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!-- new South ( Newspaper ) --
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mods:note dates or sequential designation Began in 1874; ceased in 1875?
"Wise men accept the inevitable, but strive to shape the future."
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 32 (Jan. 16, 1875).
funding Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
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mods:extent v. : ill. (chiefly advertisements) ; 61 cm.
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1875
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lccn 85038367
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mods:titleInfo
mods:title New South (Jacksonville, Fla. : 1874 : Semiweekly)
mods:subject SUBJ651_1 lcsh
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Newspapers
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Duval COunty (Fla.)
Newspapers
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sobekcm:Name Adams, Carruth & Co.
sobekcm:PlaceTerm Jacksonville Fla
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The new South
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00048585/00009
 Material Information
Title: The new South
Uniform Title: New South (Jacksonville, Fla. 1874 Weekly)
Physical Description: v. : ill. (chiefly advertisements) ; 61 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Adams, Carruth & Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: June 23, 1875
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval COunty (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1874; ceased in 1875?
General Note: "Wise men accept the inevitable, but strive to shape the future."
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 32 (Jan. 16, 1875).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002042984
oclc - 16156679
notis - AKN0865
lccn - sn 87062262
System ID: UF00048585:00009
 Related Items
Related Items: New South (Jacksonville, Fla. : 1874 : Semiweekly)

Full Text
'~


-~-l- -I -- -- 1-3 -I~-'- l~Y3~~..i~~i~i ~";i


THE


NEW


SOUTET.


SIISE M.IENV ACCEPT THE IE VITABLE, BUT STRIVE TO SHAPE THE FUTURE
............ .... ._ -


VOL. II.


JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, WEDNESDAY MORNING, JUNE


23, 1875.


NO. 14.


ta**W ^ SOUTH.
PUBLISHED EVKI-yWEDNESDAY AND
'.;S.-A.. SATIIWAt.. +" ..' "
S TERMS OF'S-BSCRP TIOA':
SRMl-WB'BSLT,'nma=l subsc4beri, $. 5o per annum,
iv5 or qip.re copies, p3,00 eab; and an extra copy
, will be sent to every club of ten received at one time.
VW k'LfLY, mail subscribers, fz2 per anqum. Ten
aopins ;'teath : Twenty copies, $t.6o; Fifty cop-
: ADVER TIS G RA TES:
SEtM-WBMuKLY, $ oco ptir itself, or less, first insertion :
Search subsequent iInsertion. So cents.
WsuidLT, $t.aS per incb or less, first insertion: each
Subsequent insertion, 75 cnts.
Special Notices, ao cent, per line.
TERms: CfSH IN ADVANCE.
Address ADAMS, CARRUTH & CO.,
Jacksonville, Florida

ROPESSIONAL CARDS, &c.
^^J J^ .iMMPaNS4 .- ',.. ^ ,-

ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW.
Sfreedmna's Bink Building. Jacksonville, Fla.
Mr Eitlmons having dissolhed hi, profer-iimnl rela-
.ti6n with j. P. & M Railboad'. iill receive mnis.:ellane-
ous biunes& in his profession., 55 Im.

IJN. BETTES, :
A HYSICIAN, -',AND,+SURGEO ,
r" Jacksonville, Fla.
OnFICB-Opposite Ocean Houae, cornet ofAdams
and Ocean streets. 6-7-6m


WX M. & ARTHUR A. BIRNEY,
^ ., +";AJF^0:.--TON:,E:^.,S ,' -"

4J STREET, NO 330
WASHINGTON CITY

W .T R. Anno';, --
ATTORNEY.AT-LAW
Office, in Reed'" Bloc, Bay Street,
ya.kd aao>i,',',, orilda.



H. A. PATTISOT.
.pATTISON & MEEK,


A. R MEIE.


ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW.
. Office, ReQua's building, Jacksonv4lle, Fla.

N ORTON & KOOKER,
REAL ESTATE DEAl ERS, corner ..--,ar, and Bay
streets, Jacksonville, Florida.
Money lo..ned on Real Estate securuny. General
Ljfp and Fire lInsurar-ce Agents and dealers in Pre
Lan4s, Plantatiols,&c Spr.ngfield suburb -pecialty
Correspondence sollciled. 3 AE5,ti


E. JOHNSON, M. D.,
JHiOMOPTrKA
PHYSICIAN AN'--,. SURGEON.
Office, in Mithiell's n4w i-,aldi ig o.tnV-r r
strect. between Newnat.ak_uU iisrect., rne,;
opposite the POs Oset,.. 1(1i'

- A "- KNIGHT,
ATTORNEYV AT LAW,


No. a Hoeg's Block, up stairs
32SSWIy


Jacksonville, Fla.


RICHARD McLAUGHLIN,


REAL ESTATE AGENT,
Yacksonvilte, Florida.
All sorts or Real Estate bought and sold; Money in-
vested. Taxes p..id, Titles examined.
REuaRs, BV p a .rssIOi, to William Astor, E'q.,
New York Ex-Gav A G. Curtmin. Behi.-fr.te, Pa
Lewis H. Redner, Philadelphia: W. Stokes Bod,
Philadelphia; D, G. Ambler. Banker, lackonille. i,.
Henry tucker, Bostron. Mass. j-"i- i-p-l

W. L. COAN,
JUSTICE OF THE PEACE


AND


SNOTA RY


PU BL IC.


SOffice in SOLARVE'S BLOCK,
S Corner BAY and PINE. 'rcet,
JaeCksovlile, Fla.

SF. COLCORD,

Successor to Hide and Skin bnlne_ of


J. H. CROWELL,
Corner BAy and Ocean sree,-
Wighest cjab pricee paid fur Hides, Skin3, Fur,
Wax &C. 7"-i2i y

LOUIS EMILE MOURGEON,
Foam. Paris, F.aje, (L4y Forelaa Gfrate Staai
liaM Dyeing esablihnmenti.
S- W3 BEINGG AND SCOURING ESTABLISH-
MENT.
Ladies' and Gentlexsen's Wearing Apparel,
Lace Cunrtains,
Lace Sbawk.
ad other fipjabijc m otcarefull) cleaa nd ',ed .
FORS .T'I STREET, between ,enu abi Mar-
ket sateft. *.-Ic-t1


PRINTING,


TWI 'E IV SOVTH

,, JOB AND BOOK PRINTING

ESTABW4ISM NT.



T propnewors are prepared to execute orders for
,eveuy description of.:

'PLAIN OR ORNAMENTAL PRINTING.

uas BUSINESS CARDS,
VISITING CARDS,
WEDDING CARDS,-.
: BILLLH .ADS,
LETTER HEADS,


POSTERS,


CIRCULARS,


BRIEFS,
.- .*-* ;ETS ',
BLANKS OF ALL XKIDS.

COLORED PRINTING AND GILT WORK.



CROP INAT A p''
7 1 r .


Marion County and Sumter.
AsI have been.on a little -tour. re-
cently ;through Marion, ;Sumter, and
Putnam counties, it may nobe, amiss
to send you a running sketch of what
I saw and heard in my journeyings.
I left Micanopy, for my tour, on a
beautiful sunny morn, and weWded
my way parallel with the picturesque
Orange Lake for miles. There"I saw
the very wilderness blossoming as the
rose under the energy and industry of
such men as our friend Judge Mean's,
together with 'the members of a Louis-
iana colony recently settled there.
From them I learned that in less than.
two years steamers would-be seen ply-
ing its bossom, through the Orange
Creek, its outlet1 inio the o waters f
-ihE roitraniticand crooked .,Ocklawaha
river. And really this, or some other
public con\-ey.incc,will be needed soon
to carry off to market the rapidly in-
creasing amount of semi-tropicalfruits
that are produced there.
Lands now, that two years 'ago
could scarcely be sold at the lowest
figures, have and are still going up
rapidly in price-though not so high
yet as the almost .'fabuhlou rates of
poorerlandsin Orange county-so that
in the near future, unless some unfore-
seen calamity occurs, fortunes will be
+made by its owners.
Micanopy itself, but two miles from
this lake, and on the beautiful Tus-
cawilla, as well as near the more
beautiful Warburgh, is now.-almost
embowered in orange trees, for if you
look narrowly, you will discover
every man's kitchen garden to be
actually) an orange grove in its infancy.
Verily this particular, culture alone,
to say nothing of others, has given a
decided 'upheaval to this portion of
our fair State; the influence of which
is but scarcely felt yet to what-it will
be before many years. The wonder
to me is-knowing tlis ,section so well
for the past eighteen )ears-that cap-
itilists: have not as yet more largely
invested in- land enterprises there,
which would so soon remunerate them
an hundredfold., But, it is attracting
them now, and the day is at hand
when this belt of 'country will be
found to be one of tihe very best por-
tions of our State. I was : struck too,
with the very thrifty appearance of
our edible crops all along my route to
Ocala and Lee-tburg. Plci ty seems to
sit smiling at ,er)y garner's door.


to 'umter, and I was agreeably sur-
prised to witness.-the decided change.
Where before I would travel miles and
miles without seeing a habitation,
now I could scarcely get out of their
sight. Residences, school houses and
churches, were now to be seen, where
before it was an unbroken wilderness.
I really had no true conception of the
great improvement thus going on un-
til I saw it for myself, and actually
came in contact with its industrious,
civil and intelligent people. At Lees-
burg, I beheld 'with amazement a
neat, rural village-but of yesterday
almost-nestling on a hill overlooking
Lake Harris, to the right as you en-
ter; and Lake Griffin to the left. It is
too, quite a business place. I :saw
stores there that would do no discred-
it to your city, like that of .Dr. Bauk-
night's. The orange, banana and
guava culture, in the 'rich hammock
as well as in the pine lands around, is
largely on the increase, and is prov-
ing already a profitable source of in-
vestment. I spent a Sabbath there
very pleasantly, and from the quite-
ness that reigned around, as well as
from the large attendance upon divine
services, I could easily discover that I
was amniong a Christian people-one.I
trust that feared God and honored
His hol) day. I saw too a good Sab:-
bath Sclhool on the Union principle
organized there that day, under the
auspices of Mr. J. C. Eastman, a mis-
sionar- of tme American Sunday
School Union. Lawyers, 'doctors,
merchants-and earners, all seemed 'to
take much interest in the education
ihius of their youth to. the end that
they might in time fill iheir places
well in society, and in the Church.
To see all this as we did that precious
Sabbath, in a new and as yet unlde-
veloped country, where society is but
in its formative state, was to look 'up-
on something lthat augured much good
for the rising generation there.
We take the above interesting ac-
count of- a portion of 'Marion and
Sumter Countiesfrom the Jackonville
Press, and belive it to have been writ-
ten by an esteemed -clergyman iof
Gainesville. .
The portion described is similarin
character to, and no better, than the
remainder of these two counties; that
now so long have languished and been
kept back by the want of adequate
and convenient transportation. Taken
together this whole section has
no superior region of equal extent in
the State or the Sou.th. A gentleman
who spent-five months during the last
year in a thorough examination of the
whole State, although expressing a
decided preference for Marion county
iston-frai-ned to seek a location else-
where, for some eighty or more-fam-
ilies, b',lthe lack ofsufficient transpor-
tation.'
S' This is the' region/ to %iic6h "oui
Srie s-. &f e oa and .1(iat.,


T


w t4
to grow corn, cotton, and sugar-cane,
but it can boast of the noble St. Johns -
and its ocean-bordered land of trop
ical fruits grown in the greatest luxuri-
ance.
Central Florida is not in the orange'
belt, but that is no reason why the
people of this section should feel en- r
vious of the success and prosperity
that is flowing in upon Eastern Flori-
da. Why should the citizens of Mid-
dle Florida speak disparagingly of the
pin te sand flats of the East? There is
no manner of competition between
these sections. Immigrants who de- s
sire to embark in general agriculture
would not be long in deciding that
Central Florida was the home for
them, while theE orange-growers will
naturally seek the orange belt. Are
we not all brethern, and are we not asa-
'citizens of Flcrida deeply interested
in the development of the whole
State ? Men who confine their good
wishes to, the narrow pent-up Utica
around their own door-sills, are not
needed in the development of the-






SandAge,-s;nhinel. pinishelh
The Eucalyptus in Rome.
The Pall Mall Gazette says : "Gar-
ibaldi is occupied, among others
schemes, in planting the famous Eu-
calyplus globules (Australian gums
tree) around Rome, with a view to
prevent malaria. Travellers in the
south of Europe have now an oppor-
tunity of admiring noble specimens of
this tree in the promenades and pub-
lic gardens of Nice, Cannes, Hyeres
and Algiers; while in Spain its health-
giving properties are well known andt
appreciated. In'ua6o the eucalyptus
was first introduced into Spain on .ac-
count of its.hygienic virtues,' and
these'were so soon discovered by the
poor people of Valencia that they us-
ed to steal the leaves for the purpose
of making decoctions. The Cape of
Good Hope, Corsica, Sicily, Califor-
-nia and Cuba, have also their planta-
tions. The eucalyptus, in fact, is
Leaking the tour of the world Al-
ready efforts are being made to intro-
duce the tree into Ceylon as an anti-
dote to jungle fever. Unfortunely, it
is too, dedicate to stand English
'spring."
It is a matter of some wonder that
steps :have not been taken to intro-
'duce this tree of wonderful virtues
extensively in Savannah. If it posses-
ses the virtues attributed to.: it, 'its
presence here would be invaluable.
Besides it would.be an additional or-
nament to our streets and public
squares, which are now. the.pride. of
our citizens and the .admiration of
strangers,'justly entitling us to the'ap-
pelation of the Forrest City.-SdVadn-
nah yews.


to particulars, and in what I say now
I assert that I write all truthfulness
and after a careful inspection and in-
quiry. It is the result of one season's
absolute production, with a perfectly
fair and reasonable calculation of
what is to come, and these are the
result, too, of inexperience, and can
be vastly improved upon another sea-
son.
In the neighborhood of Lake City
is a farm of about 150 acres, a part
of which is woodland. The land is
rolling, copiously supplied with
springs. The usual crops havebeeni
cotton, corn and cane (sugar), and
this is the first season when a serious
attempt has been made at raising
vegetables for shipment. Seven acres
of good hammock land were cleared,
and the stumps of the trees are still
standing on a portion.
The land has been planted mainly
in peas, beans and cucumbers. To-
minatoes and onions were planted, but
none have been sent to market. The
product of these seven acres so far
has been :
191 bushels peas $3.75 716 25
;1o bushels snapbeans $4 75 665
I99 bishsa cucumbers 4.5o J 450 00
f1,831 25
EXPENSES.
Commissions ..... ......$183 12
Crates............ ..... 35 48
Fertilizers.......... ......... ................... 57 00
Seed ..... -............... 30 00
Freight to N. Y 27t 53
Labor.................. 271 00o--$85 13
Net results......................................... :... .$980 12
That is pretty good for a rough
hammock lot of seven acres, is it not,
to pay its value just five times over in
one season, and it must be noted, too,
that seventy-five bushels of beans were
lost in a February "Freeze," and
want of care, and also that 'the bean
and cucumber crop is by no means
exhausted, and thirdly, that a large
family have used that garden daily
for the table, but with all this, if you
think I am at the end of my story,
you are vastly mistaken ; I have only
just begun.
The ground occupied by the peas
is now flourishing with a magnificent
stand of cotton-four acres-and of
the other, one will be put in cane and
two in sweet potatoes. The cotton
at a low estimate, will produce 200
ibs. per acre; the acre in cane will
produce io barrels syrup, (more like-
ly 15,) and the two acres in sweet po-
tatoes will produce 6oo bushels. I
am safe in this for a small portion of
this very land has produced at the
rate of 7oo00 bushels per acre. How
does the account stand now?
SECOND CROP.
33 gals, syrup 36c; (16$i60
8oL Ibs. cotton 2C ,96 oo
6oo bushels potatoes 40C...................-240 o00
Total 5 o00
Less labor 2nd crop i.......... oo-o
SNet t results P40--00


Do ,ou think I am at'an end now?


The body--of Johni Blackford, an Dear mistaken reader, I know Flori-
American aclor,who was&-lost t-hree da and you do not. Winter peavwill
years ago- in trying to. ascend Mount follow the'cotton, and the ownier-ex-
.Blanc without guides, is, said ,bmyc pectsmto-supply New. 'York and New-
Swiss newspaper to have, been .found ark with 200, bushels for- .C4histmas- at
iq an immense block pf., ic ,which ,.. $to per bushel.,I..amwI,.m.rg 1modir-
pently fell from the pqtn.n. The ate and:put ..downx ^jpbq tif,
body is tho'6ugAJy rrved. Then ther.e will -be iCo busWelsof.rice


Itttttg tne provisions of tie ias.itnnre
amendments to the Constitution, and
after alluding to the celebrated slaugh-
ter house decision of the Supreme
Court of the United States, Judge
Nelson proceeds:
"I call your attention to this case
for reason that several distinguished
'Federal District Judges, and one emi-
nent Circuit Judge, in instructing
Grand Juries upon the presentation of
a similar question, have considered
that the interpretation by the United
States Supreme Court of this first sec-
tionr of the Fourteenth Amendment is
a judgment against the constitutional-
ity of the law under consideration,
and have therefore given a negative
reply to the question propounded.
With great respect for the opinion of
the Judges, I cannot assent to their
conclusions, and while I have no sym-
pathy with this kind of Congressional
legislation, and believe that the State
Governments should punish all wrong
or outrage of this character commit-
ted within their limits, still I think
when race, color, nativity, or religious
or political belief furnishes the only
reason for the commission of such
wrong or outrage, a proper occasion
arises for the exercise of the power of
Congress under this amendment. The
objection urged against such a law is
that it seeks to punish in the Federal
courts a violation of certain privileges
which pertain to State citizenship. It
is not doubted that this punishment of
ordinary offenses against persons' of
any race belongs to State Govern-
ments. They were created for the
purpose of protecting life, liberty, and
the pursuit of individual happiness,
and should legislate for this object.
Yet as the Fourteenth Amendment
creates citizenship and guarantees
equality of all citizens before the law,
I think Congress can provide for the
punishment of individuals who de-
prive any person of the enjoyment of
the rights of citizenship and legal
equality solely on account of race or
color. These rights and privileges
are derived 'from the.Federal Govern-
ment, and are under its protection.
It will be conceded, 1I think, -that
State legislation making an offence to
refuse the enjoyment of hotel acconim-
modation to white persons, and per-
mitting the exclusion of all other per-
sons, would be repugnant to the
amendment. If so, cannot Congress
interpose until some unfriendly and
discriminating State law is passed ?
Must it confine its -action to correct-
ing obnoxious legislation, and not re-
strain individuals-? In the case ol
McCullach agt. the State of Maryland
(.4 Wheatoh, pp. 400-437), the con-
struction of the grant of legislative
power under the Constitution as it
stood before the recent amendments
Swas fully discussed, and it was de-
cided thattwithin.the grant of powel
Sto Congress' for- purposes of legisla-
tion it may select any proper means
. of effecting the object i-n. view,- and
t may adopt any which might be appro
- pate .nd which were,. conducive to
ci to t-;,Api rasethereaso tng
Stec~iir to- t,'is' C'se, where hc e


VOp^ -femal,; c:terie,"l ia^ adj
&ira lover no less a-riif thtwIfeirty'.
Ward. Beecher," and" ther'can "be
little doubt that this boost was false,
It is, moreover,- probable that in hei
rage at her h' b&itd's '9o 6nri'-;ad
for the purpose of lettihg"hi-lW 1ow
that she was "even-with Ahim.A, she
deliberately uttered this falsehood- to
him in order to reclaim him tolgr'Hf.
But Tilton was beyond i.h p&. riod
of jealousy, and she knew notL'g,4qf
a confession of adultery could arqe
him to constancy. She pp ..i'.1 y -
lieved that Mr. Beecher bid.?.
guilty with 6ther women, for'theirf
Brooklyn was full of hs1s


Way are now seeking :to give the Gardening in Flora.
means oftransportation and develop- The following extract i~iaken from
ment, and their work'should com- a, letter of' Mr. K. hoyt to the
mand, t endthire sym thyofll th .ewark Da, v .'4i-a,'r/Ser, from Lake
mand the entire sympathy of all the City, and shoIws what can/Ibe done at
people and the earnest and active sup- marketgardening there. Air. Hoyt's
port of business men in Jacksonville, figureswere somewhat erroneous, but
for nearTy' the whole region, on the we have revised them f-ron later data
than he had. After pa)iig a hand-
accompliihnment of this work will seek ne had t thi-g n-
its natural Outlet in this city. some compliment to thei-people of
itsnatural outlet in this city. Florida and to Lake CiLty-Mr. Hoyt
proceeds: ,
Middle vs. East Florida. I am half inclined to believe that
We notice with regret that there is the warmth of the clime and the
a: dispositionmanifested on the part fertility of the soil has something to
ofthepresstodrfese on thpart do with kindness of heari. \'here
of the press to draw invidious compar- the earth gives forth its Irnjis so gen-
isons beieen Middle and East Flori- erouudy there ma3 be a couiftgnding
da. .The-Eas is olten highly praised, tendency-to generosity in the human
-hile the Mliddle or central portion r1 hcart, and if that be soI do hope
of the State is referred to disparaging- there may be an equalization of
climates so that the North may pro-
ly, and our Central Florida citizens duce two crops per year. But let me
seem to find much gratification also come to my subject. I have stayed
in referring to the poor, sandy soil here thus late that I may see what the
of the eastern portion of the State. country looks like in its first harvest.
We take it that this style of attempt- I was not early impressed with an
ing to advance the interest of one idea of. its fertility. I could see no
section at the expense of another sec- generative power in white 'or gray
tion is seriously objectionable, in that sand, nor much in the hammocks,
it is inexpedient and contrary to good which are sand likewise with a layer
taste and sound judgment. Men are of decayed vegetation. And now my
sometimes foolish and knavish enough desire is gratified. The Spring has
to build up a reputation for themselves been very backward, but the earth is
by crying down anjcdisparaging loaded with a tropical growth of
the character of others, but we believe vegetation ; even the pine woods are
it will be very generally admitted that full ot grass and edible weeds, while
no one has ever succeeded in estab- the hammocks defy the sun to wedge
fishing a good or valuable reputation itself in edgewise.
in this way. The same may be said The fever in this particular region
in relation to the system of advertis- is not for the oranges but for.the veg-
ing one section at the expense of an- tables, and I am perfectly willing to
other. sell my land in New Jersey for two
If a section has its merits, or is thousand dollars an acre, and give
good for anything, let it be presented, that business up to Florida. The
but in the name of honor and com- first crop of peas came to an end so
mon decency let no one attempt to long ago that I have forgotten wheth-
advance one section of our State by erhave had any. Beans are not
drawing strong and damaging con- eid, for the simple reason that the
trasts to the detriment of some vines won't stop bearing, but when
other section. There is no part of one crop is gathered they put out
Florida that is not good enough for a their blossoms for another. Beets
man to live and die in. Every sec- generally conclude to hold up, or
tion of the State has peculiar advant- they are pulled up when they weigh
ages, and the whole is adapted to a from six to sixteen pounds. Cucum-
very wide range of industries and a bers, of course, never die, and can
wonderful diversity of products. East only be headed offby the plow.
Florida can not boast of the beautiful Cabbages, onions and tomatoes are
hills and lovely valleys that give to crying out for some one to come and
Central Florida such a lovely, dreamy eat them, and melons are growing by
landscape-it has not the heavy, rich the thousand, at a rate which almost
clay roil that renders Central Florida challenges the St. John's railway to a
-. I I\ Ia -n rn f I p+ mf- rn n,pr^ */f frp m 01pnp Ic


.1.


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--~~-~~---i-~~ ~~--~-- ~ -~~~~~~-~ ; ~'~


.. ....I I I Ir I I 'II I ir-Nlo


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worth $1.25 per bushed, and how do
we stand ?
F r-t .'rop ........... ............... ...... .. rj 12
Se::.. d cr.:.p.................. ............ ...... 431 o
Trutdcrop....... .... .................... ..... 62 o
$2.O6 12
L si s labor ;d crop ....... ........ ..... 2 90 .
$ 1,694 2.
And now where is Ophir and Cal-
ifornia and the Big Bonanza ? Where
is Midas and the Knight of the Gold-
en Fleece? Where is Erie, Pacific
Mail and the Western Union?-
W'here is there a mine producing such
golden results, or a speculation half
so sure? And here, too, is the result
on seven acres only; imperfectly
worked. The great farm is still
beal.nd-.i" the l arpe FKia -w r-.la ,
cotton .and corn and the sugar cane.
The fruits are silently gathering their
saccharine juices, and the grape pre-
paring itself for the wine vat. And
I am warranted in'saying that all this
work is done with far less expenditure
of brain and muscle than a Jersey-
man puts on the single crop of a
season.
While you at the North are waiting
for the ground to thaw, we sigh over
the peas that are gone but can yet
put a dozen different vegetables on
the table at one time. While you
are watching the thermometer and
uncertain whether to plough, the
negro sings merrily and mother earth!
smiles and empties the horn of plenty,
Do you think I am through? Wait
for my next letter and see if I am.
J. K. H.
NoTE.-There was but a fraction
above six acres in Mr. Hornet's gar-
den, upon which the above results
were obtained.-Ed. Jacksonville
Press.

The Civil Rights Bill. -
Winona, Minn., June 8.-Judge
R. R. Nelson, of the United States
District Court, to-day rendered an
opinion affirming the constitutionality
of the supplementary Civil Rights
law, which is believed to be the first
adjudication in this direction by a
Federal Judge. As Judge Nelson has
been a life-long Democrat, his em-
phatic opinion produces no little 'as-
tonishment among politicians, as well
as lawyers. The opinion was given
in response to a request made by the
Grand Jury, before whom a case was
brought by the District Attorney un-
der the Civil Rights bill. After-re'-


_11


press power to enforce the provisions
of the amendment is given in the fifth
section, it seems to me that Conqgrest
can legislate even though a State had
passed no obnoxious law, and may also
in advance of such enactments legislate
as it may deem suitable and n.eessa-
ry to remedy the evil against which
this amendment proposes to gugTv. If
the opinion in that case correctlIytepre.
sents the extent of Congressional leg-
islation, the power of Congresscan be
exerted directly to put down all out-
rage or discrimination on the part of
individuals when the motive originates
only in race or color. I do not deem
it necessary a.; this time to more fully
'discJiCss this n -_TI2A h-.
iny opinion is constitutional.--N. Y.
Sun.

Agricultural Wealth,
After feeding a population of forty
millions of people in 1874, the export
of surplus agricultural products from
the United States: amounted. in value
to over four hundred and fifty-six mil-
liou dollars-a larger agricultural pro-
duct than that exported from any
other portion of the globe. In the
subdivision of this aggregate of our
exports of agricultural products, owe
have, under the head of "bread-
stuffs," the following results, as indi-
cated in the official reports of the
Statistical Bureau
VALUE:
Barley .. $76,496
Bread and biscuit '693,223
Indian corn .............. 26,964,013
Indian corn meal ..... 1,465,049
Oats ............ 355.956
Rye 884,o84
Rye flour z85,312
Wheat .82,752,131
Wheat flour ............... 27,898,288
Other small grain and pulse...................... 870,761
Maizena, farina, &c.......................... 356,597
Here we see that the value of these
items-wheat, wheat flour and Indian
corn amounted to nearly one hundred
and forty million dollars. Again, un'-
der the head of "provisions," export-
ed during the year 1874, we have the
following results:
VALUE
Sadon and h ms ..$3x.258.2o3
Beef 3,635,266
Butter ..................... 1.,467,066
Cheese 3,o74,946
Condensed milk ...-.................................. 90,979
Eggs ............................. 8,056
Lard IgS842,78"
Meats, preserved .......... 89.985
Oysters 193.604
Pickles and sauces N6,199
Pork 5,404,186
Onions................. 52,506
Potatoes .............. ....... 521,187
Other vegetables............ 130,806
Vegetables, prepared '4;35364


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I


stories, Beecher gave coloi'o tbheri by
his assiduous attentions to this Inter-
esting woman, and did not wakedtup'
to the situation until he fouhdhilnself
in a desperate strait, confronted by
Tilton and Moulton. -
Now, Mrs. Tlton could not deny
what she had said, for that *o.tid
have made heri more than infamous
Tilton and Moulton prucee ed ,.th'
their business, now familiar to the
public; arid it was only when'ie 'wa
confronted by Beecher on that terti-
ble night that she retracted hcreharg'.
es. Is this not a charitable -vi!W 'f
the whole Beecher buisness :. but d6es
it not also exculpate Mr. Beecherand
Mrs. Tilton :fromrthe charge of adtA,
tery, and, also Moulton and Tilton
from the charge of conspiracy,, an4
thus throw the whole origin of, the
troubles on Theodore Tiltion.

Democratic Reform a-.Filure. ,
- :The success of "reform candidates"
before the people at the pollS, we; "e
sorry to be compelled to nfte.sdbdt
results in any solid advinitage fbiliI
taxpayers. New York city 'I et'orter
are notable failures in this'respct.
All party organization was ilg'ied
for the purpose -of' masliiri"ih*'tt
of the Tweed' ring. The ',pople
elected the reform candidates bY;,ii-[
mense majorities,- 'and':-.Tweedilbadi.-i
few of his accomplices were'(arwmsted
tried, and sent to the penpieqtnji ,f!i
their crimes, or compelled.to fly frqli
the country. But as. we h'iad aoccai
to mention a day oi'f wo'since, '
rate of taxation has steadily ineis4
since the date 'of these event-. uit


i


I

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Ir 1~__


Bacon and hams runup to thirty- m.i- ,- L --1i---.,-'. '
nean-a-iaquai el, -, t uui,,, i compelled i 'to -pay. three %1idntsh1etr'
value, cheese to thirteen million, lard tnths per cent,, or'$3-oithvhtll
to nineteen million, and pork to worth for the privileg~ofowningia6'
nearly five-and a-half million dollars. 'erty, real andi perusal, inoiatBf
rty rela d p rom, ii...
In addition to these we have the fol- pcratic haveof reposeoa .Thq a or;
'OcratiC hazven, ut. rep:Ose,,,T-he flr~oris
lowing miscellaneous agricultural pro- mity of this incbus.wil -,_ .
ducts: by reflecting that five percent, 01o,
' ~ ~~VALUE b. '-- e": i"ng, ":" ''
Farm ,940 time gold bonds, exempt from, taxq-
Farm animMls ,904,600, &. ,, ,'-. ' : i,' "' d. ",i 7.'
Fruits..... I,398?2; tion, sell for par in gold; and ,th4t
Hay ...............811 -.
Hides 43...... ,472, ;such -bonds, running for a Ionget
Ho S I4,03472 8 rr b
Hops ...... ,07 perid0a, w6uld7e1T f: jpai ro0uF'a'rid--
Oil c ke. ................... 4,66,0, --.-. ,
Rice.. ..... ................ 9..A.9 a half, percent. interest'. "he itkt'-
Seeds ................................................... 8- 6,433 m 'm fairly be regained 1as"rh'l 'V6 aFe bt
Tallow .......................................... ;-.. 6,890,877
Animals amounted to nearly three mone.y. for investments in undodbfi
million dollars, hides four, oil cake securities ,'uni.ncumbered"tibyotat.
four and ,a half, and tallow nearly Hence the taxation oemg,43._;o, ,
seven million dollars in value. This the hundred,, andthe use, 9. ru Yd
is certainly a very creditable.exhibi- unburdened being worth 54, .0oIC.
tion. By adding the' value of raw hundl'ed, ft follows that over I. r
o. y ddngth .-valuer o ea a : rc @un
cotton exported, we have the follow- fourths a- the reasonable incort,. roM
ing aggregate results of the export of capItal is consumed bynthe ,nc'?e
agricultural products in 18-4: reformrulers of the city of Nw orr."-
j" A citizenofMNew York-wortilf66'
Raw cotton .......- S,4. if invested' in Government- fo6t idi
Animals, fruits, hay, hides, &C.,....... 2t,84p.88o i
Provisions 76/387;53o. oie.,alf per 'ent. ..o...a. "w-,ua
Breadstitffs, ... 142,50x,910g realize -an' annual-int6Ombe ofi"jb t
Total ......... $456"9973 per- annum. [ Should he invest ;biit'
Here is an important exhibit, and capital ^.in, busit.ss At 1it'itw .1 4
it speaks well for the prosperity of our be burdened- with and, annual. kt. i
agricultural industries. With in- $3 9,3. -ec. u. teul ,
creased facilities for transportation $7,80o per annum, net, to saypehl
and reduced rates of freight' on land' from loss.-, ,; .I.-
and water, the export of the products I this enormous taxation wereused,
of the soil will not only be largely in- in the payment 6f'he.pul.ic i*"ebled-
creased, but farmers will, as a natural ess of the city it ig.htbe e, xubk
result, receive larger profits On the This, unforttlnately, 'is n..t thl ..

annual returns for their toil'.- Wash-The. permanent 'tinutciplal-'indl&6ed "'
,ngon Cronile. ness has been steadily augmenct ib.
"no ......... paripassu, with the increase of annifiF'
.... _-........... taxation, until it now amounts to.oMtW
A Strange, New Theory of the Whole ^oopin, antl t no -tnaf o.ie-
Affair. $6 ),,OO.. and T ,t't," ,
,,. led reform movem enjts" of thi p eui.:
Although it is undeniable that many led. r- forre a:iovepnU ee- of t"
good men, who have patiently watch- olr tictLegislaatuwYr yad ..iel.e, pe-
ed the evidence, believe that Mr. .,.Stateof Ne.w York, While prq es .
Beecher is not innocent, I think' the ang gr eart zeal for te punbic wefiir;
average feeling of both worldly and ap- t- b. del ... ...
...... res U-1ts.---Wa~Mingta."ro'C tel~.'
religious men and women of keen in- rs:ls. ; ,- -. -.'.'!n ,,:: -.
sight into the mysteries of life is some- ..... ... ....
thing like this:-'1 heodore Tilton, a Prehistoic ..ein tl C .,brat i. .
..... I 1.'1%,". c" j+. .j,.
brilliant writer, given to wayward ten. A pieie of 6k fossil .zed,.W2 idib
dencies, was intoxicated with his own evidentlyjwheh .iih o'Dditioin'o'
successes. His wife was proud -of bee'&irti-fioilycllf wA&11u" I'
them, but Theodore, did not find her: to',a hapsol-'),!,' a.., ,
keeping pace with his constant ad- fot dete wtie'"iktdfl4'd p. ,tIt'-
vances, and he made her feel it. centr'l0eeril/1i1t I t ie SM II
At this time appears Mr. Beecheri,', tunnel;-- 'near'.Ft'C- t'City;' p l
who is fond of'the society of women cotn-ty;: ij8oe feetrfonrmthe'"moftdbfif
and'does not like the-society odf men tunnel, with -8oBr: virtial eet-ofi te'.
-strong characteristic ofimen'6f'gieri- mo.nta..above it. ,TI.ireai otit
ins, who are beguiled by' the-keed 'man artifice in the,,prq6,islpric,pt, j(l.
methods; daring: subtlety andlq'sytpar'was foUild in what ws. the .ye ep t.
thetic tendenciesof f he, gentler sexi: of'the great, river wbich "Anrpoith
i .:,],,:. K;, ..;,; .. A nt*. I.bmn .
A woman thus gifted he found'irin'Mts.' ipre0ent courseso'f li'eSrra r1ewiS_
Tilton, He paid' her frequent and teb. H ow6*y thou&d'hB.
unpardonable' attentions, f-awtd ,she; tries have passed sincWt
adored him, for he is comely,, brilliant. and&for bow, namhy'. )akjinl-
Sand commanding. tmbed.inits -eeply Volirsd. fir
I Theodore was then in the, habit of a uggestive subject of stLtdy!:tt-.
boasting of his conquestsand infidel- jecture. Other dioveriesindver
Sites, which of course alienated 'the the existence of man in very, reiote
t esteem of his wife, and often embitter- ages, have been made iu variqus.te-
s ed her to rage.- Now, woiien, and tons of thisold river course; andf in-
Sflighty women, like' Mrs. -Tiltoh,: are r858 a number of fossiized piwtrloi,l
r often fond of boasting -of all-sorts of seven feet long at~dfoutr fn 'datin Ct','/
- attentions they get from men, andeB' thrat had' been neat'tdy"edl and Pemb1'
s pecially from men of genius. Well',,. up together,- were-,found!iw k. tl,A -'l
I it is probable that'-whein Miss. Antho-,ghleny tunnel, u dier hIt'-'-be'o:ef'th, ,.
- ny and others-told Mrs. Ti'ltnn of the "tOld Blue River." -Tbe.i iekentl'y,
' glaring infidelities of Thebdore, this found relic-has.beeun.fpwardl.ei'tot Q
f waman in a spirit of1'"'ll.I et eeyen Sate.jitiversitr.--Coon, (.C-40
- with: him,)" tto meBer- of .ad- 1 z -,


(


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THE NEW SOUTH: WEEKLY. JACKSONVILLE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23, [875.


THE NEW SO
S. ADAM .
oVtO: ft5.iCAUTH.. ADAMS, CAR1
ORO. BURNatDIn.
....- S ADAMS, EDITOR

TO CORRESPONDENTS AND
Items ofLbc4l interest are solicited fror
State. Also, communications on sul
Interest, especially educational, soci
Stopics. Correspondents should mnak
briefas the facts an.i circumstance.
SWe are not responsible for opinions ex
correspondeiuts. Rejected mantuscri
be returned nor preerned. -Anonymoc
will nor be n'liced.


officers, thie iwportane of' a proper
.selection becomnies apparent...
It was an honorable testimonial to the
capacity and fidelity of the officers that
ltav eheretoforetacted for the Commis-
sion, that, with the exception of a slight
C anige in the personellc of the Execu-
Rtve' Comiimnt, anl the principal officers
of the previous 'earis Wore re-elected.
Cen,T1j'twvle3' was re-elected President
And fequestedl to take up his residence
jan Philadelphia and give. his whole time
t4he ork, of the- Coqnimission, by a
unanimous vote, and constited so to do.
..Thirty-three of the States and Terri-
tories were irepritseiltcd, and a number
dfibthetl'by both .Commiuissioner and al-
ternate, and, in the main, a very unusual
Unanimity ol feeling pervaded the meet-
ing and ciharacteriz-d all its proceedings.
A feeling of growing interest in the
success of this great National and Inter-
national Exhibition was manifested from
every section of the whole Union, and a
qqnstantly deepening impression as to
the scope and the signiicanee and mag-
ninde of the Exposition was continually
more araudmore apl)parent.
The fact 'that nearly every civilized
nation in the world has indicated its in-
tention acd desire to participate in the
Exposition, that from many of these ap-
plioatiohshaivb been made for increased
apace, that most of the States have ap-
pointed their own Boards of Commis-
sioners to watch over their own pecu-
liar interests, and th.,t many have made
generous appropriations to secure credi-
table representLtion, all combinEd with
the catholic and patriotic feeling which
cropped out every% here, in all that was


UUUt, LU U~~fJt'U ituti screit"c net]


si* ariuu uutc', tU U 1me HIn anl -I'enigllu
thie general interest.
.While, as remarked, many States re-
S ported active and systematic action and
Hiheral appropriations, there were quite
a number from which little except good
intentions could be truthfully 'represent-
e, aind among them was Florida, from
which no appropriation and little action
except the appointment of a State Board
and such action as, has been had under
the efficient lead ofMMrs, Long, could be
reported. ; .-::-
During the session, a recess was
taken-to allow the Commission to make
a personal inspection of the park and the
work already accompliishedl, and all
seemed profoundly inipressed with a
ney and qn.i'k appreciation of tle scope
al46Qru'yrensirenesi of lithe prepara-
ts 'already fr :i,'aric, .
We .flgrtnin -no doubt dint the people
of t.is.St.1te.-v ill fast catch tlhe patriotic
cooLagion with which the 'national at-
ranaoph(ere seems to' be -rife; -and that
many of our citizens will 'soon be anx-
iouste'take a p.trt in an Exposition in
w'iNieh the honori'Wof the'wiole nation,
a'againit the restobfthe world, is now.
evidently involved. In order to favor
this we have twice published the regu-
latioj6us govei-ning ,the applications for
space in the Exposition and hope that
the ,tSttt press will,.copy them exten-
sively.
To further the same end, and to give
some idea tf the magnitude of the un-
dertaking, we propose to endeavor to
giVe our readers a conception of the
wbrk done and in contemplation, that
-l .Imay see Ihaii It' successfully carried
eul,tipon lthe scale proposed, the Expo-
sitfbloi'wivill be one ol which every cilizeni
of the country will be proud.
The grounds devoted to the Exposi-
tion co'tpirise all the needed territory in
the midst of Fairmount Park, a Iract of
bealttfully varied surface, containing
some,';ree thousand acres just in the
ouJpk-rs of, the city of Philadelphia and
e..nding on both sides of the Sehuyl-
k'tjilter,.tlhus having the advantage of
nalurial'water scenery to a .greater de-
gree than.any other park in the world.
SOit the adoption of the final plans of
t6r6-ifldings' fbb utmost energy bhas
bgfi uscd'to push oh the work anid the
fononihg ko'lch.will show the "progress
ex tibtq to .ti0". Commis-ig i ait their
1, 3H~ ay: *. '-
U'he-Juarist of our.,.citizens wil ,pro-
'*mbhLViglh' ; most stronglyy aboht, the
btfAd%.dcc voted tb6" l-rtic n l tura 'JAnd
4 lFMItrail .purposes, arid these are two
an'iipiber.
The' Conservatory 'or Horticulturil
Hsll is.383 feet,. in length and 193 feet i
wid4h, and is built after a siyle of archi-
teture prevalent in the twelfth century.
Itis placed pon .a commanmliag loca-
:.,tion. which 'gives an excellent viuw of
te. S6ehuylkil-river and-is to be con-
stt'ucted.al'i'ost entirely of iron and
gl's. T,%his building is erected by the
City of Philadelphia andi is intended to


464 feet north and south, and will be
composed, almost entirely of iron and
glass and will cover an area of nearly
twenty two acres. Of this main building
the excavation and drainage are all
completed and enough of the iron super-
structure is erected to give one a very
good idea of the magnificent effect that
- Will be produced by the completed
building.
The main portion of the buildings of
one story having the external cornice 45
feet from the base and an internal height
of 70 feet, with towers upon each of the
four corners 75 feet in height and then
on the central portion of the inner build-
ing, which is higher than the rest, are
four other towers, one at each corner
48 feet square and to be carried up 120
feet. 0
The arrangement of the ground plan
provides for a central or main avenue
120 feet wide and extending 1832 feet in
length, and on each side of this main
avenue will be parallel naves or halls
100 feet in width and likewise extending
1832 feet while between the central and
lateral avenues will be other aisles 48
and 24 feet in width. The foundations
are laid in very heavy masonry and the
superstructure will be of wrought iron
columns on which will rest the iron trus-
ses for the roof. These iron columns
will weigh. 2,200,000 pounds and the
girders and roof-trusses will weigh
5,000,000 pounds.
Seven feet of the side walls will be
built of brick, and. above this, will be
composed of glass and iron, the roof to
be covered with tin. Side-lighls will be


light for the interior will be furnished by
sky-lights over the isles. Good views of
the whole of the interior will be obtained
from balconies on the towers. The iron
and glass for this building are now on
the ground, and October 1st is fixed for
the completion of this building. The
different States and countries exhibiting
will be located geographically in sec-
tions running across the building from
north to south.
The Art Gallery or Memorial Hall is
to be built of iron, granite and glass
and to have no wood used in its con-
struction, being intended to be entirely
fire-proof. It will be located to the north
of the Main-Building and on a line with
it. The walls are nearly completed and
the magnificent dome by which it is to
be surmounted is now being put in place.
This building will cost $1,500,000 and
is erected by the State and city and is
intended to be permanent. It is 365 feet
in length-and 210 feet in *dth, having
a basement of 12 feet and a height of 59
feet with a dome of 150 feet in height.
A very large working force is employed
day and night, and the building will be
completed by September 1st. Thehalls
corridors and galleries, will together
give some 73,000 square feet for the ex-
hibition of pictures and works of art.
Machinery hall is located on a line
with the Main Building, to the west
and only 592 feet removed from it. It
is 1402 feet long and 360 feet wide. The
two buildings will together present a
front, from east to west, along one of
the principal avenue; of the Park, of
3,821 feet and our readers can judge of
the magnificent effect that will thus be
produced. The whole area covered by
machinery hall and the engine-room at-
tached is about 12 acres, and this with
the uppe floor will give 14 acres of
floor-roomi. The interior height of the
main avenues is 70) feet and of the aisles
4.1 feet. The ground plan shows two
main avenues of 90 feet% wide extending
136)0 leet with a central aisle between
andi one on each side of 70 feetinwidth.
The foundations are of heavy masonry
and the superstructure of solid timber
columns, supporting the roof-trusses.
The outer walls to a height of 5 feet are
oil m:intsonry 1 above that, of glass. Eight
lines of' shafting for motive power, will
extend the whole length of the.building.
The work on this building is proceeding
.rapidly and it will probably be complet-
ed in September next. -
SThe area covered by these five build-
.ings' is as Iollows: .
Main Bnilding........... ........................ 17 re .
Art Gallery................................ i ,
N[achiLery Bu Iding............ ............. 14. "
H,-.r.ulhural Buildang.......... ...... "
A, riLtl..rad Eu ldmg .................... "
Mak;n&ga total of i6.z acrti. -
We have thus endeavored to giye
our readers some idea of the vastness of
the plans and the progress of the work.
No one in Philadelphia has a doubt that
all the work will be well done' and in
season, and vast as are the preparations,
none too mach space is provided so far
as is now apparent.


'UTH. remain in its present location perma
nently. The work on this building is
RUTH & Co. rapidly progressing.
The Agricultural Building is located
R. a little to the north of the horticulture
hall and consists of a long nave or hal
) OTHERS. 820 feet in length and 120 feet in width
Sall parts ofthe with a height of 75 feet from the floor
objects of general
ai and ndustrial to the top of the arch. This long hall is
e their letters as
ill permit, crossed by three cross-halls or transepts
expressed by our
ipts cans nier the central one of the same height, be
ous contributions lug 100 feet in breadth and the two
cross-halls being 70 feet wide and 7(
feet high. All these halls'are construct
EADYDONE. ed of Howe arch-trusses of the Gothic
Juted States style. The courts between the main and
3, on many cross-halls as well as the space at th(
t and inter- four.corners of the whole, will be in
uI red closed and roofed in and altogether wil
of selecting form a parallelogram 820 feet long anc
ssion for the 540 feet in width and will cover a space
Opening of of ten acres having near it enclosed
onme, and as yards for the exhibition of all kinds ol
Exposition stock, poulti'ry, &c.
rely upon The main Exhibition Building is
yv of these uge structure extending in the form o.


lican, but otherwise not. With a full
Convention, free discussion of men and
measures, with a fair nomination and
a fixed pre-determination to give the
whole strength of the party to the ticket
nominated, a Republican triumph is
certain. Private quarrcls.must be set-
tled before or in the Convention he says,
or success need not be expected,
Workings of frost are noticed in the
telegraphic dispatches as follows: Juno
14, Orange county, New York, severe
frosts on the low lands and in the val-
leys all along the Erie Railroad, and a
heavy frost at Wilkesbarre, as also in
Binghampton. Thin ice formed at
Windsor.
In New England, the same date,
heavy frost was reported at. Pittsfield
and near Hartford. The central portion
of Michigan- was visited by frost at the
same date.
New York, June 17,-The official dis-
charge of Tweed arri$vd at Albany last
night.


"- Ti '' Tie Centennial.
-
A SKETCH OBF THE WORK ALR
SThe recent ineetingroftheU
2egnteinial Commission was
AccDounts,;thi ,most- important
testingg ono'lhat has ever o>.ct
The most important work
'the -officers "of-the Commnnis
Siv0rking year prcecdirg the
the Exposition, wasn't" be do
.tbe success or failure of the
must of necessity depend lai
ti'e co,',j')teincv and cner'r


Many otf the Commissioners are on
hand from foreign governments, and
the French Commissioners on inspection
of the work already accomplished, ex-
press great satisfaction. The English
Commissioners, are probably in the city
ere this and have already made applica-
tions for double the space originally
asked.
Active local committees are already
engaged in insuring comfortable quar-
ters for the immense throng expected
and in providing reasonable terms of
transportation. The applications for
space already exceed all the anticipa-
tions of the officials and the progress of
the work, the rapidly growing interest
at home and abroad, with the constantly
increasing applications for space, all be-
token an unhoped for success for the
National Exposition of 1876.
Nothing can exceed the warmth and
cordiality of the greeting that will be
extended alike to every section of our
common country and the effect of the
Centennial in reviving and strengthen-
-inag the general and common patriotic
regard for our own home-land will more
than compensate for all the costincurred.
As yet little, except from the efforts
of that noble woman Mrs. Long, has
been done in this State, but our people
are awakening. The Executive Com-
mittee of the State Fruit Growers' Ass-
ciation are moving and it is to be hoped
that so good an opportunity to do a good
work for Florida will not be allowed to
go unused.
Exactly So.
A Jacksonville correspondent of the
Fernandina Observer remarks as follows;
The NEW SOUTH now and then fires a
random shot but with blank charge.
Perhaps so. On the other hand we
observe that our convertible cotempo-
rary habitually fires blank shots with
very random charges,

Our St, Augustine Letter.
Our readers will recognize in our St.
Augustine letter, the hand-marks of an
old and valued correspondent of the
Republican and NEW SOUTH. The more
frequent his letters may be the more
they will be welcome. If as is reported,
the orange trees are suffering from the
insect, Mr. A. can do no better service
to the State, than to write a series of
articles embodying his knowledge and
opinions upon the subject.

Saturday's Stfrm in Tallahassee.
We are informed by Mr. Kennedy,
master mechanic of the J.,P. &M. Rail-
road, that the brisk thunder shower of
Saturday here, was a very sharp rain
-Mnd _ihail _storm-. _aaccompanied with a
heavy gale, causing a storm as severe
as that of September last in Tallahassee,
Much damage was done in different
parts of the county and the large build-
ing in process of construction for the
new Railroad shops was completely
prostrated.

Hon. Dennis Eagan.
Our worthy Commissioner of Lands and
Immigration, Hon. Dennis Eagan, spent a
day in the city last week on his return from
New Orleans. Mr: Eagan brings upan the
whole a favorable report of political matters in
Louisiana an-i says that the Republicans there
are.well satisfied with the Wheeler comprom-
ise, as the best thing that, under the circum-
stances could have been done. If peace pre-
vails, they say they can easily carry the State
as the Republicans are in large majority. Mr.
Eagan's report will command attention and
credit as the opinion of a sound Republican
and a judicious and sensible man.

Transportation to the County Fair.
The arrangement for transportation to
outr County Fair, are now as we under-
stand completed, and passengers, goods
and stock will be transported over the
J., P. & M., and the A. G.W.I.T.
Co's Railroad as well as on the Charles-
ton and Brock's steamers, to and from,
for fare one way. By their habitual
courtesy and public spirit in promoting
whatever appertains to our local pros-
perity, the liberal managers of these
lines of transportation have laid our
citizens under heavy obligations, which
should ever be borne in mind.

Senator Conover.
Senator Conover was in the city for a
day during the last week and seemed
in good health and spirits. He speaks
encouragingly of the general political
situation and very hopefully of the pros-
pe'cf in" Florida,; provjidedi "the" proper
course is taken in them impending cam-
paign. With united and harmonious
action he thinks the State will go Repub.


thrown away an opportunity which no
other man in the State has had, except
Jenkirii. With four years training as
Speaker of the oAssembly and his early
participation in the formation of the
party in this State, he should to-day,
possess the confidence and affection of
the leading. Republicans, white and
colored. But his great self-love, blind
ambition, and his tender regard for the
"old guard" have proved to be para-
mount to the unity, efficiency and suc-
cess of his party. With a cabal even
more unscrupulous than that of King
Charles, he has revived and strengthened
that system of close political corpora-
tion which has so long distracted the
Republicans of Florida and endangered
their future success. Showing a sub-
lime contempt for every leading colored
man, and most of the members of the
Assembly, has made only such appoint-
ments as suited his few tools in the
Senate, like Dennis and others, and en-
irely ignored the Representatives of the.


S' South Florida.
S LAKE WORTH, DADE Co., FLA.
May 22, 1875.
SEditor *ew South:-I picked up on
i the ocean beach the other day, the frag-
* ments of a board broken in two by the
Saves, on whichh when put together, I
found this notice, evidently hastily
brushed on with red lead and by the ac-
Stion of ths waves and sand rendered
- scarcely legible, viz:
Sl March 7, 1875
f Schooner Ella L. Trefethen, foundered
at sea. W. S. BEERS, Captain.
As it may be the only record of the
f fate of thelvessel and her crew, and per-
t haps thcirlfriends may be waiting anx-
7 iously to hear concerning them, it would
Sbe well ifolther papers would copy this
Site, probably the last effort of brave
men to let the world know their fate.
On my return from Jacksonville I
brought Vith me a large number of
Orange trees together with some apple,
peach, figi and other trees and shrubs,
from Hardee's Nursery in Jacksonville,
all of wkch are doing well, many of
them not even wilting the leaves. Also
over a thousand orange trees from In-
dian River and several hundred banana
plants. With very few exceptions all
are flourishing and out of two thousand
trees and plants brought down that trip,
I do not think I will lose five.
Settlers are coming in and the coun-
try is improving rapidly. Probably be-
fore this reaches you the people on the
lake will have taken hold and rendered
navigable an inland water communica-
tion with Indian River. A very little
sub-marine blasting is needed to give
us a permanent inlet and good harbor
for crafts drawing less than nine feet of
water, and any one understanding the
modus operandi will bear of a job by
writing to me. Any information con-
cerning the process and expense will be
very thankfully received.
There are many people on Indian
River who seem to make it their special
business to outrageously misrepresent
this most beautiful and healthy country;
but fortunately people are not simple
enough to be turned back without see,
ing for themselves and those whoa e,
almost without exception locate here.
There is much valuable land here yet
subject to homestead entry and consid-
erable can be purchased cheaply by ac-
tual settlers. Speculators in land are
not wanted. I will be happy to answer
all letters of inquiry concerning this sec-
tion from persons really wishing to lo-
cate in Florida. To one or two good
men and their wives I would give con-
stant employment and help them to
make good comfortable homes. When
this most beautiful country becomes
known and easy of access, it widTISecome
the most popular winter resort in Flor-
ida, as here will be found the greatest
variety of fruits, the most even and
healthy climate, the best fishing and
hunting, the best chance for surf and
still water bathing, and mineral water
both iron and sulphur, in the most health
producing combinations known to the
material medical, also lime water and pure
soft water springs. There are fine cattle
ranges convenient to the lake and the
finest tobacco, sugar and rice lands in
the world; while the convenience of ac-
cess to inexhaustible deposits of the best
of fertilizers render the poorest lands in
this section of country very valuable for
the production of oranges, lemons, limes,
citrons, grape-fruit, grapes, figs, pine-
apples, cocoanuts, sweet potatoes, small
fruits and garden stuff. As for mos-
quitoes they may be plenty some of the
time during the summer, but for the last
two weeks I have not seen half a doz-
zen, and with netting at the doors and
windows around the beds one need not
suffer from them at any time.
Such a thing as ague and bilious
fever are unknown here. Small grain
sown at the right season, I think would
do quite well and corn certainly will,
upon our rich lands though other crops
are so much more profitable than grain
is in any part of the country, that it
would be poor policy to spend time,
labor nd land upon cereals. The rich
man can here find most profitable in-
vestments and the most solid enjoyments
for his money, the poor man the surest
and earliest road to wealth, and the in-
valid the surest an.d speediest road to
heath, as thousands can testify. What
more can man want than this part of
Florida offers, and with the last terrible
winter at the North fresh in mind, who
can doubt the rapid influx of population
this coming fall and winter.
M. C. DWIGHT.


next year, in which the cotton sprang
up from the old roots though the cattle
and hogs had the run of the field. I
noticed that some very fair cotton grew
in some spots of good land, springing
up from these old roots. I formed the
idea that if the ratoon had been cultiva-
ted in the same way and with the same
*care given usually to cotton planted
from tihe seed, a fair crop could be made
from the ratoon,
Accordingly I took a sharp grubbing
hoe and cut the old stalks of my cotton
down even with the cotton beds. As
soon as the old stubs showed signs of
budding out, I worked the dirt away
from the stalks, leaving them bout three
or four inches out of'the ground. In
this way I left one-half the patch to
grow from the ratoon and planted the
other half with cotton seed. When the
cotton seed began to come up, I had to
begin- to thin the ratoon cotton by break-
ing off a part of the shoots which had
began to come up very thick, and look-
ing very promising and grew very fast.
By the time the seed cotton began to put
out forms,.the ratoon cotton had blos-
soms, on or about the first of May. I
gave the same attention but one hoeing
less than is usually given to the cotton
from the seed. Picking from the rat-
oons began in July, the bolls on them be-
ing much larger than on the seed cotton,
so much so that the difference could be
distinguished to the very last row. I
was asked by many persons what I
had done to the cotton on one-half the
patch to make it look so different. When
I told them, many wondered what the
result would be.
The result was that the ratoon cotton
came off one month sooner than the
other, the picking being begun and
finished one month sooner. The dif-
ference between the ratoon and the
seed cotton was, that the ratoon cotton
was similar to the best grade of short
staple cotton, being much shorter than
the seed cotton, very white and harder
to gin in a foot gin. The patch made
about twenty-five more pounds of clean
cotton than in the year before, but did
not command as high a price. Although
the same price prevailed in the cotton
market as in the previous year, the
ratoon cotton did not do as well owing to
the staple being short and the ratoon
and seed cotton being put together.
My opinion from my own experience
is, that long staple cotton if ratooned
for three or four years, will become
very poor cotton and will in fact become
short staple and only sell for short sta-
ple cotton. Yours, &c.
SAMUEL SPEARING.

Another Letter from Modoc Chief.
THE COMBAT DEELPENS-A GENERAL OVER-
HAULING-THE CLOSE CORPORATION
SYSTEM LAID BARE-AN INVITATION TO
BACK SEATS-TICKETS THAT WILL NO
LONGER WIN.
Editor New South:-The fearful shak-
ing of political dry bones must be taken
as proof that somebody was "hurted"
by my first letter. I am only a sentinel
on picket duty, and if the leaders and
henchmen of the close corporation sys-
tem in politics cannot stand picket fir-
ing, what will they do when the main
army moves on their camps in 1876 ? If
the hand writing on the political wall
appears ominous, they had better strike
their colors and run up the white flag.
Discretion is the better part of valor,
you know. But present and past spoils
have hardened their hearts; they are
joined to their idols and will not heed.
Let them go. Florida, as a political
grave-yard, has been a success; and as
lumber can be had almost forthe asking,
they are sure of a decent burial with
ready mourners.
If there is anything that lies close to
Stearns' heart besides the gubernatorial
chair and a prospective seat in the
United States Senate, it is a subsidized
press; one at each end of the road,
grinding out different tunes at the same
time. These organized organs with well
trained grinders give a beautiful con-
ception of political success. The only
thing which mars the picture is the flag-
rant inconsistency forced upon the head-
center or subsidizer by the different tunes
of the two principal organs, While his
home organ sings good orthodox tunes,
his grinder at this end shows strong
proclivities to wander off after strange
gods, While the one "points with
pride," the other derides, Of course
the thing is a blind; but then a person-
more especially a Governor-ought to
"tote square" you know, in order to
inspire confidence and win,
It is a pity that some men will persist
in sacrificing a brilliant future fr a
present mess of pottage. Stearns has


people. Just see what a nice little
family arrangement is run in Duval
county I With a finger in every import-
ant pie, who is the great mogul around
whom lesser lights must revolve ? Look
too, if you please, at Dennis, in Alachua
county. Although it only takes two-
yards of linen to make him a pair of
pants, he runs Stearns and controls all
the appointments in that county. He
has "farmed out" more offices than any
other man in the State. AndyetDennis
cannot control fifty votes in Alachua. I
don't believe in a black man's party, nor
in a white man's party, but I do believe
in fair play. As the colored people
form about ninety-five per cent. of the
Republican party of the State, it would
seem but fair to give them a fair show-
ing according to their abilities. By
denying them a representative in the
Cabinet in Gibbs' place, Stearns has
committed an outrage upon them which
I believe even Bloxham would not have
done under .the circumstances. And
yet with this outrage fresh in the minds
of the colored people, Hicks, the politico-
religious acrobat, smarting from the
stricturesbfi my first letter, takes refuge'in
his editorial columns by assuming the
role of a'colored man. as correspondent
from Marion county! Too thin, for
every colored man of any note in that
county is known to be hostile to Stearns
and fellows of his kidney. Hicks sets
up the well-known cry of the old Ring
of a "black~party." There used to be
some virtue in that cry, but it- has been
used so much that its thin coat of dis-
guise has been worn through until now
the spurious compound is plainly seen.
Another wornout trick of the "Old
Guard" is to get the colored men to
fighting each other through petty politi-
cal jealousies. Too old, Mr. Hicks; it
played out before you saw Dade county.
The only trick that will win hereafter is
even-handed fair play, and a true regard
for the interests of good government;
in which cause I have drawn my trusty
tomahawk. MODOC CHIEF.

St. Augustine.
Editor New South :-Capt. Pratt, in
charge of the Indian prisoners now con-
fined in old Fort Marion at St. Augus-
tine, is doing everything in his power to
divert their minds from a sense of their
tedious confinement, and thus secure
them from a condition of unrest and dis-
quietude, and whose efforts are nobly
and humanely seconded by Col. Hamil-
ton, in command of the Military Bar-
racks at this place. On Saturday last,
the 5th inst., a party of forty Indians un-
der a guard of four soldiers, were taken
on board of one of the harbor pleasure
xaeht,_ani.L treated& to a short sa
ing excursion down to the outer beach,
some four or five miles distant,' where
they all enjoyed a fine bath in the surf,
and afterwards they engaged in an excit-
ing foot race upon the beach for a prize
of one dollar to be given to the swiftest
runner. The prize was won by a Cam-
anche Chief, and it is said of this tribe,
that they always excel in all sports of
agility. Afterwards, Col. Hamilton at-
tempted with instruments and other-
wise, to instruct them in a knowledge
of the rise and fall of the tides in the
ocean. The whole party seemed de-
lighted with their pleasant and instrutive
excursion, and it is now the intention of
Capt. Pratt to give a similar excursion
to the remainder of the party, some
thirty or more Indians, at an early day
the coming week. He has also under
consideration the subject of organizing
a school among them for the purpose of
general instruction, &c. 1 understand
it has been further intimated that Capt.
Hitchcocks of the Coast Survey Steamer
"Endeavor," has tendered the use of the
steamer under his command to Capt.
Pratt, to take the whole party in a body,
on a short excursion out to sea, and
thus further astonish and instruct them
by permitting them to see the "big
heap" water in the open ocean.
A Century Plant in Mr. Atwood's
garden in this city, has thrown up a
shoot forty feet in height and is begin-
ning to expand its blossom stems pre.
paratory to coming into full bloom.
ST. JOHNS.
The Proceedings of the Florida Fruit
Growers' Association.
Editor New South :-I called at the
agency in this city for a copy of the
above pamphlet, and was told th!t they
were sold to members of the Association
and others, at twenty-five cents a copy.
I had intended to have procured fifteen
or twenty copies to send to friends, but
concluded that I could not afford to do


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I


We find, on inquiry at the Custom
House, that the Schooner Ella L. Trefe-
then is a vessel of 81.35 tonnage, hailing
from Portland, Maine. This letter may
convey the first sad intelligence to those
who are watching and waiting for her
return.-,j-EP. NEW SOUTH.

Ratoon Cotton.
Editor New South :-Ifaving noticed
in your paper a few days since, an arti-
cle on Ratoon Cotton, and having had
some experience in this direction I am
led to believe that perhaps my expe-
rience may not be without interest and
that my own judgment thereupon may
be of some service.
In the first place, some years since, I
planted one-half acre in long staple cot-
ton and made from it 250 pounds of
ginned cotton, which was ginned on a
foot gin about the last of February of
the nelt year. My attention was drawn
to this matter of ratoon- cotton in this
way; I had noticed an old field of very
poor land that had been planted in cot-
ton and which was left uncultivated the


_.._li~


~II


__


so at such a price. I purchased one
copy, and I notice in the proceedings
that J. S. Adams offered ithe following
resolution which was adopted:
Resolved, That the Secretary and the
Executive Committee be directed to
arrange for the publication of the pro-
ceedings of this Convention, and to use
the funds raised by the Committee for
this purpose. If the funds be not suf-
ficient to pay for as many,as they think
are required, they are authorized to en-
large the edition and charge the cost
price.
Now, Mr. Editor, do you think it cost
twenty-five cents a copy in addition to
the funds on hand for that purpose, or
even half that sum to publish the pro-
ceedings of the Association. A friend
of mine thinks his olfactories detect the
odoriferous exhalations of an exagge-
rated rodent in the transaction. Will
the gentlemen of the Committee rise and
explain P MEMBER.
We publish the above as coming from
one of the most intelligent an4 respected
members of the Association It was up-
derstood that Secretary Walton so4u6ld


publish the proceedings and sell them.
at a small margin above cost, and we
incline to think that neither the old or
the present Executive Committee had
much, if anything, to do with the pbpuli-
cation. The funds raised by the Com-
mittee were largely used in, 'tile enter-
tainment of the speakers from abroad,
The Secretary, Mr. Walton, caanmoste
satisfactorily Krespond to "M-ember."--
[ED. NE'* SOUTH. '-

Death ofBhn.; B. Andrews.
Mr. Ben. B. Adrews died suddenly in
this city on Monday morning last,. .
Mr. Andrews was well known
throughout the State as a genial social
and pleasant person, and leaves a large
circle of acquaintances both in and out
of his profession. Little is known here
of his past history but we gather.AJ ew
facts in regard to his life which may nob
prove, uninteresting to those who have-
known him,
He was born in Cortland County, New
York about the y-ear 1837, his father be-
ing a Methodist minister, In the year
1861 he joined the 23d regimentLof New
York Volunteers, lie resigned from
this regiment and joined in T862 the
147th regiment. His connection with :
the regiment was of shortI.diration tnir
retuning home he was shortly afta-
ward, married. In the year 1864 he-
came to this State and for a time acted
as United State District Attorney.--He-
has resided in this city for the past it e.
or four years engaged hi the practice of.'
his profession. -' "
A meeting of the bar bf Fernandia'
was held on Monday and it was resoiy-
ed to attend his funeral in a body. A.
committee was appointed to draft suita-
ble resolutions. The committee has not
yet reported and the'fesolutibns willtap-
pear next week.-Fernandina Observer.,

ORANGE COUNTY.
CASTOR BEANS ANDOHANoGETREES.-
From a gentleman who has been engag-
ed in the cultivation of the orange" andi
its kindred fruits, we get the following;.
The castor bean is one of the best- o
fertilizers. I know it .is a long a.ty
ahead of cotton seed. It cotlton, for fer-
tillizing, is worth 15i cents, per bushel,
then castor'beans are worth 75 cents for
the same purpose. It is also very use-
ful as a protection to young trees espec-
ially *hen sot Ont in- grove form; when.
used for this purpose, the beans .should
be planted about eight feet south of the'
tree; this jprnishcs shade for the ydupg-
tree and th'f4lling leaves act as a mul-
ching ti the ground cool. Should
the bean"f Fbw too large it can be cut
away and. fe stein and leaves act as a.
fertillizeras it decays very rapidly; thba
beans arl used in the nilk- state, ,A'd
should be handled as any oilier vegetable
fctillizer; the matured beans should bo
crushed into a-kind of meal, beforeb-s-
ing as this gives the tree the immediate
benefit of theapplication.-SoulAh.Flori-
da Journal,'.
A portion of the freight of the MoNt-
gomery on herIast trip was thirteen
thousand watermelons, aind it was'ntfa
good day Ior- tuit iteither--Th'largest
number'whioli-'i saefamer ever took
rrom . n.aa4 V ; :oie time was eight
thousand.-FerFandlina. Observer. ...


.. .. II -I. I r -1.. -..-.-*


L


_


I


_ _










THE NEW SOUTH: WEEKLY. JACKSONVILLE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 23,


CITY NEWS.


Ho! for the Bar.
On Thursday, (to-morrow,) the steamer
Silver Sprins will make an extra trip to the
sea-shore. She will leave Fairchild's wharf
at 8 o'clock a. m.

:-.. ." the Foundry.
Frank Pond has his foundry about ready to
commence casting. We observe quite a num-
ber of flasks opn the Poor ready to receive
metal. .

) / Branching Out.
Our busy friend Philip Walter has bought
the stock of papers and envelopes of the late
firm of C. L. Mather & Co., and now offers
|hem for sale at his Cigar store.

.1.. :, a,. The Weather.
The rainy season may be said to be upon
us, ,Thunder, lightning and copious showers
are now our daily visitants, and a clear
healihgiving atmosphere is the result.

New Sign.

One of the largest and most attractive signs
1ia the city has just been placed upon the top
Sof Mitchell's new Block, Bay Street, bearing
the "names of "Smith, Norton & Cos' Music
HIouse."

e take pleasure in directing the attention
of all visitors to the Duval County Fair to the
.notice of Mrs. DeCottes, with whom some
thirty of the late Georgia Excursionists so-
journed during the recent visit here. A quiet,
comfortable home, on fair terms, in a conven-
ient part of the city can be had at Mr.s C's.


Creveling Grapes.
We are in receipt of a box of this fine
grape' from the elder Mr. Jameson. The
bunches were of good size, compact and the
berries handsome, and although not fully ripe,
they were of fine flavor. We think it a
promising variety, worthy of cultivation in
this section.


Mechanics' Engine.


We observe that this engine is now untder-
-. going considerable repairs under the eye of
Mr;CrOlly the engineer. New lubes will
render the boiler ais gorml as new, and restore
this fine mach'.Oe to.ils fullest tficiency, andl
we have not a hi' b-111lie able ,, bur.i
any remaining p: S bidr hose left in
the Departmcn ._ '.

Another Ste
The growing inimp fiance o '.- Ocklawaha
river country tii.) be es.inialcf '? ihe rapid
multiplication 'of rteiners f<'r lh$. ace.immo.
dation of its growing iradt. \e 'ee ano.ilher
of these peculiar and very' original I oiing
craft at the ship)ard. of Mr. S eti1g, where
she is receiving the ffiiisAg AGuches of the
joiners preparslor) t, lht,.p'utitg in of her
machinery. She is oai.'., *v4 understand,
at Lake Griffin, and i bth* est dr.&ugii,
craft upon thai .,rea.--".:* ilding steamers
ree seems to mien.s 6lu"J

New Buildd* ..Bay Street.
It is very pleasant to 0ote ithe rapid prjgre's
made on the new'and" elg.ant brick block.s
that are taking the place of the old shanties
that formerly marred the appearance of the
ampp"- end 'of Bay Stiaet.
The walls ot the Taylor block are rapidly
rising under the direction of Mr. Thebaut,
and Swart's Block, is being plastered. With
.two large stores in the lower story and six
large, airy and convenient offices in the upper
tioery, the Swart's block, will bea credit to its
,owners, its builders and to the city.

A Fortunate Misfortune.
-n the afternoon of Sunday last, the large
building oa the corner opposite the Convent
which wis c big built by Mr. Bigelow, spread
apant juad "fell to pieces. It was a large
eivsaea hailditgs e 40x7o feet and as we
are informed h s-it 4'ithout any upper cross-
-'beamis tb strengthen it. It was passing strange
that it should pass through the gale of Satur-
day and fall in the perfect quiet of Sunday,
when no workmen were in it and as fortunate
;as strange.

New Machine Shop.
We are every day meeting with some new
evidence of the rapid and wide growth of the
city, the last of which is the new machine
hAop of Mr. Murphy, which is now rapidly
approaching completion at the lower end of
Bay Street, on thO lots recently filled by Alsop
& Clark. Mri. Murpfihy hIls been many years
;a resident of Savannah, where he bears a high
ire.utatioaas a, citizen and as a mechanic,
and we gladly welcome him to Jacksonville,
where there is ample room and much need for
.such men as he.

Off for Indian River.
On Thursdaynoming last Capt. Lund's
Asteamer Pianeer.crossed St. Johns Bar on her
sway to the fiela of her 'future operations.
;She will run in connection with the Volusia
,ontlie St. Johns, thus forming a continuous
line trom Jacksonville. The Pioneer is one
,of the best examples of compactness and econ-
,omy of space we ever saw, and will, for her
size, accommodate comfonably more passen-
gers than any other craft on our waters. She
will add largely to the pleasure of a trip to the
Indian River country, and has our best wish.
,es for her success.

Prof. C. A. Foster.

-'' following "ttec"fiom; this gentleman,
iM response to one from Smith, Norton & Co.,
.: offering him a position in the Floriida Conser-
vatory of Music, will be of interest to mem-
.-bers and friends of that institution. Prof.
SFoster, is a young man of fine musical abilities
Sand a thwoopgh gentleman .as well as a great
Worker. A better selection could not have
beeiii~dte : "
DcATCR o ILL., June 14, 1875.
NMpSS. SMITH, NORTON & Co.: Gvtleme .'.-.
Your litter bearing dae June 8th, i. recei.ed. In re-
Ily to theasame I will say I accept your propositon.
ft wWi be, however, impossible for me to reach Jack-
psoivlUI. assoon as the aosh or even the 29th, as m will
MbIee.~~~ve or.six weeks to arrange my affairs so as to
S aTI go to Jacksonville to locate ermaxetl_,f-
a_-.- toneofyou-to work earnestly and faithfully for
Vs itS wiltys and l interest of alt concerned. in,
:" -*'i I nsm serve: r will be with you at
/earijest ibiJc date. RespectilIl yonus,
'- -.-. '.- "', C.!A Fos-rTR -


ly on the increase.
The rpore the matter is discussed the better
the prospect of making a creditable show ap-
pears, and every day's inquiry shows more and
more clearly that the County can and will
make a much better exhibition in all direct-
ions than any anticipated. Arrangements have
been perfected with the Charleston Steamers
and with those ,of Brock's line for transporta-
tign for fare one way, and without doubt,
within a few days similar arrangements will
be announced with the Railroad.
The Fair if well sustained, will not only be
of great present service to the county, in ex-
hibiting what has been and of course, can be,
done here in a horticultural way, but it will
give the npgded opportunity to acquire the ex-
perience indispensable to give proper charac-
ter and success to the State Eir in January
n"et, to which we are already committed.
This is a matter of very great consequence be-
cause many strangers, from every section of
the Union will then be present, to form their
own conclusions as t9 the capacity of the
State, from wht tbhey ray see witb their own
'eyes; 1 .'-


The Literary and Musical Entertain-
ment of Thursday evening.
We do not remember to have ever attended
in this city, a more agreeable entertainment
than that given at Metropolitan Hall or
Thursday evening of last week, under the aus-
pices and for the benefit of the Florida Asso.
ciation. The Association is orfknized foi
mutual improvement in literary matters, and
with the ultimate purpose of providing a free
public library for the city, and thus, by its
aims and objects, commends itself to all
thoughtful people. .The entertainment con-
sisted of reading by Mrs. Taylor and of selec-
tions of vocal and instrumental music by Mrs.
Weldon, Mrs. Barnnett and Mr. Philip Mil-
ford. By this pleasant intermingling of mus-
ical with literary entertainment, the almost in-
evitable tiresomeness of a long evening given
solely to either was avoided, each relieving
and providing a relish for the other, and the
result was a very complete and satisfactory
evening's entertainment. Mrs. E. A. Taylor,
who has created for herself so inviable a rep-
utation and so respectful and warm a regard
throughout our State, really seemed inspired
by the music and the evident partiality of the
audience, to outdo herself. Her rendering of
"The Maniac" as a recitation in character, was
terribly effective, her maniacal shriek, when
at last she recognizes the change from "Not
Mad" to insanity, as the result of the severities
and indignities heaped upon her, thrilled
through every heart, and the entire effort
would have taken high rank in any theatre as
a tragic impersonation. All of Mlrs. Taylor's
readings were of more than her usual excel-
lence, but our preferences were for the touch-
ing selection of "Jane Conquest" and the dif-
fficult but well executed rendering of "Creeds
of the Bells." Of this portion of the enter-
tainment little more need be said than that
Mrs. Taylor, by her exertions largely promot-
ed a good work and adled very decidedly to
her previous reputation. It may well be
doubted if we shall, in'the next five years,
be favored with hearing and seeing any better
execution or any more apparently complete
mastery of the Piano than was exhibited by
Mrs. J. H. Weldon. Something of a stranger
here, her cool and self-possessed, but modest
and unpretending excellence as a pianist
took all by surprise who heard her for the
first time. And Mrs. Barnett, by her sweet
and winning voice added much to the charm
of the evening. Mr. Philip Milfoid, too, by
the sweet tones he drew from the clarionette
and the perfect harmony of his accompani-
ment, gave new ideas of the compass of this
difficult instrument and established himself at
once as a favorite. And, after all, the crown-
ing beauty of the whole, was the entire free-
dom from professional airs, and the utter ab-
sence of all pretentiousness, by which all the
exercises of the evening were characterized
throughout. This was a grace as valuable
from its variety na; from it intrinsic worth, and
% a3 Il' il) L il.-l..V t-. ty .11.
In d'Ide tiri n r. h..'r IA another as pleas-
ant an evening'% eire-taiiiment in furtherance
ufr tihv -.isL'Ln..orl OTC' T,-inenrb-rassdBy
pctti sh and croIthl) o I.ppoition.


Dat Boy "Peanuts."
Thls commur,iiN h. mi,.ed him. We mean
- Peanut'." lie l er N.., iiihwith Mr. Kellogg
m the capacity of private secretary, or some-
thing of that sort. Arriving at the Grand
Central Depot in New York, Mr. K. found
himself obliged to wait from 8 to 11:45 p. min.,
for the train by which lie intended to go to
Massachusetts, and so left "Peanuts" at the
depot in charge of trunk, bird-cages, bundles,
boxes and medicine -chest,--which latter, by
the way, we are informed was replenished in
New York,-while he went to visit his rela-
tions. The leading of such a life, though in
a strange city and constantly the observer of
strange things, became monotonous to "Pea-
nuts" and he improved the occasion to "inter-
view" the medicine-chest, to which he had
seen resort so often made during the perilous
sea voyage, and got gloriously, effectually
drugged. Under these circumstances his
natural inclinations were, not to remain in
charge of the effects of his superior, but, like
the "musing organist" in the vision of Sir
Launfel, to "wander where he list." Inthose
wanderings he fell in with a policeman; and
as the rules of the New York police force do
not admit of its members walking about with
guests of that city, "Peanuts" fell into another
place and Mr. Kellogg's collection of Florida
curiosities were transferred to the hands of the
depot authorities, was locked up for the night,
and the owner on his return was obliged to
seek quarters in a neighboring hotel. We
think the Fifth Avenue was his temporary
address.
Alas for "Peanuts !" He is not the boy
our fancy pictured him; would that it were
not so. He is fertile soil for the sowing of
seeds of Puritanical reform, and we fancy that
the gentleman who transplanted him from the
Land of Flowers and chicken roosts has com-
menced the work of harrowing in those seeds.


Our County Fair.
The general interest of all our people in the
approaching Fair of the Duval Agriculture
and Horticultural Society is daily and srrong-


FIRST NATIONAL BANK


t OF FLORIDA.
JACKSONVILLE.
_JThe only National Bank in aeration in iket Stte.
Exchange on Savannah and New York sold, and Ex-
change on all Northern points bought,
AT CURRENT RATES.

DIRECTORS AND STOCKHOLDERS:.
Foreign, Home,.
JOHN CLARK, Esq.,
Hon. F. E. SPINNER, W. A MCLEAN, Esq.,
PHILO REMINGTON, Esq., C. A. FAIRCHILD, Esq.,
SAM'L REMINGTON, Esq., DAMON GREENLEAF, Esq.,
W. C. SQUIRES, Esq., W. M. BOSTWICK, Esq.
September 26, 1874. ii-4-iy


NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.


SPECIAL FAIR ACCOMMODA-
TION.
Those who desire to attend the Duval County
Fair, may secure comfortable quarters at
MRS. DECOTTES,
near the residence of Dr. J, D. Mitchell. Eighteen
airy and pleasant Rooms, with or without board can
be had on reasonable terms. 6-23 5t.


BOX RENT IN POST OFFICE.
The law in regard to Box Rents in the Post Office
provides as follows:
"Box rents must be collected and acc-unted for as a
part of the revenues of the Department, and no box
shall be assigned to the use of any person until the rent
thereon has been paid for one quarter."
A nlew quarter begins on July ist, and box holders
will take notice that the law requires every Postmaster
to place in the General Delivery all mail matter
directed to boxes with rent not ,aid in advance.
6-23 3t. J. S. ADAMS, postmaster.

A $200 ORGAN OFFERED AT
PRIVATE SALE.
There can be a better bargain made by buying this
organ than you can make in New York. Inqure at the
house of Emanuel Fortune, on Elizabeth street, between
Newnan and Market streets.
Jacksonville, Fla,, 6-23 3t.


WILLSON & WHITLOCK,


GR 0 CERS


And Commission Merchants,
Manufacturers of


and


CORN,
CORN MEAL,
PEARL HOMINY,
CRACKED CORN,
GRAHAM FLOUR,
RYE MEAL,
ETC., ETC., ETC.

TURNING AND SCROLLSAWING

TO ORDER.
OAK AND PINE WOOD SAWED TO ORDER
AND
DELIVERED IN ANY PART OF THE CITY.

ROSS' BLOCK,
OPPOSITE OUR MILL AND WHARF,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


AGENTS FOR THE SCHOONERS-

MAGNOLIA AND FLORENCE,
Plying on the St. Johns River and down the Coast.
6.-23.


FLORIDA. The Proceedings of the
FLO ID FLORIDA FRUIT-GRow-
ERS' Ass6ciA'riON, at its Annual Meeting in January
last 68 pp. extra large 8vo. Full of reliable informa-
tion concerning Florida, anid the culthivation of the
Orange and other tropical and semi-tropical fruits.
Mailed for 25 cents. Send to cents also for A copy o
THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURIST, Weekly, $3 a year.
Add-ess CHAS. H. WALTON & CO., Jackson-
ville, Fia. -
AW" Copies for sale at the office, Ocean street, two
doors from Bay. June 6-a.


D R. P. E. JOHNSON, HOMCEOPATHIST
Has removed his office to Mjtcbell's new building,
.north side of Bay street,betweh Neol'n an nd Market
nearly opposite the Post Offiet. I-r;tf


Melons.

Nine boat loads of melons were moored at
the market at one time yesterday morning.
The melon-cholic days have come at last.

PIANOS AND ORGANS-CASH PRICES; EASY
TERMS.
FROM $25 to $xoo can be saved in the purchase of
a Piano or Organ under our new system of selling at
CASH PRICES with EASY TERMS for payments.
Pianos have never before been sold on such favorable
terms in the South.
FINE PIANOS at $275 $300 $325 and $350, fully
guaranteed for five years. Terms $5o cash, and bal-
ance in six months, or $roo cash, and balance in one
year.
THECELEBRATED MASON & HAMLIN
ORGANS are also sold upon cash payments $25 to $50
and balance in six and twelve months.
SPECIAL TERMS arranged to suit convenience of
all responsible parties. Monthly or quarterly pay-
ments received if preferred. Pianos and Organs for
rent and rent applied on purchase. A good stool and
cover goes with each piano sold from our warerooms,
Send for our new REDUCED TIME PRICE LISTS
and see what real inducements we now offer.
LUDDEN & BATES,
Southern Music House,
6 23 it. Savannah, Ga.

CALL AT
Smith, Norton & Co's., and see their $6o Organs.
5-12 tf.

INK, INK, PENS, PENS.
Pencils, Pen-Holders, Pencils, at Smith, Norton
& Co's. 5 12 tf.

THE PARENTS
Of all well regulated families purchase their groceries of
Rich, Polk's Block, Bay street. o10.21 tf

TWENTY-FIVE OLD PIANOS WANTED
in exchange for new ones, at SMITH, NORTON & Co's.

MORE NEW AND BEAUTIFUL SHEET MUSIC.
Messrs. Smith, Norton & Co.. seem determined to
keep up with the times, so far as Musical Merchan
dise may be concerned, and havejust received at their
elegant store in Mitchell's block, on Bay Street, a
magnificent stock of fine musical gems, recently pub-
lished, that cannot fail to elicit the admiration of every
lady performer upon the piano-forte in this city.
5-12 tf.

ONLY CALL,
as others have done, and be convinced that Cheaper
Bargains can be obtained, and with greater satisfaction.
Polite and attentive salesmen to wait upon every one,
great and small, at THE GREAT SOUTHERN BAZAAR.
11-14 tf

BUY BOOTS WITH
A. K. PERCIVAL'S stamp upon them. They are supe-
rior to all others. oo-3itf
MUSICAL-PHILIP MILFORD
Of England will give lessons on the Piano, Organ,
Claronet, Flute and all Brass and Stringed Instru-
ments. Terms $15 per quarter of 24 lessons. Apply
at Smith, Norton & Co's., Music Store, or address P.
0. Box 10xo9. 5-12 tf.
BUILDERS AND CONTRACTORS
Will find a complete assortment of lumber, dressed
and undressed, mouldings, shingles, etc.. at the Depot
Lttmber Yard. Orders to be delivered at landings on
the River receive especial attention.
Address Louis J. BRUSH.


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POST-OFFICE NOTICE.
ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE OF MAILS.


ARRIVE.
Northern and Western, daily, 9:oo00 A. M.
Fernandina and Florida Rail-
road, daily.................. 9:00 A. M.
Saint Augustine and Palatka,
daily, (Sundays excepted)... 4:00oo P. M.
Key West, arrives every Mon-
day................................ 9:oo00 A. M.
closes every Monday and
Thursday..........................
Enterprise, Mlelonville, Hali-
fax and Indian river arrives
Tuesday,Thursday and Sat-
srday.............................. 4:00 P. M.
Enterprise, Melonville, Hali-
fax and Indian river rail,
leaves on Monday, Wednes.
day and Friday........... ......
Fort George, and Mayport
arrives Tuesday and riday 4:00 '. M.
leaves Wednesday and Sat-
urday ..............................
St. Nicholas........................ 10:00 A. M.
OFFICE HOURS.


CLOSE.
3:30 P. M.
3:30 F. M.
8:00oo A. M.


3"30 P. M.





8:00oo A. M.


8:oo A. M.
10:00 A. M.


The post-office will be open daily (Sundays excepted)
from 8 A. M to 6:30 p. 2M.
The office will be open on Sundays from ie to 1:30
o'clock P. M.
The general ant box deliveries will be open at all
times during the regular hours, except when the mails
received are being distributed.
MONEY ORDER OFFICE.
The money order office will be open from 9 A. M. to
1:30 P. M. and from 3 to 4 P. M.
Money orders are issued at this office payable in any
part of the United States, and also orders payable in
Great Britain, Switzerland and Germany.
The following are the rates of commission:
DOMESTIC MONEY ORDERS.
On orders not exceeding $Po, 5 cents.
Over $o10 and not exceeding $20, 90 cents,
Over $20 and not exceeding $30, 05 cents,
Over $30 and not exceeding $40, 0o cents,
Over $40 and not exceeding $50, 25 cents.
FOREIGN MONEY ORDERS.
On ordeis not exceeding $o10, 25 cents.
Over $0o and not exceeding $2o, 50 cS" ,
Over $20 and not exceeding $30, 75 cents.
Over $30 and not exceeding $40, $1i.oo.
Over $40 and not exceeding $50, $1.25.
J. S. ADAMS, Pottmaster.
Jacksonville, May 1, 1875.


STEAMERS.

.LESTON AND


FLORIDA


THE


"'EMPIRE" PIANO. C0HAL
We have been selling the "EMPIRE" Piano for S'I
the past few years in all parts of the United States, and
to the entire satisfaction of all purchasers. The reas- '_r-
ons for this are very simple-
FIRST- CHA
They are DURABLE; this is the MOST ESSENTIAL TI]
quality.
SECOND-
They are MAGNIFICANT IN TONE; rich, full, l leaveC
for tiehrbeutiful anashevery
and especially noticeable for their beautiful singing Palatka, and
quality y. THIRD-
~~THIRD--
Tl.'iy ,jre REASONABLE IN PRICE; not a cheap, Leave Palatk
poor Piano, but well and carefully made in every part, every Frida
and placed at such a figure as cannot Jail to please all same day, at
purchasers who desire a Saturday.
Through b
REALLY GOOD PIANO AT A LOW PRICE. phia, NewY
FOURTH- Ttie Dicta
ships every S
They have very attractive and HANDSOMELY ton. Conne
FINISHED CASEb in various styles, suited to all road at Tocc
tastes. All have carved legs, and every improvement Upper St. J
desirable in a modern Piano Forte; in addition to
which we have introduced the celebrated RA
RAN
"AGRAFFE" BRA
JEF
iaits,.l in every Piano Forte. jEF
C.l
,TO THE PIANO TRADE.
We can commend the V
"EMPIRE" NEW

as being a most desirable and attractive instrument to
sell, its laowfrice and the quality ofremoeinin good i
order, make the "EMPIRE" Piano an especial fav-
orite with dealers.

WM. A. POND &I CO'S
PARLOR AND CHAPEL ORGANS.
These Organs, although but a short whiie before the
public, have met with such hearty and unqualified ap-
proval that their entire success is already secured.
Great care has been taken to combine in these instru-
ments, BEAUTY AND VOLUME OF TONE, with
an ATTRACTIVE APPeARANCE. The tone is
as pipe-like as can be obtained in an instrument of this
class. The soft stops are delicious for their purity and
refined character, while the full organ is grand and im-
posing in its sonority.
After very elaborate preparation, we have just corn- CAN AC(
pleted new and very beautiful cases for all our styles, (
and are prepared to fill orders with
THE VERY BEST AND HANDSOMEST ORGAN These steal
AT THE LOWEST PRICE. River, every
*W LIBERAL TERMS TO AGENTS. Wharf every
Purchasers who are at a distance from any of our For freight
agents will receive price lists and catalogues upon ap-
plication.
MANN'S NEW METHOD FOR THE PIANO
FORTE
Is the latest and best book for Elementary In- Or W. J.
struction for this instrument. It combines
the excellences of all other works; is representing
systematic, progressive and pleasing. 10.10 sw tf
A great help to both teacher and
pupil. Price, $2.50.


WM. A. POND & CO.,
[Established over Fifty Years.] T ACKSO
Keep constantly on hand the largest and most com- M
plete assortment of American and Foreign SHEET G
MUSIC, BOOKS, INSTRUMENTS, and MUSICAL
MERCHANDISE of every description. Orders by
mail will receive prompt and careful attention. On and a
Correspondence with the Trade solicited. ger trains onT
WM. A. POND & CO., 547 Broadway, D
S Branch Store, 39 Union Square. N. Y.
6-23 6m.i Ieae Jacks


RAILROADS.


GROCERIES AND PkOVtSIONS.

OHN CLARK,

J FORWARDING

&COMMISSION MERCHANT
COMMISSION MERCHANT


AND DEALER In
ROCERIEa, PROVISIONS,
HAY, SEGARS,
Sole Agents for Florida for


GRAIN.
&c.


Averill's Chemical Paint, and


White's Patent Mone' Drawer,


FEAM PACKET CO.


kNGE OF SCHEDULE.
E STEAMER DICTATOR,
CAPTAIN LEO VOGEL,
Charleston every Tuesday evening and Say-
Wednesday, for Fernandina. Jacksonville,
I intermediate landings.
R E T U R N I N G:
ka every Thursday evening, Jacksonville
y morning to suit the tide, Fernandina
arriving at Savannah and Charleston every
bills of lading given to Baltimore, Philadel-
York and other points.
tor will connect within New York Steam-
Saturday, both at Savannah and Charles-
ction is also made with the St. Johns Rail-
ii, and at Palatka with steamers for the
ohns and the Ocklawaha river.
AGENTS.
VENEL & CO. Charleston.
AINARD & ROBINSON, Savannah.
FFREYS, BRO. & SON, Fernandina.
FFREYS & BRO., Jacksonville.
J. ADAMS, Palatka.
I. BOHN, St. Augustine.
o10-2 tf

YORK AND


SRNANDINA
STEAMSHIP LINE.



ERNANDINA, FLA., October 1, 1874.

MOTGOMERY,
Capt. Faircloth,

HUNTSVILLE,
Capt. Chester,
:OMMODATE FIFTY FIRST-
CLASS PASSENGERS.
miners sail from New York, Pier 2, North
Thursday, and from Fernandina Railroad
SWednesday.
or passage apply to
HERM. GELPCKE, Agent,
5 Williams St.. New York.
P. McQUAID, Agent,
Polk's Block, Bay St., Jacksonville.
WOODWARD,
g CHAPTER & KING, Agents,
Fernandina, Florida.


STEAMER LIZZIE BAKER,
VOLUSIA.
AND
Van Brunt & Bro's. Line Sailing Packets,
FROM NEW YORK.
tw36-Ig92 Bay Street, Jacksonv iltl,Florida.

WILILSON & WHITLOCK,
Successors to Thos. A. Willson
SEALERS IN

GRAIN. FLOUR, AND FEED,
Manufacturers of

CORN MEAL, HOMINY, CRACKED
CORN, RYE MEAL, GRAHAM

FLOUR, CRACKED WHEAT,&c.

SCROLL SAWING & WOOD TURNING
TO ORDER.

Wood Sawed, Split, and Delivered

by Cord or Load.
Ross' Block, Bay Street, opposite our Mill and Whar
2A CKSON VILLE, FLA.
T. WILSO'. 15-66 W. A. WHITLOCK


T HE JACKSONVILLE
SALE AND LIVERY


STABLES

C. B. McCLENNY, PROPRIETOR.


)NVILLE, PENSACOLA AND Notice is given to the public that I have purchased
MOBILEE RAILROAD CO the well-known HARTRIDGE STABLES, opposite
the METROPOLITAN HOTEL, and have on hand


GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE,
TALLAHASSEE, December i9, 1874.
Rter SUNDAY, DEC. 20, 1874, Passen-
this road will run as follows:
DAY PASSENGER, DAILY.
A. M. Arrive P. M.
sonville... 4.00 Chattahoochee t.oo


nal win......... 5.55 yuncy........ .. 2.35
Lake City..... 8.32 Tallahassee.... 4.30
A. M.I P.M.
SLive Oak...... 3.00i Madison......... 8. 15
Madison ....... 5.151 .A. M.
ITallahassee ... 9.40 Live Oak...... 3.00
Quincy .........ii.col Lake City...... 4.33
P. T.O PBaldwin .......... 7.4S
Arrive Chattahoochee 12l.4o Arrive Jacksoivile ..... 9.o5
Passengers can go through to St. Marks Mondays-
Wednesdays and Fridays, and return Tuesdays, `1hurs,
days and Saturdays.
LUMBE R TRATN, Dadly, Saturdays excepted.
P. 50.1 P. M.
Leave Jacksonville... 8.33'Arrive Live Oak...... 9.55
Baldwin......0. .00o5 A. M.
A. M I Lake City..... 4.33
Lake City. .....55 Baldwin........ 7.5
Arrive Live Oak.... 3.30oArrive Jacksonville... 9.05
NOTE.-The 8.35 p. m., Lumber Train has a pas-
senger coach attached, persons taking this Train for
points West of Live Oak avoid I detention there.
ROBERT WALKER.
Receiver and Gen'l. Supt.
T. C. SPOONER, Master Transportation. 5-2

A G., & W. I. T. CO.'S RAILROAD.

FROM
FERNANDINA TO CEDAR KEYS.

GOING SOUTH.
ARRIVE. LEAVE. ARRIVE. LEAVE.
Fernandina............ a. m...... 4 25...... a. m... 4 45
Callahan ............... 6 15...... 6 20o...... 6 15...... 6 20
Baldwin................. 7 4o0...... 8 oo 0...... 7 40...... 8 00oo
Starke.................0o 29......10 36...... 9 47..... 9 52
Gainesville............12 38A......12 50......It 40......1i1 47
Archer.................. ..... 204. o1......2 54......r2 59
Bronson................. 2 48 ..... 2 55... i 31...... 37
Cedar Keys........ .. 5 52...... P. m...... 4 oo...... p. m.
.GOING NORTH.
ARRIVE. LEAVE. ARRIVE. LEAVE
Cedar Keys........... a. mIn...... 8 oo...... a. m...... 9 30
Bronson.................00o 35......io 42......It 49.....1 55
Archer...................It 20o......I1 26...... 11 28......12 33
Gainesville......... ...r2 4I......i2 52 ...... 38...... i 44
Starke................. 2 5...50 ... 2 56...... 3 a ...... 3 6
Baldwin................ 4 58 5 33 ......5 5 ...... 5 33
Callahan ............... 6 58...... 7 o5...... 6 58...... 7 0 5
Fernandina............ 9 00o...... p. m...... 9 00o...... p. m.
CONNECTIONS.
At FERNANDINA, w th Steamer City Point from
Charleston and Savannah, Mondays at 4 a. m.; steamer
Dictator from Charleston and Savannah, Tharsdays at
4 a. m. With steamer Lizzie Baker, from Savannah,
Brunswick and St. Mary's, Mondays at 6 a. m ; for
those points on Fridays at 8 a. m.
At BALDWIN, with J P & M. R. R. from lack-
soiville at 4:07 p. inm.; for Jacusonville at 9:02 a. m.
At GAINESVILLE, with tri-weekly stage line for
Tampa: with stage line for Newnansville, Tuesdays
and Fridays.
At CEDAR KEYS, with steamers to and from New
Orleans, every Saturday. Wilh steamers from Key
West and Tampa, Fridays ; from these places. Thurs-
days With Steamer Cool, from Tampa, Sundays : for
Tampa, Mondays. \Vith Steamer Wawenock, fromi
Suwannee Fridays; for Suwannee, Tuesdays.
D. E. MAXWELL,
5-13 Superintendent.


"I'HE FLORIDA PHOTOGRAPH
AND


FERROTYPE GALLERY,
ATLANTIC BLOCK, BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE.
Is the only place in the State where every branch of
the Art is Successfully Conducted. Open for business
from 1o A. M., until 5 P. M.
A. G. GRANT will attend to the taking of all
Photographs until further notice. Out-door Photo-
graph orders attended to as usual, on due notice being
given. 5 5 If.

B OAT BUILDING.
A. G. CIHAPPELL,
BAY STREET, near the Cable Crossing,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

YACHTS AND WHITEHALL
BOATS,
Bijilt to order.
STEAM YACHTS
With the most approved machinery. Will build of
any size, from 25 to too feet Call and get my prices.
NEW 28-FOOT YACHT


or sale.

A SSIGNEES SALE.
I will offer for sale
ON THURSDAY, THE 24th
OF JUNE,


9-30 tf




DAY


at to o'clock A. M., the entire
STOCK OF JEWELRY, &C.,


at the old stand of I. J, Holland.
This is a well selected stock and will be sold without
reservation The sale will be continued from
io A. M., UNTIL i P. M.,
each day until the whole stock Is disposed of.
Terms of sale cash.
J. C. GREELEY, Assignee for
J. J. Holland, Bankrupt.
6-9 41


A VERY LARGE STOCK OF HORSES AND
MULES FOR SALE.

Those desiring to purchase will find it to their ad-
vantage to examine this unusually large and attractive
stock, adapted to all uses. I am also receiving

A COMPLETE OUTFIT OF

BUGGIES, PHA3TONS, AND
OTHER CARRIAGES,
of the latest styles,

FOR LIVERY SERVICE,
which will be furnished
AT THE SHORTEST NOTICE,
and on the
MOST REASONABLE TERMS.

Mr. G. M'. BRITTAIN is. my authorized Agent
and Manager, and will always be found at the Stables
ready to attend to all business appertaining to the es-
tablishment. LC. B. Met LENNY.
Sept. 16. 1872. ir-21tf


M ASON1.
SOLOMON LODGE, NO. 20.
Regular meetings first and third Wednesdays in
each month.
GEO. W. JONES, W. M.
CHAS. G. ELLIOTT, Secretary.


T S. SWAIM,


PRACTICAL JEWELLER
And WATCHMAKER, late with J. J. Holland, has
taken a window in WALTER'S CIGAR STORE.
two doors west of the Post-office, where he is prepared
with a good stock of tools and material to do any kind
of work in his line.
Extra Fine Mounting of Florida
Curiosities
a specialty. Fine watches carefully, thoroughly and
promptly repaired.
N. B.-If it's worth doing at all it's worth doing well.
talto-Isod at30jo sitA
'aio1S aL213 s,.jalEAk 1e 'H3HIVNHDLVAk PUV

daTI M3Aaf 'IVDI.LJVId

'NIVA "S L


FOR SALE.
A half interest in one of the most flourishing and pro-
ductive
ORANGE GROVES
In East Florida. For particulars apply at this office
1-232 m


WHOLESALE ORDERS AT SAVANNAII PRICES.

H. ROBINSON,


WHO5t4eALB & RaTAIL
DRUGGIST,
Hoeg's Block, Bay St.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
COMPOUNDING PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY.


CARRIAGE SHOP.


GEORGE I. LEA,

CARRIAGE MAKER,
COR. WASHINGTON AND ADAMS STREETS,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA,
Will build in first-class style, Carriages, Buggies and
Light Wagons.
Reparing neatly done. Come and see my work.
10-21 3m.


W IL COX,


Dealer in
FRUIT AND VEGETABLES,
MAGNOLIA MARKET.
Families supplied at regular market rates.

Also, he still keeps
A STALL IN TIlE OLD MARKET,
For the accommodation of down-town customers.
It will PAY to conice and see me.
4-7 Y H. E. WILCOX.

A LLIGATOR STEAM SAW AND
PLANING MILLS.
Has constantly on hand and for sale at lew prices
rough lImber cut in diesensions to suit builders
Planed lumber of every grade and description In quan-
tities to suit customers. Turned work of every ind
all descriptions, Scroll work of ay paltarni. Palings,
Lath, Mouldings and all other wood material required
tor building and furnishing purposes. Satisfaction in
workmanship and material guaranteed. Call before
purchasing elsewhere or send for price list.
ALEXANDER WALLACE.
N 26-tf,


LEGAL.


A SSIGNEES SALE--TO DEAL-
. ERIS IN BOOKS, AND BUSINESSMEN.
For sixty days from this date, I will offer at pri-
vate sale, the large and well selected stock of Books&,.
Stationery, Chromos, Gold Pens, Glass and Moulding
for mounting pictures, ete., etc.. belonging to the firm
ofChas. L. Maiher & Co. Bankrupts.
Also. the valuable lease held of the premises lately
occupied by said firm having 8% years to rin,,sftuate.
on the North side of Bay street between PWie .
Laura streets, Jacksonville, Florida. The Store is a
0oo feet in depth and 22% feet in width, a-V : shaped
Ware Room runs the entire length of the Store, having
an average width of six feet. 'IThe Store is elegantly
fitted and-famurnished for the purposes for which it has
been used.
The stock will be sold entire or in lots to suilt per,
chasers. Stock and inventory will be shown at all
times to parties meaning business. "
The foregoing property will be sold at public auction
if not disposed of within the nine specified.
J. H. LDURKEE
Assignee in Bankruptcy f.othe firm of Chas L Mather
& Co.
Jacksonville, June z6, 1875, 6od.


A SSIGNEES SALE.
By an order of the United States District Court for
the Northern District of Florida, I will offer forsal* o
the highest bidder at Henry VonDohlen's Stable, on
Saturday the 26th inst., at 9 o'clock a. m., the follow-
ing property being part of the assets of Henry Von
Dohlen, Bankrupt, to wit:
3 Four Wheel Wagons.
2 Wheel Wagon ,Beds.
4 Two Wheel Carts.
z Two Wheel Dray.
z Four Wheel Spring Buggy.
I Bugey.
A lot of Single, Double and Dray Harnesi.
Terms of sale cash. "
J. C. GREELEY, Assiea.
of Henry VanDohlen, Balkrupt.


june lo-zw.

PROPOSALS FOR DREDGING.


U S. ENGINEER'S OFFICE, 38 Church street,
MOBILE, ALA., May 7. 87.
Sealed proposals, in duplicate, for dredging 16.o0
cubic yards, more or less, through the bar at the month
of th- harbor of Cedar Keys, and in the channel between
the bar and Cedar Keys, Fla., will be received at this
office until 12 o'clock, M. Saturday June 26. 1875; and
opened immediately thereafter.
A guarantee will be required, that within ten days
after notification of the award of the contract, contract
shall be entered into.
Printed blank forms of proposals and guarantee,
specifications, instructions to bidders, and any desired
information, can be had on application to this office.
A. N. DAMRELL.
5 26-4W. Capt. Eengineers, U. S. A.


N TIHE DISTRICT COURT of
THE UNITED STATES, FOR THE NORTH-
ERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA.
In the matter ofEugene F. Gilbert, Bankrupt. In
Bankruptcy.
Notice is hereby given that a petition has been filed
In said Court, by Eugene F. Gilbert of Jacksonville,
in said District, dulydeclared a Bankrupt under the
Act of Congress of March l2d, 1 867, and the several
Acts amendatory thereof for a'discharge and certificate
thereof, from all his debts and other claims provable
under said Act, and that the 19th day of June, A. D.
1875, at xc. o'clock, A. M., at the office of Hon. W. A.
McLean, Register In Bankruptcy, is assigned for the
hearing of the same when and where all creditors who
have proved their debts and other persons in interest,
may attend and show cause if any they have, why the
prayer of said petitioner should not be granted.
Dated Jacksonville,. Florida, June r,.i87.
PHILIPWALTER;
6-2 2w. Clerk District Court ofsaid Di ,trict:;

N OTICEK
Notice is hereby giferr of the seizure ofitour barrel
of distilled spirits on c ne 7, 0875, atJacksonvilleFla.;
three barrels distilled spirits seized June 9, 1875, at St.
Augustine, Fla.; two barrels distilled spirits seized
June 8, 0875, at Micanopy, Fla., and three barrels dis-
tilled spirits seized June 12, 187:,, at Tallahassee,. Fla..
all of which are seized for violation of the Internal
Revenutre Laws.
Any person or persons claiming the above described
articles must appear and make claim within thirty days
or otherwise they will be sold at public auction as re-
quired by law. A. A. KNIGTHT, Collector.
6-i6-3w.


HOTELS AND BOARDING HOUSGSS.


M MANSION HOUSE.


PORT ROYAL, S.,'.,


The NEW CITY, situate on the South Atlantic oss,.
and at the terminus of the Port Royal Railroad. The
great desideratoan, so long required there is nowde.
veloped.
Respectfully the Soperintendent undersigned, laiely
of Augusta, Ga., announces that on the 25th inst. she
will open the
NEWLY CONSTRUCTED ANIX NEWLY FR'
NISHED

MANSION.
For private and transient boarders. Confident of her
ability, from past experience, she will zealously
consult the comfort of all who may patbonize, and at
terms the imost favorable.
ANNIE BJSSE.
Dated March x5, 1875. 3-24t


FERNANDINA, FLA.

SAMUEL T. RIDDELL, Patorximroa.

4G"''%agnificent d *e ot eighteen miles on the fiaest.
Atlantic Beach.
*W-Refreshing sea breezes.
OPEN SUMMER AND WINTE.-
BOARD:
Per day .. 3.o
Per week .........from $1 2to $15.o0
Satisfactory arrangements made with families.
Fine livery accommodations. i1-4-f


ROBERSON & MAPSON


Have opened a first-class
SHAVING SALOON,
corner of Bay and, Pine streets, where all the modern
appliances used by the best saloons in the country ican
be tond. They also furnish at all hours

HOT AND COLD BATIHS.
Tickets entitling lhe bearer to eighsavus, for-sale
for Si .oo; eight shaves, hair cutting and, shampooing
$i.so. V-SW


A FREE HOME.
I will give a building lot in the new two a
ROSEWOOD
To any one who will improve It.
GOOD GOVERNMENT LAND"
Can be entered within a half mile of the depot, ati"
STATE LAND
Bought at $1.25 per acre.
It is believed that no government land can be ovte'
in the State so accessible.
Apply to me at the WAVERLY HOUSE, or id'
dress at ROSEWOOD, LEVY COUNTY.
C. B. DIBBLE,
Jacksonville, January a6, 1875. 1-30 w&Sw


DEPOT LUMBER YARD.

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS
WILL AFIND
FULL ASSORTMENT U0,
DRESSED AND UNtRESSED LUMBNE,
MOULDINGS AND SAWED
PINE SHINGLES,
CHEAP FOR CASH AT '

THE DEPOT LUMBER YARD.
Lumber delivered in all parts of the city and vicinity,
and at all landings on the river, at low rates.A. A or.
ders receive prompt attention..
LOUIS I. BRUSH.
7acksonville, March. 6, 1874.


TEAM FERRY.

The Steam Yacht DAISY will.untdl ft r podm,.
run between Jacksonville and the South Side of tbS
river, as follows: leavi the city for ArlIngton .atji
t o o'clock a. m., and 4+0o clock p m. ; and =Wa
Point a 9 a. M., and t and 6p m. R -etmiirk
leave ArlMngtt atS anod is a. m., and S O'cJI -
leay2 Phillips' Point at io o'clock a. 2,,iI '
p. in,, touching at Reed'. Landing adL VIIi.
wharves hetwen th.bove poam, bolh if. -. F '
TheDAISY will also be for charter for
and Sunday excursitoi, t (easouable raE." ,.
56 t!, A.R 4UM YaW l".


I87:5.


- r-- ~rCc~-~-~ .i---~de -----~s~ij~-a ~ ~


Agent for


CONSTRUCTION OF HOUSES
OF REFUGE.
Sealed proposals will be received at this Department
until 12 o'clock noon of Tuesday, the 2yth day of
June, 1875, for the construction of Houses of Refuge,
at the following named localities on the coat of Floria,
to wit : One on the beach about thirteen miles north
of Indian River Inlet, at the trail from Bethel Creek ;
one on the beach about one and one half miles north
of Gilbert's Bar, at a place known as Saint Lucia
Rocks; one at Orange Grove, (so called,) on the beach
about thirty miles north of New River Inlet; one near
Fort Lauderdals, on the beach about six miles north of
New River Inlet; and one on the beach opposite the
head of Biscayne Bay, about ten miles north of Cape
Florida.
Bidders muststate the time in which they will contract
to complete the houses, and the bids must be accompanied
with satisfactory guarantees as to the ability of the
bidders to do the required work. All proposals must
be endorsed "Proposals for construction of Houses of
Refuge," and addressed to the Secretary of the Treas-
ury. Washington, 1). C
Specifications a' d plans can be obtained at the office
of the Collectors of Customs at Bangor, Portland, Bos-
ton, Wilmington, N. C.. Fernandina. Jacksonville,
Key West and Pensacola. Also, of Capt. J. H.
Merryman, Inspector of Life Saving Stations, No. 06
Broadway, New York City, and upon application to
this Department.
The right to reject any and all bids, or to waive de-
fects, if it is deemed for the interests of the Govern-
ment to do so, is reserved.
[Stgned] CHAS. F. CONANT,
Acting Secretary.
WASHINGTON; D. C., May 26, 1875. 6 a 6w.


r_


IDDELL HOUSE,








THE NEW SOUTH: WEEKLY. JACKSONVILLE, WEDNESDAY, ThJUNE 23, 1875.


Let us--T-ry-to be Happy.
JLet5us;try tob ie happy We may, i" we will,
Find some piasures in lfe to o'eibalance the ill.;
There never wa. an evil, irwell uifderstood,
SBit whit, rightly managed, would turn to a good
If we were butas ready'r, Io..t t.- the light ,
As we are to'sl moping because it is night,
We should own it'O ttuli, bAth fn w.rd ai in deed,
Thfa w6o tniei t be l)app' "ip) tIr ttoo iicceed


Lequs try to'be happy I Somne shade- of regret
Are sute t_ bang around, wh,,;h ue (cannCo forget;
S'Thire are'uime when the'ligbhtest of spirits must bow,
Andihb suanniest race wear a cloud'bn iisbrow ;
We must never bid feeih-g. tlhe purest and best,
'Lie'b.untrThad cc-Id ii our biorom at rest:
But tIhe dieeper our own grciejs, te greater our need
STo try tC behppy, lestother hearts bleed. '*


Let ,sitry andibehiiapp! It is not for long
We shall cheeron each c-thor w;ih c.:isnael or song.
If we make the bett f our. time that me t ray,
There is much me can do t.;,erlven the may ,
Let us only in earneitnsas each do our best, "
Before God and our c.n'icience, and trust for the test
1Lotallkipg this trtth, both .n word and in deed,
Thatrwho tries to be happy is sute to succeed.
a
," .. .- 4 : '.
f. ,. ; Good Nigbt. -
Apple blossoms fa;r and lonely
S Opened ith the daw'ninday, -: .
'Shook their aimr hes-,ds and nodded
._- -To the blossoms o'er the way,
Caught t he stnnshiqe ;n the frolic,
lleldt i in the:; pe.Pls brhtu, -
Scattered [ perAitme o the breezes
LauIghing, dancing, said Good Night.
.'-Fading bllc.soms, pure and stairnlss,
SLs i) fliater from the trees
Snc.sy petals sadi linger
Playlrg mith rheeveuig-breere,
,,-. Driting, tlvating, falLg ever,
if --. Fairy angeli robed in white,
SHid amoirng the deay,gracses,
.. .-Sofi, .adiq, 'sibic'o Gt-oa Night.
S, y.nd4by, ar-ne and likely,
L -a- uves and hcs-oms ithered-dead,
While, ij uees .cfm r-.-bcd sorrow, -
Mourning fr their Lauly fled. '
uat from out the barren trnches,
,.lndl, stilej ii licer s a hie,
..pgeulc-l'fth corni:mig sprir, time,
,Swfqet tuned i,:i: btrebath: Good N;gbt
-i. We are waiting for the spring time-
Dirk ard drear ma, be Hlie day-
Still our U.;,t'ut'ey are rurnrg :
To theI ".omnetimc"'-far away,
So we snil; to reat, mill trusting
Sleep, to dream orinornimg light,
Where the DJloers isil blom forever,
Where we nte'er shall say Good Night.


M; H. V.


Ljmroi~t i rJL> ir0reserve -1 :-
Alderman John Hiorn, Jr., of De-
troit, Mich., who has become so fa-
mous for saving persons from drown-


ing, made another rescue last week.
The circumstances are thus set forth
by the Detroit Post. "
S"As the ferr)boat Fortune was
coming into her dock at the foot of
Woodward avenue, about five o'clock
yesterday afternoon, one of the deck
Shands,.with criminal negligence, un-
hooked the guard chain, upon which
was seated a fourteen-year-old news-
'boy niiaed Isadore Vermette, and the
little fellow was suddenly thrown
backward into the river. The acci-
dent was witnessed by hundreds of
people on the ferryboat and along the
docks, but no one seemed to have
presence -of mind enough to helpthe
boy, who was struggling desperately
in the water. Fortunately Alderman
.J'ohL Horn, Jr., the savior of scores of
human lives under similar circun-
Stances, chanced to be seated in his
private office on the dock, and hear-
ing the uproar, ran out, seizing a life-
preserver, plunged into the water, and
swarm to the boy just as his tiny
strength had failed him and he was
onr the point of sinking. Seizing the
victim by the arms he kept his head
above water until a line could be
thrown from the boat Victoria, and
both were safely pulled our amid in-
tense excitement and the cheers of the
assembled crowd. Mr. Horn-'s gal-
lant act was the theme of universal
praise among all who witnessed it.
Yesterday's exploit makes the total
number of men, women and children
whom this intrepid man have saved
S from drowning in the Detroit river
justT 1o. In fair weather and in foul,
in the broad light of day and in the
pitchy darkness of night, he has ever
been ready to imperil his own life for
the safety of others. The new medal
voted to Mr. Horn by the last Con-
gress will not be an undue recognition
--*fchis humane services. Aside from
'th' danger .to life and health to which
Mr. Horn has been exposed, his pe-
cuninary sacrifices have been by no
means inconsiderable. Hundreds of
.4cdflars' worth of clothing has been
destroyed by-htis--sudden plunges into
the water. A-new suii of clothes
which 1he..qd. on yesterday was entire-
ly ruined"'. --- -- L
.* '* @ :
Scabies. .
Johnny says: Ispose babies is dif.
fernt from folks cos they don't no no
n"bett&r,but if I was them you wudent
cetch me putting everything in this
world into my mouths, I can tel you,
Slike;Qurn does. Mary, t.iats the house
maid, she was a only chile wen she
-was td.olbme,aTpd she use to have dols,
but, ,"he iiever see a mr'eat baby real
cloce .til she come to our house, nnd
that -girl was jes a- stonish ol the time
to see wotl.baby W'ude do, and it was
morn a munthli fore she wude tuch it.
One! day 'MOry" she come a bustin in
the dinin room wen it was dinner,
wite like a sheet, and hardly any)
breth, anil she said 0,- if you pleas,
1bum,' babby .hat went and et the
nursFy-dore,.6very bit up, ol but jes
the nob,'bui:-wen my mothers she
-- went to see wo.t was the matter it was
only ,father had, ;uke of the dore to
f eid it,'"and "baby was a sucking a
round paper wale. Sech a girl!
A'W'hen1'1sn5-e firs come to live'with us
dn0 'day Uncle Ned hlie was a i lain
.with baby after luncheon, and hlie hat]d'
the cork of a ale bottle a. stickin on
the cork scru, and he was a lettin
baby take it in his motvt'h. Mary
.`Ae.come in wile he was a doin it, and
-0 #,P- A, p Lu.' u .' uick, and she,
S.ra i- the- -kitchen as tas as ever she
nc a tumbler on
a.tt.ra-l -w+ e t e and you I don't
.leevc.- "ot any thinker-!
7A. s


Fusion of .Independents .,with: ..Republi-
cans.. :


excitement or stir being .-created: in
this State. We have had in operation
here for several years a State Civil
Rights bill and so little attention is
paid to it by anybody that its exist-
ence is scarcely known. Our colored
people have heretofore shown good
sense in all these matter, 'and past
experience- warrants us inhoping that
'even the Congressional Civil Rights
bill will give nobody in this State any
serious trouble._
As to the jury question, it is true
that in many instances these people
do allow the question of color to ini-
fluence their decisions; but we have
seen many), good verdicts rendered by
juries on which there were a majority
of negroes. The better class of these
people often, prove themselves very
,ged juror'-while on the other-hand
it must be said tnat there are many of
them totally unfit., both from ignor-
ance and prejudice, for such a respon.
sible posfition-.--Flo'dian.


The :Distress of Spain.


There seems to be a ;very general
desire among the Republican press,
says the Sacrament.p Bee, for a fus'ipn
between the Republicans and theii
old associates, the Independents ; and
the. Independents: are kindly lookinfl
towards it also! Why, then, should it
not be? Who will be to blame ifit
sha-ll not be?
-We do not,,see. why this fusion
should not take place. If there is
any consistency"' with' the Tidepend
ents they Can never be-in the Dem
ocratic party.- Whatever disappoint-
ment they may have felt when theY
left the ranks of the Republicans, the)
have, long since discovered that they
are powerless for.good of themselves
They are charged with being a factor
of disappointed *grumniblers. 'Since
they assumed to be independent 6o
the, two great :parties, they have swung
like Mahomet's coffin between.heaver
and earth. We are. willing, to give
them .such credit as they are entitled
to for not. being.able to continue ir
the Republican party because the)
differed from it.- But- as the:differ-
ences are now so. small, as they arn
not Democrats, and as they must wist
to--beuseful, in. aiding tQf secure the
best men to serye the country, it, per-
haps, may not be out of place 'to sug-
gest- that as -long as- they are Inde-
pendents they are merely a detached
excres-ence belonging' iowliwte'and tc
nobody. Why continue in that State,
which, permits what isnriot politically
desirable to exist from their sheer in-
ability to .prevent -it !' Why not
rather accept the definition of Macau-
ley-the essence of politics is com.
promise, and compromising the differ.
ences'which led to this separation,
rejoin tlie -Republican- party for a
grand and -decisive effort in 'the fort-.
coming campaign ?

Nothing to be Gained by Re-Immigra.
.tion.
For some time/past great numbers
of German and other adopted citizeris
of this country have..re-emigrated toc
their native lands. The reason foi
this course of action is the present
stagnation of trade and business in the
United States. They cannot procure
work in that, abundance and at- such
prices as pleases them, and hence they
turn their faces towards the Qld WorIl.
But are matters any better there ,thain
here? `Can employment be procured
in Germany or Ireland more readily
than in the United States ? A recent
letter from Berlin tells the Germans
of this country that they will no more
find the El Dorado in Germany now
than they discover it in this nation.
If wages have been reduced twenty
per cent. in the United States, they
have. fallen forty per cent. in Ger-
many. If there are hundreds of idle
men here, there are thousands in Ber-
lin -and other parts of Europe, And
the same general facts will apply to
Ireland, and thus it is apparent that
neither German n-or Irish citizens can
better their condition by leaving this
country at the present time-. -There
is a-general prostration of business in
all parts of the world. Some employ-
ers are discharging. hands, others are
closing their establishments. But a
change for the better must come, and
when the tide does alter it will rise
with more celerity in this country
than in the overcrowded, kingdoms
and districts of the Old WorldT. This
being the case, it is far better for our
adopted citizens to "bear the ills they
have" than seek to avoid; them by
leaving the country. The latter ex-
pedient will assuredly be followed by
disastrous consequences and,results.--
Philadelphia, Tnimes. "

SNot Exactly io.
We take the following extract from
a Florida letter in .a ,,Troy,(N. Y.)
paper: *
'The news of the passage of the civil
rights bill caused some little stir, and
had not "the-force bill been pending
close on its heels there wquld -have
been much excitement. The' mrim-
bers of the -Florida Legislature- d' hot
hesitate-to- ,y; that jf .the, bill was en
forced there would be bloodshed. If
the Nbrthern people were'down here
and could see and hear for themselves,
they would not blam-e the.$outh.
They are imposed upon,-taxed beyond
reason and oppressed -to a degree
where patience aceaeS,to be a virtue.:
nTi-drrsi~e-cases ts-e -~A-s~srs .ar Col:-
lectors and they 'do rnot pay over to
the State the taxes collected, but put
the money in their pockets, and there
is no redress. The darkies serve on
all juries, and an impartial verdict is
impossible. These negroes are the
tools of white men who dare not face
the front. They may say what they
will at the North, but it is time to
change affairs down here."
As to a change being needed, that
is lamentably true, "but in'reference to
the Civil Rights' bill we.':liow of no


M> ET A LI, I C.
BURIAL CASEb,
AND
WOOD COFFINS,


OF ALL SIZES AND QUALITIES.


LADIES' AND GENTLEMEN'S ROBES.
EMBALMING DONE WHEN REQUIRED.
ALSO,


MARBLE AND MARBLEIZED
SLATE MANTELS,
SLATE HEARTHS, &c.,
MANUFACTURED TO: ORDER
AND FOR SALE BY
CALVIN OAK,
0orsyth Sireet, b wm en Laura and Hogans,
tw36-592 Jacksonville, Florida.


FLORIDA:


SAVI N G S BAN K


AND. REAL 1 ESTATE- EXCHANGE.
[Incorporated July 6th, i874:]'

OFFICE IN LOVERIDGE'S BUILDING, OCEAN STREET, i
JACKSONVILLE, FLA., i


A Madrid correspondent of the
London Times, commenting upon the
finance minister's statement, says:
,The consolidated debt of. Spain in
1871-2 -was only ,,297,343,000 .pay-
ing ,8o^o,ooo interest., -It is now
known to exceed Z5 30,000,000, and,
according to the Inipar/ia., it is im-
possible thai Spain could pay more
than. .xper: cent.: interest. "But.:,shse
can, according to Senor Salaverria,
pay absolutely nothing, at least "with-
out having recourse to credit opera-
tions at an enormous ::rate of interest,
which inra:sbort time doubles ihe or-
riginal.debt:.": One should also take
into account the floati-ng-,debt,.,which
*in June., 1873, already amounted to
29,96oooo0,000. Te m'in-ister. considers.
that, besides its own expenditure, the
communr.tyhas to' bear the waste of
Sits resources caused by the exactions
of the Carlists, and- to feed the war on
both sides; he points to the immense
amount of national wealth trodden
under foot by the contending armies,
the paralysis of the productive powers
of the country, owing, to: interrupted
communications, and -to the with-,
drawal of-so many,hands, .from useful
employmrents and he glances also at
war in Cuba, "equally cruel anl not
less costly, which is turning the rich-:
est c1o6ny of the m-onarchy into a
heap of ashes'.:. : ...

The Suez Canalsroekwas recently
placed upon the books of the London
Stock Exchange.' At the same time
-it was stated in financial quarters that,
the receipts of the work for 1873
reached nearly ,1,ooo,ooo, while its
running expenses for the same period
amounted to 5225,-000. The divi-
dend declared- and paid during, the
year'wasthree and three-quarters per
cent.,. The cost of the canal was $95-
ooo,ooo. Of this the Egyptian gov-
ernment paid $3x.,ooo,ooo. This
leaves the capital of -the company
$64,o000,0o00. As the business of the
cut-off is on the increase, it is expect-
ed that-still heavier dividends will -be
paid in the future. If this reduced
water-path from Europe to India is
marked with success, there need& be
no fear of a failure in case such. a work
is completed across the Isthmus that
divides North and ,SSouth America.
The current of trade and commerce
which will flow along such a channel
will assuredly make it a financial and
national success.

They were married in the morning
and immediately stepped aboard a
railroad train for a bridal tour. They
attracted considerable attention by
their honeymoon ways, and created -a
great deal-of quiet fun among the pas-
sengers. In due time the cars entered
a tunnel, and all for a few moments
were enveloped in darkness., All top
soon the cars emerged into the glare
of the: noonday -sun, and our loving
bride and groom- were discovered
locked in each other's arms and ex-
changing kisses:at a rate seldom .seen
in public. The passengers took in
the situation in about a second, and a
shout went up that nearly threw the
train from the track, and brought the
conductor to the scene on the double.
quick. "Pass it around," said a big
man, "Go back to the tunnel," yelled
a little man to the conductor. As the
newly-made husband settled back
in his seat he., was, heard to say.:
"Sarah,:I always thought tunnels were
longer. Durn a railroad .company
anyway.,
) -, ..
DEMocRACY.-Democracy has been
tried and found wanting. It once
stood before the -people as a party of
honor and justice. -But it turned its
back ;on freedom persecuted, its
champions and became- the mere tool
of the- slave :power. Infidelity to
principle brought corruption into its
administration. When .the Nation
rose in i861, to- cast it out from its
high office of governmental control,
it was not the political freak :of an
hour, but resolve of a peopl.e. that had
no further use for! the party- that had
betrayed its trust. Its fall was the
death blow of the power..which sus-
'tained .it The grave of .Slavery
:should have been the grav of Democ-
'r a c y :. .' : : -' : '
,: -As a political power, it should have
been banished from the field of Am-
,erica ,,politics. But the.; power of
aili- -ftentre.s outlveis the -institu-
tions which genreated it. Slavery is
dead, but i ts ripened fruit, corrupt
Democracy, still lives to exert its
baneful influence on the destiny of a
nation. To-resist the spread o( its
political poison1. require" fidelity,
watchfulness, energy andcthorough or-

love their country, and' desire its gov-
ernment to remain in the loyal hands
of thoseiwthd saved~i{ from the deadly
attack of Democracy and Slavery.


Incorporated July:6, 1874;

A ASSETS.


Capital Stock $20,000.


SOffice Fprniiure and Fixtures.............. .......................................... $ s25 o
C ash-on'4h nnd ..................... .......... ............ ..... 5. 10.^04-30
State, Cqtint and It,, T'Ircaury 'arrants, f.ce value g f,4)6 4 n-t-i.h valde, .. ... ...... 1,758 07
R eal Esjti e in the ,.ji,' o Jai .:.r' .lie....... .............. .............................................. 5, 98 15
State, County and City Tax ('ert-ricate .. ........... .................... .. ... ..... .... ,195 5
Notes ahdMMortgages, ecUred by pledge of real estate and personal property of the value of -.'
y 5'j '. .... ............. ..... ..... ..................... .......... ....................... ......... 13,3,0 72 ,
S R eot. & .:. pnd.rf ,'Vida, ,. :. ......... .......................... .. ...... ....... 6o ,o
Une-pir-d Insurance Premiums .................. ........................................ ......... 20 6o
.'' 'i'o t Al ............... ..... ........... ... .. ......... ............ ..... .... ......... ........ 32,978
LIABILITIES.
Tndividual depo" its;... ... ........... ..... .... ... .... .. .. .. ...... .............. .. $24,169 74
CLapal Stl)-: paid i. .. ..... ... ......... ......................... .............. ,oqo.oo -
U ndivided Pr,..titi ......... ..... ..... ............. ..... ...................... ... 6.0 0 go -
- Pru iti and L...ss i ... unt .................... ......... ... ....... ......... ......... .. ..... .. 86 8 35--32,978 09
STATE OF FLORIDA, I
. -. ; Duvaq* County. I
ST, J.me.; H 'aine. Pre-;dent of the Florida Savings Bank and Real Estate Exchange,
do solemnly swear that the In-reg.oing statement ; trie to the best ofn my knowledge and belief.
.. .. JA M E S.H PA IN E, President.


.alAt l, uI, FLUK.IJA,I .
Duval County. j
Sworn and'subscribed before me this 23d day of April A. D. 1875.


Correct. Attest: JONATHAN C. GRIBLEY, Treasurer.


A. 0. HUSSEY.


HUSSEY &
S-WHOLESALE AND RE


BO OTS,

LEATHER &


9-3ott


H. JENKINS, Jr.,
[SEAL]: Notary Public.


JNO. W. HOWELL.


HOWELL,
TAIL DEALERS IN


SHOES

FINDINGS.


A complete assortment of New York and Philadelphia fine
Goods always on hand.
SSole agents in Jacksonville for Samuel Dunbar & Co.'s
Misses' and Children's Fine Shoes.
Goods sent by mail or express to all parts of the State.
Bay Street, near Laura, Jacksonville, Flo.


MISCELLANEOUS.


F RESH -ARRIVAL
OF. NEW AND FASHIONABLE GOODS


It '
GENTLEMENS' FAL AND WINTER, WEAR,
EMBRACING
FRENCH, ENGLISH, GERMAN ITALIAN
AND AMERICAN FABRICS,
SUCH AS
FINE BROADCLOTHS, CASSIMERES, VEST-
INGS AND GENERAL FURNISHING
GOODS,
at the store of
J. BARATIER,
Merchant Tailor,
Laura Street, Just above Bay Street,
. 1-2z-6m .., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


SAMUEL B. HUBBARD,


Jacksoaille, .Fla.,


lImporter and Dealer in

HARDWARE, IRON AND STEEL,
EDGE TOOLS, TABLE and POCKET
CUTLERY,
Nails, Glue, Patty, Glass, Paints, Oils,
LEATHER BELTING, RUBBER PACKING,


MISCELLANEOUS.


SA R N-EY' S

FLUID EXTRACT


K


BUC H U
The'only known remedy for


BRIGHT'S


DISEASE,


And a positive remedy for
GOUT, GRAVEL, STRICTURES,
DIABETES, DYSPEPSIA,
NERVOUS DEBILI-
TY, DROPSY,
NON-RETENTION, OR INCONTINENCE OF
URINE, IRRITATION, INFLAMMATION.
OR ULCERATION OF T14E

BLADDER AND KIDNEYS

SPERMATORRHCEA,
Leucorrhcea or Whites, Diseases of the Prnstra..
Gland, Stone in tha Bladder, Colculus, Gravel, or Brick-
dust Deposit and Mucus or Milky Discharges.

KEARNEY'S


-17VY'TD A ("T DTTrT-TTT


STOVES, TINWARE, CROCKERY, PUMPS, ... J. I- *A%-. 4- 5) U U J.1 U


Lead and Iron Pipe,


Permanently cures all Disea es of the


RASHLNDMLDI GA BLADDER, KIDNEYS, AND DROPSI-
.. ,, "CAL SWELLINGS,-. "


Mills, Evaporators, &c.


Gas-Fitting, .,Roofing, jfobbng, aiud Tin
Smtuitmn dne .to order. -_ :- dIy.


BUILDERS'
FURNISHIN-G. MILL,

JACKSONVILL1t, FLA.

The undersigned would respectfully call the atten-
tion-of those contemplating building to their establish-
ment. They are prepared to furnish at short notice all
kinds of
Builders' Material


consisting of
Rough and Planed Lumber,
Mouldings, Bradc
Scroll and Turned Work,


Existing in men, women and children,

NO MATTER WHAT THE AGE!

Prof. Steel says: "One bottle of Kearnsy's Fluid
Extract Buchu is worth more than all .othe uchus
combined!" -:' -.. ,. -- ;.
Price One-Dollar per Bottle, or Six Bottles for Five
D dollars. ..
DEPOT, o04, DUANE ST., NEW YORK.
A Physician in attendance to answer cprrespondece'
and give advice gratis.
W'5END STAMP FOR PAMPHLETS, YREE.-(

TO THE


e, NERVOUS AND DEBILITATED


OF BOTH SEXES.


NO CHARGE FOR ADVICE AND CONSUL-
Sawed and Rived. Shingles, Lath, FencingTATION.


&c. at lowest rates.


We have recently enlarged our mill and increased
our facilities for executing all orders with dispatch.
Give us a call before going eliewaere.


4-14


BILLIARD SALOON.


(The Largest south of Washington.)


BAY STREET,"OPPOSITE POST-OFFICE.


z co





.Mo





:..u ... .


4 3m T. .. WGNI," Pmprietcr.


I


0
KI


DR. J. B. Dvorr, graduate of Jefferson Medica
College, Philadelphia, author of several valuable works,
can beconsalted on all diseases-bt the Sexual ar.-rin-
ary Organs, (which he has mode an especial study)
either in male or female, no matter from what cause dcf
iginating or of how long standing. A practice of 30
years enables him to treat diseases with success. Cures
guaranteed. Charges reasonable. Those at a distance
can forward letter describing symptoms and enclosing
stamp to pay postage.
Send for the Guide to Health. Price ioc.
B. J. DYOTT, M. D.,
Physician and Surgeon, zo04 Duane St., N. Y.

LIVERY, SALE AND FEED STABLES,
*


The best and.most style s -livery teams in the city
can be found at the.Stable of the undersigned, near the
Florida Home, comer of Cedar and FArsyth Streets,
Horses boardedand well cared for on reasonable
terms.n
Strong toams'for hauling purposes always on hand.
SW. H. AVERY.;
:Jacksonvillh,.Fia.,May30,o874. ( tf.


$5t OPr" Day at home. Tnerms tee.
,l, to"l y.Add=aG.,S'nr'& Co.,
,v l-v Pord bl-,M~li.


J. H. NORTON,
Atorpey al Jaw antd Notary Public.


4S.1 KfOKER.


NORTON & KOOKER.: .
DEALRS IN

REAL ES T AT E
4 OF1 ALL KINDS. -
GENERAL INSURANCEi AGENTS, representing i tlhe..following cornm-
panies:
FRANKLIN, F- PH4LADELPHIA,... With combined assets of over
CONTINENTAL, O.F NEW YRK, '
MANHATTAN, OF. NEW YORK, 0
PENN, OF PHILADELPHIA, $7,Ouu ..;
LOANING MONEY ON REAL ESTATE AND CONVEYANCING A
.- -SPECIALTY.
We give below a few of the, many choice places for sale by us:
No. 73- Two-story house on Ashley street, near St. No. xo5. Dunla--ton Plantation; on Halifax river,
James Hotel, pleasantly'situated,Adn one of fthe best seven miles nirth of Mbosqdio inlet-,at Port Oirange ;
neigtg.rb-.:.o-ds in the c:;ii houseisnew, %.-h -.% rr.,,., ,1:, acres, i,iso acres rich hammock, lying one mile
plenty f ,l,-c.e', and god servant's r,..o.m loi .,' %s 'r.'.m r ier t.o acres high, shell land, immediately on
1o5 feet, good, fen., g..:d se, .ik, and the street the r;er bank. having ttdult of about one fourth mile,
shelled; grapes in bearng, a fine I-..i of young orange .itnh large, tuo-.tory, frame house, 18 rooms, neerly
trees; flowers and shade trees growing thriftily; go,:d tin-bed hou.e comands "iew of'dhe'river sme ocean
well, with pump. on.back porch., l-;.-h ;- covered aith and is 'urrournded wit)h large, bearnifg, orange trees,
flowering vines. Will be sold cheap. .,me 7t', o 100 in number. good, well, and a cistern
N. B. To capitalists "desiringabig thing," there that holds i,o.- gallons, in yard; thoroughly, dilcied
is a fine opern;ng ir, SprirEfi-ld. a feA th.-,aMad dollar; ,nddrained; canal from sugar-hou-e running to the
' ill go a crel a ju:t r,.-.ow F:,r .arti,:ulir enquire roerf,:r transportation of crop; immense quaniti of
of Nororn Kooker, ..,rrner Ocean and Bay streets. sold orange trees ,n ehe place : the so. is similar; lo the
-.e~t sugar lands of Cuba, to which it is fully eclual:
No, 74 A HANDSOME R RStDENCL FOR SALE -S 'mt-tue is abundant. This j ceisrayn f th
large rooms and kitchen, double b anda..- on the .creatyon.. .eoa--" a a. scb-
-west, large double parir. dle piaza on ihe -.h,, iet ple in a, a as non as such -t
com m ending oine :.i ihe tfrntst ,,e. ; n Jack:-'r-iin-le t -' ,"e;' .
windows filledaith four highLtof '-,nrchgla.l and nung .. B. Do yc.u want a snug 'winter hcm, with
with cords and 'elghL 'i-..n pl., ar-nd rea,.hng I-. the orange trees and flower',in FlorGU ? Youcan gt a
floor, with blind.: all casiMng are ni,hne ,ainh mould, beautiful ot, 7oa1O_ et,, ir-Sp Sringlidd'ft h ijid
irig and oiled and varnished, making a beautiful finish; h-althfifl,and thin te a minutes walk ol the post-office,
ceilings high, walls hard-finished, open stairs, double, on w-hich to make it, for 53. For prm'tkulAti efitllre
glass, front doors, mortice lock on every door in house; of Norton & Kooker.
china closet, store-room, plent' of ,...he,-pr%,e .-,bath-
roomin; hip roof, with cupola, fr.-.m a h;ch a charmng No. 119. Atrac i of88 acres; 6 acres cleared ham-
view is tobe had ofthe city, therit.,r and i.trmouid;ng uckland, fine fiont.-m St. John's ner; twomileswest
country ; three lots, making i57 -:'-n ieeu gci-od ell,.,t" lacksonvi le. This is one of the most desirable river
young shade trees started; halfa mile from post-office. fronts in the vicinity of Jacksonville.. Will be divided
For sale at a- bargain, ifdrc-re.
No. 96. A large, two-story house with ten large N6o 146. Six acres'on Arlington river, adjoining the
rooms; thoroughly built, and finished in first-ratestyle, Florida- Home., containing the old ',tneyard, ar le
with twelve feet ceilings; one acre of ground, covered at a bargain. .
with fruit trees and flowers; pleasantly located; within -:
five minutes walk of the ridroa,.4te.l .,t. 'rice $io,ooo0; No. 147. METItOPOUrAN HoTrL. -This hotel is
$4,50oo down, balance o long ,,m',1" l.J.;red. centrally located, built of ihe best Freich brick; *ad is
f a first-class -honsse in every respecLt For pries and
No. 99- 400 acres in Orange county; one mile from t s apply to Norton & Kooke,.
Melonville. Price, 5 per acre. o K ..


Call on or write to us, and state your wants: ---
OFFICE COR. OCEAN AND BAY STS., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
&jVisitors always welcome. Latest papers on file. "


&-ig6m


THE SINGER MANULFACTU RING COMPANY'S CELEBRATED


SILK


TwSTIasr.


This company now having in full operation at Newark, New Jersey, the largest SILK *WOKKS-ilth
world, propose to furnish a superior article of Silk Twist : -
A T G R EA T L Y RE D U C E"D PRI-'CEs., ".
For the convenience of the public this celedi-ateb Twist Js
PUT UP ON SPOOLS OF DIFFERENT SIZES," -"


The finest quality being thereby offered on sprolsn quantities -" "
FROM FIFTY YARDS UPI, A ^-S. '
The above unequaled twist is manufacture.j esp&eialh- for the uwe ol all kindiof wiai machines and gmd
for diferetat Machines through the c,.unirq arc u'ing ih.s tsia in large V- 2a&f d as
SPECIAL INDUCEMENTS .
are offered to the trade, all those about to purchase will do well to send rr price list;

THE SIN,/GER'E

















AGAIN TRIUMPHANT.

133,254 MAJORITY. :

STATISTICS OF SWORN SALES FOR 1873: .


Companies, Sold in z873.
THE SINGER 232.444
Wheeler & Wilson 19,o80
Domestic 40.114
Grover & Baker 8,0"n9
W eed....,, .............. 1,760
Wilson ..........21.. ,247
Howe :..:,,.,.. No returns
Gold Medal 16,43l
Wilcox & Gibbs 15,881


Companies. -Sold iP_;W.3-
American, B. H. -. ,182,.
B & Howe 13,979
Remington Empire 9.183
Florence........;;-.. 8,960
avia ..,.......,. 8,S s
Victor .... .., 1
Blees : '" -
Secor...-......... ., ... ; a,, -,,,, .;i a :
Xtna, JE..ianso.,..,.i...w.". 3>f.-


OUR NEW FAMILY MACHINE -,
Embodies New and Essential P.inciples-Si-plicity of Construction: Ease of Operation; UniformiW of. a
Action at any Speed; Capacityfor RLange and Variety of Work, Fine or Coars.-6 ... .
LEAVING ALL RIAL LS IEHI.INDT, :

TEST THE SINGER BEFORE PURCHASING. ANY QT.HER,
'TERMS EASY-PAYMENTS LIGHT,. ,: .-..

Besides the "WORLD'S FAVORITE." we keep constantly on hand a lage supply of ,' ,
CLARK'S 0. N. T. SPOOL CQTTOM, four spools for twen ty-ve cents. .
SINGER'S STANDARD MACHINE TWIST, from twenty-five cents up-all sizes and co oaQ,
ACME MACHINE TWIST, soo yard spools, 2 for 25 cents ; 50 yard ools, 3 for 25 cens.
SINGER'S LINEN AND FLAX THREADS, OILS,. NEE-LES,*'&Sl.,-&4


The Singer MainufaotUi-g. ,
No. 172 BROUGHTON ST., 'SAVANNA, -A. -
C. A. VOS #/NQ,, Maaqr.-
G -ORGE W. FRAZIER, Agent, ,
1.i-7tf JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.' .


ESTABLISHED IN 1868. ...


A. K. PERCIVAL ,-' :
SUCCESSOR -TO J.,H.,CROWELL, ... ;- : ,1:










DEALER IN

BOOTS, SHOES, LEATHER,

AND FINDINGS., ;;


"Percival's Stamp" Hand Boots '.
Burt & Mears' -' -. .-
Philadelphia and Baltimore "
Vienna Medal cable sewed ." -, .
Percival's Stamp Hand Congress- --
Burt & Mears' .
Philadelphia -
Vienna Medal cable sewed -


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.- .-'- ;, ... >a 0.;,.
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GOODS SENT BY MAIL AND.EXP," _.N,- -
To all parts ofthe Stie. ..
AT THE OLD STAND, COR. BAY and OCEAN STS., JACKSONVILLE, FA.


.


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U-

5- '5 tmal


PENNIMAN & CX).


__ __ 1~~ i


I


IEsrEAT.-Tnterest at the rte of severe and three.teniha per cent (or two cents per day on tiooi -a il! be paid
annually, upon all depo-sits h.ch shall hbae remaniped three months cr more in the Bank, to be added annually
:o the principal ofthe.Depositor. ,, ,
- ; LoANs.-ALmoneys received on deposit.shall.ube,.invested in first mortgages on real and personal property in
thi. Stateoftt leastrdoubleithe'yalAe,h6orin.other-ample collateral securities. .-; *
REAL ESTATB.-This corporation will act as trustees ori the purchase'and sale of real estate or the renting
adand age nene, Ffrmeste and property generally. . ? :. ,
SJAMES H. PAINE. : SAM'L SPEARING, JONATHAN C. GREELEY,
President V',ce- 'resident. Treasurer.


STATE, COUNTY AND CITY. ; SCRIP SOLD;- AT -,CURRENT RATES.

SEMI-ANNUAL STATEMENT
OF THE
FLORIDA SAVINGS BANK -AND REAL ESTATE -EXCHANGE.
Jacksonville, Florida.


COFFINS AND UNDERTAKERS


-.'^ $


In-alm T ifea Draesrvr


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