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The West-Florida times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00048634/00004
 Material Information
Title: The West-Florida times
Portion of title: West Florida times
Physical Description: v. : ill. (chiefly advertisements) ; 57 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: J.W. Dorr
Place of Publication: Pensacola Fla
Creation Date: March 17, 1857
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Pensacola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Escambia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Escambia -- Pensacola
Coordinates: 30.433333 x -87.2 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with Dec. 2, 1856 issue.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 6 (Jan. 6, 1857).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002015750
oclc - 02720157
notis - AKK3142
lccn - sn 83016276
System ID: UF00048634:00004

Full Text






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'VOL. I. PENSACOLA, FLA., TUESDAY, MARCH 17, 1857. NO. 1G.


ADDICKS, VAN DUSEN & SMITH,
Y o. 1S9 Market st., above Fourth,
PHILADELPHIA.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
SHOES,
BOOTS,
BONNETS,
ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS,
HATS,
-*1' *\ CAPS,
S..... FURS, &c,
.arO 2. ADDICKS, SAMUEL 2. -TAN DUSEN,
THOMAS B. SMITH. 1 ly

WTILLIAMS, STEVENS, WILLIAMS & CO'S.
T LIST OF IMPORTANT ENGRAVINGS, in prepara-
tion, in press, or lately published.
The Twins-After Sir Edwin Landseer. Engraved
ty Thomas Landseer.
Glimpse of an English Homestead-After J. F.
Herring. Engraved by George Patterson.
Bed Time; or, Mother and ,Child-After W. P
Frith. Engraved by Lumb Stocks.
,1. "Speak, Lordl" (InJant S.niuel)---Afler J. San
Engraved by Samuel Cousins.
Timnothy-After J. Sant. Engraved by Samuel
Cousins.
"There's Life in the Old Dog yet"'-After Sir E.
Landseer. Engraved by H. Ryall.
The Dairy Maid-After Sir ,E. Landseer. En-
graved by H. Ryall.
Landing qf the Pilgrim Fatihers o the Coast of
America, A. D., 1620-After C. Lucy. Engraved
hy W; H.,'Simmons.
The Highland Congregation-After Sir E. Land-
ur. Engraved by Thomas Landseer.
It is I!-After R. S. Lauder.
Oh Jerusalem I-After Ary SAheffer. Engraved
by Mandel.
Lucerne-After J. M. W. Turner,- Engraved by
Wallis.
Zurich-After J M. W. Turner. Engraved by
Prior.
Golden Bough-After J. M. W. Turner. En-
graved by Prior, "
Baron's Charger--:After J. F. Herring. Engraved
by Robert Graves. ,
"Why call ye me Lord, Lord?"-After Dela-
roche, Engraved 'byLempn.-
Nelson on the Eve of the Battle of Trafalgar-
After C. L'Diy. Engraved by Sharpe.
Consolation-Alfter Bathauan. Engraved by Huf-
fan.,
Cottage Devotion-After T. Faed. Engraved by
Lemon. .
Christ Blessing Little Children-After Clixton.
Engraved by Bellin.,
The latest publications, English, French end Ger-
man, always in stock. Artists' materials, English
(md French, of the most approved makers.
WILLIAMS, STEVENS, WILLIAMS & CO.,
1 6m 353 Broadway, New York.

HAVE YOU SUBSCRIBED
IN THE
COSMOPOLITAN ART ASSOCIATION
FOR' THE THIRD YEAR?
& E THE RARE INDUCEMENTS!-The man-
Sagement have the pleasure of announcing that
the collection of Works of Art designed for dis-
tribution among the subscriber,, whose names are
received previous to the 28th of January, '57, is
much larger and more costly than on any previous
year. Among the :leading works in Sculpture-
executed in the finest Marble-is the new and beau-
tiful Statue of the -
-"WOOD NYMPH,"
The Busts of the Three Great American Statesmen,
CLAY, WEBSTER and CALHOUN,
Also thh exquisite Ideal Bust,
"SPRING."
APOLLO AND INDIANA,
In Marble, Life Size.
Together with the following Groups and Statues
Ii Carrara Marble-of the
TRUOGGOIE FOR THE HEART,
I VENUS AND APPLE; PSYCHE; MAGDALEN ;
..CHILD O THE SEA'; INNOCENCE ;
CAPTIVE BIRD; and LITTLE TRUANT?
With numerous works in Bronze, and a collec-
tion of several hundred
FINE OIL PAINTINGS,
by leading Artists.
The whole of which are to be distributed or alot-
ted among the subscribers whose names are re-
ceived previous to the; '
T* TWENTY-EIGHTH OF JANUARY, '57,
when the Distibuuion will take place.
-' .'.: -TERBM OF sUBSCRIPTION.
Every subscriber of three dollars is. entitled to
A copy of the splendid Steel Engraving, "Satur-
day Night," or
A copy of any of the following $3 Magazines
one year; also
A copy of the "Art Journal" one year, and
A Ticket- in the Annual Distribution of Works
of Art. ..
Thus, -for every $3 paid, a person not only gets
a beautiful Engraving or Magazine one year, but
also receives the Art Journal one year, and a Ticket
in the Annual Distribution, making four dollars
worth of reading matter besides the ticket, by
which a valuable painting or piece of statuary may
be received addition. -
Those who prefer Magazines to the Engraving
"Saturday Night," can have either of the following
one year: Harper's Magazine; Godey's Lady's
Book,'United States- Magazine, Knickerbocker Ma-
gazine, Graham's Magazine, Blackwobd'AMIagazine,
Southern Literary Messenger.
No person is restricted to a single share. Those
taking fixe memberships, remitting $15, are enti-
tled to six Engravipn., and to si -tickets in the dis-
tribution, or any live of Lhe Magazines, one year,
and, six tickets.
Pesons, in remitting funds for membership, will
please register the letter at the Post Office, to prep
Tvent loss; on receipt of: which, a certificate of
Membership, together with the Engraving or Mag-
agine desired, will bf forwarded to ay part of the
country, .
For further particulars, see the November Art
Journal, sent free on application.
For membership, address
A.MARZONI,
-". +-7. FlS. Democrat Office,
1 tf Pensacola, Fla.

TQ ARRIUVE--Ql Consignheat.
PEE schooner A. P. Flowe, from New York-
SL 80 boxes English d4airChbeese ,.
.25 boxes Cheese, .. -
,. S ," 0Boxes scaled Herring,
80. bags Buckwheat: .j
.. *; ."s Sboxes dx do
20 boxes Powchong Tea, .
5 .fralJ. Dates,"
..O M imported Cigars.
<-: *- ..... KEESSSK,. JCI)AE &: CO...
lqov. 25, 185&6. --; ,-." l" ltf

| Mobile Tribune and Alabama Planter.
I rr.":" IH_ BALLENTYNE & C0. = :!;. "


ThBE Daily Tribune. i issued .each day, Mondays
exoeled, at $ 'per attinti, or $4 50 forsix
conthbi. 'The Tribnne hasn a Lrge circulation, both
vt 'home and abroad, and. is a valuable medium of
*%i .jew(a4 mBwcellany;.
The Alabama Planler is publihed every Monday
0rWqgDin imperial octavo form, containing alargpe
4*ipa"of reading matm, together with valnablW
#Ailuq Er At*1* raP-ty In ltnee 1.'


that-" -:'
""T'other hand!I" roared coon-skin, shouldering
his way face up to the short man, "We've heard
about you! You fiddle down thar in that d-d
Bluegrass county, 'mong rich folks, with your
;right haid, ;And then when you get up in the hills
amongg por*ifOli#,Aft bavA d dd1n gSW+ enuffpr


[From the (Porter's) Spirit of the Times.1
The Left-Handed Fiddler;
OR,
HEADING OFF THE MUSIC.
"Insure me a brass band, and I'll insure your
election," was the musical reply of a "wire-worker"
to a question from an aspiring political candidate
as to the proper means to secure- his election.-
And so widely, during the last election, was music
called in to aid oratory that this answer serves as a
good endorsement to the poet's note, that
"Music hath charms to soothe the savage breast,"
and attractions to-"go to the polls and vote
early."
The forty-horse power of music on elections be-
ing thus settled by common consent, leads us to
believe that "too much credit cannot be awarded"
(style of expression sanctioned by usage!) to the
Kentuckian who faced his political opponent's mu-
sic as follows:
Both vere candidates for the office of Governor
of Kentucky, and "stumped" the State together
quite harmoniously until they reached one of the
counties in the "hill country." Here it was neces-
sary to make a decided demonstration, and accord-
ingly the to candidates fairly spread themselves
to catch all the votes possible-scaring up the
American Eagle and calling down' the shade of
Washington; pitching out profuse promises and
pitching into each other's party politics, in a man-
ner decidedly refreshing to the hearers. On the
first day's canvass, victory hung suspended by the
tail feathers over the rival forces; but the second
day fell slap into the lap of the shortest and stout-
est candidate, leaving his long and lean opponent
"no kind of a show." In vain the long man'pumped
up the waters of eloquence and poured out a full
stream-there was nobody to drink. But round
the short man elbowed and crowded a mass of
thirsty voters, drinking in his tones with delight.
Why this attraction? Had he a barrel of old
Bourbon? No; he had a fiddle! Getting the
start of the long man, he had addressed the voters
in a short speech, and then, for the first time,
bringing out a fiddle, retired a short distance from
the speaker's stand, in order to let his opponent
reply, playing, however, such lively airs that he
soon drew the entire assemblage away, and left the
other side of the question unattended to, un-
heard.
For three days in succession short man and the
fiddle carried the day, in three successive mass
meetings, in as many towns in the hill country, and
long man's chances fur a single vote in those parts,
grew remarkably slim. In vain a long consulta-
tion was held by the.latter with his political friends.
"Get the start of him at the next meeting, and
speak first," advised one.
"Raise a, fiddle aiand play them choones!" said
another.
"Yell him down," shouted a third.
The long man followed the advice of his first
counselor, and got the start in voice, but the noise
of the fiddle run him neck and neck; he would
have listened to his second monitor and raised a
fiddle, only he knew it would fall through, as he
couldn't scrape a note ; and as for his third advi-
ser, he told him that "yelling down" short man was
"simply ridiculous."
Affairs grew desperate with long man, when, on
the third meeting, he saw, as usual, the entire
crowd of voters sweeping off after short mari and
his fiddle, leaving only one hearer, and he a lame
one, who was just about to hobble off after the
others. -
"Can it be possible that freemen, citizens of
this great and glorious country, neglecting ihle vi-
tal interests of their land, will run like -%ild 'me-n
after eat-gut strings t Can it be possible, I say ?"
And the lame man, to whom long man Was thus
eloquently discoursing, answered, as he, too, cleared
out-
"'Well it can, old hoss !"
Despair encamped in the long man's face, as he
watched short man, at a distance, playing away for
dear life and the Gubernatorial chair on that "blast-
ed" old fiddle; but suddenly a ray of hope beamed
over his "rueful visage," then another, and another
ray, till it shone like the sun at midday.
"Got him now, sure I? fairly shouted the long
man, as he threw up his arms, jumped from the
stand, and started for the tavern, where he at
once called a meeting of his political friends, con-
sisting of the landlord and one other, then and
there unfolding a plan which was to drive his rival
"no where in no time."
The fourth meeting was held. Short man ad-
dressed the crowd with warmth, eloquence and
brevity, vacating the stand for his adversary, and
striking up a lively air on the violin, in order to
quash his proceedings; but, though as usual, he
carried the; audience away, he noticed that they
were as critical as numerous. One six footer in
homespun, walnut-dyed clothes, with wild looking
eyes, and coon skin cap, eyed every- movement
of the fiddle bow, with intense disgust, finding ut-
terance' at last, in-
S"Why don't you fiddle with that t'other hand
o' your'n ?"
"T'other hand!" shouted a chorus of voices.
"Fire un with that t'other hand!" Faster played
the short man, but louder and louder shouted the
crowd, "T'other hand, t'other hand"
"Gentlemen, I assure you--"
"No more honey, old hoss. We ain't barsl"
shouted the man with the cOon-skin cap.
"T'other hand, t'other hiand !" yelled the crowd;
.while even from the distant stand where the long
man was holding forth "to next to nobody" for lis-
teners, seemed to come a faint echo, "T'other
hand, t'other hand I"
Short man. began to be elbowed, crowded,
pushed;' in vain he tried to draw the bow; at one
time his bow~arm was sent to the .shoulder over the
bridge, at another, down went the fiddle, until he
,shouted4 out-. "-- -
"Gentlemen, "what can I do but assure you


dent that he too must have had some unpleasant
recollection of our former acquaintance, or why
should he have hurried away so abruptly? Who
could he be? I worried myself with the question
all day; and, when I went to bed at night, turned
over incident after incident of my past life, but
Iould connect that face with none of them. Where


them; you've cussedly missed it! Left hand do-
in's wont run up hyar; tote out your right, strang-
er, or look out for squalls !'
The short man looked out for squalls, threw
down the fiddle and the bow, oh, oh !-jumped on
his horse and put a straight horse tail between him
and his enraged "fellow citizens."
"It's a fact," says the long man, "my oppo-
nent's being left-handed rather told against him up
in the hill country, and whoever circulated the
story, up there, that he always fiddled with his
right hand down in the Bluegrass country, headed off
-his music for that campaign."

[From "Porter's Spirit of the Times."1
LOVE, SWEETLOVE !-nv FINLEY JOHNSON.

Oh love, sweet love, is a welcome guest
In the hearts of the bold and the brave,
But he stays not long in the changeful breast,
Of a lovely and wayward maid;
For though she vows at the parting hour,
And swears by the heavens above,
Yet soon she forgets her tears and her vows
In the joys of another love.
'Tis true that a gentle maid will blush,
Yea, blush like a faint rose leaf;
But her love for you will have a life
Like the beautiful rose bud-brief;
And if she swears by the stars on high
That no change her heart shall know;
Soon will you find when the stars shall pale,
That her love had a briefer glow.

Calumet Island.

THE UNFORTUNATE RECOGNITION.

What Gibbet street is to the thieves of London,
the backwoods of Canada are to the riff-raff popu-
latign of the entire world-a home. In those vast
forests are to be found men from every European
country, and speaking every variety -of dialect;
men whose sole object is to obtain the means of ex-
istence far away from the homes of their youth,
from places where they might be recognized, from
people who might know something and care to
know more of their antecedents. There, in those
vast solitudes, spending their days in felling trees
and in forming the huge logs into rafts which are
floated down the majestic Ottawa, you will find
fallen types of almost every nationality. From
England you will see the big burly "rough," with
his receding forehead, sunken eyes and heavy,
massive jaw, side by side with the wan, dissipated-
looking merchant's clerk, the warrant for whose
Apprehension for forgery is even now preserved in
the desk of some lawyer or among the archives of
the detective. There, too, are black-bearded,
bright-eyed Frenchmen, ardent devotees of the
barricades and bonnets rouge; short, stout, fair-
haired Germans, friends of the deceased Robert
Blum, and subscribers to Freiligrath's poems; olive-
gkinned Ittaiane, "wbom real history would De a for.
tune to the penny-romancer; swarthy Spaniards,
whose dislike to return to their native country may
be accounted for, some on Carlist reasons, others
on account of their partiality to the West India
traffic, with a passing allusion to three hundred ne-
groes in the hold of a slave ship; lying Greeks, and
even renegade Turks. In intense bodily labor, in
the bitterest fatigue, these men seek mental obli-
vion, the forgetfulness of past crime or dread of fu-
ture discovery. There, the knowledge of compan-
ionship in misery checks all indiscreet inquiry, and
the -blay task is performed, the residue of life
worn put and the grave attained, without the lift-
ing of the veil which covers all by-gone misdeeds
with its solemn folds.
The little town of Bytown, even now risen to be
called the City of Ottawa-and, from its position
as the central medium for traffic between the States
and Canada, destined to be soon one of the prin-
cipal cities of the colony-is, perhaps, the only re-
cognized haunt of men in which these wild tribes
are ever to be seen. Thither, they are compelled
occasionally to come; there is the great depot
whence they supply themselves with provisions to
last them during their protracted exile; there they
effect their engagements with the various large
timber and raft owners by whom they are em-
ployed; and there, on Bytown wharf, some hun-
dred of them were standing on a bright July morn-
ing, in the year 1850, when I, being at that time
engaged in Canada in the civil service of her Maj-
esty, lounged in amongst them.
The entrance of a stranger into such an assem-
bly never passes unnoticed; and as I moved among
the different groups every head was raised, my per-
sonal appearance was scanned by all, and made
the subject of free comment by many of them. I
waited for nearly an hour, puffing my cigar and
listening to the loud laughter, the noisy altercation,
and the queer jargon of the people around me,
and was almost lapsing into a curious day-dream
relative to their previous and future career, when
I was roused by a man who appeared to hold some
superior position among them, and who ordered
them at once to prepare to start. The instant I
set eyes upon this man, I recognized his features,
and a painful sensation that we had met before,
and under unpleasant circumstances, came over
me. He was young, handsome, and in spite of his
rough costume, looked like a gentleman, His
hands, too, though tanned by the sun, were well-
shaped; and, as he pointed towards the river, I
noticed on his little finger a thin hoop of gold, like
the guard-rings of women, which must have been
there some time, as the flesh seemed to have tight
ened beneath it. I coald not recollect who he was,
nor where I had seen him. I looked agvin ; and,
as I stood with open mouth and eyes, gazing at
him, he turned sharply round, and our eyes met.
But for an instant, though; for, flushing scarlet, he
turned on his heel, and, followed by a body of the
lumberers, strode rapidly away.
To a person of nervous temperament like myself,
such a circumstance was particularly unpleasant.
It 'was plain that the recognition between this man
and me had been mutual, and it was equally evi-


had we met, and what made the recollection pain-
ful? Could he have been at school with me at
Lowbarre, and, as a monitor, have thrashed, and
bullied, and tortured me? No; no one did that
but Gandler, and I knew that Gandler was a dry-
salter in Cripplegate. Could he have been with me
at Bone, and did we quarrel and go out to Popples-
dorf and have it out with short-swords? No; Leis-
ten was my only opponent in that way, and he is
dead, poor fellow. Had he stood in my way in
love, in business, in pleasure ? Was he an editor
who had refused my contributions, a lawyer who
had sued me on a writ, a rival joker and diner-out
in society ? He was none of these.
I was up early the next morning, and off on my
journey to Calumet Island, a small settlement of
French Canadians, Americans and Irishmen, some
fifty miles further towards the source of the Otta-
wa. As I proceeded on my monotonous route, my
brain once more fell to work, trying to solve the
mystery of the previous day. Passing through the
little village of Clarendon, I was surprised to find
the main street thronged by the inhabitants all
dressed in holiday costume, and I found on inqui-
ry, that they were assembling to witness the laying
of the first log of a new church. Of course I
stopped to see the ceremony, which was performed
by the village clergyman-a fine white-haired old
man, who invoked a fervent blessing on the under-
taking. I had no sooner resumed my journey than
suddenly the whole story of my mysterious ac-
quaintance flashed across me. I am not sufficient-
ly versed in metaphysics or the subtler theories of
mental pathology to explain how this occurred;
my belief is that the sight of the clergyman and
the gaily-dressed villagersre-awakened the slumber-
ing reminiscence, and solved the mystery.
Three years previously, after a long and danger-
ous illness, I had been removed to a seaside water-
ing-place in Wales, which I shall call Plenmouth.
Watering-place ? It did not, in truth, deserve the
name. There were no parades, esplanades, terra-
ces, crescents, no hotels all stucco and plate-grass,
no boarding-houses all ancient, single lady and
three-card loo; there were no yachting men, no
dreadnoughts and pea-jackets; no telescopes, no
mushroom hats, no yellow slippers, no small wood-
en spades, no invalid chairs, no half-crown-an-hour-
flys, no German bands, no goat chaise, no don-
keys-nothing which we recognize as the charac-
teristics of a well-conditioned watering-place. But
there was pure air, an open sea, good bathing,
and-what was most essential to a person in my
condition, perfect quiet. There, in walking, swim-
ming, reading and writing, I passed three very hap-
py weeks. At the end of this time I made the ac-
quaintance of the clergyman of the parish. With
him, and with his wife and daughter, I was soon on
excellent terms, and I should probably have be-
come more intimate, but that the attention of the
family was entirely absorbed in an approaching
event-the marriage ot the young lady to a Mr.
Hugh Elvyn, the son of the principal partner in a
London banking firm. The wedding was to take
place within a fortnight after my first introduction
to them. She was a girl full of animal spirits, and
apparently madly in love with her future husband,
whom she had met the previous season in London
while on a visit to her aunt, and about whom she
was never tired of talking. The wedding day was
fixed for Thursday, and Hugh was coming down on
Tuesday night, and I should be introduced to him,
and we should like each other so much; and, after
their marriage, I should come and stay with them
at the villa at Richmond which Hugh's father had
given them, and so on, and so on, until I began to
be rather bored by the constant repetition of
Hugh's name, and to preconceive a dislike of him.
The long looked-for Tuesday night arrived. I
dined at the parsonage, and we sat anxiously until
the last train had come in, but Mr. Elvyn did not
come by it. The Wednesday morning passed, and
it was not until late in the afternoon of that day
that the Elvyns, father and son, arrived at Plen-
mouth. I walked up to the parsonage in the even-
ing, and was introduced to them, and then learned
that their departure from town had been delayed,
owing to the discovery of some heavy forgeries on
the bank, which hid been first communicated to
the firm through an anonymous letter, the writer
of which promised, in the event of certain un-
named events happening, as it was believed they
would, to name the forger. My preconceived dis-
like to Mr. Hugh Elvyn was not done away with by
his personal appearance or manner. He was very
good-looking, certainly-tall, well made, and with
fine black hair and white teeth. But his eyes were
set very deeply in his head; he had a shifting, un-
settled glance, never looking up into your face;
and his manner, even towards Annie Vaughan, his
betrothed, was nervous and constrained.
The next morning all the inhabitants were dressed
in their best ; the three bells of the church tried
their utmost to make a merry peal; and, as the
bridal party advanced, young girls strewed flowers
in their path.
I joined the party at the church door. Mr.
Vaughan, who was about to perform the service
himself, hurried before us to-put on his robes ; and
we had just formed in a semi-circle round the altar
rails, when a tall, thin man, dressed in a tightly-
buttoned blue frock-coat, advanced. I recognized
him at once as a "plain-clothes" member of the
metropolitan police, who, the year before, had been
instrumental in regaining some papers which I had
lost. He stepped forward, and bowing to the elder
Mr. Elvyn, gave him "Good morning."
"Hallo, MartinI" said the old gentleman; "fol-
lowed me here I News already ?"
"Yes, sir," replied the man. "If you and the
young gent 'ill just step outside with me, I've a
word to say to you."
"Wait until the ceremony's over," said the old
gentleman ; but on being urged and tgld it "would
not take a minute," he passed his arm through his
eon's and they went out into the porch.
I followed him closely, and no sooner were we
clear of the church than Martyn said, "Very disa-


come, perhaps, to deliver me into the hands of the
law, from which I have escaped; perhaps some
better motive prompts your pursuit. All is, how-
ever, useless; no amount of toil, hunger, or misery
(and Heaven knows I.JhavI endured all these!)
would appal me, but I oehwoet endure once more
to be pointed at as a felon, or even to be seen pr
spoken to by any one who bad known me In my


moments before he muttered, "What does this
mean?"
"Only this, sir," replied Martin, "A second anon-
ymous letter, in the same handwriting as the first,
came to the bank after you left on Tuesday night,
and, according' to your instructions, I opened it.
It named Mr. Hugh Elvyn as the forger of the doc-
uments, and the writer gave an address where
further proofs could be found. I went there at
once and saw the writer of the letter, heard cer-
tain evidence, and took the party to Bow street.
Upon what she stated, upon her oath, the magis-
trate issued a warrant, which I've got in my pock-
et now."
"She!" exclaimed the father. "Was it a woman,
then?"
"It were, sir," responded Martin, briefly, "Ellen
Monroe by name."
The young man groaned, and clasped his hands
across his face. "Tell me, what did she say ?"
"About you, sir ?" replied Martin, c-aftly blink-
ing the evidence. "She says, 'Hugh Elvyn,' saya
she, 'has ruined me-now I'll do the same by him.'
Those were her words."
By this time the rest of the company came hast-
ening from the church to tell us that Mr. Vaughan
was waiting for the bridegroom, and laughingly to
reproach him for one moment's absence on such an
occasion- Of course, the dreadful nfiewshad to be
told to them; and it was needless to describe the
scene that followed One only person retained the
smallest self-possession,and that was AnnieVaughan.
She made ino boisterous declarations of her belief
in her lover's innocence-no melodramatic ranting
or swooning; but, after the first shock was over
she walked up to his side, and, .placing her band in
his, said-"Hugh, I know you are not guilty of
this wickedness, and I know that you will be proved
innocent. We will bide our time."
This catastrophe was, of course, the finale of my
visit to Plenmouth. As soon as I found that I
could be of no use to the Vaughans, I returned to
London: and, six weeks afterwards, was in the
Central Criminal Court, when Hugh Elvyn was
found guilty of forgery, and sentenced to trans-
portation for life. The principal witness against
him was a young woman who, after havlfig been
the repository of all his secrets was deserted by
him and left to starve. Of the Vaughans I could
learn nothing, beyond that, immediately after the
trial Mr. Vaughan had exchanged livings with a
clergyman in the farthest part of Lancashire, and
that Annie was supposed, by the Plenmouth doc-
tor, to be in a rapid decline.
This man then on Bytown wharf, this lumberer,
this mysterious personage, the recognition of whose
identity had so perplexed me, was Hugh Elvyn?
He must have escaped from the place of his banish-
ment, and found a home among hundreds of others
similarly circumstanced. As the notion grew upon,
me, att -,a----"colcctiaonx--cm- 1- 'uig thrOdgh
my mind. I saw the little fishing town and the
market, redolent of shrimps and herrings; the
jolly little ale-house where I lodged, with its sanded
ed floor and those perpetual choruses on Saturday
nights. I saw the worm-eaten, sea-besoaked jetty;
the huge, hard-drinking, hard-handed, soft-hearted
fishermen; the church, with its worn, grey tower,
its wooden tomb-stones and quaint epitaphs; the
parsonage, with its smiling-'garden, the delicious
smell of flowers always hanging around its porch,
and its simple-minded, hospitable owner. I thought
of Annie, and-but that is no matter! In the
calm reflection of after years, I often fancy that I
had other causes of dislike to Hugh Elvyn beyond
those I have mentioned. Revolving all these mat-
ters in my mind, I arrived at Calumet Island and
walked into the public room of the hotel. At the
further end of the apartment was a large counter
or bar, at which several people were drinking;
among them, and recognizable at once by his
height and manner, was Hugh Elvyn. I had scarce-
ly set foot in the room when he saw me; our eyes
met, and hastily tossing off his liquor, he hurried
out through a door opposite to that by which I had
entered.
I was now convinced of the accuracy of my con-
jecture, and of Elvyn's determination to avoid me;
but I determined not to be baffled in my attempts
to learn something more of his history. I accord-
ingly mixed with the lumberers still surrounding
the bar, and endeavored to draw them into con-
versation. In this attempt I am bound to say I
signally failed; so far, at least, as my object was
concerned. They talked freely of the weather, of
the prospects of the ice breaking up, and of that
grand topic in which all dwellers in Canada are in-
terested, the annexation question; but of them-
selves, or of their recent companion, whose name
I casually mentioned, they would say nothing.-
One by one they dropped out of the room. At
last I drew a table to the window, pulled out my
traveling case and commenced writing a business
dispatch. I had been at work about half an hour,
when a shadow falling across the paper caused me
to raise nmy head, and+, looking up, I saw an Indian
squaw, who, after glancing cautiously round, threw
a letter upon-the table, pressed her finger on her
lip, and retired as mysteriously as she had arrived.
Immediately on her departure I took up the letter,
broke the seal and read as follows:
"I thought I had escaped pursuit, and that I
might linger out the remainder of my life alone,
unsuspected and unknown. When, having eluded
the vigilance of those to whom my crimes have
consigned me, I managed, after enduring the great-
est hardships, to reach these solitudes, I fancied
that the overhanging sword of the avenging angel
had at length been turned aside, and that I might
be allowed to die without ever encountering a face
which I had seen before, or hearing a name which
I had borne in happier times. It seems, however,
that this is not to be, and that .you have discovered
my retreat. I saw you yesterday on Bytown wharf;
to-night I find you have traced me further. What
your intentions may be I know not. You have


ciple as ancient as free government itself--every-
thing of a practical nature has been decided. No
other question remains for adjustment; because all
agree that, under the constitution, slavery .in the
States is beyond the reach of any hammi p wer,
except that of the respective States themselves
wherein it exists. May *.VtD than,boPeVAt#M lb.
IatI agitation c1~ fuhpijeat is aip,~Maerif 4


IT


former condition. On this side the grave, at least,
I wil b. free from interference or reproach.
'*. '. ..,. H.E ..
That night I retired tobed more disturbed' than
ever, and only determined upon one point,.that I
would pursue my investigations no further. I could
be of no assistance to this unhappy man, and no
mere verbal consolation would have been of any
benefit to him; my best plan was to try to forget
the events of the last two days, and never to allow
Elvyn's name or history to pass my lips. ..After
a seemingly never ending night spent in feverish
tossing and rumblings, with occasional snatches oft
perturbed sleep, I rose with the first glimmer of
daylight, and hurried out into the fresh morning
air. .
On issuing from the 'door of the inn, my, atten-
tion was attracted by a group of people, on-the riv-
er bank, who were gathered, round, sonim darkl ob
ject which had apparently,beenlanded from an In
dian canoe lying near. As I approached tke grpiu
divileG, aiu lit.-, i-, I.. >L !~ "l *" ?..dk ?d
dripping, discolored and confused by the snags
against which in the rapid flow of the river, it had
been tossed, and with a small punctured wound in
the chest, round which the blood had clogged, lay
the body of Hugh Elvyn.
Horror-stricken, I inquired, of the bystanders,
and was soon made acquainted with all they. had to
tell. A young Indian attached to one of, the lum-
bering parties had for some time suspected the ex-
istence of aa intrigue between his wife and Elvyn;
on the previous evening he had seen them contin-
ually together, had tracked her to the inn ,whither
she had been sent with my letter, and then had
been heard to vow vengeance against her betrayer.
Late that night, Elyyn was peieeivedin- a ihalf-in-
toxicated state, making his way towards the shanty,
at the edge of the river; he was never seen alive
again. The Indian had decamped, and so far as I
know, was never captured. My business was uri-
gent, and I could stay no longer. Wearied and
dispirited I returned to the inn, and in a few min-
utes bade adieu forever to Calumet Island.

The Inaugural Address.

Fellow Citizens: I appear before you this day to
take the solemn oath "that I will faithfully execute
the office of President of the United States, and
.will, to the best of my ability, preserve, protect,
and defend the constitution of the United States."
In entering upon this great office, I must humhly
invoke the God of our fathers for wisdom and
firmness to execute its high and responsible duties
in such a manner as to restore harmony and an&
cient friendship among the people of the several
States, and to preserve our free institutions thrpotigl
out many generations. Convinced I owe my eee-
tiM to the inherent love for the Constitution and
the Union which still animates the hearts of the. .
American people, let me earnestly ask their power-
ful support in sustaining all just measures calcula-
ted to perpetuate these, the richest political bles-
sings which Heaven has ever bestowed upon any
nation. Having determined not to become a can-
didate for re-election, I shall have no motive to in-
fluence my conduct in administering the govern-
ment except the desire ably and faithfully to serve
my country, and to live in the grateful memory of
my countrymen.
We have recently passed through a Presidential
contest in which the passions of our fellow citizens
were excited to the highest degree, by questions of
deep and vital importance, but when the people
proclaimed their will, the tempest at once subsided
and all was calm.
The voice of the majority, speaking in the man-
ner prescribed by the Constitution, was heard, and
instant submission followed. Our own country
could alone have exhibited so grand and striking a
spectacle of the capacity of man for self-govern-
ment.
What a happy conception, then, was it for Con-
gress to apply this simple rule-that the will of the
majority shall govern-to the settlement of the
question of domestic slavery in the territories!
Congress is neither "to legislate slavery into any
Territory or State nor to exclude it therefrom; but
to leave the people thereof perfectly free to form
and regulate their domestic institutions in their
own way, subject only to the constitution of the
United States." As -a natural consequence, Con-
gress has prescribed that when the Territory of
Kansas shall be admitted as a State, it "shall be
received into the Union with or without slavery, as
their constitution may prescribe at the time 'of their
admission."
A difference opinion has arisen In regard to the
point of time when the people of a territory shaul
decide tht question for themselves.
This is, happily, a matter of but little practicaI
importance. Besides it is a judicial question .which
legitimately belongs to the Supreme Court of the
United States, before whom it is now pending, and
will, it is understood, be speedily and finally set-
tied. To their decision, in common with all good
citizens, I shall cheerfully submit, whatever this
may be, though it has ever been my individual opin.
ion that under the Nebraska ,Kansas act the appro-
priate period will be when the number of actual
residents in the territory shall justify the formation
of a constitution with a view to its admission as a
State into the Union. But be this as it may, it is
the imperative and indispensable duty of the gov-
ernment of the United States to secure to every
resident inhalbitant the free and independent ex-
pression of his opinion by his vote. This sacred
right of each individual must be preserve& That
being accomplished, nothing can be fairer ths
to leave the people of a territory, free from all for-
eign interference, to decide their own destiny for
themselves, subject only to the constitution of- the
United StateL. -
The whole tel. trial question being then settled
upon the principle of popular sovereignty-.a prim-


greeable, this, sir, but business is business." Then
turning to Hugh Elvyn, he added, as he gripped
him by the elbow, "Sir, you're my prisoner I"
I never shall forget the abject look of mingled
rage- and despair that passed across the young
man's face as he heard these words. As for the
father, he stood perfectly aghat, and it was some





--I-: C;-F.. '~f(.3 -S..- -t -- ~..;^.. ~iLL. -I i.. _


end, and that the geographical parties to which it
has given birth, so dreaded by the Father 'of his
country, will speedily become extinct! Most happy
will it be for the 'country-when the public mind
shall be diverted from this question to others of
'more pressing and practical importance. Through-
out the whole progress of this agitation, which has
scarcely known any intermission for more than
twenty years, whilst it has beem productive of no
positive good to aniy hlhuman being, it has beenthe
prolific source of great evils to the master, to the
slave and.to the whole country. It has alienated
and estranged the people of the sister States from
each other, and has even seriously endangered the
very existence of the Union. .
Nor has the danger yet entirely ceased..- Uigder
our system there is a remedy for all mere pdhitical
evils in the sound sense and sober judgment of the
people. Time is a great corrective. Political
subjects which but a few years ago excited and ex-
asperated the public mind have passed away and
are now nearly forgotten. But this question of
domestic slavery is of far graver importance than
any mere political question, because, should the
agitation continue, it may eventually endanger the
personal safety of a large portion of our 'country-
men where the institution exists. In that event nko
form of Government, however admirable in itself,
and however productive of material benefits, -can
compensate for the loss of peace arind domestic se-
curity around the family altar. Let every Union-
loving man therefore exert his best influence to
suppress this agitation, which, since the recent leg-
islation of Congress, is without any legitimate ob-
ject.
: It is an evil omen ur ~ ~ ... .t -t ,, hav,
undertaken to calculate the mere material value of
the Unidn, Reasoned estimates have been pre-
gented of the pecuniary profits and local advanta-
ges which would result to different States and sec-
tions from its dissolution, and of the comparaiie
Injuries which such an event would -inflict on other
States and sections..:.-Even descending to this low
and narrow-vieweof the mighty question, all such
calculations are at fault. The'bare reference to a
single consideration will be conclusive orin this point.
We at present enjoy a free trade -throughout our
extensive ando expanding country, such as the
world never witnessed. This trade is conducted on
railroads and canals-on noble rivers and arms, of
the sea-which-bind together the North and the
South, the East and the West of our confederacy.
Annihilate the trade, arrest its free progress by the
geographical lines of jealous and hostile States,
and you destroy the prosperity and onward march
of the whole and every part, and involve all in one
common ruin. But such considerations, important
as they are in themselves, sink into insignificance
when we reflect on the terrific evils which would
result from disunion to every part of the confedera-
cy, to the North not more than to the South, to
the East not more. than to the West. These I
shall not attempt toportray, because I feel an hum-
ble confidence that the kind Providence which in-
spired our fathers with wisdom to. frame the most
perfect form of Government and Union ever de-
vised by man will not suffer it to perish until it
shall have been peacefully instrumental, by its ex-
ample, in the extension of civil and religious libbr-
ty throughout the world.
Next in importance to the maintenance of the
Constitution and the Union is the duty of preserv-
ing the Government free from the taint, or even
the suspicion, of corruption. Public- virtue is the
"1 "-* I~ ~,,, hi-hstnrv proves that
-when this has decayed, and the love of money has
usurped its place, although the forms of free Gov-
ernment may remain for a season, the substance
has departed forever.
Our present financial condition is without a paral-
lel in history. No nation:has-ever before been em-
barrassed from too large a surplus- in its treasury.
This almost necessarily gives birth to extravagant
legislation. It-produces wild schemes of expendi-
ture, and begets a race6of-speculators and jobbers,
whose ingenuity is exerted in contriving and pro-
moting expedients to obtain public money. The
purity of official agents, whether rightfully or
wrongfully, is suspected, and the. character of the
Government suffers in the estimation of the people.
This is in itself a very great evil.
The natural mode of relief from this embarrass-
ment is to appropriate the surplus in the treasury
to great national objects, for which a clear warrant
can be found in the Constitution. Among these I
might mention the extinguishment of the public
debt, a reasonable increase ok the navy, which is
at present inadequate to the protection of our vast
tonnage afloat, now greater than that of any other
nation, as well as to the defence of our extended
sea-coast.
It is beyond alf question the true principle that
no more revenue ought to be collected from the
people than the amount necessary to defray the ex-
penses of a wise, economical and efficient adminis-
tration of the Governmont. To reach this point,
it was necessary to resort to a modification of the
tariff, and this has, I trust, been accomplished in
such a manner as to do as little injury as may have
been practical:to our domestic manufactures, es-
peciaily those necessary to the defence of the
country. Any discrimination against a particular
branch, for the purpose of benefitting favored cor-
porations, individuals or interests, would have been
unjust to the rest of the community, and inconsist-
ent with that spirit of fairness and equality which
ought to govern in the adjustment of a revenue
tariff,
But the squanidering of the public money 'sinks
into comparative insignificance as a temptation to
corruption when compared with the squandering of
the public lands.
No nation in the tide of time has ever been
blessed with 'so rich and noble inheritance as we
Enjoy in the 'public lands. In administering this


important trust, whilst it may be wise to grant por-
tions of them for the improvement of the remain-
der, yet we should never forget that it is our car-
dinal policy to reserve these lands as much as may
befor actual settlers, and this at moderate prices.
'We shall thus not only best promote the prosperity
of the new States and Territories, by furnishing
them a hardy and independent race of honest and
industrious citizens, but shall secure homes for our
children and our children's children, as well as for
those exiles from foreign shores who may seek in
'tiii country to improve their condition, and to en-
joythebe blessings of civil and religious liberty.-
Such emigrants have done much to promote the
growth and prosperity, of the country.' They have
proved faithful both in peace and in war. After
-becoming citizens, they. are entitled, 'under the
constitution- and laws, to be placed on a perfect
6eqpality with the native born citizens; and in this
.bkartacter they should ever be kindly recognized.
The federal constitution is a. grant from the
Btates to Congress of certain specific powers; and
the qixfstiou, whether this grant'should be liberally
'r stritlyy construed, bas mone orless, divided io.
A" p"9ie9 from the beginning. Without cter-
'5-


ing into the argument, I desire to state, at the
commencement of my administration, that long ex-
perience and observation has convinced me that a
strict construction of the powers of the Govern-
ment is the only true, as well as the only safe theo-
ry of the constitution. Whenever, in our past his-
tory, doubtful powers have been exercised by Con-
gress, these have never failed to produce injuries
and unhappy consequences. Many such instances
might be added, if this were the proper occasion.
Neither is it necessary for the public service to
strain the language of the constitution; because
all the great and useful powers required for a suc-
cessful administration of the Government, both in
peace and in war, have'been granted either in ex-
press terms or by the plainest implication.
While deeply convinced of these truths, I yet
consider it clear that, under the war-making power,
Congress may appropriate money towards the con-
struction of a military road, when this is absolutely
necessary for the defence of any State or Territory
of the Union against-foreign invasion. Under the
constitution, Congress has power "to declare war,"
"to raise and support armies;" "to provide and
maintain a navy ;" and to call forth the militia to
"repel invasion." Thus endowed in an ample man-
ner with the war-making power, the corresponding
duty is required that "the United States shall pro-
tect each of them [the States] against invasion."
Now, how is it possible to afford this protection
to California and our Pacific possessions, except by
means of a military road through the Territories of
the United States, over which men and munitions
of war may be speedily transported from the At-
lautic States, t- meet and repel the invader? In
the event -Of i war with a naval yower much
stronger than our own, we should then have no
otheravailable access to the Pacific coast; because
such a power would instantly close the route across
the Isthmus of Central America. It is impossible
to conceive that, whilst the constitution has ex-
pressly required Congress to defend all the States,
it should ',.r deny to them, b any fair construc-
tion. ithe ,onlYT po-sible means by which one ofttiese
States can. be defended. Besides the Government,
ever since its origin, has been in the constant prac-
tice of constructing military roads.
It might also be wise to consider whether the
love for-the Union, which now animates our fellow-
citizens on the Pacific coast, may not be impaired
by our neglect or refusal to provide for them, in
their remote and isolated condition, the only means
by which the power of the States on this side of
the Rocky mountains can reach them insufficient
time to protect them against invasion.
I forbear, for the present, from expressing any
opinion as to the wisest and most economical mode
in which the Government can lend its aid in ac-
complishing this great and necessary work. I be-
lieve that many of the difficulties in the way which
now appear formidable, will in a great degree van-
ish as soon as the nearest and best route shall have
been satisfactorily ascertained. It may be right
that on this occasion I should make some brief re-
'marks in regard to our rights and duties as a mem-
ber of the great family of nations. In our inter-
course with them there are some plain principles
approved by our own experience, from which we
should never depart.
We ought to cultivate peace, commerce and
friendship with all nations, and this not merely as
the best means of promoting our own material in-
terests, but in a spirit of Christian benevolence to-
wards our fellow men, wherever their lot may be
cast. Our diplomacy shall be direct and frank,
neither seesmg to-uraainmoja nor .euvrt.ing les,
than our due. We ought to cherish a sacred re-
gard for the independence of all nations, and never
attempt to interfere in the domestic concerns of any
unless they shall be imperatively required by the
great law of self-preservation. To avoid entang-
ling alliances has been a maxim of our policy ever
since the days of Washington, and its wisdom no
one will attempt-to dispute.
In short, we ought to do justice in a kindly spirit
to all nations and require justice from them in re-
turn. It is our glory, that whilst other nations
have extended their dominions by the sword, we
have never acquired any territory except by fair
purchase, or, as in the case of Texas, by the volun-
tary determination of a brave, kindred and inde-
pendent people, to blend their destinies with our
own. Even our acquisitions from Mexico form no
exception. Unwilling to take advantage of the
fortune of war against a sister republic, we pur-
chased these possessions under the treaty of peace
for a sum which was considered at the time a fair
equivalent. I
Our past history forbids that we shall in the fu-
ture acquire Territory, unless it be sanctioned by
the laws, of justice and honor. Acting on this
principle, no nation will have a right to interfere
or to complain if in the progress of events we
shall still further extend our possessions.
Hitherto, in all our acquisitions the people under
the protection of the Ameriean flag, have enjoyed
Civil and religious liberty as well as equal and just
laws; and have been contented, prosperous and
happy. Their trade with the rest of the world has
rapidly increased, and' thus every commercial na-
tion has shared largely in their successful progress.
I shall now proceed to take the oath prescribed
by the Constitution, whilst humbly invoking the
blessings of Divine Providance on this great Re-
public.
JAMES BUCHANAN.


WHERE THEY HAVE GONE"To.-The latest letter
from Walker's camp attempts to account for tIhe
men who have emigrated to Nicaragua. The writer
says;
I found, on very particular inquiry of prominent
officers, that since a year ago last June, Walker
has received four thousand six hundred men. Of
this number five hundred have probably been dis-
charged or deserted. Half of these five hundred
have doubtless since died from disease contracted
in the country. His present force consists of eight
hundred able-bodied men, or less, besides a hun-
dred and fifty in the hospitals, and possibly there
may be two hundred more in the capacity of cooks,
servants, hostlers, teamsters, mechanics, etc., ma-
king a total of eleven hundred and fifty. In all,
including those he received previous to June, 1855,
he has had not far from five thousand men. De-
duct the eleven hundred and fifty now remaining
in the country, and two hundred and fifty yet re-
maining alive of those discharged and deserted, the
whole-loss appears to be three thousand six hun-
dred. .I do not include Lockridge's command,
consisting of about four hundred men, on the river.
And I do not believe this an over estimate. All the
officers I spoke with concurred in saying that the
graveyards and pits of Granada contain fifteen
hundred of the filibusters, and many placed it as
high as two thousafi& :

,A correspondent of the Boston Conrir states
that Mr. and Mrs. Breckenridge were the hand-
somest couple at the inauwufatiom


J. W. Dst ................r a EDITOR.
J. W. DO9RR ................. ..EDITOR.


OFFICE IN THE REAR OF W. H. BAKER & Co's.


Terms of The West-Florida Times.
0
SUBnsCRIPTIoN--$3 00 per annum in advance; oth-
erwise, $4 00.
ADvERTISING--Advertisements not exceeding ten
lines, or less, inserted at the rate of $1 00 for the
first, and 50 cents for each subsequent insertion-
Liberal discount made on contract advertising by
,the year, or for a less time.
Bills will be presented quarterly to yearly adver-
tisers.


PENSACOLA, March 17, IS57.


To Advertisers.
It is perhaps unneceessary that we should call the
attention of persons in PENSACOLA, WA]R-
RINGTON, WOLSEY, MILTON, and elsewhere,
desiring to Advertise, to the advantages which the
West Florida imes offers. Commencirng, as it does,
with a large subscription list, in this immediate lo-
cality as well as in Southern and Eastern Alabama,
especially along the line of the projected Railroad
in that State, there are no postoffices within the area
of its circulation which the Times does not visit.
EV Advertisers will please hand in their favors
as early as possible on Monday. Tuesday morn-
ing will be too late for that day's issue.
SPostmasters everywhere are requested to
act as agents for this paper, and are authorized to
deduct the usual commission from all cash subscrip-
tions which may be forwarded.

SSee LITERARY FILLIBUSTER, on fourth

page. _
NEXT WEEK
we shall do ourself the honor of skin-
ning M. Paul Villars, of l'Orleanais, of New Orleans,
and now we offer his pelt for sale in advance. Hi
pronunciamento, of March 10, came to hand oy
Monday and, of course, too late to put him thr gh
the decuticleizing process, without neglect other
matters of importance, for M. Villars i a very
lengthy blouse, of gumbo-French verbosity.

WE MUCH DESIRE
to send a missionary up-country to
procure subscribers. We think some one with
nothing better to do would find it better than do-
ing nothing.
WE REGRET
that the gentleman of the Warrington
postoffice should put a construction upon our re-
marks, relative to mail service between this city
and that village, warranted neither by the article
nor its intent.
It is a prerogative, which few are bold enough to
dispute, of the editor to growl at the mail service ;
it is a necessity of our postal system-as adminis-
tered, an opinion in.which we are confirmed by
seeing now before us the envelope of a very im-
portant business letter bearing two postmarks--one,
that of the Mobile office, where it was mailed for
this city, and the other that of the Camden office,
whither it was sent from Mobile. A letter of much
importance to us was mailed in Mobile five weeks
ago and has not yet come to hand.
The affairs of the Pensacola office are conducted
with careful attention.
S
MR. BRITTAN,
editor and proprietor of that excellent
and able paper, the Montgomery Messenger, offers
a half-interest for sale.
THE STABBING AT oLS1EY.-
From the Warrington
correspondence of the Democrat we learn that the
boy McCaskill is said to have stabbed the negro in
self-defence, which we hope was the case.

NEW WORx.-


We have received from the publisher,
T. B. PETERSON, 102 Chestnut street, Philadelphia,
a beautiful copy of "Love After Marriage and
Thirteen other Choice Nouvellettes of the Iheart,
by Mrs. Caroline Lee Hentz, a familiarly known and
gifted authoress, the moral and instructive tendency
of whose writings is acknowledged by all, and gives
her works'a high place among the light literature
of the day. The letter press of this book is in the
finest style of the art.
The work will be sent free of postage to any
person remitting the price to T. B. Peterson, 102
Chestnut street. Bound in cloth, one volume,
$1.25; or two volumes, paper, $1.00.
-m0---
A BIGAMOUs SCOUNDREL.-
A case of bigamy, of
singular villainy and hardihood, wasconsummated
a few days since by Columbus Reddick, who mar-
ried a young woman in Milton. On the 15th of
February ult. the rascal was married to a Miss
Hatcher, at Warrington, and within a month's time,
and within thirty miles of the scene of his first, his
second nuptials are perpetrated. We do not know
whether the woman was party to the criminality of
the transaction, and hesitate to give the name, in
such connection,/of the daughter of a very respect-
ble citizen of Milton. The couple left for Alabama
immediately-so giving a new aspect to our com-
mercial relations with that State, which thus im-
ports rogues from Florida, instead of exporting
them, as is customary.
Tuesday Morning.-The Mobile stage this morn-
ing brought back Reddick, handcuffed, en route for
Milton, the scene of his villainy. On learning that
Reddick had a wife, Mr. Peterson, father of the
young woman whom he espoused in Milton, started
in pursuit and overtook the fugitives in Mobile, as
they were about starting for Montgomery. He at
once had Reddick arrested, and has now brought
him back to answer for his crime. We ought to
have a Penitentiary!

MONTGOMERY MAIL.-
Our citizens generally are
much interested in Montgomery, its news, affairs
and very good people, and it is natural that they
should be so interested, and that they should desire
to take a newspaper published in that city which
shall contain reliable and early information. Such
a paper is the Mail, edited by J. J. HOOPER, author
and humorist, who, on any and-every subject,
wields the most vigorous pen in Alabama, and is
ably abetted by his associate, Mr. COYNE. Hooper,
an arch magician in invisible immaterialities, sits in
his editorial laboratory with his pen stirring "'un-
known quantities" (of humor, railroad progression
and political erudition) into philters wondrously po-
tent, and, when the brewing is ended, the power of
the charm is sent thrilling throughout the Southern
press, and scarce needing a credit to point its au-
thorship.
Next to receiving subscriptions to The W. F.
Times would we be gratified to receive and forward
names and money to the Mail-scarcely a No. of
which but contains Railroad news of interest to this
section. Daily Mail $7 per annum--Tri- Weekly
$5- Weeki $S10--Clubs of five, or more, supplied
at $2.


appropriation for building five sloops-of-war; won-
der if the building of one at this point could not be
procured. If anything can be effected Mr. Mallory
will attend to it.

FOR TAmpICO.-
The vanguard of the colored emi-
gration from this city beyond the limits of the U.
States, have engaged passage at $600 00, and wilL
sail for Tampieo in about a fortnight. Thisfirstde-
tachment numbers twenty-four persons, compris-
ing heads of families, wives and little ones, who go
ahead to spy out the land, to be followed by the
greater proportion of the free-colored population of
the city.

"ROTATION"
is a word just now claiming a large
share of public attention. This sudden interest is
induced by the recent Federal appointments in New
Orleans and elsewhere, and which have suggested
the possibility that the principle of "rotation in of-
fice" may have an effective bearing not confined to
any particular latitude or longitude.


_I ~__ t


_Y~W~UWW~


IWL-UWI~WWWWUMUUNCWYU


FLORIDA BONDS.-Mr. George Peabody, the great
London banker and benefactor of Baltimore, was to
visit Savannah from Charleston. The Republican
says that one object of his visit South is to see after
his interest-in certain Florida State bonds, payment
of which has been refused by the authorities of
that State.-[N. O. Picayune.
Let the Middle, the East and the South ask us
for reasons why we of the West-wish to sever our
corporate connection with them, and we point to
that paragraph as the repetition of one that we have
before advanced. The name "Florida" conjures
to the offended vision of financiers the ghost of re-
pudiated bonds, and in our march of progress we
drag with us the carcass of a defunct credit, hang-
ing upon us-the incubus that chills and deadens the
nerves, the "sinews," of advancement. With the
name of Mr. Peabody, a representative, almost an
embodiement of finance and securities, is associated
the name, "Florida", as that of a State repudiating
its indebtedness to him. What security can we of
the Western corporations offer but "Florida" secu-
rities-Florida "securities"? New York money ar-
ticles inform us, with bitter facetiousness, that
"Florida bonds are a horse that won't trot in Wall
street." By the Spirit of Progress! if the balance
of the State will be so kind as to kick us out of its
rsscally companionship, we will show that Pensaco-
la, Ala., bonds can trot in Wall street-ay, ride
roughshod and dictate terms.
The State, in its Eastern and Middle portions, is
pushing forward a brilliant system of Railroads, the
completion of which will ensure her a solvent future.
But the time when we shall have immediate connec-
tion with, or feel immediate benefit from these enter-
prizes is almost too remote to be visible to the eye
of faith in such fruition. We tell the East that
its unsecured promises and pretty talk "is a horse
that won't trot in the West."
D IAL DUEL.--
Since our last issue we have re-
eived intelligence of a duel fought near Mobile by
Mr. Nixon, of the New Orleans Crescent, and Mr.
Breckinridge, of the-N. 0. Courier, in which the
latter was severely wounded, one thigh being bro-
ken. While we regret that the meeting should
have occurred we cannot but rejoice that it eventu-
ated in safety to Mr. Nixon, of the Crescent, for it
would have been sad indeed if one of the most
brilliant and powerful pens in the South, or the
union, had been silenced forever, or even.for a sea-
son by such unhallowed means.
We lament the conceived necessity of resort to
the duello, and see, with alarm, that the opinion in
favor of such expedient for the healing of difficul-
ties is gaining ground in the South. Scarcely a
week occurs that we have not tidings of a hostile
meeting in some part of the South, and so fre-
quent has been their occurrence of late that it is
useless to try, in the face of such facts, to con-
vince the prejudiced English that the Arrowsmith
hoax is all a hoax, and nothing else.

PENSACOLA TITLES.-
We would say to the Mont-
gomery Mail that those desiring to purchase real
estate in Pensacola need not fear defective titles.-
The troubles with "tax-titles" which the Pensacola
correspondent of that paper spoke of, are caused by
the very measures which are to ensure good titles
in future. Questions of property right and proper-
ty claim are being determined, and when settled
the titles are good-and who holds a good title
can sell a good title. We would further say to our
readers abroad that the titles to a large lot of very
valuable real-estate, which we expect soon to adver-
tise for sale, cannot be impeached by all the legal
ingenuity of Alabama and Florida combined.
U. S. DISTRICT CoURT--Judge .cQ. McIntosh pre.
siding.--
During last week this Court was occupied
in trying the case of U. S. vs. Dudley Walker,
in which no conclusion, but a non-suit, was arrived
at. Chandler Yonge, Esq., U. S. District Attor-
ney, appeared for the U. S., and the defence was
conducted by B. D. Wright, R. L. Campbell and
D. Jordan, Esqs.
His Honor intends to prosecute the interests of
the U. S. vs. Timber Cutters on Public Lands.vigo-
rously. In this department of its duty it i ,pr.-
sumed that the Hen. Court will achieve gri at re-
suits. It has heretofore been so very successful
in preventing trespass that it is, supposed that it,
has preserved to the United States at least a dozen
sawlogs, if not more, by its exertions at each ses-
sion-which occur, with great regularity, once in
several years. If our excellent Uncle Samuel
wishes to take care of his possessions he must ex-
pend some little care in looking after them. Six
years have elapsed since a U. S. Court was held
here, and now there is an accumulation of busi-
ness which must be disposed of, in some way or
another, by postponement or otherwise, in a short
space of time. W\V don't blame folks so much for
taking logs, for they are scarcely provided with
means of knowing that it is wrong to do so. Reg-
ulations of the Federal Government with regard
to maritime matters, inland navigation, etc., are
heedlessly and unthinkingly infringed by those who
are no better informed, or even think they are a
dead letter, because here there is no vigorous ad-
ministration of Federal authority, when here comes
a session of Court, after a lapse:of time in which
the last session has almost ceased to be remem-
bered, and parties are made the victims of "com-
mission," whereas a better and more constant su-
pervision of these affairs should have made them
only subjects of "prevention."

THE CABINET.-
The nation at large has no reason
to complain of Mr. Buchanan's Cabinet, and the
South should be especially gratified, for it is com-
posed of a majority of Southern men. We have the
Secretaries of the Treasury, the Navy and of War,
and the Postmaster General. Of course we expect
that some use will be made of Southern Navy Yards,
and that Southern mail service will receive as much
attention as that of the North. There has been an


DR. N. D. SPOTSWOOD
Continues the Practice of Medicine and
Surgery, as heretofore.
***Office at the Drug Store of N. D. SPOTSWOOD
& CO., Palafox street, opposite the Winter's House.
Pensacola, March, 1857. 15


Through in 48 hours?

MILTON AND CHATTAHOOCHEE



StzLae LinLe.
HAVING BOUGHT OUT THE INTEREST OF
the late proprietor in the mail line from Milton
to Chattahoochee, the undersigned is prepared to
put this line up to a standard of dispatch and comfort
which hitherto it has not attained. With drivers so-
ber, careful and experienced, good teams and com-
fortable coaches, three passengers can be sent
through at a time, and in forty-eight hours' time.
Leaves MILTON every TUESDAY and FRIDAY,
at 10 A.M. -
Leaves CHATTAHOOCHEE every TUESDAY and
SATURDAY.
Fare through.................... $18. -
*,*Travelers will find the tables atthe various sta-
tions well supplied, and the prices very low.
Dr. GEEO. D. FISHER.
Milton, Fla., March 4, 1857. 15'
tVMoblle Weekly Advertiser copy to amount of
$10. G. D. F.


0 N NEW-YORK and NEW-ORLEANS at sight,
for sale, in sums to suit purchasers, by,
it EYSS, JUDAZl &Mo


NICA1UGUA.-
News by late arrivals would indicate
that Walker's stock is again looking up, and we
must confess.that there is now every prospect of
fillibuster authority being firmly established, and
of Anglo American rule being introduced under
such auspices. If one can look on these matters
without the intervention of prejudice, discarding
alleged precedents, and judging the case in question
solely by its merits, it is yery likely that its two
sides will be found so nearly to balance that his
opinion will remain balanced until it is carried down
by the weight of the,-success of either side. Ab-
stract principle cannot always be properly, and un-
der all circumstances, brought to bear. If a pair
of breeches were adjudged to be a fit for a man
five feet high it would be rather disagreeable to the
subject of six feet altitude to have his stature re-
duced one foot that the breeches might fit him also.

CAPT. RoWE SAYS:
"Call up to the Cap'n's office and
settle." See advertisement.

FOR MARCH.-
The March number of the "Ameri-
can Cotton Planter and Soil of the South" is a su-
perior specimen of that excellent Southern Rural
Magazine. It is published in Montgomery by Un-
derwood & Cloud, at One Dollar a year. Every
household should have it.

"tfferers with Diseases of the Bladder, Kidneys,
Gravel, Dropsy, Weakncss, &c. Read the adver-
tisement in another column headed "Helmnbold's
Genuine Preparation."


MARINE LIST.

Arrived.
March 10.-Schr. Charles M. Lee, Lewis from Pt
Isabel, in ballast. '
March Il.-Schr. Colorado, Sheldon, from Indiano-
la, in ballast.
March-14.-Schr. Civility, Winslow, from Tampa,
in ballast.
March 16.-Schr. Powhatan, Caro, from New Or-
leans.
Schr. Zulime, Webber, fm N. Orleans.
Schr. Mary Ellen, Rowe, from New Or-
leans.
a Schr. Southerner, Perry, from.New Or-
leans.
Schr. Martha, Harrison. from New Or-
leans.

Cleared.
March 9.-Schr. Onward, Hopkins, for New Or-
leans, by Wm.Wcbb.
March ll.--Schr. Dianmond, Bowen, for New Or-
leans, by E. E. Simpson &co.
March 12.-Schr. Mary Ella, Wood, for Galveston,
by E. E. Simpson &co--Pearce &sons.
March 13.-Schr. William, Roach, for Galveston,
I5y E. E. Simpson &co.
Schr. Lizzie Mezzick, Hanson, for New
Orleans, by E. E. Simpson &co.

GALVESTON-Per Schr. Mary Ella--80,000 ft.
lumber, 50,000 laths, 90 pieces door, 30 pieces sash.
-Per schr. William--120,000 ft. lumber, 100,-
000 laths, 500 ft. sash, blind arnd door.
NEW ORLEANS-Per schr. Onward-38,000 ft.
lumber.
-Per schr. Diamond-48,500 ft. lumber, 800 ft.
sash; 21 bales cotton by JnoD Leigh; 127 hides, 6
bundles skins by A & G Forcheimer.
-Per schr. Lizzie Mezzick-74,388 ft. lumber,
264 feet sash, blind and doors.


BOOK STORE,

D. SPOTSWOOD & co.
.... P Palaox street, opposite the
WINTER'S HOUSE, Pensacola,
A RE NOW IN RECEIPT OF CHOICE SELE_
tions of BOOKS, from the stock of MIDDLE.
TON & McMASTER, Booksellers and Stationer%
Mobile-which they offer at IVpbilq prilie.
In their list of Books may be found-
Life and Beauties of Shakspeare,
History of Free-Masonry,
Humorous Poetry of the Englin Langsuage,: "
Byron's Works.
Types of Mankind, or Ethnological Researches; ed.
ited by Dr. Nott and Mr. Gliddon from the inedited
papers of Samuel George Morton, M. D., with ad.
ditional contributions from.distinguished profe.
sors.
Yusef; a Crusade in the East.
Ballou's Travels,
Cotton is King; American'Chesterfield,
Lives of Queens ofEnglandi' : : :-
Uncle Sam's Palace, or the Reigning King,
Puddleford Papers, or Humors of the Wes4
Arabian Knights, Robinson Crusoe,
Pilgrim's Progress, Life in Israel,
Bible .in the Workshop,
Ship-Carpenter's Family,
Festus.
Also-The Slave: of the Lamp,
SPlay-Day Book, :' .
Tit for Tat, a reply to Dred -.
My Brother's:Keeper,
Basket of Chips, Silver-woodj
Life of an Old Maid,
Inez, a Tale of the Alamo, ,
SRifle, Axe and Saddle-Bags, .
Married, not Mated, ,Berinad Lile, :-.
Thoughtsto Helpand Cheer, Rainbow around the
". Tomb,
Knight of the Golden Melice, Gilbert:Go-Ahead,i
and many others, handsomely bound.
IN CHEAP FORM-A ,great variety of public.
tions--"light reading."
School Books.
Scholar's Companion, First Book of History,
Mitchell's Primary Geog- Smith's' Fist;Book:'fftis
raphy; : tory, I-
Parley's NewGeography, Practical Introductidn: to
Speller and Definer, Study of Geogramphy,
Intellectual Arithmetic, Youth's Manual of Geogr
Practical rld Menl& Ar- phy.'
ithmetie.
Our stock is always kept full; being continue
ally replenished by fresh supplies from Mobile.
Stationery.
A varied assortment, excellent in every particular.:
Pensacola, March 10, 1857.- 16


PORT OF PENSACOLA.


B ARRETT & WIMBISH-- :
GENERAL AGENTS
FOR
NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS.
OFFICE at their Printing Establishment,
Central Square near Central Bank.
s15 MONTGOMERY, AIi.
wX. 0. LEE ........ ........... N. CTZ

LEE & CARTE.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
GENERAL AGENTS AND COLLECTORS,
Commerce street.......M o n t go me r y, Ala.f
Will pay particular attention to the purchase and
sale of COTTON and other Country Produceand to
the Filling of Orders.
REFERENCES:
Johnston, Stewart &co., Harroge & Smith,
Pomrov & Gregory, A. P. Pfister &co.,
Josiah Morris, I Joseph S. Winter.
Having ample storage room we are prepared to re-
ceive and make liberal advances on consignments.:
16*
GUARDIAN'S SALE.
BY AUTHORITY OF AN ORDER OF TI
Court of Probate for the county. of Escambia, I
will sell at public outcry before the door of the Court-
house, in the city of Pensacola, on SATURDAY, the
21st day of March next, TWO SLAVES, viz:
Negro man WILLIAM,
Negro woman WINNEY,
Belonging to the Estate of the Minor Heirs of CHA&
WINTERS, deceased.
Terms of sale-Cash.
L. F. BRONNUM,
Guardian of the MINOR CHILDREN
of CHARLESa WINT21a
Pensacola, Feb. 17, 1857. 12tdo
Circuit Court--State of Florida--,
Escambia County.
George W. Hutton, as Administrator
of John Jackson, deceased,
vs.
John McCrea, of the
City of Philadelphia.
HE DEFEN-DANT IN THE ABOVE STATED
Case is hereby notified of the filing ofa petition
in the said Court to establish a lost-deed, of which
the substance is as follows, to wit: A deed of bar-
gain and sale duly executed, sometimepriof to the
year eighteen hundred and twenty-six, by the said
John McCrea, conveying, for a valuable considerS.
tion, to the said John Jackson, of Florence, Alaba-
ma, all his right, title and interest in and to certain
real-estate situated in PensacOla, Florida, and em-
braced in a deed of conveyance by John Donelson#
Jr. to James Jackson, Sr., James Jackson, Jr., Tho-
mas Childress, John H. Eaton, John C. McElmore,
the said John Jackson, the said John Donelson,'Jr.,
and the said John McCrea, executed 15th day April,
1818, and recorded 8th January, 1839, at page.3895
of Book F of the records of the Circuit Court of said
County. GEORGE W. HUTTON,
Administrator of JorNt J.aCXso.
Feb. 24, 1827. 13
Crooa.elry :
AND
GLASS-WARE.

E. T. HOYT,
159 DUANE STREET,'
New York,
HAS CONSTANTLY ON HAND A COMPLETE
assortment of Crockery and Gla".
Ware. Also, STONE JUGS and JARS of all
sizes, which he would offer to the country trade at
the lowest rates. March S. 14
L. ROSENFIELD,,
COMMISSION IECHANT,
NO. 42 POYDRAS STREET,
NEW ORLEAN&.
March 3, '67. 14
A. c Oetc1.
..4LC~zx%0L.d.

GEORGE W.HUTTON,
General Auction and CoMM oisuion Xerobwt
A~Nn
REAL-ESTATE AGENT,
For the sale of.LOTS, LANDS, MERCHANDISE,
NEGROES, STOCKS, VESSELS, etc., etc.,
Pensacola, Fla.
Feb. 24, '57. 131y
A Choice Collection of
OIXa IA.IN rTIGcSB,
"BY OLD AND MODERN MASTRS,.
Elegantly FrAdt, -
HE SUBSCRIBER HAS JUST OPENED A
Splendid Collection of Oil Pai *tul., ip
superbly rich Gilt Frames, at his
SALES-ROOM ON GOVERNMENT STREET,'
fronting the Public Square, affording a fine opportu.
nity to the citizens of Pensacola for furnishing their
parlor walls with WORKS OF ART, seldom afeiing
in this place. Theattention of connolueia, th*
patrons of the Fine Arts, and the public genially,: k
invitedto this egdeotlc, OW o'pei fofWsiW mih..
Feb. 17, 1807, [12] WOW.HUTTQN.


~__I ___________


N OTICE.
FROM AND AFTER THE DATE OF
& this notice FREIGHT REGULATIONS
of steamer Ewing, between Pensacola and War-
rington or Wolsey landings, wili be STRICTLY EN-
FORCED. A charge of 10 cts. will be levied on small
packages and, on those larger, proportionably in-
creased.
*,* NO ORDERS for PASSAGE of Servants re-
ceived in payment of fare.
JOSEPH H. ROWE, Master.
March 17, 1857. 16


Three Steam Engines and Boilers.
T HE UNDERSIGNED OFFERS FOR SALE THE
following property, viz:
One large Engine and Boiler, 11 inch cylinder, 3 ft.
stroke and 20 horse-power. The Boiler is Locomo-
tive, made of very heavy iron, and made in the very
betV;nanner.
On6 Engine, 8 inch cylinder, 22 inch stroke, and
12 horse-power, with Locomotive Boiler containing
five flues, 6 inches in diameter each.
Both of the above Engines are on iron frames,
handsomely finished.
One Engine, 8 inch cylinder, and 20 inch stroke,
and 12 horse-power. Boiler 22 feet long, 42 inch-
es in diameter, and containing two 14 inch flues.
ALSO,
A double-cylinder patent Pile-Driving Windlass,
nearly new, and in good order.
One Fire-Engine,
Two setts Blacksmith Tools.
One lot of Machinist's Tools.
Seven Circular Saw Mandrels.
One Turning Lathe complete.
One case containing 42 C. S. Upright Saws, 6, 6+
and 7 ft.--IIoe's nianufactui'e, New York.
One case 6 Circular Saws, Cross-Cut and Edgers.
The above property will be sold on FAVORA-
BLE TERMS, on application.
March' 10, '57. 15 GEO. W. HUTTON.


For Sale,


3 LARGE MULES,
3 large CARRY-LOGS,
2 ROAD.WAGGONS,
4 LUMBER CARS,
1 BUGGY,
2 LIGHTERS,
1 SAIL-BOAT colrplete.
March 10, '51. 15 GEO. W. HIUTTON.


i;


~i~rla -~b~rrfisPmentr.








Correspondence of the W. F. Times.
MOILE, March 12th, 1857.
Mr. Evrron: Winter is upon us again. The blos-
soms and flowers which were springing into life un-
der the genial sun and seemingly spring showers of
a fortnight ago are now nipped in the bud.
The weather the past week is without a parallel
In our recollection at this season of the year.
We have been visited by heavy rains, lasting for
three or four days, with the- thermometer ranging
very low.
It is reported that snow fell to some depth in
New Orleans, about this time, which we can readi-
ly believe, although it is a thing we never heard of
before in that region.
The rains have been succeeded by cold and a
keen biting northwester which one feels all the
more from having been previously indulged, for a
few days, witbfine warm sunshine.
The thermometer, at present, ranges at a very
low figure, not far, we suppose, from the freezing
point, which is death to all vegetation.
The theatre has been but poorly attended this
week owing to the severe weather, but now that
the difficulty is removed the house, no doubt, will
be filled to overflowing to witness the performances
of Mr. Edwin Booth, a young actor, and the son of
the lamented actor of the same name.
This young gentleman, who does not exceed
twenty-five years in age, is winning for himself, in
the field so well filled by his talented progenitor,
the highest laurels. He is pronounced, by the se-
--Terest' critics, one of the most perfect and faultless
delineators of character now on the stage and bids
fair soon to eclipse all competitors. Many have
been unable to see and.judge for themselves of his
merits by reason of the weather, but that obstacle
being now removed large and highly appreciative
audiences will attend, when we shall be better able
to judge of the success -of the young aspirant be-
.fore the public.
The races, also, at which so much sport was an-
ticipated by the "sporting" gentry of the town and
visitors of that character, were sadly interfered
with by the weather. The last day or two, howev-
er, the sport has been continued and the attend-
ance has been larger with some betting.
To-day a race was run for the Jo y Club
Purse, $150, mile heats. There were three entries,
but Mobile took the prize. The race was won by
Col. R. H. Long's s. f. Forty Cents, by Wagner,
dam by Gerow, three years old.
Next week the sport will be continued on the
new Magnolia Course, which is situated at the end
of the plank bay-road, about five miles from the
city. This is a new course erected by the proprie-
tors of the plank-road.
Dr. Bealle's Panorama of Dr. Kane's Arctic Ex-
pedition-is still here and as popular as ever. To
the attractions of the panorama is added those of
the performances of Mr. Gnosphelius, a very fine
pianist.
Our citizens were a little startled on Sunday by
the report of a duel which was fought late the even-
Ing previous near the city by two belligerent news-
paper men of New Orleans. The parties, we learned,
were Messrs. Nixon, of the "Crescent," and Breck-
lnridge, of the "Courier," and the difficulty grew
out of remarks made the one of the other in their
newspapers. The spot selected was on the bay-
road, a short distance from the city. The weapons
were pistols and the distance ten paces. At the
second fire Mr. Breckinridge was wounded in the
left thigh, the ball shattering the bone and passing
Into the fleshy portion of the other thigh. The
wound was said to be a very severe one. The
parties having thereby satisfied the demands of
their wounded honor departed for home on the
next day.
As the Mobile "boys" are never behind their
neighbors in anything, you will not be surprised to
learn that a challenge has passed between two
young gentlemen of this city, who, both as to size
and fighting qualities, are said to be "Bantum
Cocks." The affair, at the last accounts, was in
the hands of the seconds, which gentlemen, we
suppose, as we have heard nothing of the matter
for a day or two, have settled the matter consist-
ently with the "honor" of the parties.
JUNIUS.

THn CABINET.-The following gentlemen have
'been appointed by the President and confirmed by
the Senate, as members of the new Cabinet:
Lewis Cass, of Michigan, Secretary of State.
Howell Cobb, of Georgia, Secretary of the Trea-
sury.
Isaac Toucey, of Connecticut, Secretary of the
Yavy.
John B. Floyd, of Virginia, Secretary of War,
Jacob Thompson, of Mississippi, Secretary of the
Interior.
Aaron V. Brown, of Tennessee, Postmaster
General ,
Samuel W. Black, of Pennsylvania, Attorney
General.

QUICK PASSAGE.-The schooner Victoria, Captain
James Gosnell, cleared at Pensacola on the 9th
inst., sailed thence with a full cargo of lumber, at
10 o'clock p. m., and arrived at the Lake end of
the New Canal at 6 o'olock of the 10th, making
the run from port to port in 20 hours. This we
believe is the quickest trip between these places on
record.-[N. O. Bulletin.
[We doubt not there have been other trips as
guick, but they are not "on record."-TIMES.]

A joint resolution was passed by Congress, au-
thorizing Capt. Hartstein-and other officers to ac-
cept the swords presented" them by Queen Vic-
toria.
It is supposed that about ten thousand people of
the city of New York, were in Washington on the
4th of March.

IMP.~O NT BLas PASSED.-Among the measures
that recently passed Congress, was one to establish


an overland mail to California, another pay to
the Texan Navy Officers, for the term of five years;
another granting one year's pay to the Navy
Officers dropped by the late Naval Board. Also, a
million of dollars were granted for the construction
of five steam sloops of war.
i-- Q .
RUMORED AProINTMENTS.-Among the rumors
from Washington, is one to the effect that General
Cass, the Secretary of State, will appoint his son,
Major Cams. (now U. S Minister to Rome,) as As-
sistant Secretary of State. Another rumor says
the Hon. T. J. D. Fuller, of Maine, is to be Assist-
ant Secretary of the Treasury, under Mr. Cobb.

Never trust with a. secret a married man who'
loves his wife, for he will tell her, and she will tell
)er sister, an4 her sistfe will tell everybody.

The income of the Marquis of Westminister is
400,000 per annum, equal- to $5000. per day, or
over $3 for every minute of time, night and day
Stonaghout 1te entire ysw.: 1yery tick of the
d .sk Ibeow a bat dime ito his purpa.


THE MOVEMENT WESTWARD.-The Chicago Dem-
ocratic Press publishes a table of the returns for
the four principal railroads running west from that
city. It shows, that these four roads alone have
taken West 207,853 passengers more than they
brought back.

IMPROVEMENTS IN HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA.-The
Independent, of Saturday week, says that Huntsville
is on the rising ground-rapidly improving. All
that is wanted, is more mechanics. There are not
near workmen enough to put up all the buildings
that are wanted. Brick masons are wanted parti-
cularly. Four large public buildings are now to be
built immediately; a hotel, a college, and two
churches-besides a large number of private bulid-
ings. Mechanics out of employment, says the Inde-
pendent, should hasten to Huntsville at once, and it
assures them that they will find plenty to do and at
good prices.

RAILROAD RIoT.-We learn that, ,a .few days
since, a serious riot took place on the Fernandina
Railroad, in Florida. The particulars of the af-
fair, as far as we could learn from a gentleman
who arrived in this city yesterday, are as follows:
Some slight misunderstanding took place between
a countryman and one of the laborers on the road,
in relation to a horse race. The affair ended in a
fight, and the parties were separated. Some hours
afterwards, the friends of both parties made ar-
rangements for a conflict on a more extended
scale. The countrymen, armed with rifles and
guns, made an attack on the railroad men, when a
severe battle ensued, during which one man was
killed and a number wounded on both sides. The
railroad men were defeated, and driven from their
ground, some of whom made their escape by se-
creting themselves in the neighborhood, and others
arrived in this city by yesterday's steamer. The
parties engaged in the riot, we are informed, num-
bered from forty to fifty on each side. In conse-
quence of this unfortunate affair, our informant
learned that the work on the road had been sus-
pended temporarily.-[Savannah News.

DEATH OF REV. DOCTOR SCHROEDER.-The New
York Courier announces the death in Brooklyn, on
Thursday week, of Rev. John F. Schroeder, D. D.,
of the Episcopal denomination, and at one time
Assistant Minister of the Trinity church, New York
city. He was 56 years of age.

THE INAUGURATION IN NEW YonK.-The Express
says that the inaugural has created a very favorable
impression in New York. Its kindliness of tone,
its broad nationality, its excellent foreign pro-
gramme, are noted with pleasure. The "Sun" hails
with satisfaction the great highway marked out to
the Pacific. The "Journal of Commerce" rejoices
that the President contradicts all the expectations
by his opponents of "Slavery propagandism," "war
with European powers," "Fillibusterism," &c. The
"News," rather fillibusterish, is, nevertheless, de-
lighted with its "vein of strong common sense,',
and is in exulting pride, that it helped along such
a man to the Presidency. The "Tribune" seems to
be satisfied with the President's declining to run
again-but it is not sure that that is "no induce-
ment to go astray"-and then the editor chuckles
over Mr. Buchanan's refreshing greenness in felicita-
ting himself that slavery agitation is at an end.

PENSACOLA SHOE STORE ENLARGED.
OPPOSITE PUBLIC SQUARE,
Corner Government & Palafox sts.

A NEW STOCK
-or-
-OF-

BOOTS, SHOES AND GAITERS
Just received, direct from Philadelphia,
of the LATEST STYLES, comprising
every article in the Shoe line, from ladies' and gen-
tlemen's Fancy Gaiters to Staple Bro-
gans, to which I ask the attention of this city
and surrounding towns.
My stock is Largeand FASHIONABLE, and will
be sold-by the dozen, or single pair, at a SMALL AD-
VANCE on Philadelphia prices, for cash.
P. M. HATCH.
N. B.-Country dealers who will call and exam-
ine my stock, CANT HELP BUYING.

W" Mr. Hatch has made such arrange-
ments with the fi:m of Jos. S. Levett & Co.,
of Philadelphia, that his stock will be continually re-
plenished with all new and fashionable styles, as
well as with fresh supplies of staple articles.
December 25. 5


LATHROP, WILKINSON & CO,
IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS
OF
FRENCH, GERMAN, ENGLISH
AND AMERICAN
I"A.D'OY GOODS.
H AVE removed to the store No. 26 BEE K-
M AN st., running through to No. 18 Spruce,
where they-offer a complete assortment of the dif-
ferent articles in their line particularly adapted to
the Southern Trade, comprising-
Combs, Musical Instruments,
Buttons, Looking Glasses,
Threads, Percussion Caps,
Jewelry, Pins and Needles,
Perfumery, Spectacles,
Colognes, Brushes,
Extracts, Carpet-bags,
Pomades, Woodenware,
Hair Oils, Tubs, Buckets,
Soaps, Baskets, Brooms,
Inks, Wrapping Paper,
Letter & Cap Paper, Etc., etc.
Their increased facilities enable them to IM-
PORT DIRECT, and to offer EVERY ADVANTAGE IN
VARIETY AND EXTENT OF STOCK, as well as in terms
and price.o 1 ly


FRESH GARDEN SEEDS.
A COMPLETE ASSORTMENT OF FRESH GAR-
den Seeds, from the best growers, just re-
ceived, and for sale by WM. H. BAKER & CO.
Pensacola, Jan. 27. 9


LAND WARRANTS.
H'IIEST CASH PRICE given for Land War.
rates, by KEYSEIB IJUDAH & C00
Diber 1., td


__


SHIP-CHANDLERY,


S hip- Store > s
AND
FAMILY GROCERIES.
THE subscribers have now in store, and are con-
stantly receiving from New York and New Or-
leans, a fine assortment of Fresh Articles, consist-
ing of-
TEAS-Green and Black.
SUGARS-Crushed and Powdered.
SOAP-Castile and Brown.
BUTTER-Goshen and Western.
CHEESE-English Dairy and Pineapple.
Pearl Starch, Saleratus.
Soda and Cream-Tartar.
Buckwheat Meal.
Yeast-Powders, Guava Jelly,
Havana Preserves, Shaker Preserve&
Prunes, Raisins, Almonds,
Dried Apples and Peaches,
Cranberries, Citron, Currants,
Preserved Strawberries,
Pickles, Ketchup, Sauces,
Gnions, Olives, Capers,
Salmon, Lobster.
SPICES-Allspice, Cloves, Cinnamon,
Nutmeg, Pepper, Ginger, Mace.
Superior Kentucky Mustard.
WINES-Madeira, Port, Claret.
Superior, Cognac Brandy.
Old Monongahela Whiskey.
Bourbon
Schiedam Aromatic Schnapps-genuin artieie.
Lemon and Orgeat Syrups.
CORDIALS-assorted.
Mackerel, Codfish and Smoked Herring.
Crockery and Tinware.

SUxlr"-C0"h Ar t" d"* ex-y.
Manilla and Tarred Rope,
Houseline, Hambroline,
Spun-Yarn, Cotton Lines,
Russia Bolt-Rope,
Rigging-Leather,
Pump, do
Cotton-Duck,
Oakum, CWal-Tar,
Tar, Pitch, Rosin,
Spirits Turpentine,
Sperm and Lamp-Oil,
Blocks, Single and Double,
Jib-hanks and Mast-hoops,
Ship-scrapers,
Hook and Thimbles,
Paint and Tar-brushes,
Caulking-mallets, Marlinespikes
Pump-tacks, Copper, Nails,
Anchors, Chains, etc., etc.
S***We invite the attention of our friends and
customers and solicit a call.
We sell for cash, or on short time.
W. H. BAKER & CO.


Nov. 29, 18-99


2tf


Sash, Door and Moulding Factory,


BAGDAD, Fla.
THE Subscribers will receive orders for every
Description of Sash, Doors, Blinds and
IMIouldings, made at the above Factory, and
furnished at short notice.
3 KEYSER, JUDAH & CO.


COLLINS'S C. S. AXES.
UST RECEIVED AND IN STORE-A FEW
boxes Collins C. S. Axes, Kentucky pattern.
Will be sold low to close a concern.
GEO. W. HUTTON.
Pensacola, Feb. 17, 1857. 12


WHI. R. ROBERTSON,
W PRACTICAL
ENGRAVER, EMBOSSER, COPPER
Plate and Color Printer,
22 DAUPHIN STREET, MOBILE.
Having a choice assortment of
PLAIN, ENAMEL AND MOURNING CARDS
AND ENVELOPES, SILVER PLATED AND
BRASS DOOR-PLATES AND BELL-PULLS,
of superior qualities and fashionable sizes, I am
prepared to fill all orders for ENGRAVING or
PRINTING.
W Particular attention paid to furnishing the
most fashionable styles of Wedding, Visiting and
Invitation Cards and Envelopes.
PERCUSSION SEAL-PRESSES,
warranted superior to any in use.
il Orders left at the West Florida Times office
will receive prompt attention. 1 ly


Benj. M. & Edw. A. WHITLOCK & Co.,
13 Beekman street,
(CORNER NASSAU)
First street above the Astor House, on the opposite
side of, and Four doors East, of the Park,
WEW-YORK.
MPORTERS of Cognac Brandies, from OTARD
DUPUY & Co., HENNESSEY, PINET, CAS-
TILLON & Co., and other houses of the highest re-
putation, and sole proprietors of the celebrated
brandies of
CHATEAU BERNARD,
SUPERIOR VINEYARD,
LIQUEUR DES CHAMPS D'OR,
"MAGNA CHARTA," &c., &c.,
SCHIEDAM AND
OLD HOLLAND GINS,
JAMAICA AND WEST INDIA RUMS,
MADEIRA, PORT AND SHERRY WINES,
from the oldest established houses in Europe, all of
which have been ordered and selected with a view
to their purity and medicinal use.
Cglarrs,
Imported for our own trade, from the best ship-
pers in Havana.
Agents for the finest description of
VIRGINIA MANUFACTURED TOBACCO.
Also, a large stock of medium low grades, and
Wholesale Dealers in Fine Groceries.

Premium Champagne Cremant.
Benj. M. & E. A. W. & Co. are the exclusive own-
ers of this wine, and are in receipt of shipments by
regular packets, and beg those who may not have
given it a trial to do so, under their guarantee that
it will be found superior in delicacy of flavor and
quality, to any wine at present imported.
BENJ. M. WHITLOCK,
EDW. A. WHITLOCK, B. M. & E. A, WHITLOCK
FRD. J. HAVERSTICK, & Co.
OLIVER W. DODGE,
HENRY CAMMEYER. J 1 ly


WM. 0. LANE & CO,
IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF
STAPLE AND FANCY DRY GOODS,
194 Broadway, New York.


VwV. 0. LANE,
EDWARD H. LAIN,


1 Iy


KER BOYCe,
se s LAOB.


MUNICIPAL ELECTION.
--------
PEOPLE'S tICKET.
Union of Interests to advance the Interests of All.
The following Ticket is presented to the citizens
of Pensacola for their support at the ensuing Muni-
cipal Election, to be held on the .first Monday in
April next. MANY VOTERS.
For Mayor,
FRANCIS B. BOBE,
For Aldermen,
FRANCIS BOBE,
W. H. CHASE,
GEO. W. HUTTON,
JOSEPH RIERA,
M. H. HERNANDEZ,
O. M. AVERY,
C. F. QUINA.


ST. MARY'S HALL,
PENSACOLA, Fla.
T HIS FINE HOTEL, affording superior accom-
modations for a hundred persons, is now com-
pleted, and is open for the reception of permanent
or transient boarders.
With all household arrangements on the most
improved plan, with an accomplished chiefde cuisine,
an experienced corps of waiters and servants for
dining-room and dormitory, and long familiarity
with the business, the proprietress has confidence
that no one will have reason to be dissatisfied.
***Lodgers can at all times be accommodated
with horses and carriages.
**In the summer season extensive bath-houses
will offer delightful advantages for salt-water bath-
ing.
Rates:
Board and Lodging, per month......... $30 00
per week.......... 8 00
per day........... 1 50
MRS. M. COLLINS.
December 30, 1856. 5 ly


MILLINERY, LACE


AND -
E-S-brColcerles.
M RS. BLAIR, 36 DAUPHIN STREET, MOBILE,
imports direct from Paris, a very large assort-
ment of
BONNETS,
CAPS,
HEAD-DRESSES,
and RIBBONS.
Also, every description of LACES, FRENCH EM-
BROIDERIES and MANTLES.
*** Orders carefully attended to.
SDDRESS MAKING at the-shortest notice.
F. BLAIR,
1 y 36 Dauphin st.


ROB'T ADAMS.


DAN'L HARRIS.


ADAMS & HARRIS,
House, Sign, Ornamental and Steamboat
EPaintin ;
DEALERS IN
Paints, Oils, Glass, Brushes & Window-sash,
Nos. 2 & 4 Dauphin st.,
MOBILE, ALA.


***All orders promptly attended to.


4 6m


OF
HIGHLY CONCENTRATED COMPOUND
FLUID EXTRACT BUCHIU.
For Diseases of the Bladvr, Kidneys, Gravel,
Dropsy, Weaknesses, Obstructions, Secret Dis-
eases, Female Complaints, and all Diseases
of the Sexual Organs,
Arising from Excesses and Imprudences in life, and
removing all Improper Discharges from the Blad-
der, Kidneys, or Sexual Organs, whether existing in
MALE OR FEMALE,
From whatever cause they may have originated,
AND NO MATTER OF How LONG STANDING,
Giving Health and Vigor to the Frame, and Bloom
to the Pallid Cheek.
JOY TO THE AFFLICTED !!!
It cures Nerrous and Debilitated Sufferers, and
removes all the Symptoms, among which will be
found Indisposition
to Exertion, Loss of
Power, Loss of Memory,
Difficulty of Breathing, Gen-
eral Weakness, Horror of Dis-
ease, Weak Nerves, Trembling, Dread-
ful Horror of Derth. Night Sweats, Cold Feet,
Wakefulness, Dimness of Vision, Languor, Univer-
sal Lassitude of the Muscular System, Often
Enormous Appetite, with Dyspeptic Symp-
toms, Hot Hands, Flushing of the
Body, Dryrees of the Skin, Pal-
lid Countenance and Erup-
tions on the Face, Pain
in the Back, Heavi-
ness of the
Eyelids,
Frequently Black Spots Flying before the Eyes,
with Temporary Suffusion and Loss of Sight;
Want of Attention, Great Mobility, Restless-
ness, with Horror of Society. Nothing is
more Desirable to such Patients than Soli-
tude, and Nothing they more Dread for
Fear of Themselves; no Repose of
Manner, no Earnestness, no Specu-
lation, but a Hurried Transi-
tion from one question
to another.
These symptoms, if allowed to go on-which this
medicine invariably removes-soon follows a Loss
of Power, Fatuity, and Epileptic Fits--in one of
which the patient may expire. Who can say that
these excesses are not frequently followed by those
direful diseases-INSANTTY AND CONSUMPTrON ? The
records of the INSANE ASYLUMS, and the melancho-
ly deaths by CONSUMPTION, bear ample witness to
the truth of these assertions. In Lunatic Asylums
the most melancholy exhibition appears. The
countenance is actually sodden and quite desti-
tute-neither Mirth or Grief ever visits it. Should
a sound of the voice occur, it is rarely articulate.
"With woetul measures wan despair
Low sullen sounds his grief beguiled."
Debility is most terrible! and has brought thou-
sands upon thousands to untimely graves, thus
blasting the ambition of many noble youths. It
can be cured by the use of this
INFALLIBLE REMEDY.
If you are suffering with any of the above dis-
tressing ailments, the ELUID EXTRACT BUCHU
will cure you. Try it and be convinced of its effi-
cacy.
BEWARE OF QUACK NOSTRUMS AND QUACK
DOCTORS,
who falsely boast of abilities and references. Citi-
zens know and avoid them, and save Long Suffer-
ing, Money, and Exposure, by sending or caring for
a bottle of this Popular and SPECIFIC REMEDY.
It allays all pain and inflammation, is perfectly
pleasant in its taste and color, but immediate in its
action.
Helmbold's Extract Bachn
Is prepared directly according to the Rules of
PHARMACY AND CHEMISTRY,
with the greatest accuracy and Chemical knowledge
and care devoted in its combination. See Profes-
sor DEWEES' Valuable Works on the Practice of
Physic, and most of the late Standard Works of
Medicine.
'$100oo
One Hundred Dollars will be paid to any Physi-
cian who can prove that the Medicine ever injured
a Patient; and the testimony of thousands can be
produced to prove that it does great good. Cases
of from one week to thirteen years' standing have
been effected. The mass of VOLUNTARY TES-
TIMONY in possession of the Proprietor, vouching
its virtues and curative powers, is immense, embra-
cing names well-known to
SCIENCE AND FAME.
100,000 BOTTLES HAVE BEEN SOLD
and not a single instance of a failure has been re-
ported!
Personally appeared before me, an Alderman of
the City of Philadelphia, H. T. HELMBOLD, Chem-
st, who being duly sworn does say that his prepa-
ations contain no Narcotic, Mercury or injurious
Drug, but are purely Vegetable.
H. T. HELMBOLD, Sole Manufocturer.
Sworn and subscribed before me this 23d day of
Nov., 1854. WM. P. HIBBARD, Alderman.
PRICE $1 per Bottle, or SIX for $6, Delivered to
ANY Address,
Accompanied by reliable and responsible certificates
from Professors of Medical Colleges, Clergymen
and others. Prepared and sold by
H. T. HELMBOLD,
Practical and Analytical Chemist.
NO. 52 SO. TENTH ST., BELOW CHESTNUT, AS-
SEMBLY BUILDINGS, PHILA.
To be had of N. D. Spotswood & Co., PEN-
SA COLA, and of all other Druggists and Dealers
throughout the U. S., Canadas and Br. Provinces.
BEWARE OF COUNTERFEITS--ASK
FOR HELMBOLD'8-TAKE NO OTHER-
OUBES GUARANTEE. (1


JOS. S. LEVETT & CO,0
MANUFACTURERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN


AND FINE BOOTS AND SHOES,
No. 122 Market street, 3d Store from
FOURTH,


3,00


APPROXIMATION PRIZES.


4 Prizes of $250
4 200
4 100
4 80
4 65
4 60
4 55
4 50
4 45
4 40
4 30
4 25
0 20


ap'x'ting to $50,000-$1,000
20,000 800
S 10,000 400
9,000 320
8,000 260
7,000 240
6,000 220-
S 5,000 200
4,000 180
A 3,000 160
2,000 120
1,000 100
are........... 60,000


3,260 Prizes amounting to............. .$204,000
WHOLE TICKETS $10-HALVES $5-QUARTERS $2j.
Plan of thie Lottery.
The Numbers from 1 to 30,000, corresponding
with those Numbers on the Tickets printed on sep-
arate slips of paper, are encircled with small tin
tubes and placed in one Wheel.
The first 212 Prizes, similarly printed and encir-
cled are placed in another wheel.
The wheels are then revolved, and a number is
drawn from the wheel of numbers, and at the same
time a prize is drawn from the other wheel. The
number and prize drawn out are opened and exhib-
ited to the audience, and registered by the Com-
missioners, the Prize being placed against the num-
ber drawn. This operation is repeated until all the
Prizes are drawn out.
APPROXIMATION PRIZES.-The two preced-
ing and the two succeeding Numbers to those draw-
ing the first 12 Prizes, will be entitled to the 48
Approximation Prizes, according to the scheme.
The 3,000 Prizes of $20 will be determined by the
last figure of the Number that draws the $50,000
Prize. For example, if the Number drawing the
$50,000 Prize ends with No. 1, then all the.Tickets
where the number ends in 1 will be entitled to $20.
If the Number ends with No. 2, then all the Tick-
ets where the Number ends in 2 will. be entitled to
$20, and so on to 0.
Certificates of Packages will be sold at the fol-
lowing rates, which is the risk:
Certificate of Package of 10 Whole Tickets....$80
"10 Half '" .... 40
10Quarter ... 20
Address Orders for Tickets or Certificates of
Packages of Tickets either to
S. SWAN & Co., Atlanta, Ga.,
or S. SWAN,
2td Montgomery, Ala.
IN ORDERING TICKETS OR CERTIFICATES,
Enclose the money to our address for the Tick-
ets ordered, on receipt of which they will be for-
warded by first mail.
The list of drawn Numbers and Prizes will be
sent to purchasers immediately after the drawing.
["f Purchasers will please write their signatures
plain, and give their Postoffice, County and State.
p em Remember that every Prize is drawn, and
payable in full without deduction.
W All Prizes of $1,000 and under paid imme-
diately after the drawing-other prizes at the usual
time of thirty days, in full without deduction.
All communications strictly confidential.
C Prize Tickets cashed or renewed in other
tickets at either office.


PHTT.ADn.LPHIA, Jan., 1857.


To DEALER.s IN ALABAMA AND FLORIDA:
Gentlemen :
WE are now established in the

WHOLESALE SHOE BUSINESS,
in this city, and beg leave to invite your attention
to our
NEW AND EXTENSIVE STOCK
OF
BOOTS, SHOES and BROGANS,
Direct from the Manufacturers in Massachusetts,
New Jersey and Pennsylvania ; and believing, with
our long experience and superior facilities, our
Stock, for YoUR TRADE AND FOR THE SATISFACTION
or YOUR CUSTOMERS, CANNOT BE SURPASSED,
we solicit an EARLY CALL when you come' to the


city.


Yours respectfully,
3OS. S. LEVETT & CO.,
No. 122 Market st., 3d store from Fourth,
PHILADELPHIA.


JOB. S. LEVETT,
formerly of Pensacola.
6 ly


PAUL STICKNEY,
of Boston.


DISSOLUTION.
THE firm of WOLFE, GILLESPIE & CO., is
this day dissolved by mutual consent.
JOHN WOLFE,
G. D. H. GILLESPIE,
RICHARD P. BRUFF.
New York, Dec. 31, 1855.
NEW FIRM.

BRUFF, BROTHER & SEAVER,
No. 44 WARREN ST., NEW YORK.
T HE undersigned, for many years connected
with the above House, have formed a copart-
nership and associated with us, as special partner,
Mr. JAMES I. DAY (late of the firm of Slark, Day
& Stauffer, New Orleans.) Our business will be
conducted under the style of
BRUFF, BROTHER & SEAVER,
in our commodious New Store, No. 44 Warren st.,
New York.
We have now on hand and are receiving a very
large and entirely new stock of Foreign and Do-
mestic Hardware, Guns, Cutlery,'Sporting Appara-
tus, &c., which we offer at the lowest rates for Cash
or approved notes.
We are the only agents for R. P. Briff's Cast
Steel Warranted Axes and Edged Tools.
WgOrders will receive.ou*tlest and prompt at-
tention, and are respectful stli.ited.
RICHARD P. BRUFF,
CHARLES BRUF, BRUFF, BRO'. & SEAVER.
OEO. ARTHUR BEAVBR,
New York, April 6, p18r. 1 ly


AT

AVERELL'S
NEW STORE, 106 Dauphin street,
Four Doors above the Public Square,
MOBILE, ALA.,
Now offering new styles in
SILKS, SHAWLS.-.
MANTILLAS, CLOAKS,
DELAINES, MERINO08
FLANNELS, BLANKETS,
EMBROIDERIES, LACES,1
FRENCH CORSETS,
HOSIERY, GLOVES, ke.,
Together with
PLANTATION GOODS
ci every kind, at remarkably LOW PRICES.
a
ALSO,
A Fine Assortment of WINDOW SHADES,
LACE CURTAINS,
CORNICES,
BROCATELLES.
3fA call is respectfully solicited. 8
P. LOUGHRY,
IMPORTER OF
CHINA,
GLASS and
QUEENSWA=E
34 Water street,
4 6m IOBILE, Ala.

JAMES KELLY,
SUCCESSOR TO
A. J. & P. A. LESLI3,
& DEALER IN

FIPINE WATCHES,

JEWELRY, SILVER-WARE,
AND
Fancy Goods,
No. 94, DaUphin street,
3 ly MOBILE, Ala.

W. H. WICKES CO.,
(Successors to Dunn & Boughton,)
Wholesale and Retail Dealers In

READY MADE CLOTHING,
SHIRTS, DRAWERS
-AND--
GENT'S FURNISHING GOODS.
***Also-Trunks, Carpet Bags, Valises, Umbrel-
las, Oil and India Rubber Clothing.
No. 41, Water street,
MOBILE, ALA.


W. H. WICKED,


WM. BOUGHTON, D. P. BERIT.


4 6m
EW-YORK tTYPE-FOUNDRB
and
PRINTER'S WAREHOUSES
established in 1810.

S TYPE,
PRESSES
AND PRINTING MATERIALS,
Manufactured and for sale by
CHAS. T. WHITE & Co.,
No. 63'& 65 BEEKMAN STRZRT,
16m coR. o 'GOLD.


EXCHANGE HOTEL,
EXCHANGE ALLEY, (between Commerce and
Water streets)
'MoJbtle, .Ja..
I. GRIFFING, Proprietor.
ggThis hotel is conveniently located In the buw
Iineseiiesrt of the city and enjoys the pesihl pg
tronage of the meral couta. .1 Vl,,j


ff


Helmbold's Genuine Preparation


-- "^-L !-yo-" '----"I-- --'i -IPCI-D~S~- -y- y----- r--~^ --- ------ .__..~1. .. L


J. S. LEVETT,
late of Memphis, Tenn.


SWAN & CO.'S LOTTERIES.
Capital Prize -
50,000 2
.------
Owing to the great favor with which our Single
Number Lotteries have been received by the pub.
lic, and the large demand for tickets, the Managers
S. Swan & Co., will have a drawing each Saturday
throughout the year. The following will be drawn
in each of the:r Lotteries for March, 1857.
Class 26,
To be drawn in the city of Atlanta, Georgia, in
public, on Saturday, March 7th, 1857.
Class 27,
To be drawn in the city of Atlanta, Georgia, in
public, on Saturday, March 14th, 1857.
Class 28,
To be drawn in the city of Atlanta, Georgia, in
public, on Saturday, March 21st, 1857.
Class 29,
To be drawn in the city of Atlanta, Georgia, in
public, on Saturday, March 28th, 1857,
ON THE PLAN OF SINGLE NUMBERS.

3,260 Prizes!
More than One Prize to every Ten Tickets
30,000 Tickets.
MAGNIFICENT SCHEME!
1 Prize of.......$50,000 is.........$50,000
1 ...... 20,000 is......... 20,000
1 ...... 10,000 is..... .... 10,000
1 ..... 9,000 is......... 9,000
1 ....... 8,000 is......... 8,000
1 ...... 7,000 is. ........ 7,000
1 ..... 6,000 is......... 6,000
1 .... 5,000 is......... 5,000
1 : .... 4,000 is......... 4,000
1 ....... 2,000 is ......... 2,000
1 ...... 1,000 is.......... 1,000
100 Prizes of...... 100 are........ 10,000
100 ...... 50 are......... 5,000


ILADELPHI A.
PAUL STICKNEY,
of Boston.


1 ly


W. T. STOCKER,
Lumber Commission Merchant.
-OFF IC E-
182 Circus street.....New Orleans.

REFERENCES.
J. W. WILDER, Esq., )
J. R. PIKE, New Orleans, La.
J. B. ST.AMAND, -'
D. McBEAN, Esq., Handsboro',
8 ly S. S. HENRY, Miss.


WM. L. MCDONALD,
Mannfaeturer of Carriages, etsa
"- REPOSITORY
No. 26 BEEKMAN & 18 SPRU-CER,.
street-a few doors East of the Park, opposite Park
Place and Murray street,
1 ly NEW YORK.
"BEroiwnrsl's -3Eote!,
OPPOSITE PASSENGER DEPOT,
MIACON, Ga.
P' Meals ready on the arrival of every Train.
1 ly

MOBILE BOOK STORE,
LEWIS A. MIDDLETON. 8. H, MCMASVZIT


MIDDLETON a MCMASTER,
BOOKSELLERS, STATIONERS,
PRINTERS and BOOKB[1NDtl RS,
38 WATER STREET,
(LATE STAND Or T. N, MANN & CO.)
MOBILE, ALABAMA,
Offer, at very low rates, a large and general 4wort-
ment of
CLASSICAL,
THEOLOGICAL,
AGRICULTURAL,
LAW, MEDICAL,
MISCELLANEOUS.
AND SCHOOL BOOKSn
STATIONERY OF ALL KINDS,
Printing, Writing, Wrapping & Drawing,
Besides-every othpr d.cription Ff-t.per. --
CARDS, BINDERS' AND BONNET-BOARDS, IC
Printing and Writing Inks.

SA very large
s to' on hand,- or man-
ufactured-to order, for Clerks of
the Courts, Sheriffs, Mercantile Houses, &o.
Books Neatly Boond.
SUNDAY SCHOOL DEPOSITORY.
Middleton & McMaster keep a large supply of Sab!
bath School, Religious and Juvenile
Books. Also, Bibles,
Testaments,
Hymn-Books for various denominations,:
Church Music, &c.
WALL-PAPER, TESTERS, BORDERS, FIRE-BOARtDS &e.
gfS Booksellers, Merchants, Teachers, Acade-
mies, Schools, and the Public generally, supplied
Wholesale and Retail, on liberal terms.
"EoGe's PXroooo,
AND PRINTING OFFICE MATERIALS asib TYPE,
constantly on hand, and sold at New York
prices, adding expenses to Mobile.
g~Postage is cheap, and small orders may be sent
by mail._..
Orders for Music Promptly Filled.
-1 AlyND '
FALL AND WINTER


___ ____~__..__~


_ ____L__ ____ _


3,00













Alter Ego, Esq., Editor, Publisher, etc.


"Terms of the Literary Fillibuster.

StBscRmPTioN-I-a;Wes liberal, but very seldom in
advance.
ADbvErrIsING-For advertisements of some length a
Certain rate, and longer ones in proportion, un-
less other terms are agreed upon; in which case
we shall discount as little as possible from the
above rates.
SVfis will be presented continually to- those who
may honor us with their patronage ..'_ ..


'Simmon Crop of the United States.
WUAT Is YOUR ESTIMATE ?-?There being much
speculation in' regard"to Wthe'simmon crop of the
United States .for 1856, we have determined to put
up a prize of a beautiful crockery-ware tea-set, worth
three dollars and seventy cents, for the nearest es-
timate. The set may be seen at the wet grocery
store of Hoof & Co., south-southeast corner of Pal-
afbx and Gorer'ieint streets-the plates having
beautiful blue embossed edges, and the cups and
saucers rich red flowers with very green leaves.
aN'Each of those who desire to make estimates
will enclose five cents to the Fillibuster office, di-
rected to Alter Ego, Esq., and name his figures.
The money will be deposited in Hernandez's bar,
and the estimates opened on the 19th of March,
by a committee of "moderate drinkers," who are
not interested in thepioking and eating of 'simmons.
The figures -of each applicant will be published on
the. 23d of March without his name, which will be
carefully kept secret until the close of the 'simmon
season. :
tff When the seventy-four subscriptions shall
have been made the list will be closed.
j' All enclosures of money -received after the
listis filled will b.: returL'..1 to the senders-"in a
horn" of red-eye.

W-Kicking Party._=
The' fighting editor of the Fillibuster will hold a
levee at an early day, when all persons who desire
to take an active part in the exercises of the oc-
easion are respectfully invited to be present at this
office and state their grievances, and they will re-
ceive satisfaction in full.
Henceforth we shall- hold regular Quarterly
Kicking Parties, .when all troubles can '.e adlju-trdl
a,,to date, and we hope those who are aggrieved
will bear this in mind, and not interrupt our work
by calling to be kicked betwcenwhiles, but postpone
the affair to the regular day, for we are so very
busy thattw. really couldn't spare time even to
kick a ipsissippi: editor, great as the temptation
,would be.
POSTMASTERS abroad are earnestly desired to
avail-themselves of the great advantages afforded
by this arrangement.

WE HiAVE RECEIVED a poetical contribution
fromF Mbontgomiery, but its views and diction conflict
so strongly with co6iventornal prejudices, that re-
spect for our interests compels us to decline its pub-
lication. It is, nevertheless, a "sweet little thing"
and its thoughts are neatly expressed. Potato
says-"Tel you, it's a fine thing-fine thing; I like
it! 'gad, Ego, he's a poet--a poet,, sirias well as
myielf-try a cigar ?" whlic we declined trying, not
being of an adventurous dfsposition--having here-
tofore TRIEp- what; Potato pleasantly terms a ci-
gar." The villain would pizen us if we'd let him.

Those who-bave aet- -at seui in their 'Simmon
Estimates are notified that the list will soon -lose--
y3 limitation. 'er. sp,.-[very sappy.]
ylnkaio. Yr.s

"Are You Dead?"
We this morning received a paper from abroad
with the above absurd query penned on the mar-
gin, and we reply to that publisher, of TIHAi paper,
THAT the Fillibuster IS dead to any editorial gen-
tlemian who will, it his editorial columts, recom-
ined..an improper work to the perusal of lady, and
other, readers because he happens to be agent for
its sale, and would make a few rascal counters the
recomppense for .disseminating corrupting influences.
The Fillibuster has a profound respect for the press
of Mississippi generally, and deeply do we regret
that we ever condescended to admit to the familiar-
ity of exchanging the only publisher in that State,or,
"we -believe, in the whole South, who would allow
in his columns advertisements of the most infa-
mous publications to the issuance of which the
press was ever prostituted. Sucheditorial depravi-
ty should not Pass, even in these un-Christian
Tmnes, without reprehension from all decent prints,
including the Fillibuster, which now feels ferocious
enougktp challenge platoon of Mississippi edit-
ors-:except Rube Nason-dear Rube-of the Prai-
rie News, who puffed it discreetly, while it stole
some of his wit in requital. We have scratched
THAT. paper, above alluded to, but not named, off
our 'exchaiged list, and- evermore are dead to it.

Physiognomy of the Human Face.
Having last week seen some remarks, under this
heading,'in The West-Florida Times--a distinguish-
ed contemporary, excellent in its way, but rather
"slow," yet would we advise everybody to take it-
-we beg leave to enlarge upon the same subject,
and differ from such positions as we've mind to.
yo'e.-This feature is, perhaps more than any
"Other, indicative. The thick and larger forms of
snib-nose indicate lack of beauty in the feature
;and show that the person wearing such an orna-
meoit in the centre of his mug is peculiar in several
respects, arid peculiarly ugly in that particular re-
spect, and though we do not blame hiii for having -
such a nose, we do blame him for not dying in that
period ofteteder infancy-when his nose was like to
Small other infantile excrescences, which a courteous
i reiice to their locality induces the world to de-
-signate as "noses"-an amiable fiction, with the
fact, and not the.intent,, of which we quarrel. The
turn-up nose .is bad-very bad. It is "Hogarth's
line of beauty," and if it cbhfess not to the preva-
lence'of a very'o'fenstve odor, or to the presence
-ofsosneo:bject of-much contempt, itis certain to in-
dicate a departure from right-lines in the cast of the
'pi.s;fiead Jwe say beware of such noses !- We once
knew a man wearing such an one to be hung with-
out paying:for his paper, and we advise every read-
er who may fall in with the victim of such a probo-
scis to shoot him without delay and, if possible, on
the nose. The sooner they are killed, the better
for posterity. Beware of noses neither' very long
nor very short, for they indicate a cruel,destructive,
musical chaeracter-Nero, who performed on a vio-
.hn of'remons, while Roinewas being burned up
aid Taown, having an organ of this description.-
Men wilh Such noses frequently have the yellow fe-
'ver and other distempers--ae sometimes quartel-


some and predisposed to severe headaches, in con-
seq nee oF being knocked down for being sassy.-
This. i substantiated by Potato, in whose writings
re find the following' confnmatory passage:, "He
I oLta) came up and said tojpe, said Potts-Pota-
ieqifh ou uso I'tto1.d theta lgarq Jw b(tee-*-*-


another article.

OUR PICTURE GALLERY.


EX-GOVERNOR REEDER.


The artist this week presents our readers with an
admirable likeness of this extinguished governor
and statesman. Contemporary literature may have
been unjust to the subject of this memoir, but pos-
terity will do him justice and award him a high po-
sition in the ranks of mediocrity of talent and petit
criminality. Of "speculative" rather than practical
bent of mind, he was, nevertheless, not without in-
genuity, for he contrived to turn speculation" to
practical benefit, by applying it in certain transac-
tions in lands. To these operations his time was
principally devoted, bht at stated intervals he would
condense his straggling abolitionism into a prolonged
howl for Kansas, after which he would -resume the
practice of the better paying branches of mercena-
ry'politics. He howled remarkably well for an am-
ateur, and when he threw in the variation of a fan-
cy Kansas shriek the effect was fine. But the eyes
as well'as the ears of his home audience were at
length opened and pressure of circumstances finally
compelled him to vacate the public stage. He left
Kansas for the east with certain feelings, but his
musical ability enabled him to perform the "'Kan-
sas Traveler" with much grace, his transit being a
continuous ovation-in Pennsylvania.
The subject of this memoir now fills a very small
.place in the public eye-in fact, is scarcely a mote
in that visionary orb.-Plutarch's Lives.

WgWe this week find room for "Mrs. Jemima
Crane," and we fancy that "Mrs. Smith, of Greene"
will feel rather blue when she sees it:
PINEY-WOODS, March 1st, 1857.
To Mr. Phil. I. Buster :
DEAR SIR: I was reading in your paper last week
(that our schoolmaster got in town) a letter that
was writ by Mrs. Smith, of Greene: It was address-
ed to Mr. Mail, but our schoolmaster says that they
always'call the man. that prints the paper the same
name of the man what prints it, and he says you are
called Phil. I. Buster. I like the first part of your
name very well-Philip is a Scripture name; but if
I was you I would change the other. I don't like
it, but I suppose there is nothing in a name.
Well, this letter of Mrs. Smith, of Greene, has a
great long rigamarole about the wimin folks not
having exercise enough to keep them healthy, and
all sich stuff. Now, Mr. Buster, if you will jist lis-
ten to me I can satisfy you that Mrs. Smith don't
know what she is talking about, or else she has nev-
er lived in the Pipeywoods of Florida, for I can jist
tell you if the wimini folks here 'aint healthy it aint
because they don't git exercise enough, and if I had
my way I wouldn't stand it, and if I can get up a
Woman's Rights Association I intend to do it, but I
don't want my old man to know nothing about it,
and I don't want "Am to know about this letter
neighther, for he'%.apt." spaciouss any how; but he
can't read, and he only hears a paper read when
our schoolmaster reads one for him; and he has
_promised to skip this letter if you should print it,
id #- gitethe paper tfat it h&,


51~~:


7


V


PROSPECTUS
OF THE
WEEKLY MONTGOMERY MESSENGER.'

"To show the very age and body of the TIMES."

The undersigned proposes to publish, in connec-
tion with THs DAILY MESSENiER, a weekly paper,
-to be called the MONTGOMERY MESSENGER.
Ae in the umniou oeant o a ou weekly, we salU l


~ffl'~Y~ ~L~i(Ii[luSfQ!


PROSPECTUS


OF THE

"WEST-FLORIDA TIMES"'
A WEEKLY NEWSPAPER, "
The First No. of which was issued in the
City of PENSACOLA, on the
25TH OF NOVEMBER, 1856.
Many years have passed since the earliest agita-
tion of a project for connecting by Railroad the rich
heart of the South with the best harbor on the
Gulf Coast-a scheme of vital importance to the
city of lPensacola, and promising much advantage
to the planting regions of the interior ; during this
weary lapse of seasons, hope, which "springs eter-
nal in the human breast," has at no time permitted
an utter extinction of the belief that the scheme
would eventually be carried out, and that Pensaco-
la,-the Gulf terminus of an iron bridge spanning
the strip of pine barren which has hitherto insula-
ted bar, would rise with magic growth to a proud
position of prosperity and importance among the
cities of the South. Even now the consummation
of this hope appears to be at hand. An'unwonted
bustle and stir is in her coasts-the Railroad has
actually been commenced, and under'circumstances
which leave no doubt of its early completion--
strangers are flocking in to identify themselves
with the city in her march of progress-those to
the manor born, whom necessity compelled to
make their*abiding places in stranger cities, but
who have ever turned in longing expectancy to
that which sent them unwillingly forth, are coming
home to animate the old familiar scenes, and lend
their aid in freeing the chrysalis city from the bonds
of torpor which she is struggling to throw off.
In view of the facts which happily have-furnished
occasion for such preamble, we have resolved to
establish a newspaper which shall be, to the extent
of our means and ability, a type of the improved
prospects and condition of the ancient city of Pen-
sacola; a paper which, as it values its own exis-
tence and prosperity, shall be devoted to the advo-
cacy of the carefully studied interests of the public
who support it; a paper, in politics independent-
actually independent-and taking and expressing
its own views of State or National men and meas-
ures. .
Convinced, in common with a large majority of
the citizens of the West, that its union with tho
rich and prospering State of Alabama is essential
to the progression and development of its various
interests, the Times will be established and con-
ducted on an uncompromising Annexation Plat-
form, and in advocating that great measure, ques-
tions of State, or of immediately local politics, will
be set aside or valued and advanced as they sub-
serve the end. We take up the cause of -outraged
nature, the aim of which, in giving these harbors
to be the gateways to the fertile plains of the inte-
rior, has been so thwarted by the ingenious stupid-
ity which apportioned the gates to one and tlhe
fields to another.
The Times will be a paper of handsome appear-
ance, and contain a large amount of reading mat-
ter-the latest news carefully collated, the choicest
newspaper literature current, full commercial and
marine intelligence, and, it is hoped, will be made
the medium for the exposition of the views of the
ablest men in the West relative to matters of public
importance and general interest. All measures ac-
cessory to securing the Organ of Annexation a
large circulation in West Florida, and South and
Middle Alabama, will be put in practice and for-
warded by the aid of ample capital and command-
ing influence; and when the whistle of the first lo-
comotive shall send startled echoes. through the
still feet aialee of pines, t the iron horse Gahes


on fiom nithe waters of the Gulf to the emporium of
central Alahbnia, the train will bear io the inliabi-
tants of the interior the Iatest news in the columns
of the Daily Ti.mes. '. J. W. DORR.


a prOmiseus liar, hid' and with that'I flung out at
him like a patent, back-action, catapultic-balista of
a batrering-rani, and scattered him (Potts) round on
the floor of the grocery wilh a head that was of no
use, except to ache, for a fortnight arter."--vide
Potato's Gambling Experiences, vol. III, p. 527.-
Now we have not a doubt but that the man Potts
who, the author informs us, stoled the cigars, was
the proprietor of a nose similar to that now in ques-
tion. When we say we have not a doubt, we mean
that-that is-that we have not a doubt.
Eyes.-The eyes are also indicative to some ex-
tent. Blue eyes, light, are found in persons of va-
rious temperaments, and the same rule applies to
black eyes, only, it will be observed, black eyes
and blue are never found in the same subject. Per-
sons with one eye, whether black or blue, may be
set down as gamblers, by qualification and gift of
nature ; their predisposition to sporting is inevita-
ble, and they'" go one eye blind on everything.
We warn our readers to beware of these Cyclopic
gamesters, and counsel them to shoot all such,
wherever they may find them. Persons with three
eyes may be put down as extraordinary characters,
very peculiar, and not to be trusted. Squint-eyes,
cock-eyes, cross-eyes-every variety of the italic i
-are found only in the figure-heads of dangerous
members, of society, for, dog 'em, they keep one
eye to wind'ard and the other on. the dog-basket,
thus taking a' mean advantage of respectable citi-
zens who can only look one way at once. Our
readers should keep an eye. on. such. When we
say keep an eye on such, we mean-that is-both
EYE-look at'em-keep eyes peeled.
J2out-.-The mouth is a remarkable feature,and
being the. only one necessary to life-and when we
say life we mean, that is, living-it is, naturally, a
strong symbolization. Par example: instead of
being red, the flaps of the African's" mouth are
.black, thus showing him to be a negro and fond of
molasses; so in the Indian, red lips show him to
be a red-man of the forest and that he's goss on
whisky-particularly that rare and superior brand
known as 'red-eye.' Pouting, rosebud-rosy lips, af-
feeting to conceal small white teeth, ordinarily
found in the female subject, indicate a fondness for
kissing and good provisions. The larger forms of
mouth, with large, strong teeth, tell their own
tale-whenever their owners have a mind to talk.
With a mouth. of this. description the subject is gen-
erally capable of considerable victuals. This falls
in with Potato's dicta, for that author, speaking of
phizmahoganical indices, says: "I have frequently
known persons with such mouths to sit down to a
dish of bacon and collard greens and eat as much
as they wanted."-N. K. Potato's Phizmahoganical
Researches, vol. IX, p. 717. And again, from page
911, same volume-"The lady of the house placed
in front of the hungry party a large dish of gumbo-
des-herbes-which is pretty good substitute for vic-
tuals-and told them to, fall to, which they did with
a will, Big-Mouth'Sam jest a letting' of himself out--
by loosening his waistband, which was curious, I
should say." The 'skew-angular mouth, with one
corner looped up to the left eye, and the other cor-
ner tied down under the right jaw, indicates ugli-
ness, but is a great convenience, as its proprietor
can whistle Yankee-Doodle through one corner and
talk dog-Latin (Latinus-Oanis) through the other,
atone and the same time, without producing dis-
cord; this variety of mouth is sometimes found
ornamenting the head and front of members of the
editorial-political profession; we don't admire the
cut-but everyone's mouth to their taste, and taste
to everyone's mouth.
-'-Tli subject of physiognomy-cannot be disposed
,of in an article of this length, and we may contin-
ue it in future issues of the Fillibuster-when we
say continue it, we mean continue it-that is-write


I want you to- let me know where Lucy Stone
lives I have heard some of her talk, and she is more
to my way of thinking than Mrs. Smith, and there
is another woman I have heard of Mrs. Twisthelm
or Shifthelm, I don't know which, but she stands
up to her fodder about right, and if we had a few
jist such here in the Pineywoods we could soon git
things strait. If you jist knowed what a time we
have you would not print any more letters from
Mrs. Smith, I know. And it is to let you know
something about it that I write this letter, for if
my old man was to hear that letter of Mrs. Smith's
read, he would agree with her, and would say that
the reason I look so thin was for the want of exer-
clse, and 1 know it aint no sich thing, for gracious
knows I git enough of that, and so does all the wo-
men in these parts, and to show you, I will tell you
just what we have to do. Now, I have a small fam-
ily, only nine children, and me and the old man;
well, I have to cook, wash and iron for us few--on-
ly eleven head; well, that's a part of my business
every day. Then I tote all the water we use about
a quarter of a mile, chop up the wood and tote it in
the winter time, and in summer I have to milk the
cows and mind out the gophers to feed, and work
the tater patch, and go to mill, tote the corn three
miles and a baby besides as big as a half bushel.
Now, Mr. Buster, what do you think of that for ex-
ercise? What would Mrs. Smith say to that? Well,
that aint half, but I won't say no more, for if my
old man was to git hold of it, Jehu! I'd smell the
patching," so I'll jist close, and if you want to know
any more about the Pineywoods, jist print this, and
I'll drap you a few lines more that '11 make you sor-
ry you ever printed Mrs. Smith's letter.
Yours till deth, JEMIMA CRANE.
p --
Tubbs, captain!-A Local Fragment.--BY
N. K. POTATO.
Ha! ha! AH? A-H-H!! Dog it!
Boots! Boots! Put him out! Phu-ew-u-ew I
Tubbs Ah ha! Capt. Tubbs--tubs, hogsheads!
"Shrewd merchants!" Tubbs! Potatoes, Cider,
Apples! Butter! SHREWD merchant's
Mouths water and pockets bleed-wacks!
Tubbs! Barrels! Buckets! Capt. Tubbs I
Tubbs, captain! Preserved Quinces Ah! Tubbs!
Nova-Scotia blue-nose-Yankee skipper Tubbs !
Shrewdmerchants-Merchants shrewd-Tubbs I
Apples, potatoes, butter, ah, ha! AH Tubbs I
Not much to observation given, yet
Have I, N. K. Potato, traveled some,
But never yet have I-ah, ha! Tubbs, captain
Yours, N. K. POTATO,

LIFE INSURANCE.-


rpHE GREATEST MEDICAL DISCOVERY OF
L I HE AGE.-Mr. Kennedy, of Roxbury, has
discovered, in one of our common pasture weeds,
a remedy that cures every kind of humor, from the
worst Scrofula down to a common Pimple.
He has tried it in over 1,100 cases, and. never
failed, except in two cases, both thunder humor.
He has now in his possession over 200 certificates
of its virtue, all within twenty miles of Boston.
Two bottles are warranted to cure a.nursing sore
mouth.
One to three bottles will cure the worst kind of
pimples, on the face.
Two to three bottle will clear the system of boils.
Two bottles are warranted to cure the worst can-
ker in the mouth or stomach.
Three to five bottles are warranted to cure the
worst case of erysipelas.
One to-two bottles are warranted to cure all hu-
mor in the eyes.
Two bottles are warranted to cure running of the
eyes and blotches among the hair.
Four to' six bottles are warranted to cure corrupt
A benefit is always experienced from the first
bottle, and a perfect cure is warranted when the
above quantity is taken.
Mr. Kennedy gives personal attendance in bad
cases of Scrofula.
Manufactured by Donald Kennedy, No. 129 War-
ren st., Roxbury, Mass. Price $1.
Reader, I peddled over a thousand bottles of
this in the vicinity of Boston. I know the effects
of it in every case. So sure as water will extin-
guish fire, so sure will this cure humor. I never
sold a bottle of it but that sold another; after a
trial, it always speaks for itself. There are two
things about this here that appears io me surpri-
sing-first, that it grows in our pastures, in some
places quite plentiful, and' yet its value' has never
been known until I discovered it in 1846: second,
that it should cure all kinds of humor.
In order to give some idea of the sudden rise
and great popularity of the discovery, I will state
that in April, 13853, I peddled it, and sold about six
bottles per day. In April, 1854, I sold over a
thousand bottles per day of it.
No change of diet ever necessary ; eat the best
you can get and enough of it.
DIRECTIONS FOR UsE.-Adults, one table-spoonful
per day; to children over eight years, dessert spoon-
ful; children from five to eight years, teaspoonful.
As no direction can be applicable to all constitu-
tions, take sufficient to operate on the bowels twice
a day.
Wholesale Agents for New York-Chas. II. Ring,
No. 192 Broadway; C. V. Clickncr, No. 81 Bar-
clay street; A. B. & D. Sands, No 141 Fulton st.,
and retailed by all respectable druggists. 2 4m


I


Second Edition of
IMPRESSIONS OF ENGLAND. By the Rev.
Arthur Cleveland Coxe. 12mo. 840 pages, $1: 0(
Mr. Coxe set out on his tour with rare quao
lifications for an appreciative 'tour in the mosher
country. For he possessed an acquaintance -with
English geography, history, and literature, such as
few American scholars can boast. No one can
read this volume without.being'impressed with th
evidence of this intimate and thorough knowledge,
not gained in the course of travel, but- a torel,
throwing its light before to illuminate the 'pathway
of the traveller. *
As a literary performance, then, Mr. Coxe's vo.-
lume is entitled to take high rank' in the class of
work to which it belongs. In fact, it reminded ub
pleasantly of "Eustace's Classical Tour in Italy,!'
And substituting British for Latin authors, we miglh
well style.tha work before us a "Classical Tour i
England."-[Church Review, April, 1856.
THE EPISTLE TOTHE --EPHESIANS; in
Greek and English, with an Analysis and
Exegetical Commentary. By Samuel H.
Turner, D. D., Prof. of Biblical Learning
and Interpretation of Scripture in the Gen-
eral Theological Seminary, and of the He-
brew Language and Literature in Columbia
College, N. Y. 8vo. 218 pages,........$1 566
He is thoroughly read up. Works as late as Co
nybeare and Howson, and. Eradie, are repeatedly
referred to, and have been as thoroughly orlted
in, as any old commentators. Nay, the' preface
concludes with a regret that the author has not
been able to consult, for his book, two'other works
which, at the time his own was put to. press, had
not yet appeared. This is highly 'characteristic of
the indefatigable diligence, and also the deep mi-
desty,'without which the' trih6itaind highest degree
of learning is impossible.--Church Journal
Second Edition of .
-LEGION, OR FEIGNED EXCUSES. "'Fo ,they
are many." By the Author of a "Letter. ,
to a Member of a Church Choir." 12mo.
116 pages, muslin..................... -0 z8
Tract Form,........ .........;...... .$0 16
A series of short papers originally published in
the American Churce Journal, which, on the prin-
ciple of the ridiculum acri, &c., gibbet in succes-
sion, with a fair mixture of humor and earnestness,
the well-worn excuses which meet 'the clergyman4
or his lay co-adjutos' in thir'parochial visits.-
[London Guardian.
Honest, pithy,' pointed, strong,7yot kindly, con.
densed, and abounding in straight-forward, simple
Saxori, talking to plain people in the plainest way--
it takes up and disposes of nearly all the common
excuses which men ifid wotfiten are wont to.plead
for their neglect of tha "one thing needful. There
is no parish clergyman in the land who will-' ot
find it one of the most generally- useful books be
could possibly selecti.g yigoirus circulation among
the cooler part of the population. The author haa
both his head and his heart in the'right place; and
his hand has given faithful expression to the best
of both.-[Church Journalb
IN PRESS,
THE" EPISTLE TO THE GALA'TTANS; in
Greek and English. With ahi Analysis and' "
Exegetical Commentary! BJ thea Rev. Pro. '~
fessor Turner.
A FIRST CATECHISM FOR LITTLE OHIL
DRBN. By James Beaveny D. D., Author
of "A Help to Catechizing." With lMorn-
ing and Evening Prayers and Hymnsn., 82mo
16 pp. '$2'per hundred;
NEW TRACT OF DANA & CO.'S SERIES,
FOUR LETTERS TO:a. BRAPTI'BrI-. By a
Layman of Alabama. 12mo. 40O-pages. $4
per hundred. -
The Church is already Indebte' t6 an' e teemei
Presbyter of Alabama, for the admirable "Letters
to a Man Bewildered amtomg--many Counsellers,',
and now we have, from a layman of the eame.Dio-
eese, a series of "Lettersa-o -a Baptist," conceived
in the same kindly and "Catholic spirit. These'let-
ters are a frank and able eAhibition' 6f the conclu-
have arguments which ied-th- Churchman. UnambitiousI n style, andfree ftom
all pretension to polemic skill, but evidently the
production of a vigorous and'well disciplined mind
thorotlghly educated id th d'riciples hd' A bue
with the spirit BOo Ohi
limber'B Ori< .:s.:i, v. a ()rid% s 9-"6


1


I h


in this indulge in no extravagant promises. With
the daily as with the weekly MESSENGER, we shall
try to make it "The herald of a: busy Word;" an
epitome of the Times, by culling for its columns,
from every source within our reach, articles on all
subject-short, pithy paragraphs; for, in this "fast
age," as it is appropriately styled, the newspaper is
not the place for long essays and disquisitions, on
any subject. It should be multum in parvo-as
full of news "as a hickory-nut is of meat;" and
this is what we shall endeavor to make the weekly
MESSENGER.
Into the politics of the day we shall not enter.
To this determination, however, there is one limi-
tation: In the struggle now going on between the
North and the South, we could not be silent if we
would. A native of the Southern soil, our heart's
warmest feelings cluster around its interests; and
whenever these are invaded, our arm, feeble as it
is, will not be laggard in the fight.
The undersigned would respectfully appeal to
the friends for whom he has so long catered edito-
rially to exert themselves a little in behalf of his
new enterprise. He has at least One "hundred true
and tried" friends in the State, each of whom can
send the names (and money) of ten subscribers,
within ten days after reading this prospectus ; and
they are the men that will do it.
It is intended to issue the first number of this
paper on the 14th of January, 18'57, and we shall
be under obligations to those who will. send us a
list of subscribers previous to that time.
A commission of ten per cent. will be allowed to
Post Masters and others who may send subscribers.
Subscription price $2 00 a year, in advance.
P. H. BRITTAN.
Montgomery, Dec. 18, 1856.
Mobile Daily and'Weekly Register.
BY FORSYTH & HARRIS.
THE Daily Register is published every day in the
I week, Mondays excepted, at $10 per annum,
or $5 for six months, payable invariably in advance.
The Weekly Register, containing the matter
from the Daily paper, including the full Commer-
cial reports for the week, is issued every Saturday
morning, at the reduced price of $2 650 per annum,
daylbae in advance. 1 ly


ACCUMULATED FUND,$2,829,894.

LOSSES PAID, $1,427,934.
DIVIDENDS PAID, $773,836.

PERFECT SECURITY


AND
STRICT ECONOMY
are distinguishing features of
THE MUTUAL BENEFIT LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY.
Among the many advantages offered to the pub-
lic are: The Security of a Large Accumulation;
Annual Declaration of Dividends; Payment of Di-
vidends in Reduction of Premiums. One half of
the Premium on life Policies of over $50, may be
paid by note, bearing 6 per cent. interest. Receipt
'of Pren'iumm Semi-annually vnd Quarterly. Pro-
spectuses, Statements and Applications, will be
furnished upon application at the office. All infor
mation desired will be given by the undersigned.
ROBERT L. PATTERSON, President.
JOEL W. CONDIT, Vice President.
BENJ'. C. MILLER, Secretary.
JOS. L. & J. P. LORD,' Agents,
1 6m No. 11 Wall street, New York.


!A SURE PRIZE
FOR EVERY TENTH PERSON.
CHANCE FOR A GRAND PIANO FOR EVERYBODY,
ONLY TWO DOLLARS.

400 BEAUTIFUL GOLD WATCHES,
100 ROSEWOOD GRAND PIANO FORTES,
LADIES' BRACELETS,
WATCH CHAINS, BREAST PINS,
DIAMOND RINGS and SILVER SP OOS,
To be given away. -
Encouraged by the success which has attended
the publication of LESLIE'S ILIUSTATED NEWSPAPER,
which is now closing its second volume, the Pro-
prietur has determined to return to his numerous
subscribers a portion of his profits in the following
manner:
Every tenth subscriber will have his money re-
turned by the next mail, and the paper will be
sent gratuitously for his term of subscription.
Thus in every 1000 subscribers, 100 will have
their money returned and the paper sent for six
months when they remit $2, and twelve months
when they remit $4.
Every subscription, as it is received, by letter or
otherwise, at his office, 12 Spruce street, New
York, will be registered in a book kept by the
Proprietor himself.
The Prize numbers will be 10, 20, 30, 40, 50,
60, 70, 80, 90, and 100 in each hundred. Per-
sons obtaining any of these numbers will have
their money returned and the paper sent free, as
above.
Persons obtaining the following numbers in
every thousand, in addition to the return of their
subscription money as above, will receive the fol-
lowing prizes:
No. 100, Lady's Gold Bracelet.
200, Gentleman's Gold Watch Chain.
800, Gold Watch (either Lady's or Gen
man's.)
400, Lady's Gold Chatelaine.
500, Set of Silver Tea Spoons.
600, Gold Breast Pin.
700, Gold Watch (either Lady's or Gen-
tleman's.)
800, Diamond Ring (either Lady's or
Gentleman's.)
900, Set of Silver Dessert Spoons.
"' 1000, Grand Rosewood Pianoforte.
These prizes will be given to the same numbers
in each and every thousand, in addition to the
subscription money being returned and paper sent
free to each and every tenth subscriber, as above
stated.
This subscription book was opened October 20,
1856, in which all future subscriptions will be reg-
istered.
Every person whose money is returned, or who
is the recipient of either of the above prizes, will
be required to furnish an acknowledgment of the
same, and their names will be published from time
to time in the advertising columns of Leslie's Illus-
trated Newspaper.
It should be borne in mind that every subscri-
ber, under all circumstances, whether the recipient
of a prize or not, will get more than a full equiva-
lent for his money in the paper itself. This is the
only Illustrated Newspaper in the United States.
CLUBBING.-Persons sending us Eleven subscri-
bers are certain to receive back one subscription
and have a chance for two; for example, on the
receipt of the cloven subscriptions, the last number
on the books might be 98-the eleven additional
subscribers will then include two prizes.

FRANK LESLIE'S ILLUSTRATED NEWSPAPER.-The
last numbers of Frank Leslie's Illustrated Paper
have come to hand. In style and general appear-
ahce it resembles, and is quite equal to, the London
Illustrated News, which is world renowned for the
excellence and variety of its illustrations. The
New York paper, however, is sold at hali' the price
of its London 'prototype. The engravings in Frank
Leslie are infinitely superior to -those in Banum's
Pictorial.-[Whig, Easton, Pa.


A limited number of Tickets or Shares for sale,
...AT ONLY $1 EACH, OR TWELVE FOR $10.
Each of these Tickets will admit four persons to
PERHAM'S ENTERTAINMENTS
In various parts of the country, and the purchaser
will receive as a
FREE GIFT
A Certificate entitling to one Share or interest in
the following 300,000 GIFTS!
A well-known Marriageable Gentleman, with proper-
ty in his own right, valued at 7 $5P,000
A beautiful Young and Marriageable Lady,
with property in her own right, valued at 25,000
A splendid Country Seat, near the city of
,New York, valued at - 25,000
1 Farm in Waldo county, Maine, containing
144 acres, valued at - 10,000
1 Farm in Illinois - - 6,000
1 Lot of 100 acres of Timber Land in Ver-
mont, near railroad, valued at 4,000
1 Farm in New Hampshire - 2,000
1 Lot of Land in the town of Shapleigh,
Maine, containing 27 acres, valued at 1,000
6 Lots of Land in Dedham, Mass., valued at
$500 each, - - 3,000
3 Lots of Land in the city of Lawrence,
Mass., valued at $500 each,- - 1,500
2 Lots in the town of Pavonia, New Jersey,
opposite Philadelphia, valued at $400 each, i 800
1 Mirror of American-Scenery, one of the
most successful and profitable exhibitions
in the country, valued at -- -- 20,000
1 set of Dissolving Views, with apparatus
complete for exhibition, valued at 5,000
100 lots of Jewelry, (Rings,
valued at $25 each, - 2,50
10 splendid- Rosewood Pianos, $500 each- 65,000
20 splendid Rosewood Pianos, $500 each, 6,000
The original Dioramic Elxhibition of the
Burning of Moscow - 65,000
The celebrated trotting Mare, Lady of the
Lake, who can trot in harness, a mile in
2:40, valued at -. .-. 1,500
1 Melodeon Organ, suitable for a
church - 250
1 Melodeon Organ, suitable for a
church -- ---. 200
2 Melodeon Organs, $100 each, 200
1 Marine Timepiece, a wonderful
piece of Mechanism, - 160
1 Set Dioptric Paintings, valued at 5,000
1 Panorama of a "Tour in the
East" - - 20,000
100 Orders for Hats on "Genin," the
celebrated N. Y. Hatter, $4 each, 400
87 Clocks, worth foam $5 to $25
each, averaging in value $8 each, 696
5 magnificent Gold Watches, $300
each, - - 1,500
10 magnificeent Gold Watch.e, $100
each, - - 1,000
100 magnificent Gold Watches, $50
each, - - ,0,00
100 magnificent Silver Watches, $25
eachi, - - 2,500
100 magnificent Silver Watches, $15
each, - -- 1,500
5,000 Gold Pencils, valued at $3 each '15,000
10,000 every-day Registers, valued at $1
each,. .- .. 10,000
25,000 Engravings - 6,250
50,000 pieces of popular Music, 12,500
209,338 articles, Hand Books and Pamph-
lets, .- . .-. .-. 19,250

$273,696
If in the division of the Gift Property, any un-'
married lady should become entitled to the "Mar-
riageable Gentleman," and it should prove agreea-
ble to both parties, then it is understood that they
shall be united in
MARRIAGE, AT THE CRYSTAL PALACE' IN
NEW YORK,
In the presence of such of the certificate holders
as choose to attend. But if such marriage is not
agreeable to both parties, or if any other person
than a single lady becomes entitled to 'the mar-
riageable gentleman, then in place of said marriage,
such person shall be entitled to receive from Mr.
Perham a FARM, valued at $10,000 in place oI
said marriageable gentleman.
If in the division of the Gift Property, any un-
married gentleman should become-' entitled to the
"beautiful young lady," and it should prove agreea-
ble to both parties, then it is understood that they
shall be united in marriage at the Crystal Palace,
in the presence of such of the certificate holders
as choose to attend. But if such marriage is not
agreeable to both parties, or if another person
than a single gentleman becomes' entitled to "tAe
beautiful young lady, then in place of said manrrie,
such person shall be 6atitled to reooiv fro Mr.


P ERHAMM'S PLATFORM ENDORSED! Pro-
ceedings at the'Shareholder's Convention.
PROGRESS
OP
PE.RHAMI'S
FOURTH GIFT-CAMPAIGN
ANti
MATRIMONIAL ENTERPRISE!
A meeting of the Shareholders in Perham'r
Great Matrimonial and $300,000 Gift Enterprise,
was held according to published call, at George-
town, D. C., on Thursday, May 8th, 1856. The
meeting was organized by calling Captain Ephraim
Fenton to the Chair, and appointing John S. Cle-
ment, Secretary.
The following resolutions were then offered and
adopted:
Resolved, That each shareholder present be en-
titled to one vote for each and every ticket held
by him, on all questions brought before this meet-
ing, and that it require a majority of all the shares
represented for the adoption of any resolution, or
to elect a committee.
,Resolved, That we now go into an election for a
committee, consisting of three shareholders, to-re-
ceive from Mr. Perham the gift property, and to
hold the same in trust, and distribute it among the
shareholders, in such manner as will give the most
general satisfaction to all concerned; Adopted:
156,255 shares voting yea, 8,160 voting nay.
The election for a committee was then gone
into, and resulted in the choice:of-
E. Fenton, of Palmer, Mass., he re-
ceiving votes representing 128,210 shares.
J. H. Briggs, of N. Y. City, 157,646- do -
Ira Yale, do 157,424 do
Resolved, That the committee be, and are here-
by instructed to adopt a plan, select a place, and
make all necessary arrangements for the distribu-
tion of the 300,000 gifts at as early a day as prac-
ticable. Adopted unanimously.
Resolved, That the committee have power to fill
all vacancies that may occur by resignation or oth-
erwise. Adopted unanimously.
Resolved- That this meeting adjourn, subject to
the call of the committee when they are ready to
distribute the gifts. .
Attest, EPHRAIM FENTON, Chairman.
J. S. CLFME.T, Secretary.
A second meeting of the committee appointed
by the shareholders in Perham's Fourth Gift En-
terprise, was held at the Astor House, New York-
Augnst 6, 1856. On motion, E. Fenton: was ap,
pointed Chairman, and J. H. Briggs, Secretary,
when it was unanimously
Resolved, That Thursday, the 28th of February
next, be appointed as the day to commence the
distribution of 300,000 Gifts, at Georgetown, D.
C., and that the shareholders be and are hereby
requested to meet this committee, and then and
there participate in the same.
Resolved, That the committee acknowledge the
receipt of the usual vouchers for the 300,000
Gifts from Mr. Perham.
E. FENTON, Chairman.


SCOTT'S FASHIONS, No. 156 BROADWAY, NEW
YORK. Semi-Annual "'Report of Fashions," $3
a year.
Monthly "Mirror of Fashion," $3 a year.
For both the above works, if paid yearly in, ad-
vance, $5.
The above publications may be regarded as the
standard works of our country, they having a wi-
der circulation, and being more generally read by
the business portion of the inhabitants of cities and
villages throughout the Western hemisphere, than
any other periodical. 1 6m


Perham the sum of o*5,000Irca;sI p N erT
beautiful yonng lady.
hundred thousandth part of the above, mentioned
gi't property to be delivered by Mr. Perham to
the ticket holders as afore-mentioned.;: and that
the disposition of this property will be, wbolly unm
der the control of the tiuket.holders, and of their
only.
All orders for Tickets by inil, Ishould Ube&d
dressed to T
JOSIAH -PERHAM,; 664 Broadway, N. .;.
Correspondents will pipase write d;stililne,y. Lhet
names, residence; County and 'State, to prevent -
error. Or, if coiv1ement, dnclose an envelope with
their direction onit -in .full, in which such tickets
as they'.may order will be returned.
AGENTS WANTED
In every, city, town and village in the United
States and Canadas, to obtain subscriptions for
Tickets, to whom liberal commissions will be given,
and every facility in the way of Showbills, Cijcu-
lars, &c., will be afforded to make the business s
paying one to those disposed to enter into it with
spirit. Applicants for Agencies will apyly or ad-
dress as above. "

DANA & COMPANY.
PUBLISHERS, IMPORTERS, AND BOOKSELLERS _
No. 381 Broadway, New York, .
Have published Two Superior Editions of ,-
THE BOOK OF COMMON PRAYER, 16 mo. and 24 mo.
Styles and Prices .as follows:-
16mo. '. .
(1) Turkey Morocco, super extra, antique, -or .
flexible, gilt edges,................... 2
(2) The same, with clasp,............... 3 00
(3) Turkey Morocco, second.style, gilt edes, .I 4 (4) The same, with clasp,,...." ........ 2 25
(5) French Morocco, gilt edges, ......... .1 25
6) Roan, (gilt edges,.,........;...... 1 1
(7) Roan, red dges............. 1 0.
(8) Roan, marble edges,............1'...
-:'--- *- wSty]T7e"s
(C) Calf Antique, super extra, red edges,:. .T:'l5.
(10) The'same, with clasp,.....;.........V, 8 00

(1) Turkey Morocco, super extra, antique or
flexible, gilt edges,.................... 00
(2) The same, with clasp ..............2 t
3) Turkey Morocco, second style, gilt 'edges:, 1 2i
4) The same, with clasp,...................1:'75
(5) French Moroceo, gilt edges, ........... ,
,6) Roan, gilt edges,........... .. 80
7) Roan, red edge,.....8... ......'..... 80
(8) Roan, ,marble edges,.............., i
New Styles.
(9) Cal~fntique, super extra, red edges,... ''
(10) Thrame, with clasp,........ .'..,. ,' 50
SThese Editions are printed, in a supemiqr
manner, and excel other editions of same geur-rf" -
style, in, the, size of type of the Psalms and Hymns.
They are sri'd by several eminent critics'to'be, iff.
ter the standard, the most accurate books in tlh
market..
NEW PUBLICATIONS.
SERMONS ON VARIOUS SUBJECTS. Writ., *.
ten and Preached at Different 'Places alad'
Times during his Public Miniitr 'of'Forty. '
four Years. By Rev. AdaffEmpie, D.-D,
late Hector of.St.L lames'. Church, Rich--
mond, Va., l2mo. 611: pages, ... .$1 28
The, marked characteristics of these discourses
are simplicity, directness, and eait'nestness, in' pro.
claiming the cardinal doctrines and vital precepts
of the Gospel, and carrying home its appeals to the
heart and conscience. The author, absorbed in
the.pursuit of these objects, does not step asido
from his straight-forward course, to cull flowers of
fancy for the embellishment of his thoughts;. but,
in a plain style, with godly sincerity, and without$
resort to rhetorical accessories, be succeedsrin awa
kening a serious and intense interest i. spirital
things. .
The complexion of his theology, and the tone of
his preaching, would lead one to rank him among
our divines of the (so called) evangelical school.;
yet, in stating his views of-,Sacraments and ordi-
nances, he employs terms "'thich evince a. disiiet
recognition of primitive and catholic truth.-[Put*
lisher's Critic.