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The West-Florida times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00048634/00003
 Material Information
Title: The West-Florida times
Portion of title: West Florida times
Physical Description: v. : ill. (chiefly advertisements) ; 57 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: J.W. Dorr
Place of Publication: Pensacola Fla
Creation Date: February 17, 1857
Frequency: weekly
regular
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Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Pensacola (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Escambia County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Escambia -- Pensacola
Coordinates: 30.433333 x -87.2 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with Dec. 2, 1856 issue.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 6 (Jan. 6, 1857).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002015750
oclc - 02720157
notis - AKK3142
lccn - sn 83016276
System ID: UF00048634:00003

Full Text









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VOL. I.


PENSACOLA, FLA., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY I7, 1857.


NO. 12.


S


W. H. WICKES &CO,
(Successors to Dunn& Boughton,)
Wholesale and Retail Dealers In

READY MADE CLOTHING,
SHIRTS, DRAWERS

GE1Wr'S FUlRNISHING GOODS.
*,*Also-Trunks, Carpet Bags, Valises, Umbrel-
1las, Oil and India Rubber Clothing.
No. 41, Water street,
MOBILE, ALA.
W. H. WICKES, WM. BOUGHTON, D. P. BERRY.
4 6m
WILLIAMS,'SkEVENS, WILLIAMS .,& CO.'S
LIST OF IMPORTANT ENGRAVINOS, in prepara
tion, in press, or lately published.
The Twins-Aftfi Sir Edwin Landseer. Engraved
by Thomas Landaeer.
Glimpse of an' English Homestead-After J. F.
Herring. Engraved by George Patterson.
Bed Time; or, Mother and Child-After W. P
Frith.- Engraved by Lumb Stocks.
"Speak, Lord!" (Infant Samuel)-After J. San
Engraved by Samuel Cousins.
Timothy-After J. Sant. Engraved by Samuel
Cousins.
"There's; Life in the Old Dog yet"-After Sir E.
Landseer. Engraved by H. Ryall.
The Dairy Maid-After Sir E. Landseer. En-
graved by H.' Ryall.
Landing of the Pilgrim Fathers on the Coast of
America, A. D., 1620-After C. Lucy. Engraved
by W. H. Simmons.
The Highland Congregation-After Sir E. Land-
seer. Engraved by Thomas Landseer.
It is I !-After R. S. Lauder.
Oh Jerusalem!-After Ary Scheffer. Engraved
by Mandel.
Lucerne-After J. M. W. Turner. Engraved by
Wallis.
Zurich-After J. M. W. Turner. Engraved by
Prior.
Golden Bough.-After J. M. W. Turner. En-
graved by Prior: ,
Baron's Charger-After J. F. Herring. Engraved
by Robert Graves.
'$Why call ye- me Lord, Lord ?"-After Dela-
roche, Engraved by Lemon.
Nelson on the Eve of the Battle of Trafalgar-
After C. Lucy. Engraved by Sharpe. ,
Consolation-After Buchanan. Engraved by Huf-
fan.
Co6ttage.Devotion-After T. Faed. Engraved by
Lemon.
Christ Blessing Little Children-After Claxton.
Engraved by Bellin.
The, latest publications, English, French ond Ger-
man, always in stocl. Artists' materials, English
and French, of the Inost approved makers.
WILLIAMS, STEVENS, WILLIAMS & CO., '
S 1 im 353 Broadway, New York,.


HAVE YOU SUBSCRIBED
*IN THE
COSMOPOLITAN ART ASSOCIATION
,, FOR THE THIRD YEAR ?.
QEE-THE RARE INDUCEMENTS!-The man-
; agement have the pleasure of announcing that
the collection of Works of Art- designed -for dis-
tribution among the subscribers, whose names are
received previous to the 28th of January, '57, is
much larger and more costly than'on any previous
year. Among the leading works in Sculpture-
executed in the finest Marble-is the new and beau-
tiful Statue of the,
'tWOOD NYMP.H' .
The Busts of the Three Great American Statesmen,
CLAY, WEBSTER and CALHOUN,
Also the exquisite Ideal Bust,
"SPRING."
APOLLO AND TNDTANA,
In Marble, .if .Size.
Together with the following Groups and Statues
4n Carrara Marble-of the
STRUGG'IE FOR THE HEART,
VENUS AND APPLE'; PSYCHE; MAGDALEN;
CHILD OF THE SEA; INNOCENCE;
CAPTIVE BIRD; and LITTLE TRUANT?
With numerous works in Bronze, and a collec-
tion of several hundred
FINE OIL PAINTINGS,
by leading Artists.
The whole of which are to be distributed or alot-
ted among the subscribers whose names are re-
ceived previous to the
TWENTY-EIGHTH OF JANUARY, '57,
when the Distribution will take place.
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION.
Every subscriber of three dollars is entitled to
A 'copy of the splendid Steel Engraving, "Satur-
day Night," or,
A copy of any of the following $3 Magazines
one year; also
A copy of the "Art Journal" one year, and
A Ticket in the Annual Distribution of Works
of Art.
Thus, for every $3 paid, a person not only gets
a beautiful Engraving or Magazine' one year, but
also receives the Art Journal one year, and a Ticket
in th'e Annual Distribution, making four dollars
worth of reading matter besides the ticket, by
which a valuable, painting or piece of statuary may
be received in addition. .
Those who prefer Magazines'to the Engraving
' "Saturday Night," can have either: of .the following
one year: -Harper's Magazine; .Godey's Lady's
Bobk,; 1: State's' Magazine, Knickerbocker Ma-
gazine.," m's Magazine, Blackwood's Magazine,
Soutlfe'm" ierary Messenger.
, No person is restricted to a single share. Those
taking five membership, reumiumnLr $15f, are enti-
tled to six Engravings, ,-]d to li ickie.-t in the dis..
'tribution, or any five of the Magazines,:one year,
and six tickets. .-
1, Pessons, in remitting funds for membership, will
please register the letter at the Post Office, to pre-
'vent loss; on receipt of which, a certificate of
Membership, together with the Engraving or Mag-
agine desired, will be forwarded to any part of the
country.
For further particulars, see the November Art
SJournal, sent free on application.
For membership, address
A.VMARZONI,
Fla. Democrat Office,
1 tf Pensacola, Fla.


Mobile Daily and Weekly Register.
BY FORSYTH & HARRIS.
T HE Daily Register is published every day in the
week, Mondays excepted, at $10 per annum,
or $5 for six months, payable invariably in advance.
The Weekly Register, .containing the matter
from the Daily paper, including the. full Commer-
cial reports for the week, is issued every Saturday
morning, at the reduced price of $2 50 per annum,
daylbae in advance. 1 ly


N EW-YORK TYPE-FOUNDRY
.AND
PRINTER'S WAREHOUSE,
established in 1810.

'TY PE,.
"' 'RESS ES,
,and
PRINTING MATERIALS
Manufactured and for sale by
S'CHAR. T. WHITE & Co.,
No. e.6 & 6 BEEKMAN SBTrEET, COR.
1 mn OF GOLD.


matologist..
The sovereign, who himself was an expert in
these sciences, paid much respect to the knowledge
of the Jew banker, and had actually, a few years
before, bestowed upon him the distinction of the
title of "Medailleur to his Court."
"Meyer," he began, as he handed him his well-
filled case, "I know you to be honest, and conscien-
tious." Here is all I possess; take it, and return it
to me when this tempest shall have blown over,
and when better times dawn upon us."


'ORIG#AL VERSE.

CROWDED HE LITERY.FILLIBUSTER.

Ye LEG v 'a*Y DPOLE:
(ONSrTU'ED INTO MORAL RIME.
Y E Daye was setting in ye Weste,
Ye Birds had' ceased their singing,
And through ye twilighte aire ye Crowes
Their roostwarde waye were winginge:

I sate and watcht ye gathering Nighte
Beside ye cottage doore, o'erhung
Wi' flow'ringe vines whose blossom'd wealth
A fragrance on ye coole aire flung:
A little waye in front there played
Ye tendre Childe, whose Mother's love
Made in my humble home on Earthe
A Heaven like to that Above ;
That Mother sate beside and wateht,
Wi' me, ye prattlinge Infante's played,
And while my hliande e'en clasped Her's
Ye lov'd Heade on my, shoulder laye.

Suddenne we saw, adowne ye Lane,
A Stranger form approach full slowe;
His garbe was rags, his gaite was halt,
His hoarie Heade was bended lowe:
Ye little Childe in terrour shrank
From ye gaze of His weird e'en,
And quicklie crouch'd her tendre form
Ye Father's guarding knees atweene.
Ye Stranger spake-his accents sharpe
As if from sounding Metall rung-
Oh ne'er a Voice so owreestrange
Before had come from Mortall tongue:

"I thirst!" quod he, "Give me to drinke!"
And in evere ringing note
Ye Wordes did quaintlie seem as though
Blown forthe from route a Brazen throat.

Ye goode Wife brought a drinking home,
O'erflbwinge to ye brimme,
And curt'sied to ye dewysodde
In handing ye Draught to himme:
Ye Stranger seized ye brimminge Cuppe
And raised it to his Lippes, .
Then dash'd It, cursinge, on ye Grounde,
Before one Drop he sippes 1
Ye little Childe screamed with affrighte,
Ye goode Wife turn'd full pale,
And I, in Manlie wrathe, began
At ye Stranger Manne to rail -
"Why dashe ye Cuppe upon ye grounde-
Ye Cuppe ofoostlie tine ?
Ye Waterre so clear is Heaven-sent,
And cursinge It Ye sinne!"
Ye Stranger Manne then straight beganne-
"G ooI e Sirre, your pardon grant;
I' d drink your Waterre if I could,
But re'llie, Sirre, I can't;
"Listenne! yeStorie I'll propounde,
Amid, e'er my Tale is o'er,
You'll know that how accurst am I
In thirsting Evermore:
"'Til Centuries off, e'en now," quod He,
In M etall-ringinge tone,
"Sin' .1 was working in ye Flelde
Wi' mny own Self alone;
"Ye Daye was warm as Daye could be,
And in ye copper Skye
No little Cloude was seene whereon
To reste ye dazzled Eye;
"Ye Graine was in ye ripen'd Eare,
Ye aharpe Scythe in my Hande;
And thus I reaped, so faint wi' Heate,
That I could hardlie stand:
"At last I sought ye rippling Brooke,
SAnd cast Me down beside
Its mossie Bankes, and deeplie drank'
From route ye crystal Tide:
"My thirst was slaked, no Gratitude
Founde lodgemente in my Sdule,
As there I laye and watcht ye played.
Of a merrie lMacke Taddpole:
"Sometime I watcht, wi' curious eye,
Ye little black Thinge saile
Upon ye tide, then with my Scythe
I CHOPT YE TADDPOLE'O TAILE!
"Darke grewe ye Waterre iri ye Brooke-
Its hue was bloody Redde-
And forth from its horridde flood there came
An awefull Voice which said:
"'Ungratefull Manne! 0, thanklesse Knave!
'Ye Taddpole's taile you chopt,
'And hence beginnes that raging Thirste
'Which Never shall be stopt.'
"And sin' that Daye, in ev're spring,
A nd all ye drinking pales,
Ye Waterre wears a bloody hue,
And, mixt-wi' Taddpoles' tailes,
"Forbiddes mc that I coole my Tongue,
Or dampe my parchEd Throate,
Which is so drye that cache Worde rings
Like a brazen Bugle note."
Then ceas'd ye sinfull Thirsting Manne,
And pass'd from out our Sighte,
As toddling down ye Lane his form
Was swallowed by ye Nighte!

The Money Kings.

A CONDENSED SKETCH OF THE HISTORY OF THE ROTHS-
CHILDS, FROM THEIR RISE TO THE PRESENT DAY.
The season was September, 1793. The Land-
grave of Hesse-Cassel saw the French revolutiona-
ry bando approaching his dominions, and waving
at his very frontiers. Hastily he packed up his
jewels and valuables, together with between two
and three millions of thalers, and took the way to
the .ancient city of Frankfort, hoping to find means
of placing his wealth and the jewels of his house
in security,
Arrived at the city which had, for centuries,
sent forth the rulers of the "holy Roman Empire,"
the fugitive Landgrave knocked at the door of an
humble Jewish banker, Meyer Rothschild, richer
in children than in thalers, but, withal, a distin-
guished and experienced archeologist and numis-


"Such vast confidence does ,me great hoior," f
replied the Hebrew, "but your Highness must not
forget that the' republican army*'is almost before
our doors." a
"We are in the hands of Providence," relied t
the Landgrave. "I ask fdorno receipt." t,
The Prince re-entered his vehicle, and hu-ried
off, without listening 'to the renewed protestations t,
of the man of bIsiness, p
What Meyer Rothschild had anticipated, duly u
came to pa* Before a week was over', Frankfort d
was in the possession of the French troops, ani the t:
banker, who had been denounced as an anti-evo- tf
lutionist and an ally of the tyrants, found hb do- I
micile sacked and his cash-box plundered in the t
name of liberty and the people. tf
No sooner, however, had the victors left F'ank- n
fort, 4han Meyer Rothschild re-opened his banking- a
house, finding, at first, credit among the Jews, and
ultimately with all the business world, and soon I
was reputed richer than ever. In 1802, he was
once more considered as one of the most reliable
bankers in Germany.
About this time there came a short period of
rest for the crowned heads of Germany. The 1
Princes of the Rhenish Confederacy rested under t
the high and forced protection of Napoleon.- t
Raised by the will of the great commander to the E
dignity of an Elector of the German Empire, the t
Landgrave of Hesse received permission to return 1
to his dominions. On his way he passed through
Frankfort. The journals had before informed him
of the plundering of Rothschild's house, and he
naturally believed his own wealth long since a prey
to the Jacobins. Still he determined to visit his
numismatic friend, if only to assure him of the
continuance of his confidence.
"Good morrow, Meyer," said the Elector, with a (
frank and hearty shake of hands. "At last we f
have peace, old friend, but it costs us dear enough.
Before you stands a ruined man, as poor as Job." t
"What! you poor, your Highness ?" T
"Certainly, for have not those confounded sans
culottes stolen my wealth along with yours? If I
do not now too much inconvenience you, I should
like to borrow a small advance upon the indemnity
which I shall receive in Hesse-Cassel."
"An advance is not needed for your Highness,
for all that you confided to my care is safe and un-
touched."
"What!" exclaimed the Prince, "and were you
not plundered, then ?"
"The French have taken everything I had, and
I was very careful ,not to excite them by resist-
ance; otherwise, they would have searched more
thoroughly, and might have found your diamonds 4
and money where they were hidden in my cellar."
"How, is it possible ?"
"Yes, my surrender was a strategem. They nev-
er found what I had hidden. For the last nine
years, in order to indemnify myself for the moneys
I had lost, I have taken the liberty of using some
of yours. All my enterprises have proved succeSs-
ful, and, without embarrassing myself in the least,
I can now return you the entire sum, with five per
cent. interest."
The Prince was deeply moved.
"Meyer," he said, "you are the most honorable
Jew I have ever heard of. Keep my mone:, and
continue to operate with it. From to-day for two
years I want no return of it, and only tw per
cent. interest."
And thus Rothschild became a millionaire.
Old Meyer died in 1812. Before he dbd, he
had his five sons, Anselm,Solomon, Nathan, Charles,
and James, called to his bed-side. They received
his blessing, and swore to him to be true to the
law of Moses, never to separate from each other,
and never to undertake a great enterprise without
having first obtained the counsel and advice of
their mother.
"Observe well these points, and you wll soon
be the richest among the rich, and the world will
belong to you."
The old Hebrew proved a prophet. A financial
Pentarchy was founded at his grave, aid soon
erected its thrones in the five principal citiess of
Europe-Frankfort, Vienna, Naples, Lonlon and
Paris.
The deposit of the Elector of Hesse-Cassel con-
tinued to produce rich harvests to the heiis of Mey-
er'hIothschild.
In 1814, at the Vienna Congress, the Hector re-
lated to the assembled Sovereigns the stcry of the
Frankfort invasion, and of the integrity of the old
Jew. At once, the house at Frankfort obtained
the custom of the "Holy Alliance." It was com-
missioned with all the important loans which at
that time were negotiated by the Emperors of Rus-
sia and Austria, and the Kings of England, Prus-
sia, Denmark, Naples and Sardinia. In every one
of these great financial operations, each of the five
Rothschilds had a share.
James, the youngest of the family, received the
loan of two hundred millions, which France need-
ed, to make friends of its enemies.
Disposing over enormous capitals, the five broth-
ers created active and energetic corresponding
agencies in every part of Europe. They received
information of the slightest stock fluctuations in
all the different and most remote places. They ne-
gotiated with the most perfect security; and their
operations remained wrapped in the most impend-
trable secrecy, and were secured by certain success
in speculation of the money market. Three of old
Meyer's sons seem more particularly to have inher-
ited his genius. These are Nathan, Solomon and
James.
Nathan deserves especial mention. Scarcely of
age in 1798, he located himself at Manchester,
with a capital of 500,000 francs, which he had bor-
rowed from the paternal coffers. In four years he


ble was burning down his country houses and cas
tie. With his natural shrewdness, he perceived
that his flight would be the signal for an unaltera
ble confiscation of his numerous possessions, amnd
he had the courage to remain.
Numerous anecdotes are in circulation, illustra
tive of his presence of mind and firmness durinE
the trying days of '48. We will not, however, re
peat them allpiere. One especially has been ofter
told in the papers: It relates to a call made upoi
him by a rough party of Red Republicans, demand
ing an equal distribution of his property. He ad


b


hat was offered, and thus gained at one stroke of
business thirty millions.
The invasion of 1815 quadrupled his fortune,
nd, despite of the most gigantic banking under-
akings, he never neglected even the smallest mat-
er of business. He died in 1836.
Physically, Nathan Rothschild had repulsive fea-
ures. His deportment was that of the evident
parvenu. To him is ascribed the first plan of-re-
niting the children of Israel by the banks of Jor-
an; he designed to buy from the Turks that coun-
ry which was promised to his'race. They would
hen, from pure gratitude, have made hinim King of
'alestine; bnt whether they would have exchanged
heir European wealth and business for the land of
he Bible, still remains an open question. Our la-
mented friend, the late Major Noah, was a zealous
nd earnest co-laborer of Rothschild in that cause.
Nathan married the sister of Isaac Cohen, who
had a dowry of fifteen million francs.
..James, the head of the Paris house, went from
Vienna to Paris, to establish himself there, at the
'ery moment when the sceptre fell from the hands
of Napoleon. 'He was the principal banker in the
loans of the Restoration. He and his brother Na-
han received the billion of war expenses, and the
wo billions of indemnity paid to the Allied Pow-
ers. That enormous stream of money flowed through
heir coffers, and how much of it remained there
ias never been ascertained.
After the downfall of the old dynasty, Baron
Fames offered his gold-filled hand to the monarchy
of the July revolution, and the hand was gratefully
;rasped. The Baron and his wife now obtained the
)ften-before-refused entree at Court, and, the Prin-
ces often appeared in Rothschild's saloons.
Thus, under Louis Philippe's rule, the influence
if the Rothschilds daily and visibly increased. In
fact, ago reigned supreme, and even art and talent
contended for the honor, and often in vain, to obh-
tain the entree to the hotel in the rue Lafitte, for
Baron James was often very particular in the
choice of his guests.
Only towards literati he was amiable, especially
towards M. Heine, the piquant and spirited humor-
st, who often had his fun, even at the expense of
his host. Thus, at the close of a brilliant banquet,
several bottles of Lachrimae Chrieti had been con-
sumed, Rothschild said to the poet-
"What a peculiar name for a wine! What 'can
be the origin of it?"
"The etymology is perfectly simple," replied
Heine. "Christ weeps at the fact that Jews should
Irink such excellent wine."
"Deuce take your smartness!" exclaimed Roths-
child, amid the convulsive laughter that followed.
Ordinarily, the two conversed in the German
Jewish dialect; but Heine would never permit
Rothschild to assume towards him the condescend-
ing nabob style he always exhibited towards others.
If they had a dispute, the poet threatened the man
of money to publish their conversation in the Re-
vue des deux Mondes. The Baron immediately turned
pale with apprehension, and at once took the most
humble steps towards a conciliation.
It is well-known that, since 1852, the peculiar
financier has become Consul General of Austria.
The secret history of the first half of Louis
Philippe's reign has yet to be written, but only one
who is thoroughly acquainted with the life and
business of Baron Rothschild will be able to write
it correctly. At the time of the coalition in 1839,
for instance, the millionaire financier alone created
rain or sunshine at his will. The Tuileries and the
hotel in the rue Lafitte stood in the most intimate
connection, and the Duke de Montpensier was one
of the regular dancing partners of MTle Charlotte
Rothschild.
The banker Baron obtained the royal concession
for the Northern Railroad, and the demon of stock-
jobbing awakened by him soon spread over the en-
tire nation, to the injury of small speculators, and
to the exclusive enriching of the big financiers,
who, it is said, divided half a billion among them-
selves.
However, there are many traits and instances of
patriarchal benevolence to be told of the Prince ol
the Bank. When the short harvest of 1846 seemed
to threaten a universal famine in 1847, Baron
Rothschild attempted to avert the impending evil
by buying upon his own account immense quanti-
ties of breadstuffs in Europe and America. At the
hall in Paris, grain and flour were then sold below
the market prices, and the profits of this immense
speculation were to be applied to furnishing bread
for all the needy and hungry.
A special bakery sold bread to the poor at a very
great reduction from the price charged by the reg
ular bakers. But the people, in this instance, would
not believe the benevolent intentions of the donor,
railed against imaginary usury in grain, believed
the most absurd and ridiculous reports-among
others, that Rothschild had bought spoilt flour, anc
had made it palatable by an admixture of sweet
almonds; of course, they never thought that such
an admixture would have made the bread three
times as expensive.
Those same sweet almonds of Baron Rothschilc
contributed a good share to the February revolu
tion.
Ever ready for adding fuel to the flames, evei
ready to excite the masses, and delighting in stir'
ring up mischief, the National said of the Baroi
Rothschild, that he had mixed his flour with the
sweat of the people, which, of course, would have
produced very objectionable bread. At the same
time, a number of pamphlets against Rothschil
made their appearance, and whilst the people thu
rewarded his charitable efforts, their benefactor ii
reality lost heavy sums, as he could not dispose 0
the provisions he had procured.
The revolution of 1848 filled the house of Roths
child with terror. The Baron heard that the rub


*


a


I _


_ .ii '-II .II 21L I II I lIL


Ci_ C





mitted their estimal "e of his wealth was correct, Exaggeration
computed the popular, tion of France, among whom .. ,:
his money was to be e equally distributed, and paid BY ELIZA. COOK. ,
his revolutionary assaL ants two francs each, as We wonder what would be thought of a -person
their proper share in an equal distribution, who deliberately loaded and fired a forty-.punder
In 1830, Rothschild h id given 15,000 francs; to kill a bluebottle, or who begged, the loan of a
this was a great deal, for no one had threatened sack to carry home a pottle of strawbeftries in.
him. In 1840, he signed 50,000 francs for the What would be our opinion of any one; who em-
wounded and unemployed ha 'borers. At the same ployed a sledge hammer to drive,. tadk, or who
time, his son, Alphonse, who. had just.come of age, purchased a quarter of oats to fill'raBinsebag;
at once wrote to the Provision al Government, peti- why, we should' undoubtedly believe him to be in.
tioning for his right of citizens iP. no state to make a will, and question the propriety
It is said that just at the mon ient when James, of his going at large. Yet we find greater innova-
almost overcome with terror, % "as hesitating be- tions of consistency committed every,day' as re-
tween the safety .of his person 1 ind his millions, gards the purpose and meaning of language, with-
Marc Caussidiere made his appeaI*a nee before him, out our conceivingany direct notion that' the par-
and said: ties indulging in such, are fitting candidates for
"Citizen Rothschild, no weakness I I pledge my- election at St. Luke's.
self for you!" The habit of exaggeration in language is a char-
The banker dreampt all night of '"iat man's red acteristic in many people, which appears :to us to
scarf, the pistols in his belt, and the i great cavalry afford a truer index of their general qualities, than
sword that dragged at his side. But w, hien he saw, is ordinarily observed.- A great depth in any fac-
on the next morning, that measures hat 1 been ta- ulty, or acute intensity of any feeling, is 'seldom
ken, not only to protect his hotel, but a'so all his possessed by those who invariably use the most im-
possessions in the neighborhood of the city against posing words they can find to express theiropin-
any attack, he discovered that the words of the ions and sentiments; The stereotyped grandilo-
Prefect of Police were more than idle win d. In quence and florid warmth of tone used by them in
less than K year after this, Caussidiere, baa'shed, discussing simple matters, or relating simple inci-
and without any means, came to London. Hei 'e he dents, are, to our matter-of-fact organization, little
received a letter from Paris, as follows: beyond the flourishing of drum and trumpet, which
"SiR: Permit me to place at your disposal the upon close investigation is found.to be the issue of
sum of thirty thousand francs. This little capin d sheepskin, brass, and common atmosphere. Some
may enable you, upon the hard soil of exile, to en- people's tongues are eternally emulating the frog in
ter into some kind of business. You may return the old fable, and always straining into an ox-a.
the sum in ten or twenty years, or whenever you state of verbal inflation alke diculous and false.
like. This is a small recognition of the valuable Ihere are those who never experience a moderate
services you have rendered to the country, an d occasional degree of pain, but they speak of it
"Ever yours, ROTHSCHILD." as -a "splitting" headache, an "awful" spasm,, or
At first, Rothschild was very inimical to the dreadfull" torture. If they meet with a sllghtin-
Government of the second of December. H vision of the skin'they have "cut their finger, to,
would mos probably have been sent to Mazas for the bone;" the application of.a mustard poultice
this, but his position as Austrian Consul General for five minutes, never falls to flay them alive;,
protected him, a common oold is mentioned seriously as a "most
He had often been bitterly reproached for never violent influenzaa" and a. week or two of fever is,
claiming anything for the benefit of his poor co-re- recorded as a severe and fignhtfulng mood with them
ligionists. "superlative",fisthereigning mood with them;
hgskim mil becomes Devonshire crtawn, and smalL
"At least," it was said to him, "give them the skim milk becomes Devonshire creem, and smalL
profit of one single speculation on 'Change." beer G nes's stout; "superb," "exquisite," "won-
H derful," "glorious," "horrible ;" tremendousu," "de--
He approved of the idea. A manceuvre of. ll.nns h i e fu. _t;e *c, *on-
cious, "charming," "beautiful ",terrfic, "aston-
"bulls," which he organized one fine morning, fol- ciosg," "' chamrn "'bea tifu n. i n thirt-
lowed up immediately by a manoeuvre of "bears," fishing and such extreme adjective, ang, on their
left a net profit of 850,000 francs, which he at lips as plentifully as conjunctions, and. we often
once devoted to the erection of a Jewish asylum wonder, while gauging the narrow calibre o f brain
in the rue Picpus. whence the big torrent issues, how such large fur-
y the rue Piipus t a niture could be found in such a small house. tet.
By his total absence of courtesy and manners, .. ...
e g b e ha mr m these people repeat a story or circumstance, and
the sovereign banker has created more l-feelings u can hardly detect the ori ina, they see every-
,. .. ,you can hardly detect the orgnal, they ,e e evry-
thanthe loud ring of his millions has ever created thing through a magnifyi g and caedioscqpe'
envy. He takes a great pleasure in humiliating blended. Talk Of painting in veritable colo the-
men of talent. A short time ago, however, on foregund and of piting itn given ri,tele worst
such an occasion, the impertinence of the man of beat tge pre-Roud aeltesby, often ven ineruth g-
money was properly and spiritedly reproved. beat tle pre-saphaelite, by notches; sDuteh tr.
,, i. .i den all tulips and peacocks, or a nimmer sueset all.
Cremieux, who had never seen his moneyed co- ren al t l, a e o a m sm : e al
religionist, met him one day in the synagogue, and tp urple and gold, are soft and unimposing compared
having occasion to speak to him upon matters con- to the ming power OfeOf these fluts -
cerning the congregation, introduced himself with- painters.
We once kept account for a lMy, during-a donee-
out ceremony, and commenced to spealk upon his mls w to rh s y l, who. de-
busiess.miles! walk through rather sandy lanes, wh&. ere-
business cleared herself "half dead" with fatigue every few
"And are you really Mr. Cremieux?" asked minutes; and we found that se'had ded exactly
Rothschild, measuring him with his looks from head eleven times and a' half at the end of the journey,.
to foot. when she swallowed cider and sandwiches in a most
"Yes, Baron, I have already done myself the v fso considering her multiplied state of
hoo fmninn ynm. vital fashion, considering heir multiplied state of
honor of mentioning my name." demise. We met a cottager's child, which she
"Certainly; but I thought Mr. Cremieux, the ruse up to and pronounce l to be an angelice
famos avocteshold e bgge thn yu ae."rushed up to and pronounced tb be an 'angelim
famous advocate, should be bigger than you little cherub ;" but our near-sighted eyes could only'
At these silly as well as impertinent words, Cre- bread-and-buttere-
mieux bit his lips, but proceeded to say what he perceive e about as aver aged a mobread-nd-butter-d: then
had o sy uon usiessandRotschld avevouring little biped as ever plagued a'mother: th6n
had to say upon business, and Rothschild gave she informed pas that the vicw to the left was
clear and distinct answers. "grandly sublime," though there was nothing to
"But are you really Baron Rothschild? said Cre- elicit rapture by od a br d common fiiged with
mieux, interrupting him. a plantation, barely relieved in the foreground with
"What! do y. hou chance to doubt it?" a very yellow pond, and still yellower goslings.
"Certainly. I thought the great Baron Roths- We chanced to tell this lady of a visit we had
child should be a better-bred man." paid to the Porcelain Works at Worcester, and
With this anecdote we will close the sketch of mentioned among other things, that a part of the
f this family, and especially of this.man, who, des- materials used was rnd animal bones; shortly
Spite of the envy of the aristocracy of birth and of afterward we were told that we must have made a
genius, and simply by his shrewdness and the might mistake in our recital, for M. H'had repeated our
of his genius, now forty years past has controlled
the destinies of our century more than another account, and impugned our veracity by declaring,
Sthe destinies of our century ore than an that cups and saucers were made of ground human
power. ____ ____ bones, and saying that we had assured her of the
NIGHT. fact. We informed her one day that 1 marble
BY mENRY w. LONGOFELLOW. figure just put up in a friend's hall was three hun-
done and the darkness dred weight, and were laughed at soon after for
Falls from the wings of night, having told Mrs. H. that it was three tons. We
As a feather is wafted downward have never talked much to Mrs. H. since theta
SFrom an eagle in its flight, florid mistakes.
I see the lights of the village An elderly gentleman amuses us very often, by
SGleam through the rain and the mist, his description of his only son.' The young mnan,
And a feeling of sadness comes o'er me, according to his papa's portraying, is an "immense
That my heart cannot resist. genius,"-indeed his "mind is too much .for his
A feeling of sadness and longing body;" his abilities are in fact so great, that they
That is not akin to pain, do not know what he is fit for; he "plays divine-
s But resembles sorrow only ly," "sings exquisitely," and "possesSes the poet's
inspiration in a wonderful degree;" if he lives long
* Come, read to me some poem', enough he will "do something very grand;" and
Some simple and heart-felt lay, withal, he is "so delicate in constitution that he
That shall soothe this restless feeling,cahadybrtewidoblw nhi"Tes
And banish the thoughts of day.canhardlybearthewindtoblowohi." These
are the doting sire's own words, but we should, in
Not from the grand old masters, giving a candid opinion o' the youth, use leas ele-
NWhot fistae bfardssupsblim vated language, and say that he is nothing more

Through the corridors of Time. than a spruce fir, entered and 'labeled in his pa's
f .. grand conservatory as a cedar of Lebanon; and as
o, lThkei musi s for his "delicate constitution," it seems to stand
e Life's endless toil and endeavor; pretty well under an unlimited amount of large din-
e And to-night I long for rest. sipations and "small hours."
R oad from some humbler pt, Now these people are but types or a class
s Whose songs gush from his heart We meet with these inflated exa~geratloim in
As showers from the clouds of summer, manifold shapes-from the Prime 'Minister to the
f Or tears from the eyelids start, pot-boy, from the political leader writer to the last-
Who, through long days of labor, dying-speech-and-confeasion inditer, from the con-
s- And nights devoid of ease, tinentally-educated duchess to the A-B-C-loeu scu-


Still heard in his soul the music lery-maid; there seems a natural tendency in many
Of wonderful melodies. to verbal apoplexy, and we wonder some hnagins-
d Such songs have power toquiet tons are not found dead in their bid. Our public
The restless pulse of care, press teems with this-exaggeration as much as our
S And come like the benediction private parties. We should like to know how
That floweth after prayer.
many "great national crises," how many'"awful and
Then read from the treasured volume eventful epochs," how many verging on "desper-
S The poem ofthy choicA,, ate revolutions," and how many 'most serious and
g And lend to the rhyme of l pOet fat l onse ", ndho 'y motsrosd
The beauty of thy voice. fatal consequences to the country," have occurred
ti in the newspaper columns during our, recollection
S And the night shall be filled with music, Yet St. Pauls stands where it always did, and ex-
And the cares that infest the day r f s o n e
Shall fold their tents like the Arabs, lied royal foxes seek old Englandas the safei t cov-
And as silently steal away. er they can run into. We should ike to know how


had tripled his capital, removed his banking-house
to London, where the extent of his business soon
assumed perfectly gigantic proportions.
Nathan served his Government as intermediator
with the Continental Powers, who at that time
were fighting against France, and he alone contin-
ued to extend credit to the Cabinet of St. James.
He was at Brussels in 1815, during the battle of
Waterloo, and immediately after it hastened to
London, where he arrived twenty-four hours in ad-
vance of the official news of the victory. During
these hours be went on 'Change, bought everything





' A


many reviewers have held up the "coming genius
of the age," and pointed attention to the "most
distinguished writer in English literature;" how
many volumes have been pronounced as "the finest
work that has appeared for many years -" and yet
we often come across some of these sterling pro-
ductions in partnership ,with the, trunk-maker's
paste. We should like 16 have the sum total of
domestic hyperboles, such as being "as hot as fire,"
"as black as.a coal,"being "delighted and charmed"
to see a tenth-rate acquaintance, and being "deep-
ly distressed" to hear that Mrs. Robison's seventh
Child has folen sick of too much pudding. What
a census of illuminated "figures" we should have
to, wade through, and what outrageous fibs. We
have no great objection to a respectable "white
lie" now and then, such a judicipys bit of coloring
often gives valuable relief to a" bit of domestic
"Rembrandt," and dispels the gkom of a house-
hold "Salvator Rosa;" but we do not admire the
Silly and superfluous indulgence in lies that bear all
the tints of the rainbow. ,
Not. that we are advocates for .drab.colored ser-
mons or pale gray philosophy. solely. We: can en-
joy the true-blue love-letter, and participate in the
deep scarlet burst of enthusiasm,: as much as any
Parnassus-climbing idiot; but we certainly quarrel
with the general mode of speech adopted by those
, who deal so widely in:the big "words"' of the dic-
tionary, without attaching to those: words the'
Slightest portion of their meanings. The 'flowers
of rhetoric" are only acceptable :when backed by
the evergreens of Truth and Sense. The habit of
exaggeration in language should be guarded against;
it misleads the credulous and offends the percep-
ftive; it imposes on us the society of a balloon,
when a moderately-sized skull would fill the place
much better; it begets much evil in l5romising what
it can not perform, and we have often found the
most glowing declarations of intended good service
: end in mere Irish vows." Those who, when we ask
a favor, affirm they will do it., "cost what it may,"
; and though they may to "move heaven and earth,"
are sever found by us.to be so likely to confer it
as a certain steady person we could name, who
says he will "do it if he can." Strong exaggera-
tion in'every day language should be avoided, we
,think, as:being mentally unhealthy,: and conversa-
tionally wearying, A straightforward intention in
speech is as grateful to associates as well ordered
dress, and we feel. as much doubt and dislike in
talking to one who, with very inferior intellect,
'flings allsorts of loquacious yeast in our ear-'s, as
we should in grasping an unwashed, coarse hand,
-covered with paste rings. Now, kind reaiter, we
: have filled up the "hour before morn" with our
pen-and-ink-dreaming, and if we express (an earnest
hope that it isi Tor your amusement, pro.y don't ac-
Scuse us of Exaggeration.

Who is Beally Independent?

In one. of the statutes passed in the reign of
Henry the Eighth, idleness is characterized, in good
Saxon English, as being "'the mother of all sin.,
Ii was the philosophy of those medieval times, in
fact, tu regard it as a mans duty first to serve and
honor his Creator, and next to be 'skilled in some
craft or business, so as to avoid coming in contact
on the Commonwealth for support. The acquisi-
tion even of learning was regarded as but of sec-
ondary'ilnportance, A citizen, it was held, might
be a good citizen, even though he could' not read
Homer in' the original, but not if he wanted the
abifly io maintain himself. The last was absolute-
ly essential; the first, as a general rule,was not.
"If, through thrift, energy and industry, the ordina-
ry citizen acquired a competence, then the study of
the liberal arts might be properly undertaken.-
But till then, the first duty "of every one who was
not heir to a large etatLe, was to learn some busi-
ness. It was in this way, to quote again the words
of the old statute, that our forefathers took care
ihat their children, when grown up, should not be
driven, from want or incapacity, "to dishonest
courses." \ ,
We hare made great advances in many things
since that Lime, but we doubt it, in this particular,
we have not gone back. Not that our generation
attaches too much importance to schools and chool-
mnasters. It is impossible to have books, readers
orteachers in excess. But those old times certain-
ly surpassed our own in the dignity they imparted
to labor, and in the public opinion which expected
every man to have some craft or profession by
whiph to earn his .bread. Education was then con-
sidereda to include something more than book-learn-
ing, and. was regarded, in its true sense, as the
forming of the entire character. The first requi-
itea for the respectable citizen, was, that he should
Je able to maintain himself, because, without this
abilityy' he could not really, be independent, and
was liable through idleness, to fall into evil courses.
Hence the child, from earliest infancy, was taught
to Iok forward to a life of active work as the
highest dignity of manhood. .Hence every citizen,
whatever his rank, "pulled at the laboring oar,"
each i s bi own sphere, it is true, but not the less
idinuttriously for that. From the 'king on his throne
tQ the peasant in his ht, all worked and all worked
hard;' There were no drones in those days. The
class of men with which modern society abounds,
the class that livea only for show, luxury or pleas-
ure, was utterly unknown. The rich did not con-
'aider that their wealth entitled them to spend their
lives in selfish idleness. The poor were not tempti
ed to'look on labor as disgraceful, and to prefer
comparative starvation to comfort and indepen-
dence. a a
.A present it. is different. At present a false no-
tion exier, ive'y prevails that if, labor is not abso-.
lutely disgraceful, it is at least a mark of. gentility


to10 have nothing to do. Under the influence of this
absurd idea hundreds of parents who havq acquired
but moderate fortunes are bringing up their chil-
dren in elegant idleness, forgetting that the estate
hichh supports one household will not sustain those
of a dozen descendants, and that even if it would,
wealth ma\ take uiiigs and fly away. Then great
tile?, in c6nsequence, are crowded with men edu-
catedk to great expectations, but now literally pen-
niless, and who live, consequence, from hand to
mouth, the honest of them starving for more than
Shal'f their tunime, th? dishonest practicing all the
'rta of swindling and .finally, of crime. Even pa-
rentals who i have no fortunes at 'all, often bring up
their sn in. Idleness. "It is vulgar," they say,
"to put then to a trade." And thus a plentiful
crop of Shiftles, purposele", vagrant, good for
nothing yoiing men are' aiially turned loose on
socety, ,o inflict other young men by their exam-
ple, to liye parasitically on the community, and
to die in the alms-house or jail, if not under the
gallows.
He odly is truly independent who is master of
li own fortunes. No man is master of his own
fortunes unless ie has learned a handipraft, studied
a procession, or acquired habits of business. Such
a man, even ,if he' should b" nch and afterwards
become poor, can never be otherwWe than bide-


pendent; for he is secure of his daily bread, can
keep out of debt, and need fear to look no fellow
being therefore in the face. It would be better for
modern society if it cultivated a healthier public
opinion on this subject; if it insisted that every
child should be brought up to do something for a
living; if it honored the worker more than the
droge, and rated the honest laborer above the rich
and idle sensualist.-[Baltimore Sun.


NJ. W. DORR- i---- -EDITOR.
J. W. DORR ................... EDITOR.


OFFICE IN THE REAR or W. H. BAKER & Co's.

Terms of The West-Florida Times.
"> *
SUBSCRIPTION-$3 00 per annum in advance; oth-
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ADVERTisINa-Advertisements not exceeding ten
lines, or less, inserted at the rate of $1 00 for the
first, and 50 centA for each subsequent insertion.
Liberal discount made on contract advertising by
the year, or for a less time.
Bills will be presented quarterly to yearly adver-
tisers.


PENSACO'LA, February 17, 1857.


To Advertisers.
It is perhaps unnecessary that we should call the
attention of persons in ENSACOLA, WAR-
RINGTON, WOLSEY, MILTON, and elsewhere,
desiring to Advertise, to the advantages which the
West Floridi Times offers. Commencing, as it does,
with a largf; subscription list, in this immediate lo-
calit, as well as in Southern and .Eastern Alabama,
especially along the line of the projected Railroad
in that State, there are no postoffclees within the area
of its circulation which the Times does not visit.
W Advertisers will please hand in their favors
as early as possible on Monday. Tuesday morn-
ing will be too late for that day's issue.
It1 Postmasters everywhere are requested to
act as agents for this paper, and are authorized to
deduct the usual commission from all 'ash subserip-
tions which may be forwarded.

As the Times undoubtedly now has a larger cir-
culation than any other paper published in this city,
that fact commends it to advertisers as a proper
medium for making known to the public all matters
in which the public are interested, or in which it is
desirable that they should be interested. Our
friends are not idle, and subscribers are continually
pouring in from various quarters. This is a modest
statement of facts, charitably designed for the ben-
efit of the advertising public, and uot at all for our
own glorification or emolument.

W- See fourth page.

MARIANNA PATRIOT.-
Our esteemed contemporary
and friend, Mr. JUDAH, of the Marianna Patriot, of-
fers for sale a half interest in that paper. The Pa-
triot is one of the best paying papers in the State,
having no competitor throughout a large extent of
populous country.

GODEY'S LADY'S BO'OK.-
We have received from the
publisher the January and February Nos. of this
excellent magazine, and find it still keeping pace
with Godey's glorious motto, "Excelsior." We
concur with a contemporary who says the Lady's
Book "is a fountain of unexceptionably pure and
instructive literature, and an unfailing source of the
finest intellectual enjoyment." The frontispiece,
fashion, tinted, colored and pattern plates, are
beautiful works of aft, and alone are worth the sub-
scription price. We beg to commend the Book to
our fair readers, as especially adapted to their
tastes, and to toilet, housewife and, in fact, domes-
tic requirements, generally.
The price of the Lady's Book is $3 00 per an-
num', cash in advance; our terms are the same;
'but for $5 00, in advance, we *ill furnish the
Lady's Book and The West-Florida Times, for one
year, from this office. This great inducement is
effected by a private little club arrangement be-
tween brother Godey.and ourself. He is a gentle-
maii4f he is a ladiesman. For Club Terms see ad-
vertisement.

DEAR DEMOCRAT:-
Don't apologize, we beg, about
that "delicate compliment"; you need feel under
no obligations; you are perfectly welcome, and
may keep the change, or, if you will return it,
hand it over to the *vannah Georgian & Journal;
he's the chap who thought there was "something in
your head"; :we didn't.

RAILROAD.-
In the Montgomery Mail of the 9th we
f.nd thefollowing response to our queries, premis-
ing that we did not inquire the distance between
Montgomery and Pensacola-which all our little
readers of a dozen summers knew twenty years ago
-but the distance from Montgomery to Greenville:
Our neighbor of The West-Florida Times is in-
formed that the distance from Montgomery to Pen-
sacola, by the survey, is 165 miles. The iron is se-
cured, together with the rolling stock for 32 miles.
The grading is finished for a much greater distance.
We doubt, however, if the Pensacola people will
have to wait on us of Montgomery any length of
time. But every few months the gap between us
will contract, and by and by we shall all kick our
shins under mahogany graced with gopher soup
and broiled pompano I Speed that glorious "good
time!"
To be precise, we get from head-quarters the.fol-
lowing facts and figures:
The Company have actually contracted for 2,500
tons of iron, 2 locomotives and 200 car wheels-as
well as other materials necessary for the completion
and equipment of the road for thirty-two miles.-
Nothing but the loss of vessels at sea, or some
providential occurrence of the sort, can prevent the
said 32 miles from being in use by the first day of
next November.
The Montgomery and West Point and La Grange
and Atlanta Companies have guarantied the bonds,
and the President has not the slightest difficulty in
negotiating them at par.:
If the Butler county subscriptions come tp pretty
lively within.the next two or three weeks,'Col. Pol-
lard, the President, intends to buy 500 tons of iron
in New York-for immediate use on the-road; there-
by increasing the number of miles provided for to
thirty-nine.

THE NAvY AGENCY.-
From the, Florida Demo-
crat of last Thursday we are gratified- to learn
that Hon. A. 'E. MAXWELl, our present distinguish-
ed Representative in Congress, has received the ap-
pointed to the office of Navy Agent at this place,
made vacant by the death of the late lamented in-
cumbent, Hon. WALKER ANDERSON. Until Mr.
Maxwell enters on 4he discharge of the,; duties of
the office Purser W. W. J. Kelly is empowered as
Acting Navy Agent.,

SOLD OFF; *- '
The lgtlu steamer Cora has been' sold
off the line, his'aIndonied her consort, the Ewing,
resumed her maiden name, "Mayflower," and left
our shores to plough the tepid waters of Tampa Bay.
She was cleared 'on Sunday last by James McKay,
her new owner. 'Luck attend her.


many years and until this hotel was destroyed by
fire, Pascagoula was the favorite watering place,
the Newport of the South; it was, indeed, almost
the only place where sea-breezes, sports and scene-
ry were to be enjoyed. Some of the citizens of
Pascagoula are determined that we shall once again
have the pleasure of meeting at this unrivalled
watering place of the South. A new and very su-
perior hotel is now being erected by a chartered
company on the elevated ground where the Sixth
Infantry encamped after the Mexican war. The
contract for building this hotel has been awarded
to a citizen of Mobile at the price of $38,500.
I was much pleased a few days since to see ex-
tracts from the New York papers praising, in un-
measured and seemingly very extravagant terms,
the performances of Miss Matilda Heron, the young
actress. By the Times of that city, Miss Heron is
styled the "Ristori of America," and by the Cou-
rier she is called the "American Rachel." A critic
thus discourses: "She is great, really grand! eve-
ry look and breath discloses the artiste. She is
sublime in pathos-sublime in simplicity-sublime
in grandeur. She is no mere actress in Camille,
but a woman consumed, by love. Passion, emotion,
sentiment, these are her toys; she plays with them.


FROM
our local contemporaries we learn that Mr.
Peter Gonzalez of this city has been appointed U.
S. Deputy Marshal of the Northern District of
Florida.

FINE ARTS.-
We commend the Collection at Mr.
Hutton's sales-room to the Inspection of our citizens.
Amid such an assortment of land and waterscapes,
&c., the tastes of few will fall of being suited.

FEEDING OF LADIES.-
We have read with much in-
terest the communications of a certain "Mrs. Smith,
of Greene," as published in the Montgomery Mail,
and next wecek intend giving our lady readers a
taste of her quality, as taken from that paper. We
consider Mrs. Smith uncommonly sound in her posi-
tions, which she fortifies in most graceful and vig-
orous style. Mr. Hooper dhimadverted severely
on the impropriety of which a beautiful girl was
guilty in concealing a quantity of onion hash at a
table d'hote, and his impudence has fortunately
eventuated in calling out Mrs. Smith, who takes up
the cause of the sex and demonstrates their inde-
feasible right to as much victuals as they desire.
Of course Hooper does not contest the point, but
meekly bows to the consequences of his humorous
squib which has forced him into the position of one
desiring to starve the ladies.

THE MOBILE REGISTER
has unintentionally omitted
to credit us for an article, and it now regrets its
omission, as we do.
W_ Ga
A mysterious and horrible murder was committed
on Harvey Burdell, a dentist, on the 80th January
last, at No. 31 Bond street, New York. It has be-
come the subject of much comment'by the press,
and a general and interesting subject of conversa-
tion of the citizens of that place. The Coroner is
busily engaged in taking his inquest, and the proof
before him. begins to throw some light upon the
probable murderer. The victim was strangled to
death; a dirk was stuck into his throat; he was
stabbed in fourteen places; and the body, as well
as the floor of the room, were besmeared with
blood. The knife alone was left, but all other evi-
dence of the crime was effaced. In all other re-
spects, says the N. Y. Herald, the crime stands as
one of the most perfectly planned and successfully
executed outrages on record.
The evidence elicited goes far to fix the crime
upon a man by the name of Eckel, whose assistant
and accomplice was undoubtedly a Mrs. Cunning-
haib, the landlady of the house where Dr. Burdell
boarded. Eckel was a fellow-boarder. It would
appear that Mrs. Cunningham was the mistress of
Dr. Burdell, an old man, and to him she asserts
she was married; she was also living on terms of
guilty intimacy with Eckel. Dr. Burdell was very
wealthy, and it is supposed that the woman imag-
ined she could prove having been his wife, and
thus inherit his estate.

NEGRO MASHED UP.-We learn, as the train of
cars on the Alabama & Tennessee Railroad was on
its downward trip on yesterday just the other side
of Montevallo a negro man employed on the train
in attempting to get upon the train while it was in
motion, fell'between the cars on the track, and was
most shockingly mangled; cutting off one leg en-
ti.ely and mashing up the other so as to render am-
putation necessary. Drs. Reese and Hale, of Mon-
vevallo, were on board and rendered all the aid
they could. The boy was left at Montevallo under
the care of Drs. Reese and Hale. He belonged,
we understand, .to Mrs. Sharp, of Burnsville.-[Sel-
ma Sentinel.
We do not admire the tone of careless indiffer-
ence with which the above dreadful item of human
suffering is chronicled. Such articles are fit for the
triumphant comment of abolition journals, as giv-
ing to their incendiary representations of Southern
brutality and carelessness of the comfort and life
of the slave, a color of plausibility and justice.

Correspondence of the W. F. Times.
MOBILE, Feb. 13th, 1857.
MR. EDITOR: After a rather severe winter, spring
again dawns upon us. The weather the past few
days has been that of the softest, mildest spring,
which gives new life to all nature.
In such pleasant and agreeable weather the
amusements are all well patronised and draw well
filled houses.
Mr. Neafie is at present fulfilling an engagement
at our theatre very successfully. In the "Corsican
-Brothers," Mr. Neafie has won great applause.
Our city was thrown into consternation by an
immense loss by fire whiph occurred here a few
days since. The fire originated in a cotton ware-
house owned by Messrs. Magee & Cluis, of this
city, and notwithstanding the strenuous exertions
of our active fire department the devouring ele-
ment was not stayed in its progress until it had
consumed the entire square, which was covered by
warehouses, filled with cotton to their utmost ca-
pacity. There were nine thousand five hundred
bales of cotton burned, valued at present prices of
cotton at over sixty dollars per bale, which makes
the total amount of loss, not including the ware-'
houses, about five hundred and seventy thousand
dollars. Of this amount about two hundred and
fifty thousand dollars falls upon our home insurance
companies. Viewing the loss of the cotton as well
as the loss of labor, compressing, lightering, &c.,
which is lost to the city by the burning of this cot-
ton, it may well be considered one of the 'greatest
disasters which has ever befallen our city.
As spring, the forerunner of summer comes on,
one is tempted to cast his eye around him to see
where .the long and dull summer days may be
passed more pleasantly than in the heated and
dusty city. On this account many of your readers,
no doubt, will be happy to learn that one of the
most noted and favorite haunts of former years of
of this description is about to be re-opened. For


Her very complexion is crystal and shows her
feelings within. Now hectic with fever, now pallid
with fear. In her struggles and agony she breathes
forth a sadness irresistible. The most cold hearted
cannot refrain. Mrs. Hacy at her side shedtears-
true scalding tears, and the whole audience dis-
persed overpowered by that delicious emotion,
caused- by great events, and imposed only by
great genius." JUNIUS.

special Correspondence of the W. F. Times.
NEW YORK, Jant. 29th, 1857.
DEAR TIMES: The mails have been so irregular
of late, in fact, I may justly say, we have had no
mails from the South for two weeks, and it begins
,o look as if we never would get any more news
:rom your parts save by telegraph, and, under these
existing circumstances, I will relate to you all the
aews I can gather from our own parts and the eas-
lern continent.
First and foremost, no doubt, you have all heard
*f the assassination of the Archbishop of Paris.
"his man's predecessor, the former Archbishop,
vas murdered Dy a ball from a rifle in the happy
rays which gave France her liberties only to be
comineered over by Louis Napol.W. As he came
f-om his house to reason with the mob and endeav-
or to conciliate them, he was shot down like a
nangey dog, and now the last incumbent has been
daughtered.
The Archbishop of Paris was assassinated on the
evening of the 3d by a discharged priest named
Verges, of the Diocese of Meaux. The Archbish-
op was performing religious service in the Church
of St. Etienne du Mont, when the assassin, in plain
clothes, stepped forward, and, lifting aside the pre-
late's cape, plunged a Catalan knife into his heart,
exclaiming "A bas la doesseI" ("Down with the
Goddess!") an expression which the murderer af-
terward explained to refer to the doctrine of the
immaculate conception. The Archbishop fell to
the pavement, and, faintly muttering, "Ah malheu-
reux 1" expired.
The present Bishop of Amiens has received the
appointment to the vacancy. The difficulties be-
tween Prussia and Switzerland have been peacea-
bly settled, the King of Prussia relinquishing all
claims to the territory of Newfchatel, but still hold-
ing the two castles as his own private property.
Queen Victoria, of England, is againaencienteand
it is expected will present another pensioner upon
the English Government about March. Two more
men have been picked up who represented them-
selves to have belonged to the French steamer
"Lyennais," lost at sea by being run into by anoth-
er vessel when three days out from New York.
They report sixty drowned. These two escaped
upon a raft. Crawford, the Sculptor, is lying dan-
gerously sick at Rome from a malignant cancer
which it is expected will terminate his life. Mrs.
Crawford sailed in the "America" last week to join
her husband. Ibrahim Pacha has beaten the Rus-
sians badly in Circassia, leaving 4,000 of the enemy
on the field. besides their Commander-in-Chief.-
The Emperor and Empress of Austria, accompanied
by Count Buol and Barons Bache and Bruck, have
to-day made their entry into Milan. Canton has
been bombarded by the English and Americans,
and Shanghae taken by the rebels. Four Ameri-
cans were slaughtered at the former place and their
heads stuck upon the walls in sigHt of the opposing
armies. Teas and Chinese goods are therefore nec-
essarily very high here, importers holding firm un-
til next advices. M. de Morny, Ambassador of
France to Russia, has been married to a daughter
of the Countess Trebedeskoi.
Now for home. .Matters in Nicaragua are pro-
gressing rapidly-down hill fashion. Emigrants to
the number of five hundred has been stopped and
detained from proceeding on the Tennessee by the
U. S. authorities. Among them are Col. Hall, Capt.
Fabens and Mrs. Hensingen, who was lately a
wealthy widow in the State of Georgia. Shipwrecks
are so common here now that we think it remarka-
ble two or three are not reported every morning.
Mr. Brooks, of South Carolina, died. at 7 o'clock
on tuesday evening at Brown's hotel, Washington.
Mr. Keitt, of South Carolina, announced his demise
in tie House on Thursday. He was followed in
remarks by Gen. Quitman, Messrs. Campbell, Cling-
man and Savage. This latter gentleman rendered
himsdf 1opprobrious to all by his foolishness. Mark
now:
Mr. Savage did not approve of much talking at
any thie, but he would do injustice to his feelings
and lose of his constituents by remaining silent on
this sad occasion. History records but one Ther-
mopyle, but there ought to have been another, and
that f(or Preston S. Brooks. Brutus stabbed Cwsar
in the capitol; and whatever may be thought of
the justice and wisdom of the deed, the world has
ever iince approved and applauded the act. So
shall ihe scene in the Senate chamber carry the
name of the deceased to all future generations,
long t be remembered after all here are forgotten,
and wien these proud walls shall have crumbled
into runs. Had he been permitted to choose his
own dtath, he (Savage) was convinced he would
have fallen in some great battle for public freedom;
but it as not for him to question' the wisdom of
Omnipotence.
After a brief recess, the corpse was brought into
the Hocse, and in the presence of the members of
both branches of Congress, the President and Cabi-
net, the Judges of the Supreme Court, Mr. Bucha-
nan and others, the Rev. Mr. Waldo, Chaplain of
the Howe, delivered a brief discourse (making no
allusion to the deceased) from the wrds of our
Savior tc the thief on the Cross: "This day thou
shalt be with me in Paradise"-the object being to
justify Christ in making that declaration to the pen-
itent, and to show the necessity of repentance.
The House shortly afterward adjourned, and the
remains ef Mr. Brooks were deposited in the Con-
gressional Cemetery.
Garroting, a new way of robbing a man by night
and day in the streets and tlhoroughfares of the
city, originally introduced into this country by a
desperate band of English highwaymen, has been
frequent in occurrence and rather disastrous in its
effects upon the victims. A number of the scoun-
drels have been detected in the act, and our city


GUARDIAN'S SALE.
BY AUTHORITY OF AN ORDER OF THE
Court of Probate for the county of Escambia, I
will sell at public outcry before the door of the Court-
house, in the city of Pensacola, on SATURDAY, the
21st day of March next, TWO SLAVES, viz:
Negro man WILLIAM,
Negro woman WINNEY,
Belonging to the Estate of the Minor Heirs of CHAS.
WINTERS, deceased.
Terms of sale-Cash.
L. F. BRONNUM,
Guardian of the MINOR CHILDREN
of CABLES WINTKRS.
Pensacola, Feb. 17, 1857. 12tds


A Choice Collection of
COMA PA.Ivi *J.-JL.. Ca-B,
BY OLD AND MODERN MASTERS,
Elegantly Framed.
HE SUBSCRIBER HAS JUST OPENED A
SSplendid Collection of Oil Paintings, in
superbly rich Gilt Frames, at his
SALES-ROOM ON GOVERNMENT STREET,
fronting the Public Square, affording a fine opportu-
nity to the citizens of Pensacola for furnishing their
parlor walls with WORKS OF ART, seldom offering
in this plade. The attention of connoisseurs, the
patrons of the Fine Arts, and the public generally, is
invited to this collection, now open for examination.
Feb. 17, 1857. [12] GEO. W. HUTTON.


COLLINS'S C. S. AXES.
UST RECEIVED AXD IN STORE-A FEW
boxes Collins C. S. Axes, Kentucky pattern.
Will be sold low to close a concern.
GEO. W. HUTTON.
Pensacola, Feb. 17, 1857. 12


Godey's Lady's Book.
EVERY SUBSCRIBER TO THE LADY'S
Book receives 1200 pages of reading, 25 steel
engravings, 12 of which are four, five or six figure
colored fashion plates, at least 720 articles by the
best writers in America, and about 800 engravings
on wood-besides plates printed in colors, which
are not given by any other Magazine, and all these
at the following low rates:
One copy one year $3. Two copies one year $5.
Three copies one year $6. g Five copies one year
and an extra copy to the person sending the club,
making six copies $10. Eight copies one year and
an extra copy to the person sending the club, mak-
ing nine copies $15. Eleven copies one year and
an extra copy to the person sending the club, mak-
ing twelve copies, $20.
Godey's Lady's Book and Harper's Magazine,
both one year $4 50.
Godey's Lady's Book and Arthur's Home Maga-
zine, both one year $3 50.
Godey's Lady's Book and The West-Florida Times
both $5 00.


In reference to the late disastrous fire in Mobile
the Mobile Advertiser, of Wednesday, says:
Upon inquiry made this morning we learn that
the amount of cotton consumed was about 9.500
bales, of which 2,000 were ship-marked, and of
course the property of foreign holders, the remain-
der "planter's mark." At 12+c. per pound, the
inside quotation for Middling cotton, and averaging
the cotton at 500 pounds per bale, the total loss of
cotton would be about $582,000, on which there
was an insurance of a little less than $250,000 in
the Merchants', City, Mobile Navigation and Mu-
tual, Alabama Life and Trust, Firemen's and Ful-
ton Insurance Companies-all local institutions-
the greater portion of the loss having been sus-
tained by the three first med. The warehouses
were insured in the jEtna, Ala aa Life and Trust,
and City Insurance Compa about $14,000.
It will, however, be gratif interested, to
know that arrangement, W de by the va-
rious offices to meet' promp[t the losses sus-
tained, and that they are amply able to satisfy all
the liabilities supposed to have been incurred, and
even more, should further examination prove our
present estimate below the mark. The results are
sufficiently deplorable, but we are glad to find them
less serious than was at first supposed. The loss to
Mobile and interior planters will, together, be in
the neighborhood of $400,000, of which the insu-
rance companies share the largest portion.

THE CHINA WAR.-A dispatch from Trieste (re-
ceived by the steamer Africa) mentions the arrival
at Suez of the East Indian mail steamer Calcutta,
with dates from Persia and China to December
16th. Only a few words were telegraphed, but
they are important. Yez, the Governor of Canton,
continued obdurate. The French Folly fort had
been taken and destroyed. The Chinese had set
fire to the factories, and all the hongss" were de-
stroyed. The Oriental Bank, Bank of Agra, und
Mercantile Bank were on fire, with no hopes of
saving them. It was said that the city of Canton
would no longer be spared, and that the discharge
of rockets and shells had already commenced.
The British fleet had taken possession of the forts
of Bushire and the Island of Karrack, in the Per-
sian Gulf. It was reported that a Russian foroa
had occupied Astracan.


6 6w


2 HALF-BARRELS PICKLED HERRING; 20,
half-barrels No. 1 Mackerel; 25 kitts No. 1
Mackerel; 20 bbls. Beets, 10 bbls. Ruta Baga Tur-
nips. For sale by W. H. BAKER & CO.
Jan. 31. 10


PENSACOLA SHOE STORE ENLARGED.
OPPOSITE PUBLIC SQUARE,
Corner Government & Palafox sts..-

A NEW STOCK
-OF-

BOOTS, SHOES AND GAITERS
Just received, direct from Philadelphia,
of the LATEST STYLES, comprising
every article in the Shoe line, from ladies' and gen-
tlemen's Fancy Gaiters to Staple Bro-
gans, to which I ask the attention of this city
and surrounding towns.
My stock is Large and FASHIONABLE, and will
be sold by the dozen, or single pair, at a SMALL AD-
VANCE on Philadelphia pricesfor cash.
P. M. HATCH.
N. B.-Country dealers who will call and exam-
ine my stock, CAN'T HELP BUYING.

W Mr. Hatch has made such arrange-
ments with the fin;m of Jos. S. Levett & Co.,
of Philadelphia, that his stock will be continually re-
plenished with all new and fashionable styles, as
well as with fresh supplies of staple articles.
December 25. 5


FRESH GARDEN SEEDS.
A COMPLETE ASSORTMENT OF FRESH GAR-
den Seeds, from the best growers, just re-
ceived, and for sale by WM. H. BAKER & CO.
Pensacola, Jan. 27. 9 1

W. T. STOCKER,
Lumber Commission Merchant.
:- 0 F F I CE----
IS2 Circus street.....New Orleans.

REFERENCES.
J. W. WILDER, Esq.,)
J. R. PIKE, New Orleans, La.
J. B. ST.AMAND, "' )
D., McBEANI Esq., Handsboro,
8ly S.S. HENRY, Miss.

B. C. WILLIS,
.ALucotioneer.,
AJzi D
GENERAL AGENT,
3 Will attend promptly to all business entrusted
to him. itf

Sash, Door and Moulding Factory,
BAGDAD, Fla.
THE Subscribers will receive orders for every
L description of Sash, Doors, Blinds and
IM]ouldings, made tat the 'above Factory, and
furnished at short notice.
3 KEYSER, JUDAH & CO.
TRIMIBLE & PETERSON,
S al 1-3M Qlax. e ,
HEAD OF NEW WHARF,
Solicit a share of public patronage.
TENTS, AWNINGS &c.,
made to order. 1
JUST RECEIVED,
(Per schr. Chas. R. Vickery, tom New York,)
5O BOXES Buckwheat;
8 30 do. English Dairy Cheese.
KEYSER, JUDAH & CO.
Jan. 13, 1857. '7

ST. MARY'S HALL,
PENSACOLA, Fla.
THIS FINE HOTEL, affording superior accom-
modations for a hundred persons, is now com-
pleted, and is open for the reception of permanent
or transient boarders.
With all household arrangements on the most
improved plan, with an accomplished chef de cuisine,
an experienced corps of waiters and servants for
dining-room and dormitory, and long familiarity
with the business, the proprietress has confidence
that no one will have reason to be dissatisfied.
*,*Lodgers can at all times be accommodated
with horses and carriages.
*,*In the summer season extensive bath-houses
will offer delightful advantages for salt-water bath-
ing. .
Rates:
Board and Lodging, per month......... 0 00
,, 4, per week... 0So
4 per day...-.....- 1o
lIMRS. Mi. COELINS.
December 30, 1856. 5 ly


WN. B. ROBERTSON,
Or PRACTICAL
ENGRAVER, EMBOSSER, COPPER
Plate and Color Printer,
22 DAUPHIN STREET, MOBILE.
0
Having a choice assortment of
PLAIN, ENAMEL AND MOURNING CARDS
AND ENVELOPES, SILVER PLATED"AND ,
BRASS DOOR-PLATES AND BELL-PULLS,
of superior qualities and fashionable sizes, I am
prepared to fill all orders for ENGRAVING or
PRINTING.
[- Particular attention paid to furnishing the
most fashionable styles of Wedding, Visiting and
Invitation Cards and Envelopes.
PERCUSSION SEAL-PRESSES,
warranted superior to any in use.
0 Orders left at the West Florida Times office
will receive prompt attention. 1 ly


JOS. S. LEVETT & COiL,
MANUFACTURERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN


AND FINE BOOTS AND HOS,
No. 122 Market street, 3d Store from
FOURTH,
PHILADELPHIA.
J. S. LEVEIT, PAUL STICKNEY,
late of Memphis, Tcnn. of Boston.
1 ly


I


- 18 1 I I I -II---~ s L Ilrk IL


NOTICE.
THE CREDITORS OF THE ESTATE OF WALK-
ER AND]RSON, deceased, are hereby notified
to present their claims to the undersigned, within the
time prescribed by law, or this notice will be pleaded
in bar thereof. W. EDWARD ANDERSON,
Executor.
Pensacola, Feb. 3, 1857. 10 4w
NOTICE.
THIRTY DAYS AFTER DATE THE UNDER-
signed will apply to the Honorable the Court of
Probates, of the County of Escambia, for an order to.
sell so muth of the Real Estate of JUDITH BYRD,
deceased, as may be necessary for payment of Debts.
B. D. WRIGHT, Executor.
Jan. 80, 1857. 10 4w
NOTICE.
SIX weeks after date I will apply to the Court of
Probates, for the County of Escambia, for Let-
ters of Administration on the Estate of JOHN
JACKSON, deceased.
January 6, 1857. GEORGE W. HUTTON.


MARRIED,
In this county, on the 3d inst., by Hon. C. N.
Jordan, Judge of Probate, Mr. WILLIAM B. JOR-
DAN to Miss MARTHA SHEPPARD, both of this county.


Judge has placed them in comfortable quarters for
the rest of their lives. Clubs for self-defence have
been organized in this city for the purpose of as-
sisting those attacked by these desperadoes, and
it only waits till some number of them is attacked
for the chroniicle of death to the robbers, for men
now carry weapons of all descriptions. A 'gentle-
man (by the way) the other night dropped his re-
volver in the Academy of Music at the Opera,
which exploded one barrel, fortunately doing no
injury, but creating, as you may judge, an immense
sensation.
I wind up this long winded and not over interest-
ing letter by subscribing myself; as originally,
JUBAL CAIN.

WASHINGTON, Feb. 9.-The ice in the Potomac
broke up yesterday, and carried away a large por-
tion of the Long Bridge.

LAND PAYING FOR ITSELF IN ONE CROP.-The late
sheriff of SpottsylvanEa county, Va., Robt. C. Duer-
son, sold a farm of 200'acres for $800. The pur-
chaser put 8 acres in tobacco, which he cured and
brought to Richmond, and after paying all expen-
ses, carried home $1,000.


6 6w


4


PORT OF PENSACOLA.

MARINE LIST.


Arrived.
Feb. 9.-Schr. Southron, Perry, from New Orleans,
in ballast.
Schr. West-Florida, Burns, from New Or-
leans, to Criglar, Batchelder &co.
Feb.10.-Schr. Mary Ellen, Rowe, from New Or-
leans, to Keyser, McVoy &co.
Schr. John M. Houston, Russell, from New
Orleans, in ballast.
Schr. Thomas Deunison, Storey, from New
Orleans, in ballast.
Feb.14.-Schr. J. T. Bradford, Taylor, from Tam-
pa, in ballast.

Cleared.
Feb.10.-Bark J. H. Milley, Gray, for Rio de Janei-
ro, by E. E. Simpson &co.
Feb.11.-Brig Harper, Gilley, for Havana, by Key-
ser, McVoy &co.
Bark John Wesley, Sylvester, for Hava-
Sna, to. Keyser, Judah &co.
Feb.13.--Schr. Satilla, Wass, for Cardenas, by Key-
ser, Judah &co.
Feb.14.--Schr. Burissa, Fowler, for New Orleans,
by Criglar, Batchelder &co.
Steamer Mayflower, McKay. for Tampa.
Schr. West-Florida, Burns, for New Or-
leans, by Criglar, Batchelder &co.
Feb.16.-Schr. Allie Day, Myers, for New Orleans,
by W. W. Harrison.

Exports.
RIO DEJANEIRO-Per bark J. H. Milley-2,531
pieces pine plank, 35 spars.
HAVANA-Per brig Harper-86,000 ft lumber.
-Per bark John Wesley-177,000 ft lumber.
CARDENAS-Per schr. Satilla-100,000 ft lum-
ber.
NEW ORLEANS-Per schr. Burissa-44,404 ft
lumber.
-Per schr. West-Florida-71,000 ft lumber-1
planing machine-53 bales cotton by Keyser, Cush-
man &co.
-Per schr. Allie Day-68,510 ft lumber.







CHaNoES IN TEMPEnATUri--It'is the opiniongein-
rally entertainedby both professional men and people
generally that great and sudden changes intempera-
-ure are unhealthy, but it is the opinion of Capt.Hart-
stAne that it is not so. In his account ofthe Polar Sea
Expedition, he tays:
SNature has qualified man -to breathe an. atmos-
phere of 120 degrees above zero, or 60 below it,
-without injury to health; and the doctrine of physi-
-cans that great and sudden changes of temperature
are injurious to health, is disproveed by recorded
fact. There are very few navigators' who die in the
Arctic zone ; *tisthemost,healthy climate on the
globe to those who breathe the open air. We have
among our associate observers one who observes and
records the changes of temperature in Australia,
where the t,-mperature rose to 112 degrees at 2
(O'clock P. M., and next morning is was down to 40
degrees--a change of 12 degrees in fourteen hours;
Here the people are healthy; and another at Fran-
vonia, N. H., where the changes are sudden, the
nmo-t frequent, and of the greatest extent of any
place with which I am in correspondence on the
American continent; and yet there is %o town of its
size that so great a. portion of its inhabitants pass
the age of three score years and ten. It is the quality
of the changed air that constitutes the difference that
physicians notice, and not the temperature.

BOUNDARY BETWEEN COSTA RICA AND NICARAGUA.-
The Washington correspondent of the New York
Herald writes on the 30th ult.: Advices have been re-
ceived by the last steamer from Aspinwall, at the
Central'American Legations here, that Costa Rica
tAid the Nicaragua Rivas Government have amicably
arranged the boundary .question and all other mat-
ters in dispute between the two Republics. The
territory foTrming the southern bank of the San Juan
river is ceded to Costa Rica, and that river is made
the dividing line between them. The right of transit
is to.be. exercised jointly, and all privileges under
it are to be made. the-subject of joint grants. It is
also stated that two commissioners have been sent
to New York, to make a new sale of the Transit
rkute'President Rivas has obtained abundant proof
that the bld Accessory Transit Company is as much
to lame tor the advent of Walker to Nicaragua as
the Morgan & Garrison Company is for supporting
him. The confiscation of the boats aud property of
the old Transit Company by the Rivas Walker
government will be sustained by the present Rivas
Sadministraion, and the whole-thing sold to some new
party. Senor Mohna, the Costa Rican Minister here,
will leave for New-York -in a-day or two, to meet the
two commissions there.' -

A BRIGHT RUSTIC.-A few days since, a country-
man came to town at Lowell, Mass., and going to the
postoffice with a bank bill, called for a dollar's worth
of postage stamps; the clerks wanted specie, and he
straightwaiv returned with four Spanish quarters: and
these being also denied admittance, except at a dis-
count, he came a third time with a hundred coppers
and a very copperish look of exultation. Being in-
formed by the official behind the window that cop-
ers were not a legal' tender to a itarger extent than
three cents at a time the man from the rural districts
coolly purchased a single stamp, and repeated the
operation till his persecutor caved and took in the
remaining cents: in a lump, much' to the, internal
isatislaction of the infidividual- outside;

MUrttoN vs. PoRKl-An exchange says, Mutton can
be produced pound for pound, at less than half the
price of pork; yields more nourishment when eaten,
and keeping sheep does, not exhaust a farm to the
extent that feeding hogs does. Sheep can be kept
through the winter on hay and turnips, or mangle
wurtzel, or sugar beet,; while hogs will not do with-
out at least some corn.
ToBAcco.-The use of this article is increasing in
England and the prices advancing. Next to salt
this article is becoming pne of the most extensive
and universal articles of conrmption. The revenue
derived from its importation into Great Britain, is
nearly $25,01"1,"000, nearly a dollar to each inhabit-
ant. The consumption of tobacco in the United
States is three and a half pounds per head; in France
one add a half pounds, and in Great Britain' one
pound. ,_ ,


INTERESTnrNG TO NiVY OrrcIEns.-The National
Intelligence of 'Saturday states that several peti-
tions having ,been filed;at the Navy Department,
asking for a Court of Inquiry under the recent act
of Congress 1 the Secretary of, the Navy, with a
yiew to granting a hearing at the earliest pracidea-
ble day, has appointed a Court, to meet in Wash-
ington on the 20th instant.
' The Court is composed of Commodore E. A. F.
Lavaletle, Commodore S. H. Stringham, and Cap-
tain W. J. McCluney. :
The Attorney General. is of opinion, as we un-
derstand, that under the law there may be a plural-
ity of Couris in session at the same, time. Mr.
Dobbin, however, as we learn, does .'not deem it
necessary to appoint more than. one at this time.

FEOx WASHiNGTON.-CoNESSIONAL.--Mr. Mx-
well, of Flqrida, on the 27' ult., addressad the
House.for;r.one hour. He defended the positions
assumed, by the President in his annual message,
and vindicated .the .nationality of the Democratic
party. The true explanation, said he, of the posi-
tion of theDemocratic party,, notwithstanding the
diversity'of opinion alleged against it, was that it
was neither a pro-slavery nor an anti-slavery party.
It -held that, whatever might be the opinion of
this; man or that man, the Constitution forbid him
to thrust that opinion upon the theatre of the Fed-
eral Government. :

A SIkuLAR FASCikATION.-An English paper re
plates the following unaccountable occurrence: "One
of the nost singular instances in connection with ma-
terial- things exists in the case of a young man who,
not long-ago, visited a-large iron manufactory. He
siood opposite a. large hammer and watched with
great interest its perfectly regular strokes. At first i
was beating immense lumps of crimson metal into
thick'blaek sheets; ,but the supply becoming ex-
hausted, at length it 'only descended on the'polished
anvyil. Still the young man gazed intently on itn
motion, then-followed its stroke with acorresponding
motion of'his head; then his left arm moved to thi
amme tulie; and finally, he deliberately placed his fis
upoi lhe anvil, and in a second it was smitten to
Jelly;;The only explanationn he could afford was tha
he felt an impulse to do it,- that he knew he should
-be disabled, that he saw all the consequences in a
misty kind of maner, but that he still felt thl
power within above all sense and reasou--a morbie
impulse, in fact, to which he succumbed, and b;
which he lost a good right hand.

A V"SEL, BUILT AT WETUMPKA !-We understand'
.(says the Montgomery Mail) that- te lessee ha
built and launched at the Penitentiary, a ,sloop 0
about thirty tons. She is:a sloop, called the Cc
qwette and is intended to be sold lor a fishing
smack is Mobile. She was designed and built b'
two or three nautical convicts.: Herp' draft is, tw(
feet and a half. -'- -

THE BOMBARDMENT OF SAN JuAN.-'The Paris Con
stitutionnel states that the merchaitti of Nante
have petitioned the Emperor, appealing to '"th
high apd paternal solitude of his majesty" f-in, fato
iof the French -citizens who were sufferers by th
destritlion of'San Juan ("Greytown") Py the Un
ted States, on the' 13th of July, 1654. The chan
l 0q. o m comerrce of ,Preans,, and the,.principa
merchants of that town had poeviously presented
VeItioh to-the saMe'"effedt. "Their 'example is be
ing followed by the merchants of Paris, Lypns, an
k lseilles. "


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ANOTHER DEFAULTE..-A package of $25,000 in
notes on the Dansvile (N. Y.) Bank was abstracted
from the safe of Benedict & Coit, real estate bro.
kers, on the 2d Januaryj and suspicion fell on the
book-keeper, (a young Englishman, named Edgar
C. Winter,) which was afterwards confirmed, a por-
tion of the missing notes having been recovered at
the Metropolitan Batik, and it was ascertained that
the suspected individual had left on the previous
Saturday, in the steamer Atlantic. The money
was traced back, through several brokers, to a
small exchange office in Wall street. Mr. W. A,
Coit, Jr., one of the partners, started in pursuit
in the steamship Persia.

HUNTING TURKEYS BY STEA&-The Memphis Bul-
letin is responsible for-the folig:
One of the most novel uses r railroads that has
come to our knowledge was demonstrated last
night by the down train of the Memphis and
Charleston company. When a little beyond the
Mississippi junction it thundered through a flock of
wild turkeys, killing two fine ones. One of them
struck the head-light, smashing the glass, putting
out the light, and getting completely "bagged" in
the lamp, from whence he was taken by the engi-
neer in charge of the locomotive. It is yet an un-
decided question, which was the most taken by
surprise-the engineer, in having his light so put
out, "all of a sudden," or the turkey, in finding
his flight thus suddenly cut short. It is clear, how-
ever, that the engineer got the best of the bargain.

BONES or A GIANT FOUND.-Not long since, while
the workmen were digging a well near North Bend,
Ohio, the skeleton of a man or rather of a giant,
was found, twenty-nine feet below the surface of
the earth-who, when living, towered to the enor-
mous height of twenty-three feet and ten inches.
The skeleton was critically examined by Professor
Lind, who arrives at the startling fact, that this
monster man was capable of wielding the fore-arm
with sufficient force to have thrown a cannon bal1
weighing 18 pounds from Cincinnatito Indianapo'.
lis-or a distance of 88 miles; or to have taken a
large millstone in each hand, and have walked with
perfect ease at the astounding rate of 3'71 miles
an hour. J-e-r-u-s-a-l-e-m-[Nashville Gazette.

A HINT TO ADVERTiSERS.--Warren's celebrated
blacking manufactory has now ceased to be. The
business. has "died" out simply from a resolution
taken by the proprietor who succeeded the spirit-
ed original of the firm, "to discontinue advertising
in the newspapers as a useless expense." The con.
sequence might have been foreseen. The firm of
"Warren" has ceased to exist within one genera-
tion. -
DISMISSED.-Lieut. Charles E. fleming, U. -S.
N., late the first Lieutenant of the brig of war
Bainbridge (on the Brazil station) has been dis-
missed from the service in pursuance of the sen-
tence in his case of the naval court martial recent-
ly in session at Philadelphia. ,

Stringer ani Rice, for the recent robberies of
the Bank of New Orleans, were examined on Thurs-
day. Of one charge Rice was acquitted, anid on
another admitted to bail in the sum of $2,500.
Stringer was committed for trial, without bail in
either case.

SHIP-CHANDLERY,
S3lx 13L ip t : -t o r e is
AND
FAMILY GROCERIES.
THE subscribers have now in store, and are con-
stantly receiving from New York and New Or-
leans, a fine assortment of Fresh Articles, consist-
ing of- _
TEAS-Green and Black.
SUGARS-Crushed and Powdered.
SOAP-Castile and Brown.
BUTTER-Goshen and Western.
CHEESE-English Dairy and Pineapple.
Pearl Starch, Saleratus.
Soda and Cream-Tartar.
Buckwheat Meal.
Yeast-Powders, Guava Jelly,
Havana Preserves, Shaker Preserves.
Prunes, Raisins, Almonds,
SDried Apples and Peaches,
Cranberries, Citron,'Currants,
Preserved Strawberries,
Pickles, Ketchup, Sauces,
Gnions, Olives, Capers,
Salmon, Lobster.
SPICES-Allspice, Cloves, Cinnamon,
Nutmeg, Pepper, Ginger, Mace,
Superior Kentucky Mustard.
WINES-Madeira, Port, Claret.
Superior, Cognac Brandy.
Old Monongahela Whiskey.
S Bourbon "
t Schiedam Aromatic Schnapps--genuine article.
Lemon and Orgeat Syrups.
CORDIALS-assorted.
Mackerel, Codfish and Smoked Herring.
Crockery and Tinware.


SManilla and Tarred Rope,
Houseline, Hambroline,
Spun-Yarn, Cotton Lines,
Russia Bolt-Rope,
Rligging-Leather, -
Pump, do
Cotton-Duck,
Oakum, Coal-Tar,
t Tar, Pitch, Rosin,
o Spirits Turpentine,


8, perm and Lamp-un,
Blocks, Single and Double,
Jib-hanks and Mast-hoops,
Ship-scrapers,
S Hook and Thimbles,
Paint and Tar-brushes,
S: Caulking-mallets, Marlinespikes
Pump-tacks, Copper, Nails,
Anchors, Chains, etc., etc.
***WNe invite the attention of our friends and
customers and solicit a call.
We sell for cash, or on short time.
W. H. BAKER & CO.
Nov. 29,18-99 2tf


.ON NEW-YORK and NEW-ORLEANS at sight,
for sale, in sums to suit purchasers, by
3 KEYSER, JUDAH & CO.


MILLINERY, LACE
AND


-3mx>roid.ex'ies.
M RS. BLAIR, 36 DAUPHIN STREET, MOBILE,
imports direct from Paris, a very large assort-
ment of
BONNETS,
CAPS,
S HEAD-DRESSES,
S "and RIBBONS.
Also, every description of LACES, FRENCH EM-
BROIDERIES and MANTLES.
** Orders carefully attended to.
DRESS MAKING at the shortest notice.
F. BLAIR,
1 ly 36,Dauphip st.


.LAND' WARRANTS
TJIGHEST CASH PRWE given for Land War-
l rants, by, KEYSER, JUDPAH & CO.
Decr-pm re 1. .. 4


__


WM. 0. LANE & CO.,
IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS Or
STAPLE AND FANCY DRY GO0DS;
194 Broadway, New York.


WM. G. LANE,
EDWARD H. LANE,


1 ly


KER BOYCE,
JESSE C. LANE.


SWAN & CO.'S LOTTERIES.

SOUTHERN MILITARY ACADEMY
LOTTERY.
Capital Prize
O,OOO
Class 25.
To be drawn in the city of Atlanta, Georgia, in
public, on Saturday, Feb. 2Sth, 1857,
ON THE PLAN OF SINGLE NUMBERS.
3,260 Prizes!
More than 1 Prize to every 10 Tickets!
30,000 Tickets,
MAGNIFICENT SCHEME!
1 Prize of.........$S0,000 is.......$. 50,000
1 ......".... 20,000is........ 20,000
1 .......... 10,00Ois......... 10,000
1 ".......... 9,000is....... 9,000
1 8.. @... 8, is.........8,000
1 "..... 1.. ,000is......... '7,000
1 ".......... 6,000 is......... 6,000
1 .. .... 5,000is........ 5,000
1 .......... 4,000is......... 4,000
1 ".......... 8,000is......... 3,000
1 .......... 2,000is......... 2,000
1 1i Lii nf: 1q 1 iAn


1 ...
100 Prizes of...
100 ...
APP]
S4 Prizes of
4 L, Li
4 L, LL
4 4" "
4 "
4 "
4 LL c L
4 "' LI
4 I" t
4 ,' g L
4 "'
4 3 '
3,000 ,t


ROXIM.


Aluuu Is. ....
100 are........
50, are.......
NATION PRIZES.


i,uut
10,000
5,000


$250 ap'x'ting to $50,000 are 1,000
200 20,000 800
100 10,000 400
80 9,000 320
65 8,000 260
60 '7,000 240
55 6,000 220
50 '5,000 200
45 4,000 180
40 3,000 160
80 2,000 120
25 1,000 100
20 are.................60,000


3,260 Prizes, amounting to.......... $204,000
WHOLE TICKETS $10--HALVES $5--QUARTERS $2j.
The 3,000 Prizes of $20 will be determined
by the last figure of the number that draws the
$50,000 Prize. For example, if the number draw-
ing the $20,000 prize ends with No. 1, then all the
tickets where the number ends in 1 will be entitled
to $20. If the number ends with No. 2, then all
the Tickets where the number ends in 2 will be en-
titled to $20, and so on to 0. ,,
Certificates of Packages will be sold at the fol-
lowing rates, which is the risk:
Certificate of package of 10 Whole Tickets..... $80
"L L 10 Half .... 40
I" 10 Quarter .... 20
Address orders for Tickets or Certificates either
to S. SWAN & CO., Atlanta, Ga.
or S. SWAN, Montgomery, Ala.


Fort Gaines Academy
Toittery.
Class 24.
.To be drawn in the city of Atlanta, Ga.,
in public, on Thursday, Feb. 19, IS57,
ON THE PLAN OF SINGLE NUMBERS.

30,000 Tickets--3,260 Prizes!
More than One Prize to every Ten Tickets.
BRILLIANT SCHEME!
1 Prize of.......$50,000 is........ $50,000
1 ...... 20,000 is.... .... 20,000
1 ....... 10,000 is......... 10,000
1' ....... 9,000 is......... 9,000
1 ....... 8,000 is.......... -8,000
1 ..... '7,000 is......... 7,000
1 ....... 6,000 is... ..... 6,000
1 .......5,000 is......... 5,000
1 : ..... 4,000 is......... 4,000
1 ....... 2,000 is.......... 2,000
1 i ....... 1,000 is.......... 1,000
100 Prizes of....... 100 are....... 10,000
100 ...... 50 are........ 5,000
APPROXIMATION PRIZES.


3,00


4 Prizes of $250
4 200
4 100
4 80
4 66
4 60
4 L 55
4 50
'4 45
4 L 40
4 30
4 4 25
00 20


ap'x ting to $50,000-$1,000
'20,000 800
9 10,000 400
9,000 320
i 8,000 260
L. '7,000' 240
6,000 220
6 5,000 200
4,000 180
8,000 160
2,000 120
1,000 100
are........... 60,000


3,260 Prizes amounting to............. $204,000
WHOLE TICKETS $10--.HLVESq $5-QUARTIBS $21,
The first 307 Prizes are decided in the usual
manner.
The 3,000 Prizes of $20 will be determined by the
last figure of the Number that draws the $50,000
Prize. For example, if the Number drawing the
$50,000 Prize ends with No. 1, then all thelTickets
where the number ends in 1 will be entitled to $20.
If the Number ends with No. 2, then all the Tick-
ets where the Number ends in 2 will be entitled to
$20, and so on to 0.
Certificates of Packages will be sold at the fol-
lowing rates, which is the risk:
Certificate of Package of i0 Whole Tickets... .$80
"L 10 Half 40
10 Quarter .... 20
Address Orders for Tickets or Certificates of
Packages of Tickets either to
S. SWAN & Co., Atlanta, Ga.,
or S. SWAN,
2td Montgomery, Ala.
Plan of Swan & Co.'s Lotteries.
39,000 Numbers corresponding with those on the
Tickets are placed in one Wheel. The Prizes are
placed in another Wheel. A number is drawn
from the number Wheel, and at the same time a
Prize is drawn from the other Wheel. The Prize
drawn is placed against the Number drawn. This
operation is repeated until all the Prizes are drawn
out.
IN ORDERING TICKETS OR CERTIFICATES,
Enclose the money to our address for the Tick-
ets ordered, on receipt of which they will be for-
warded by first mail.
The list of drawn Numbers and Prizes will be
sent to purchasers immediately after the drawing.
W Purchasers willplease write their signatures
plain, and give their Postoffiee, County and State.
W Remember that every Prize is drawn, and
payable in full without deduction.
W All Prizes of $1,000 and under paid imme-
diately after the drawing-other prizes at the usual
time of thirty days, in full without deduction.
All communications strictly confidential.
W Prize Tickets cashed or renewed in other
tickets at either office.
p PRINTING INK.--
JOHN G. LIGHTBODY, New-York,
Pledges prompt attention to orders for his Colorec
'- '- .nn nv Dart of the Union.


ROB'T ADAMS.' DAN'L HARRIS.

ADAMS & HARRIS,
House, Sign, Ornamental and Steambodt

DEALERS IN
Paints, Oils, Glass, Brushes &Window-sash,
Nos. 2 & 4 Dauphin st.,
MOBILE, ALA.
**All orders prdmptly attended to. 4 6m


BOOTS,
BONNETS,
ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS,-
HATS,
CAPS,
FURS, &c,
JOHN Ei ADDICKS' SAMUEL B. VAN DUSEN,
THOMAS B. SMITH;. 1 ly


WM. L. CDONALD,
Maufacturer 6f Carriages, etc,
o REPOSITORY
No.26 BEEKMAN & 18 SPRUCE
street-& few doors East of the Park, opposite Park
Place and Murray street,
1 ly NEW YORK.


3EmovwL'-s IE3cotel,
OPPOSITEE PASSENGER DEPOT,
MACON, Ga.
! Meals ready on the arrival of every Train.
1 .ly


JAMES KELLY,
SUCCESSOR TO
A. J. & F. A. LESLIE,
DEALER IN
FINE WATCHES,

JEWELRY, SILVER-WARE,
AND


Fancy Goods,
No. 246 Dauphin street,


3 ly MOBILE, Ala.

P. LOUGHRY,
IMPORTER OF
CHINA,
GLASS and
I QUEENSWARE,
34 Water street,
,4 6m 1MIOBILE, Ala.


EXCHANGE HOTEL,
EXCHANGE ALLEY, (between Commerce and
Water streets)
IM~obile, Ala.
H. GRIIFFING, Proprietor.
WThis hot'l is conveniently located in the bus-
iness heart of tie city, and enjoys the special pa-
tronage of the nercantile community. 1 ly


LATHROF, WILKINSON & CO.,
IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS
OF


FRENC GERMAN, ENGLISH
AiD AMERICAN
:lA..M-OY G-OO:DS,
HAVE removed to the store No. 26 B E E K.
M AN st., running through to No. 18 Spruce,
where they offer ) complete assortment of the dif-
ferent articles in their line particularly adapted to
the Southern Trale, comprising-
Combs, Musical Instruments,
Buttons, Looking Glasses,
Threads, Percussion Caps,
Jewelry, Pins and Needles,
Perfumery, Spectacles,
Colognes, Brushes,
Extracts, Carpet-bags,
Pomades, Woodenware,
Hair Oils, Tubs, Buckets,
Soaps, Baskets, Brooms,
Inks, Wrapping Paper,
Letter & CapPaper, Etc., etc.
Their increased facilities enable them to IM-
PORT DIRECT, nmd to offer EVERY ADVANTAGE IN
VARIETY AND EXTEaT OF STOCK, as well as in terms
and prices. 1 ly


Benj. M. & Elw. A. WHITLOCK & Co.,
13 Beekman'street,


(CORNER NAsSAU)
First street above the Astor House, on the 'opposite
side of, and Jour doors East, of the Park,
1EW-YORK.
IMP1ORTERS of Cognac Brandies, from OTARD
DUPUY & C.., HENNESSEY, PINET, CAS-
TILLON & Co., and other houses of the highest re-
putation, and sol( proprietors of the celebrated
brandies of
CHATEAU BEINARD,
SUPERIOR VINEYARD,
LIQUEUR )Es CHAMPS 0'O) ,
"MAGNA. CHARTA," &c., &C;,
SCHIEDAM D
OLD HOLIAND GINS,
JAMAICA AND WEST INDIA RUMS,
MADEIRA, POIT AND SHERRY WINES,
from the oldest established houses in Europe, all of
which have been ordered and selected with a view
to their purity andmedicinal use,
Cigai's,
Imported for our own trade, from the best ship-
pers in Havana.
Agents for the fiest description of
VIRGINIA MANUFACTURED TOBACCO.
Also, a large stock of medium low grades, and
Wholesale Dealers in Fine Groceries.

Premium Campagne Cremant
Benj. M. & E. A. W. & Co. are the exclusive own-
era of this wine, and are in receipt of shipments by
regular packets, and beg those who may not have
given it a trial to d.) so, under their guarantee that
it will be found superior in delicacy of flavor and
quality, to any wine at present imported.
BENJ. M. WHITLOCK,
EDW. A. WHITLOCK, IL M. & E. A. WHITLOCK
FRD. J. HATERSTICK, Co.
OLIVER W. DODGE,
HENRY CAMMEYES. J 1 ly


THE GREATEST MEDICAL DISCOVERY OF
THE AGE.-Ir. Kennedy, of Roxbury, has
discovered, in one cf our common pasture weeds,
a remedy that curesevery kind of humor, from the
worst Scrofula downto a common Pimple.
He has tried it ii over 1,100 cases, and never
failed, except in two cases, both thunder humor.
He has now in his possession over 200 certificates
of its virtue, all within twenty miles of Boston.
Two bottles are warranted to cure a nursing sore
mouth.
One to three bottbles will cure the worst kind of
pimples on the face.
Two to three bottle will clear the system of boils.
Two bottles are warranted to cure the worst can-
ker in the mouth or stomach.
Three to five bottes are warranted to cure the
worst case of erysipelas.
One to two bottles are warranted to cure all hu-
mor in the eyes.
Two bottles are warranted to cure running of the
eyes and blotches anong the hair.
Four to six bottles are warranted to cure corrupt
A benefit is 'always experienced from the first
bottle, and a perfect cure is warranted when the
above quantity is taken.
Mr. Kennedy gives personal attendance in bad
cases of Scrofula.
Manufactured by Ionald Kennedy, No. 129 War-
ren st., Roxbury, Mass. Price $1.
Wholesale Agents for New York-Chas. H. Ring,
No. 192 Broadway; C. V. Clickner, No. 81 Bar-
cly street; A. B. & D. Sands, No 141 Fulton st.,
.t A ,to hy all respectable druggists. 2 4m


city.


Yours respectfully,
JOS. S. LEVETT & CO.,
No. 122 Market st., 3d store from Fourth,
PHILADELPHIA.


JOS. S. LEVETT,
formerly of Pensacola.
S6 ly


PAUL STICKNEY,
of Boston.


FALL AND .WINTER
:D3R-S -CrOO:DS
AT

AVERELL'S
NEW STORE, 106 Dauphin street,
Four Doors above the Public Square,
MOBILE, ALA.,
Now offering new styles in
SILKS, SHAWLS,
MANTILLAS, CLOAKS,
DELAINES, MERINOS,
FLANNELS, BLANKETS,
EMBROIDERIES, LACES,!
FRENCH CORSETS,
HOSIERY, GLOVES, &c.,
Together with

PLANTATION GOODS
Sol every kind, at remarkably LOW PRICES.

ALSO,
A Fine Assortment of WINDOW SHADES,


LACE CURTAINS,
CORNICES,
BROCATELLES.
WA call is respectfully solicited.


3


MOBILE BOOK STORE.


LEWIS A. MIDDLETON.


S. H. MCMASTER.


MIDDLETON & MCMASTER,
BOOKSELLERS, STATIONERS,
PRINTERS and BOOKBINDERS,
88 WATER STREET,
(LATE STAND OF T. N. MANN & CO.)
MOBILE, ALABAMA,
Offer, at Very low rates, a large and general assort-
ment of
CLASSICAL,
THEOLOGICAL;
AGRICULTURAL,
LAW, MEDICAL,
MISCELLANEOUS
AND SCHOOL BOOKS;
STATIONERY OF ALL KINDS,
Printing, Writing, Wrapping & Drawing,
Besides every other description of Paper.
CARDS, BINDERS' AND BONNET-BOARDS', &c.
Printing and Writing Inks.
T., A LW31 K3BCECO 3MJB,
A very large
stock on hand, or man-
ufactured to order, for Clerks of
the Courts, Sheriffs, Mercantile Houses, &c.
Books Neatly Bound.
SUNDAY SCHOOL DEPOSITORY.
Middleton & McMaster keep large supply of Sab-
bath School, Religious and Juvenile
Books. Also, Bibles,
.Testaments,
Hymn-Books for various denominations,
Church Music, &c.
WALL-PAPER, TESTERS, BORDERS, FIRE-BoARDs, &c.
W Booksellers, Merchants, Teachers, Acade-
mies, Schools, and the Public, generally, supplied
Wholesale and Retail, on liberal terms,
"laoe'o0 XEOXDtx3ooo,
AND PRINTING OFFICF MATERIALS AND TYPE,
constantly on hand, and sold at New York
prices, adding expenses to Mobile.
W'Postage is cheap, and small orders may be sent
by mail.._
Orders for Music Promptly Filled.
1 ly


PROSPECTUS
OF THE
WEEKLY MONTGOMERY MESSENGER.

"To show the very age and body of the TIMES,"

The undersigned proposes to publish, in connec-
tion with THE DAILY MESSENOER, a weekly paper,
to be called the MONTGOMERY MESSENGER,
As in the announcement of our weekly, we shall
in this indulge in no extravagant promises. With
the daily as with the weekly MESSENGER, we shall
try to make it "The herald of a busy Word;" an
epitome of the Times, by culling for its columns,
from every source within our reach, articles on all
subject-short, pithy paragraphs; for, in this "fast
age," as it is appropriately styled, the newspaper is
not the place for long essays and disquisitions, on
any subject. It should be multum in parvo-.-as
full of news "as a hickory-nut is of meat;" and
this is what we shall endeavor to make the weekly
MESSENGER. -
Into the politics of the day we shall not enter.
To this determination, however, there is one limi-
tation: In the struggle now going on between the
North and the South, we could not be silent if we
would. A native of the Southern soil, our heart's
warmest feelings cluster around its interests; and
whenever these are invaded, our arm, feeble as it
is,"will not be laggard in the fight.
The undersigned would respectfully appeal to
the friends for whom he has so long catered edito-
rially to exert themselves a little in behalf of his
new enterprise. He has at least one "hundred true
and tried" friends in the State, each of whom can
send the names (and money) oelen subscribers,
within on days after reading thisgrospectus; and
they are the men that will do it.
It is intended to issue the first number of this
paper on the 14th of January, 1857, and we shall
be under obligations to those who Vifl send us a
list of subscribers previous to thati'. t
A commission of ten per cent. will be allowed to
Post Masters and others who may send subscribers.
Subscription price $2 00 a year, in advance.
P. H. BRITTAN.
Montgomery, Dec. 18, 1856.


HAY AND BUTTER.
A('- BALES prime Northern HIay; 26 firkins
4J00V choice Goshen Butter. In store and for
sale by KEYSER, JUDAH & CO.


F INE GOLD AND SILVER WATCHES. The


FINE GOLD AND SILVER WATCHES. The
subscriber would call the attention of purcha-
sers to the following, (at less than the usual prices,)
and which will be forward*l to all parts of the
United States and Canadas, by mail or express,
free of charge.
JULES JURGENSEN WATCHES.
Warranted perfect time-keepers, from $150 to $250
COOPER WATCHES.
Duplex and Levers, fromn........... $125 to $275
INDEPENDENT SECOND AND QUARTER
SECOND
Watches, for timing horses........$125 to $250
EIGHT-DAY WATCHES.
Which run eight days with once wind-
ing...................... ..... .$140 to $185
ENAMEL WATCHES.
For Ladies, some in hunting cases.... $35 to 1 0
.CHRONOMETERS.
Splendid Gold Pocket Chronometers,
perfect time-keepers........... $125 to $250
MAGIC WATCHES,
Which change into three different
Watches.....................I$100 to $1'5
Daguerreotype Watches............ $98 to $100
Fine Gold Lepine Watches, 4 holes jewelled.... $25
Fine Gold Detached Levers................ 30
Gold Enamelled Watches for Ladies........ 35
Gold English Patent Levers................ 35
Silver Patent Levers as low as............ 16
Silver Detached Levers as low as:........... 14
WATCHES REPAIRED
In the best manner, and warranted, at less than the
usual prices. Also, Clocks and Jewelry repaired
in a superior manner. GEO. C. ALLEN,
Importer, Wholesale and Retail,
No. 11 Wall street, (2d floor) near Broadway,
1 3m New York.


Mobile Tribune and Alabama Planter.
H. BALLENTYNE & CO.
THE Daily Tribune is issued each day, Mondays
excepted, at $8 per annum, or $4 50 for six
months. The Tribune has a large circulation, both
at home and abroad, and is a valuable medium of
news and miscellany.
The Alabama Planter is published every Monday
morning in imperial octavo form, containing a large
amount of reading matter, together with valuable
market reports, at $3 per annum in advance. 1 -ly


TO ARRIVE--on Consignment.
PER schooner A. P. Howe. from New York-
30 boxes English dairy Cheese,
25 boxes Cheese,
S0 boxes scaled Herring,
30 bags Buckwheat,
20 boxes do
20 boxes Powchong Tea,
5 fails Dates,
50 M imported Cigars.
KEYSER, JUDAH & CO.
Nov. 25, 1856. ltf


PROSPECTUS


PROSPECTUS
OF THE


"WEST-FLORIDA TIMES,"
A WEEKLY NEWSPAPER,
The First No. of which was issued in the
City of PENSACOLA, on the
25TH or NOVEMBER, 1856.
Many years have passed since the earliest agita-
tion of a prjet for connecting by Railroad the rich
heart of the South with the best harbor oh the
Gulf Coast--a scheme of vital importance to the
city of Pensacola, and promising much advantage
to the planting regions of the interior; during this
weary lapse of seasons, hope, which "springs eter-
nal in the human breast," has at no time permitted
an utter extinction of the belief that the scheme
would eventually be carried out, and that Pensaco-
la, the Gulf terminus of an iron bridge spanning
the strip of pine barren which has hitherto insula-
ted her, would rise with magic growth to a proud
position of prosperity and Importance among the
cities of the South. Even now the consummation
of this hope appears to be at hand. An unwonted
bustle and stir is in her coasts-the Railroad has
actually been commenced, and under circumstances
which leave no doubt of its early completion-
strangers are flocking, in to identify themselves
with the city in her march of progress-those to
the manor born, whom necessity compelled to
make their abiding places in stranger cities, but
who have ever turned in longing expectancy to
that which sent them unwillingly forth, are coming
home to animate the old familiar scenes, and lend
their aid in freeing the chrysalis city from the bonds
of torpor which she is struggling to throw off.
In view of the facts which happily have furnished
occasion for such preamble, we have resolved to
establish a newspaper which shall be, to the extent
of our means and ability, a type of the improved
prospects and condition of the ancient city of Pen-
sacola; a paper which, as it values its own exis-
tence and prosperity, shall be devoted to the advo-
cacy of the carefully studied interests of the public
who support it; a paper, in politics independent-
actually independent--and taking and expressing
its pwn views of State or National men and meas-
ures.
Convinced, in common with a large majority of
the citizens of the West, that its union with thoe
rich and prospering State of Alabamanis essential
to the progression and development of 1t4 various
interests, the Times will be established and con-
ducted on an uncompromising Annexation Plat-
form, and in advocating that great measure, ques-
tions of State, or of immediately local politics, will
be set aside or valued and advanced as they sub-
serve the end. We take up the cause of outraged
nature, the aim of which in giving these harbors
to be the gateways to the fertile plains of the inte-
rior, has been so thwarted by the ingenious stupid-
ity which apportiofned the gates to one and the
fields to another.
The Times will be a paper of handsome appear-
ance, and contain a large amount of reading mat-
ter-the latest news carefully collated, the choicest
newspaper literature current, full commercial and
marine intelligence, and, it is hoped, will be made
the medium for the exposition of the views of the
ablest men in the West relative to matters of public
Importance and general interest. All measures ac-
cessory to securing the Organ of Annexation a
large circulation in West Florida, and South and
Middle Alabama, will be put in practice and for-
warded by the aid of ample capital and command-
ing influence; and when the whistle of the first lo-
comotiLve shall send startled echoes through the
still forest aisles of pines, as the iron horse dashes
on from the waters of the Gulf to the emporium of
central Alabama, the train will bear to the inhabi-
tants of the interior the latest news in the columns
of the Daily 1Times. J. W. DKQR.
-*, -


.. ._~....,:, ~~,:..... .rl.- ;;y -- -- "' "'". "`' i I ~I I


I


ADDICKS, VAN DUSEN & SMITH,
No. 159 Market St., above Fourth,
PHILADELPHIA.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
SHOES,


PHILADELPHIA, Jan., 1857.
To DEALERS IN ALABAMA AND FLORIDA :
Gentlemten:
WE are now established in the

WHOLESALE SHOE BUSINESS,
in this city, and beg leave to invite your attention
to our
NEW AND EXTENSIVE STOCK
OF
BOOTS, SHOES and BROGANS,
Direct from the Manufacturers in- Massachusetts,
New Jersey and Pennsylvania ; and believing, with
our long experience and superior facilities, our
Stock, for YOUR TRADE AND FOR THE SATISFACTION
OF YOUR CUSTOMERS, CANNOT BE SURPASSED,
we solicit an EARLY CALL when you come to the


DISSOLUTION.
T HE firm of WOLFE, GILLESPIE & CO., is
this day dissolved by mutual consent.
JOHN WOLFE,
G. D. H. GILLESPIE,
RICHARD P. BRUFF.
New York, Dec. 31, 1855.

NEW FIRM.

BRUFF, BROTHER & BEAVER,
No. 44 WARREN ST., NEW YORK.
THE undersigned, for many years connected
S with the above House, have formed a copart-
nership and associated with us, as special partner,
Mr. JAMES I. DAY (late of the firm of SIark, Day
& Stauffie ,lew Orleans.) Our business will be
condubtpdudler the style of
BRUkF', BROTHER & SEAVER,
in our commodious New Store, No. 44 Warren at.,
New York. r
We have now on hand and are receiving a very
large and entirely new stock of Foreign and Do-
mestic Hardware, Guns, Cutlery, Sporting Appara-
tus, &c., which we offer at the lowest rates for Cash
or approved notes.
We are the only agents for R. P. Bruff's Cast
Steel Warranted Axes and Edged Tools.
IlWOrders will receive our best and prompt at-
tention, and are respectfully solicited.
RICHARD P. BRUr, )1
CHARLES BRUF, V BRUFF, BRO'. & SEAVER.
GEO. ARTHUR SEAVER, )
New York, April 5, 1856. 1 ly


1


- -1








a lunatie-a raving, distracted, dangerous bedlam- cate her passion-that I'm her'n in life and death-
ite ? : and sign my own name to it.


Altejr, Ego, Esq., Editor, Publisher, etc.




STerms of the Literary Fillibuster.

SUBSCRIPTION-Rates liberal, but very seldom in
advance.
Ar[iVaiS1,N--;-Fr aol''r;-.-m>'uti of some length a
certain rate, and longer ones in proportion, un-
less othe. terms are agreed upon;' in.which case
we shall discount as little as possble from the
above rates. *.*
Bills will be' presented continually to those who
may honor us with their patronage.

UBsumptatory.
With certain 'feelings we resume control of the
editorial pen of the Fillibusiter, prepared to' go our
length, boot-heels, beaver and all, into universal
newspaperdom,. for which our contempt has assum-
ed a',type most exaggerated, aggravated, and truly
startling in character. A faint perception begins
to grow upon our quickened faculties that we have
been trying to pierce with our feeble mortle eye-
Ssight the dim recesses of the shadowy-obscure,
where is hidden the womb of the future holding the
germs-of an improved newspaperdom; that we have
been butting out our editorial brains againstthe
adamantine walls 'of:'ost apathetic indifference;
that newspaperdom doesn't 'care three Schied-n
Schnapps of the finger for us, But does that make
a dit of difference ? Not a difference!
Week before last we left a sub., Mr. Potato, in
charge,'but he has been ignominiously deposed for
being corruptible-receiving a bribe-bribery and
corruption.' The purity of the press suffered in .his
hands, and he was greedy. We 'thought Potato
would not have gotten 'so ecstatic over that cargo
of oranges, unless for a consideration, and deter-
mined to sift the matter to the bottom we repaired
to his sleeping apartment on the morning after the
issuance of the Fillibuster. The'amateur editor had
evidently passed a sleepless night; Fame was a bed-
fellow too novel and unaccustomed to permit him
undisturbed repose; A -candle exhausted to the
socket and several copies of the last Fillibuster, the
impression seeming dim and faded as if worn out
with much reading, showed what had been the na-
ture of his vigils. Just beginning on another copy,
when we entered. Mr.,Potato slipped the paper un-
der the bed;clothes and feigned sleep, snoring with
more emphasis than harmony..
"Hallo, Potato;"' said we, "wake up, man; we're
hungry; bring on your surreptitious fruit-your il-
licit oranges; w'e smell oranges."
"Oranges!" quoth -Potato, starting in guilty
fright,; "o.-r-a-n-g-e-s! you smell oranges? 'gad, I
like that! Smell oranges! Ha! ha! Come here,
Ego, and let me look at your nose : Remarkable
organ, that! How's the wind-South! Don't you
smell lemons, too? You smell oranges all the way
from Cuba! I'm a villain if there's been one in this
ro09m for three-yes, four months. Smell again,
old feller, and maybe you'll smell a rat, or a pine-
apple,' or a bull-fight! Remarkable nose !"
What.are'these, Mr. Potato ?" said we, handing
him a InumIber of orange seeds which we gathered
offthe'floor. ... .
"Don't know; very singular looking grainh' Oh,
ho! Good joke that I shouldn't recognize them.-
Come nearer and ll tell you what they are, in con-
fidence,.for I expect to make a fortune: they are
seeds of a new seedling goo-eborry vhich I brought
from Brazil. I shall get you to 'advertise them two
hundred dollars' worth. You should see those seed-
linggoos.-ij, rres-',Eg'o "
.."Whatare these, Mr. Potato-gooseberry rinds?"
said we, emptying a qiantity'of orange peelings
South of an old boot in which the poet had snugly be-
stowed them. \
"I'oe''t know-ha Let me see? Well, I hope I
may never have a whole coat or write another lick
if somebody hasn't been bringing orange peels into
m 'nroom! 'Singular circumstance, very 'Gad, I
only ni'h they had brought -he orane6s in the peel,
Ego; I'd haie cv itL for you, and we'd have had a
jolly blow-out."
Sebzequ-ieitlv we learned that Potato had made
*'our oraiges the consideration for an article in glo-
rification of a holder's stock of the article. Our con-
fidence'inhis integrity was gone. The purity of the
press had been idandalized. His opinion had owed
a'bia tohi-, iritre--t. Four oranges was too small
price. Ie gree.ld'y ate them all himself-dog him!
He tergiversated to conceal his rascality. We ig-
lidminiously kick him off the editorial tripod of the
Fillibuster, a&. one naturally disqualified for the
moral instructing and guiding of the people.

THE, harvest of a thoughtless moment is often reap-
' ed in long days of thoughtfulness, and happy is it
if they be not of pain. We are led to this moral
reflection by reading the consequences of, a silly
Valentine which we addressed to Potato, in delicate
feminine calligraphy. It quite capsized the poor
poet's slender modicum of philosophy, as the read-
er will .see by perusing his communication.,

: ''..... TTER FROM POTATO.

MY APASnTMENTS, )
., Pensacola, Feb. 13, 1856.
Solemn Crisis.
.EDIToi :-Having, from my own free-will and
choice" as you know, very voluntarily resigned the
unpleasant editoriall position into which your impor-
tunity forced me, so much against my will, I yet
beg the indulgence of a column or so of the Fitli-
buster as a correspondents. Permit me to remark


here, in the outset,, that my corporate personality,
my incarnated individuality, can be purchased by,
Sand econum the property of'any 'dealer :in Fancy
Groceries at the reduced ad'valorem tariff of 3'c.
Vi, avoirdupois weight, and when they have got
me at .that price I'm a knave- else, if I'd take the
bargain ff their hands at 100 per cent. discount-
dog nme'! olbr I Ifeel ."dog cheap." Here am I, tPota-
to, hitherto A respectable citizen of the world, and
now--what? What is now which was N. K. Pota-
to ? '"Gad, yon can'4 tell me, and if I know myself
I hope I may be tied, neci and heels like Mazeppa,
and forced to jockey a dead jack through a quarter
race as long as a parallel of latitude South. from
Greenwich! I db, by-the bye! .
What Potat6' was-the World knows. What Po-
tato is-the. World, aad the Solar System ,don't
know; but eI can guess ,I'll tell you what I think
I am: I think rm a luna-tic; I think I'm the fel-
ler h*bo wdid "pluck bright honor from the pale-
faced ao1na.and itI the attempt got his fingers be-
tween the 6ld lady's grin4eri, and, instead qf col-
lecting a had'dl of honors he came 'out a mouth-
ful of digits wol'e off'than when he went into the
speculation. Hence, hp was, calledja luna-tic, and
I'm enough bigger fool than he, to be caUed a
looney-tic. Answer me, Editor! On your'life, or
I'll slamb you, What am I? Ain't a fool, a maniac,


I sought bright honor-that bubble, reputation,
at the steel pen's point, and I got it! Got reputa-
tion with a vengeance! Why the little dogs of news-
paperdom do howl at me! I d.i, r r't, look at riay own
shadow for fear of seeing the reflection of undue au-
ricular development. The pens of universal news-
paperdpmo are pointing, gibbering, jeering and
sneering at me! Ow! wolves! fire! water! mur-
der! Ow! Ow! Take 'em off! Help! Ow! *
Editor, the last lick, the asinine kick at the dy-
ing lion was dealt of "Rube," but the editorial
breath was too nearly out of my bpdy that I should
feel it, and, in the capacity of a private citizen, I
now proceed to kill '-Rube," who discourseth thus
in the "Milton Phoenix "--we make Butcher's meat
of "Rube" and call it veal-ha:-
"an thaur ar uther things that i wud lik to speke
bout, but ferin u wil git mad an not publish eny
mor o my articles, i wil ontle alud to 1 uther thing,
an that is that fillybuster paper in penncycoly buy
mister alter ego, now i inks upun his ritins as purty
sensybul, aumtimes, but that poik pertater his ritins
awl nonsense i don't no wot the editur means by letin
such articles be publisht, i see hes the editur this
weke an has got up his doggrytip or ambrytip or
sum uther tipe, which i recin was tuk by that picture
taker wat wus up her, it luks like he wus distantly
related to an ole profit which we rede uv, that wus
the fust one uv that ciud that ever spoke an I recin
pertaters the 2d." "RUBE."
Good! That means me! Ha! Now, in the first
place, I bring my right hand down slap on the top
of Mr. Rube's, cabesa with sufficient momentum to
drive his old hat over his eyes and nose, and punch
the crown out; in the next place I take hold of the
disconnected rim of said hat and jerk it over the
owner's head in a violent manner, his smeller only
being preserved from serious damage by the physi-
cal peculiarity of its turning the wrong way without
my assistance, thank you; I next take a deter-
mined hold on this central ornament of Rube's in-
telligent countenance and attempt, with brutal en-
ergy, to unscrew it oat of its socket in his face,
my left hand being at the same time engaged in un-
screwing his right ear; meanwhile my neck is oc-
cupied in holding both of Rube's hands, and the
lower part of my body is drawing off the attention
of his boot-toes from the operations being carried
on against their owner's upper works. I then relin-
quish my enterprising design of unscrewing Rube's
nose and ear, and screw them back where I found
them with a series of rapid and artistic revolutions
of each hand. By a sudden change of operations
I disturb Rube's equilibrium and effect a junction
between_ his back and the top of the side-walk; I
then seat myself luxuriously on a part of his body
softer even than his head, and deliberately proceed
to pizen him by forcing him to "eat his own words,"
choking his mouth open with one hand while the
other feeds to him, as fast as he can swallow, frag-
mentary transcripts of a copy of the "Milton Phoe-
nix" containing the above communication. Having
administered this dose and several severe kicks, as
a counter irritant, I turn Mr. Rube over to the ten-
der mercies os the efficient medical faculty of Mil-
ton who, with the other half of the population, are
squatting round on their hams and watching the en-
gagement.; the faculty, thinking that desperate
cases require desperate measures, insert the suction-
hose of an old fire-engine in Rube's esophagus, by
way of a stomach-pump, and save him for hanging
at some future day, I trust. I then invoke ye Shade
of Bob Robinson and whip with ease the whole Po-
lice Department of Milton which attempts to arrest
me; retreat in a masterly manner, spend the night
in a familiar swamp where I used, long ago, to bam-
boozle the patrol; get aboard the steamer Ewing
next morning; attempt to "do" Capt. Rowe out of
the fare; fail in the attempt, and come to town
with a clear conscience, an empty pocket, a tailless
coat, a collarless shirt, a variegated complexion, a
number of bruises, and a bit of Rube's starboard
ear by way of a relic. Yours, N. X.. POTATO.

*So Conscience maketh cowherds of us all.
S... .-Spokeshave.


Car'cL


., Beware of Man-Traps! B
SNIGGER KILLER POTATO, hereby utterly
4) refute, contradict, disclaim, do away, ignore,
and contemptuously *st back in the teeth of the
vile slanderer, the libellous assertionii of the "Flori-
da Democrat," that "Potato has gone in the coun-
try." I not only have not been in the country for
three months past, but have not been outside the
outsquirts of Pensacola, and, moreover, nothing
less than a desire to obtain the' Satisfaction of a
Gentleman from "Rube," of Milton burgh, could in-
duce us to leave town.
Furthermore, I say to the "Democrat" BEWARE !
mind who you're fooling with! keep your pickers
and stealers off the rattlesnake's nest! BEWARE!
12 ten yrs N. K. POTATO.
Pensacola, Feb, 13.
W|"Milton Phoenix" please copy and send bill
to Democrat office. N. K. P.


Potato Receives a Valentine.
PENSACOLA, Feb. 14.


MR. EDIROR: Permit me-oh, the charmingest,
exquisitest, littlest, loveliest, sweetest, dearest, per-
fumedest, darlingest Valentine, oh me! Dear Hr..
Potato-what tender confidence-I know just as
well who sent it-there's a magnetic sympathy be-
twoen us which speaks to each all in which the oth-
er is interested, other is interested-oh, bliss-The
Spring-Time of the year hath come, The Birds their
tender lays are singing, While in the Spring-Time
sunshine they, Theifr joyous flights are gleefal wing-
ing, And still ilkere'er their course they turn, Their
gay and grateful song is ringing-the angel !-the
unqualified, undeniable angel in, in hoops, I expect
-,writes like a, a Potato-fit match for a poet-
'gad, I'll marry her-oh, happy posterity! a new
generation of poets are about to spring up in your
midst, to be born unto you, wacks-Then, dear Po-
tato, why should you, And I, your unknown corre-
spondent, In loneliness forever sigh, Forever sigh
from hearts despondent, 'When thus, your Valentine,
art nigh, W/wse heart to thine e'er beats respondent
-Whoo! Potato, fascinating dog, you've touched
that angelic creature's heart on the tender bnd-of it!
'gad, I've touched it on the raw-I won't trifle with
her-I'll marry her-she'll die if I don't, certain-
she's far gone-let's see, where's there a house to
rent-Then, frs the birds, 0, let us learn, And
practise what vweLnow; You labor for our bread and
T11 Your ragged breeches sew; And together, down
the stream of Time, Our little bark we'll row-oh!
-The eitrairdnary angel !-rather utilitarian,
though-tat'Wrmark on labor sounds unpleasantly
like a reflection-could labor for the angel, but
then its such deuced hard work-besides, its my
mission to write, 'gad, I'm a poet-don't fincy that
ragged breeches all.usion-had no idea she could
see-wear shanghai coat-must have it attended to
-oh, the phoenix of female loveliness-I'll write
and tell her that I knodywho she is-that I recipro-


Rapturously :


POTATO.


Lime.
1~ BBLS. THOMASTON LIME-for sale
B by W. H. BAKER & CO.
Jan. 80. 10


OMAN EYE BALSAM,
FOR INFLAMED EYE-LIDS.
The delicate structure of the Eye-Lid readers it
peculiarly sensitive, and
LIABLE TO DISEASE.
When from any cause it becomes affected, the
inner membrane rapidly inflames, and the eye-lid
evinces the strongest predisposition to attract to
itself humors from all parts.of the body.
HUNDREDS F PERSONS -
of scrofulous habit are disfigured by rawness or red-
ness of the eye-lids, commonly called scre eyes,
and tortured with apprehensions of impaired vision,
who by
I USING THIS BALSAM,
may obtain almost immediate relief-the irritation
allayed, the inflammation reduced, and in o reasona-
ble time,
ALL APPEARANCE OF DISEASE REMOVED.
In all cases the earlier this remedy is applied the
better.

READ THE FOLLOWING EVIDENCE :
NEW YORK, July 1I, 1856.
Messrs. A. B. & D. Sands:
Gentlemen-I have been troubled for ears with
an affection of the eye-lids, and have tried a num-
ber of remedies, without experiencing any decided
benefit. A few weeks since I obtained some of
your Roman Eye Balsam, and applied it according
to the directions. The first application produced a
decidedly beneficial effect, and I had not used it a
week before my eye-lids were entirely free from
inflammation, which had not been the case before
for many years.
Yours, &c., G. B. WILLIAMS,


262 Broadway, iN. Y.
SCOTT'S FASHIONS, No. 156 BROADWAY, NEW
YORK. Semi-Annual "Report of fashions," $3
a year.
Monthly "Mirror of Fashion," $3 a fear.
For both the above works, if paid yearly in ad-
vance, $5.
The above publications may be regarded as the
standard works of our country, they having a wi-
der circulation, and being more gene-ally read by
the business portion of the inhabitants of cities and
villages throughout the Western hemisphere, than
any other periodical. 1 6m


A SURE PRIZE
FOR EVERY TENTH PIE9RSON.
CHANCE FOR A GRAND PIANO FOR EVERYBODY.

ONLY TWO DOLLARS.

400 BEAUTIFUL GOLD WATCHES,
100 ROSEWOOD GRAND PIATO FORTES,
LADIES' BRACELETS,
4 WATCH CHAINS, BREAST PINS,
DIAMOND RINGS and SLYER SPOONS,
To be given away. -
Encouraged by the success whici has attended
the publication of LESLIE'S ILLUSTATSD NEWSPAPER,
which is now closing its second vdume, the Pro-
prietor has determined to return t# his numerous
subscribers a portion of his profits n the following
manner:
Every tenth subscriber will have his money re-
turned by the next mail, and thl paper will be
sent gratuitously for his term of subscription.
Thus in every 1000 subscribes, 100 will have
their money returned and the prper sent for six
months when they remit $2, ane twelve months
when they remit $4.
Every subscription, as it is recdved, by letter or
otherwise, at his office, 12 SpMce street, New
York, will be registered in a book kept by the
Proprietor himself.
The Prize numbers will be 10, 20, 80, 40, 50,
60, 170, 80, 90, and 100 in each hundred. Per-
sons obtaining any of these numbers will have
their money returned and the paper sent free, as
above.
Persons obtaining the following numbers in
every thousand, in addition to the return of their
subscription money as above, wil receive the fol-
lowing prizes:
No. 100, Lady's Gold Braceet.
200, Gentleman'a Gold Watch Chain.
300, Gold Watch (either Lady's or Gen-
man's.)
400, Lady's Gold Chatdaine.
500, Set of Silver Tea Spoons.
600, Gold Breast Pin.
'700, Gold Watch (either Lady's or Gen-
tleman's.)
S" 800, Diamond Ring eitherr Lady's or
Gentleman's.)
"' 900, Set of Silver Dessert Spoons.
1000, Grand Rosewood ?ianoforte.
These prizes will be given to ;he same numbers
in each and every thousand, h addition to the
subscription money being returned and paper sent
free to each and every tenth subscriber, as above
stated.
This subscription book was opened October 20,
1856, in which all future subscriptions will be reg-
istered., a
Every person whose money B returned, or who
is the recipient of either of the above prizes, will
be required to furnish an ackmowledgmcnt of the
same, and their names will be published from time
to time in the advertising colunns of Leslie's Illus-
trated Newspaper.
It should be borne in mind That every subscri-
ber, under all circumstances, whether the recipient
of a prize or not, will get more than a full equlva-
lent for his money in the papei itself. This is the
only Illustrated Newspaper in tie United States.
CLUBBING.-Persons sendingus Eleven subscri-
bers are certain to receive badk one subscription
and have a chance for two; for example, on the
receipt of the eleven subscriptions, the last number
on the books might be 98-tbe eleven additional
subscribers will then include tw prizes.

FRANK LESLIE'S ILLUSTRATED NEWSPAPER.-The
last numbers of Frank Leslie's Illustrated Paper
have come to hand. In style and general appear-
ahce it resembles, and is quite equal to, the London
Illustrated News, which is world renowned for the
excellence and variety of its illustrations. The
New York paper, however, is sdd at half the price
of its London prototype. The ngravings in Frank
Leslie are infinitely superior tc those in Banum's
Pictorial.-[Whig, Easton, Pa.


I IFE INSURANCT.-
ACCUMULATED FUND, $2,829,894.

LOSSES PAID, $1,t27,934.
DIVIDENDS PAID, 773,886.
PERFECT SECURITY
AND
STRICT ECONOMY
are distinguishing features of
THE MUTUAL BENEFIT LIFE ISSRANCE COMPANY.
Among the many advantages offered to the pub-
lic are: The Security of a Lirge Accumulation;
Annual Declaration of Dividends; Payment of Di-
vidends in Reduction of Premiums. One half of
the Premium on life Policies 4f over $50, mvy be
paid by note, bearing 6 per ce.t. interest. Receipt
of Premiums Semi-annually ind Quarterly. Pro-
spectuses, Statements and Applications, will be
furnished upon application at the office. All infor
mation desired will be given by the undersigned.
ROBERT L. PATTEESON, President.
JOEL W. CONDT, Vice President.
BENJ'N. C. MILLER, Secretaiy.
JOS. L. & J. P. LORD, Agents,
1 6m No. 11 Wallstreet, New York.
THE HOUSE-FURNISHING WAREROOMS, 601
Broadway.
J. & C. BERRIAN.
Importers, Wholsesale and Retail Dealers in
HOUSE-FURNISHING ARTICLES
and
FINE FANCY GOODS,
would invite attention to their present assortment
as being the largest-and most complete in Amnji-
ca, and which is offered to their customers and 'The


French Dyessing or Rack Combs.
Bone, Ivory and Germany Silver Combs.
Pocket Combs.
Ivory Fine Tooth Combs.
Italian Whisks, etc., etc.

MATS.
Rope, Jute, and Manilla Door Mats, all sizes.
Alicant Mats.
Caire or Calcutta Door Mats.
Lined Manilla or Mattrass Mats.
English Sheepskin Mats, of white, yellow, orange,
crimson, maroon, brown, green and blue.
Cradle Skins, of fine white lambswool.
Crimson Hearth Rugs.
Carriage Mats, Lamp Mats.
Shaker Table Mats, of plaited Palm Leaf.
Chinese or. Canton Tea Cup.
Plate and Table Mats.
French Willow Table Mats.
English Oil-Cloth Table Mats.
Plate and Tea Cup Mats, etc., etc.

BATHING APPARATUS.
Pillar Shower Bath, with and without pumps.
Bates' Patent Shower Baths.
Plunge Baths, six feet long. Other sizes to order.
Children's Bathing Tubs, all lengths.
Hand Shower Baths.
Sponge Baths, of every kind.
Hip Baths, of zinc and tin.
Leg Baths.] Slipper and Bedet do.
Foot Baths, of wood, tin and tinc.


public at the VERY LOWEST PRICES. Among
their variety may be found-
Settee Tables-an article much approved of-
they economize room in a small kitchen;, when
folded up, they become a seat, the box' containing
the froning blankets, cloth, etc.
Kitchen Tables, of all sizes, with and without
drawers.
SIroning Boards., Pantaloon and Bosom Boards.
Dress or Skirt Boasd. Press Boards.
Wash Tubs, 12sizes. Cub and TreeTubs.
Wash Boirds and Benches.'
Step Ladders and Clothes Horses.
Towel and Nursery Horses.
Clothes Pins and Lines.
Paste Boards and Rolling Pins.
Smoked Beef and Cabbage Cutters.
Beefsteak and Potato Pounders.
Chopping Boards and Trays.
Oval Trays and Wooden Bowls.
Butter Trays and Pails.
Flour Pails and Nests of Boxes.
Ice Cream and Kitchen Pails.
Painted Pails and Keelers.
Piggins and Barrel Covers.
Umbrella Stands. Russia Bowls.
Common and Knot Bowls.
Brass Bound, plain and striped, Cedar Pails.
Round and Oval Coolers.
Brass, Wood and Iron Bound, plain and striped
Cedar Pails.
Knife Tables and Knife Boards.
Towel Rollers. Knife Boxes.
Beef and Bread Cutting Boards.
Baking Trays.
,Hair, Wire and Bolting Cloth Sieves.
Shaker i
Gravy and Tea Strainers, Spice Sieves.
Muddlers. Lime Squeezers. Apple Peelers.
Lemon 'Corers, Clothes Pounderg.
Bed Wrenches, Pins and Cords.
Fish Cleaning 'Boards. :
Faucets. Bung Starts.
Boot-Jacks, plain and folding.
Shovels and Scoops. Twine Boxbes and Keels.
Sugar Mallets. Syllabub Sticks.
Crimping Boards and Rollers.
Shaker Boxes in Nests.
Mahogany Butlers, Trays and Stands.
Foot Stoves, with and without Lamp Heaters.
Butter Moulds and Forcers. Butter Prints.
Butter Pats. Butter Knives.
Wood Spoons and Ladles.
Meat Safes, double and single.
Spice Mortars and Pestles.
Kitchen and Fancy Bellows. Piano Bellows.
Dippers and Trenchers. Shaker Dippers.
Measures and Half Bushels.
Swifts, for winding thread, silk, etc.
Spice Boxes, Salt Boxes, Newspaper Files.
Rat and Mouse Traps.
Salad Spoons and Forks.
do do do, jointed.
Box and Cocoa-wood Napkin Rings.
Ivory and Mahogany do do
Bird Cages, plain and gallery.
Mocking-Bird and Breeding Cages.
Camphor-wood Trunks, a valuable article for
preserving clothes from moths, etc.
Foot Stools, Camp Stools and Chaias.
Artists or Sportsmen's Chairs.,
Yard Sticks, Boys' Sleds, Bows'and Arrows.
Dahlia Poles, Flower Frames and Trellises.
Flower Steps, Window Flower Stands.
Axe, Shovel and Hammer Handles, etc.
Clothes Hampers.
Plate Baskets, lined with tin.
Clothes Baskets, square and oval.
Market "
Cake and Egg Baskets.
Travelling and Fishing Baskets.
Knife and Tumbler Baskets.
Nursery Baskets.
Infants Clothes Baskets.
Splint Baskets, opened and covered.
S Market, "
Peck and Cherry Baskets.
Clothes Baskets, square, and oblong.
Palm Leaf Baskets.
Travelling or Pic Nic Baskets.
Willow Wagons, single and double seat.
falling or calash top.
Cradles.
Basket Chairs, with table, etc.
Bottle Baskets.
Salad Baskets, Children's Rattles.
Wine Coopers, Straw and Cane Bags.
School Satchels and Reticules.
Silver Trays, Dinner Trays.

RATTAN OR CANE-WORK.
Chairs, a variety of patterns.
Infants Chairs.
.4 high for table.
Flower Stands, Work Stands with basket.
Knife. and Spoon Baskets.
Clothes Hampers, Work Tables.
Flower Frames, etc., etc.

BRUSHES, FLY DRIVERS, ETC.
Carpet and Sweeping Brushes.
Dutch ""
Common and Fancy Dusting Brushes.
Fancy Toy and Hearth "
Hearth Brushes, various styles.
fine telescope.
Grate and Black Lead Brushes,Furniture Brushes.
Popes Heads and Eyes, with long handles.
Vial, Bottle and Decanter Brushes.
Window Brushes, long and short handles.
Mattrass and Stove Brushes.
Tea Cup Mops. Coffee Pot and Decanter do.
Shoe Brushes, in sets of three, or single.
Paint and Marking Brushes, Varnish Brushes.
Curved and Utopian Crumb
Whitewash and Scrubbing
Long-handled do
Paint Scrubbing
Horse and Carriage do
Paint, Dusting, and Silver Plate
Sash Tools, Jewel and Button
Stair
Tow, Cotton, Worsted-and Wool Mops.
Horse-foot or Dondruff Brushes.
French Whisk Scrubbing "
Long handle "
Shaker Sweeping Brooms.
Clothes Whisks.
Patent Feather Dusters.
Picture Feather Dusters.
Piano "
Wall and Window Brushes.
Floor Sweeping Brushes, for oil-cloth.
Velvet Whisks.
Toilet Brushes and Combs. Shaving Brushes.
.ivory and ebony handles.
Tooth Brushes, English, French, etc.
Nail 'Brushes, all kinds.
Hats and Clothes Brushes, all kinds.
Flesh "
Hair Brushes,
Infants' Hair Brushes.


A limited number of Tickets or Shares for sale,
AT ONLY $1 EACH, OR TWELVE FOR $10.
Each of these Tickets will admit four persons to
PERHAM'S ENTERTAINMENTS
In various parts of the country, and the purchaser
will receive as a
FREE GIFT
A Certificate entitling to one Share or interest in
the following 300,000 GIFTS! 1
A well-known Marriageable Gentleman, with proper-
ty in his own right, valued at $50,000
A beautiful Young and Marriageable Lady,
with property in her own right, valued at .25,000
A splendid Country Scat, near the city of
New York, valued at - 25,060
1 Farm in Waldo county, Maine, containing
144 acres, valued at - 10,000
1 Farm in Illinois - --. 5,000
1 Lot of 100 acres of Timber Land in Ver-
mont, near railroad, valued at 4,000
1 Farm in New Hampshire - 2,000
1 Lot of Land in the town of Shapleigh,
Maine, containing 27 acres, valued at 1,000
6 Lots of Land in Dedham, Mass., valued at
$500 each, - - ,000
3 Lots of Land in the city of Lawrence,
Mass., valued at $500 each, - 1,500
2 Lots in the town of Pavonia, New Jersey,
opposite Philadelphia, valued at $400 each, 800
1 Mirror of American Scenery, one of the
most successful and profitable exhibitions
in the country, valued at - 20,000
1 set of Dissolving Views, with apparatus
complete for exhibition, valued at 5 5,000
100 lots of Jewelry, (Rings,
valued at $25 each, - 2,5
10 splendid Rosewood Pianos, $500 each, 5,000
20 splendid Rosewood Pianos, $500 each, 6,000
The original Dioramic Exhibition of the
Burning of Moscow - 5,000
The celebrated trotting Mare, Lady of the
Lake, who can trot in harness, a mile in
2:40, valued at - - 1,500
1 Melodeon Organ, suitable for a
church-- .... .--- 250
1 Melodeon.Organ, suitable for a
church - - 200
2 Melodeon Organs, $100 each, SOO
1 Marine Timepiece, a wonderful
piece of Mechanism, - 150
1 Set Dioptric Paintings, valued at 5,000
I Panorama of a "Tour in the
East" .---- .--. .- -. 20,000
100 Orders for Hats on "Genin," the
celebrated N. Y. Hatter, $4 each, 400
87 Clocks, worth .from $5 to $25
each, averaging in value $8 each, 696
5 magnificent Gold Watches, $800
each, ---. - 1,500
10 magnificent Gold Watches, $100
each, ---. - 1,000
100 magnificent Gold Witches, $50
each, -. - 5,000
100 magnificent Silver Watches, $25
each,- - - 2,500
100 magnificent Silver Watches, $15
each, - - -- 1,500
5,000 Gold Pencils, valued at $3 each 15,000
10,000 every-day Registers, valued at $1
each,-- .- .. 10,000
25,000 Engravings ,- -.- 6,250
50,000 pieces of popular Music, 12,500
209,338 articles, Hand Books and Pamph-
lets, .....--- -19,250
$278,696
If in the division of the Gift Property, any un-
niarried lady should become entitled to the "Mar-
riageable Gentleman," and it should prove agreea-
ble to both parties, then it is understood that they
shall be united in
MARRIAGE, AT THE CRYSTAL PALACE IN
NEW YORK,
In the presence of such of the certificate holders
as choose to attend. But if such marriage is not
agreeable to both parties, or if any other person
than a single lady becomes entitled to the mar-
riageable gentleman, then in place of said marriage,
such person shall be entitled to receive from Mr.
Perham a FARM, valued at $10,000 in place of
said marriageable gentleman.
If in the division of the Gift Property, any un-
married gentleman should become entitled to the
"beautiful young lady," and it should prove agreea-
ble to both parties, then it is understood that they
shall be united in marriage at the Crystal Palace,
in the presence of such of the certificate holders,
as choose to attend. But if such marriage is not
agreeable to both parties, or if any other person
than a single gentleman becomes entitled to the
beautiful young lady, then in place of said marriage,
such person shall be entitled to receive from Mr.


S ., .......... .r ..... '' ,r .......~..~'~~. .~., .. ... .. .. ..... . . ... ... .. .... . .... ... .. .. .. .


imperial, oval, oblong, etc.
Water Cans, all kinds,, etc., etc.

ALSO,
HOUSE-KEEPING HARDWARE, CUTLERY,
SILVER PLATED WARE,
JAPANNERY.
GERMAN SILVER AND BRITANNIA WARE,
composition, enamelled, and iron
HOLLOW WARE.
Bronzed, Copper and Brass Goods.
Bathing'Apparatus, Tin Ware, Baskets, etc.
Refrigerators, Sporting Tackle, etc., etc.,
For sale at No. 601 BROADWAY,,
New'York.
SAn early examination solicited. 1 6m


Perhanmthe sum of $5,000 n caah, in' place of tho
beautiful younng-lady. ,
hundred thousandth part of the above mentioned
gift property to be delivered by Mr. Perhaim to
the ticket' holders as afore-mentioned; and that
the dispositioan-of this property, will be wholly trn-
der the control of the ticket-holders, an4 of them
only..
All orders for Tickheta by mil, should -be 'ad-
dressed to
JOSIAH PERHAM, 638 Broid4wa, N. .
Correspondents will please write distlrctly, their
names, residence, Cotiuty and State, to prevent
error. Or, if'convenient1 enclose an envelope with
their direction on it in full, in which such ticket
as they may order will be returned.
AGENTS WANTED
In every city, town and village in the United
States and Canadas, to obtain subscriptions for
Tickets, to whom liberal commissions will be given,
and every facility in the way of Showbills, Cicu-
lars, &ce, will be afforded to make the business a
paying one to those disposed to enter into it with
spirit. Applicants for Agencies will, apyty o0 ad-
dress as above. .


PERHAMM'S PLATFORM ENDORSED Pro-
ceedings at the Shareholder's Convention.
PROGRESS
;- .OF
PERHAM'S
FOURTH GIFT CAMPAIGN
AND
MATRIMONIAL ENTERPRISE!
A meeting of the Shareholders in Perhan's
Great Matrimonial and $300,000 Gift Enterprise,
was held according to published call, at George-
town, D, C., on Thursday, May 8th, 1856. The
meeting was organized by calling Captain Ephraim
Fenton to the Chair, and appointing John S. Cle-
ment, Secretary.
The following resolutions were then offered and
adopted:
Resolved, That each shareholder present be en-
titled to one vote for each and every ticket held
by him, dh all questions brought before this meet-
ing, and that it require a majority of all the shares
represented for the adoption of any resolution, or
to elect a committee.
Resolved, That we now go into an election for a
committee, consisting of three shareholders, to re-
ceive from Mr. Perham the gift property, and to
hold the same in trust,'and distribute it among the
shareholders, in such manner as will give the most
general satisfaction to all concerned. Adopted:
156,255'shares voting yea, 8,160 voting nay.
The election for a committee was then gone
into, and resulted in the choice of-
E. Fenton, of Palmer, Mass., he re-
ceiving votes representing 128,210 shares.
J. H. Briggs, of N. Y. City, 157,646' do
Ira Yale, do 15'7,424 do
I Resolved, That the committee be, and are here-
by instructed to adopt a plan, select a pluce, and
make all necessary arrangements for the distribu-
tion of the 300,000 gifts at as early a day as prac-
ticable. Adopted unanimously.
Resolved, That the committee have power to fill
all vacancies that may occur by resignation or oth-
erwise. Adopted unanimously.
Resolved, That this meeting adjourn, subject to
the call of the committee when they are ready to
distribute the gifts.
Attest, EPHRAIM. FENTON, Chairman.
J. S. CLEMENT, Secretary.
A second meeting of the committee appointed
by the shareholders in Perham's Fourth Gift En-
terprise, was held at the Astor House, New York,
August 6, 1856. On motion, E. Fenton was ap-
pointed Chairman, and J: H. Briggs, Secretary,
when it was unanimously
Resolved, That Thursday, the 28th of February
next, be appointed as the day to commence the
distribution of 300,000 Gifts, at Georgetown, D.
C., and that the shareholders be and are hereby
requested to meet this committee, and then and
there participate in the same.
Resolved, That the committee acknowledge the
receipt of the usual vouchers for the 300,000
Gifts from Mr. Perham.
E. FENTO4, Chairman.


ters are a frank and able exhibition of the conclu-
have arguments which led'the author to become a
Churchman.' Unambitlou In style;anfd frebift
all pretension to polemic skill, but evidently the
production of a vigorous and wel isipined ainjpd,
thoroughly educated in the principles and imbued
with the spirit of sound OtLhmminlip.--PWl-
lisher's Critic. I1 "


DANA & COMPANY.
PIUBLISaIfs, IMPORTERS, AM)P, BQOKs3.1Oz ",
No. 381 Broadway, 'New York, :*.i
Have published Two Stperior'Editions of
THE BQoK or COMMON PRAhy* 186mo. and 2-a mo.
Styles and Prices, as follows:-
16mo. ,' ,
(1) Turkey Morocco, super extra,, antique or... ,
flexible, gilt edges,.....................$250
(2) The same, with clasp,80...............S Q(o
(3) Turkey Morocco, second style, gilt edges, 1 165
(4) The same, with clasp, ...... ........,
5) French Morocco, gilt edges,........1... 1
(6) Roan, gilt edges................ 1 l
(7) Roan, red edges,..... ............ 1 W-
(8) iRoan, marble edges,,................ ,8
New Styles. ;.
(9) Calf Antique, super extra, red edges,'.. !
10) The same, with clasp........"'...... O0
24mo.
(1) Turkey Morocco, super extra, antique or..
flexiiedble, gilt edges,.., ................$2 O
2 The same, with clasp---------- ----2 2'
3 Turkey Morocco, second style, gilt edges, 24
4 The same, with clasp.............. 11 5
5 French Morocco, gilt.qdges,.-...:........ I0
6 Roan, gilt edges,...,,.......... 80
'7 Roan, red edges,.................... 80
(8) Roan, marble edges......................... "5
NewStyls. ,
(9) Cilf Antique, super extra, red edges,.-,' 0
(10). The same, with clasp,-,..,..;.. ,,-.' 50
W, These Editions are. printed in a superior
manner, and excel other editions ofi sae general
style, in the size. of type of the Psalms and Hymns.
They are srid, by several eminent critics to be, af-
ter the standard, the most accurate books in th.
market. : ..
NEW PUBLICATIONS.
SERMONS ON VARIOUS SUBJECTS. Writ-
ten and Preached at Different Places and..
Times during his Public Ministry of Forty-' ,
four Years. By Rev. Adam Empie, D. A,:
late Rector. of St, James' Church, Xclihc.. W
mond, Va., 12mo'. 5L1 .pages,..........-$1 25
The marked characteristic of these discoures-
are simplicity, directness, and eartnestnessin pro-
claiming the cardinal doctrines and vital ,preiepto
of the Gospel, and carrying home its appeals, to ithe6
heart and conscience. Thie author, absorbed in
the pursuit of these objects, does not step aside
from his straight-forward course, to cull ,flowers of"
fancy for the embellishment of his thoughts; but,
in a plain style, with godly sincerity," and without
resort to rhetorical accessories, he succeeds in awa-
kening a serious and intense interest in spiritual
things.
The complexion of his theology,,.and .the. tone of
his preaching, would lead: one to rank him among
our divines of the (so called) evangelical schpol;
yet, in stating his views of Ecramens an. otdi-
nances, hevenploys terms, which evince a dislin.t
recognition of primitive .d ,oatholic truth.-[Pub-
lisher's Critic. ,
Second Edition of
IMPRESSIONS OF ENGLAND. By the Rev.
Arthur Cleveland Coxe. 12mo. 340 pages, $1 0Q
Mr. Coxe set out en his tour with rare qua-
lifications for an appreciative tour in the' mosher
country. For he possessed an acquaintance with
English geography, history, and literature, such as
few American scholars can boast. 'No one can
read this volume without being impressed with thoi
evidence of this intimate andm thorough knowledge,
not gained in the course of travel, but a torch,
throwing its light before to illuminate the pathway
of the traveller. *
As a literary performance, then, Mr. Coie's vo-
lume is entitled to take high rank in -th class of
work to which it belongs. In fact, it reminded. us
pleasantly of "Eustace's Classical Tour in Italyi'
And substituting British for Latin authors, we might
well style the work before us a "Classical Tour in
England."-[Church Review, April, 1856. ''
THE EPISTLE TO THE EPHESIANS; in
Greek and English, with aa .Analysis and
Exegetical Commentary. By Samuel H.
Turner, D. D., POf. of Biblical Learning
and Interpretation of Scripture in the Gen-
eral Theological Seminary, and of the He-
brew Language and Literature in Columbia
College, N.Y. 8vo. 218 pages,..........$1 50
He is thoroughly read up. Works as late as Co
nybeare and Howson, and Eradie, aie repeatedly
referred to, and have been as thoroughlly worked
in, as any old commeitators.-Nay, the preface
concludes with a: regret that the author has not
been able to consult, for his book, two other works,
which, at the time his own was put to press, 'had
not yet appeared. This is highly chairaeteristic of
the indefatigable diligence, and also the deep: mo-
desty, without which the truest andb highest degree
of learning is impossible.-{Church Journal.
Second Edition of, '
LEGION, OR FEIGNED EXCUSES; "For they
are many." By the Author of a "Letter
to a Member of a Church Choir." 12mo.
116 pages, muslin ,.................... $0 8
Tract Form,................ ........... $0 16
A series of short papers originally published in
the American Churce Journal, which, on the prin-
ciple of the ridieu/um acri, &d., gibbet in succes-
sion, with a fair mixture of humor and eareatnea,
the well-worn excuses whih meet the elergymaR
or his lay co-adjutors in their parochial visits.-
[London Guardian.
Honest, pithy, pointedA strong, yet kindly, con-
densed, and abounding in stralght-fdrward, simple
Saxon, talking to pla& peoplein'the plainest way-
it takes up and disposes of nearly all, the .common
excuses which men and women are wont to plead
for their neglect of the "one thing needful. There
is no parish clergyman in the land Wvho 'H net
fred it one of the most generally used hooks he
could possibly select, for vigorous circulation among
the cooler part of the population. The author has
both his head and his heart in the right place; and
his fiand has given faithful expression to thur best
of both.--[Church Jourial.
PRESS,
THE EPISTLE TO THE GALATtANS; in
Greek and Engiish. With an Analysis and.
Exegetical Commentary. By the Key. Pro-'
fessor Turner. '
A FIRST CATEDHISM FOR LIJTTLu ClHL-
DREN. By James Beaven, D. D., Author
of "A Help to Catechizing." With Morn-
ing and Evening Prayerwand Hymns. 82mo.
16 pp. $2 per hundred.
NEW TRACT OF DANA CO.'S SERIES.
FOUR LETTERS TO A BAPTIST. By a.
Layman.of Alabama. l2mo. 40 pages. $5
per hundred. ..
The Church is already indebted to an esteemed
Presbyter of Alabama, for the admirable "Letters
to a Man Bewildered among many Counsellers,"
and no* we have, from a layman of the same Dio-
cese, a series of "Letters to a Baptist" conceived
in the same kindly and Catholic spirit. These let-