign still there) men in
"civvies" are outfitted in the new
clothing they'll wear for the dura-
tion and six months thereafter--
unless there's an unforeseen hitch.
And we're still chuckling over
this amazing transformation: the
old-time bar there truly has come
down to earth, for it's now the shoe
shop! Instead of frosty tall glasses,
the bar supports a prosaic sign ad-
vising trainees how they must
give their first name, their middle
initial and their last name.
Now we go down the hither-to
concealed stairs to the basement
-across the driveway and through
the modern entrance. Normally,
the hotel baggage rooms, we find
buckets of paint and supplies of
brushes. There are convenient
work tables, too, for here each
boot must stencil his name on each
article of clothing issued him.
Yes,-St. Augustine's Ponce de
Leon has gone to war. For 57 years
the internationally famous hostel-
ry served the expensive whims of
its wealthy clientele. TIoday it
has removed its "white tie and
tails"' in exchange for the uni-
form of the United States Coast
Guard!


OUTFIT THE OUTFIT i
"Dear Mom" (Bill writes),
"We had beans tonight and they
tasted fine, because I knew you'd
helped pay for them. It was swell
of you to skip that new coat and
buy a Bond instead. With you
and.me n the same team, we'll'
lick that Axis gang."


morale, he says, are excellent food, sions. He also has a habit 'af
regular mail from home, and high writing a line of Scripture on the
caliber officers, bombs.
The chaplain rarely misses a The line is always the same.*
chance to say a few words to the "Whatsoever a man soweth, that
men before they take off on mis- shall he also reap."


Fliers Fight

To Fight Japs

By THOBURN WIANT
AP Features
AT A UNITED STATES
HEAVY BOMBER BASE SOME-
WHERE IN INDIA-The morale
at this United States heavy bomber
base is so high that the men fight
for a chance to go on combat mis-
sions, says Captain William B.
Hood, 43-year-old chaplain from
Charlotte, N. C.
"They would rather miss a meal'
than miss a mission,"' Hood de-
clares. "If their name is not in
the list of those assigned to go out,
they beg me to go to bat for them."
Hood says the commanding of-
ficers here found it necessary to
lay down rules against the men ac-
companying the missions without
definite orders. Medical officers
have doubled physical checkups be-
cause many fliers neglected to re-
port ailments that would prevent
them from getting another crack
at the Japanese.
Hood probably knows more
about the young Americans out;
here than any one else. They talk
to him freely about everything.
Chiefly responsible for the high

The goal of the Second War
Loan drive is 13 billion dol-
lars. That is just about one
fifth of the estimated increase
of the Public Debt for the fis-
cal year of 1943.


.vno.o-. un. 9-


12 CATHEDRAL PL.'


Your War Bonds and Stamps.
help outfit the outfits fighting for
,you. Buy an extra Bond today.
Remember, they give their lives.
U. S. Treasury Department


PAGE 12


RECORD


UNITED STATES COAST GUARD TRAINING STATION


Congratulations

TO THE
WOMEN'S AUXILIARY
OF THE

R, V. A.

UPON THE SPLENDID WORK
OF THAT ORGANIZATION


WAR HAS GIVEN
C4INESE WOMEN
BETTER CHANCE
The war has given Chinese wo-
men of the hinterland greater op-
portunity to serve their country
and greater national status than
ever before.
Two hundred and fifty girls from
Kwangsi Province made an army
for the front lines, and others
joined guerilla warfare. After the
invasion of industrial coastal re-
gions hundreds of other Chinese
girls went to work in small co-
operatives all over the hinterland,.
spinning yarn for soldiers' uni-
forms on old-fashioned American
spinning wheels.
More women set up a farm ex-
perimental station to develop im-
proved plants and raise imported
pigs and chickens.
V
RUSSIAN WOMEN
'MATCHING WAR
JOBS OF MEN
Russian women, whose constitu-
tion gives them equal rights with
men, match men's war jobs on
virtually all fronts.
Besides fighting in actual battle
and shouldering guns in guerilla
warfare, they serve in medical and
technical units close to the firing
lines. Russian nurses operate on
skis in frozen war zones. Tens of
thousands of Russian women work
in coal mines. behind the lines and
six operate highly successful mines.


0 BRIGHTEN
UP THE

HOME FOR

THE DAY

OF HIS

RETURN




For Quality and Economy in
Furniture, Shop at



DENMARK,'S
86 ST. GEORGE ST. PHONE 1000
BUY WAR BONDS


An








To



Local"



Residents


COMPLIMENTS


TO THE

Service Men

Located In This City
'And To The

R. V. A. AUXILIARY

From


KEENE & KEENE
Optometrists and Opticians

See Keene for Keen Sight


SHARE THE HOSPITALITY OF YOUR

HOME WITH A SERVICEMAN!


Servicemen coming to St. Augustine find great
difficulty in finding a room because of crowded con-
ditions. Do him a favor by offering the spare room
in your home--better yet, maybe you can arrange
an apartment for a serviceman's family.



J. O. Miller Cab Co.


40% Cathedral Pl.
St. Augustine, Fla.


Phone 391


PHONE 79





a


~D*CCULIUIIIWU----uu----Y-u.u-u----


LI I Ils-- I I --rru


I I


I NMI


Il~a~P8mrs I I Ir


I


- I I 119 __


L I we


FNDIA PIPES TEA
FOR UNITED STATES
To speed deliveries of tea to the
thirsty United States, India' has
erected a mountain "pipe line"
which covert in a few hours pre-
cipitous terrain which formerly _
took days. The pipee line"'is an
aerial ropeway, replacing mules
and ox carts, which runs suspended
on a trolley down the mountain,
where the tea is grown, to the fac-
tory.


War Workers
Have Church
BELLEVILLE, M i c h. A
Seventh Day Adventist Church has
been rented by an Episcopal
Church group for services to min-
ister, to war wdirkPrs in the com-;
munity. A Sunday School and a
Daily Vacation Bible School, as
well as regular Church services are
being provided.


Crowley I s Mainten-
ance And Security Of-
ficer; Work Is
Two-Fold


:


The local "housekeeper" for Un-
cle Sammy's Semper Paratus boys.
in wartime, is a veteran of 18 years
Coast Guard service. ...
He accepted a commission in the ..'.
U. S. Coast Guard in 1924 during.
the prohibition drive, and to him is
entrusted the exacting duties of ..
Maintenance and Security Officer of
the local Coast Guard Training
Station.
That officer, Lieutenant-Com-
mander J. P. Crowley, is a native of
New London, Conn., and came,
ashore a few months ago after
completing twelve years sea duty. :
He has participated in practically .
every activity in which the Coast
Guard is engaged. Those twelve ." .
years of general Coast Guard sea ..
duty found him mostly in Atlantic, LIEUT.-COMDR..
Gulf, Pacific and Alatkan waters.
During his time at sea Lieuten- the Coast Guard
ant-Commander Crowley command- to the Station here.
ed the cutters Carrabasett, Electra External upe
(now the Presidential yacht Poto- Exen liberty
mac) the Aurora, the Champlain watle on liberty
and the Nike. It was while in com- groundsvkeep the
mand of the Nike that he saw much rund Security Wat
anti-submarine duty off the North protective schedu
Atlantic seaboard.
Commander and Mrs. Crowley Carefully
and their two daughters, are quite The members a
at home in St. Augustine. They are and S. W. have b
residing on Tremerton Street and elected. The prese
the two girls are attending school force comprises e
here. police officers fro


.if


We invite you to see
the lovely selections we
are now showing. De-
signs that appeal and
prices for wartime
economy.


A


and is attached
vision of the men
and continuous
buildings and
Shore Patrol and
ch on a full-time
le.
r Chosen


ok


In the dim past this old gate protected the north entrance to the
city from all intruders. Contrasted with it are these modern war-
time military and civilian guardians. In the jeep: are Chief Specialist
William Lindsey of the Coast Guard Shore Patrol, and Corp. Joe
Street of the Army's Military Police. Standing beside them is
Virgil Stuart, the city's chief of police.


of the country. Most of the Se-
curity Watch are ex-firefighters
or special police officers. ..
Despite the scope of his duties,
the Maintenance and Security Of-
ficer 6f St. Augustine's Coast Guard
Training Station has a small-but
thoroughly adequate-staff. Lieu-
tenant (j. g.) J. L. Wattengel of
New York State, is the engineering
officer and Lieutenant (j. g.) J. G.
Alligood, of Apalachicola, is Com-
mander Crowley's assistant. Round-
ing out the staff is Warrant.Ma-
chinist N. MAatheson, who's the con-
struction man.
- Like the good "housekeeper" he
is, Commander Crowley knows his
three local hotels! He, even found
the remnants of the original water
reservoirs, or tanks, about which
the picturesque and ornate towers
of Hotel Ponce de Leon were built.
From those tanks, through means
of gravitation, water was supplied
throughout the Ponce de Leon, in its
"debut" years. Sulphur water from
a private well long flowed through
the pipes of that hotel and its "sis-
ter across King Street," the Alca-
zar.


of both the S. P.
ken carefully se-
mnt Shoie ,Patrol
ex-State and city
Dm various parts


,t.


Ic


in direct charge of Lieut. John L.
Dunn.
It is a veteran organization now,
having been established in June,
1941. It is quartered in the Army
Recreation Area just north of
the City Gates off San Marco Ave-
nue.
The shore patrol here consists
largely of Coast Guardsmen from
the Training Station at the Ponce
de Leon Hotel. It operates under
the command of Lieut-Comdr. J. P.
Crowley, maintenance and security
officer,' and 'is in direct charge of
William Lindsey, chief specialist.
The two units use jeeps or travel
in the local, police squad cars for
vehicular patrol and at all times
are in two-way radio communica-
tion with their headquarters.
One. of the thorny problems with
any police unit of either service
lies in watching over the various
bars, restaurants, and other pub-
lic places which service men fre-
quent.
Neither the Army nor the Navy
wants its personnel patronizing es-
tablishments in which sanitary
conditions are objectionable, pros-
titutes are allowed on the premises,
or where .liquor sale regulations
are violated.


The services cannot close these
places, but they can very effectively
deal with them by placing them "off
limits." This means that M. P.'s
or S. P.'s will take up posts outside
the establishments and prevent ser-
vice men from entering.
In some sections of the nation,
entire cities have been placed "off
limits" when local authorities are
unable or unwilling to correct ob-
jectionable conditions.
This problem is a very minor one
in St. Augustine, according to Ma-
jor Edelstein, who has been here
long enough ta know the situation
thoroughly.
Pleased With Conditions
"Aliost all the bar operators,
restaurant owners and other bus-
iness men here cooperate to the let-
ter," he reports. "We have been
most pleased with conditions and I
think I'm not exaggerating when I
say that St. Augustine has about
as clean a bill of health, hygienical-
ly and morally, as any city of its
size on the east Florida coast."
The delicate decision of the "off
limits" is usually made by Major
Edelstein, probably because the ar-
my unit is older in experience here.
Coast Guard authorities cooper-
ate very closely with him in this
matter, and what few "off limits"
recommendations he has to make
about recalcitrant business places
in St. Augustine have Coast Guard
approval. Inversely, the Coast
Guard recommendations have Ar-
my approval.
The military police and shore pa-
trol policing is not severe. The pa-
trolmen do not "get tough" unless
an unusually bad situation demands
it.
Trouble makers of the more seri-
ous type are marched off to cells in
the city jail, or if the man is a
Coast Guardsman, to the brig in
the training station.
The Army' Recreation Area also
has detention cells for temporary
interhementt.
Major Edelstein reports that out-
of-town service men, whose trouble
making is not of an extreme nature,
are usually released the following
day and sent back to their camps
and a report on their conduct is
forwarded to their commanding of-
ficers. *
In the case of deserters or those
absent-without-leave, the home
camps are contacted and, if neces-
sary, the prisoners are returned un-
der guard.
A policing problem for the Army
and Navy can.sometimes be a hard
nut to crack. In St. Augustine, the
cooperation among civilians, local
police and business men with the
armed services is so complete that
this problem scarcely exists at all.


Work Two-Fold


As the title suggests, the work
of a maintenance and security of-
ficer is two-fold. Maintenance is
the upkeep of the station and all
its, parts and accoutrements; se-
curity, protection from fire, air
raids and against possible sabot-
age. And under security comes
also the operation of the Shore
Patrol.
So, to Commander Crowley falls
the great responsibility not only.
bf keeping in tiptop shape, the pala-
tial Hotel Ponce de Leon (his own
office headquarters) but Hotels
Monson and Bennett and all the
Station's equipment (including
boats)., As if the interior would
not present sufficient problems, he
must be as careful a guardian of
the' exterior.
Replacements
Considerable replacements of ma-
terials usually are necessary, the
officer pointed out, in older build-
ings, such as house the Station in
St. Augustine; also it often is
deemed advantageous to add cer-
tain buildings or equipment.
For instance, Commander Crow-
ley revealed that, the refrigeration
in Hotel Ponce de Leon was insuf-
ficient to maintain the number of
men quartered there for any length
of time. To remedy that situation,
two new units-each about the
size of a refrigerator car-have
been placed onw the grounds. Men
like, and require, showers and
since the hotel plumbing provides
few of these, it is probable outdoor
showers will be constructed short-
ly. Being of a temporary nature,
these necessary additions serve a
real purpose in the Station's goal:
fitting more and more civilians to
take their place alongside Coast
Guardsmen and other fighting men.
Commander Crowley's "house-
keeping troubles" are lessened by
the fact that the original gardener
and several of the hotel retainers
still are at the Ponce de Leon in
their former capacities.
Security Watch
Ever since the three hotels
were taken over by the Navy
Department for the St. Augus-
tine Coast Guard Training Sta-
tion, it has been common knowl-
edge that those reservations are
under guard 24 hours every day,
rain or shine. Those guards are
known as the Security Watch. It
is their duty to patrol the desig-
nated boundaries of those "reser-
vations"; to be alert for signs of
fire, smoke or disorder; to in-
stantly investigate and report
anything out of the ordinary
which might occur in their beat.
Shore Patrol
The Shore Patrol-those S. P.
arm band wearing guards-is di-
rectly under the supervision of
Commander Crowley, and works in
cooperation with Major Max S.
Edelstein, commanding officer of
St. Augustine's Army Recreational I
Area, and his Military Police. Each
serves more or less as supervisor
over all members of the armed
forces. Purpose of both S. P.'s and
M. P.'esis to prevent a man from
disgracing the uniform of the Unit-
ed States in any sense; to give the
-ommunity, protection or security.
They work in harmony with local
law-enforcement agencies.
"Captain Virgil Stuart of the St.
Augustine Police Department," de-
clared Commander Crowley with
appreciation and satisfaction, "has
given us exceptionally fine cooper-
ation."
Former Chief of Police W. B.
Lindsey, now wears the uniform of


Iu CO MPLIMENTS ,



ALTOONJIAN' S GIFT SHOP

3 Full Line G


Linens-Bags-Jewelry-Gifts


| '51 King St, .

r't% n"n


/


'UNDAY, APRIL 25, 1943


THE ST, AUGUSTINE RECORD.


PAGE 18


THE MODERN AND THE OLD CITY GUARDIANS


Military Police

And Shore Patrol

I Work Together

Mugment Local Law Of-
ficers In Keeping Ser-
vice Men in Line
,OLD RIVALRY GONE

fEach Is Empowered To
Arrest Exuberants In
Either Uniform
Throw several thousand service
jOen of all branches into a city the
size of St. Augustine on week-end
leaves and there arises inevitably
.Oe M. P. and S. P. problems.
The M. P.'s, or military police
of the Army, and the S. P.'s, or
$4he shore patrol of the Navy and
Coast Guard, are charged with
the task of augmenting the local
police agencies in helping to keep
this temporarily enlarged popula-
tion in hand. ,
"The average service man on
leave is an exuberant, hap]py-go-
lucky fellow, who wants, above
everything else, to have a good
time.
That this good time does not
pake a disorderly, rambunctious
turn is the main responsibility of
hose well known soldiers and
tailors who walk their beats with
*he distinguishing M. P. and S. P.
rmn bands and swinging their billy
Olubs.
They patrol the streets, pull the
service men up short on any vio-
lation of uniform wear, prevent
,.ghts and break up those already
ki progress, take care of over-im-
bibing soldiers and sailors and
patrol "off limit" establishments.
Close Cooperation
One of the Innovations of this
War is the close cooperation be-
tween the military police and shore
patrol. The old rivalry and sep-
arate bailiwicks no longer exist.
Since all branches of the armed
services are fighting the same war,
Vhis feeling is carried through even
o the matter of policing.
Today, in St. Augustine,, as else-
where throughout the'-nation, the
thore patrolmen and the military
policemen pair off and walk.their
beats together.
Some service men are unaware
_f it, but there is no longer any
imitation as to which patrolman
may arrest whom.
Military policemen are now em-
towered to arrest Naval and Coast
Guard personnel disturbing the
seace, and .the, shore patrolmen
lay take like action with army
personnel.
. The St. Augustine military po-
lce unit is a force of about 48
men under the leadership of Major,
Itk-S: "Edelsfein, Iifiaifg'hatis l


City's Churches

Extend Welcome

To Service Men
From stately church edifices to
small chapels, St.. Augustine has
numerous worship places, where
service men and others are welcome
always.
Some of the churches, aside from
the primary religious atmosphere
and interest which surround them,
are historical in background. Chief
among these is the Roman Catho-
lic Cathedral, which faces the an-
,cient Plaza. This is the oldest ca-
thedral in mainland United States,
antedating the famous old Cathe-
dral of St. Louis in New Orleans.
This is the oldest Catholic par-
ish in the country, because the work
of the Catholic Church started here
from the very day on which Ped-
ro Menendez landed, September 8,
1565, to found the city.
The second oldest church is
quaint and historic Trinity Epis-
copal Church, on the opposite side
of the Plaza from the Cathedral.
Beautiful church edifices are oc-
cupied by Memorial Presbyterian,
Ancient City Baptist, Grace Metho.
dist, and First Methodist congrega-
tions. Of these Memorial Presby-
terian has a particularly interesting
background, because it was built by
the late Henry Morrison Flagler,
millionaire developer and -philan-
thropist, as a memorial to his
daughter, Jennie Louise Benedict,
who died at sea.
There are numerous smaller
churches in the community, which
serve their neighborhoods, and
many worshippers.
V
Buy Bonds to "outfit the outfits"
out fighting for you. You can do
without. They can't.


"Housekeeper" At Station

Is Veteran Coast Guardsman


Maintenance And
Security Officer


New

Fashions

That Appeal


THE LEW


SHOPPE


Cathedral Place


SOLDIERS





SAILORS





MARINES.'.


,-e


SERVICE MEN AND THEIR DEPENDENTS
RECEIVE A CORDIAL WELCOME HERE


The Pilgrim Shoe Store, Inc.
"All That's Beat -in Footwear"


We're Proud Of You




And Proud To Have You!




When you are off the post or on shore leave
stop in at Service for a snack ... Whether
it is for a Chocolate Soda of a' full meal, like
mother used to cook, you'll find it here...
And at prices designed to fit the service
man's pocketbook.


49 KING ST.


PHONE 1193


At Your Service




Since 1895


SERVICE


DRUGS


REALTORS and INSURERS


EUGENE L. BARNES & SON

SERVICE AND PROTECTION
ESTABLISHED 1895
65 KING ST. ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA.


WALGREEN AGENCY

"ON THE CORNER"






-I


I '


Civilian Closely Aligned

Uniformed Citizen In

Works Through Def,


i-
S ... i i ,






















,ADVERTISING.











r-PHOTO ENGRAVINGS,
..4% KE S EV I N 0
















6 -SOUTH- MAIN ST.
JACKSONVILLE. -FLORIDA
asisin rtt
n~n urantainIlml ,,l,<00 ,.,
""""""""""" "" ;;Tll~llll


























JACKSO NVI LLE. FLO RI DA.


i I


I ----L ~JI 111' LL -s


-- I-- --JI -' ~ --- I I


-


_~_ ___


Service Personnel



Buy 4 I PROMPT--SA.

SMBULANCESERVICE

PHONE 73




Craig's Funeral Home


-1 ,,,-, _


I I II 'IIC C ~L--I~U_ r ~1 I I I I I


-r.. THE ST. AUG USTTN'E I RECORD


I With

This War;

ense Council

Frank H. Harrold; and Col. H. L.
Butler, Major Max S. Edelstein, S.
C. Middleton, Ray Kauble, D. M.
Lyon, Carl W. Hawkins, W. M.
Toomer, Jr., and Dr. C. J. Settles,
members.
Citizens Defense Corps
The Citizens Defense Corps is
presided over by Colonel Butler, the
director of air raid services; and
the Citizens Service Corps by Dr.
C. J. Settles, the director.
The action divisions--five in num-
ber--comprise the Citizens Defense
Corps.' Primarily concerned .with
action during an attack by the ene-
my from the air or invasion by land
or sea, they are: the division
of civil protection, Capt. Otis E.
Barnes, chairman; the division of
communication and, transportation,
D. M. Lyon, chairman; the division
of health and housing, Dr. Charles
H. Crooks, chairman; the divi-
sion of power and fuel,; William S.
Weff, chairman; and the division
of water supply and fire protection,
Lamar Harmon, chairman.
An independent unit under .the
division of health and housing, is
the Woman's Ambulance Corps, of
which Guy E. Gatchell is chairman
and Captain Edith Gardner, the
commanding .officer. Another in-;
dependent unit in the Citizens De-
fense Corps is the air raid warden
group, in charge of I. Lloyd Clarke,
chief air raid warden.
Titles. designating the divisions
practically explain their function. ,
Shortly after its organization,
the Defense Council under instruc-
tions from the Army and the State
Defense Council, established the,
-ircraft warning stations in this
county; recruited and trained the
personnel, arid today this service
unctions directly under order of
he First Fighter Command of the
'.rmy. According to reports from
i hat office, it has established and
maintained d a splendid record under '
.he guidance of its director, Cecil
SZinkan.
The Council recruited and or-,
anized Company D, Third Battal-
ion, Florida Defense Force, then
Spurned it over to the Adjutant Gen-
eral, Brig. Gen. Vivian Collins, for
tate service. Today,, Company D
'is at full strength and has a splen-
S7id record', recognized throughout i
'he state. ,i, '
Citizens Service Corps
The Citizens Service Corps in-i
eludes the war service divisions anti i
embraces practically every activity
in.,defense not covwred.by the Citi.-
zens Defeone Corps. It consists of
.*!Fht divisions: the division of in
dustry ,and& material resource-,
whose chairman is Carl W. Haw-
kins; the division of finance anm.l
budget, Israel- Feiden, chairman; |
the division of agriculture; Hubertl
E. Maltby, chairman; the division
of food, 0. D. Wolfe; division ol
home and community services/,Mrs.
A. L. Phillips; division of infor-
mation, education and morale, Dr.
C. J. Settles; division of labor and
personnel, C, E. Coomes; division
of recreation, R. O. Holton.
Some of these divisions have as
:nany as twelve sub-divisions.
Among the important sub-divi-
:ions are those of evacuation and
road clearance, of which David R.
Dunham is chairman; the emer-
gency food and housing, Walter
Moeller, 'chairman; the command
staff, T. W. Fleming, chairman;
and the public works, Vivian Uiina,


sentatives of the Regional Office of
Civilian Defense and from State
Defense Headquarters in Tallahas-
see, St. Johns County is well and
efficiently represented in the na-
tional civilian defense organization.
Formed Two Years Ago
The St. Johns County Defense
Council was organized two years
ago. Then the t6tal membership
consisted of the present chairman,
Colonel James H. Reynolds, Jr.,
and John W. Dillin, the executive
secretary, who since has been com-
missioned in the Air Forces of the
United States Army. Its sole equip-
ment was a letter from .Governor
Spessard L. Holland to Colonel Rey-.
nolds and an envelope of orders in
the custody of Mr. Dillin.
The first meeting was held in the
office of the Chamber of Commerce
and an office established on the
back porch of that building.
Today, the St. Johns County De-
fense Council consists of an.Execu-
tive Council, the governing body
which has jurisdiction over two
corps of five.and eight divisions,
respectively, and many independent
units. In addition to the chairman,
the Executive Council is composed
of the vice chairman, M. H. West-
berry; the executive secretary,


Never before in history has the
citizen in civilian clothes, been soL
closely associated with the citizen
in uniform as today. Civilians, sol-
diers and sailors today are all
fighting the war, each in his own
way, for a common cause and made
necessary by modern warfare meth-
ods. This state of affairs has been
responsible for the creation of an
organized and disciplined force of
civilians known as the Civilian De-
fense Council, or in some states,
as the Civilian War Council.
The Work these men and women
are doing, whether it beserving on
the defense staff, evacuation divi-
sions, the food and housing section,
in the division-of public works ser-
vice, or as, nurse's aides, air raid
wardens, in the, aircraft warning
service, as auxiliary firemen, po-
lice, fire watchers and many other-
activities, is all-important, for
'they are contributing to the defense
of their country. And in the words
of the director of the Fourtlh Re-
gional Office of Civilian Defense
at Atlanta, Charles H. Murchison:
"The work being done by the vast
army of civilian defense workers
will win undying gratitude of gen-
erations unborn."
According to reports from repre-


/


AT


JEROME'S

For Delicious Seafood--And Especially



FRIED SHRIMP

Prepared As Only Jeroine Knows How!




JE ROMEO tM, PhO'S

44 Granada St. Phone 9163


, rector of St, John's Episcopal
Saldp;r in nIt* 1ni ti S+2 ni n h.hrh


The Rev. Hedley J. Williams
-Church, Brooklyn, N. Y., visits sick
Fort Hamilton. The parish supply
matter and games, as well as proi


siein postu nols atl l rneay
ies hospitalized men with reading
vides for regular visits.

Eskimos In Alaska
Work For Red Cross
IGLOO, Alaska-Service to the:
Red Cross by Eskimos here, only i
75 miles below the Aretic Circle,
can be matched by few other;
groups of comparable size.
Eskimo ,women, at the sugges-
tion of Mr. and Mrs; William V.
Benson, Idnian service teachers at]
Igloo, made mukluks, Eskimo boots]
of reindeer skins and ugruk hides j
sewed with reindeer sinews, and .
sold them. The proceeds were turn- i
ed over to the Bensons to send down i
to the American Red Cross. Chil- *
dren of the Igloo school also raised
funds. ..
------v----- !-
Buy Bonds to "outfit the outfits"
fighting for you. Remember they
give their lives. t


all are closely affiliated and neces-
sarily work together.
In the beginning, the functions of
the Defense Council we're quite 'im-
ited, the work being confined en-
tirely to protection against air
raids, Florida being one of the first
states to create and maintain a ci-
vilian defense organization. La-
ter, .when the organization of ,he
Washington office was completed,
many additional activities develop-
ed and were .delegated to the vari
6us states from time to time. To-
day,-the Defense Council is a clear-
ing house for every activity per-
taining to the defense program.
such as Red Cross classes for first
aid and nurse's aides; defense bond
sales, child welfare, ration boards,
etc., not overlooking the welfare of
those residing in the area for which
it is responsible.


!I


We are doing work for men of all branch-
S' es of the armed services ... your clothes
too will receive the same careful, treat-
ment needed to make them last longer
and look better. It you send your
laundry and cleaning to Modern.


BEST WISHES

To The Service Men

And Women In St. Augustine






MODERN

LAUNDRY andCLEANERS, Inc.


chairman.
The department of screen-o-ut
services, of which W. M. Toomer,
Jr., is chairman, is responsible for
lighting the area in compliance with
Army screenout orders.
The department of public rela-
tions, for which Harris R. Angell
is acting director in the absence
from the city of Director Gale M.
Merchant, is responsible for the
publicity- in connection with. all
defense, activities, including the Ra-
tion Board.. (Mr. Merchant is on,
leave of absence.) Mr, Angell is
the assistant director.
All of these divisions function,in-
dependently, some more so than
others :a. the .occasion demands, but


.Our Best Wishes,

To The


SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 194


PAGE 14


PARISHES SUPPLY HOSPITALIZED MEN


I
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,~ ~



3


Goodfellows


Meet


i~aara6~


TAKE


YOUR


. along side

Sour, fighting men! ;,"


167 W. KING ST. .j


S PHONE 54


22 GRANADA ST.


PHONE 73





E N S H UN'


N'S FAMILIES
,Y WELCOME


Muscles straining, backs brace
go through one of the most impor
are a familiar daily sight on St.

SLEEP JEEP
OFFERED AS
BUNION CURE
AP Features
The Sleep Jeep, a vehicle design-
ed to save the ordinary soldier from
acquiring bunions, roams the Hard-
ing Field air base at Baton Rouge,
La., on a regular schedule providing
a base bus service for officers and
troops.
Rambling along at only about
eight miles an hour, the Sleep Jeep
never has to stop. Passengers just
hop on and off.
It was tossed together by Capt.
Earl M. Gregg, base motor main-
tenance officer, who started out
with the frame from: a wrecked
truck, axles from a steam roller.
Now Capt. Gregg has orders to
build another.


_ I I i I ~


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I


PAGE 15


THE ST. AUGUSTINE


RECORD


TRY THEIR HAND AT BOAT PULLING Messages Accepted
AD I iFor Far East Camps
WASHINGTON-- Cable m e s-
sages for newly announced .Amer-
tant MA ican prisoners of war and inter-
nees in the Far East are being
accepted by the American Red
Cross through local chapters.
Because international communi-
t t e cation facilities must be reserved
Q-What three mistakes has for vitally important matters, Red
Hitler made which oxersh adouw nany Cross limits at this time the num-
made by the United Nations? ber of messages which may be
A--Anthony Eden tah.s they are sent-one for each prisoner or in-
(1) failure to invade England aft- ternee. In the event of serious
er Dunkirk; (2) attacking Russia emergencies involving "life or
.instead of the Middle East in death" the agreement provides for
search of oil, and (3) instigating, additional cable service.
if Hitler did. Japan's attack on The messages may be accepted
the United States at Pearl Harbor. for prisoners of war only when
a* there has been official notification
Q-A member of the British of imprisonment. They will be
Parliament suggests that the R.A. also accepted for any civilian
F. should drop some blockbuster "presumed to be in the Philip-
bombs into the crater of Mt. Vesu- pines."
vious to start the volcano erupting
and causing huge damage in Italy.
Is the plan feasible?
A-Seismologists say the whole
idea is nutty.
Q-Do men of the Merchant
Marine turn in their ration books
when they ship out to sea?
A-Yes. Books are surrendered That's Wh
to the local Ration Boards if the
sailor is leaving the country for SERV C
30 'days or more. When he comes
F.home, the book will be returned
;'s- for use while the sailor is in the And T:
United States.
t -Ii -Q-Can service men send par- FAMI
cel post packages free?
A.-No. While they may write
home without postage'stamps, theRIV
d, these Coast Guardsmen are learning the value of team work as they privilege does not extend to par-
taut as well as rigorous phases of their training. These pulling boats cel post.
Augustine's Matanzas Bay. *I
Q-Who is Marcel Deat, recent SERVICE ME
TEAR GAS FOR TRAINEES object of a third assassination at- ESPECIALL
tempt ?
o A-He is the former editor,of a
Paris newspaper and an ardent The Most Convenien
pal of Pierre Laval in the scheme
t to sell Hitlerism to the French
4- ll people.
I Q-Are men with dependent IR
Children being drafted, now ?'
A-Not yet. Local boards are OVERLOOKI
X under orders not to take such men
until they get different instruc-
tions from Washington.








p.w "









We have (
; Armed Ser

- rWe, and o
,purchases o

OurOrgan
A trip through the local Coast Guard Training Station's gas sale and Ore
chamber or tent is usually sufficient to impress on the trainees thea
importance of the gas mask. Each trainee is given a whiff of tear
gas with the blinding tearful result seen on this trainee's face as WE WILL
he emerges.
SERVICES
Son Of Bishop is Organ Pipes In TION OF '
Chaplain With North Scrap Drive OUR SER
African Troops CIVILIAN
OCEAN CITY, N. J.-The dum- TION PIC,
BERKELEY, Calif.--Among the my organ pipes in Holy Trinity
lirst to land with American troops Episcopal Church, Ocean City, are
n North Africa was Chaplain going to the scrap drive. Says the
'hineas McCray Casady, formerly rector, the Rev. R. S. Bailey, "What
rector of All Souls' Episcopal tremendous improvements might
Church, Berkeley, California, whose we not have aesthetically by "re-
father is the Bishop of Oklahoma. moving these and other so-called
Chaplain Casady officiated at the ornamental hardware from our
burial of America's first war dead churches and donating it to the na-
in North Africa, including the first tion's need? There is much brass-
Army chaplain to' meet his death in work in many of our churches that
that sector. we would be better off without."


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93 TO THE






MEN and WOMEN
!... ,..,..,.,jil~::s ~j: ..........







IN UNIFORM

13 Treat and Greet Your Friends At The --


a BLUE HERON
BARanGrL... .IL

"At The City Gates"
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Church Institute
Enlarges Services

NEW YORK, N. Y.-Indicating
the tremendous increase in the
need for its many services to sea-
men, the Seamen's Church Institute
of New York has added a story to
its 13-story building. The Rev.
Harold H- Kelley, D. D., Episcopal
clergyman who is Director of the
Institute, says that enrollment in
the Institute's Merchant Marine
School has forced an increase fr6m
five to twenty-two instructors. Over
9,000 men have completed courses
in the school within the past two
years, and are now serving aboard:
ships of the Merchant Maritie,
Coast Guard and Navy.
V
Blind Eleanor C. Judd, Kew Gar-
dens pianist, gets in her lick
against the Nazis by donating
blood to the Red Cross blood bank;


I






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t Location in St. Augustine


MATANZAS BAY AND


PLAZA PARK


NG


slip over a dressing gown.
His ostensible armament is a
rifle slung over his shoulder and a
dirk at his belt. But inside the
voluminous folds of his burnouse
are other odd knives, pistols and
grenades.


I


I



















I


A splendid varie-
ty of jewelry,
novelties to de-
light your best
girl, wife or
Friend.


I


136 St. George St.


St. Augustine, Fla.


StJNDAY, APRIL 25, 1943

Goum Guerillas

Terrifying Enemy

In North Africa

Tales Of Bravery Of Tur-
banned Moroccan Ir.
regulars Spread
By WILLIAM KING
AP Features
ALGIERS, North Africa-The
Goums-those turbanned Moroc-
can irregulars-terrify the enemy
by their power to move through
impossible territory, while their
sensational fighting tactics amaze
their allies, the American and Brit-
ish soldiers.
Tales of their bravery have
spread through the Army in Tu-
nisia, along with stories of their
disregard of life and love of loot.
Their unorthodox methods and
self-sufficiency in action tend to
complete the mystery which sur-
rounds them.
Goums are strictly a patrolling
force. They are often given a rov-
ing commission or are sent to a
special sector to create general de-
struction.
.-The Goums are definitely merce-
nary. It would be foolish to pre-
tend they are fighting for the priin-
ciples of the Atlantic Charter. In
addition to their pay, there is al-
ways the prospect of military
booty.
Because it is easier to leave a
dead soldier than a live one, Goums
in the past h~te shown reluctance
to take prisoners. To restrain the
primitive urge to kill needlessly,
the Allies have instituted bounties
for prisoners.
Like woodsmen who have spent
Sa lifetime hunting, Goums have
developed an intimate knowledge
of the rough wooded :hills of North
Africa and abnormally keen senses
of sight and hearing.
They set out, with their odd
rifles and sharp knives, in a strag-
gling column, leaving known roads
as soon as possible. Unlike most
native troops they like night oper-
ations and usually manage to
reach a "lying up" point right
under the enemy's nose. At dawn
they rush the position, before the
enemy has any idea they are
within miles.
Goums are recruited from the
mountains of Morocco. They are
all volunteers. During the days
after the defeat of France, the
Goums were held together as a po-
tential fighting force by a ruse.
The Axis Armistice Commission
was told that they were labor
gangs.
" The Goumier individuall mem-
ber of a Goum unit) wears his hair
in an odd-looking queue under a
distinctive turban. His main outer
garment is a orown-and-white
birnous-which looks like a loose


** * * *

* FROM THE *
:HOME FRONT *- ,
Q.-If I pay my farm rent on
shares, can I sent4tlhe owners of
the farm half my liter?
A.-OPA says you must collect
points from them for the better.
Q.-Should I report to my draft
board an incurable health condi-
tion or should I wait until I am
called ?
A.-Report the condition now.
Q.-I took the test for the
WAACs but failed. Can I take it
again ?
A.-Yes, after 30 days.
V
Four hundred American women
are- teaching and nursing 107,000
Japanese evacuated from the west,
coast and,stationed in 10 isolated
War Relocation Centers.


TRAINEES 1


iat ALL

EMEN
heir

LIES

HERE


'~ ~


8 ~an


TPLAZA HOTE


DON'T
FORGET
WAR
BONDS


DANIE LS

JEWELRY CO .


St. Augustine, Fla


GET YOUR


o GIFTS


SOUVENIRS


FILMS



KODAK FINISHING





HOPKINS

CAMERA AND GIFT SHOP


7 King St.





SERVICE MEN LIKE TO DANCE


Pl~ -- I c---e I 1 I''


-r --


r I I I I I I r I


SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 194i

































LIBERTY- .


13 from the horror of war |



"With liberty and justice for all"-let it always be that
way in America, and soona .oall over. the world. The more
C War Bonds we buy, the quicker olr boys will be march-.
ing through Berlin. Lets swell that savings account v
| and deduct 10%' of our wveekly income for War Bonds.
It brings us&nearer to Victory'
I ..enny.-

























1 135 King St. 173 San Marco Ave.=
i I IIIIIIDIIIIIIIIIII ii a l
B
=ff Wy n meica adson'a ovr hewold Th mreB ,






















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All facilities, of the club are
.FREE TO A-I.o'SERVICE MEN.
Saturday night dances are reg-
ular and popular features. Under
the supervision of Miss Evelyn
Bradford and her assistants, Miss
Rhoda Emma Neel and Miss Ethel
Corbett, contests are held in the
game room, with prizes given the
winners.
Mrs. Wells, the, official hostess,
-organized a chapter of the Girls Ser-
vice Organization, the GSO Girls
acting as dance partners and ju-
nior hostesses at all affairs, as well
as performing other duties. Wo-
men of the following cooperating
local organizations serve as senior
hostesses: Sub-Junior Service Club,
Service Mothers Club, Arts Club,
Junior Service League, Pilot Club,
Memorial Presbyterian Church
Auxiliary, Trinity Episcopal
Church Auxiliary, Ancient City
Baptist Woman's Missionary So-
ciety, Ambulance Corps, Memorial
Lutheran Woman's Missionary So-
ciety, Grace Methodist Woman's
Society for Christian Service, Vet-
erans of Foreign Wars Auxiliary,
Daughters of Arherican Revolution.
Tie Service Mothers Club was
formed under the sponsorship of
the club. These mothers have done
a wonderful work, taking care of
the needs of the men. One of
their main services has been the
altering and mending of uniforms,
more than 200 garments 'coming
under their care. The Club's Christ-
mas Party and many other
thoughtful acts which only mothers
can accomplish, were Service Moth-
ers Club projects.
A Service Wives Club also was
formed, but because of the fluctu-
ation of the men from one location
to another, it was impossible to ac-
complish any specific service.


Both Local and Visiting
Service Men Enjoy
Free Facilities

Since November, 1941, the USO
Club operated by the Army and
Navy YMCA and located in the Le-
gion Home on the Bay, has been a
real haven for service men, both
local and visiting. First director of
the club was George W. Gleaves of
Memphis, Tenn., at which time the
American Legion retained the din-
ing room and canteen, operating
these for the benefit of the service
men.
In June of 1942, R. C. Oliver, who
had been sent to Memphis from
Florida to organize and open a'
USO Club for the Army and Navy
YMCA, assumed the directorship of
the local club, succeeding Mr.
Gleaves who wished to return to his
home in Tennessee for similar
work. Mrs. Estelle E. Wells, of
Sebring, Fla., became the secre-
tary and official club hostess.
Soon afterward, the USO took
over two rooms on the second floor
for use as writing and game rooms.
A number of facilities were added
to the program, including fishing
tackle, cameras, golf clubs, shaving
materials (especially for those who
come from other camps and bases
for week-end visits-between 50
and 100 men use this facility every
Sunday morning), an information
bureau which secures rooming ac-
Commodations for visitors and men
stationed here and having their
families with them; a checking sys-
tem and dissemination of 'general
information such as points of inter-
est, train and bus schedules, loca-
tion of churches and hour of ser-
vices, etc.


''-iM"'. '.". ,'. ,"
One of the top moments for officers and enlisted men of St. Augustine's Coast Guard Training Station during the past two months
was the recent visit of, Vice Admiral R. R. Waesche, commandant of t he U. S. Coast Guard, seen here accepting a review of the station's
trainees. He stands beside Captain W. K. Scammell, commanding officer of the station. Standing at the rear, from left to right, are Comdr.
Frank Leamy, Lieut.-Comdr. Arthur J. Hesford, aides to the admiral; Comdr. W. W. Kenner, executive officer of the station; Comdr. A. W.
Davis, recruit and gunnery officer, and Lieut.-Comdr. J. J. Hutso n, Jr., welfare and assistant training officer.


Many excellent housekeepers,
who used to feel pretty busy and
important, are worried these days
as to whether they are doing their
share in the war effort. With wo-
men doing defense work in fac-
tories and offices everywhere, it's
hard for Mrs. Housewife not to
feel a little guilty if she concen-
trates on cooking and child care.
That's a defeatist feeling, how-
ever. Much as every bit of our
war work counts, officials and edu-
cators everywhere feel that a wo-
man with small children owes her
first duty to them. Of course,
many such women are doing occa-
sional work for various- defense
organizations, but even those who
.are on duty at home twenty-four
hours a day can find a dozen small
ways to show their patriotism.
They can shop more carefully
than ever, putting away every dime
saved for war stamps and bonds.
The pleasant home atmosphere can
be shared by inviting soldiers from
nearby camp over for Sunday din-
ner. And, they can contribute to
the enjoyment of soldiers, sailors
and anarines everywhere by giving
books to the Bookl Campaign.
The American Library Associa-
tion, the American Red Cross and
the United Service Organizations
are all behind this drive to acquire
"more and better" books during
1943. It is NOT a drive for old
algebras and dog-eared Victorian
novels; rather it is a campaign to
accumulate plenty of interesting,
stimulating books of the kind the
givers themselves have enjoyed.
A real family project could be
made of sorting the family books
and deciding which of them to give.
Every member of the family- could
share in this task in the real Amer-
ican way.
Dad and mother could pick out
some recent novels and non-fiction
best sellers that gave them pleas-
ure, also some of Dad's technical
books. Brother Bill might contrib-
Soldier Finding
Many Biscuits In
His Battle Rations
If Your sweetheart or husband
never ate crackers before he went
to war, it's a good bet that he will
when he returns. Special biscuits,
because they provide concentrated
energy, taste good, keep well, are
easily shipped and distributed, now
are included in all types of emer-
gency rations prepared for the
Armed Services.
There are three basic types of
biscuits now in wide use which were
developed by the Quartermaster
Corps in cooperation with the indus-
try-Types C, K-1 and K-2. The
K-1 and K-2 are well known be-
cause they are important parts of
the famous Emergency K Ration
which provides full meals in pocket
size.
The K-1 Biscuit contains virtually
all the essentials of a balanced diet
in itself. Minerals, fats, proteins
and carbohydrates are all present,
including 17.6 International Units
of Vitamin B1 per biscuit. It is pos-
sible for soldiers to carry on, exist-
ing on'these K Rations because the
K-1 Biscuit contains 2,172 calories
per pound. The K-2 type is a con-
centrated graham biscuit which also
has a high caloric count.
Most soldiers, however, will pro-
bably become better acquainted
with the Type C Biscuit, which has
a graham flavor, since five are in-
cluded in the U. S. Field Ration
used in emergencies during maneu-
vers or combat. A square biscuit
made with C-type formula is also
shipped to overseas Army stations,
so if your soldier has been in North
Africa o" Guadalcanal, he's prob-
ably eaten many of these nourish-
ing, compact wafers.


ute some of the western stories and
adventure: tales which he liked and
which would also appeal to young
soldiers. Maybe Sister Sue has
some myi.\stery tales and shot story
collections to add to the pile. The
point is that all will help to.sort
out books that will be good reading
for service men.
Perhiaps one family may have a
dozen books to giye, the family
in the next house bnly one or two
--but multiply these families by
millions of other generous groups
throughout the nation, and it's easy
to imagine the millions of books
that will be collected for our fight-
ing men throughout the United
States.


This crowded dance floor-in the USO Army-Navy YMCA-oper-
ated Club at the Legion Home on the Bay--is evidence of a well-
known fact: service men, on the whole, enjoy dancing.


The Record Press, Inc.



ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA




Designers and Producers

of Distinctive. Printing


PRINTERS OF





THE






SHIELD



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION


OF THE



U. S. COAST GUARD TRAINING STATION


and of



Special Stationery For Our Armed. Forces



PAGE 16


THIE ST. A TTUSTINE RECORD


YMCA-Operated USO Club

At Legion Home Is Haven


HIGHEST RANKING COAST GUARD OFFICER VISITS LOCAL STATION


Women On Duty At Home 24 Hours.
Every Day Can Find Dozen Small.
Ways To Show Their Patriotism


NEW AIR-BORNE
LIFEBOAT REAL
AID TO SEAMEN

LONDON (AP) British air-sea
rescue experts, continuing their ef-
forts .to save torpedoed sailors and
fliers forced down into the sea,
have invented the air-borne life-
boat. This newest life-saving de-
vice can be dropped by parachute
to men drifting outside normal
ship and plane patrol routes.
The lifeboat can be dropped
safely even in a sea so rough that
the landing of a Walrus Super-
marine amphibian rescue plane
would be impracticable, says the
British Information Service. The
boat is released so that it strikes
the water with sea anchor already
extended and, with favoring winds
and currents, will drift towards
the men.
Each boat, which can carry 11
men, has fuel for' 100 miles. It
can make up to six knots per hour
and has a sail to augment the
motors. Stored in lockers are me-
dical supplies, food and water,
clothes, a wireless, charts, maps
and signal lamps.


Organized Machine
Cabinet Helps When
Emergencies Arise

What to do. until the doctor comes
is familiar knowledge to thousands
of women who have taken the Red
Cross First Aid Course. But it will
be easier for them to apply that
knowledge if the home medicine
chest is ready for emergencies.
Next to knowing what to do, speed
in doing it is most important. When
danger strikes, there is no time-to
rummage through mniscellajireou
bottles, tubes, cartons, and tazor
blades.
A clean uncluttered medicine
chest with a place for everything,
and everything in its place, should
be in every household, particularly
in war time. Cosmetics, hair pins,
manicure tools, and miscellaneous'
articles should not be in the chest,:
where they are'only in the way.


OSTRICH and ALLIGATOR FARM


THE ABOVE SHOWS A FEW OF THE 6,000 ALLIGATORS ON .
DISPLAY IN THIS TROPICAL PARADISE


AN UNEQUAI.I.ED COLLECTION OF WILD LIFE

LOCATED AT ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA:
ON BEAUTIFUL ANASTASIA ISLAN D--Y4-MILE SOUTH OF LIGHTHOUSE


ORIGINAL ST


THE


AUGUSTINE


OSTRICH and ALLIGATOR FARM













ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA, SUNDAY MORNING, APRIL 25,1943 --


i


7


1


1 ,


"Tent City" On Civic



Center Grounds Now



For Mil it ary Police


Visit To Company Area Takes Writer Out Of This
World Into New Land

BY ADELAIDE SANCHEZ
Two short hours "out of this world" and within the confines of one
of thMer military Police Companies quartered ion the Civic Center grounds,
a~d we gained a clear-cut picture of what these men are accomplishing
in the way of training.
We saw how they live, where*
they sleep, and ate the good food listed on the Bulletin Board. This
they eat, We saw how thoroughly board is erected at the south end
organized is a company of soldiers, of one of the company's gravel
how well-ordered their equipment, streets and is in front of the tent
how well-regulated the various de- known as the orderly room. We
tails of the day's schedule. paused before the board to find
We learned that the first hour
posted there such a variety of or-
inAthe morning is devoted to set- ders and prpnouncements as truck
ting up exercises, calisthenics, with e t a t c
andwithout rifles-and close order schedules to and from the beach,
drill. Hourly periods, until n&on house rules, regulations governing
and lunchI' time arrive simulta- use of company vehicles, the com-
neouSly, consist of lectures, instruc- pany roster (listing men of the
tion on various. military subjects. entire company, their duties ac-
Generally from 1 until 5 o'clock cording to their particular pla-
in the afternoon, the men are occu- toons) designated according to
pied with field problems in areas rank, a diagram showing -each and
outside' of the camp area. For this every piece of equipment and cloth-
particular activity, beaches are ing issued a, soldier and how and
used for some, the wooded terrain where it should be individually
for others. Field problems consist marked for identification purposes.
of squad, platoon and company We. found the orderly room, a
problems; occasionally, the com- compact, well-equipped administra-
pany, participates 'in an all-day tive office. Here are prepared the
tactical march-anyvwhere in the charts listing the enlisted men, the
neighborhood of a 25-mile "walk." subjects they take, and their grades
While on marches, the company according to each individual's qual-
takes up tactical positions, anti- ifications. There is a filing system
aircraft positions and gas alerts.- as complete.as that to be found hn
The man so designated in advance any office set-up in civilian life. Dis-
"maps" the area covered, no one played on the walls are the weekly
gettig out of this interesting Newsmtaps, distributed only to mili-
thore, for long. t.'tary and naval groups, and pertin-
In the evening, at 5:30 o'cock, ent posters urging the reader to
there is retreat formation, all com- buy more'.war bonds, or warnitig
panics within the camp area form- against carielpss handling of equip.
ing when .the Flag is lowered. ment and weapons.
Supper's' at 5:45 and after that rail is handled'according to spee-
: o;manJ aitess they Aave been idfcafos laid down"By the Post Of-
given special duty of some sort, are ce Department.- There is a camp
S;reto lave the area. Bed hek Post Office and each company also
,occurs: on the stroke of 11 p. in. has its own: This also'is a part of
.1 Athletic Teams the orderly room, as is the military
At the present time, severaof library. All typesof technical field
*.^ thb companies are organizmig ath- manuals, and data pertaining to
;,.letic teams, such as softball, base- subjects included on the training
ball, volley ball, basketball-the, schedule, are available in that li-
-men also have the use of thbi'Civic
en also have the use of the c brary, for reference. Most of such'
Center tennis courts and, other information is contained in Army
game and" recreational, facilities. Regulations, the "military Bible."
'Each compjany'ha"it, own athletic
officers Apc in turn tlere is a non-' Strength of, the companies var-
eom ink charge 9f each company's ies, but the routine is the same,,and
athletic.acti activities. Equipment is schedules for each company change
arriving and' given ambrief practice weekly.
period,, the ,company teams are An individual service record is
'ppected to. develop strong rivalry. kept of each man. This includes his
Since .each of the M. P. com.. medical records, his property and
Spaniels here is practically iden- equipment records, ad so on, each
ticall and since we were 'fortunate item' of clothing or equipment is-
i i having for our guide, Captain sued from time to.time being shown
John F.: Jubeck, we will let his on his chart. .
company be the "model" for' this The officers have their duty ros-
yortrayal.: But, from what we ter, as do the enlisted men, each
,gathered from an earlier tour of officer in turn being on duty for a
.-inpectioii with Major Max S. Edel- 24-hour period. \
:'itein, commanding officer of the There is an Officers' Call each
area, each company is in the higher day, attended by the company com-
brackets., meanders or a fellow officer whom
On Duty 24 Hours he designates. The camp's comrn-
Captain Jubeck told us that manding officer, Major Edelstein,
0owmeone was on duty 24 holars conducts the daily meeting, at
,daily, with the charge of quarters (Continued on Pagme Two)

COLORS AT MARATHON


.<


Soldiers often do a great deal
more than duty, demands. Fre-
quently, those "extra acts" are for
the benefit of civilians rather than
fellow service men.
This has been evidenced more
than once right here in St. Augus-
tine, by the' Military Police quar-
tered on the Civic Center grounds
in St. Augustine's Army Recrea-
tional Camp.
Perhaps, the acts for which they,
have received the widest recogni-
tion, from the public generally, are
those when they have assumed the
roles of fire-fighters.-
From George U. Meserve they
have received a sincere testimonial
of their valuable service in this
respect. When his home on Grove
Avenue, was badly gutted by fire
this winter, a group of Military Po-
lice from the nearby camp did.-ex-
cellent work n saving the furniture
and furnishings from destruction.
Mr. Meserve says he owes a great
debt of gratitude to these service
men and in a letter to Major Max
S. Edelstein, commanding, officer
of the sub-post here, he asked that
his appreciation be expressed to
each man who helped perform such
an unselfish and prompt act for an
unfortunate civilian family.
On more than one occasion, the,
soldiers have traveled many miles
to assist Coast Guardsmen and oth-
ers in combatting brush fires
which threatened destruction of
homes or other buildings. Forests
aflame also provide too great a
menace to ships at sea, to go for
long without attention, and in this
the service men also have had, a
real role to play.
Recently, they were on hand to
protect government property-mail
sacks-which had to be tossed from
a blazing railway baggage car.
They':also stood ready to aid local
firemen in putting out the fire, the
train being stopped at a street
crossing in the city's outskirts.
Their knowledge of first aid and
resuscitation likewise proves valu-
able during their off-duty hours, as
more than one fellow service man
or civilian will testify.
V

Narrow Escape

For Cee Gee In

Mediterranean

Edward Pearson Recounts
"Closest Shave" After
Reaching Africa
'How his ship, a Coast Guard
transport, narrowly escaped pos-
sible destruction when attacked by
two German torpedo planes in the
Mediterranean was told by Edward
Pearson, Chief Boatswain's- Mate,
U.S.C.G:, of 3320 Bell. Plain, Chi,
cago, Illinois, upon his return from
Africa.
According to Pearson, a former
welterweight boxer, his convoy was
under almost constant fire during
its operations in the Mediterranean,
although his own vessel ran the
gauntlet to and from Algiers twice
without injury to ship or personnel.
But one attack, Pearson recalled,
appeared almost certain to end in
disaster. "It-was the closest shave
we had," he said, "and it occurred
the day 'after we arrived at Africa.
In the midst 'of an air raid, two
German bombers singled us out
where we were anchored and each
dropped a torpedo at us from about
1,000 yards off.


while all!of us were too occupied
firing at the planes to watch
'fish,' I knew they were coming
at us. It was plenty tense await-
ing the shock that would knock us
into kingdom come.
"Then, as one torpedo neared our
bow, it suddenly veered off and
passed astern, missing us by about
20 yards.
"The other one kept on coming
right at us. But it, too, turned at
the last mniinute, just enough to
pass between the bow of our ship
and the anchor chain. It came
within three feet of getting us."
Pearson was at his gun station
on the after deck when the British
aircraft carrier HMS AVENGER
was torpedoed and sunk.
"She followed us in the convoy,"
he said, "and was only a few hun-
dred yards off our stern when she


got it. I didn't mind all those shell-
ings we went through, but seeing
that explosion gave me a shaking
I won't get over for a long time." I


Fox of Queens Visage, Long:Is-
liaid, New York. .;i*tation Sur-'
geon;. and First Lieutenant Jos-
eph. F. McCauley,. of Rockaway
Park, Long Island,; Nw York, as
Dental Surgeon..
In addition to being 'the com-
mariding officer, Major Edelstein
is responsible for the supervision
of the training of each company
stationed within that area. Many
of the camp's former functions
reinain unchanged. For instance,
the C. 0. still is cl.arged with the
responsibility of seeing that the
MI. P.'s continue their supervision
and codntrbl over the service men
within the city.
"As far as the men coming here
from nearby camps and bases are
concerned," said Major Edelstein,
"we still will try to do everything
we \'an to help make their stay
pleasant: The Civic Recreation
Center, now under our auspices,
will provide excellent, recreational
facilities and entertainment pro-
grams. Though, it's true we no
longer, can put them up for the
night, I believe there are ample


.-Soaring through the cloud billows over St. Augustine, these Grumman Navy torpedo bombers are
typical of the fighting aircraft of all types which roar through the skies over this area every day.


fi6 barjise iitn .a gas chamies',.It
is 'planned tb erect, a tem#"o*,ary
structure for shelter, 'bathing; eci-
lities and for trtiningpurpope.
The men also utilize the "(..yie
Center building during week-days
for lectures, training films, rahiy
day sessions.
Functioning on a 24-hour-a-day
schedule are the medical an'd den.
tal clinics, which share one screen-
ed and framed, structure ajnd a
single waiting room whose wals
are adorned with diverting "Varga
Girl" color prints and whose stands
hold the traditional "picture maga-
zines," such as Life.
Everything But A Bed" i.
The Station :Surgeon, Lieute-
nant Fox, has "everything but a
bed" in his little, business-like
clinic, for men are not hospitalized
there. He: proudly tells visitors
that "this is comparable to any
doctor's ,office, minus the fancy'
gadgets," and- proceeds- to prove
his point by showing off his equip-
ment. His supply cabinet is well
(Continued on.Page Two) >


Director's Office on March 26th,
in personal and family problems
involving illness, death, financial
difficulties and other matters; Wil-
liam IB, Thirlwell, Red Cross Field
Director, sayss,
Mr. Thirlwell advises that he and
his staff keep themselves on call
twenty-four hours a day to handle
emergency cases.
"In practically every .case we
could not have given aid had it not
been for the, close tie-up with the
Red Cross Chaplters in the' home
towns of these service people," Mr.
Thirlwell explained. "The Red
Cross Field Director is here as a
symbol of the American people's
determination that the needs of
their men or women on active duty
will not be forgotten. Our services
are at the command Of every ser-
vice man and woman in St. Johns
County."
500 Families
During the past year approxi-
mately five hundred families living
here, whose sons, husbands, and
fathers are in camps in other loca-
tions have been assisted by the St.
.Johns County Chapter of the Amer-
ican Red Cross. They have been
helped in contacting these service
men and aided with loans when
money was needed for such pur-
poses as basic maintenance, and
hospitalization. Some families have
been helped in the filing of claims
for pensions due to the death or
disability of those in service.
In addition to the services men-
tioned above, the local chapter
sponsors a* number of Volinteer
Services which include sewing and
knitting, the, making of surgical
dressings, teaching classes in Home
Nursing, First Aid, and Nutrition.
An outstanding service is that of,
training young women to be
Nurse's Aides in hospitals.
The Camp and Hospital. Council
has furnished three day rooms for
the Service Men located at Camp
Blanding and another day room at
the M. P. Area in St. Augustine.
Trey have also Irovided books,
magazines, and games for each of
the Service Groups within the
County.
The Junior Red Cross has been
busy this year with knitting, mak-
ing scrapbooks, place cards for
holiday dinners and many -other
things to brighten the everyday
life of the service man and woman.
V
Everybody's Happy
But The Co-Eds
BOULDER, Colo (1P)-For the
first time in 25 years co-eds out-
number men at Colorado Univer-
sity. There now are 1,111 women.
1,094 men. Heretofore the women
have been outniumbered about two
to one.


MAJOR MAX, S. EDELSTEIN
For ovr twoyears, Major Max S. Edelstein, Infantry, United
States Army, has been a:familiar figure in St. Augustine.. Since 1941,
he has been in command of the more than $50,000 project known as
the St. Augustine Army Recreational Area and located on the Civic
Center grounds. That camp, a joint effort of the Army and the Des
pertinent of Interior, and an integral pfirt in the National Defense
Program, on April Ist of- this yearbecame a sub-post of Camp Bland-
ing. Since last Fall, it' has quartered Military Police training com-
panies,i with Major Edelstein remaining the area's commanding
officer.


All hands report for colors even the mascots at U. S.
Coast Guard Advance Base at Marathon. The dogs are popular with
the men stationed there for purpose of patroling the waters surround-
ing the hundreds of small islands, most of which are uninhabited,
making up the Florida Keys.


i


ST AUGSTNE FA S A MG A I 25 14 "'


ST. AUGUSTINE-

The Nation's Oldest City,


SECTION C

Special Edition


ARMY


T RA NINGIN


CAMP


AUGUSTINE


HAS


ST.


NAVY: WAR BIRDS OVER ST, AUGUSTINEI


Recreational Area



Becomes Sub-Post


Of Camp Blanding

Major Max S. Edelstein Remains Commanding Of-
fmcer; Now Quarters Military Police

,St. Augustine has an Army .training camp, officially des-
ignated as a sub-post of Camp Blanding.
,Effective April 1st of this year, the St. Augustine Army
Recreational Area, which was formally dedicated on the after-
noon of August 15, 1941, ceased to exist as such. Actually,
it; has not been operated as a* .
recreational' camp: since last housing accommodations'for them,.
October 19th, on which date Our Army Recreational. Bath-
the. first Military Police Crnm- house at, St. Augustine Beach
pany to be stationed here, ar- again is. in operation, with. free
rived. transportation provided the men
So, well did the St. Augustine. to and from that site. After: all,
Ariny Recreational Area, under. the average week-ending service
command of, Major, Max 'S. Edel- man comes to this city for the
stelni, acquit itself that it was the entertainment ,and recreation of-
last in the country to change_ its' fered."
status, training finally being giv- Few Changes,
enathe priority over recreation.p site, revea
.As a Recreational Area it more A tour of the c p site, reveals
than served- its purpose,4 as at- surprisingly few changes were nec-
tested to by records and the fact it essitated by the transfer from rec-
was the .last'one to, go out of rational area to the Blanding
existelice.' Its tents could be more training sub-post. Additional tents'
than filled each week by service .were ereted to. care the in-,
men .visiing the, area, but train- creased officer personnel. Two ada
ing space was needed and because jacent lots, not originally inlciid-
ing space was needed and because ..
of the ideal set-upjto be found on ed within the'area~btton the San
the. Civic Recreation ..rCenter. Marco Lot, were embraced, for use
grounds, it changed overnight into as motor pools. Two gasoline
"home" for the Military Police, pumps,.to serve the camp's vea
several training companies being hicles, were installed. Bathing faci-
quartered there. cities for both men and officers
were increased, an entirely new
,,Station Complement bathhouse being added for theex-
Major Edelstein and most of the elusive use of the officers.
forn'er officers and enlisted men "Permission has been secured
comprising the station comple- from the city administrative body
ment are remaining here, the for the use of Francis "Field for
Major as the C. O., Captain Wil- training facilities, since space for
liam E. Harvill of Dublin, Geor- this purpose 'was limited. The
gia. as Camp Adjutant; First Military Police also share the. Fort
Lieutenant Ernest B. Aden of Green with the -Coast.Guardsmein.
Mc41a.nzie. Tenn.,.. a.,sSpply Offi- Negotiation. are mndeywa-y, also,
encr JFir*t T.irest pn-ini' arrv. l.fr --ftSle.i- oli tnid r eraidti on .f' a


Our Soldiers"


Do More Than


Duty Demands

Military Polite Based"
Here Perform
Special -Acts


Com'nndu.n

Officer Has


Red Cross Does Fine Work In
Cmmn With
I- SOri cetl And A oir Fmor ien

Sn ServiceAnd Their Familes


Active Career

An example of what St. Augus-
tine and its people become to men
and women here on duty or pleas-
ure, is found in Major Max S.
Edelstein, commanding officer of
the St. Augustine Army Recrea-
tional Area, and Mrs. Edelstein who
liked it so well, they purchased a
home on Davis Shores and estab-
lished their legal residence here. /
Major Edelstein, an Army offi-
cer of the old school, as he'puts it,
became a reserve of. the Regular
Army, following World War One,
being called back into active ser-
vice in 1933 to assist with the or-
ganization of the Civilian Conser-'
vation Corps.
Places in today's headlines are
of more than ordinary interest to.
Major Edelstein, for he served in
the Philippine Islands during the
unrest there; was in Corregidor
during the Japapese-California in-
cident; was stationed in Manila at
Fort William McKinley; has been
on duty in Jolo in the southern
part of the Islands, to mention a
.few.
He enlisted in 1911, in Chicago,
coming up through the ranks from
a buck private.
Major Edelstein received his com-
mission at Camp Pike, Ark., and
has been on duty at Camp Perry,
O.; Camp Grant*in Rockfort, Ill.;
Fort Sheridan at Chicago; Camp
McCoy in Wisconsin and also was
in command of Camp Skokie Val-
ley, near Chicago, the largest CCC
Camp in the United States.
V

NEW PILOT STUDENT

HANDBOOK OFFERED

ARCADIA (FNS)-A new pilot
student handbook by Jack Hunt .and
Ray Fahringer has just been an-
nounced.
This is a revised, enlarged and
improved edition which these ex-
pperts published a year ago. Hunt
formerly was head of flying opera-
tions at Carlstrom Field here and
is now serving with the army in
Texas. Fahringer is a former Walt
Disney cartoon artist and the illus-
trations in the book' follow that
cartoon style of drawing. Few of
the 250 pages in the book are not
illustrated.
It is a brief, easy-going, inti-
mate book of advice that even non-
flyers can understand. It gives
the "do's" and don't's and is stud-
ded with horse-sense humor.
V
The top vertebra in the human
body is called the atlas, because it
supports the skull as the mytholo-
gical Atlas supported the earth.


Two Offices Are Main-
"tained Here To
Aid Men /
The life of a service man or wo-
man is crowded with many prob-
lems besides those learned in the
class room or on,the field.
In most instances they are sep-
arated from their families, some-
times by thousands of miles, and
this separation alone. may. present
a problem. When serious illness oc-
curs in the 'immediate family and
the attending physician recom-
mends the presence of the person
in service he or she may not have
the means of financing, such a trip
or paying the medical costs in-
volved. When the Commanding
Officer grants an emergency fur-
lough or'leave in such instances,
the service man or woman is then
referred to the' Red Cross Field
Director's Office, where a loan can
be arranged for transportation and
necessary personal expenses.
Upon their arrival.home if they
find that the family' has been un-
able to make satisfactory .arrange-
ments for expenses arising from
the illness they may then go to
the Red 'Cross Chapter in their
home town where a loali can be
made to the family. No service
charges.or interest are ever made
on either kind of loan. A satisfac-
tory plan of repayment can be
agreed upon which does not work a
hardship-on either the service man
or woman or on their families.
There are many problems that
arise which do not require financial
assistance but which call for ad-
vice, counselling and often just
listening on the part of the Chapter
worker or Field Director. When
families fail to hear from or are
unable to locate their loved ones
in service, the Red Cross stands
ready to help them. A Field Direc-
tor is stationed in every spot in
the world where the American
Armed Forces are located.
Two Offices
In this community the Red Cross
maintains two offices to meet the
needs of the service men and wo-
men located in and adjacent to St.
Augustine, and the families resid-
ing here of service people located
elsewhere. The Office of the Field
Director is in the Marion Hotel
and all service men are welcome
to call there to discuss any prob-
lems with which they need assist-
ance in solving. When the wives
or parents of members of the
Armed Forces need help, advice, or
counsel on family problems, they
may call at the St. Johns County
Chapter Office at No. 212 St.
George Street.
The Red Cross has assisted sev-
enty-two men stationed here since
the establishment of the Field








RecreationalArea Becomes Sub-Post


Two In The Family?
Takes you a month to save
up a pound of waste kitchen
fat ?
It all adds up to the millions
of pounds that are needed for
explosives.
Keep it in a cool place until
tyou have"a pound-then take it
promptly to the buther.


I
I ;I


--


" I I -"IN


I


This company has a day room,
where the men gather to catch up
,on their correspondence and spend
their off-duty -moments in the quiet
relaxation of a magazine. (Right
here, we might mention, they could
use more reading material and-, a
game or two.)
Each company has its own motor
pool and vehicles are inspected reg-
ularly ofn Saturday mornings. It
is interesting to note here that the,
non-conis atie on hand for an. hour,
from 9:30 to 10:30 a. m., to see
that their men prepare everything
for inspection, conducted by com-
pany officers from 10:30 to 12
o'clock noon. That, uneasy period
behind them, the men enjoy Satur-
day afternoon liberty.
Captain, Jubeck's company re-
centlyd started a War Bo-nd Drive
and reached its goal of 100 per cent
participation, Under the new plan,
the minimum amount that can be
taken out of a service man's pay-
check for this purpose, is a $3.75
monthly deduction.
The past month, March, was de-
voted to the annual membership
drive and 1943 War Fund of the
National American Red Cross and
all men of the company made their
contributions.
Their part in the tin salvage
and other war-necessitated cam-
paigns or programs is well known.


I ;


I ill I I II -.


]


r


THE ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD


-


tainers for wet and dry garbage,
for tin cans (the Army plays a
big part in the tin salvage pro-
gram) and other refuse.
There are separate mess halls
for the officers and the- enlisted
men, but all eat at bare tables
(with attached benches) with a
whole battery of condiments rang-
ing down the center of each table.
Cooks lead a hard life, especially
insofar as hours are concerned,
so they rotate on duty, two at a
time, assisted by several K. P.'s.
They have to be up at 4 a. m., and
if they get away by 7 o'clock that
night, it's practically a miracle,
They not only prepare the food and
cook it, they have to do the more
distasteful job of cleaning up
afterward. All food handlers are
examined regularly for com)nuni-
;cable diseases.
Rationed, Too
It wasn't so difficult. once, but
now with food rationing and the
complicated point system :ever be-
fbre them, the cooks really have
themselves a time. Yes, the service
man is rationed, even as civilians.
The good old Arny bean is much
in evidence, a visit to a typical
stock, room showed. Six bins in one
container held, in the order named,
rice, red kidney beans, blackeyed
peas, pento beans, navy beans,
and baby limasl. Ironically the
macaroni was stored atopthe bins.
And those bags of oranges were
Florida and not California, grown.
It takes only a peek into a
supply room to realize the neces-
sity of food rationing, for the
amount required to feed one com-
pany just one meal is little short
of staggering. It's a man's work
they're doing, a man's life they're
leading and it takes a man's food
to do it.
The motor pool provided still
another interesting insight into
Army life. Despite their hard
usage, every vehicle literally is
in the pink of condition. Daily and
weekly inspections help see to that,
but the men themselves take a
tremendous pride in their motor-
!cycles, their armored scout cars,
their versatile little jeeps and
peeps.:
Each driver assigned to a ve-
hicle is responsible for that ma-
chine, and he doesn't have an alibi
in the world .if anything occurs
out of the ordinary-for his name
Iis prominently displayed on the
windshield. W
The motorcyclists are privileg-
ed to name their mounts and their
choice ranges from the typical
wide open space, appellation of
"Tex" to glamourous "Betty
Grable.",
Though each company within the
area operates as a separate unit
and 'has its individual "tent city,".
the men's lives are much the same.
Their, hour for tumbling, out of
I their well-made Army cots is
'identically early, and they tuck
themselves in also in unison. The
day's menu is consistent through-
out the area.' And all tents and
their contents are always alike.


(Continued from Page One)
stopked and equipped for any
emergency. Routine lab work is
done there. Men are given their
"shots in the arm," their complete
physical examinations, but they
don't get put to bed! If they're
sick enough for that, they're sent
to the Army hospital. Though field
equipment furnishes the clinic,
with its ."stripped for action"
"minus-gadgets" look, there's a
tiodern refrigerator, for storage
of vaccines and serums. (That's
one reason housewives have had
to make the old one do.)
The medical detachment there is
composed of the station surgeon,
the dental surgeon and six enlist-
ed men: Sergeant Charles Long
of Anniston, Ala.; Frank Goodale
and Dothan Wilson of Pensacola;
John Lelito, Chicago;- Ratchford
Long, Fort Lauderdale; and Jos-
eph Sremba, Grand Rapids, Mich.,
all first class privates.
These men also are trained and
equipped to go out into the field
with the troops, forming first aid
stations.
There is an ambulance at their
disposal.
The medical staff also is charged
with the regular and routine in-
spection of restaurants and other
places were soldiers congregate.
Dental Clinic
Equally well-equipped and effi-
cient is the dental clinic over which
Lieutenant McCauley is in charge
in his capacity as dental surgeon..


Here, too, there's amazing com-
pactness and utilization of space.
The dentist's clair, into which
everyone climb'lvs ith such reluct-
ance, is of the .iven field-chair
variety. It, and everything else
in the clinic, can be packed up and-
readied for removal to another
locale, within a very few minutes.
Probably the most pretentious
building-it even has a cement
floor-is the structure housing the
canteen, now operated by a pri-
vate concern. Its stock ranges from
soap and other essentials to choco-
late bars and "the things the men
like." Prices are at rock bottom,.
but don't get ideas! Only soldiers
can make purchases. There are
convenient tables and chairs oc-
cupying one side of the building.
The other is taken up by a long
counter. It has coin machines, too,
for musical entertainment, Need-
less to say, it's a popular spot.
An interesting phase of the in-
spectidn tour was the visit to the
kitchen, mess hall and food supply
tents, which are grouped together,
for obvious reasons. Gasoline field
ranges are used exclusively. There,
are the necessary' refrigerator
units for perishable foodstuffs.
Just outside the mess hall are the
outdoor brick ovens with the tradi-
tional trio of hot water containers
for washing, rinsing and steriliz-
ing the men's mess kits. In close
proximity to this "dish-washing
setup" (though they don't have
dishes) are the various metal con-


Pretty costumed hostesses at the Fountain of Youth give cordial welcome to a trio of visiting soldiers
who would retain their youth by drinking of its fabled waters. It and other- showplaces in ancient St.
Augustine daily are hosts to-hundreds of service men and women, who converge upon the city from near-
by camps and bases, joining those stationed in sightseeing tours via horse" and buggy, on bicycles and
afoot.


L9 one) displayed for all to see-and strive
Sfor.
s are ironed .They are so scrupulously neat
and clean they would put even the
om, we vis- best of housewives to shame. Take
or supplies. into consideration too that the meli
*geant's do- have to put their little domicile into
sible for all tip-top shape before they go .out
3ent. Need- :on the drill field at 8 a. m.!
re kept un- Each man has his own mess kit,
scrutiny of of course. You can tell the, alumi-
hese supply num ones at a glance, for they shine
storerooms, brighter than the others which were
tted within allotted when th,aliuminum supply
ns posted to ran out. They are'kept on a -nail,
ly sergeant handy to a man's cot and other be-
ce space .in longings. Lined up for chow, the
his is. treat- kits come under special inspection
strative sec- arid if they're not satisfactorily
on of a sup- spotless, the owner is sent out of
line to put the utensils through the
s the need washing process before he can get
stores are back into line again.
pose. As explained in an accompanying
lipment article, all dish-washing is done
throughout out-of-doors in. a manner which
here is am- must be typically Armny. No towels
pment and are used, -neither are the tables in
n a well-de- 'the mess halls bedecked with the
ble location, customary tablecloth and napkins.
Iarvell, the The officers have their qwn, little
rves as fire .mess hall; apart from the non-'
ng the out -corns and the enlisted men, .But
ipment, we they eat the same food--thrbugh-
i tent was a out the area, the menus are con-
for instant sistent day by day. Captain Jubeck
two in each and his fellow officers do have china
as a, waste- and silverware,_ but conveniently
close at hand is .the, officers' field
Small but the mess kit-of white, granite ware.
or the most This is a compact storage arrange-
example of ment, in a field metal .trunk,, that
lay in and would strike job to the heart of a
ions are re- picnicker--but when it's in use, the
t with five men are on anything but a'picnic
nt, neatness outing!
t necessity. Tasty Food
to keep his The food served is good, tasty
ind orderly, a'nd so well-seasoned we wondered
aligned in a at the array of condiments taking
miraculously up most of the table's center. We
)ment not in couldn't think of a condiment that
.is barracks was missing; it was better stocked
g from the then your favorite grocer's these
diet articles days!
raph ortwo A typical menui---and we canll
iced on the vouch for its goodness-includes a
top of the mound of fluffy Irish potatoes,
tent. Floors whipped; green peas, yellow corn,
e kept spot- a 'green tossed salad, fried shrimp
scrubbed at or fried oysters, tartar sauce,
ner if neces- bread and butter, iced chocolate and
le up Army a half-pint of fresh 'milk, and
so we won't canned peach halves for dessert.
And you mustn't forget, the Ar-
ion my's rationed, too..
dual tent in The men of this company fol-
fted and rat- low a vigorous training schedule
)sted on the calculated to turn them into the
ally that in- peak of perfection for their job of
designation Military Policemen. For instance:
best' platoon out on the drill field, under the
wooden plac- leadership of company non-com-
e facts are missioned officers, there is a 15-


(Continued from Pa
which company problem
out..
From the orderly ro<
ited the tents used fi
This is the supply ser
main and he is response
the company's equipnm
less to say, the tents a
der lock and key and the
the sentries. Since t1
tents are in reality
no smoking is permit
them and there are sig&
this effect. The supply
has his own little office
one of.the tents, for tl
ed as a separate adminis
tion under the supervisi(
ply officer.
Tents are replaced a
arises and among the
extra*congs for this pur)
Fire Fighting Equ
In this company and
the entire camp area tl
ple fire-fightding equil
this is painted red and i
fined and easily accessil
Captain William E.*
camp adjutant, also se
marshal. Supplementih
door fire-fighting equ
found a "must" in-each
large fire bucket, ready
use. There actually are
tent, for one is used s
paper basket..
Tents are stripped of
bare essentials, a*nd fo
part, they're a shining
good housekeeping, d
day out. Daily inspect
sponsible, perhaps, bu
or six men sharing a te
must' be *a downright
Each man is expected
clothes hung neatly a
his shoes shined and a
row beneath his n
made-up cot. All equip
use is stowed within h
bag and this is hu-ng
foot of his cot. His to
and perhaps a photogr
of loved ones, are pla
ledge which forms the
framed portion of the
are wooden and must b
lessly clean, so they're
least twice a week, ofter
sary. A properly mad
cot defies description, s
attempt it.
Daily Inspecti
Each day, each indivi
each company is inspect
ed with the findings po
bulletin board. Genera
section results in the
of the best tent, the b
and the best cot and w
ques attesting to thes


minute physical drill at the. bright
and early hour of 8 a. m., Then a
commissioned officer takes over for
15 minutes of close order drill, fol-
lowed: by a half-hour's instruction
in "personal encounter" (judo) un,
der another officer. Then there's a
two-hour stretch, from 9 until' 11
:o'clock, for machine gun a*nd :me-
chanical. functioning of such a wea-
pon. Or it might be a Thompson
sub-machine gun, or again, greln-'
ades. Offensive use of chemicals
may come next to occupy the men
in the hour before the noon- day
meal.:'- Tactical training of the in-'
dividual, tactics of the squad,
marches and bivouacs may' be on
the schedule for the four-hour per-
iod from 1 to 5 p. m;. The men are
given a half-hour to change from
their drill to their ""'A" uniforms
and prepare for Retreat, daily at
5:35! p. m. There- are ten-minute
rest periods on the hour, every
hour.
Day Room


*


F,,'


Dori't w ait until
your radio needs a
complete rehauling
. have parts re-


paired now at



ST. AUGUSTINE

RADIO SERVICE


88 CHARLOTTE ST.


1;


"Where Customers Send Their Friends"
123 SAN MARCO AVE St. Augustine, Fla.


McCRORY'S
5c--10c STORE
ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA. H. C. CURTRIGHT, Mgr.


You'll Find Something Different at



LEONARDI'S

Jewelry and Gift Shop

42 CATHEDRAL PL.


SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1943


PAGE 2'


TIME-OUT FROM TRAINING FOR VISITING


Warden


"Tent City" On Civic Center Grounds


YOU'RE r

TOPS f


WITH US



AND IF WE CAN
BE OF SERVICE TO
YOU-CALL ON US


Complete Automotive Service
-<-

WRECKER SERVICE


DIXIE GARAGE

183 W.KING ST.


LIKE TQ


SPEND THEIR /
"OFF TIME"


AT
'EVEl
WEI




SPON C"E'S,

DUTCH TAVERN
Just Across the Bridge of Lions


DANCING


FOOD


DRINKS
I


RADIO REPAIRS


ELMER.O
SCOTT


.PAT
BERNARD


*PHONE 627


e writeET

SILYour Adl VU MONEY


We


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McCrory's Add Their


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For "Him" or "Her"

or the Folks Back Home


IN EXTENDING OUR HAND OF GREETING TO THE

FAMILIES AND MEN OF ALL BRANCHES OF THE ARMED

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THAT "IF YOU LIKE FLORIDA,..YQU'LL LOVE ST. AU-

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Fort Marion Chevrolet Co.


MEN OF THE SERVICE


PHONE 896


































































































































BAR

PHONE 1566


r


-r


I


~


SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1943


THE ST. AUGUSTINE


-Photo by F.. Victor j--hner.
Hines, Edw. C. Kopp, J. J. Mas-
ters, R. C. Masters, Jr., Donald
McElroy, C. H.: McKinnen, Jas.
W. McNair, M. B. Moorehouse,
J. L. Mormino, Frank Morgan,
John F. Parker, J. J. Presslar,
R L. Priester, C. M. Rogers, C.
R. Smale, Victor A. Solano, E. F.
Taylor, Judson B. West, G. iR.
Wiles, Jr., Bruice T. Whiite, A. L.
Lowasser, E. L. Andreu, W. H.
Harris.
Also members, but not shown
in the picture are: Privates Har-
vey J. Lopez, Samuel G. Hoge,
and E. C. Osborne.


C. Blalock, line sergeant First
Platoon; Sgt. George H. Harrif-
gan, platoon sergeant Second
Platoon; Sgt. Roy W. Motes, line
sergeant Second Platoon; Sgt.
Delbert G. Godwin, supply ser-
geant; Corp. Langston Moffett,
company clerk; Corp. H. P. Hahn,
Corp. Woodrow Clifton, Corp.
James R. Perry, Corp. Randall I.


St. Johns County's Company D,
i FloridaDefense Force, which.re-.
placed the former National Guard


men. Captain Giles G. Randall,
commanding officer, is shown
standing, at the extreme left of
the above picture. Standing at
right of First Platoon is First
Lieutenant W. W. Wilson, First
Platoon leader, recruiting and
public relations officer. Standing
left of Second Platoon, is Second


Van Winkle,'Corp. Morris Wex-
ler, Corp. Shellie La Pradd.
Privates first class are: Jos. P.
Bazemore, Frank J. Conwell,
Lysten B. Corrick (company
cook), Edw. A. Dugger, S. A. Mc-
Lucas, Howard L. Whitley; Pri-
vates Thos. M. Adams, Edw. S.
Arnold, Jr., L. F. Barnett, Ter-
rell Bell, E. C. Creech, R. D.
Crozier, Chas. DeShocka, Myron
L. Dickey, E. W. Dilsaver, R. H.
Ellzey, Ben A. Fleming, R. G.
Gammon, R. E. Gardner, To H.
Gardner, R. T. Goodwin,. James
K. Gatchell, L. R. Hamilton, R. L.


Lieutenant Herman Watson, Sec-
ond Platoon leader, supply officer
and first aid instructor. First
Sergeant Edward L. Davis is at
extreme right.
Other members of the unit
shown in the picture are: Sgt.
Harry P. Alexander, platoon ser-
geant First Platoon; Sgt. James


tions. Guard duty training is given
much stress. Talks and demonstra-
tions are featured. Judo, instruc-
tion is provided by a veteran of
Bataan. Many other:items impor-
tant to a well-trained group is
included in the training program.
State Controlled
Company D, as well as the nu-
merous .other units all over the
state, is controlled by the Military
Department of the State of Florida
with Governor Spessard Holland as
commander-in-chief. General Viv-
ian Collins is the Commanding
Officer of the Florida Defense
Force, Lt. Col. E. D. Vestal its In-
specting Officer. The Third Bat-
talion, to which Company D is
attached, is commanded by Major
N. B. Gibbs of Fernandina. Captain
Giles G, Randall is commanding


when that body was inducted in-
to Federal service, was organ-
ized arid recruited by the St.
Johns County Civilian Defense'
Council. At its full quota, Com.-
pany D has three officers and 62


officer of Company D, and the other
officers are First Lieut. W. W.
Wilson and Second Lieut. Herman'
Watson.
Military Discipline
When an F. D. F. member is
in uniform his civilian life and
prestige is forgotten and he is
obliged to render the same military
courtesies as ordered in the Federal
Service. Penalties are given for
infractions of rules and strict dis-
cipline is maintained at all times.
Out of the uniform the F. D. F.
'member is again "Bill Jones", the
truck driver, or "John Doe", the
"big shot" executive.
Machine Gun Squads
In addition to each member being
supplied a Riot Gun, he is given an
opportunity to be on the Machine
Gun Squad.' This group mans the
Thompson Sub-Machine Guns and
is trained to shoot with deadly
accuracy; also to ,dismantle and
assemble these lethal weapons
while blindfolded.
Camps and Maneuvers
The Company, since its organi-
zation, has enjoyed several maneu-
vers and week-end camps. During
these, actual field problems are
worked up and'the men show real
enthusiasm as they undergo rigor-
ous routines. I
Quick To Mobilize
Several months ago Company D-
was called out to assist the Coast
Guard and Army in a search for
suspected saboteurs. When the
mobilization order Was given one
platoon of the unit was assembled
and moved to the desired location
within 35 minutes. Within an hour
the entire company, with the excep-
tion of three men, was on duty
serving alongside forces of the
regular armed services. -The local
unit proved of valuable aid and
was highly complimented by offi-
cials.
Inspections and Drills
Periodic inspections by heads of
,the State Military Department are
given. In addition, the U. S. Army
designates high ranking officers to
inspect each company at regular
intervals and to criticize' and make
suggestions for its improvement,
One such inspection will be early
in May when Army officials will
visit each Defense Force Unit in
the state. The local Company
drills each Thursday night and
attendance is obligatory unless
special permission is given. Mon-
day nights a volunteer special
school is held and this also- has a
good attendance, showing the high
interest of the membership.
VI
The less you spend, the more
Uncle Sam can. Buy Bonds to out-
fit the fighting men.


These Zoot Suiters
Are The Sole Of Wit,
SALT LAKE CITY (P)--A
couple of zoot-suiters, on Salt'Lake
City's busiest downtown corner-
"Nice looking pair of two-toned
shoes you got there."
"Yeah. These are my B-17s.'
"Whaddaya mean, B-17s?"
"You know-bought before cou-
pon 17."


Facilities


Fully Equipped
The Florida State troopers are
fast becoming the best equipped
volunteer organization in the
country. When each recruit of
Company D is sworn in he is issued
a complete summer uniform of
nickel grey gabardine consisting
of overseas cap, shirt, tie, belt,
pants, zippered tan jacket, tan
leggings, two pairs of shoes,, tan
and black, ammunition belt, riot
gun, cantden, mess kit, pack car-
riers, etc. Also blue denim work
suit and cap, pair olive drab field
overalls. The winter outfit is of
forest green and includes overseas
cap, O. D. shirt,-wool pants, dress
coat, heavy mackinaw. Gas masks,
steel helmets, wool blankets, and
raincoats also are issued to each
ax.m In addition the Company's


The St. Augustine, Young Men's Christian Association is
playing host to large numbers of service inen weekly. The
facilities of the association are being used by the Coast Guard,
the Army and the Navy. Re-*
cently the Military Police Fortunately the activities of the
Training Center has used the armed forces have taken place for
YMCA for testing and train- the most part during the day, and
ing men, utilizing the swim- there has been little conflict with
ming pool for organized class- the regular program for local boys
es in water safety. and girls after school hours, and
While the swimming pool has had in the evening.
first claim on the time of the ser- The Military Police officers have
vice men, badminton and boxing been using the YMCA swimming
have had thdir quota of devotees pool to test groups of soldiers as
Badminton so far has interested to their swimming ability. This
only the Coast Guard officers. Reg- is an important phase of service
ularly each Wednesday afternoon men's training.
from 4:80 to 6:30 o'clock a group Swimming classes of 25 to 30
'of these officers, led by the Captain men have been held regularly each
of the Port, Lt. George R. Loehr, day until the Army officers were
who is an excellent badminton satisfied the men could care for
player, join with the regular civil- themselves in the water.
ian players at the YMCA gym. These various services the YMCA
.The boxing team' of the Coast has been glad to furnish, and every
Guard numbering 16 men, uses the week the number of men using the
YM1CA each 'afternoon. it also is YMCA grows as the word goes out
utilized for workouts by the Coast th Camp Byanding, Lee Field and
Guard but since, the weather has other nearby training centers that
permitted outdoor boxing, the team a hot shower and a swim can be
uses its outdoor ring on Valencia had at the YMCA.
'Street, and finishes up with a
shower and a swim at the "Y."
Loans Equipment.' *i
The YMCA also has cooperated
with the Coast Guard physical di- ,;..;.'.
rectors in lending its six wrestling
mats for service men's wrestling '
matches at the Lyceum, and has ,:
also loaned the boxing ring floor .
canvas for boxing matches.
The Military Police Training
Center also has utilized the boxing |
,gym at the YMCA to train its
Sboxing team.

Army's Experience A/
Will Boom Use Of
Dehydrated Foods
Some food authorities think that
dehydrated foods will bethe t hing...
after the war. Great advances -... '
have been made recently in the dry-
irig of all types of vegetables and
fruits-even orange juice is now
being sent to overseas troops in
powdered form.
American housewives should not
have any trouble learning to cook :
with these compressed forms, 'as
they have always used some de-
hydrated foods even if they never i
called them that. One of the most
common is biscuits and crackers
which have a moisture content of
less than six per cent by weight
in comparison with the 36 per cent
moisture in bread.
V
A sheet that has worn in the
center still has some life in it. Tear
it down the middle, cut away worn '
section and hem. Place two out-
side edges together and sew with. "
a felled seam. I,


Mo d ern Styling ,for
Your Hair by Expe-
rienced Beauticians.



MODERNISTIC
BEAUTY SALON


: I


141 King St, .
SPhone 272


BUIDT PRIOR TO 17683
nS," .


The Biggest Little House in City, Located One Block North of
Post Office, on Narrowest Street in U. S. A.
If Not the Oldest, Old Enough to Give a Quaint, Attractive
Setting for Rare and Modern Merchandise.
INCLUDE THIS SHOP IN YOUR GIFT HUNT AND
TREASURE-FINDING OF THE OLDEST CITY
IN THE.UNITED STATES.


.W HEALTH
Q. What foods are needed in the diet
every day?
A. Meat, milk; eggs, potatoes, vege-
tables, fruits, cereals, fats and
sweets.
Q. What are the three functions of
food?
A. To furnish energy, build and re-
pair body tissue and regulate
body processes.
Q. What foods contain complete
proteins? ,
A. Meat, milk, eggs, cheese, fish and
S poultry.
Q. What is an adequate or com-
plete protein?
A. A protein that contains all of the
indispensable amino acids; a
protein' that will maintain life
and promote growth.
Q. What proportion of the protein
in our diet should come from an-
imal foods?
A. At least half.
Q. Why do children need more pro.
tein per pound of body weight
than adults?
A. Because in addition to repairing
their broken down tissues they
are growing and need protein for
building new tissue.


BUY

AT LEAST

A BOND

A MONTH


b


RECORD


PAGE S


Local Company D, Third Battalion, Florida Defense Force, Is At Full Strength


Company D Fully



Equipped,Trained


For Defense Duty

County Unit Of Florida's Defense.,
Force Is Regarded In State Militia
As Crack Outfit; Has 65 Volunteers

St. Augustine is proud of Company D, 3d Battalion, Flor-
ida Defense Force, which has its headquarters at the No. 309
Charlotte Street Armory. Company D is one of many such
units in the state which have*
replaced the National Guard supply room'is stocked with gren-
as State 'Troops until such ades, tear gas, field kitchens, pup
time as the National Guard tents, first aid kits, etc., for use
will return to peacetime duty. if needed. Each man is provided
Company D is fully equipped and a steel locker in which to store
trained for any duty within the his wearing apparel.
confines of the state. Sixty-five Excellent Training
:.strong, the local unit now has the Close order.drill, the manual,of
full quota allowed each company arms, care of the rifle and other
and is regarded in the State Militia basic rudiments of Army training
as one of the crack units of the are first taught all recruits. As
Florida Defense Force. Because a recruit learns, he is advanced to
of the draft and other war reasons a regular squad where his further
the turnover in the membership training includes extended order,
has been great, but the company's mob control, the use of grenades,
recruiting and training program scouting, patrolling. etc. The
has enabled it to keep itsquota full company takes periodic trips to
and all members finely trained, the firing range where the men
Company D has been organized become proficient in the use of the
for two years and its membership riot guns assigned them. Each
represents a cross-section of county man becomes familiar with the use
life. of "Tommv Gunsa" anndl their oprna-


Local YMCA Has Important Role

To Play For Service Men, So Its

Equipment Is In Constant Demand


SERVICEMEN


EVERYWHERE



IF YOU'RE

SERVING I

STHE U. S.

ARMED SERVICES

Then You've Got the


BEST WISHES OF


Andrew's Maroket
223W. King St. Phone 367


Swimming Pool, Boxing Gym And Ganme
Proving Valuable To Men And
Physical Directors


MONTGOMERY SISTERS

ANTIQUE GIFT. SHOP
57 TREASURY STREET


Marine Bar

THE FAVORITE

OF THE TOWN


You'll Like It Too!


MARINE

9 KING ST.





I


ASSOCIATED P

INTRODUi

SUPPLY

By JAMES MARLOW AND
GEORGE ZIELKE


Held Important In Storage Of Food E FO
BEAUTY FOR CHANGE NOW
Remember the three C's, clean, with those foods. Scald and air I ID
cold, covered when storing food so milk containers often. o O. RON HE .
that spoilage will not creep up and Milk and egg dishes spoil quick-
consume what the family should ly. If not to be eaten at once, cook
have.I quickly, cover and keep very.cold.,
The coldest place in the ice box is. Cold, and covered go with cheese, I JH i G
the place for meat. Fresh meat, too. Cottage.and other soft cheeses,
should be covered loosely. If spoil rapidly so should be used soon. Dedicated to Wives,and
ground, it spoils sooner, therefore: Hard, cured cheeses, well wrapped, Sweetheart of Srvice
should be kept extra cold and used may be kept longer. i
quickly. i Never wash eggs before storing.. Men ... coiffures that
Cooked meat also should be cov- Water destroys the protective film, are wonderfully simple I: I
ered. Chopped or sliced spoils that keeps out air and odors. But
sooner than one large piece, so cut; wipe off soil with a dry, rough for yourbusy days ..
or chop just before using. Un- cloth. Then store in an opeh bowl ,l simply wonderful for
cooked well-cured meat belongs 4n or wire basket in a cool place.
a dark, cool, dry, airy place. Wrap- Raw salad vegetables.-Wash, '% your star-.spangled
pings should be left on ham and ba-' drain and store in covered vege-
con till ready to cook. Mildly .table pan in a cold place. Cooking evenings.
cured meats can be kept like fresh, greens.-Wash, drain and pile
meats. loosely in covered vegetable pan,.I.
Poultry should be thoroughly or waterproof bag. Keep cold.
washed inside and out, patted dry; Beans, peas, corn.-Keep cold and
and stored very cold until time to preferably in the pod or husk until
cook. i ready to use. Cabbage family--
Fish and sea food spoil very Leave uncut, cold and not too dry:
quickly at room temperature. Cook Root vegetables.-Keep in cool ven-
at once or wrap in waxed paper; tilated place. Cut tops to save VI I I I
and store very cold. space. White potatoes, onions-.- .. .
Keep milk in the colder part of; Store dry, cool and dark, but avoid D l AITTV QHnP D
the ice box. Don't put leftover milk freezing. Sweet potatoes, squash. I SiH i
back in the main supply. Keep -Dry, cool storage.
odorous foods-fish, onions, cab-; Allfruits, soft or firm, should be Ecanw Bank Bldg. Phone 21
bage, melons-away from milk un-; treated gently. Pinching and bruis-, nnkgBlg., one 21
less. the familylikes milk flavored, .ing the skin invites rot. Berries.: I-- IC -~isC M3 D =" l I "- it t i

--------- ------ '^vgMlLk





Y.... A CORDIAL WELCOME 9 5

COAST GUARD '
ARMY
NAVY 1
MARINES
BUY

*$'T rail ansd lmb W0I NOMiil
oil from crankcase.
S-lL Refll with Ffresh, Midl
spring and summer l. u
Sh Aa o s.-- 2$ I.)
tur /3. Flush transmission and
differential of old grease.
4. Fill with correct weight
0 Slubricants. (Limit 6 po ndsi)
9. Firestone complete chessid
"Imlubrication.
a6. Check front wheel beMaring
... 7. Drain and flush radiator -
refill with water.
8.Clean and test spr rki00
--resotgaps.
i ,9.Test battery wHi, M
hydrometer. "-
10.-Inflate Tires o 4Piffrme
pressure.







OUR BOYS

WILL CARRY
NOT NECESSARY
," ,u .FIGHriTO REMOVE

The American b'oys now in action-- id the service men -now in training in St. Au- -'TAKES
gustine have our best iWishes. "We hope that a speedy victory and a quick, safe re- oNLY d
turn to your loved ones is in the near future.

TIME ..............






PHONE 560 PHONE 1398




~"'""***


COCKRILL RETURNS
TO AERO SCHOOL;
WAS IN ENGLAND

CLEWISTON (PNS)--John T.
Cockrill, squadron commander of
the Riddle-McKay Aero college
here, has returned after a 3/2-
:months trip to England. While
there he attended the standardiza-
tion school .for instructors.
He flew to England and returned
by boat. The lessons he learned
from observation of operational
methods in England and the system
of training pilots will be reflected'
on pilot training here.
Cockrill is one of the dozen orig-
inail .flying, instructors. to start
training Army Air Corps cadets at
Carlstrom Fieldwhen itwas opened
in March, 1941, and was later
transferred here when this school
was placed into operation.

cherries, grapes.-Store in shallow
tray in cold place. Wash just before
using. Peaches, pears, plums.-
Store in cool place and spread to
keep from bruising. Under-ripe
fruits may be ripened at room tem-'
perature. Oranges, lemons.--Keep
cool and spread to prevent mold
and rot.: Apples.-Keep cool. Dried
fruit.-Store in tight bag or jar
in cold, place. Watch in warm
weather for worms or weevils..


lo d Covered-.....


WASHINGTON, April 24 (OP)
Oogistics" is a word military
men use to describe the science <
getting the right number of mE
and supplies to the right pla(
at the right time.
It's a word now being used
another connection-supplying c
vilians' needs.
There seems to be a growir
belief among congressmen that tI
civilian has become wartime's fo
gotten man and that somethir
bought to be done about it.
SThat's part of the argument
offered in support of the bill, e:
pected to come up in the Sena
next week, which would create
Civilian. Supply Administratio
That agency, independent of tl
VWar Production Board (which no
has an office of Civilian Supply
,Would direct production and distr
bution-including decisions on r
tioning-of the things civilian
need.
As explained by its sponsor
Senator Maloney (D.-Conn.), tI
bill would authorize the new admi
!itration to apply to other govern
intent agencies for allocation
manpower, materials, transport
tion and other facilities-with St





















S. .










RE






VULCj

ALL TYPES OF

We have recently purchased
added their equipment to our a
give you a complete recapping
otherwise good tire. Don't dis



PAR


SERVICE
W. H. 'SIL"

166 SAN MARCO AV]


r
I


- lq


We Won't
That last night you
ny, you and your Moth
to dinner.
You reached for th
grinned, proudly, when
first. You were going a
were staying, safe, at
ours to pay; not yours,
The check for what y
ours, too. For Guadalc
For bombing the dayl
They


USDIN
129 ST. GEORGE ST.,


Released by U. S. War Depar
WAACS IN RADIO SCHOOL-
tors: is part of their training at., M
at Kansas City, Mo. Here are Tech
Staten Island, N. Y., (left) and J<
,They are taking the prescribed court
)in Army radio repair and operation

Three C's-Clean C


RESS FEATURE WRITERS

CE "LOGISTICS"-CIVILIAN'S

PROBLEM-ON THE HOME FRONT

bilization Directoriaines F. Byrnes Prices have been a big factor:
acting as a sort of referee. Under the original price ceilings,
It's a problem in logistics: Dis- the "freeze" found prices higher
tribution has been a major factor, in some areas than others-so sup-
ry for instance, in food shortages. plies (meat, for example) went to
of Some areas apparently get all of the areas with the highest price
en certain kinds of food they want; ceilings.
ce others are or have been short of Now the OPA is in process of
meat, poultry, butter, milk, .pota- establishing dollars-and-cents ceil-
in toes and other items from time to ings (to be the same in the same
ci- time. type of store in the same area)
Manpower Problem on meat, and retail merchants fig-
ure some of the prices may be cut
g. Manpower to produce civilian back in connection with the "hold-
he goods is one part of the problem. the-line" anti-inflation order.
r- Getting everybody supplied runs And they're worried about this
ng into all sorts of complications. For angle:
example: Some butchers say rationing has
nt A dealer who used to distribute cut their business down by at least
x- goods over a considerable area has one-half, others say one-third. In
less supplies available. He doesn't any case it's been cut, as has been
n. want to use up the tires on his trade in many lines.
he trucks, any faster than necessary, Reduced Volume
so he decides to concentrate on Reduced volume, retailers say,
W selling what he has in the area increases proportionate cost of
ri- closest to his warehouse, sales, because "overheadl"-lights,7
a- Then the people who live outside rent, heat and 'so on-are fixed ex-
ns this concentrated area are cut off penses.
from their source of supply, where- Ordinarily, the storekeeper would
Dr, as there's no shortage in the cen- take care of that by raising prices
he tral area. In this case, it's a ques- -but now he can't do that. And if
n- tionsof new tires. a lot of storekeepers go broke, what
n- Or the question of manpower tem to thbution sys
of may enter into this, too--perhaps e "
- the manpower isn't available to Well, the backers of the civilian
;- send out a lot of trucks. supply bill say the set-up needs
some application of logistics' a
,scientific approach to getting a
civilian's food, clothing, fuel and
so on distributed properly-in the
right place at the right time.
War Production Chairman Don-
Sald Nelson and Manpower Chief
Paul V. McNutt, among others,
oppose the proposed legislation.
They say it would cut across their
.lines of authority and tend to ad-
minister to civilians at the expense
of military strength.

Accessories

May Become

"Best Friend"
.... .est...e..



, BY DOROTHY ROE
i. AP Fashion Editor
I Q. If Uncle Sam tells you one of
these fine days that you may buy
only one dress a year, what are
you going to do about it?
A. You're going to make the best
of it-and the best will be pretty
good, with the aid of some of our
bright young accessory designers,
who can turn a basic dress into a
wardrobe by a little fast switching
of hats, dikeys sand gloves. e
Twoof the leading lights in this:
movement to better the state of un-.
derprivileged dresses are Merry
Hull, who whips up gloves and
matching dickeys out of anything
from gingham to sequins, and Hel-
ene Garnell, who employs the same
tactics with hats.
These'two benevolent young wo-
men teamed up with a fashion show
,OR at the Rit- to demonstrate what a
girl can really do to expand the
horizon of a simple costume, if she
sets her mind to it.
They started out with a few odd
bits of striped bed ticking, flowered
| dimity. They finished with a col-
lection of matching ;hat and gloves
that had the effete luncheon crowd
STIRE REPAIRING at the Ritspounding .te tables
and calling for more.
Says Miss Hull, who is a decora-
the Cox Vulvanizing Company and tive blonde and the inventor of the
already modern plant. We can now finger-free glove:
g job or repair the bad places in an Give a girl enough gay dickeys
scard your old tires SEE USI and gloves-and, of course, hats-
and she can be well-dressed with

Says Miss Garnell, who is a dec-
orative red-head and a milliner
who arrived in New York via Paris
and Hollywood:
iRS -"Give a girl enough inspired hats
-and, of course, dickeys and gloves
SSTATION --and she doesn't need more than
VA
PARRISH, PROP. Therell always be an America,
if we back up our men with the
E. PD OYE C equipment they need. Buy the
E. PHIN Bonds that "outfit the outfit" fight-
ing for you.


Fumble for the Check, Johnny
were home, John- warshipt and for smashing your way
er and I went out toward Berlin.
Part" "of the check is being presented
e check and you now 18 billion dollars for the Sec-
i my hand got it ond War Loan, for tanks and planes and
Lway to fight. We guns.
t home. It was It's our check, Johnny, and we're lend-
, Johnny. ing Uncle Sam our money to pay it,
you're doing now is gladly, thinking of you out there and the
canal and Tunisia. check you may be asked to pay-with
ights out of Jap your life!
The Folks at Home
Give Their Lives--You Lend Your Money
BUY WAR BONDS NOW

['S DEPT. STORES
PHONE 700 -AND- 205 W. KING ST, PHONE 1537


The "command performance"
carrying the most import these
days is one which the fighting men
of the United Nations dictate. A
master record is made to order in
this country and many pressings
produced. The tunes are those
requested by service men.
The, latest "command perform-
ance" was recorded last week in
Hollywood. And so, this week the
boys on the African front or in the
South Pacific or in England, for
instance, are hearing what they
asked for--"Home on the Range,"
sung by Baritone John Charles
Thomas of the Metropolitan Opera
Company,
V
Archers Make A,
Meal Of Cougar
SALT LAKE CITY (RP) Ever
try "victory veal?" It's not ra-
tioned but that doesn't mean it is
easy to get.
Recently J. C. Trittin and Jeano
Orlando, Salt Lake City archery
enthusiasts, bagged a cougar the
bow-and-arrow way. In an experi-
mental modd, they skinned the
"'lion" and cooked a portion.
Trittin says it tastes like veal,
but Orlando insists it's even better
than that.


*


ntment Bureau of Public RelationI
-Operating high frequency oscilla-
idland Radio and Television School
mnicians Fifth Grade Eleanor Prury,
eanette Sheets, Shaker Heights, 0.
rses of the U. S. Army Signal Corps
. --.-.....--.. -.. .....-


THE ST, AU GUSTINI RECORD


SUND~T, ~ME IlMW


~AaE1 12~_


COMMAND PROGRAMS

GET MOST ATTENTION





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% #aft #L" #"* M0"410-1PLO- 'JJ^ft.1--1j^ 0"1%JALA AL A"tfuJbkM^* AiA <*J ALA A 044


SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1943


PAGE S


THE ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD


SALUTAT'ION'
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a Men of the Army, the Navy and All Armed Force'sof, These V

UnitedI-States, Whether In the Air,Hon Landor, theHigh Seas
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1^ 1Men 0^ (fee Army, the .Navy and All Armzed Forces of These |

|^ United States. Whether In the Air, on Land, or, the. High Seas J
is, 4
ta( *C
ra *.*' ^





TO a
ftD t **. **o
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ANDA

INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE

ST. FRANCIS STREET 4


4


B^^^^<^^^^^^^^^^^^^<^^^^^^^^^^^i^sf


NAVY CRASH BOAT AIDS FLIERS




ts1B


This high speed Navy vessel patrols the coast as an emergency
rescue craft for Naval fliers whose planes may be forced down at


this cou
amazed
ca's bul:
h good
entire fa:
en won
xist on
ted in
timates
The na


ntry as a whole wants daily variety
ment and has been loath to accept sev-
ging eral days' serving of the same
food food.
mily But this attitude is due for a
t to change if America is to win the
battle of food supply. Food pro-
the duction has increased by leaps and
the bounds over the past three years.
run Production goals for 1943 are
ition higher than ever yet. Supply has
not kept up with increasing de-
mands.... From the armed forces,
I from the civilian population with
highest-in-history p u r c h,a s i n g
power, from the other United Na-
tions whose food sources have been
greatly reduced by enemy occupa-
tion.
Only ,by making the fullest pos,
sible use of America's food sup-
plies can all these demands be met,
even in part. Rationing of canned
goods leaves many households with
smaller supplies of these products
than they have been accustomed
to keep on hand. .Rationing of
meat limits the amount of that
important dietary item which a
household may consume. In these
two foods at least, the necessity of
making full use of them will be
forcefully impressed on everyone.
But all foods must be 'conserved.
No useable leftovers thrown into
the garbage pail: (Army reports
that 62 per cent of leftovers in Army
kitchens are re-used at future
meals), and no food must be allow-
ed to spoil. One carrot left to
shrivel, one apple allowed to rot
may not seem like much food,
waste. But multiplied by the car-
rots and apples from the nation's
34 million homes, they would sup-
ply nourishment for many families
and many fighting men.
Fighting food waste starts with
food buying. :Not an ounce more
should be purchased than the fam-
ily will actually eat, and the menu
should be planned in terms, of
number of servings.
V


European visitors to t
have always expressed
at the sight of Americ
garbage pails. "Enoug
in there to feed an en
for a day," they's bee
murmur.
No actual figures e:
amount of food waste
United States but est
into fantastic figures.


Temper Control


With a temper which was always
simmering and ready to boil at
the least mishap, my high school
science teacher had a plan where-
by he gave vent to his feelings
Without offending anyone. He
merely numbered his curse words.
He alone knew the code. For in-
stance, if the apparatus collapsed
just as he was to demonstrate an
experiment he would exclaim,
"Twenty-one, thirty-seven, forty-
five!"
The big moment came one day
when he backed into a fiery blow-
torch. Giggles and snickers came
from the class, then silence. For
an instant his face resembled an
explosion in a catsup factory, then
he yelled, "One to eighty-seven in-
clusive!" To this day we don't
know to what expletives his num-
bers referred but we are certain
that momentarily we had :been ex-
posed to his entire repertoire.-
Stewart Harral'in Your Life.
V
The gremlins in your pocket-
book urge you to buy things you
could do without. Be firm., Spend
your spare dollars on "outfitting
the outfit" fighting for ybu. Buy
Bonds.


OUR BOYS WILL DO THE REST!


PRICE'S
DAVID PRICE, PROP.
228 W. King St.


This smart forest green uniform
I now being worn by members of
'he U. S. Marine Corps Women's
Reserve, recently organized to free
Leathernecks for combat duty.
Aside from a flared skirt, the only
striking difference from the regu-
lation Marine winter uniform is a
scarlet cord decorating the front
of the visored cap. A scarlet wool
muffler is a feminine complement
fto the top coat,


Telephone 342


SPANISH TEACHERS

,HEAR DIPLOMAT IN

FORUM AT ROLLINS
WINTER PARK, Fla., April 24
--John Fletcher Martin, former
member of the U. S. diplomatic
service in Spain and Latin Ameri-
can countries, and now acting di-
rector of the Institute of Inter-
American Affairs at the University
of Florida, participated in a forum
conducted at Rollins College today
for consideration.of proposals for
the advancement of the teaching
of Spanish in Florida according
to an announcement made here to-
day by A. J. Hanna, Director of
Inter-American studies at Rollins.
This forum was a feature of the
annual meeting of the Florida
Branch of the American Associa-
tion of Teachers of Spanish which
was established at Rollins in 1934.
Others participating were Dr. W.
T. Edwards, Curriculum Consultant
of the State Department of Educa-
tion, and Dr. Luis A. Baralt of the
University of Havana who was
brought to this gathering by the
Office of the Coordinator of Inter-
American Affairs.
V
Members of the American Wom-
en's Voluntary Service are taking a
kitchen on wheels around New
York to teach Manhattan house-
wives how to get the greatest food
value out of the point rationing
system.


FLORIDA PICTURE

BE SHOWN TO MEN

IN ARMY CAMPS
JACKSONVILLE (FNS)-Ar-
rangements have been made with
Florida State Theatres to show
the 35-m film of Florida made by
Dave Newell and bought by the
1941 Legislature to service men in
camps adjoining 31 cities and towns
in this state, Karl Lehmann, chair-
man, Motion Picture Committee,
Florida State Chamber, of Com-
merce, announced this week.
Exhibitions will start May 1, he
said, and will continue until prac-
tically every service man in the
state has been given a pictorial
tour of the scenic and historical at-
tractions of Florida.
Florida State Theatres have gen-
erously offered the use of their
theatres, operators and facilities
and will pay the entire cost of the
exhibitions. Showings will be made
in the forenoon hours and will be
sponsored by local chambers of
commerce.
V
Women At War
BESSIE
"All right,, Bessie," said the boss
of the little factory which was mak-
ing jackets for soldiers. "Did you
want to see me about something?"
The thin middle-aged woman
stood up from the chair in the out-
er office and looked earnestly at the
boss with her huge, grave gray
eyes.
"It's about this ten per cent
pledge," she began.
"Oh, that's all right, Bessie,"
the boss said. "I'd been meaning
to speak to you about that. We
don't expect you to pledge ten per
cent of your pay for War Bonds
like the others are doing. We
know you have a hard time mak-
ing ends meet since Jake died.
Eleven kids, isn't it ? That's quite
a lot of mouths to feed. Let's see,
you make $25.50 a week including
overtime, don't you?"
'"Yes, sir but..."
The boss smiled.
"Don't give it another thought,
Bessie. You've got your hands full
now. Uncle Sam knows you haven't
got a penny to spare. Don't let it
worry you. We understand."
The boss turned to go back into
his private office.
"But what I wanted to say was
." Bessie raised her voice and
the boss looked-around. "I wanted
to say, would a dollar a week be too
little? You see, after we get the
living expenses paid, there's just
about a dollar a week left. Would
they be willing to accept a dollar
a week?"
"They'd be more.than willing,"
the boss said quietly. "They'd 'be
proud."
Bessie looked relieved.
"All we have to do is scrimp, a
little," she said. "I'd feel just ter-
rible if we couldn't give something."
Back in the boss' office a repre-
sentative of the Treasury Depart-
ment was waiting. The boss shut
the door and sat down.
"I've just seen the greatest single
sacrifice I know of," the boss said.
'"Listen, if you want to hear what
American women are made of..."
(Story from an actual report in
-the files of the Treasury Depart
ment.)




-U, S. Treasury Department
V
White rings on furniture can be
removed with things from your
,pantry shelf. A little salt and
olive oil rubbed into the spot will
restore the finish.

Marines Are Wearing..


sea. It operates out of St. Augustine under the Air Operational
Training Command in Jacksonville.

Every Bit Of Food Should Be Used
And None Wasted If Demands Be Met


The Matanzas Shop



IS A


FAVORITE SPOT


WITH


SERVICE MEN















BECAUSE


THEY GET THE BEST IN


FOUNTAIN DRINKS


SANDWICHES


ETC.





Matanzas Shop

NEXT TO MATANZAS THEATRE


MAKE 'EM SWEAT


k BUY


BONDS







JIMMY DOOLITTLE, ONE YEAR AFTER BOMBING TOKYO, SAYS:




U. S. Air Power Means Death For Axi


Written for AP Features
BY MAJOR GENERAL JAMES H. DOOLITTLE
A year ago when American bombs thundered in Tokyo the
Japanese people were undoubtedly badly shaken.
Today as the United Nations air might roars in an ever
heightening crescendo, the specter of crushing vengeance
must weigh like a sentence of death on the entire Axis.
It is unfortunate that the air raid on Tokyo was necessary.
It is regrettable we have been obliged to drop daily on mili-
tary objectives in the Mediterranean over ten times as many
bombs as were dropped on Tokyo.
It is deplorable that greed and bestiality have embroiled
almost the entire civilized world in war. Admittedly unfor-
tunate though it all is, an untenable condition exists and must
be faced and corrected.
To this end our Air Force, together with workers back
home, our associated services and our Allies have dedicated
themselves to the accomplishment of complete victory and a
just, permanent peace.
It is doubtful if one out of ten persons in the United
States, at the time Tokyo was given its first taste of war


a year ago, realized the rapid strides that were made by
their armed air forces in the ensuing twelve months.
Looking back I can hardly realize it myself, and I've
never been conservative in my hopes for air power.
Since that historic day last November, when Allied forces
entered French North Africa, what may well go into military
annals as the most-amazing air warfare of this war has been
waged against Axis tactical objectives in Tunisia, Tripolitania
and even against Sicily, Sardinia and Italy.
I'm well cognizant of the terrific trials of the Battle of
Britain; the well-remembered "total war" waged by the mad
dog of Munich; and of the magnificent task performed in past
months by the RAF on Germany's factories of death-dealing
machines.
The North African campaign, however, from the start
has been a bitter, continuous struggle. As ground forces
marshalled their resources and strength for the obvious
blow-to crush Rommel and his associates-air power
has hammered incessantly at the enemy. It destroyed
their supplies at the source, severed their lines of com-


munication and smashed directly at their forward
positions.
And here, far from home and facing a supply prob-
lem of incomparable dimensions, the Twelfth Air Force
(now part of the Northwest African Air Forces) has
demonstrated the heartening growth of the United
States Army Air Forces since last April 18, when the
Jap first felt our air strength on his home ground.
Our might must grow even more than that of the phenome-
nal period of the last twelve months, until we can strike crush-
ingly anywhere on the globe.
United Nations air forces have the best equipment in the
world, flown by the best pilots and maintained by the best
technical experts.
Morale problems are non-existent. Even in the darkest
moments in the most isolated sections of North Africa, where
operating conditions are extremely difficult and living con-
ditions are most unpleasant, our spirit is high. If defense
plant workers at home could see this, they would again re-
double their production efforts.


At this writing, the airplanes which these wo ers
have built for us have destroyed over 500 enemy air-
planes in actual air combat here, not including over 200
blown to bits on the ground in bombing operations.
Against this we have lost less than one to two-and this
is against one of the best organized, trained and equipped
air forces in the world.
We have dropped over 4,000 tons of bombs in "pre-
cision bombing" raids, operating every day that bombers
and fighters could find their way through the weather to
their targets and then back to their base.
Some fifty enemy ships have been sunk by our bombers in
this theatre. These include cruisers, destroyers, submarines,
tankers, cargo vessels and troop carrying craft.
I should like to take this opportunity to commend the entire
personnel of the Twelfth Air Force for what, not only I, but
the rest of the world must recognize as a magnificent job.
Their accomplishments stand but to me as a bright exam-
ple of what United States' air power is capable of doing when
given the unparalleled support of the great democracy which
stands behind it.


.j u.IIIII-IIIDImiaIi ilimilunii iiiiiii'-tiN11R1Di MAGGIE IN BLUNDERLAND-
. a
Demon Girl Reporter Braves The Perils

SVisit The Place OfU.S. Navy Pre-Flight Obstacle Course

S5 BY MARGARET KERNODLE downhill grade. Just when things legs and arms but I got over. I
U AP Features Writer looked a little easier, too! felt triumphant.
te Nv Pr-Fiht y I never got over the wall. I was After you go up and over all
WHE E IOWA CITY, la.-The boys intoo tired. I walked around. you can take (more than I could
.1 i the Navy Pre-Flight Training What! No Rocking Chairs? take), you get a nice underneath
SSchool here have to go through Bravely I trotted toward a 12- approach. It's called a log tunnel
0 this thing they call an obstacle foot water jump, jogging warily, and it's another hand-blistering
S|% = course in less than four minutes like a mule about to balk. I got hazard.
1 '_ or they don't graduate. right to the edge of the hole of After this, I assumed new cour-
I M T ': I thought I could beat their time, muddy water and backed up. The age. Surely I was near the finish.
EE l but it's a good thing nobody called. Navy man ragged me and so I But then there was a little ladder
Time on me. Just between us girls, backed away from the hole and hurdle. We won't talk about that.
r' TI0 g it took me 40 minutes flat. started running madly toward it, I won't admit I fell four times
It's 580 yards around this Navy thinking: "Oh well, Maggie, a little even if a Navy man says so.
S_ nightmare. (The boys don't mind mud bath won't hurt you." But The final straw is a dash over
Sit much. One of them even made my feet wouldn't jump. I finally three four-foot steps to finish this
Sit in 2:33.6.) walked around again. pre-flight test for military track,
Looking at it, you think, what Hills, hills, hills! Everybody in which is the Navy way of explain-
W do they mean "toughest, roughest, the East thinks Iowa is flat coun- ing an obstacle course.
Sest"? Trying it, you think, "Hit- try. Everybody ought to try this Never belittle our brother when
ler'd be scared to death if he knew military track test. Everybody he brags belittle yout this kind of thing.
American aviators could live would change everybody's mind. He's a better man than I am,
D IX IE S through stuff like this." Sharp turns. More hills.
First, you merely walk rails. I felt just lik- a Lilliputianco Gunga Din.
BAR AND PACKAGE STORE Merely! The boys have to cross ing into Gulliver's land when I -
BAR ANDAU E!LSt T O= without a spill. I took three tries, rounded a curve and a hill to find
SGee! Iowa is dusty! a nine-foot wall warding off my Are Y
182 San Marco Ave. Phone 629 Th Hanging on the Ropes route. It was go over or go back. e Y
18 San Marco Av. P one 6 Then up and down hills I plodded. I could not, I simply could not go
Illlilll illlllllllill illllll ill Suddenly staring me in the face was back. Not me.
a 30-foot rope across a gully. The This time the Navy man was a .
Navy man grinned, watching me help.
SI- try to cross, monkey fashion, The ladder at the side is for
T E L L 'E M 'clinging to the rope with hands shorties like you, he said.
STELL 'EM OJ -AI.'EM and knees. My fingers felt worse Go on, even the short fellows
THROUGH THESE AD COLUMNS than they do after the broom ram- take that way. It isn't easy either.
[ T OU HL UMHNSSE AD CN page during spring-cleaning days. It wasn't. You know the kind of
I was out of breath when I makeshift stairs they sometimes
bumped into a four-foot wall on a build ir. barns. I scratched my


Women At War


INVEST IN VICTORY NOW


0


BUY WAR BONDS



So let us labor, let us salvage, let us save,
let us spend,-for freedom. Let us be grate-
ful for the privilege of fighting for free-
dom on the world front ald.- on the home
front. "Long may our la'ntT'e bright with
freedom's holy light, protect us with Thy
might, Great God our King."




VERLE A. POPE, Agency


Phone 1016


SOPHIA
Mrs. Kimball and Mrs. Worthing-
ton, dressed soberly and wearing
their best black gloves, walked
along the stony country road back
toward Sophia Hardy's farm, to pay
their visit of condolence.
"How do you reckon she'll be
bearing up?" Mrs. Kimball asked
Mrs. Worthington. Both ladies
wore their most solemn, funeral
expressions.
"A mighty severe blow," Mrs.
Worthington said. "Mighty severe.
To lose your only son, the mainstay
of your declining years. And such
a dreadful death, too-to go down
with a ship. Mercy!"
"The first of our boys from Hand
County to go, too," Mrs. Kimball
said, mournfully. "I wouldn't
blame Sophia Hardy for feeling
right bitter."
They stood on the simple stone
doorstep, with downcast eyes, get-
ting themselves into the proper
commiserative mood.
"Come in"
The voice was brisk and cordial.
They looked up in surprise. Sophia
herself had come to the door. As
they followed her into the parlor
they exchanged glances, with eye-
brows lifted. Sophia was not even
in mourning. The parlor shades
were not even drawn.
"It's nice of you to come," Sophia
said. "Do sit down."
"We came," Mrs. Ijmball said
almost reprovingly, "to tell you
that our hearts are bleeding for
you in your great loss."
"We know how lonely you must
be out here," Mrs. Worthington
said. "With nothing to take your
mind off off .. ." She sniffed
and reached in her purse for a hand-
kerchief.
S"Oh, I keep busy," Sophia said.
"I've just finished applying for the
Government insurance on Tom's
life."
The visiting ladies could not re-
-ist a shocked glance at one an-


iil er.
"I want to get it right away," So-
pliia said. "So I can put it into War
Bonds. My boy hasn't finished
':hting yet, not by a long shot."
The ladies were so occupied with
"'cling horrified, so titillated by this I
callous behaviour in a bereaved
:other-that neither of them no-
:cted Sophia's hands. Under the
folds of her clean print dress.
against the seat of her chair, they
\vere tightly clenched.
(Story from an actual report in
the files of the Treasury Depart-
ment.)
Carry on for mothers like
Sophia. Buy War Bonds till it
hurts.
-U. S. Treasury Department


MORE TRAINS ARE
ON TRACKS; SAFETY
IS WARNING GIVEN

TAMPA (FNS)-Asher Frank,
director of the Florida Safety
Council, has issued the following
war-time warning:
Remember more trains are trav-
eling over grade crossings than
ever before.
In 1942 there were 82 railroad
crossing accidents, in which 36
persons were killed and over 400
injured.
Troop trains or trains with war
materials do not run on schedules.
Every train accident delays the
movement of needed troops or
equipment.
You can't outguess the railroad
time tables-play safe and stop at
all railroad crossings.
"V_
Mrs. Ruby Barnett, a 41-year-
old grandmother who used to hunt
with her husband in Pennsylvania,
has a war job testing rifles and ma-
chine guns at the Aberdeen Proving
Grounds.


Notice how quickly a good quilt
soils when children are around?
Save expensive cleaning by making
a slip cover of cheese cloth and
tacking it to the quilt with colored
tufts of.wool. Bright color of the
quilt shows through the thin cheese
cloth and the cover whips off for
washing in no time.

Clean carpet sweepers live
longer and work better. If the
brush is cleared of hair, dust, and
lint it will pick up faster and more
thoroughly. Waste Wardens make
a habit of keeping the carpet
sweeper really clean.

Stubborn grease spots on wall-
paper often respond to a paste of
fuller's earth, or a commercial dry
cleaning powder and carbon tetra-
chloride. Apply thickly to spot and
leave till thoroughly dry. Wipe
off with cloth dampened with car-
bon tetrachloride.


WOMEN

Nurses Aides

Women's Ambulance Corps


MEN AND WOMEN

Fire Watchers
Army Air Corps Ground Observer Corps

STOP AND THINK!

The above services protect your home and family

WHY NOT HELP?

Contact St. Johns County Defense Council


67 King St.


Public Relatoins Office


AT ONCE!


Phone 692


The St.Augustine National Bank
Affiliated With Barnett National Bank of Jacksonville, Florida


*


Renovate an old lampshade in-
stead of buying a new one. Any
holes in the original fabric may.
be mended with scotch tape. Then
cover whole shade with rows of
fringe that can be bought at the
trimming counter. Start at the top
and work down.

Have you an old taffeta evening
frock hanging in your closet? Cut.
it down to any of the new ballerina
dresses for your daughter. You
can give it a gay new feeling with
appliques of print at waist, shoul-
der, or hem. Cut print appliques
from a scarf, blouse, or another
old dress.

Prevent that inevitable dust
stain on your walls over the radi-
ators, if. you' would save yourself
a serious cleaning job later. Radi-
ator shields throw the air out into
the room instead of letting it flow
steadily up the wall. Use them if
you can.


Doing Your Share In The War Effort ?


Tips For Home Waste


gillinE ln" .' ___________. ,.. b ,za,.
The St. Johns County Defense Council urgently needs
following branches:


MEN

Auxiliary Firemen
Auxiliary Policemen


YOU as a volunteer in the


55 King St.


I


I JI I I 'II I Il Ir I .


I ~--~ hY I~


I I


I


SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1943


THE ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD


PAGE 6


A^





THE ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD


By EVELYN
Time was
months ago
Chamber of
ed as if Old


.ON THE



TRANSPORTATION FRONT\

YOU hear more and more today about the ground crews- \
the boys back-stage who keep them ticking and upon
whose skill and energy successful prosecution of war and \
production so much depends.
SJust such groups compose the maintenance forces of Florfda \
Motor Lines. They, too, are the unsung-behind-the-scene
stalwarts to whom we owe so much of our ability to "keep
'em rolling."
Yep-they are all fine performers intelligent, hard.
working, loyal specialists as a result of years of train-
ing. These boys are in there swinging with both hands to
squeeze every ounce of performance out of existing equip-
ment-irreplaceable equipment. For war's extra burden on
transportation takes heavy toll and brings hard hours to
L- lan j..' .a fa4-.ion fleets u to4 re-war standards


keep tocays sa nsforla pii pieeT Up TO f C-- atcfiuu-
of safety and comfort.


PAGE 7,


SOLDIERS AND PRETTY GIRLS TRY THEIR LUCK IN LOCAL WATERS, FISHING PARADISE


Information requests
The letters and cards from all
sections of the United States are
filled with requests for informa-
tion. Modern school teachers do
not give Johnnie and Mary oppor-
tunity to hide behind large geog-
raphy books. They are busy
writing for folders with local
statements and pictures for their
scrapbooks. Since April 1st, 49
such requests have come in. To
them are sent descriptive folders
and no letter is written.
Requests from prospective visi-
tors and buyers are answered
promptly with letters having evi-
dence of personal interest in their
inquiries and with a cordial invi-
tation for them to come and see
in person the scenes shown on the
folders sent them. Along with
the folders goes a sheet with a list
of hotels, guest homes, tourist
courts and cottages, ,and apart-
ments owned by those who pay for
this special service.
Weekly Bulletin
Once a week the Secretary is-
sues a bulletin called "Live Wires"
which goes to all those on that
list. In this bulletin is copied
every letter containing inquiries
about real estate or accommoda-
tions. In this way everyone has
impartial opportunity to sell his
wares, by writing to the names
and addresses given on the bul-
letin. It means efficient prompt
service for all.
There are miscellaneous re-
quests for information that have
nothing to do with plans for
coming to the city. The substitute
secretary, if she does not know the
answers, is so well acquainted in
the city that she knows who can
furnish the correct information;
so she has had the satisfaction of
meeting every challenge.
Employment Day
On Wednesday, from 8:30 until
3, Starr Parsons, representative of
the United States Bureau of Em-
ployment is on duty in the Chamber
of Commerce office. The room is
then comfortably full of appli-
cants for positions as well as those
drawing claims. There is a host
of intelligent, talented young wom-
en in this city who, accustomed to
activity back at home, are bored
with doing nothing all day long.
Their husbands are service men
at Camp Blanding or with the
Coast Guard or M. P. camp here.
If there were a small establish-
ment here for the manufacture of
some little hand-made part for a
larger war necessity, it would
utilize much of this, ability now
going to waste. The young wom-
en are urged to assist with surgi-
cal dressings at the Red Cross or


Service men like to fish and these pictures show why! St. Augustine is a fishing paradise for both salt and fresh water anglers for
summer and winter, the fish grab those hooks. Here soldiers invite several local girls to be their companions on a fishing trip in Matanzas
Bay.


with the production'of articles for which are, as a rule, written to CLUB IS PRAISED
the "Bundles," of course. How- Dorothy Dix. It is all a grand BY RICKENBACKER
ever, there is still opportunity for work and certainly worth the sup-
planned, paid-for activity of these port of every good citizen of St. DADE CITY (FNS)-The Voice
temporary residents. Augustine. of Victory Club, originated by John
Contact is made with them as ---- V- S. Burks, has received high -com-
they come in, searching for apart- mendation by Eddie Rickenbacker,
ments. They are referred to all WILL BEGIN CATTLE famous ace of World War I.
those listed with the Chamber of AUCTIONS APR. 29 A new feature of the work of
Commerce and, to date, no one the club is'the presentation of in-
has left the office without at least PLANT CITY (FNS)-The dividual service books to every
a glimmer of hope about a new State Livestock Market here will family in Pasco County having a
abode. begin cattle auctions Thursday, member in the armed services.
Questions vary from the ordi- April 29, manager R. E. Johnson These will be used to keep records
nary ones inquiring about ac- announced this week. of data and important experiences
commodations, (with fifty per This will be the fourth year the of the men as related in their let-
cent of the interrogators spelling market has operated. Last year 22 ters or published accounts.
that word with one "m," regard- sales held over a period of six ----- V---
less' of their education,) to those months brought producers $11,370. BUY WAR BONDS!


Quick! A Goldfish
Psychiatrist!

You've heard a lot about vitamin
deficiencies lately. But did you
know that all living things -need
vitamins? When your azalea
plant withers and dies, it's prob-
ably because of a vitamin defi-
ciency. If you see.a fox.wvit a
bad case of jitters, or one that is
losing its fine pelt, it's because he
isn't getting all the vitamins he
needs. And goldfish suffernervous
breakdowns. At least, so they say.
V---
One of the earliest American
newspapers was the Boston News
Letter, first published in 1704,


PHOTO STORY: THE WAR COMES TO JACK AND MARY-AND NOW NEW BONDS UNITE THEM!


Jack and Mary, like millions of American men and women these When pay-day rolls around they find a nice Mary likes beautiful clothes-(as what girl
days, irk side-by-side in a ar plant. As has happened before, check-even after deduction for War Bonds-that, doesn't?)-and asks.Jack to stop in on their way
days, hork qsidt--side gin a war plant. As has happened before, what with fewer things on the market to buy, from work to see a new dinner dress that has
from this acquaintance grew a warm friendship. They are both doing really gives them more money "to play around caught her eye not that she really needs an-
essential war jobs, making good money- with" than they have ever had before, other one-but-


BUY WAR STAMPS AND BONDS EVERY PAY DAY AND HELP TOWARD VICTORY


"Why, Jim!, when did you get back home? It costs more money to win this war. Jack
Jack, do you know Jim? He lives just across the doesn't have to do much talking to convince Mary
street from us. He's been in Africa what that more of their war pay should be going for that
happened, Jim.? Oh, how terrible!" Jack is
doing some serious thinking right now. After all, purpose than for luxuries. The Government must
there are millions of Jims out there on the fighting raise thirteen billion dollars during the Second
fronts of the world-sacrificing everything-and War Loan drive in April. Jack and Mary decide
not asking much in return but victory and peace to buy at least one extra bond a week to do their
for this old world. part, just as every American must do. Dig deeply'


SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1943


THE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE UNDER WAR IMPACT
. VAILL full swing. In the rear office (as a feminine parcel of efficiency and' attractive to visit
and not so many in the Navy "rear" implies su- good will, beloved by men and wom- conducive toward
, at that, when the perior rank) sat that Secretary en alike, a gal with a quizzical ex- its citizens.
Commerce rooms look- Extraordinary, John Dillin; att an- pression who knows all the answers So much for thi
Home Week were in other desk sat the Super Associate, and tells them to you with her past and the future
snappy brown eyes dancing all over day?
the place but with her lips prac- Well, that Maste
tically immobile, Helen Cook. John Dillin, is a ]
DON'T NEGLECT Back of the counter in the front out west. His tal
office the typewriters clicked; well be used by I
smiling matrons with pencil in .there is no room
hand bent over.city maps with the swarms of people i
passing strangers and theoretical- to St. Augustine if
ADIO REPAIRS ly guided them to all the romantic, Leonard Drazba is i
historical spots of the Ancient ing in to his headqu
City; young men and women plot- activities having ti
ted tournaments, picnics, and stage reaction of service m
shows for the young of heart, al- Florida hands over
though some of them were bald, former assistants
In these momentous gray, and with a bit of stiffness in Civic Center, and tl
In t e momentothe knees doors are off with s
times, enjoy perfect re- In that day the pretty girls of or doing war work 1
caption of important the city had a break on the roto- herself has gone to
gravure sections of the metropoli- convoy to our Re]
radio programs. tan papers of the United States Charles Usina for
with the Orange Bowl, the Azalea that the Legislatur
Festival and other glamorous con- Her reports of he
tests in full swing. The disciples his secretary are a
of Izaak Walton, too, came in for her friends here
their full share of glory, wistfully sorority sisters in
measuring their fishes and report- house and the Solor
ing figures for statistics in the the Capital are cl
dependable Workmanship
Chamber of Commerce. moment they have
Scene Erased The writer sits a
desk and, so far, h
RTO B sOen i r The scene is erased, but thefar
chalk to draw it back on the black- succeeded in keep:
SB /W E F The scene is erased, but the routine that m
O B PE board has been saved; in fact col- the routine that w

-Chamber of Commerce has a com-rn stituting. Here is
RADIO SERVICE oredchalk is being added. The dg eet
RADIOImittee for post-war planning and ck undof
LES ST. PHONE 1116 the whole community is invited to every morning fbin
send in to the office suggestions special detail filling
for making the old home town more spaces unexpectedly


R


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9 AVII


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. -'.. -.1 1 1 Fm


- -


rs and more
the welfare of

e scene of the
e. What of to-

er of Publicity,
Lieutenant way
lents might as
Uncle Sam, for
to house the
he might entice
I he were here.
n Alaska, dash-
larters from his
o do with rec-
nen to warm his
the stove; his
in the office,
he great out-of-
ervice husbands
ocally. "Cookie"
Tallahassee as
presentative F.
the sixty days
e is in session.
er activities as
bit vague, but
know that her
the Chi Omega
is milling about
perishing every
with her.
It Helen Cook's
has breathlessly
ng up with all
as accomplished
om she is sub-
the general
day, although
igs a wealth of
the few blhnk
y.
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FAOM 8


VICTORY GARDEN IDEA CATCHES HOLD IN

THIS COUNTY SAYS MISS ANNA E. HEIST,

WHO ENCOURAGES FARM WOMEN TO PLANT


f youl wuat to get an idea of how th& :Victory Garden"
Idea is going over in St. Augustine and t:"Johns County,
Just take a swing around the town, and get out into the
county, if you can wangle a*
ride from some farmer, or garden and conservation chairman
somebody else who has busi- for the St. Johns County Defense
ness out that way. Council, says that she believes the
It will amase and delight you increase in home gardens will run
to see what folks are doing in the around 200 per cent, at least.
raising of "garden sass," as the Help Solve Food Problems
d mu~tocall it Help Solve Food Problems
old-tiaer used to call it.
There are vegetable gardens Out in the county, practically
where front lawns and flower beds every farm home, big and little,
used to be. There are vegetables has its flourishing garden. There's
growing in nice straight rows, side a garden at every fence corner it
by side with posies of every kind seems, with all sorts of things
and description. There are vege- giving promise of good eating in
table gardens in the back yards, the farm home, and thus helping
and in vacant lots. One enterpris- to solve food problems.
ing gardener even has a "vege- Busy Canning
table mound." In a corner of his
yard, where some earth had been And the women are busy can-
thrown up as the garden was ning. Miss Heist is one of the
feared and planted, vegetables busiest of them all, covering the
were planted all over the mound. county, meeting with home demon-
The family is eating beet greens, station clubs, and advising wo-
turnipa, etc, from the top and men in the different communities.
sides of the mound right now. They come to her with all their
problems. She carries her canning
Increase Impressive equipment with her to the differ-
Miss Anna E. Heist, county home ent communities, and the women
dewtonatration agent, who is home bring vegetables from their gar-


dens to can, and then stow away
on their pantry shelves. Hundreds
of jars have been put up already
from the home gardens, and mean-
time the family tables have been
loaded with good things that came
out of the home soil.
Cooperative Spirit
A fine cooperative spirit is indi-
cated. Some women who have
flourishing gardens don't know how
to can. And some women who are
expert canners have not been able
to have gardens, or their gardens
are slow in producing. So these
women pool their produce and their
skill, and are "canning on shares."
The other day Miss Heist car-
ried two sacks of cabbage from
one farm home to a young woman
who is an expert canner. She will
make sauerkraut from the cab-
bage, and retain a certain number
of the jars for her own use. Nu-
merous other instances of fine co-
operation are being recorded daily,
she says.
And in the meantime the sum
total of food, which will help to
feed our people, and help to win
the war is being increased.


IT'S NOT THE BIGGEST BUT

THE BEST THAT COUNTS


Yes you'll get the best at Colee's Bar and besides that
you'll enjoy the friendly, cheerful atmosphere that pre-
vails here. You'll find us right next to the Bus Station.


a
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STHE 8T, 'AUGUSTINE RECORD


New Waterproof

Pilot Chart For

Ship Survivors

Would Provide Protection
Against Sun And Also
Have Other Uses
The plight of ship and airplane
survivors cast adrift at sea will
be eased considerably by a new
waterproof and weatherproof pilot
chart adopted by the Navy De-
partment's Hydrographic Office.
The chart was developed after
many months of experimentation
by the Navy Department and pri-
vate manufacturers and it is to be
placed aboard all lifeboats and life
rafts as soon as it can be supplied
in sufficient volume.
The chart is printed on an en-
tirely new material developed by a
small manufacturer at the sug-
gestion of the Navy Department.
The material resembles bond paper
in appearance and is highly re-
sistant to the effects of salt wa-
ter, sun, and other elements. It
car. be rolled into a tight ball and
spread out smoothly.
The charts have the added ad-
vantage of being suitable for the
catching of rain water, providing
protection against the sun, and
other uses that might contribute
to the safety and comfort of ship-
wrecked persons.
Present plans call for the inser-
tion of copies of the charts in pock-
ets on rubber life rafts and life-
boats where they will be readily
available when the crew casts off.
Navy Department navigation ex-
pcrts said that persons with rea-
Ssonable intelligence, even without
i sea experience, could readily inter-
pret the charts. Not only do the
charts show distances and land
areas but they indicate currents
and prevailing wind directions that
can be used to great advantage in
setting a course.
The world is divided into six
major areas in plotting the charts
-the North Pacific, South Pa-
cific, North Atlantic, South Atlan-
tic, the Carribean Sea and the In-
dian Ocean. Charts are being made
for each month of the year for these
areas, but for the time being each
sheet will be printed with a winter
chart of the particular rea on one
side and a summer chart of the
same territory on the other.
The charts measure 26 by 38
inches and are packed in a carton
measuring 9 inches by 4%1 inches by
1% inches. Vessels will be issued
charts only for the area in which
they are to operate.
Old manuscripts show that the
manufacture of writing ink had
reached a high degree of perfec-
tion in the middle ages.


MARINELAND'S FISH RETURN TO SEA FOR DURATI


SUNDAY, APIt 2kS, Iw

ION
-5DAiK~iMAUKEHIIN"" ^- ... ffer L^a9 '


.. .... &. -, -+- .. .. .- ,
Marine Studios, million-dollar aquarium at Marineland, wan one of the first major Florida attractions to close for the duration. Its
huge tanks now empty and most of its buildings sealed and shuttered, it is playing a small but important role in the war effort. The
hotel and restaurant units are now serving as a coastal station for Coast Guardsmen of the Seventh Naval District operating under the
St. Augustine Captain of the Port's Office.


Flashes of Life
By The Associated Press Director Earle Kerr $5-although
Romance Rationed he owed nothing.
SEYMOUR. Conn.-An 84-year- "After living elsewhere," the
old farmer admitted to the ration man explained, "I think it is worth
board that he had used the gasoline at least $5 to call New Mexico
allowed for his tractor in his car my home. ..."
instead. Asked why, he replied: Puzzled at first, Kerr quickly
"To go to see my girl friend." decided a dummy tax return could
Cautioned by the surprised board, be fixed up-so the state can keep
the octogenarian quickly suggested the $5.
a way to eliminate those pleasure
trips. Nice Idea, Anyhow
"How about extra gas for a hon- KAN S A S C IT Y-Pupils of
eymoon?" he asked. Franklin School, who recalled a
Reluctantly, the board said no. custom of the early American In-
dians and planted fish to fertilize
Perfectly Legal their victory garden, report a set-
SANTA FE, N. M.-A former back.
New Mexico resident, now living in Dogs came from everywhere.
Virginia, sent State Income Tax They dug up the ancient fish with


vigor and rolled in same with gusto.
Man At Work
TWIN FALLS, Idaho-Pvt. O.
A. Kelker, C. A. P. pilot and for-
mer Twin Falls Times-News city
editor, was flying over mountain
canyons last week, hunting a miss-
ing airman.
Yesterday another emergency
arose-so he replaced the paper's
measle-stricken society editor.
The Plunger
SEATTLE, Wash.-Walter Gise-
burt, 20-year-old shipyard worker,
won a $15 bet.
He's sorry now.
He dived off a Lake Washington
ferry to swim a quarter-mile to his
shipyard.
His pals paid off-but Giseburt
paid $37.45 court costs he was
assessed at his trial on a public-


nuisance charge, plus incidental
costs and loss of wages during th
trial.
Total: $115.
He didn't even get to finish his
swim, he sighed; the Coast Guard
stopped him.
Saboteur
MIAMI, Fla.-A monkey in the
corn brought new complications for
Mrs. J. M. Bridges' victory garden.
"He's there now, shucking and
eating the very ears I had planned
to have for supper," she complained
to police.
A squad car hurried out to help
preserve the food supply, but the
footloose monkey had eaten his
fill and scampered away.
You can help bomb Berlin too.
Buy Bonds that "outfit the outfits"
that go there.


SEALTEST M ILK from




McCARTER'S


.,I

--r6

.. .~6~


b


MILK


SERVES THEM WELL!






Phone 452 For Delivery


173 SAN MARCO AVE.


ST. AUGUSTINE


P. O. BOX 622


IMilk has an A-1 place in the mess halls of our fighting men ... in the lunch pails of our
war workers ... in the diets of young Ameri cans! And it gets top rating in Uncle Sam's
nutrition program.
Service men in St. Augustine know the quality of McCarter's Milk ... Milk is your best
food and Sealtest Milk distributed by McCarter's is the best food at its best.




McCARTER'S


-- BIRDSEYE FROSTED FOODS


* GRADE "A" -FARM FRESH PASTEURIZED..MILK *


I

I


COLEE'S BAR


AND PACKAGE STORE
8 GRANADA ST. PHONE 158


i


BOB

McCARTER


QUALITY DAIRY PRODUCTS


DAVID

McCARTER


rPFa~L~I~WIIYCIIIIIRIWIIL~IIHIWUL~IILIU


_ _~___ .. -1 1


L


IIRlmllMUlImImIiIDIiIIIaIIMfIt ilWHnUM IIMInllHllHllaiulliMiiDitIIilllMiiilallllllltifiiDi llHllmalli t


I


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SUqDAY. APRTL 25, 194S TUE ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD PAGEg


Dishonorable Discharge Is

The Same In The Coast Guard
A man who receives a dishonor- This Bureau knows from long
able discharge haa practically no experience in handling correspon-
chance of employment by reputable dence of the tremendous handicap
finms and industries, he has no suffered by men convicted of de-
civil-service privilege, and in later section in time of wai and dishon-
life will on many occasions sin- orably discharged. Solely in the
merely regret his conduct which re- interest of the men concerned and
faulted in his receiving such form their future, it urgently requests
of discharge. that all men, old or young, give
If he marries and has children serious thought to the consequences
and the question "What did you do before they commit any offense
in the last war?" is put to him, against Navy rules or regulations.
he is placed in a position of being The punishment imposed by the
compelled to lie about his service Navy is so far reaching that it
or admitting that at the time of will, regardless of their conduct in
his country's need he most miser- after life, prove a stumbling block
ably failed in his oath of allegiance in every worthwhile effort they
and that which was expected of make.--(Iureau of Naval Person-
him. nel Information Bulletin, October,
WH is not eliibhle for m minh, hin 1942, No. 307.)


in any organization composed of
Navy and military men, and he and
his family will suffer many mo-
ments of embarrassment due to the
character of discharge he received.
In addition to all the above, the
Bureau cannot too strongly stress
the disability that attaches to a
dishonorable discharge based on
conviction by general court martial
on a charge of wartime desertion.
Such men forever lose their Fed-
eral citizenship rights and the
privilege of holding any office un-
der the United States Government.
They are branded for all time as
the most odious of all things, "A
wartime deserter."


SILENT MESSAGE AT SEA FOR CONVOY


Tall Story
Gus Edwards, mechanic's mate,
is one of the navy's most season-
ed tale spinners. One day he was
sitting with,a group of English
tars, discussing the relative merits
of British and American ships.
"I'm curious about your car-
riers," one British tar said. "How
fast are they?"
Old Gus looked at him and re-
plied, "To tell you the truth, I
don't know. We've never really
opened them up. All they've been
required to do so far is to keep
up with the planes."-Tail Spins.


45
.... ..

SInternational code flags are ho
municate with other vessels of a
the submarine menace.

SAmerican Womr

I Post-War S
AT THE U.S.O. Isure
5 Insure W
... OR OFFICERS CLUB
SMagazine Polls National
= I Panel For
You'll be the No. 1 Girl .. look your loveliest panel
Opinion
in one of our new fashionable spring frocks. -- i
0, NEW YORK, April 24-Keeping
s ,tep with the rising tide of interest
From all quarters in post war plan-
ning, the Woman's Home Compan-
LU CILLE SHO P I on has polled its national panel of
1- women readers on three important
1 aspects of this question.
144 ST. GEORGE ST. Results of this poll show the
Women of America overwhelmingly
IInitIOn nll ii lllUml lull llhIIIIIIt I D0IIIqHI~IIOilltll1iiHt11n11 IIIUII0a1nil II in favor of accept ng restrictions


. - .


i -


LT oyC s A



TROPICAL K


BAR

172 ST. GEORGE ST.


WE PACK AND SHIP CANDIES and FRUITS



Le Roy's Tropical Bar

172 ST. GEORGE ST.


listed by a Coast Gua
foreign-bound mer ch


irdsman aboard a cutter somewhere at sea to com-
hant convoy. Use of the radio is barred because of


ten Favor Hold That Call

sacrifices To Is Good Advice

Orl D em ocracy Telephone companies throughout
r the country are urging the public
to cooperate with them by reducing
that would affect their daily living calls as much as possible. In con-
habits in order to achieve the kind ducting the war the government is
of peace we are fighting for. To using a considerable portion of the
the query "Would you be willing wires at all time. At the same
to accept rationing and food re- time the public needs more service
strictions after the war to help feed than usual to cooperate with the
foreign nations?" 92 per cent of government, and the telephone cpm-
the women answered yes. pany is sandwiched without means
Typical comments of those who to expand its facilities due to labor
voted to make this sacrifice indicate conditions and shortage of. mate-
a practical grasp of world condi- rials. It is a critical situation.
tions necessary to insure a lasting, Conservation of telephone facili-
democratic peace and a definite ties as well as any other of our
scrapping of the doctrine of isola- war resources is necessary. Con-
tionism. Some of the comments: servation means making the best of
"If we wish post war cooperation what we have. Making useless and
from invaded nations we must give telephone calls at the
cooperation first and by way of unnecessary telephone calls at the
cooperation first and by way of
food." expense of the war effort is waste-
food.fulat the present time
"Rationing after the war to feed fulSt at the p ent time.
foreign nations will provide mar- Stop and think before making a
kets for our increased production long distance call. While you are
and thus avert a sudden collapse telling the folks about the Service;
in our economic structure." that you are taking your cod liver
"If we are sincere in our reasons every night and that you miss them
for fighting this war, we must be so much (which you could put in a
willing to sacrifice after hostilities letter) some important govern-
cease to create the kind of world ment call may be waiting to come
we think worth fighting for." through. It may be an order for
The report released in the May movement of troops or supplies or
issue of the magazine is the sixth concerning the purchase of essen-
in the Companion's continuing sur- tial war material and ultimately
vey covering women's opinions on may effect the lives of millions of
wartime problems, it is based on people. Multiply that ly thou-
a national panel of approximately sands of other useless and avoid-
2,000 women carefully selected to able calls and you will find that
give an accurate cross-section of the odds are very much against the
the magazine's millions of readers, government. You don't have to be
The current poll also throws some a genius to imagine that.
interesting light on the degree of ---__ V--
sympathy American women feel School Feedbag
toward our various allies and to- A W
ward the invaded nations. A War Casualty
To the question "Which of the CHARLOTTE, N. C. (P)-There
nations invaded by the Axis would will be no junior-senior banquet
you be most eager to help?" 35ths year a Queens College, a girls'
per cent put Greece at the top of this yer at Queens College, a girls'
the list. Poland came second with schohere.
a vote f 30 per cent; China made The juniors were unable to nd
a vote of 30 per cent; China made an eating place with enough food
a close third with 28 per cent and to serve the banquet and the se-
Holland ranked fourth with 25 to serve the banquet and the se-
Holland ranked fourth with 25 niors were short on escorts because
per cent. so many young men had gone to
When it come to the question a .
"Which of our allies do you feel war.
most friendly towards?" two coun-
tries received a majority of wo-
men's votes although many said,
"We should feel friendly toward
all of our allies." The two most
favored nations were Great Britain
(49 per cent) and China (26 per /
cent). Some of the comments sup-
porting these preferences:
"The British, because they be-
lieve in the same fundamental prin-
ciples of democracy that we do."
"Great Britain has fought va-
liently against all odds holding
back the enemy and sending sup- ALSO DAIRYME
plies to other allied nations." ALSO DAIRYME
"The people of China deserve our
small sacrifices--their fortitude AND FARME
and patience are examples all of us
could well afford to follow."
"The Chinese have always ex-
pected little and complained less
than most of our allies and still
keep on plodding." S
Police Nab Fugitive FEED & S1
From A Ration Card
COLORADO SPRINGS, Col. (P) PHONE 1137
Police officers snapped to attention ST. AUGUS
when a citizen called and said an
unbranded calf was walking se-
renely along a downtown street.
Officer Oren Boiling called one of HIGH QUAI
Colorado Springs rodeo stars, then SEEDS T
jumped in a car. With the cowboy
sitting on a fender and twirling
a rope, they gave chase and soon
had the veal cutlets in custody.


10 Major Awards Fox CAUGHT WITHOUT A RATION CARD
DARLINGTON, S. C. (A)-Her a rural school, was #ttacke4 I$y t
F r U S Hs name wa': not Red Riding Hood fox which tried to snatch her uinch
or U. S. Heroes and no wolf was around, but a box. An 11-year-old Oy killed
six-year-old girl, on her way to the fox with his bare haud s,
There are 10 major awards with
which America honors its sol-
diers and sailors for heroism or *
performance of exceptional char- OTHE
aeter. A-M fto
The Army Medal of Honor is
given for conspicuous gallantry inT
action beyond the call of duty; the S N
Distinguished Service Cross for
extraordinary heroism in action. IN THE C VI
The Distinguished Service Medal SERVICE
is awarded for exceptionally merit- (
orious service in a duty of great
responsibility; the Silver Star for
gallantry in action; the Purple
Heart for meritorious service and F H ER
for wounds received in battle; the
Soldier's Medal for heroism not in-
volving actual conflict with an
enemy. GREETINGS
enemy.
The Navy Medal of Honor and .
Distinguished Service Medal cor- TO A LL
respond to the same decorations in A
the Army, and the Navy Cross is
for extraordinary heroism or dis- ER ICE ME
tinguished service.
Both the Army and Navy award
the Distinguished Flying Cross for MR R
uitm.nr avimavnm *,iia 0 MR G-RAC RGO DE


I



I

[




I

I


ST. FRANCIS APTS.
COR. ST. FRANCIS AND MARINE STS.
FACING THE BAY


^_______-4'


CO

FUR?


Ileruiatsi uor exaLruaumallilty acnhieS-
ment in an aerial flight.
,V-
These Women

Career Girls t

Rule Roost

In Wartime "

By ADELAIDE KERR
AP Feature Writer
Mrs. Linville Martin, National
Junior League President, thinks the
war is going to boot women up-
stairs into bigger jobs.
"It's going to push them into
more important work than ever
before-if they deserve it-and
they'd better get ready," the soft
voiced Southerner warns.
"We're in the midst of a social
revolution. Class consciousness
is out."
Take that from the head of 36,-
000 Junior Leaguers, most of whom
have Social Register backgrounds.
"There is going to be greater
equality after this war and we'd
better be educating ourselves for I
the part intelligent citizens will
have to play in the new world
we live in. It's important for
people to begin right now read-
ing and thinking about a per-
manent peace, so that we will be
patient this time in evolving a
workable plaia and not be in such
a hurry to slam back to nor-
malcy."
To "broaden the outlook and
toughen the thinking" of the na-
tion's Junior Leaguers, Mrs.. Mar-
tin and her supporting .committee I/
added a good stiff course on world,
affairs to the 1943 agenda.
It is a part of a general Junior IIttlU
League system to harness the ca- i
abilities of its members in aid of
the community. Many of them give g
voluntary services in clinics, hos-
pitals, day nurseries and other
community centers.
"It's intelligent service we
want-n-ot just dallying," Mrs.
Martin says. "War work is com-
munity work. We have to keep
the home front strong or else why
win the war if we are going to
lose what we are trying to pro-
tect. If we send our boys out tb
fight for democracy we've got to E
live it at home.
"Anybody who is fortunate
enough to be born to a good
home, education and plenty of :
good food owes the less fortun-
ate members of society some
help. It's like the parable of the
ten talents. They have got to be
spent in good hard work which
makes the community a better
place to live in."
Mrs. Martin, wife of a major in
the air force and mother of three,
lives in Winston-Salem, North Car-
olina.
--------- !
Biscuits and crackers combine in
concentrated form many nutritious
foods such as wheat, butter, cheese,
eggs, milk, molasses and corn
syrups, honey, fruits and shorten-
ings.





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V


PAGE 9


SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1948


_I


THE ST. :AUGUSTINE RECORD


W




PAGE 10


NAVY WOULD CURB

ABUSES OF PARCEL

POST PRIVILEGES

Navy personnel serving outside
of the United States may have
their privilege of receiving parcal
post mail further restricted un-
less certain abuses of this privi-
lege are eliminated.
At the present time the Navy
does not require the addressee to
obtain prior permission of his Com-
manding Officer to receive a pack-
age, whereas Army personnel
abroad is subject to this restriction.
Some merchandisers have taken
advantage of this situation to en-
courage the sending of an exces-
sive number of packages to over-
seas Navy personnel, with a con-
sequent flooding of regular parcel
post channels.
The regular flow of mail and
necessary parcel post packages to
Navy personnel is considered high-
ly desirable by the Navy and it is
reluctant further to restrict such
service. Continued abuse of the
package-sending privilege by vari-
ous merchandisers and individual
senders, however, might penalize
the entire personnel by an official
curb on parcel post service.
The current difference in regu-
lations governing the sending of
packages to soldiers, sailors and
marines is in no way unfair dis-
crimination, but is the result of
greatly different conditions under
which the two services operate.
One of the principal differences
is the fact that ships operate over
wide areas, and longer delays in
mail service are created. Conse-
quently many months might elapse
before a commanding officer's per-
mission could be obtained and for-
warded to the family and friends at
home to send packages. Moreover,
small ships run out of supplies and
frequently replacements of such
personal articles as might be sent
from home are not available.
Careful restriction of the size
and weight of packages sent over-
seas has been made necessary by
the continuing shortage of shipping
s, space on airplanes and cargo ves-
sels, which are sorely needed for
the movement of ammunition, food
and medical supplies and troops.


Ammunition From
The Kitchen Stove
Waste kitchen fats are need-
ed for the war.
They fire anti-aircraft shells
and anti-tank shells.
They make dynamite and gun
powder.
Save, strain, sell, all waste
kitchen fats. Your meat dealer
Will buy them.
HELP WIN A BATTLE.


HOMES OF UNITED SERVICE ORGANIZATION S


These two centrally located structures house St. Augustine's two USO clubs, mecca for many hun-
dreds of service men and women "morning, noon and night." In the Cathedral Lyceum Building on St.
George Street (above) is situated the USO-operated National Catholic Community Service Club. Over-
looking Matanzas Bay and in the heart of the downtown business district is the Legion Home (below),
headquarters for the USO Army-Navy YMCA-operated club. Attractive furnishings, diversified facili-
ties and a well-planned and executed weekly program make both USO Clubs highly popular sites.


IT'S A PLEASURE, JUDGE. Na edic Attenda Forget
TOPEKA, Kas.-Police JudgeN y edcal endants ore
Eldon Sloan sentenced a 16-year- Men Uner Fire
old speeder-a second offender-. es To A Men Under Fire


to ten days in jail. mTen ne pa-
roled the youth on condition he buy
a $25 war bond immediately.


To A

Friendly Hotel

For

Friendly People







OPEN ALL SUMMER








Buckingham Hotel

GRANADA ST. PHONE 1470

ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA.


Marines Owe Their
Lives To Heroism Of
Young Corpsmen
(The following story was writ-
ten by Sergeant Samuel Shaf-
fer, of 1709 H St., N.W., Wash-
ington, D. C., a Marine Corps
Combat Correspondent.)
GUADALCANAL-(Delayed) -
No higher tribute can be paid the
Navy's young corpsmen, or medical
attendants, than the unstinting
praise lavished upon them daily
by Marines on the front here.
Back home the corpsmen, who
are attached to every Marine com-
pany, are called "swab jockies" by
the Leathernecks. Here they're
known as "Doc."
The usually hard-shelled Ma-
rines make no attempt to conceal
their admiration of the men. Many
owe their lives to the heroism of
these "swab jockies," who ignore
shell-fire and shrapnel to adminis-
ter first aid.
Here, in brief, are stories of some
corpsmen who shut their eyes to
their own safety to save the lives
of Marines:
Hospital Apprentice First Class
Richard H. Painter, 18, of Detrit,
Michigan, was with a patrol pin-
ned down by Jap machine gun fire.
When a man was seriously wound-
ed, Painter ran through the hail
of bullets to stop the flow of blood
and apply bandages. The corpe-
man was shot in the leg. Without
tending himself, he carried the
Marine to safety and then, saying
that stretchers were needed for
others, hobbled back to the first-aid'
station.
In night fighting three corpsmen
ran through fire to a ravine where
a big Jap shell had fallen on a
company of Marines, seriously
wounding six of them. In dark-
ness, while mortar shells exploded
about them and the Japs shouted
and banged knives against shell
cases to lure the Marines into firing
and thus disclose their location,
the corpsmen rendered life-saving
first aid. They gave the wounded
cigarettes and used their helmets
to cover the glow-helmets neces-
Ssary for their own protection when
shrapnel fell.
The corpsmen were Pharmacist's
Mate Third Class Richard Seaver,
17, of Detroit, Michigan; Hospital
Apprentice First Class J. Roy
Spence, 18, of Chowchilla, Califor-
nia, and Henry H. Sickler, 18,
Mossyrock, Washington.
On another sector, Pharmacist's
Mate Third Class Marion E. Por-
cupile, 18, of Seminole, Oklahoma,
left his foxhole to treat three
wounded men, one of whom had a
severely lacerated arm. For 45
minutes "Porky," as he is known
to the men, worked deftly in the
Smidst of falling shells. This morn-


ing the battalion surgeon told him
his speed had saved the life of the
boy with the wounded arm. A de-
lay of two minutes would have
meant death.
"Porky" was entitled to a rest
after that, but as he explains it,
"some mortar shells fell next door
and wounded three guys and I went
over to see what I could do."
On another occasion, a hail of
snipers' bullets felled two men in
a company which had just moved
up to the front. A call for a corps-
man went down the line, and, ob-
livious to the bullets he ran to the
wounded, tossing his helmet away
because it slowed him down.
Meanwhile the men of the com-
pany fanned out into action. They
blazed away with rifles and auto-
matic weapons until the ravine
ahead was clear of Japs.
"I can't hold those kids back,"
their commanding officer said.
"They hear a sniper and off they
go. They've got guts."
The two wounded men had re-
ceived superficial though painful
injuries. They lay silently, puf-
fing on cigarettes their buddies
placed between their lips, as the
corpsman dressed their wounds.
,I carty morphine.to deaden the
pain," the corpsman told me, "but
I haven't given it to anyone yet.
None of them will admit they're in
pain."


.. No Eggs *


Army nurses drag out the old
tin bucket for an impromptu
shampoo at their base in Aus-
tralia. Lieut. Lily Fucci of Rut-
land, Vt., works up the lather
while Frances Cox of Wood-
land, Me., gets ready for a cold
water rinse.


A


lIu IvTIK LJ r v iI i u -R L ^ l.|K T KI ^ vy* 1,-,jl J S s. i;


H.


E. WOLFE


CONSTRUCTION




COMPANY


EXCHANGE BUILDING

ST. AUGUSTINE, FLORIDA



8'


PAGE~~~~~~ 10 THE- ~ CI ST. AUUTN RECOR SIJY APIL 2,


-


I


"By


-- --


The Dawn's


SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1943


THE ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD


Early Light...





THE SIGHT of our flag still waving our way of life ... our armed forces ... in
at Fort McHenry in 1814 inspired the words fellow Americans everywhere who will win
of "The Star Spangled Banner" ;.. "By the this war with their work, their courage,
dawn's early light" at Pearl Harbor on De- their sacrifice...
member 7th, Japan attacked the United BACK OF the battle lines stands a
States ... and once more Americans knew united people ... a people determined to
that our flag was still there... that a nation let nothing get in the way of the victory
firmly united would more than meet the effort... to give their dimes and dollars to
challenge to its future life ... its Freedom. the very limit so that our fighting men
AMERICANS TOOK up the fight as will have more and better equipment to
they have in the past, confident and un- crush the enemy. Make more of YOUR
afraid, with faith in "the power that hath dollars fight for America... for Victory.
made and preserved us a nation" ... in




OUR BEST WISHES


TO ALL


U. S. SERVICE UNITS


STATIONED IN


ST. AUGUSTINE


AND VICINITY






SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 194~ THE ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD PAGE 11


New Course For Training

Night Lookouts Devised


On the alertness of the men on ing panel, t]
lookout depends the safety of the lighting con
of the mode
ships of the Navy. It is their vigi- can practice
lance that warns tile Officer-of-the- in all degree
Deck of the presence of other ves- the center o
sells and thus permits him to call ing belt wit]
the crew to battle stations, ready beams are r
to beat the enemy to the punch if and the b(
the ships sighted are hostile. through the
Most difficult of lookout assign- tic manner.
ments are those of the night watch- flashes are
es, when low visibility combined as the fiery
with physical weariness and ignor- sel at sea.
ance of proper methods of night production c
vision increases the possibility of try to locate
dangerous errors, their observe
Recognizing the need for special- Concurren
ized training in this important field, actual look
the Navy has developed a new battle condi
training course for teaching pro- given instru
ficiency in the use of the eyes at identification
night. of observat
Heart of the course is a dark and use of tl
rbom in which night conditions at on the phys
sea can be reproduced, thus en- the men an
abling the instructors to exercise need for ada
the trainees in lookout duty under fore the loc
conditions which they will actually sibility for t
encounter when on lookout station the eyes mu
in the war zones. dim lights w
The dark room is equipped with Exposure to
a training stage representing 90 match will d
degrees of the horizon on which at least a fe
there are accurate scale models of vision is "of
enemy ships. By means of a light- corner of th


he instructor may vary
editions around the area
ls so that the trainees
e spotting the models
es of darkness. Across
f the table is a convey-
h a model on it. Moon-
reproduced in this area
elt carries the model
beam in a most realis-
Lightning and gun
also reproduced as well
glow of a burning ves-
Thus, under exact re-
of night at sea, the men
Sthe models and report
nations to the instructor.
it with the practice in
out work under actual
tions, the trainees are
action in ship and plane
n, the proper reporting
ions, and in the care
he equipment. Lectures
biology of the eye give
Understanding of the
iptation to darkness be-
okout assumes respon-
he night watch and why
st be shielded from even
while on lookout watch.
o the light of a burning
destroy night vision for
w minutes. Why night
I center" or out of the
ie eye rather than "di-


ST. AUGUSTINE'S BEACHES LURE SERVICE MEN AND WOMEN


.... .. ,

The city's biggest natural attraction-for service men and uniformed women, as well as civilians is its fine beaches and excellent
bathing facilities. Here, a happy group of khaki-clad soldiers chat s with local bathing beauties in the shadows of the Ocean Fishing Pier
at 'St. Augustine Beach. In the background, men of other branches o f the service and their fair companions race toward the sparkling
waters of the Atlantic Ocean for a refreshing dip.


rect vision" or looking straight at
an object is thoroughly explained.
The training stage offers a valu-
able means of practicing methods
of searching.
The course was developed with
the sole purpose of training men
for lookout duty. However, it has
possibilities of being of great value
as a screening test, revealing defec-
tive night vision in the trainees and
thus enabling commanding officers
to assign to night lookout duty only
those men best equipped for the
service.
V-
LARRY LYNCH IS
WITH "ARMY TIMES"
WASHINGTON, D. C. (FNS)-
"Army Times," national weekly
newspaper for the Army, announces
that Larry S. .Lynch, well-known
Florida newspaper man, has joined
its Washington staff as general
sales promotion manager for both
"Army Times" and "Civilian Front."
The latter is the national weekly
newspaper for civilian defense.
Lynch was for many years asso-
ciated with newspapers in Orange,
Lake and Sumter counties and dur-
ing the past two years has repre-
sented "Army Times" at Army
installations throughout the south-
east, with his headquarters in
Jacksonville.
V-
The diaphragm is the busiest
muscle in the human body; it
completes a half billion move-
ments in an ordinary lifetime.


,Marine Runs To "Wrong Goal"


(The following story was writ-
ten by Sergeant Samuel Shaffer,
1709 H St., N.W., Washington,
D. C., a Marine Combat Corre-
spondent.)
GUADALCANAL (Delayed) -
The famous incident of the football
star who scored a touchdown, only
to discover that he had run in the
wrong direction, was recalled here
when a Marine unintentionally got
deep into Japanese lines.
Thinking he was going to the
rear of his own lines, Private
First Class Bernard Linquist, U.S.
M.C., 20, of 1310 Frank Avenue,
Albert Lea, Minnesota, wandered
nearly a mile and a half into Jap
territory. He didn't discover his
mistake until he had killed a Jap
and come to a river which he knew
was held by the enemy.
Linquist was working with an-
other company, and when its ob-
jective was reached, he left to
report to his own section.
It's easy to get lost in the
jungles of Guadalcanal. So Lin-
quist did not know he was head-
ing in the wrong direction when
he came upon a Jap leisurely sit-
ting on a log.
"I told him to surrender in the
only Jap words I knew," Linquist
said. "Instead, he started pulling
a grenade on me. I figured I


couldn't take him prisoner then, so
I shot him through the head, be-
fore he had a chance to pull out the
safety pin."
Suspicion began to gnaw at Lin-
quist as he climbed ridge after ridge
without seeing Marines. Finally
he saw a river which he knew was
still held by the Japs, The realiza-
tion hit him hard--he was about
2,500 yards in front of our front
lines.
"I was scared," he admitted. "I
had no compass with me and I had
failed to take any water along. I
didn't even have any grenades. All
I had was my rifle.
"I started back cautiously. I
heard some Jap voices and ducked
behind a tree, holding my breath
for fear they'd hear me, It was a
party of Japs carrying machine
guns. I decided to lay low 'till they
passed. I couldn't knock off many
with my rifle and if I tried, I'd
never get back. My own outfit
would think I was taken prisoner
and begin worrying. I had to get
back."
Linquist returned to his section
exhausted. He had been in Jap ter-
ritory for five and a half hours.
The battalion intelligence officer
told him: "Good work, Linquist,
but don't get lost again."
Linquist was boin in Sheldon,


50 WORKING GIRLS
LEARN TO FLY IN
THEIR SPARE TIME
AP Features
BLYTHE, Calif.-Out here in
the California desert fifty young
women have been engaged in a co-
operative flying venture looking
forward to the day when the arm-
ed forces may call them to the
newly formed Women's Auxiliary
Ferrying Squadron.
They all are working girls in the
Los Angeles area and in addition
to chipping in their share of ex-
penses they drove 500 miles each
week-end. They couldn't practice
closer to home because civilian
planes are grounded in the coastal
area.
The girls called themselves
Eagles and sported smart military
uniforms. Their equipment was a
small, high-winged blue-and-gold
monoplane.
Their instructor was Commander
Bettie Lund, who has 4,500 hours
in the air.
Because of their jobs, they could
fly only on week-ends, but they
held a ground school in Los Ange-
les every Tuesday. They learned'
maintenance well enough to put 32
patches on their little ship and
otherwise kept it in flying condi-
tion.
V
It has been shown medically that
a child grows most rapidly in the
summer, slowest in the winter.


Validity of red stamps from Ra-
tion Book Two runs to April 30th.
These can be j'se4 for meat, fats,
oils, cheeses, c'tfned fish.
Remember, poultry, game and
fresh fish are not rationed.
Sugar: Stamp No. 12 from Ra-
tiop Book One is valid for five
pounds through the end of May.
Sugar for home-canning of 1943
fruit crops will be available to
housewives. Formal details will
be announced very soon.
Coffee: Stamp No. 26 from Ra-
tion Book No. 1 is cancelled now.
Watch for new announcement.
Canned goods and related food
items are covered by blue coupons
lettered D. E., and F ... a total of
48 points for the month of April.
Dry beans, peas or lentils are point-
free for use as seed.
Gasoline: "B" and "C" coupons
expire according to dates indi-
cated on individual books.
A-5 coupons are good for three
gallons. In Florida validity runs to
July 21st. Car owners locally will
be eligible for supplemental ra-
tions for necessary driving to and
from work, or in connection with
work. However, they must first
form a car club to carry three or
more persons to work regularly.
Tires: Owners of passenger cars
and commercial vehicles using tires
smaller than 7.50 x 20, may get
their casings recapped with re-


claimed rubber camelback without
applying to the Local Ration Board
for certificates. Failure to do so
whenever tires need recapping con-
stitutes tire abuse and upon the
basis of such evidence the Local *k
Board will refuse premission for -
other tire service.
Certificates for tires and tubes
granted by the Local Board may be
used at any convenient time.
Office of Public Relations,
St. Johns Co. Defense Council,..
Community Service Member,
OPA.
V
---V------ '*-
SHOW GOOD TASTE
IN CHOOSING MUSIC '
Ten thousand men-in-upiformn
applied for seats to hear John
Charles Thomas sing the baritone '..
role in Dubois' "Seven Last
Words" on Good Friday at Stock-
ton, California. The Metropolitan
opera star who offered his services
free of charge when informed that
the civilian audience had been
crowded out by the armed forces, is
elated with what he regards as a
commentary on the musical taste
of our fighting men!
V
Whole milk powder forms an
important item in Red Cross par-
cels sent to prisoners of war.


I
*


VISITOR HOMEFOLKS EVERYONE


CASH


FOR


YOUR


CAR


WHY STORE YOUR CAR? SELL IT TO US-PUT THE CASH INTO WAR BONDS


YOUR CAR LET US PUT


IT INTO A-1 SHAPE


0.


FVuee

:I.IIH ilN


AUTO PAINTING

Washing- Polishing- Lubrication

FURNITURE

REFINISHING




l


Your car is a liability if it is going to ruin stored away.


1941

PACKARD

COUPE
A COMFORTABLE
COUPE YOU'LL LOVE
SEE IT DRIVE IT

GOOD

TIRES I rtr


1941 DODGE

SEDAN I


1940 FORD

FORDOR I


Why lose the money you have invested when you can get SPOT CASH and turn the money into a
paying, patriotic investment?


1941

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SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1943


THE ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD


PAGE 11


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PAGE 12


The President's FLORIDA CHAMBER ME1
OF COMMERCE GETS

War Heroes DIFFICULT ORDER HE
JACKSONVILLE (FNS) A
AP F s fifth-grade Califrrfia school pupil
AP Featureshas given the Ffleoda State Chain-
From Manila to Dieppe, the war ber of Commerce "''difficult order w".
thus far has produced scores of to fill. Walter Bert Shank of Mod- *
American heroes-some of them esto wants:
unsung, undecorated. So outstand- Florida's State flag
ing, however, were the perform- Florida's state seal I /
ances of three men that they re- A big Florida official map
ceived public citation from Presi- The state capital
dent Roosevelt in his talks to the Some Florida industries, and a few
nation. Here they are, the "Presi- resorts
dent's Heroes:" It is presumed by Harold Colee,
Lt. Comdr. Corydon M. Wassell- executive vice-president of the
This 60-year-old ex-missionary State Chamber, that young Shank
went into action in the Java Sea wants these articles so that he may
battle, cared for wounded officers prove to his fellow-students that
and men from the cruisers Hous- Florida "indeed, has something to r
ton and Marblehead. Risking cap- offer California." "
ture, he remained on Java with a Colee is sending the pupil de-
dozen seriously wounded sailors, scriptive literature of the state. "I
finally got them aboard a Dutch believe that this will convince him,"
ship and directed its passage to Colee declares, "that upon reach-
Australia. He was awarded the ing the state of manhood, Florida
Navy Cross. should be his home."
Capt. Hewitt T. Wheless-On a
bombing mission in the Philippine two days of the raging Coral Sea
area, Capt. Wheless' ship lost con- battle, Lt. Powers dive-bombed en-
tact with the formation and ran emy ships including an aircraft car-
into a nest of Japanese Zero fight- rier, transport, aircraft tender and
ers. The bomber attacked its tar- gunboats. On the third day, "for
get, engaged the Zeros and despite the folks back home," he battled '"
the loss of three crewmen, down- through anti-aircraft fire and
ed 11 enemy planes, then returned scored on a carrier at low level.
safely to base. He received the Dis- His plane was destroyed by the ex-
tinguished Service Cross. plosion of his bomb. He was
Lt. John James Powers For awarded the Medal of Honor.


THE ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD


MO TO COMPLACENT AMERICANS:


RE ARE HARD FACTS ABOUT OUR


;RE ARE HARD FACTS ABOUT OUR

BOMBING OF WESTERN EUROPE
I N .. =--- -..


WELCOME!


-RAS 'IN
They know-this American bomber crew operating from England-that blasting Naziland is no cinch.
Their plane is good, and so are they, but on every trip they must pass through storms of flak and swarms
of fighters from the world's most experienced air force.


We extend a most hearty welcome to all of
the men in the Armed Forces of the United
States.


Richbourg Electric Service
194 San Marco Ave. Phone 838


ARMY
w


3




3


By TOM WOLFE
NEA Staff Correspondent
UNITED STATES BOMBER
STATION, England, -Back home
we've some pretty mistaken ideas
about what's happening in the air
over western Europe.
We have the idea that our super-
bombers, manned by the world's
best air crews, roar over the con-
tinent, mow down enemy opposi-
tion, leave targets in a shambles
and, make miraculous returns in
safety despite missing engines and
flak and bullet-riddled fuselages.
But that is a sadly incomplete
picture. Here are the facts:
Fact number one is that our
heavy bombers are good planes.
Feats of the Fortresses are legion.
And you're going to hear lots more
about the Liberators before the
war is over. Lib pilots think Libs
are better than Forts. Fort pilots
think they're crazy. That's how
it ought to be. A pilot must trust
his ship.


COAST GUARD


SERVICES




SONS


Need More Experience


Fact two is that our air crews
are good. They're well trained and
they've got guts. But no air crew
in the world is tops until it has had
operational experience. At this
bomber station the consensus is
that a plane's not getting hit is 75
per cent luck and 25 per cent pilot-
ing. The men here feel their losses
would have been only half what
they are if they could have known
on their first missions what they
know now from bitter experience,
which is only gainable on missions.
Fact three is that the enemy is
good. Our airmen of this and other
USAAF bomber stations in Eng-
land are the only American heavy
bombardment groups who have
met the "first team" of the world's
most experienced air force on its
home grounds. German fighter
pilots are good, and they are ruth-
less. There's no sportsmanship in
airfighting. 'Because a plane out
of formation has far less defensive


NAVY
w


We Are Proud That We Have A Son In Each Of The Above Services


fire power than it has in formation,
the Nazis gang up on stragglers
limping home. The effectiveness
of this unsportsmanlike practice
has frequently been demonstrated.
Not only is the enemy fighter op-
position good-so is the enemy flak.
Flak is sometimes more nerve-
wracking than fighters. For one
thing, you do not see it coming
until it bursts near you. For an-
other, you can't fight back at it.
Aside from "evasive action," you
just sit and take it.
Fact number four is that alti-
tude formation flying is no cinch
under any circumstances. It's
around 50 below five miles up. Oxy-
gen lines are literally lifelines.
Only when these first four facts
are fully understood, when we stop
thinking it's easy to bomb Europe,
will combat crews here get the
credit due them.
Bombs Miss-Sometimes
There are two more facts-of-
fensive facts-that should be
known by people at home. The
enemy already knows them.
First: Superior bombsight or
no superior bombsight, it's a hard
job to hit a pinpoint from five or
six miles up, even under perfect
conditions-meaning perfect vis-
ibility and all the time in the
world to make a bombing run.
Without this aerial Utopia, it is
inevitable that some raids will not
seriously damage the primary tar-
get-although they may serve
other important purposes like
keeping fighter and ground de-
fenses busy during daytime, while
the RAF does the same at night.
Second: To date the Eighth Air-
force Bomber Command has used
only comparatively small forces.
These offensive facts do not.
mean that we haven't hit the Ger-
mans hard and effectively. But a
comparatively small force com-
bined with inevitable human er-
rors in operations cannot "set the
continent on fire."
V
In the 19th century travelers on
the western plains often killed
buffalo simply to eat the tongue.


SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1943


Many States

Represented

In Personnel

Men from various states com-
prise the officer personnel at St.
Augustine's Army Training Camp
on the Civic Recreation Center
grounds.
The commanding officer, Major
Max S. Edelstein, used to call
Milwaukee, Wis., home, but since
coming to St. Augustine in the
summer of 1941, he has purchased
an attractive home on Davis
Shores.
Captain William E. Harvill, the
camp adjutant, is a Georgia man,
hailing from Dublin. The Supply
Officer, First Lieutenant Ernest
B. Aden is from McKenzie, Tenn.;
the Station Surgeon, First Lieu-
tenant Harry L. Fox, of Queens
Village, Long Island, New York;
and the Dental Surgeon, First
Lieutenant Joseph F. McCauley,
from Rockaway Park, Long Island,
New York.


The company commanders are
Captain George H. Coupe of Dis-
tant, Pa., and Captain Joseph W.
Shaffer of Greenland, Mich. Other
officers from Military Police com-
panies and the towns from which
they come, are:
First Lieutenants Roy 0. Nisbet
of Dexter, Maine; Francis D. Hous-
ton, Columbus, Ohio; Harry W.
Homan, Peabody, Kansas; Lloyd A.
Dean, Minneapolis, Minn.; William
F. X. Geoghan, Brooklyn, New
York; Clifford A. Barger, Cincin-
nati, Ohio; Second Lieutenants
Grover V. McRae, McRae, Ga.;
Leon Merz, Jr., and Harry D. Kro-
nig, both of Philadelphia, Pa.
----V----..:-
Use V-Mail
Service men who may soon go
overseas are urged by the Navy De-
partment to remember that by util-
izing the V-mail system they can
send and receive more promptly
without'time and space waste to the
war effort.
The use of V-mail cuts down the
carrying space about 98 per cent.
A mail bag containing 3,000 letters
weighs about 65 pounds. The same
number of letters on microfilm
weighs only 15 ounces, occupying
a space equal to two packages of
cigarets.
When service men ana their fam-
ilies use V-mail they thus save
weight needed for war equipment
and supplies at a ratio of 65 to 1.
The V-mail forms for letter writ-
ing can be obtained at any post
office and most stationery, depart-
ment and drug stores. A three
cent stamp carries the letter to the
port of embarkation, or a six cent
stamp carries it by air mail.
It is then photographed and the
microfilm sent overseas by air. If
the film is lost in transit, the let-
ters are simply rephotographed
from the master negative, and the
letters are re-sent.
The V-mail system is the quick-
est, as well as the most war-eco-
nomical, means of communication
between men overseas and their
families. It should be used in pref-
erence to all other forms of com-
munication.
V
Margaret Hickey heads twelve
women leaders of labor, industry
and public activities who have
been appointed a women's policy
committee by the Man Power Com-
mission to aid in recruiting 5,000,-
000 more women for war produc-
tion. Miss Hickey is a lawyer and
owner of a secretarial school in
St. Louis.
V
"Outfit the outfit" fighting for
you. Buy Bonds.


These boys from Kapa Kapa,
New Guinea, have a go at this
barber business to show they're
Sno long hairs. Left to right are:
Kopi Kinibo and Gamoga Henao.


SENIOR HOSTESSES
ARE APPRECIATED
Women of St. Augustine are
cognizant of the needs of service
men and many are giving hours
of their time helping in various
ways to make' those away from
home feel at home in the Ancient
City, Among the activities in
which women are playing a much
appreciated part, are their roles
as senior hostesses at the various
service centers here.
V
Hinda Gould. a New York career
girl, recently gave a scrap party
at which two giant barrels were
filled with such scrap material as
automobile motors, sewing ma-
chines and a flute. Hinda turned
the contents over to the American
Women's Voluntary Services.
A house fly moves its wings
backward and forward 330 times
per second.


WARTIME

ECONOMICS

Mushrooms, boiled rice and toma-
toes make a happy, trio served In
an escalloped blend, baked in a
shallow, buttered casserole and
spread with grated cheese. This is
a wholesome, economical meat sub-
stitute.
For a seasonable satisfying
luncheon dessert, have hot waffles
with fresh sliced peach or apricot
filling. Drizzle a, little honey or
maple syrup over the top.
Ground or rolled peanut brittle
gives a grand flavor to tapioca
pudding. No sugar is then needed
in the pudding. Peanuts have a
high content of Vitamin Bl.
Watch for the Victory Food Spe-
cial labels that appear on certain
foods or on chrds in the grocery
store. This is to focus attention
to the consumer that there is an
abundant supply of this particular
food' and the government urges
its use to prevent waste.
Breakfast can become a real oc-
casion in your home if you take
extra care to include appetizing,
nutritious foods. And vary the
menus often. Breakfast is one of
the most important meals to help
keep the home front fighting fit.
Don't waste a crumb 'of bread.
Leftover bread slices can be dipped
in batter, fried in small amount of
fat and served as French Toast
with maple syrup or honey. Bread
can be toasted until very dry in a
slow oven and served as Melba
toast with soups, salsa1s or in place
of bread at:.any meal. Of course,
dried and rolled bread crumbs are
used for covering scalloped dish-
es, adding to meat and fish loaf
blend. And fine crumbs make an
ex-ellent coating for meat or fish
cakes. croquettes or vegetables to
be browned or fried. Store dried
bread crumbs in a covered jar. The
crumbs should be used up within
two weeks.
Egg omelet (plain or cheese)
gets on a higher nutrition plane
when some chopped cress and grat-
ed raw carrots are put into the bat-
ter bef,,re it is cooked. Try some
for luncheon, dinner or supper.


WELCOME!


.
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Smr


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PHONE 916


JOBBERS



AUTOMOBILE

PARTS



MACHINE SHOP



FUEL OIL



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SERVICE STATION
TEXACO PRODUCTS
GAS OIL LUBRICATION


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ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA.


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PHONES 450-451


1,000 Miles To
Join The Marines


Hey Folks!


FASHIONS FOR

JUNIORS QF

EVERY AGE


I


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'(
LL\


' *


When Miss Janet Lowrie,
above, was five she lived in
Santo Domingo and two Ma-
rines came to live with her fam-
ily to protect them against na-
tive bandits. The two leather-
necks only stayed with the
Lowries for five months but they
were "so gallant" that they made
a lasting impression on ,her.
That's why when Miss Lowrie,
who is connected with the Amer-
ican Embassy in Cuba, found out
that the U. S. Marine Corps was
enlisting women she caught a
plane in Havana and journeyed
1,000 miles to Atlanta, Ga., to
join the leathernecks.


Wives of Service Men-If you have a
hard to fit problem amongst your young-
sters, then do as the home folks here do
.-take them to the Junior Shop, where
you will find a varied selection in shoes,
dresses, suits, hats, undies and all of the
other items that make a well-dressed
youngster.


1,


Junior Dept. Store


156 ST. GEORGE ST.


ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA.


TO ALL SERVICE
MEN AND THEIR
FAMILIES


WHITEWA Y GROCERY


F.


142 KING ST.


ft


218 SAN MARCO


;4~":




PAGE 13


Sports At The U. S. Coast


Guard Training Station...


BY BILL KASTELZ
Sports Editor of The Shield
On December 7, 1941, around 2 o'clock in the afternoon I'was one
of the 35,000 spectators in Wrigley Field up in Chicago watching the
Chicago Bears running all over a helpless opposition-well on their way
to another professional football championship.


The day was beautiful, ideal for4
football, and it was hard to imagine
Shat elsewhere in the world entire
nations were at each other's throats
playing a much grimmer game-
and playing for keeps.
Then came that never-to-be-for-
gotten announcement over the loud-
speaker system "This morn-
ing Japanese planes attacked the
United States naval base at Pearl
Harbor" .
It seemed as though somebody
threw a big cloak completely over
the huge stadium. A minute be-
fore, the tremendously enthusiastic
and noisy crowd, completely obliv-
ious to the earth-shaking treach-
ery going on half-way around the
world, was on its feet, cheering it-
self hoarse while the two football
teams down below provided thrill
after thrill for the packed stadium.
There wasn't any more cheering
that afternoon, at least not enough
to talk about. They might just as
well have called the game off right


then and there, for all the crowd
cared about it By the time
the game was over the stadium was
three-fourths empty.
This was it. Places like Pearl
Harbor, Dunkirk, Nanking, and all
the other thousand and one war-
torn battlefields of the world, that
just a few hours previous had
seemed a million miles away hit
those 35,000 spectators smack-dab
right between their 70,000 respec-
tive eyes. There wasn't much
question about it anymore. We
finally were in it!
Accept Challenge
Sports-minded America was
stunned by that attack on Pearl
Harbor-but just momentarily. For,
almost to a man, and without:the
aid of blaring bands and high-step-
ping majorettes, the flower of
American manhood, these self-same
football stars, took up the sword
and stepped forth to meet the chal-
lenge of the enemy.


WELCOME


TO


Our Service Men


and


Their Families


o GULF OIL CORP,

: C. B. MERCER
rftiatriknunr


U


[ T '


LET'S KEEP


OUR EAGLE


FLYING



Buying More War Bonds will help assure a more
speedy victory and an earlier return of our boys.


A FRIENDLY
WELCOME AWAITS YOU AT THE





ALHAMBRA

HOTEL
Opp. U. S. Coast Guard Training Station
St. Augustine, Fla.


Wake Island, Corregidor, Bataan
and a hundred other blood-stained
battlefields were the settings this
time-not the huge packed bowls
and horseshoes that Joe College
used to cut his capers in, while
Betty Co-ed cheered him on to
victory.
FOR YESTERDAY'S JOE COL-
LEGE IS THE JACK TAR OR
JOHNNY DOUGHBOY OF TO-
DAY!
The luster that accompanies the
All-American intercollegiate selec-
tions each year, was somewhat
dimmed last season, because there
were millions of other American
youths blazing new paths of glory
across bloodied battlefields, oil-
slicked seas, and tracer-torn skies.
Athletics were shoved into the
background, but only temporarily
so. Uncle Sam quickly realized
the necessity of recreation for the
millions of young men fighting un-
der and for Old Glory. A quick
surveillance of the personnel of his
fighting forces disclosed a wealth
of athletic material reading like a
"Who's Who in American Sports."
The hundreds of army, navy, and
air stations all over the country
took to the idea immediately, and,
almost overnight, athletic teams
mushroomed at every training cen-
ter in the land.
Explosive Start
Here in St. Augustine at the
Coast Guard Training Station,
sports got away to a faster and
more explosive start than at most
of the training stations in the
country.
Hardly had the station moved
here from New Orleans, than the
men dug out the athletic parapha-
nelia, and, under the coaching of
CBM Glen C. Cooper, swung right
into the basketball season.
Handicapped by lack of time for
practicing and by a late start, the
team, nevertheless, plowed into a
heavy schedule with high spirits.
It's true they lost a game now and
then, but for every one they lost,
they won three.
The All-Stars, as they were dub-
bed, -hit the season's peak by crush-
ing the Jacksonville Army Air Base
Bombardiers 89-48 and from there
went on to whip three powerful
opponents by top-heavy scores to
capture, undoubtedly, the service
championship of the State of Flor-
ida, and; mythically, of the entire
southeastern United States.
Great Combination
Of that great combination, and
I do mean GREAT, only a few are
still here at the training station.
Such stars as Herb Robinson, Ray
Frederick, and Mark Below are
elsewhere in the world. Not much
remains from that glory-crowned
basketball season, except a few
pleasant memories and the knowl-
edge that they met-and bested-
the best.
'The baseball season, from all
outward appearances, looks like
another splash of glory for the
Stars. In the season's first two
starts, they whipped the Ponte
Vedra Coast Guardsmen twice, by
scores of 5-0 and 12-1. At the
time of this writing, it's hard to
see them losing very many games
this season.
Blessed by a galaxy of former
major and minor league stars,
Coach Cooper has on his hands
truly one of the finest diamond
combines in this region. An ex-
tensive schedule is being drawn up
Sor the coming season, and St. Au-
;ustine's baseball fandom will be
far from slighted when it comes to
Watching high cAliber baseball dur-
ing the coming months.
All-Stars Best
It is my guess that the Coast
Guard All-Stars will prove them-
selves to be the best team in the
state of Florida in baseball, as well
as basketball. Not far and away
the best, but the best.
Though not publicized quite so
much as the aforementioned sports,
there are other interests along the
line of athletics for the recreation


All is not drill and study for WAVES/at Madison, Wis., U. S.
Naval Training School. Here they swing out in a square dance as'
Part of their physical education program.


and enjoyment of Coast Guards-
men stationed in St. Augustine.
In order to prepare the recruits
to meet the enemy on his own
grounds and at his own game, the
science of "judo" is stressed by the
Coast Guard physical education de-
partment. This combines boxing,
wrestling, street fighting, the ap-
plication of scientific leverage and
knowledge of the vital parts of a
human body-all thrown into one.
While this gaining is not as inten-
sive as that given to the "com-
mandos," it, nevertheless, gives
every Coast Guardsman an idea of
what to expect in hand-to-hand
combat in the battle areas.
Boat racing out on Matanzas Bay
every Saturday afternoon between
the various recruit companies is
something looked forward to by
participants and spectators alike.
The sight of straining shoulders,
oars flashing in the brilliant sun-
light, and barking coxswains, is
inspiring to every sports-minded
American youth, so it is small won-
der that the races are looked for-
ward to all week long.
Boxing is a comparatively new
sport at the training station, but
Chief Steve Vrsata's punchers, al-
though losing their first two starts
against Lee Field this year, are
improving daily, and it would not
surprise me in the least to see the
boxing team right on top of the
heap at the end of the season.
Obstacle Course
The newly-constructed obstacle
course located two short blocks
away from the Ponce de Leon Hotel
is another phase of commando
training given to recruits. Al-
though the course may seem rather
simple to the average bystander,
a fast work-out all the way through
it impresses pretty thoroughly up-
on the recruit just what he may be
in for under actual battle condi-
tions.
The' average American citizen
may find it rather hard to under-
stand just why all this is being
given to the Coast Guard recruit.
It's to prepare him for duty with
a service that is just as tough as
they come. On far-flung battle
seas, in foreign lands and in the
air as well as on our own
coasts, the United States Coast
Guard is once again in the thick
of the scrap usually the first
there, just as it has always been.
The life is tough, and the only way
to cope with it is to get tough.-
Prominent Place
That is why athletics will always
have a prominent place in the cur-
ricula of the Coast.Guard recruits
here in St. Augustine.


Who knows but that on the mor-
row those who have covered them-
selves with athletic glory by drop-
ping in field goals from the center
of a basketball court, will be cov-
ering themselves with greater
glory by dropping depth charges on
Axis submarines or those now
pitching baseballs will tomorrow
be pitching hand-grenades?
The Coast Guard life is rigorous.
Small wonder, then, that the
Coast Guard motto is "Semper
Paratus"--"Always Ready."
When those recruits complete
their training here in St. Augus-
tine they WILL be ready-always
ready-for anything!

Rumor Mongers

The rumor monger is almost in-
variably a small-minded individual
who is under the delusioni that as
long as he is first to deliver "news"
to his shipmates he automatically
gains in prestige and popularity.
Then there is the "comic" type, the
guy with the "terrific" sense of hu-
mor who considers it a major
achievement to instigate a success-
ful rumor that may heckle his ship-
mates. We don't know why, but
somehow they consider it a mark
of high intelligence or sophistica-
tion to spread these baseless ru-
mors which in the end are worse
than ill winds, for they blow no-
body any good.
The truth is that the rumor
monger is far from an intelligent
type. If so, he would certainly pay
more thought and consideration to
the morale and welfare of his ship-
mates and realize the harmful pos-
sibilities that may result from his
foolish pranks.
The rumor monger can have but
little or no understanding of his
social obligations and responsibili-
ties. Otherwise he would realize
that under the stress of these war
days the fates of most of us are
subject to change almost momen-
tarily.
The spreading of idle and irre-
sponsible rumors is in very poor
taste and could easily become a ser-
ious detriment to morale as well
as efficiency.
An idle mind, from whence ru-
mors usually spring, is the devil's
workshop. In any efficient organi-
zation, military or civilian, there is
no place for rumors. Almost any
place they are a nuisance and a
pointless waste of time.
V-
Dakar, French West Africa, is al-
most equidistant from South Amer-
ica and Europe. It is 1,860 miles
from Natal, Brazil, and from Gib-
raltar.


*WA *NS

WAR BONDS
**


WAAC Sports Star From Military Family


arms, but she often reads her sis- ment, and her own, during off-duty
ter soldiers' palms for their amuse- Ihours.


WELCOME


)


ATLANTIC CITY, N. J.-Now
a WAAC auxiliary, ex-diving
champ Martha Meals Bunting, is
determined to burnish a distin-
guished family tradition of mili-
tary service.
A direct descendant of Lord Nel-
son, the British naval hero, and
grandniece of the late Lord John
Bunting of World War I fame,
this diving champ is an all-round
sports star.
"I always had energy to spare,"
the athletic WAAC declares. "I
figured the Army could use it and
I mean to give all I can in every
way I can."
Auxiliary Bunting's family has
been represented in every British
and American war since 1747. She
is the daughter of Mrs. John Bunt-
ing of the city, ani Major Bunting,
on active duty with the Army.
Like her famous forebear, Lord
Nelson, Auxiliary Bunting is
short-statured and red-haired. She
is a former high-diving champion
of Central America and the Pana-
ma Canal Zone, where she lived for
15 years.
She was a member of the Olym-
pic team in 1936, competing in Los
Angeles, and also swam for the
University of Panama. In addi-
tion to diving championships, Aux-
iliary Bunting is Panama doubles
champion in tennis and won the
Panama women's golf crown in
1935, '36 and '37.
Auxiliary Bunting received her
Bachelor of Medicine degree from
the University of Panama in 1938.
In 1940, she,took nurses' training
at Herricks Hospital, Bouc Ceta,
Panama. She did post graduate
work at the University of Minne-
sota at Minneapolis the same year
and studied also at Northwest In-
stitute of Medical Technology at
Minneapolis.
Riflery and palmistry are her
favorite hobbies. She has no op-
portunity to practice the former
in the women's Army, for WAACs
are not permitted the use of fire-


Are Enrolled In

Farm Bureau

ORLANDO (FNS)-Enrollment
of East Palm Beach and Escambia
County in the ranks of the Florida
Farm Bureau Federation has been
announced by. John Ford, executive
secretary, making a total of 24
Bureau groups now organized in
the state.
The legislative program of the
federation calls for a curb on the
inordinate powers of labor unions,
a single advertising stamp for all
citrus fruits, carry-over of citrus
research funds into a new fiscal
year, and sufficient funds for ade-
quate citrus inspection, including
road guards, without digging'into
other inspection fees.
The federation asserts that
adoption of the Bankhead Bill by
Congress will not create inflation.
It points out that government fig-
ures show that while farmers con-
stitute 22 per cent of our popula-
tion, they receive less than 10 per
cent of the national income; in 1942
farm income increased only one
billion dollars over the peak of
World War 1, while non-farm in-
come upped more than 55 billion;
farn prices today are 10 per cent
below World War 1, and hourly pay
of industrial workers is nearly two
and a half times greater than the
top for that period; and.that today
the average non-farm family is
paying a lower percentage of its
income for food than at any time
during'tlie past 30 years. Today
22 per cent of the average non-
farm family income is spent for
food compared to 38 per cent at
the peak of World War 1.
V-
"FULL OPERATION"
With the arrival of a large con-
tingent of new apprentices Novem-
ber 2, 1942, Captain W. K. Scam-
mell, commanding officer -of the
St. Augustine CGTS, announced
that station was "in full opera-
tion."
Fathers who did not marry off
their children before they were 18
were fined in Canada's early days.


ST. AUGUSTINE
ALI,^


*


PALMS
HOTEL COTTAGES

137 SAN MARCO


TO ALL
BRANCHES
OF OUR


Armed

Forces


PURE


WELCOME





SERVICE MEN


FROM ALL BRANCHES OF THE
ARMED SERVICES


MAKE YOURSELVES


AT HOME


AT






GLICK'S



FAMOUS BAR


57


IC E!


It takes hundreds of auxiliary
ships to keep our Navy going. Ten-
ders, tankers for fuel, provision ships
and other craft are necessary to the
successful operation of our battle
fleets. Included in this category is
a seaplane wrecking derrick.


4


BUT FOR A TASTY SNACK COME TO


SHORTY'S


CAFE
WEST KING ST.


aL


These wreckers operate much like
the derricks about our airports. They
are fast and are equipped to "spot"
wrecked planes and aid in their res-
cue. Your purchase of War Bonds
helps pay for them. Invest at least
ten percent of your income in War
Bonds every payday through a Pay-
roll Savings Plan at your office or
factory. U. S. Treauury Departentw


DOES AN EFFICIENT JOB IN

SERVING THE SERVICE MEN!


NEW



St. Johns Ice Co.


RIBERIA ST.


A..


CATHEDRAL PL.


PHONE 786


PHONE 140


IN


--


.1


THE ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD


'*
:~i; i"


*


n


**-.


rFUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1943


i


yl4~uurvr
Ix ~ -


La84
I




PAG 14TES.AGSIERCR UDY PI 5 9,


Putting The Crusher VETERANS GROUPS
SIN ST. AUGUSTINE
V- I A A


upon ui vmanKivel

Army Engineers And Coast Guard
'Combine Efforts In Ice-Breakin

BY KEN DAVIS
AP Features
ST. LOUIS-Mark Twain only wrote about Old Man Rive
Master Pilot Glenn Slee of the Army Engineers and Con
mander A. L. Mechling of the Coast Guard have got hii
nearly under control.
Just a few days after the anniversary of his 30 years as
government river master and pilot,*
Captain Slee piloted the steamer ture on the upper Mississippi,
Del Commune into St. Paul harbor, spite of the scoffing of season
sigpaling the first successful rivermen. They said it couldn't i
smashing of the Mississippi river's done, but Mechling had managed
winter ice barrier before the nor- keep the Illinois river open wit
mal mid-April thaw. the cutter Fern, and he thought
A few hours later the first of could duplicate the feat on th
many barge convoys, laden with Father of Wateis.
vital materials, docked at St. Paul. The Del Commune, special
Long before Mark Twain cast a equipped, met and defeated tl
literary spell about the river, men Mississippi river ice, ranging fro
had tried vainly to whip winter a feather crust above St. Louis
ice.. blue ice 24 inches thick fro
This year river-borne traffic is Dubuque, Iowa, to St. Paul.
more important than ever. War Ice breaking at best is a nerv
needs impelled the Coast Guard to shattering, spine-jarring busine,
undertake their ice-breaking ven- around the clock. Repeated ran


A MODERN
HOME
for VISITORS
to ST. AUGUSTINE
RIENDS and relatives of service men located
in St. Augustine will find a pleasant place
to stay at the Courtesy Court. Modern in every
respect .. you'll like the Courtesy Court.
FOR RESERVATIONS WRITE TO


COURTESY


COURT


264 San Marco Ave.


Phone 1198


I The Regular Veterans Associa-
tion:is St. Augustine's newest ser-
vice men's organization, and Cap-
tain Frank J. Howatt Camp,
United Spanish War Veterans, is
the oldest. The RVA made its
g advent here recently, with the es-
tablishment of so many Coast
Guard and Military Police.
All of the local veterans' groups
have strong auxiliaries, with the
r. women doing fine work, and show-
n- ing amazing energy and initiative.
m For many years St. Augustine
had a strong post of the Grand
aArmy of the Republican (north-
ern veterans of the War Between
in the States), but with the death of
ed most of the old veterans, Chatfield
be Post passed into oblivion.
to Of the Confederate veterans, of
th whom there were so many here,
he since St. Augustine and St. Johns
he County gave lavishly of their men
in the Sixties, even as in every
ly other war including the present
he one, there are living here now just
m two, B. Genovar and R. K. Boyt,
to according to Confederate pension
m records. Both are well along in
their nineties.
e- St. Johns Post No. 37, American
ss Legion, is an active organization
'- composed of men who fought in.
World War No. 1, and the Veter-
ans of Foreign Wars is one of the
strongest groups. Both have active
auxiliaries, and these join the men's
groups in doing much patriotic,
.civic and community work.
ming shakes the men until their
teeth chatter.
Three principal weapons were
used by the Del Commune in con-
quering what northern rivermen
deccinbedl a "r.:"re of the toughest
v..nters in years for ice."
Chief trick in the Coast Guard
harnrpei \\a a niazre 85-ton plow.
w*.hich was an adaptation of a
H-Illand design. Shaped on th.
Ih.rtr? m ,:.iiiethliir'e Ihe a sled r '.n-
n-r. the plow allowed the boat to
I liile up or tl-h Ice and break it
I.,- its own weight.
Heavier ice. of course. stopped
the hbat and neces.stated much
I.: 1 .kinc up and raninii;g..
A c'aenete hammer-actually
r..tlh;ner n.mre than a gigantic con-
.-icte ball dropped ft'.:.n a crane-
I'.d -- n im ch aa al. thl;ir tr. enable
tl.i- li i, to I, 'l iut ;n a lti lt sptir
; t t 'la r lt .i ille M .,> !
Thihd weap.,n. and a.np discov'-
erei du one the trip.,, was bac:-
,.laIi-,;L-e. which '-!ee and Mlerhlinch.
found the mr'st effective ineaiii of
floatii, ice do:,.wn river. Water
kick:edl fir. the t'.' n ci 'c". f- or,'od -
i' IICP i nl. -- into the nilddle of'
I thlle clianr.el.


FAMILIAR GUARDIAN LANDMARK


1
!




.


SWAAC Training
Center Located
In Nearby City
Many Women In Khaki
Are Welcomed Here
As Visitors


One of the five big training cen-
ters in the nation for the Women's
Army Auxiliary Corps is almost
within hailing distance of St. Aug-
ustine, being located at Daytona
Beach, about 50 miles to the south.
Many WAAC's come here on
leave, and are given the cordial
welcome accorded to others in serv-
ice. Young women are invited to
enjoy entertainment facilities, and
make St. Augustine home as often
as possible when they are in this
part of the country.
The Second WAAC Training
Center at Daytona Beach is a huge
thing, with a tent city for recruits
and a cantonment area. Hotels,
office buildings, storerooms and
garages all over the city have been
taken over to help house the
WAAC's, and their various train-
ing schools. These include the Mo-
tor Transport School, Communica-
tions School, Cooks and Bakers
School and Administrative School.
Young women in uniform are learn-
ing how to do many things, and do
them well. They are replacing
men in various positions, and re-
leasing men for active combat.
The WAAC's are not quite a year
old yet. Last May the first con-
tingent of officers went to Fort
Des Moines, Ia., to be trained. Now
there are five great training cen-
ters, turning out thousands of!
trained, efficient young women
each month.
Mllre recruit' are needed alnd
\,aited f:,er t ile \ AAC"s. 1Ilo.e in-
Ltereede should addict ; the \.WAAC
i,'cuiting Office. 2.1 \I AA'
' iraTii; g i.'enter, Da:t,,,ria Bea,.I..
I' loi ,Ia.


V-
Military Secret?
I \e naie it froi a strikct'l' re-
IhdI..I- .oun.e that somie officials ot


Anastasia Lighthouse. huilt in 1971 to replace the old Spaniih the Ali.\ l'-c, -ti:. ailed th.e Na ;
lighthouse. not ouil miarls the ti, nce 1. thie Po of St. .\Ntu-lnie '' tle l'...' e atwr a k,-dJ: "Plea-..
and serves as a guide for coinst 1-e as- e-. on their course. it is one tll [I C titude i lo'11gal
.:'f He ,i,.hi -i iri I.-'iClj ( l u .lalI tInal i
of the cit.'s most familiar landmark. T. N v.:. I1i g '1Gu a l to ida .
Th Na i ., i ling urnabli to ideni- .
.Anastasia Lighthonue. ith il. read llaAck and whitee piral s.rilies. ,f, t 311 i.. -,.,-I t,. e'e thir- -1
is St. .\ugu tine's fir-i -. nihl of Ihe L'nite: SI iIr tCoua t CGu rd. t"o 1 i.. r..' Wt\l n. 't n.iia t t.
,"f the cit3's 21) men coming undl ir the authority of thel Ircal Captain ie "'ut r I Wt. iti:t:n to u -l
of the Pot--C. D. I)aniel. and laid 11':ui an-lihine Coa-t Guard I1. 1 '- tie that ..a: h .,f aid
personnel altached to the St. A!nae -tine Lighthouue. r.,ti., enr o,." tle. a:1d.
To'rering 16. feet into the air. its 211.0100 candlepueer light is the "I n Jr i
I the Ai t it "a thie Jar- uh'. i
capable of throwing it- beim nineteen mile. to the -ea. lt the ,1,.ld."
Though no longer open lo the public. visilor-. formeerl. theree per- A .4.a:'.. it s-.-ii that f the
mitted to ascend its 4pirnling -tair"ay and. arriving out of breath .Japl kept it a 'ecret. the Navy
at the top. eniiiy the sprcadine vi-la helnw them. "ants to k I.p it that -.' tr i!


TOGETHER


AND


0 0


THAT IS ONLY ONE
REASON WHY ALL
SERVICEMEN GET
OUR FULL PRAISE






BENNETT

FUNERAL
HOME
RONDAL L. BENNETT


Cordova St.


St. Augustine


PHONE 3
AMBULANCE SERVICE


THE


POLLARD


MOTOR


CO.


DEALER FOR


FORD


-I


MERCURY


I-


LINCOLN


AUTOMOBILES



Is Doing Its Utmost to "KEEP THE WHEELS ROLLING"


We are"swamped" of course and we wish to thank our host of
loyal friends and customers for their patience and appreciation of
our difficulties.

We assure them that we are exerting every effort to serve
them honestly and efficiently.


OUR
GOOD
WISHES
TO THOSE SERVING
IN THE
ARMED
FORCES


POLLARD


164 SAN MARCO AVE.


MOTOR


W. PITT BARNES, GEN. MGR.


CO.


L
''
I
i
I~

Y


PHONE 1500


~rar IIII L:


i


E 1 I rI


~s~L-C I -~


SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1942


PAGE 14


THE ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD


I


3


N





SUNDAY. APRIL 25. 1943 THE" ST. AUGUS'~'INE RECORD PAGE 15


HISTORICAL


LIBRARIES

HOLD APPEAL

Some Service Folks
Welcome Chance
For Research

Men and women in service Coia
from every rank in life, and have
so many different interests that
some of them are sure to have
research work as one of those
interests.
Many sojourners and visitors
here, connected with different
branches of the service, have been
delighted to find two very fine
historical libraries in the commun-
ity. One is the Webb Memorial
Library of the .St. Augustine His-
torical Society and Ibstitute of
Science oil St. Francis'Street, of
which Mrs. E. W. Lawson is acting
librarian, and the other is the
library of the Florida Historical
Society, located upstairs over the
St. Augustine Gas Company on
Cathedral Street, with Mrs. Alberta
/Johnson as acting librarian, while
Watt Marchman,. librarian, is in
military service.
, Both of these libraries have very
fine collections of books, manu-
scripts and maps. Their collections
of Floridiana are outstanding. In
other years hosts of people have
come here especially to do research
work. 'Naturally, due to the war,
many who are doing research now,
and visiting these .fine libraries,
are service men and women anxious
to do something of the kind, during
leisure time.
T'Tpi are some valuable histor-
ical books in the St. Augustine Pub-


/


FAT'S IN THE
FIRING LINE
It takes fats to make glyc-
erine for use in explosives.
Uncle Sam needs every ounce
that housewives car spare.
Waste fat-the kind you used
to throw into the garbage pail
or down the sink-is needed
now. I
Your Meat Dealer is an of-
ficial Collection Agent.
SAVE IT. STRAIN IT.
SELL IT.


He's Jeep Ambassador
To The United Nations
TOLEDO ()P) Bill Kershow
hasn't left the country since the
war started, but he's rapidly becom-
ing a "man of the world." Bill is
official "interpreter" for the globe-
trotting jeep and, as such, his vo-
cabulary is assuming cosmopolitan
proportions.
As a member of the Willys-
Overland service department, it's
his job to translate into the diverse
languages of the United Nations
the American "know-how" in the
operation and care of the fast-
moving blitz-buggy.
Among others, the 1,6-page jeep
maintenance manual has been
translated into Russian, Chinese,
Spanish and French.
V-
British Town Puts
Poverty Out the Door
CRAWLEY (P) There is no
poverty in this Sussex town. The
local distress committee have re-
ported that the equivalent of $20
was given for relief during 1942.


lic Library on Aviles Street which,
however, appeals for the most part
to the instincts of those who want
to do more general reading in their
time off.


"Every Recruit A

Slogan For Wo

Secretary Knox Addresses,
Message On
Enlistment
Every recruit a recruiter-this is
the new slogan for the WAVES and
SPARS, says Lieutenant Com-
mander T. J. Needham, officer in
charge of recruiting at the Jack-
sonville office. He points out that
women volunteers can sell the
Navy to others, because by their
own action in enlisting, they show
that they are sold themselves on i
war participation in a branch of
the service that needs and wants
them.
Secretary of the Navy Frank
Knox addresses a message to every
woman who wants a part in win-
ning the war saying:
Never Before
"Never in history have Ameri-
can women been offered such a
chance to serve their country.
Never has there been such an urg-
ent need for their service.
"This is total war-a war in
which every woman as well as
every man must play a part. The
men in the Navy and Coast Guard
are in for one reason alone-to
fight! They're in to fly the planes,
man the ships, smash the Nazis
and Japs.
Man-Size Jobs
"But to keep them fighting, there
are important service jobs that
must be carried on at home-man-
size, full-time jobs which you, the
women of America, can fill-jobs
in which you can serve your coun-
try in your country, and release
the men to fight at sea.
"That is what you-as a member
of the WAVES or SPARS-can do
to help win this war."
Miss Nina Hawkins, a volunteer


must be at least 20 years ola, and
not yet have reached your 36th
birthday. If you are under 21,
you must have the written consent
of your parents or guardians.
You must have had two years of
high school or business school.
You will be asked to submit a
record of your occupation since
leaving school.
SWhen you have completed your
training, you step into an impor-
tant shore job at full Navy pay.
"--V

Memory Rhymes

For Rules Of

The.Road

Two Steamships Meeting--
When both side lights you see
ahead,
Port your helm and show your
red.
Two Vessels Passing-
Green to Green or Red to,Red
Perfect safety-go ahead!
Two Steamships Crossing-
If to your starboard Red appear,
It is your duty to keep clear;
To act as judgment says is proper
To port, or starboard, back, or
stop herl
But, when upon your port is seen
A steamer's starboard light of
green,
There's not much for you to do
For Green to port keeps clear
of you.
All Ships Must Keep a Good
Lookout-
Both in safety and in doubt
Always keep a good lookout,
In danger with no room to turn
Ease her! Stop her! Go Astern.
General Rules for, Sailing-
If closehauled on the starboard
tack,
N6, other ship can cross your
track;
If on the port tack you appear,
Ships going free must all keep
clear;
While you must yield, when going
free
To sail closehauled, or on your
lee,
Both free, with wind on different
sides,
Rule XIV. C, your case decides,
And if you have the wind right
aft,
Keep clear of every sailing craft.
V---
They Must Have Been
Peeling Ambitious
KEARNS FIELD, Utah (R)-
SFour privates on kitchen police
'uty were told to peel 400 pounds
of potatoes. The mess sergeant
came to find they'd peeled 600
pounds and were still at it. "We
wanted to quit." one explained,
"Lut every time we were about to
stop, we heard someone yell, 'He*
K. P.' We thought that meant keep I
lpeelin'."


.'


LET


I .
!


/
/


"I'.


us.


SERVE


YOU!


St. Augustine's Historical background and its wonderful beaches
have always made it a mecca for tourists from everywhere ...
our Soldiers, Sailors and Marines have added even more to its
colorful background. As official greeters for our city and county
we extend you a cordial hand of welcome.
If our offices can be of service to you or to your families please,
call on us. We want your stay in St. Augustine to be a lasting
pleasant memory.



ST. AUGUSTINE and ST. JOHNS





CHAMBER of COMMERCE


LOCATED IN THE CIVIC CENTER


VISIT OUR SPECIAL
RATION DEPT.
Every Item Plainly Marked and
Priced for Your Convenience.


SERVICE WIVES

A cordial welcome always awaits the Service Wife at The
Quality Food Store. Our reputation for satisfaction with the
Homefolks has also made us popular with Service Wives.
Shopping here, you will find top quality and low prices in
groceries,,western and native meats and a really fine display
of seasopable produce.


MAKE IT A HABIT, MEET YOUR NEIGHBORS AT




QUALITY




FOOD




STORE


Cor. Bridge and Washington Sts.


f


I


THE\ ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD


PAGE 15


Recruiter" Is County Board Rationing Board One Fling Leads Art Inspires Soldiers
,To Another On Alaska Highway
men's Navy Branch Coopera e EncountersAll CHATTANOOGA,Tenn. )- SEATTLE (P)-Now it's art'fpr
avyBranchoope ati eTcounters city court clerk called the case the Army.

W ve(y) H ir Everything the county commis- from the country prison camp and painting.pictures to hang in the
Wave(y) Hair Sorts Of Things O painting, pictures to hang in the
soners have been asked to do by captured inside the city. Nobody barracks and headquarters of the
way of cooperation with the St. answered. Now the'cops are look- men whomaintain the 1,63-mile
Johns County Defense Council has Members) Must Interpret ing for the deferidaIn'on a second international highway to Alaska.
been done by this public-spiritedM"fea
Sbeen done y ts p -spirited charge-escaping rom the city Lieut. Richard L. Neuberger,
group of men, headed by Herbert Manifold Regulations jail i Leut. Richard L. Neuberger,
SWilson, chairman. These men For Townspeople aide to the Northwest Service Corn-
stand ready to serve at all times. ppret to the best of their ability the mand commander, Brig. Gen. James
A '. Personnel of the county board So you want to take it up with manifold regulations, orders, rul- A. O'Connor, said the paintings
includes besides Chairman Wilson, the rationing board! wings and statements which come to were being received at the North-
"T Commissioners H. H. Bailey, H. K. Lots of people have troubles, them, many of them couched in ob- land posts from professionals and
Jackson, G. R. Wiles, Harry Her- grievances and requests to present sure language which practically amateurs. "The pictures," he said,
S sey before'the rationing board, and it is have to be/decoded when it comes "will help to brighten the livJng
The county is the key to the set- of interest to know who the long- to translating them. places and working headquarters
Sup in all defense plans, with the suffering members of that organ- The local War Price and Ration- for the mefi assigned to one of the
State Defense Council working nation are. A. A. Jacksonischair- ing Board, which is part of the most lonely wildernesses on the
with county groups. Therefore it man; and the other' members are government machinery for fighting continent."
S can be seen how important it is C S. Smith, G. U. Meserve Charles the war on the home front, has a -- V
that these men be alert to the needs W. Isaacs, Jr. and E. J. Wishard. capable, office staff which helps to A small blood capillary is one-
of communities in ar time, and All serve without pay for patriotic struggle with the manifold prob- fiftieth the thickness of a human
work consistently with defense au- motives. lems. hair.'
thorities. If you wa t to get an idea of E3
V-- some of the things,they encounter, ]
: Chinese Language read the article purporting to be
S 1 'Has Its Points the experiences of a Rationing
!' ^: I r r : / r II C A n Board member in a metropolitan
S For U. S. Airmen center, appearing in the 'current
i CALCUTTA )--Amei- Saturday Evening Post.
can airen in China ()-Aeri- Probably local board members
can airmen in China are being could tell similar tales, and more
4- ,taught to read Chinese with their of them.
fingers. of .them. Is
S1 fingers. Some of the sorrows of the ra-
I .B_ _sb They have had to learn that,ay, tioning board members have been OUR NAME
TO meet Navy requirements, because no matter how hard their eased this past winter through the
this coiffure was especiaer worked they could not volunteer services of Gale M. Mer-
designed for the WAVES by the learn in a hurry how to speak so a chant, visitor from Massachusetts, d Oh B
New York State Hairdressers Chinese could understand it. The entering at Vaill Point, who has! An W Strive
land Cosmetologists' Association. new finger method is called "poin- handled public relations and cor-
Ensign Bertha C. Borden shows tie-talkie." munity service work. H. Angel to Live to It
how, while it requires but a mi- Say -an American airman is in charge of this department since t L Up It
imum of attention, its upsweep forced down in China, perhaps be- Mr. Merchant left for his northern
ines are eye-catc g. hind the enemy lines. The natives home. Numerous other splendid
are suspicious. He pulls out his volunteers have given many hours
recruiter for the women's branch little pointie-talkie book and goes of service to the Local War Price PRESCRIPTIONS
of the Navy in St. Augustine, has to work. There is one column of and Ritioning Board, which is PR S RIPTIO S
application blanks, booklets, and questions to ask, written in Eng- working with Office of Price Ad- PROMPTLY FILLED
othdr information for local young lish. Opposite is the same thing ministratibn to help keep prices in
women who are interested. Contact in Chinese. So the airman points line, and prevent a run-away infla- I
Miss Hawkins at the Record Office, to the Chinese. The Chinese reads tion, which would be disastrous
Phone No. 51, or address the the question and naturally begins for thp country. One of these vol-
Recmruitiig Service of the U. S. spouting the reply in Chine-e. But unteers is Alfred Houston, who was
Naxy. Pot Office Building, Jack- the airman can't uindrstand. of such valuable assistance when i
sonville. However, below each question War Ration Book No. 2 registra- DRUG CO.
Leading Colleges are several possible answers, print- tion was carried on. DRUG CO
Remember, girls who enlist are ed both in English and Chinese. Many people are unhappy and P
trainedat a leading olege.Aong Which answer fits the question? dissatisfied over decisions of the 177 San Marco Ave. Phne,78
the colleges listed as training cen- Well, itis up to the Aimerican air- Rationing Board. Some of these
tears are Hunter College, New man to persuade the i'hinese to get decisions may be exceedingly dif-
York, Indiana University, at nto the game and select the right ficult to understand, but let it be
Bloomington, Ind., Oklahoma Agri- answer said that the board members inter-
cultural and Mechanical College at
Stillwater, Okla.; University of
Wisconsin at Madison, Wis.; Iowa
State Teachers College. at Cedar
Falls.' Ia.,: and Georgia State Col-
lege fbr Women at Milledgeville,
Ga. The school to which you are i
assigned depends upon the type ,
of job for which you are being
trained. The training period aver- ,,
ages four months.
At Least 2 0 ;,
On the date of enlistment you
mus Deatjes yar io a,


I


jj


J


B


i SUNDAY, APRIL 25, 1943




PAL 14TEST UUTIE RCRDSNAY PI 2;1


0.'


,,o and only you


CAN MAKE HIM HOLD THAT SMILE


I -


IT'S FAITH


that lifts that bead--it's confidence in


YOU that


makes him smile in, the knowledge that he can do the job which


has been assigned to


him. With your support, he and all


comrades --afloat,


afoot and


aloft--can


keep on


carrying the


battle to the enemy on


all the ,fronts


of theb world;


without


your support,


you can't expect him to


keep that smile of


9


They Give Their Lives...


gressiveness aglow,


You can't


those clear eyes unless you


let him down--you


do your


keep him and his buddies supplied with the


can't face


part. Dig..DEEP...and


things they


need


You Lend Your Money!


to, win


YOUR


fight.


He's looking to


you. Buy War Bonds


and then buy


More War Bonds.


The


most you can buy,


the least you can


TED


STATES


TREASURY


WAR


FINANCE


COMMITTEE


A H: THIS PAGE SPONSORED BY THE FOLLOWING DENTISTS:
4a 'A4Y l DR. C. T. ELKINS DR. H. C. FARRIN frNP
DR. Z. L. WEBB DR. GEORGE D. YOUNG
DR. W. M. NEWELL DR. W. T. TRUETT
DR. R. N. GORDON


You have done your bit-Now do your BEST/


his


ag-


UN


I


do!


is


THE ST. AUGUSTINE RECORD


SUNDAY, APRIL' 25. 1949


PAiGEr, 18


I .-