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UFPKY NEH LSTA



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!-- new South ( Newspaper ) --
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mods:languageTerm text English
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mods:physicalLocation University of Florida
UF
mods:note dates or sequential designation Began in 1874; ceased in 1875?
"Wise men accept the inevitable, but strive to shape the future."
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 32 (Jan. 16, 1875).
funding Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
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mods:publisher Adams, Carruth & Co.
mods:place
mods:placeTerm marccountry flu
mods:dateIssued marc point start 1874
end 1875
mods:dateCreated May 26, 1875
mods:frequency Weekly
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mods:physicalDescription
mods:extent v. : ill. (chiefly advertisements) ; 61 cm.
series
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mods:detail Enum1
mods:caption 1875
mods:number 1875
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26
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1875
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5
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26
26
lccn 85038367
oclc 12368935
mods:titleInfo
mods:title New South (Jacksonville, Fla. : 1874 : Semiweekly)
mods:subject SUBJ651_1 lcsh
mods:geographic Jacksonville (Fla.)
Newspapers
SUBJ651_2
Duval COunty (Fla.)
Newspapers
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mods:country United States
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mods:city Jacksonville
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sobekcm:VID 00005
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sobekcm:Name Adams, Carruth & Co.
sobekcm:PlaceTerm Jacksonville Fla
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The new South
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00048585/00005
 Material Information
Title: The new South
Uniform Title: New South (Jacksonville, Fla. 1874 Weekly)
Physical Description: v. : ill. (chiefly advertisements) ; 61 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Adams, Carruth & Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 26, 1875
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval COunty (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1874; ceased in 1875?
General Note: "Wise men accept the inevitable, but strive to shape the future."
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 32 (Jan. 16, 1875).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002042984
oclc - 16156679
notis - AKN0865
lccn - sn 87062262
System ID: UF00048585:00005
 Related Items
Related Items: New South (Jacksonville, Fla. : 1874 : Semiweekly)

Full Text
f.
1'
~ K~.


WTII-E


NEW-^ *r< ~^9 *iM* ^^


Sp*


A. -..


soUTEL


"WISE MEN A ACCEPT THE INEVITABLE, PaT 'STRIVE TO SHAPE T HE FTlTURE.


~VGL.~ II.


JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, WEDNESDAY. MORNING, MAY


26, 1875. :


__________________________________________ -_ --- '--' a1 --


THE 'NEW- SOUTH.
PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY' ;AND
SATURDAY ,.-
TERMS OF cVBSC.&IP.TO:
SEMI.-WnEKLY. maisubscribrs, o3.5o per annum,..
Five h mor-coies, '''," each; and extra copy
will be sent teevery cliibof ten reeivedat one time. :
WBBlnci,ifaail. subscribers, $i2' per annum. Ten
eopie 1a-.75 each; Twenty copies, $i.6o; Fift cop.
les, i.4deach. .
(.:* AVERTISiA'G RATES: .,.
SEMI-WEEKLY, $i oo per inch, or less, first insertion:
each subsequent insertion, 50 cents.
WEBj!..q pei&hchoriessfirsi insiitioii: each
subsequen,:insetrti~ss; 75lfa<-lt .:.54 .t:"
+S~sclijfofoict^'lo Cf:U.p's!m.} Z -
Teams; CASH IN ADVAN..1"
Addrm. ADAMS, CARRUTH`& CO.,
lacksouville. Florida.

PROFESSIONAL CAD,, ft.

F P.C. EMONS, S ;
+ :. .. ;:' ** *:*{ > ^ .. '* .;! l ., , ", .
ATTORNEY AND.CQUNSELLOR AF LAW-
Freedniiti'isBarink ,ilding.-Jac.ksonville, Fla. : '
Mr.'ihmots having dissolved his pr.'resi.-nal rela-
tions withJ'.'P.;& M Railroad. -ill receive micellane.
ous business in his profis..ion. 5 3m

J N. BETTES,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
*':q;i ;; *' '! + Jack-onville, Fla.
OFICB--Oppotdie dcean Hi-use, corrci ol' Ad.an..
and Ocean streets. -7-

W M. & ARTHUR'A BIRN-EV';
i. .. :. :k ';,+,+ :" +: >i :. \ +** ; *
ATTORNEYE,
4.J STR:EET, N.O ,330 ;
; WASHINGTON CITY


," .ANNO., ,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Office, in Reed" Block, -Bay'Street, ...
/ +. '.' ;: j +1 i; YachksinoileEliortda.r'
K. AiTATTIS*OSI.- :-'; A. .-MEEK.' -
P ATTISON & MIEEK,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW.
Offie, ReQua'sli idihg, Jacksornille. FIa. "

].-TON k HOOKER, \ :
REAdESTATE DEAT ERS, corner Ocean, and Bay
street,, Jack-. nville. Florida ,; z: .
Money loaned onr Real E'tate .e:urily. Central
Life and Fire Insurar.ce Acenis and dealers ;n ',ine
I.nd, Planimations, &c. Spr.igfield suhiurb a pe.:ialty
Corre.-p.:ndence so.lic;ed ; sss lf


p E. JOHNSON, M. D.,
HOMEOPATHIC
r PHYSICIAN AND SURGE ON.
Office, in Nlitcheli's ne. building, nwrh ide cr Bay
,ta..t, i.t "-"- -e.snwnn and Market street,. near!)
opposite the PoIt OfficC. iggtt .

A.. iA. KNIGHT,
; ATTORNEY AT LAW,

No. a Hoeg's Block, up stairs
S3-25wly """ Ja&sonville, Fla.

ISICHARD McLAUGHLIN,
REA ESTATE -AGENT, "
"" t yack" onnvile, Florida.
Allsorts of Reai Estate bought and sold;: Money in-
vest-d, Ta e.s paid','Titles examined. .
RiiERRS BY- PEnMISSION, to Williani Astor, Esq.,
Nev -Ydrk;' Ex.-Gov. A. ':G. Curtin, Bellefonte, Pa.;
'Lewi! H. Redn'e,. Philadelphia;. W. Stokes Boyd,
Philadelphia: D, G. Ambler, Banker, Jacksonville, Fla.
Henry 1 ucker, Bsuiton. Mai. 3-28-iy-pd


W L .'"COAN,... .
S JUSTiCE OF THE PEACE
:..'- AND.*;:** y *
N'YTA",jY PUBLIC
S ,',, Office in Sp, LARYE'S, BLOCK,;
-" : :: "Corner BAY'aiid PINE streets
""' ; ; ": ""; '- Jacksonville,-Fla;


HFr. COLCORD, .
. *.,:. y ^ ; -;*'. *.-; : ;
Sutcessor to Hide and Skit business of -
S"J"H. CROWELL, '"
-i:: C; "-' : oriner Bay and Ocean streets.
Highest cash price paid for Hides., Skins,, Furs,
W'ax &c, 7-'t8swiy

LOUIS EMILE MOURGEON,;
Fromn Paris, Feance, (lately Foreman of the Staten
Island Dyeing e-tLablishment).
NEW-'DYEING AND SCOURING ESTABLISH-
MENT.
Ladies' and Gentlemen's Wearing Apparel, '-
? .... > ;,..Lace'Curtains, *.. "
Ilace Shawls.
and other fine labrcs most carefully cleaned and d5yed.
FORSYTH STREET, between Newnan and Mar-
ket trseiL. '.-64r'

PRINTING.
.i f ,.- + :. ; +,;; ,. ; .+. ',. ';: :+ '- +. :-; ++*

STH-E NEW SOUTH:":

JOB AND BOOK PRINTING

V" ..+-;;,-:. ESTABLISH-MENT.. .....



The proprietor'' are prepdar d to" execute orders foi
every description of '' ''
PAIN OR ORNA-MENTAL PRINTING ;

Such as BUSINESS CARDS, ;
"'' VISITING CARDS,, ;
W:: .... wEDDING CARDS. '
S; BILL.HEADS, '- .
I.. V:L TTER HEADS,


PpST.ERS, '..


CIRCULARS,
5' A


*'BRFEFS, -
k'bi P LAM P"LTS,
BLANKS OF ALL KINDS.

COLORED PRINlING AND GILT WORK.
"'. ". ". -:

'H," cHEAP, NfAT.ANb iPROMPT
;d C :'1.t "A-ikf )J| *;'J i. .'- ,.


Elements of National Wealth.
SThe newt journals of the country.
airejust now congratulating the peo-
ple of.the United States on the large'
amount of agricultural products ex-
ported for sale during'the year 1874,
which is stated, as per invoice, ..in
'round numbers at $456,oco,o0oo. This
large sumis itemized as follows:
Cotton $2x5,500,oO
Cereals, flour, meal, bread,' marina' &-:;....... 142,500,000
Beef, bacon, hams, butter, cheese, milk,.
Seggs, fish, preserved meats, .* -i.r-,
pork, and gardennvegetables, .............. 7-',:- : :/' '
Farm animals; fruits, hides,, hay, hops, '
oil-cake, rice, seeds, tallow, &, -............. :. : :: :
-,...al.................. 456,ooo,ooo
This may be tr-,ted as a surplus
that is in exces.- of the consuinli.i)on
by the forty millions of people resid-
agJ+ his,~QUtintlry. And sucli; ur-
plu, indicates Ihe iinniense capa'bili-
ties of the farming and planting inter-
ests in:the Ui'ited States. But .it is
worthy of consideration, whether this
is the: best use which could be made
otfour surplus agriculturall products.
"The wealth of a'nation in its most
elementary from consists of fertility
of'soil, a :salubrious climate, minerals
,in the mines, native'forests, and skill-
ed aiid unskilled labor. The pro'duc-
tabiliy "of mines, field-and forests, is
the gilt of the' Great "Creator, and in
the absence, of human, labor.and skill,
has' no comierui.11 value.. But when
reduced to individual 'possession under
the laws of civil society, these ele-
ments may 'be regarded as somewhat
in. the nature of capital deposited in
banks or locked up' in coffers, on
which, by the application of labor,
the owners may draw-to.meet the cur-
rent demands for consumption.- In
-the' absence of these resources no
amotnit of labor aid.skill could possi-
bly build. up a .great nation.:: Every
.bushel of wheat taken from the soil,-
every ton of coalor iron taken from
the-mines, and every thousand feet of
lumber taken from the forest, :reduces
the original capital, and unless ex-
changed for an equivalent value, di-
min'ishes the national wealth. When
the capacity of the field .to produce
grain or grass is entirely exhausted,
the field becomes worthless to the far-
mer, as is the exhausted mine or de-
nuded forest to the owner.
But these elementary Co r1,,o l' ii;c
acquire additional commercial value
by the: application of.-labor. The
chemical efements found in the soil,
brought 'out by the husbandman -in
the frmn of grain aind hay and other
vegetbles. .us-es tlhie added value '-of
the cost of labor and skill employed
in their production. And so with
each transformation or change of con-
dition,; as when the grain is converted
into flour, and the flour into bread or
when the hay and grain are converted
into pork,' beef, hides, tallow and lard,
.and the hides into leather, the leather
into boots, shoes.or other useful com-
modities; timber into lumber, lumber
Into houses, barns, I fences, ships,
etc., mineral into pig ironI, pig into
bars, bars into nails, edge-tools and
other emplements.
The farmer, who after producing
his crop of wheat, changes it. into
flour, or who converts his grain and
grasses into live stock, such as horses,
cattle, swine, etc., derives a double
profit;'the planter, who having baled
his cotton, converts it into thread,
and.,the thread into cloth, and. the
cloth into garments, will derive the
:added Value of the labor and skill re-
qnired for each .transformation; 'and
so on until each of these original ele-
ments ,has been brought to its final
higher value in the domestic econo-
mies of human life... And it should be
borne in mind in -this connection that
the margin of profit to the operator,
Sin8such transformationn is greater or
Less, as grcatir or less skill is needed
in thle 'orkinanisliip. The value of a
day's labor. of a farmer is less than
that of the miller; the wages of a la-
'borer in a mine; than a man at the
forge--of a'cotton picker, than that
of a weaver or tailor, and so on to the
end of the chapter. .
Hence a nation .that sells its raw
cotton in the bale must derive: less
profit than, the nation that spins,
weaves;- and converts into; garments
and sells the ultimate. product. 'Aid
a nation that sells' its breadstuffs,
:meats and other rawv'aterial, requi'r-
ing in-its production ohly the rudest
:forms of larbor, must ultim'at~ely,:be:
conie comparatively. poor and depen-
:dent. + + : '-
-The treasonn for;.,this conclusion
ought to be too obvious to need argu-
ment or illustration. In the transfor-
mation of the. raw material into many
of'the ultimate .forms' of value,. higher
'skl-l, activity of mind, and'.even gen-
'ius are required. Operatives of th
'latter class readily avail themselves o;
the aids of science in the: production


and application of'machinery in the
pr-osecution of their business', and
drivejthis machinery ..with waler o01
steam. .;,A steam engine of onL thous-
and ; hore-power :will put forth. as
much force, under the guidance of a
single engineer, as an 'army of seven
thuihsau,4tsal.Sr/ii ,,aborers, :. .
Is it, therefore, wonderful that th'
owner of this eng-i.ne,-.who use* it ir
Spinning and weaving cotton, posses'
-ses 'an'-immense advantage over th(
cotton planter. wh6osells'the raw ma
trial ? The seenl.-thousand'laborer
employed by the planter to secure at
equivalent force must be fed, and cloth
ed, and sheltered, nursed in sickness
and -the crop if hliarvested, must: con
tinue to be provided for. ,-And; tha
Skill needed is so rnilc that the, plant


er meets with the severest competition
*.in his businesss, reducing his margin
of profits to the lowest paying point.
On the other hand the engine con-
.sumes only a few. tons of coal per day,
is never sick or hungry, or in want of
raiment, and when required may be
run day and night, year in and year
out uncomplainingly; and if idle costs
little until again needed. .IN running
it and.the concomitaint niachiiery, a
higher order of skill being required,
"the operatives meet with.less competi-
.tion, and are consequently able to se-
cure a larger margin of'profits..
:A nation that sells its rai material,
compared with oue that sells the ulti--
mate product of human skill, is .like
the cott ,n planter who a tte'nits wvith
'vWienthousand' untutored, laborers in
his field, to compete with the one
thousand horse-power engine under
the guidance of- an: intelligent and
skilled manufacturer. As certainly as
the engine driven by steam can en-
dure more' than human nimuscle, and
be kept in motion more economically
than an army'of common laborers, so
certainly will a nation that manufac-
tures raw material surpass in the aug-
mentation of wealth and pcv.tr the
one which furnishes it.with food.
-The, ultimate object of wise states-
manship should be to secure the people
in the enjoyment of all their natural
rights of person and :property. and to
make-the nation great and powerful,
that it may exert a controlling influ-
ence in tlie exaltation of the human
family throughout the world.. This
final purpose of statesmanship requires
,he augmentation of numbers, wealth,
intelligence and moral refinement,
which cannot be achieved by'sending
our raw material abroad for sale or in
exchange for the products of the skill
and genius, of the people of the en-
lightened nations of the world. In
this process, our people receive very
small profits, such as can be derived
from-unskilled labor in mines, field
an1d forests, working in competition
with the mass of untutored laborers of
the whole world, while the nations to
whom we sell will reap the larger
margin of profits on skilled labor aid-
ed byvscience, capital and genius. In
other words, we 'buck" American
muscle against European 'machinery,
;A, 0, .;1,; .1, -f s1i apn' -


vities, and his majesty has the envia--
ble privilege of paving ihe' expense
of the crtcrtainmient over which he
and his royal consort preside.
Tle posey. dance is another amuse-
ment. The females of a family of easy
rank and station in life, erect in a
-rbom of their house a neat little altar,
lit up with candles and dressed with
,pots and festoons of flowers. -The
gentlemen understand this as a polite
invitation to come and admire: the
taste of the fair architects This con-
tinues for successive evenings ; the
lady in the mean time selects from
her visitors, some happy beau whom
she delights to honor, and presents
him with a bouquet of-flbwers. His
gallantry is put to t- h' -test ; if lie
.-hould decline rlrrLerA-.aorv,-
he has only to pay the expense of
lighting up the altar; but if he accepts
this' dignity, he and his, posey -lass
become king and queen of 'the ball
which soon follows.
Charivaris are now no longer com-
mon ; they were parties of idle people,
who dressed themselves in grotesque
masquerade, whenever a' widow or
widower were married. They +often
paraded the streets, and played, buf-'
foon tricks for two or three days,
haunting the residence of. the new
married pair, and disturbing the whole
place, with noise and riot, until they
were bought off with money or
whisky.
The carnival was formerly cele-
brated by the Spanish and Catholic
population, and commenced three
days before Lent ; but with the intro-
duction of the American population,
they degenerated into mere drunken
revels, and are not now tolerated by
the respectable portion of society.,
Dancing is still the favorite amuse-
ment of the Floridians, as also of all
our southern inhabitantss. Spanish
dances and waltzes are still preferred
by the natives, while the AUmerican
cotillons are considered more genteel.
Private entertainments are frequent,
and tend to create a high degree of
sociability.
With the country people hunting is
a favorite amusement, and the abund-
ance of wild game that stocks the
woodlands,, renders the amusement
useful and interesting.


gulded uy tbe highest n t e.. c All our frontier Inhabitants are well
where competition is less. severe. Il r n a well
Aher comptition isless sreat.for- trained to the use of the rifle. This
And it would require no.great fore- leads one to speak of the animals of
cast to perceive, or learned process of Florida.
reasoning to prove, that if our surplus oia
products of bread and meat were not Most of the animals pecUliar-the
sent abroad for consumption, they Sourthern States of America are rep-
would soon be required at home. For resented in Florida.; a brief enumera-
should we decline to purchase fabrics tion is quite sufficient. The native
from abroad, they would he manufac- horses of Florida are but a breed of
tured here. hardy ponies, small, and easy to sup-
It is simply a question whether we port, but are excellent travellers.
shall send bread and meat to feed Mules are used principally for draft,
skilled laborers in Europe, and ship and are mostly 'brought from the
back manufactured products in ex- neighboring States. Cattle are easily
change, or bring these skilled artisans raised, are good breeders, and from a
and capitalists to our own country as valuable branch of industry.- Sheep
permanent residents. In other words, succeed well in nearly all parts; goats
whether we shall support .workshops are raised with ease; the perennial
on the other side of the Atlantic, grass affords sustenance to large herds
where the vast profits of the skill aug- of the above-named stock. Hogs
men the capital of other, nations or succeed to admiration ; they grow fat
transfer then to this side, where the where every other animal would
numbers atnd wealth will add to -the starve. Deer are numerous in every
permanent wealth and power .of our part of Florida. Panthers, bears, and
own country.- Washington Chronicle, wolves, are but little seen ; wild cats
and foxes are rare. Opossums and
Notesn Florida. raccoons are extremely numerous ; the
latter, in particular, about the sea
MANNERS CUSTOMS'&c.-As regards coasts live on fish and oysters, and
the manners and customs of.lhe Flori- become lumps of fat.; Otters and
dians, we have but little to say; the mink are numerous about the water
former inhabitants had many customs courses. There several kinds of squir-
former inhabitants had many customs ^^^
peculiar to themselves, but with each rels-the small grey and thea piie
change of their mas ters.there hasobeen squirrel-the latte r is a beautiful ani-
a corresponding change of customs, Mal. The Salamander lives on the
until nor the population has become roots of plants. Rats and mice are
so Amerieanized that their habits are numerous and troublesome every-
nearly the same as those of'the inhabi- where; the small, ground-mole some-
-tants of the rest of the States.- How- times makes depredations in the gar-
ever, circumstances have not materi- dens and orange nurseries. Besides
ally altered since the visit of one who' these, the only other animals are the
thus writes Many of .the planters usually domesticated ones,
of Florida are opulent ; .ithey'live a The ornithology of the State is
secluded life in remote forests or richer-than that of anyother,.as is
savannas, but abounding,-in fish, cat- shown by the investigations' of Audu-
tle, and game; they have all the nec- bon. The horned owl, long and short
essaries of life without. labor or eared' owl, thie pigeonand sparrow
diflicrulty, and the bounded hospi- hawtk, buzzard, wjay, Florida jay,
tality which they practice-Js at once woodpeckers pigeon, i ild, turkey,
an easy and'delightful-virtue. Noth- heron, crane, curlew, cornmorant., peli-
rig can be more- grateful towthe travel- can, plover, mocking-bird, red-bird,
ler.oppressed.with thirst and heat, and sparrow, parroquet, &c., are promi-
wearied with the sad uniformity of nent on the list. The Snake-bird, a
the. savannas, than the cordial welt- species of cormorant, issaid to bere-
come,'the patriarchal simplicity, the markable for its singular beauty. The
frank hospitality, and the surrender of sea-sparrow is occasionally seen. One
time, servants, and everything the of the earliest writers on this interest-
house affords, to'his comfort,dwhile he ing.feature of the State describes the
remains there." In tahe' towns and wood pelican as nearly three feethigh.
cities however. there is more sociabil- "It is seen stalking along the marshes
ty. .with its long and crooked beak 'rest-
Balls are the most common amusen- ing like a scythe upon its best. The
ment of the Floridians. The Patgoe painted vulture, a bird of rare beauty,
of West Florida is rather the intro- is seen only on, the savannas making.
duction to a.dance. A wooden bird rapid demolition of. the .serpents,
is fixed on a pole, and carried through frogs and lizards roasted by the perio-
the city by some slave; on present- dical burning of the grass plains. nThe
.ing it to the ladies, they make an of- great crane of the prairies is.frequently
fering of 'a piece of ribbon, of any five feet high, andt usually a'flnck
length or color that happens to suit remains for a season unbroken. These
their fancy or convenience. This is birds irregularly scattered, and thus
.fixed tothe bird, Which.soon becomes selfsentinelled, around, the lakes and
'decked in a gaudy and abundant ponds of the prairies, present an ap-
plumage. A time and place is set pearance as grotesque as picturesque.
apart for the fair patrons of the Pat- The wild goose, once frequent in the
goe to assemble, who are usually waters of the State, is now seldom
gallantly attended by their beaux, found.
with 'rifles or fowling-pieces. The The icthyology of the Gulf of Mex-
Pattgoe is set up as a target, and the ico and the river and coast waters of
fortunate marksman who. first hits Florida, is, we believe, scientifically
it, becomes king of the feast. The unknown. There are most 'generally
.Patgoe. becomes, his.property, and is found the following: Eel, swo.rdfish,
presented by him to..his.lady-love, she. conger, flounder, ..perch, 'mackerel,
then becomes'the queen of the festi; lasher, minnow, mullet, flying fish,
.., -. -


herring; cod, mud fish,. black fi.lih,
white -fish, trout; silver,, yellow and
blue bream, in lake and spring, garC
gorupers, porg)s, shee'p-head, bass,'
grunts, )ellow tail,h b.rracootir,' per-
mits, king fish, jew-fish, hound fish,
pompano, mutton-fish,.scrapper, mar--
gate-fish,.,amber-fish, bell-fish, stur-
geon, whiting, drum, 'skate and whip
jack. "Wh'at is a matter- of curiosity-
to the early settlers of Florida,"'says-
a traveller, -'is. the-multitude of fish'
seen at the -mouths of the immense
springs that :birst forth .from -the.,
groundof a sie at, once to form con-,
siderable rivers. When..the channels
of these subterranean. rivers.is..struck
by, perforating the earth at any dis-
tance from ..the.' f6'utaifn the hook
-thrown iu-at tt ie. perforation is eager.-
ly taken by the fish,'and fine angling
may be had as if fishing'iu a well."l-
The'shIl fish are similar to descrip-.
dtions found elsewhere on the Atlantic
coast; the turtle is abundant on the :
southern and: southwestern shores of Y
the. peninsula. There is a species ..of
tortoise which is peculiar to the pine-'
barrens of. thigh. and .the neighboring
:States, known as the\ grffre.; its shell '
is large .and. thick, and t'he animal
burrows to a great "depth. Lobsters
'abound in the lo* grounds'ard' shal-
low waters of the country'. 'A fish
pond and' turtle crawl are as necessary,
to the settler as poultry and vegeta-
bles. They are easily made, and
furnish a cheap and even handy .means:
of subsistence.. Turtling forms an
important branch of- industry, and
many make it their:whole business tos
catch them and sell them ; an expert
hand will turn, over 15 "tO 20. each
night as they come up to the beach to
lay their eggs ; they are' then sent to
market, and are sold for $5 each, so '
we see that when a market is con-
venient to- be"attained, they form a
valuable business. .Before the seces-
sion of the State from the Union,
there' used to be carried on a'brisk
trade, in fish between the gulf ports
of Florida and Cuba. Regular l:ihes
were established from Tampa.'Bay,
Charlotte Harbor, iand Key West; the
lines were mostly owned by Spaniards,
and there were several vessels to each
line. A visitor who 'passes through
the markets of Havana will be sur-
prised and delighted at the varietyand
beautiful colors of the fish there ex-
posed for sale. ; every tint of the rain-
bow and their combinations are seen,
forming a spectacle of rare beauty,
yet We--ooes-'Tor-lnow rThst-nearly all
of these come from the Florida coast.
All the coast of Florida, its riversand
bays, abound with these beautiful fish,
and turtles and oysters are plenty
everywhere, thus bringing to the set-
tler's own door the comforts and food
of life, and affording rare sport to the
hunter and. angler.

Science and its Devotees.
The lively imagination of M. Jules
Verne, in one of the latest of his
many books, has given us an exciting
story of the adventures, of a party of
balloonists; but there is nothing in
the fiction of even M.. Verne, which
is often, very strange fiction indeed,
more startling than the true recital of
the last ascent of the "Zenith." The.
narrative of M. Tissandier, the sole
survivor of the three aeronauts, adds
little information to the account trang-1
lated in the Times some days ago;
but it tells with a gre'it deal of spirit,
what was certainly a' terrible experi-
ence, and, at the same time, an ex-
Iperience whose apparent needlessness
.deprives the participants of much of
the admiration and sympathy they
might otherwise claim. It may be
that they were martyrs to science-
the aleity before whom, at the present
day, we are expected to bow in un-
questioning reverence.; but the un-
scientific reader, 'at least, willbe more
apt to regard them as martyrs to their
own foolhardiness. It was a grand
thing to ascend into the upper atmos;
phere higher than men had ever ven-
tured before, to measure its density
and test its effects upon .animal life ;
and so far as their experiment was a
practical one, and capable of being
turned to account 'by exact observa-
tions, it deserved only comnmendation.
But it is another thing to try conclu-
sions with nature, as these men did,'
seeing how near they could come to
death without .losing their hold on
life, and deliberately subjecting them-
selves to stupor and insensibilty for
the sake of the. possible satisfaction of
returning to consciousness again.
There are limits to the demands which
even science may make upon her
votaries, or to which they are called
upon to yield, and in the present case
it seems to us that' the limit was far
passed. As we read Tissandier's ac-
count, we feel that he-and his. com-
panions were not simply devoted
students, but fanatics. 'They go up,


higher and higher, watching the baro-
meter, counting the pulsations of their
arteries, and breathing occasionally
from the bags of oxygen they have
taken with them. At the height of
seven thousand yards they grow faint,
but they hmust go higher yet; they
throw ,out ballast and the balloon as-
cends. Eight thousand yards is
reached, and Tissandier becomes in-
Ssensible. Presently one of his com-
panions rouses him ; the balloon is
descending; they throw out more bal-
last, and it mounts again.. Again lhe
falls into inisensibility, and when. next.
he is roused- the balloon is once more-


I


waters of G
into the St.
send a.v yes
means of.
rivers, of w
it despatch
Near a wi
woods theE
furnishes ti
roofs of wh
Qshkosh
Your Amei
nix, and i;ts
Six months
town will I
and marble
was, once
Americans,
-P Mtadel


descending
ions are lyir
of the car,
mouths filit
to them. bu
just abir t(
while theba
fields and'
the two w.
about in the
the cord v
emptied, an
tree. Then
and thus t
found, two
one at the v
woinderi ng
is the'bare c
leel the hor
we need to
dier's nole-
tfiese,- "A
6,ooo nmetrc
the pulse of
120 to the
now 6,5oo00
sion,. We.
out ballast.
pants. We
and Crbce s
pale. A li
Croce says I
porpoise.'
Sivel and
Sleepy. ,Si
And so-on;
throwing qu
overcomes t
last is all gc
cords of obs
scope at the
metres or sc
not appear
learned exci
known befo
the height o
the earth- wi
And these
science.. ;N
scorn their
owes much-
seemed, per
But mere da
we confess t
in such dev(
his comrade
place amon,
If this be
that the A
promotes, t
the better.-


There- w
sympathy 'f
of Oshkosh,
little of thi
peculiar to
Twain. is tJ
which he ga
plifications
Genoa guit
tour abroad
person by tl
Colombo."
iest recolle
American C
to go to Os
the polite.
him an eter
an indefinit
throne of P
kosh' was n
tants-who
sawing of ti
both sides.-
almost said
itself ..sugg
Aleutain Is
Arctic para
But, ser.ic
town is a g
the most e
-to use a:
in the court
got its nair
even the na
the compc
which, borr
every race,
gressive---rm
globe, the
pluck, whici
.fore whose
iginial has'
California
cliffs that c
"Eden" to
speculative
Oshkosh, n
Unsalted S
of Winneba
and its rer
the cause o
of the popu
the spirit o
no original
side world
provement
meant corn
American s
construct a
it two. Its


,reen Bay and through them .motive was attached,-and lwheh-;then
SLawrence river, It might station agent'iead' the dispatir he al-
sel to Liverpool,- and by most doubted 'his Sehsese but"'h'ere '
the Fox and Wisconsin was ihe order to'ihr'o'the trailr into ;
vhich it has made channels, the river, duLysg'dby is.,upe,.r,. ,
slumber to New Orleafis. officer, .and he had the nurve to Qi-y
Iderness, it has mrade,-the -it,'trusting .to-the superintendenrt.-that.r'i.
source of-its wealth, and it the calamnity, of throwing id- ,' ,
he floors and shingles the would avert some grea'ter'cattrdp]',tt '
role States. of which' he knew' h:ifhlv sblr;$
will'rise again, 'ofcourse. opened the switch aid s'otQ_ Peside'"it,.
rican city is the true 'phoe- expecting every momentto se. ;i",,',
Sashes are the see(ds.of life. thundering ;dow; tfie road and :into
From now the. lustyyoung what ,seemed sure 'death.W-fSr -all t.;,,
have forgottenits mishap, board; but the burglars being 'ex.-C-
e will stand where wood perenced, had blow out b6th cylin'-
piled. For this are we derhead of the engine,'a"fitie l t"i,''I
and itiis thus that wel'v.ve, up, the roai, and the Ae14 t.I
'/tio 7Trees, .n: : "c"t upiu.]i d '/V/;W<3.* ,2I-t., .;4 ,., '


.I .. ; .: -
~'h~ 7iincx.upuctl~'c~i.~a'/.i~'&- I.


.... _'T ++l w.. _


I---~. ss~_ ----- -*hT"--*r--:--- --~-rr i ~r-r-lsrf--r~*~14Ya*LIUU*j~~I~~LII~ .t~_U~D~i~.~ll~S~S(~t)-9~Ji1U;ij~*~CII 7Nm r.~---~~I~PIC -7-1^--- .M I~-__ I ~ ---- -. 1_7~_~j-L~


----- ..


1


rapidly and his compan- An Awfu) Night. ..-
ng crouched in the bottom The San- Francisco .G/CtrnifMe of "
their fences black, their May says,: The British, bark -Ma-
:d with blood. He cries. rama, wli'iclih arrived yeste'rilay from ,7
it they do-,net-hear-; -he is Tahiti-, brought ne*9s which -explains -.-
o:.throw out. the grapnel, the non-arriival'-'yschooierMar'garet-
illoon is bounding over the Crockard, which was long .Qverd,- .,-r
woods,-a'nd:thei -bodies of The advice s are. from the.-,ca a4op
retched -men -are tossedthe schooner, and jthe. master, of, n..
ecar. At last he, reaches English vessel, who was apassenger
alve and tthe balloon IS on her. From the'rm it appears' that '
)dlies exhausted~against ~te .W.br1 :t- a .-
'dliessxhaustedragains a a,.'the w6rst apprehensions regarding the -
i Tissandier. fai-ts aay, Crockard iere : tre.': Til "schooner "-: '
he three daring men are.left Pa'pete on" the' 1dnf F&iH 1 ",
of them quite dead'. .'and :for tfis'city,' with ab'nldmfltn t f U,
'er 0 gate of death, by .th eiglht'men, icelhdi4 g he offler'*Ad.'ar-
peasants of I ndre.- "Such a lightcargib: obrAnges& nafld;tanimara B
outline of the story, but to logs. ShebadtkIhowd as pass.ng. r-. j,.
ror ol this dance of death a 'Mr. Q goedq of -Papete, aad-,hf..
read th e e la t -rtes in i tssa n -- ".' .'"
read the enies inissan- captain and crew-twenty-one .19, ...
book. lhey are such- s numrber-of.the .Britis h ship .AJy, '.
Ve -.are at the, height -": Force, which-was wrecked about three
es; -We are. welL I felt-
s. We are welh "I + W' ..monthsagoon Mangravia'Islhnd, in the '+
f Croce-Spinelhl. It beat South Sea. The men of the' Airey '";"
minute. The .,hejgh,t is .Force, after a series of adventures and "'
mnetres.,. A little: qppres- hardships, succeeded in reathing'TaI'..$
are better. Sivel throws hiti, where they were cared for by thti *i*':
Hands frozen"' Croce British -Consul, who placed tim r 6wn-'-.i
inhale the oxygen. Sivel -board the Creckard forrthis pdft-bn-- ;
shut their eyes. They ar thei .way.h..."'r., .-, ,
little better, even gay. During the first day .out the -ock'
to me : 'You blow like. a iad exVer~ie dqeed, d weatherr.5 .^ .-
We are at 7,;o06 "metres.,: ng fast. saile.r she sped ,rpidl. tr ,a:.
Croce are' : pale.' "7,500 :ward her destination.' Qn the second-,
vel -throws : out ballast-" d iy she. enc6unteid stiff breezes and" ',.
growig,!;fa-n:ter4 a04'n-.sl. heavy seas, but being astaunclh craft, "
it ballast,. till the faintness no 'fear we ntrtaid About
+ no !"far. wer'e" ntert line l ,About ;""
them wholly and the bal- dusk'the gale t coe isqa'
)ne. There ae. .some re- .and rain fell. At i'talf: past ii 6'l6ck* "'i'v
servations with the spectre, heavy sqtiall-suddehly struck'het-'w4tth
height of three thousand such forces tohro her-onhe
, but beyond 'that it ddes beam -ends .:. The halyards- were let
that anything has been 6oose and, an attempt was made-tb,.get:,;>
ept what was well enough thle sails- off forward, bit*t ftef,,at--.i.:'u ..
re, that the atinosphere at entarystrgglhe.vessel yiedt -
)f three oir four miles from the force of .the element and,;tunied?',.:
ill not sustain human : life bottom upward : ..... :..
men, were. martyrs.; to The calamitycanleso sudlylha-'
Vell, be it.so., We do qnot tos o were below had not time t
+. ..' .: ---tliose~wh0 were beow f dnohaie'O' ,.:
devotion, for the world escape. Man f.he awoke i the''
:. +. .+ -., :,, esao Tv l a-'ny tthe6ra a "ekeinutl :. ...
of its.: progress .tomen'who. -Water, with every'-avenuie 6 d'sca'Pe" "'
haps, as foolhardy as these.' cut off.' "Th'e crew 'of theiri > W
ring is cheap: enough, a.id' ng .on deck had time-t realize' ..,
P .... .. !. ."bemg'on- n dck :h~ad, .:ti me-'' relz ';
that we cannot see where- thei peril, "and iake ti.way .
otees as MA Tissaaidier and ofeboats Cptain.odixey, w-i
,- i'.+ " { ":+lie~boats, CaptainaGo ey w rl~
es can claim an: exalted had just before gon,. below-,..eiea d^, ,
g the heroes of the world.' through-a skylight. Of the four.pass,-. :
the' kind of performance engers in the cabin, Captai' Coltite,'
erial'- 'Navigation' :Society of the Airey Fore, alone succeeded'. .
he sooner it is suppressed in making his way out.. Ol.his nien, ,
-Philadelhit.Press. -'who wereall .below;but 'seven ,.re,."
ever seen afteward."oh'Elder'tiese- '.".
Oshkosh. ond mate'of'the' Crockard,-"no--wa ..."
ill of' course be generaL asleep, -was drowned, and Osgood :-
uor the unfortunate people met the same' fate. Fourteen 'mnn-7
o .. including the two Captains, succeeded.
tinctured perhaps with a n. reacahing'one' e coarse and fresh humor tipg clear-of the vessel. They.remnioAu.w ,
Americans, of which Mark 'ednear her until daylight, wh-n they ,-
he best exemplar, and of succeeded in picking upafew rangg, ',.
and a kit of mackerel. With, .no
ave one of -the best exem- other provisions bt these, they set
when he denied to-the -.out for the i'slan4 Matahiva, tno'e't.&
de, during his innocent distant, this beinrgttie 'nearest land.
1, all knowledge of any After four 'day-s, during which' their,.
he name of. "Christopher sufferings -ftiom,'htiFger-arid'thirgtWert.-,.
Oshkosh, since our earl- intense, they:i reached. The island:-,.:
ction, has been a sort of which proved to be uninhabited.-;'Ton,.
Zoventry. .To tell a.man their dismay .they4w.er unable to fnd-d
sihkosh has for years been anyfresh water.and ,the only food' i
Amnerican way of wishing yielded :was a few cocoaniuts.iForsee-,,-.
nal sojourn in Hades and ing thatthey:mtst -soon perish if 4hey .
e courtiership around 'the remairied ttIre 't-the captaif' resolved ;''*
luto, ,Exactly where'Osh- upon a desperate attempt to r'eaeh Ta-
obody except its 'nhabi- hiti. With six men he started in aft '
are mutch given to the open .boat On -the second day r. ,
mber, and whot live upon leaving the island :they. were. k4
f the river Fox-we ,had 'up by the Tahitian" sdboonor Iislad,n'
Styx-knew. The.. name Belle, which'immekiatety statedt1'0-.r:--'-
ested, .Kamtschatka,..the-.the isIand and rescued rediaiiaidet 6f '"
islands, and Mr. Seward's the party n in 'exhausted condition,
dise- The "cap'tai ibf the Island BeUe fed'
ously, the misfortune of the and car.d for ther, and transported,..
great one. It was one. of themto;the island&tAwaao:whbere-e.-i
llterprisin active '"live" .tra.isferredthemit. thebchooner;Mary ,i-
Western classicism-cities by which they were-safely' conveyed-to ,, '
itry. When and how it Papete, where the arrived twenty-six --
rne we do not know, but days after ".t*h loss of their vessel. ,
me itself suggests:a trait of JCatain Go 0fre),.and'.his.men ,willat-.
osite national character rie h ctyin afey da .n thQn
rowing the; best qualities of Graylhdn4; bargin accideot.-; ':..I:,-.I
, represent tie most, pro- -- .....; ..:, ,;:;;
nisued word-people pn. the 'Obeying O0'detSii ;. ".: :': '* -:
indomitable, preserving : **-, : *,... ,
h conquers forest, and be- "THROW: '89' :INTO ThE RIVER-I;,,.
irresistible march t'e~abo'r- New York, May 14. When the-tof-iyi..'
retired to the lava:beds -of victs who espapedPi4'fr Sing Sing jo--,u
and tnow hang's utpor the -' ^^ o "oe_.dwiihe.^
;O0hfro'nt the Pacific. .o dat:,,at .d o. f i -. "w.,d,,a
tempt and' swindle young Htudson :River-road on 'the locomo-n'i
Martin :Chuzzlewits-was tive they had stolen the priso!LQflgc-.;,'
ot even a:zenith. city of the. ials telegraphed 'to- Super'nttnderii -
eas. Away-..up! the waters Toucey, at New..Yor-k. .^T6uce.Kh kew;
igo lake,- it very. solation .. ....i 7n
noteness, .,whrle they .were ,h t s. -in ,.. ; .i...n. ;/
f its damnation in the talk of locomotive runnig, were likely to '
lace, are an illustration of run into a ,passe.ngeai .ty'ip..tihe..ju.^
f wh iclh we speak.' It had* ahead and on. the iay to New 'YorkI""
connection wihhth'e' out- on the same t'r'ack;,s6 pbtelegraphedt.:3
,bnt 'the Wisconsin Im- -
Company (these improve- the'stationigentat- the: station
pansies are as natural :t6 below whee the 'flying engither ++
society as the works' they was "Open the switch-and .thro '.'8?:' '
re artificial to nature) gave into the river." .- "89.- is,,thie nunab: .:;
s steamboats float into thie of the train; to which the istolen-:looo*.'











THE NEW SOUTH: WEEKLY. JACKSONVILLE, WEDNESDAY, MAY


26, L875.


THE NEW SOUTH.
1. 9. ADAMS.
010to. R. C4tKUTH.MA ADAMS, CARRUTH & CO.
o30. Us*RS1DR. j
J. S ADAMS, EDITOR.


TO CORRESPONDENTS AND OTHERS.
Items df'c1 Interest are solicited from all par-tsoftrhe
State. Also, communications on subjects of general
interest, especially educational social and .ndustnal
topics. Correspondents should make their letters as
brief an thc-facts,and circumstances will permit.
We are'niot responsible fox opinions' expressed by our
correspoaents. Rejected mnanucdpts can neither
be returned nor preserved. Anonymous contributions
Will not ie noticed. :


A Winter Homte in Florida.
The severity ofthe winter season just
passed, throughout tlie North and West,
has caused mae y to turn a longing and
earnest look of desire towards the Win-
ning aitrietiivef'iatures of our State while
frost and snow are reigning supreme.
and beyond a question crowds of .men
of meqns .and leisure would pro% ide
themselves.:with. a 'homin here could
they divest themselves of :the,- idea, that
their i0'n ;personal Attention hereduring
the larger portion of the year is indis-
pensiblek. A; -^ '.^ .''* :*.-. :,
'To a Northern and Western man, who
has tihe means tp make himself comfort-
able where 'and when he chooses, and
to whom defence-_of self and family
against the mterciless assaults of frost
are the principal. objects of solicitude,
there- is 'fascination, au indescribable
charmiin -the contemplation of'a d9uiet
retreat in a genial clime, within the
bouudSof' ihi own country, whereshrubs,
fruit aid flowers contrast Wso powerfully
with ,he rigorous chains-of the Northern
ice-King, h'ocklng and delying hi6 hate-
ful domination, wiith its 'smiles. of end-


I jl L_


th---------o.ii AA on~i ..L...v -"on


less verdure and' beauty But 'such a o,p an ,, w. ,UUn u


home is lookedupon asan impssibility,
without an .entire change of business
and a total relinquishment of the old
and loved home at the North. It is of
the greatest importance to our Stateand
of the highest interest to all men of this
class to know that no suchlimpossibility
exists,'aiid that the accomplishmentt of
a pleasant' home toer portion of the
winter season.is within the compass of
modeiratebmeans and without any en-
forced., change of business connections
or disruptiiuebofhome tics.
A wew York or Chicago: merchant or
professional man, without any necessity
of his permanent personal presence, and
with less outlay than is often expended
in a single visit of pleasure to The con-
tinet, may treat himself to all the quiet
pleaiures of a4semi-tropical home, may
at will, in the depth of winter, in three
days'easiy and safely, transfer himself
from the land of frost atind be lounging
among his, own orange, lemon, or ban-
ana trees, an(dl there find the pleasantest
possible: changee and rest., And the
comfortable consideration connected
with this is that any t-uch investment.
unlike the expense o(f continental tour,
will 'be as profitable in a-pecuniary point
of view as it is promotive of permanent
pleasure.' .
The remarks of Mr. Bishop, President
of the State Agricu lIitural Assoeition on
this subject, as the conclusions of a re
liable .man.. who knows of what he
speaks, are worthy of frequent repeti-
tion. He. says: : :.
Manyi' gentlemeni of ample means, de-
sire to have orange groves in contnec-
tion with winter homes, but hesitate to
act in the matter because Lthey cannot
give the enterprise theirpersonal super-
vision during thO summer. Some or
them express the opinion that they could
not make sure of competent and faith-
ful management in their absence. This
I believe to be- a- mistake.i ':- (Give me
money enough and I-: will engage to
hire a niman who can safely be trusted at
the "Jiead ,of. any undertaking. Place
money enouIgh in: mniy hands and I will
employ a man capable of assuming the
Presidency of the United States, arid of
giving us quite as good an administra-
tion -as :We are likely to get. But we
ought to understand, opce for all, -that
we cannot procure the services of a first-
rate man for the wages of a tenth-rate
mwn. Over on the hay, in sight ol this
village, there is a- grove which was
budded six years ago last June and
July.;- I visited it yesterday, -and the
spreading trees with- their dark, green
foliage and loads of-yellow fruit, testi-
fied to the best of care... Mr. Stockwell,
the owner of that gi-ove, lives in Maine,
and-spend-t only a part of, each winter
in Florida.. .' -
There are some opportunities to se-
cure superior management at ancom-
paratively ightt cot.- You can find a
good location, beside a man who is
making a grove for himself, and induce
him to take charge of your business-
to S"e that your work is done, and well
done at the proper times; to receive
and disburse your money; to kqep your
accounts; correspond with;you; and do
Small that is needful to bring your trees
forward. -
Mly friend, Mr. G. P. Lovell, of Sunmiter
county, has the general supervision of-
six groves. He owns an.undivided half
ol twio of thni, but has no pecuniary
interest in the others. They ;are all as
weUllru-cd for as they would he if coin-
staPtly'unler the eyes of their owners.
I hate charge of a grove of tw-lve
acres,' hallf:m mile from the one in which
I am.-interested on Orange Lake. It
belongs to two ladies-one Io|' them a
resident of Illinois and the other of Cen.
tral .ew York. They bought a wild
orange grove, andt my present estimate
is that they will have 1.500 beating
orange tree at an aggregate cost of
$3SM00, he original pmIehiise-nuoney
ineluded-not more than one-tenth uf
what. in the absence of any unusual : dik-
aster, the grove will lie worth lour years
frotum the day on which an axe was put
into it.
Tlie word wI'ich is ofltnest in my
miud when thhipking of ih, enlarge-
meat of orange culture in Florida is the
word "co operationn" There are rich
men and poor men who long for orange
gro'es,, and Ihose of both classes can
re'tilhtue .desired. end if they will but
ta'e pain 'to find each other out and
come' ti umod understanding. Li-ttwo
or thred or more of the Im-rnmer class se-
lrct th-ir location and purchase their
Jand..and theft say to one of the later


Ucu t'lJuViJU uI t lllllngs LUWII L anaiuUy


and despotism" at the same time, and
pirates of "retrenchment and reform,"
but neither its-adherents- nor anybody
else is deceived. The same identical
question grimly shows through all the
misty veils with which it is attempted to
r be befogged.
The great body of the Republican
- party is composed of men of free and
unfettered thought, who now, as ever,
care vastly more for principles than for
men or mere party watch-words.
The reticence of President Grant in
regard to his own plans is such as in
every way becomes a man of sense,
who by the choice of forty millions of
his fellow citizens holds the highest
office in their gift.
Had. Gen'l Grant at any time been
foolish-enough, gratuitously and in ad-
vance of the proper and legitimate oc-
casion, to decline a nomination that
never was offered, the phraseology of
his declension, no matter in what lan-
tguage it might have been couched,
would have distanced the famous "hasty
plate of soup" acceptance of General
Scott in notoriety; and "thank you for
nothing" would have been the sneering
refrain of the very papers that by all
their clamor about Cossarism and a third
term, have failed hitherto to provoke a
departure front true official dignity. -
SBehind "third term," "despotism" and
"State rights," the American people per-
ceive thIe intensely hostile and aggressive
spirit of Southern Democracy,they have
Noticed the revolutionary and bitter op-
position to the reconstructed State gov-
ernments,theyvrecollect the smooth prom-
ises of the Seymour and Blair platform
with the Broadhead letter as a commen-
tary, they were almost deceived by the
honey-fugling of the Greely declarations
ot '72, and were only aroused by the
startling cry:of "a white-man's party."
But they will not be again deceived
by the same means; they recollect the
Democracy as the party that sacrificed
-party principle, country, the recollection
of the fathers and sworn faith once for
a sactiomial dream of heartless ambition,
and will b.b'slow to trust them again.

The Independent Political Press.
In the undue ardor and zeal with
which atpartizan political press is some-
times conducted excuse or palliation is
found -in .their very zeal for their oc-
casional exaggerations. But a so called
independentt"' press that claims to stand
on high moral grounds', too high to al-
low it to participate in the "low partizan
sti-uggles" of the day should aim to keep
within sight of the truth lest its "inde-
pen d &n c" be 'construed irto -a forfeiture
oi its allegiance to truth itself.
By its foolibhi and untenable positions
in reference to matters.-itn Louisiana, the
Independent press is demonstrating its
own partizatn bias and 'prejudice and is
bringing the shrewd silence of the
Democracy into strong relief.
The exact text of the resolution about
the permanent 'status of the House,which
formed a part of the Louisiana "com-
promise" is as follows:
And that the House of Representatives
as to its members, as constituted undsr
the, award of Georige F. Hoar, William
A. Wheeler, W. P. Frye and Samuel S.
Marshall, shall remain without change
ecept by death or resignation of mem-
bers until a new gener!d election.
And here is thie way the Nation puts it:
By the terms of the Wheeler Compro-
maise, as it is called, the Republicans
agreed that the Hlouse of Representa-
tives might be reconstructed so as to
give ithe fDemocrats the majority of
which they had been deprived by the
aethIn of the troops; and, on the other
hand, the Democrats agreed not to im-
peach Kellogg for any past offenices.
There was 0o promise given beyond
this ut citlh-.r side as to the House of
Representatives.
Of the undtIrestanding and its binding
nature Mr. Frye said: -
By agr'ecment and award the status of
your "Li'latture was to remain as we
leftt. i The Democrats violate their
good faith and plighted honor in 'their
outrageous ft.auitmpt to xuhange it..


class, who haIs. a sufficiency of both
brain and muscle at command, "Go on,
now, and make a grove for each of us
and one for yourself; we will provide
the needful funds tuid take care of you
and yours." It men in easy circum-
stances will adopt the plan I here recom-
mend, and let nothing of niggardliness
enter into their treatment of their man-
ager, but deal with him as my partners
deal with: me, they may be quite confi-
,dent of. receiving trom their groves
within a few: years an annual income
equal to 100 per cent. on their invest-
ment.
Shall the Democracy be Trusted Once
More?
This, in short plain terms, is to be the
dominating question of the next great
national struggle in this country.
All conceivable ingenuity may be ex-
hausted in the invention and proniulga-
tion of an infinite variety of ostensibly
"important questions," as demanding
solution by the next election, but they
are palpably mere negati6ns or side-
,issues and so considered by those who
propound them. ... ...
Divided, discordant and utterly con-
tradictory in their financial, positions,
no cute poliiiian can determine to-day.
whether the Democracy favor a contin-
uance of greenbacks or a return to hard
money, though he is very certain that it
is opposed: to the present condition of
currency famine, which it attributes to
Republican misgovernment.
Democracy rolls its eyes terribly and
holds up its hands in pious horror at the
idea of a "third term," and talks tbrill-
ingly about "Ciesarism," "the constitu-
tion as it was" when they. abjured it,
"the traditions of our fathers" and about


The Grocer.


We have received the initial number
of The Gbrocer and 'Prd6ision Dealer,
published at Baltimore.
The following extract from the editor's
Introductory will give a fair idea of the
scope and aim of its proprietors:
r The prospect ot the Grocery and Pro-
vision -trade of ourt city is one of unex-
ampled brilliancy, and it is not unreason-
able to say that, by the exhibition ot
due enterprise and shrewdness, the
great staples of our commerce will be so
* largely handled by us that the title be-
t stowed upon us will be fitlyworn. The
advantages of our city as a shipping
centre are conceded, and we are rapidly
beginning to hold an undisputed place in
. regard to thle market we offer for vari-
ous important articles of import and ex-
port. Every indication points to the
Conclusion that we have entered upon a
period of rapid material development,
and that certain branches of trade are
those upon which- the influence of this
movement will be first and most distinct-
ly manifested. It is at such a season
that it has occurred to us to undertake
the publication of a journal which
should devote all its energies and intelli-
gence to the interest of the Grocery and
Provision Trade of Baltimore. The im-
portant relation that that trade bears to
our commercial system renders it essen-
tial that it should be in some measure
particularly and specifically represented.
This can be done in no way better than
by a well-conducted journal, alive to all
questions of import to the interests, and
quick to detect and explain them. It is
proposed, then, to conduct The Grocer
and Provision Dealer as an independent
journal in behalf of this trade in Balti-
timore, and in its common interest. It
shall be a paper published as in the
cause of a community, not of one or
two individuals, and which by a broad
and liberal tone and policy may secure
respect for itself and reflect credit upon
its more interested readers.f
The Grocer is a semi-monthly, quarto
form, twenty pages; Turubull Brothers,
publishers.

The Mouth of the Mississippi.
Capt. Eads, the celebrated engineer,
has began work on the jetties at the
mouth of the Mississippi river, and will
soon be putting into practical operation
the great scheme of deepening the chan-
nel by means of these, much talked of jet-
ties. While we heartily desire the suc-
cess of the enterprise, we cannot see
what he is going to do with the immense
amount of matter which this mighty
river daily deposits at the line of con-
tact with the ocean. As he extends his
jetties the engineer will find that the
obstruction is simply carried a little
further into the Gulft forming a tongue of
land along which 'will 'accumulate the
debris, in timet9 be covered with vegeta-
tion, and simply compelling the stream
to carry its burden of earthy matter a
few miles further before dropping it to
form a mud bank and an obstruction to
commerce. For, as long as this matter
continues to be borne down on the cur-
rent, so long must it be a bar to the
improvement of navigation through the
natural outlets of the Mississippi. Mean-
while the contractors are busy seeking
for the means to carry on the great
work. The following clipping we find
in the Vicksburg Herald, May 9th:
Among the passengers on the steamer
Great Republic, which passed down
yesterday morning, were Capt. James
B. Eads, of St. Louis, and Col. James
Andrews, of Pittsburg. Col. Andrews
is the gentleman to whom Capt Eads
has let the contract for constructing a
portion oft the jetties at the mouth of the
Mississippi, below New Orleans, and
both hie and Capt. Eads are on their
way to Southwest Pass, where jetties
are to be constructed. I
While the Republic was lying here,
Capt. Eads and Col. Andrews took the
tug Bigley, to explore the ledge of rock
along the river bank between the land-
ing and the National Cemetery. They
came back with a full supply of speci-
mens with which they were well pleased,
and it is probable that a large portion of
the stone used in the construction of the
jetties will be taken from the region of
this city. Capt Eads thinks there is
plenty of stone to be had here, but from
a hasty survey of the situation hl was


- i


last vestige of that apology for Republi-
canism has passed away, and this ex-
cuse can no longer be used. The Unit-
ed States Government has no longer any
reasonable excuse for not intervening
to arrest the destruction of life and pro-
perty, and, if deemed necessary, to as-
sist patriotic Cuba in achieving its inde-
pendence, and securing a restoration of
the public peace and prosperity. The
different members of the "family of na-
tions" are under some moral obligations
to protect each other from anarchy and
misrule. A brotherhood is of little, use
if unable to keep the peace under the
parental roof. Good citizens are ex-
pected to interfere to prevent strife and
bloodshed on the streets among their
neighbors. This isespecially true, when
such conduct seriously inturrupts the
transaction of business by the peaceful
inhabitants. Spain has no moral right
to continue a brutal and interminable
warfare on a portion of her own people,
at our doors, when this strife results in
vast damage to the peaceful inhabitants
of the United States. Our government
has the same right to command the
peace which Spain has proved herself
unable to secure, that a private citizen
should exercise in putting an end to
chronic brawls in front of his dwelling
or business office.-Washington Chron-
icle.


SAnd the Xew York Tribune, in Its
endeaver to slight a gross breach of
faith and glaze it over, speaks thus of
the session which was called pursuant
to the agreement and solely to carry out
the compromise: ,. -
Beyond quarreling over the retention
of four Republican intruders in the low-
er House, who had neither credentials
.from the-Returning Board of their own
party nor certificates ,from the compro-
mise arbitrators, we do. not perceive
that the Legislature has done any seri-
ous work except voting $117,000 to pay
its own expenses.

A New Railroad.
The prominent citizens of Marion
County have ceased ,4o. call upon the
Gods to help them out of the rut, and
have put their own shoulders to the
wheel in a way that promises good re-
sults. At a meeting held in Ocala a
few days ago, a company was organ-
ized for- the construction of a railroad
from Silver Spring to Blue Spring, of
,which Hon. E. J. Harris was elected
president, E. W. Agnew, vice-prisident,
D. A. Miller, secretary, and Wm. R.
Hillyer, treasurer.
The name, adopted is The Silver
Spring, OGala & Gulf Railway Compa-
ny; Capital stock $100,000. Subscrip-
tion books will soon be opened in this
city, and at Ocala, Cedar Keys and Cot-
ton Plant.
The report of the committee on Con-
struction shows: estimated cost of a
tram road per mile, $1,340. Third
class narrow guage, per mile, $3,500
The committee on Subscriptions re
ported 60 cash shares; 7 labor shares;
4 material shares, and 2,660 acres of
land, which was afterwards increased
to 71 cash shares; 11 labor shares; 9
material shares, and 3.380 acres of land.


situated off the coast of Anastasia Island,
about, 2 miles from the shore, and
about 3 miles from the mouth of Matan-
zas Inlet-about 9 or 10 miles from the
Bar of St. Augustine.
The captain moored Ihis vessel, just to
the east of the Spring, and put out 2
anchors, forming a triangle, just to the
west. The lines attached to those were
then made to cross each other in such a
manner as to determine the center of the
Spring, and then made fast to his vessel.
It must not be supposed that all of this
was done in a twinkling or with the
same case that a land lubber would
stroll along the beach. On the contrary,
we watched, with serious apprehensions,
the movements of the crew in the boat
-the cutter we believe it is called-as
she tossed and pitched, like a whale boat.
Considerable time was consumed in
taking the soundings, and filling bottles
with the water Irom the bottom of the
Spring. We will endeavor to give, in
an imperfect manner however, some of
the results of what we witnessed.
The soundings, just outside of the ba-
sin of the Spring-so to speak-all
around, showed 9 lathoms. Inside the
basin a depth of 21 fathoms and 3 feet.
But we were informed by the Captain


i


afraid there was. so much clay that it
would be difficult to quarry it. Col,
Andrews will return here in a few days
to further explore the situation, and
possibly to commence quarrying,
Build Cotton Mills,
The following item is a very signifi.
cant indication of what we can do for our-
selves if we will only go to work in the
right way. The difference between
sending the raw material cut of the
country to be manufactured and manu-
facturing it at home, will make us ricL
and independent. Let us begin now
The figures show that the factories in
this city and immediate vicinity have
taken since September 1st, 8,251 bales
of cotton, which is 1,520 more than were
taken last year. Were it not for out
mills this cotton -at the highest pricet
would have brought $618.725. It is
passed through machinery here, its value
increased three fold, and Columbus send,
it out in the shape of $1,856,475. Sc
about $1,200,000 above the raw mate-
rial, is brought here by these factories.
All the money is broui-ht from abroad
and kept at home.-Columbus Sun.

Cuba and tlt United States.
The recent rep6its showing a system-
atic destruction of the sugar plantations
on the Island of Cub.a are causing a good
deal of alarm in the public mind through.
out the United States., We depend
yearly upon Cuba for about eighty mil.
lion dollars worth of sugars and molas.
ses, and there is no other portion ot the
globe that can afford a similar supply,
At the rate the destruction of the sugai
plantations is now going on, the sugat
crop in Cuba will soon be reduced to a
mere remnant ot its former proportions
insufficient even for home consumption.
This destruction of the sugar estates
is prompted by the idea that Spain per-
sistently retains the Island mainly on
account of the value of its exports and
the revenue, contributed in times of
peace, to the home government. To di-
minish the value of the Island to Spain,
it is necessary to, destroy its commerce
and reduce its sugar plantations to ashes.
This is the present feeling ot the insur-
gents, and they are pursuing it with a
determination to wipe the sugar trade
out of existence.
A partial list of the sugar estates des-
troyed in three districts alone, between
March 1 and April 20, shows that six
plantations, with their cane mills, build-
ings and other improvements were des-
troyed within that time in the Districtof
Cienfuegos, representing 7,800 hogs-
heads, and worth $1,900,000; nine in the
District of Villa Clara, representing
8600 hogsheads, and valued at $1,460,-
000, and eighteen in the District of Sagua-
le Grande, representing 45,700 hogs.
heads, valued at $3,000,000.
The work is still going on with great
vigor. The entire numberof estates des-
troyed up to about thIe middle of April,
is. reported at cne hun-Jred, valued at
$7,200,000, but worth previous to the
war at least $25,000,000.
The planters are thoroughly discour-
aged, and are abandoning their planta-
tions in despair, under the conviction
that if they cultivate a crop the main
portion of it will continue to be absorbed
in oft-repeated taxation, till finally de-
stroyed by the touch of the insurgents.
Where, then, shall we look for our sup-
ply of sugar? The product of the West
India Islands is scarcely sufficient for
the foreign demand. We can obtain lit-
tle aid from that source. Louisiana
cannot, under the most favorable condi-
tions, with her limited means, give us
more than 15 to 19 per cent. of our total
consumption of sugar and syrups. Shall
we be compelled to take ourcoft'ee with-
out sugar ? The prices in tmhe sugar
market are now rising, and must coin-
tinue to do s). In short, a sugar famine
is imminent, unless the ravages of the
Cuban incendiaries atre soon brought to
a close through foreign intervention.
Is it not. therefore, thIe duty ot other
governments to interfere? If the claims
of humanity are insufficient to warrant
an outside effort to stay these Cuban
barbarities, the demand of commerce
ought to arouse public attention., and se-
cure an early stoppage of the war and
the wholesale destruction of sugar plan-
tations and other private property. No
nation on the ftacedof the globe is conr-
miercially more ecpsely connected with
Cuba than the United States. We depend
upon that island yearly for about one
hundred thousand dollars worth of pro-
ducts that cannot be obtained elsewhere,
except in limited quantities and at large-
ly increased prices. Besides this con-
sideration, Cuba is entitled to our sym-
pathy in her oppression ; her people are
our immediate neighbors; they are the
weaker party, struggling for liberty and
their rights, against an unscrupulous and
relentless foe. Yet for seven years they
have defied the military power of Spain
and shown to the worl-d, by an indomi-
table courage, great sacrifice and heroic
endurance, that they are entitled to their
independence, and fully qualified to gov-
ern themselves.
Whether they are founded or not, there
is a deep and general impression on the
mindsofihinking men, not only through-
out the United States, but in England
and elsewhere in,' Europe, that the Gov-
ernment of- the United States should
lose no time in' making a determined
effort to bring the Cuban sacrifice of life
and treasure to a close. The plea has
been that Spain wvas struggling to main-
tain a Republican form of government,
and should not be embarrassed : but the


John C. Breckinridge.
LFXif4tON, KY., May I7.--John C,
Breckinridge died this afternoon,
John Cabell Breekinridge was born
near Lexington, Iy., January 21, 1821.
HIe was of the best Kentuky stock, his
grandfather, the Hon. John Breckin-
ridge, United States Attorney General
under Jefferson, and the author of the
Celebrated "revolution of 1798" in the
Virginia Legislature, having emigrated
to Kentucky at the beginning of the
century, from which State he was chos-
en United States Senator in 1801. His
grandson was educated at Centre Col-
Slege, Kentucky; studied law at the
rransylvania Institute, and was admit-
ted to the bar at Lexington. He resid.
ed for a short time at Burlington, Iowa,
h but returned to Lexington, where he
Practiced his-.l'profession with success.
SAt the outbreak of the war with Mexico
he entered the army, serving as a major
Sot infantry, and while in Mexico dis-
tinguished himself as counsel for Majoir
General Pillow in the famous court.
martial. On his return he was elected
to the State Legislature, and in 185C
was nominated for Congress in 'he Ash-
land district, his opponent being thbe
able and popular Charles S. Morehead,
afterward Governor. After a contest
memorable for its brilliancy and vigor,
Breckinridge, who represented the
s young blood of Kentucky, was elected
Sand served in the House of Representa-
tives from 1851 to 1855, having been
elected the second time over no less
formidable a competitor than Hon. Les-
lie Coombs. One of his first public per-
formances in the House was the deliv-.
ery of a eulogy upon Henry Clay. Mr.
Breckinridge was tendered the Spanish
Smision by President Pierce, but de-
clined for domestic reasons, andi in 1856
he was nominated by the Democratic
SConvention for Vice President of the
SUnited States on the ticket with James
Buchanan. The campaign, which ended
With the election of "Buck and Breek,''
Sis still fresh in the public mind. Mr.
Breckingridge entered upon his duties
Son March 4, 1857 as President of the
SUnited States Senate, and presided over
that august body for lour years with
distinguished dignity and courtesy. In
1860 he was nominated by the Southern
wing of the Democratic party at Balti-
more, alter the split at the Charleston
Convention, as its candidate for Presi-
" dent, but was defeated, and in the fol-
lowiug year lihe entered the Senate as
the successor of John J. Crittenden.
SAt the outbreak of the rebellion Breck-
Sinridge took part with the South, ait,d
was expelled front the Senate on Decem-
Sber 4, 1861. Hie was made a major gen-
eral in the Confederate army in the Au-
gust following. Hlie commanded the
reserve at Shiloh, in April, 1862, andi
made the successful attack on Baton
Rouge in August of that year. He af-
terwards commanded a division in
t Polk's corps, at Murfreesboro and at
Chickamauga, and defeated Sigel at
Newmarket, Va., May, .1864. Hle then
t joined Lee's army, and was at the battle
of Cold Harbor, in June, and command-
ed a corps under Early, in the Shenan-
doah valley, when defated by Sheridan.
Transferred to East Tennessee, he de-
feated General Gillem, in November,
1864, and took part in the battle of Nash-
ville. In January, 1865, he became
Secretary of War in the Richmond cabi-
net, and thus was present at the death
of the Confederacy he had helped to
bring into being. Alter Lee's surrender,
Breckinridge went to Europe, and re-
mained abroad until 1868 when hlie ire-
turned to his home in Kentucky.
General Breckenridge has been in
feeble health tfor sme time, and during
the whole of the past winter has been
confined to his room, and lately to his
bed, with a dropsical affection that is
thought to have resulted from an injury
to his liver received from a fragment of
shell during the war. A week ago l)oc-
tors Gross and Sayre performed para-
centisis, with the hope of giving tempo-
rary relief, but the operation seems to
have had no effect in averting the fatal
issue. The patient has been gradually
sinking, though he retained his con-
sciousness and conversed cheerlfully with
his friends almost to the last. One of
the l)leasait incidents of his closing days
was a visit paid to him at his bedside a
fortnight ago by Vice-President Wilson,
whose interview with the former pro-
slavery champion was described asvery
affecting. Many of thle old Southern
leaders had also made pilgrimages ti
Mr. Breckinridge's bedside during his
last illness, to pay the tribute of their
personal respect.
Breckinridge was a thorough repre-
sentative of the old Kentucky chivalry.
Of fine physique and commanding pres-
ence, dignified, courteous and affable in
his manners, and of" a warm, inpetuous
disposition, he ;was a national standaad-
bearer for the young blood of the South.
But he had no especial qualification for
a statesman or a politician: he wielded
little or no influence in Congress or in
national polities, and he sank out of
sight with the overthrow of the institu-
tions which he represented. The re-
cord of his public life is but :i reminis-
cence of things past, and those who
knew him will choose to think of him
less as .a public man than as a gentle-
man.

A Medicinal Spring in the Ocean.
The editor of the St. Augustine Press
has visited this wonderful spring and
thus relates what he saw: In a space,
of about 100 feet circumference, the wa-
ter was swelling up. in spouts and whirl-
pools, with such force, that the vessel,
as she passed through,' was made to
swerve from her coruse. Thesprinr is


some pews ran up to $1,550. The,total
amount of bonus to-night is $77,000.
The total original valuation of the pews
is $z00,000. No bonus will be required
after this year, and tor the price which
a buyer pays for a pew he holds it in
fee simple, subject to only an annual
assessment of six. per cent. on the first
valuation. ".
S:mn Francisc-o, May 15.-Jas. Lick
has made a new trust deed. It differs
from that revoked in a few particulars.
The donation for statuary at the State
Capitol of $250,000 is changed to $100,-.
000 for statuary for the City Hall here.
The appropriation for the Key monu-
ment is reduced from $1-50,000 to $60,-
QO0, The $700,000 for the Lake Tahoe
'0bservatery is committed to the Uni-
versity of California for the same pur-
pose. The donation to the Mechanics'
Art School is raised from $300,000 to:
$540,000. The gift to his son is raised
to $150,000, and for himself he gives up
the lien of $25,000 annually addtakes a
gross sum f $500,000. The estate be-
comes immediately available for bene-
ficiary purposes.' Mr. Lick will be one
of the trustees himself, and others will
be announced shortly. Most of the
beneficiaries have given their assent to
the new arrangements, and qno dqbt is
entertained as to the acquiesene 6C,
those not yet heard from. '"


that he did not believe he had reached
the extreme depth of the basin. What
is most remarkable about this Spring is,
that it spouts irregularly, and, to use a
vugar expression by "fits and starts."
The results obtained Were the following:
Pirst, in what is supposed to be the
regular basin of the Spring, clean ma-
rine shells, with little pebbles, the latter
evidently not marine, There were also
obtained 3 other substances I one a kind
of gray clay; another a tlay p-pefeetly
bright yellow; and a third, a mud as
black.as it is possible for anything iii
Nature to be. Within the whirlpool, the
water was of a blue black color, btf(
perfectly transparent; while the line of
Sdemarkation between the waters of the
Springs and the ocean around were as
well defined as if drawn by a pencil.
To reiterate, the waters of the Spring,- a
blue black; that of the ocean, sea green.
The Captain moreover informed us that
Sthe appearance of the Spring was never
Alike on any two occassions on which he
r had visited it. He had laid with his
Vessel in the basin, at times, and for
some time had seen no appearance of
the Spring; when it would suddenly
well out, with bright yellow water, and
then as quickly disappear. At times,
the smell of sulphur and sulphuretted
t hydrogeu.was..so strong that it could be
Sperceived some distance before reaching
the Spring. The specimen of the water
Which we obtained was salt, but not
Like sea-water; it resembles the water
Sof the Congress Spring, Saratoga, but
Much more active and more pleasant in
its operation. Its density, compared
with sea-water, is: sea-water 10.30-
* Spring water 10.23.2.
A large turtle, of the species called
Loggerheads, is constantly-found swim-
ming about in the circle of.the Spring,
Sand we noticed large fish plunging
around the edge. One, which sprang
clear out of the water, was a bass, about
4 feet long. There is excellent fishing
around the Spring; large trout, whiting,
black fish, bazugas, and other fine fish
bite rapidly.
The specimen of the water which we
tested medicinally, using the same doses
as Congress water, operated in about 3
hours, vesy generously, and without the
least unpleasant sensations.

International Copyright.
London, May 10.-A deputation of
authors waited on Mr. Disraeli to-day
to make representations, and obtain his
views in regard to international copy-
right. The deputation consisted of
MAessrs. Blauchard Jerrold, Tm Tay-
lor, Charles Reade, Charles Dickens, G.
A. Sala and Charles Mackto, Miss Brad-
don and- Mrs. Wood, and many other
well known literary persons. Mr. Ed-
Sward Jenkins, member of Parliament
for Dundee, and author of "Ginx's
Baby," addressed Mr. Disraeli on the
part of the depntation. He pointed to
L the appropriation and mutilation of the
works of British authors by tlhe book
publishers of the United States, and
asked if some remedy could not be found
Ifor the grievances.
Mr. Disraeli replied that the subject
had already come before the Govern-
ment on the question whether a revision
of the copyright law in regard to dramas
was desirable. The Government would
give the matter full attention and strive
to remove the annoyances and vexations
now existing, but it must have time to
consider what method to adopt. He
was of the opinion that a royal com-
mission would be better than coimmit-
tee of thel House of Commons, because
it would be more likely to be well ac-
quainted with the suliject.

Charlotte Cushman.
In Boston, a[ the Globe Theatre, on
Saturday evening, Miss Cushman ended
her career as actress, and formnailly re-
tired from the stage. The icoca-sion
was, of course, one ot great aid sad in-
terest, and it was appropriately conm-
menmorated by the presentation of a
parting gift to Miss Cushman, upon the
stage arid in presence of a large andi
brilliant audience. Mr. Curtis Guild
delivered an address on behalf of Miss.
Cushman's friends. In her reply Miss
Cushman said: "It has been implied, it
not d cared, and very often repeat-
ed in the newspapers throughout the
country, that I should not have appear-
ed upon the stage again after the great
ovation which was paid to me in New
York. At least so the gentlemen of the
press decided; and many comments
have been made upon me in their papers
derogatory to my (hignity as a woman
and my position as an artist. I Jiave
passed on in the even tenor of mv way,
little regarding on my own account
these would-be censors and judges; but
it seems to me proper that I should ex-
plain to you, in whose esteem I have a
long-vested interest which must not be
endangered without a strong and earn-
est protest on my part, that if my last
engagement in New York was announc-
ed as my farewell to the stage, it was
done by no act or will or word of mine."

THE HUSBAND OF IDA GitEELEY.-
Colonel Smith is generally rated in Kan-
sas as the handsmest man in the Unit-
ed States- He resembles Edwin Booth,
and has often teen taken fol the great
actor, but upon close inspection is al-
ways conceded to be the better looking
man. He was born and brought up in
Shelbyville, Kentucky, and graduated
with high honors at Cambridge. His
first wife was the beautiful and gifted
Miss Lou Pope, a belle of Louisville.


... '__.....- ..' r Slllill


_I


I do not only read abotit, but I have be-
fore my eyes; the beautiful country
wtete my age and deiicmte state of
health Will never allow me to come.
How ebarthing if it could have been done
next year, to the g'f'eat feast; but this is
quite out of the question. I have, how-
ever, reached a greater happiness than
millions of Other&s My 70th bii'th day
was a dayrof-sunshine.and bliss--from
Smy native country and from abroad, far
away, came beautiful gifts, letters and" '
telegrams and the charming present from
i America arrived; .:..

General News. .
Joliet, Ill., May 18.--The iron rail
mills of tie Juliet Iron and Steel Works .
were started yesterday morning. Ithas -
been idle for eighteen months, and it's
resumption will employ four hundred
i men. The blast-furnace will be 'started
so o n .- "- -, .' ,'
New York, May. 19,-Winm. Butler,
Duncan has been made President and
SReceiver of the Mobile and Ohio rail-
f road to represent the New York-'and
foreign: stock and- bond-holders. The"'
Line is five hundred and seventeen miles
long and is represented by '10,839,00 ...
bonded debt and $4,466,000 capital
slo ck : -* r," -*" ..5.=-,:- ._-.. -/ -::-;.
SDetroit Mieh., May 19.--eport frao, :j
fifty points in, Michigan indicate that
I'ully a three-fourths average wheat crop
will 'be gathered-despite tie discourag-:-.
ing prospect of a month ago. All the
fruits promise well, except peaches,
which are nearly a total failure. ..*
Zanesville, Ohio, May 17.-About 8
o'clock last night Alonzo Jaekson and-'
Albert Smith, with both their wives and .
two children each, went over the. dam
in. a skiff, drowning both women and
onechildofJackson's and oneof Smith's.
It is said that the men w-ere under the .
influence of liquor, and could not man- .
age the boat. .: '
Lowell, May 17.-The manulacturin. j-
companies of this city report that one
hundred and forty-seven of the two hun-
dred and twenty-five mills are i'unniing'.
on full time. They also say that quite
a number of the section hands, or third ...
hands, sent out are anxious to return to --
work, and several of them will return---i
on Monday. .
Frauds.-The New York Postmaster
hais sent to the dead letter office between
700 and 800 letters addressed to J.
Thompson Hanna -& Co.,- a pack of .
swindlers, who advertise a sewing m-a-'
chine for twenty dollars. Newspapers
publishing their advertisement would do6 '
well to drop it, as well as the "ads" of
Drs. Burt and Price. :
Washington, May 19.--By direction
of Director of the Mint the coinage of.
the new twenty-cent silver piece was .
commenced at the Philiadelphia mint-'"
to-day, and dies for the same piece will .
be sent to'the Carson. City and San :
Francisceo mints to-day, and the coinage "
at those mints will be comni-enced ini- :
mediately on the reception-of the dies.
Three Prussian officers dressed in cit-
izen's clothes, appeared0i on horseback a'=.
few weeks ago in the neighborhood of
Rh(ims, pieci-ely at ai point where the
French engineer propose to erect a-.
strong fort. They informed the peas-
ants round about that they were native
engineers on a mission of inslpeetion. '
After taking notes they rode quieily
nack to Metz, not very fair off. This
bold raidl angered the peasants, andV
they protest that they will keep a sharp-
er lookout for the next Prussian inva-
sion. :
The American Rifle Team, says th'e
New York Herald, has at length been
selected tir the. coming international-
contest in Ireland. The successful cii.:' -
didates are Major Hlenry Fulton,-Colon- '"
el John Bodine, Colonel H. A. Gilder-
sleeve, General T. S. Dakin, G. W.
Yake and L. L. Hepburn, thIe reserves
being Messrs. Coleman, Canfield, Jr.,
and Jewell. The Irishmen will have to -
look to their laurels when they 'meet
such a band of experienced marksmen ..-
The leading ironmaster of Pittsbuig,
Mr. William Burns, in company wirti
Colonel Killebrew, has been minvesiig4-
ing the mineral deposits of Tennessee.
The Chattanooga Commercial says that
he went .north predicting that Tennes-.
see will become the leading iron State '
of the country. The Commercial neg-
lects to state that this opinion was form-
ed without an inspection of the iron dis-
tricts of Georgia and Alabama. Taeru -
is imron enough in any one of, the three
States to supply the whole world. A
Washington, D. C., May 10.-The
heaviest blow ever struck at the whiskky
ring of the country tfll upon it to-day
with telling effect. Over thirty promi-
nent distilleries and rectifying houses
have been seized at St. Louis, Chicago.
and Milwaukee, and a mass of uniu- "'-
peachable evidence has been collected,
which will insure the'downfall, iof the
strongholds of the ring at the East,.
West and South. The result reached'
has been attained atri't nearly nine
weeks' work performed by theSecretary ."
of the Treasury; no other officers of the
department, not even in the Secretary's ;
office, being intrusted with the secret.-
Special to the St..Louis Dem .. .
New York, May 17.-The pews in Dr..
Hall's new million-dollar Presbyterian .-
church were' sold to-night on a piaii"
that is believed to be unique. ,Everyi
pew in the building has a price set upon..
it, the values running from $300 to $6,-
000 each, and in addition to that fixed
,price is to be added the bonus on choice
seats received at the auction, whIch on


--- 1.


Moving to Leavenworth, he emancipated
his slaves and paid their fare to Kansas,
where he figured as a strong anti-slave-
ry man and devoted friend of Jim Lane.
Since the loss of his wife and children,
he has resided with his widowed sister,
Mrs. H. P. Johnson, formerly postmis-
tress of Leaven worth. Hl isa lawyer of
culture and considerable literary talent,
but we believe his connection with pub-
lie affairs may be summed uip in -the
statement that hie was once nominated
by Mr Lincoln as minister to Greece,
served a few years in the army, at the
close of the war made some reputation
as a stump speaker in Kana",; aid is
now understood at home to be thot eon-
tributor of acceptable articles to several:
prominent magazines, and a strong Lib-
eral, if not a Democrat, in politics.-
Kansas Paper.

Hans Christian Anderssen, thebJ~didsj
taletellerr," as he calls .himself, writes
to Whitelaw Reed, and acknowledges
the "Picturesque America" and the
money gift by the children, which 'were
sent him for a Christmas offering, but
which reached him later, anO on his
70th birth day. We quote a passage
from Mr. Anderssen's touching letter:
I rejoice at this giftf, the dearest that
could be granted to me, from the pow-
erful country where I am happy to have
so many friends young and old. Now,


9










THE NEW SOUTH: WEEKLY. JACKSONVILLE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 26, 1875.


U~


CITY NEWS.


S6fhe Busifitsh.
Mt't Geo. M. Smith. of the firm of
Smith Norton & CO.', took orders for
$3,000 Worth of their peculiar merchan-
dise While at the,- Nassau County Fair.
We call that a pretty fair day's work.
But then Geo. M. is Just the man to do
such a thing.

Burned to Death.
On Friday last Mrs. Frank Ely was so
severely burned by the explosion of an
alcohol lamp, that she died on Satur-
day evening about 11 o'clock. She
had her infant in her arms at the time
of the accident and it was also badly
burned, but it is likely to survive its
injuries.

Death of Mr. Heiser.
We were a good deal surprised at the
sudden death of this gentlemen, of
whose illness we had had no intimation.
We hadt been. acquainted with him ever
since he came here to reside, and always
found him a quiet, amiable gentlemen
and a christian. He leaves a large cir-
cle of friends to greive for his loss.

Heavy Gale.
The stamer North Point on her last
trip to New York encountered the gale
of the 12th, 13rh and 14th, and for 72
hours fought her way gallantly on her
course. The officers say it was the
worst storm they ever experienced at
this time of the year. She was delayed
two days by the gale.


The Circulating Library.
If there is any establishment in this
city which has been productive of more
general satisfaction to the entire com-
munity than Messrs. Carruth & Kel-
logg's well selected library, we are at a
loss to name it. The books are admira-
bly selected, terms of subscription very
reasonable, and the amount of enjoy-
ment derived therefrom really incalcu-
lable. Success to it now and ever.-
Press 21st inst.

SSteam Ferry.


Gov. Reed lihas secured the handy lit-
tle steam yacht Daisy, and will have her
run as a ferry boat between the city and
the various points on the other side.
The Daisy will leave the city for Ar-
lingtton at 7 and 11 o'clock a. min., and 4
o'clock p. ni; and for Phillips' Point at-
9 a m., and 1 and 6 p. m. Returning,
will leave Arlington at 8 and 12 a. m ,
and 5 o'clock p. mu ; leave Phillps' Point
at 10 o'clock a. in., and 2 and 7 p. m.
Will touch at Reed's Landitg and all
ether wharves between the above points
bolh ways.
-*-

Strwberry Festival..
The pleasant entertainment, devised
by the ladies of the Ocean streetPresby-
terian Church, which took place on last
Friday cveeiag, was a very creditable
affair. r4aite a handsome sum was
realized'whiibh will be used in the ptur-
chase of new singing books tor the Sun-
day school. We think that impromptu
.ectertainimeniits like this always yield a
larger share of saiisfaction to the guests
4n4, ajuict greater profit to the bene-
ficiaries, 't(hian those involving a greater
;amount of labor, expense and a corres-
ponding.degree of forimaity.

A New Lite3ry Society.
A few individuals desirous of provid-
ing a rational and instructive weans ot
social enjoyment have associated them-
selves together under the ,tame the
Filedida Association. Their object em-
braces readings, recitations, essays, lec-
tures, and conversation. The organiza-
tion was completed last Thursday even-
ing, and we are pleased to announce
that it starts off with every indication of
a vital force calculated to insure a long
life and future usefulness.
The officers for the coming year are
President, Hon. E. M. Randall; Vice-
Presdent, Prof. M. T. Swaim; Secre-
tary, Dr. Neil Mitchell; Treasurer, E.
Q. Norton; Executtive Committee, Hion.
A. A. Knight, Geo. E. Schnabel, and
E. Q. Norton.


Something About Cranes.
The street sights in and atout our little
city may not be quite as extensive as
those found in the larger cities of the
North but in a variety of cases they will
be found quite as interesting. Take for
example the two graceful blue cranes
promenading our streets. See how
closely they inspect every passer by as
though they were considering whether
it were worth while to form his acquaint-
ance; notice with what eagerness they
thrust their queer beaks into every bit
of fruit they may find near the sidewalk,
and then observe ho* easily they
saunter onward with a quiet, aristo-
cratic sort of dignity really hard to
describe. One would imagine front
a glance at their long, graceful necks,
that natural timidity was or should be
their prevailing trait: on the contrary,
they arc ready to do battle at any mo-
ment with anything or anybody they do
not happen to fancy; when excited, a
shrill scream escapes them that may be
heard the whole length of the street. If
they desire a nice. quiet, resting place
they very slowly draw up one foot under
the body, and stand upon the other for
hours at a time, seeming to all appear-
ance more than delighted with this ex-
traordinary and what would seem to be
a very uncomfortable position. If in a
playful humor, which is sometimes
the case, they will amuse themselves
by walking up slowly by the side of a
companion, pausing for a single instant,
and then deliberately jumping over him,
a compliment that is promply returned
in like manner a second afterwards
by the other. Whether this is consid-
ered a mere professional courtesy is an
open question.
These cranes are quite easily domes-
ticated, and make themselves perfectly
at home wherever they may chance to
be. Sometimes they seem really in-
spired with what Sut Lovegood was
wont to call a spirit oft naturall cussed-
ness." We have seen one of them
deliberately walk across the street to a
spot where children were playing mar-
bles, and coolly kick every marble out
of the way in every direction and then,
as he quietly walked away, screech out
loud enough to disturb the whole neigh-
borhood around, as though he felt hlie had
done a very smart thing, and wished
everybody else to agree with him.

In Short.
-The Rockaway has avera.arcd nearly
one excursion a day lately, and still the
end is not yet.
-Thtre have been an unusually large
number of schooners in port during the
past week. They bring, in most cases,
lull cargoes ot merchandize for this city
and the interior.
-Mr. Joseph IIernandlez, a young
man lately in the employ of Mr. Dob-
bins, gunsmrith, has opened a shop of
bis own in tihe wooden building on Bay
street opposite Mitchell's brick building.
-Those of our gardeners who under-
stand the secret of producing early and
well grow vegetables are now receiv-
ing o'ood returns from their commission
C) 'D
nmerchli:ants.
-The distinguished guests of our
Unicle Samuel should be well pleased
with the reception accorded them by our
citizens. Though informal itwasnumer-
ous enough t'i gratify-for we all de-
sired to see such mighty warriors.
-When writing an article for the press,
Whether prose or verse, just try
To utter your thoughts in the fewest words,
And let them be cri-p and dry ;
And when lt i" finished, and you suppose
It is done exactly brown,
Jaistlook it over again and then
Boil it down.
-The Encyclopedia Britannica says:
''If the natural resources of America were
fully developed it would afford suste-
nance to 3,600,000,000 inhabitants, a
number nearly five times as great as the
entire mass of human beings now exist-
ing on the globe, and what is even
more surprising, it is not improbable
that this prodigious population will be
in existence within three or four centu-
ries." This being the case, we advise
every one to secure a homestead in
Florida before the State becomes over-
crowded.


A. 61C. .Ll -- b --

The State Prisoners State News.
Onr y morning the train brought The Cedar Keys Journal says: Mag-
r m nIrnolia the new station on the A. G. & W.
among~other passengers, the prisoners I. T. Co., R. R., 18 miles from Cedar
for whom the old fort at St. Augustine Keys bids fair to become a point of con-
has been put in readiness-the Indians siderable importance, very soon, as it is
in the heart of the Gulf haniniock.
who participated in, some of the more Lttge shipments of veetables will be
r r .Large shipments of vegetables will be
flagrant border outrages in our Western made from there this season by Messrs.
territories. In all there were 73 souls W. H. Batty and B. A. Coachman.
-70 warriors, two squaws and a girl A remarkable incident happened on
about 13 years old, daughter of one of Atsena Otie, one day last week. Mrs.
the chiefs. They had the usual dirty-look Crevasse and elderly lady, while in her
so familiar to every frontiersman, but palor, had a beautiful bird of a deep
so familiar to everyblue color and the size of a pigeon to
were all stalwart fellows, with a large light on her right shoulder, and peek
reserve of latent deviltry. There were heron the ear. It rather frightened Mrs.
representatives from the Camnanchies, C. anti she blushed it off, but it appear.
Kioww, Arapahos, and Cheyennes. As ed to lie perfectly tame, and one of the
Misses Crevasse picked it up and put it in
a whole, they were not a badlooking a ctge, and kept it finor several days, hut
lot--or Indians. The party were in failing to discover any thing it would
chargE ,f ILt. Pratt, of the 10th U. S. eat, she turn d it loose. We l-ariin trom
SCava y / Wo has 1 escorted them from a friend that a species of bird answering
Cava o has esortedthem to the description, is very common be-
the far West to the extreme South. We tween here and Cuba, and the suppotsi-
doubt if a more complete punishment tion is, this one was chased by some
could have been meted out to these other bird.-Cedar Keys Journal.
savages than the transporting them to The Cedar Keys Journal gives the
so greAt a distance from their hunting names of the group ofislands eoimposing
tthe Cedar Keys, as furnish by an old
grounds. When they return, we hope resident: The islanil on which is situat-
it may be with a disposition to respect ed the R. R. depot, is called Way Key,
their G-at Father's commando. from its having been the location of
the U. S. Marine Railway during
the Indian war; the name of tht
-The Postmoster General has closed town on this Key is Cedar Key;
a contryet with Capt. James McKay, the name of Key on which is situated
Sr. of Tampa, for the carriage of a Faber's cedar mill, is Depot Key, given
--, it by the U. S. officers, in Indian war,
weekly mail by steamer from Cedar ro itsbeing the depot of supplies fii
Keys to Tampa, Punta Rassa, Manatee a part of the army; the name of the
4nd Key West. i town on this Key, is Atsena Otie. De.


pot Kev, Way Kev; Sea Horse Key,
Snake key, North Key, Scale Key, antd
others, are properly called Cedar Keys.
The Madison Recorder says: We
learn that Mr. B. R. Drew, with one
hand and one mule, cultivated a farm
last year with following result: One
hundred anid twenty bushels of corn;
twelve bales of cotton ; seven barrels of
sugar; sik hundred bushels of sweet
potatoes; tour stacks of fodder', and
grounds peas sufficient to fatten hogs,
which yield him four thousand pounds
of pork. That mule "diew putty well."
Ocala has had a mysterious lynching
affair, to wit;
THE KILLING OF IETER SNELL.-Our
town was thrown into quite a stale of
excitement on Wednesday morning by
the announcement that Peter Snell,
who had recently been committed to the
common jail of our county on a charge
.of rape, (an account of whi(.h was given
in our issue of April 24th,) had been
murdered in his cell the previous night.
An inquest was immediately held over
his body by a jury composed of six white
and six colored men, and the verdict
was that the deceased was murdered by
some person or persons unknown.
Upon examination ot the body, which
was lying in the dungeon, it was dis-
covered that his head was completely
fractured, exposing to view his brains,
which were protruding, evidently
showing that the di'ed was executed by
ax, hatchet or some other cleaving tool.
The only evidence lett .y the party who
committed this unfortunate deed, was a
stout rope, securely fastened around his
neck, which goes to show that their first
intention was to hang him.
The jurywas very rigid in their ex-
amination. Not only the keeper but all
of the prisoners were brought before
them and subjected to a close and search-
ing examination, but they could give no
clue to the party or their number.
In the absence of the Sheriff his store
was broken into and the jail keys taken
possession of and the entrance to the
jail was thereby effected. lie is now
using his utmost diligence to ferret out
the perpc trators of the offence, but up
to this time he has been unable to dis-
cover any clue to it whatever.-Banner.
EARLY VEGETABLES.-In the early
shipment of vegetables we think Marion
county is in the van of all others. Other
counties may brag of what they can do,
but what they have done and are doing,
according to the rose-tinted accounts
which ate being made in various papers
throughout the State, are still behind us
in this line of agriculture. As early as
the middle of April, Mr. A. L. Eichel-
berger, one of the most thoroughly
energetic men in the State, made a ship-
ment of cucumbers and tomatoes, lie
shipped Irish potatoes and snap-beans
nearly all through the winter. On the
3d of May he shipped two crates of eu-
cumbers, two crates of tomatoes, two
crates of snap-beans and tur harrels of
Irish potatoes. On the 10th of May he
shipped one hundred anti twenty-five
dozens ot ears of corn, three crates of
cucumbers artd two barrels of potatoes,
and on next Saturday he will ship three
hundred dozen ears of corn and other
vegetables in proportion.
We visited his ploce last Sunday and
we teasted on ripe cantelopes. If any
county in the State can beat this, let
them step to the front and speak out.-
Ocala Banner.

Philhdtlphia. May 17.-The jury in
the (Gertli,-mann case came into court at
12 o'clock and stated that they could not
agree, and were discharged.. This is a
case of a late Catholic priest, who mar-
ried and was indicted for the embezzle-
mnent of funds.
Toronto, Ontario, M.ty 15.-Out of
thirty or forty Election trials that have
taken phc throntighout Ontario, nearly
all sitting ikiilicrs oft both p)olitital par-
tics have been unseated. Ab:)ut twenty-
five or thirty of their trials are yet to
take place.

TO THE PUBLIC.
On and after the 2oth inst all papers and periodicals
formerly supplied by E. B. Kellogg will be supplied by
Philip Walter, two doors west of the Post Office
Contracts by subscription made v.'ih said Kellogg will
be completed by said Walter, until further notice.
E. B. KELLOGG, News Agent.

TWENTY-FIVE OLD PIANOS WANTED
in exchange for new ones, at SMITH, NORTON & Co's.

CALL AT
Smith, Norton & Co's., and see their $6o Organs.
5-12 tf.

INK, INK, P*.fNS, PENS.
Pencils, Pen-Holtcrs., tncils, at Smith, Norton
& Co's. 5 12 tf.

THE PARENTS
Of all well regulated families purchase their groceries of
Rich, Polk's Block, Bay street. 1c.21t f

WANTED:
Six good, active white boys. Apply to the under-
signed, East Jaoksonsilie, next door to F. Canepa's
store.
W. A YOUNG

MORE NEW AND BEAUTIFUL SHEET MUSIC.
Messrs. Smith, Norton & Co.. seem determined to
keep up with the times, so far as Musical Merchan
dise may be concerned, and have just received at their
elegant store in Mitchell's block, on Bay Street, a
magnificent stock of fine musical geni.,, recently pub-
lished, that cannot fail to elicit the admiration of every
lady performer upon the piano-forte in this city.
5-t2 tf.
AN EXCELLENT HOMESTEAD FOR SALE.
I offer my homestead with, if desired, two, three or
four acres of adjoining land, the whole now set with the


best seedling oranges, the only reason for selling being
a pecuniary inability to improve the place as it deserves.
Forty or fifty of the orange trees will undoubtedly bear
in the coming season. The whole place offers the best
chance in the vicinity of Jacksonville for a first-class
hotel with spacious grounds, or for a circle of friends
who wish to live in vicinity, as the grounds will easily
admit of sub-division into three or four private resi-
dences, in a wholesome and every way drsirable locality.
J. S. ADAMS.
SOLON ROBINSON,
In his address delivered at the late meeting of the
Florida Fruit Growers' Association, says : In all that
makes life desirable, florida is not only the feer,
but the superior, of any tf the Slates of the Great
West." The proceedings of the Fruit Growers' Asso
ciation are now being published in the Florida Agri.
cul urist. Copies for sale at the office, Ocean street,
two doors from Bay. Address
CHAS. H WALTON & Co., Jacksonville, Fla
A Send to cents for a specimen copy.

ONLY CALL,
as others have done, and be convinced that Cheaper
Bargains can be obtained, and with gi eater satisfaction.
SPolite and attentive salesmen to wait upon every one
great and small, at THE GREAT SOUTHERN BAZAAR.
11-14 tf
BUY BOOTS WITH
A. K. PERCIVAL'S stamp upon them. They are supe
rior to all others. o-3ztf
SSTUPENDOUS SACRIFICES
Daily, hourly and momentarily disposed of at th<


Ir-l4tf


GREAT SOUTHERN BAZAAR.


NOTICE.
BL'CKV will pledge to se!l Clothing, Gentlemen's Un-
derwear, Blankets, Overcoats. Cloaks, Talmas, Cover-
lets, Tranksi Valises, Silk and Fur Hats, and myriads
of other articles too numerous to fiention at very low


prices.


OI-I4tf


MUSICAL-PHILIP MILFORD
Of England will give lessons on the Piano, Organ,
Cloronet, Flute and all Brass and Stringed Instru-
ments. Terms (I5 per quarter of 24 lessons. Apply
at Smith, Norton & Co's., Music Store; or address P.
0. Box tog 5-12 tf.
BUILDERS AND CONTRACTORS
WVill find a complete assortment of lumber, dressed
and undressed, mouldings, slilingls, etC.. at the Depot
Lumber Yard. Orders to be delivered at landingsg ol
the Rivet retelve especial attention,
Address Lotis J, BRiUSit.

METEOROLOGICAL RECORD.
Observations taken at 7 A. Mt 2 M.and9 P. M.
daily, by the Signal Service U. S, Army, in this city.


a 0
April 0

1875. 5

Tues 2pm 30 i6
9 P m 30.17
Wed. 7 a mI 30.25
2pm 3023
9 p m 30.22
Thur 7am 30 30
2pm 30.24
S 9 P m 30,20
Fri. 7 a m 30 17
2 pm 30,11
9 P m 3o.05
Sat 7 a m 29"99
2p" pm 29.96
S9 pm 29.91
Sun. 7am 29.84
S2 pm 29 8t
9 p m 29.85
Mon. 7am 2).87
2pm 29 84
9pm 29."4
Tues. 7 a m 29.84


a-
73



ga
64
67
Ba
69
73
8o
75
78
70
7'
74
71
73
8o
74
71
68






77
72


a
la
'5
42
68
64
38
6o
63
40
64
56
46
71
90
9
90
9
74
8t
90
58
76
al


Wind.
9 "2
0 0
n

NE Fresh
S E Gentle
calm
SW Gentle
S Fresh
SE Fresh
E Fresh
E Gentle
NE tLigat
NE Fresh
NE Gentle
E Fresh
E Fresh
NE Fresh
NE Gentle
S Light
E Gentle
NW Fresh
NW Fresh
NW Light
SW Fresh


i3


"D.O
t



0.00
0 0
O.OO

0 00
o 00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.02
0.52
oo6
o.13
0.02
1.04
o 00

000
0 00
0.00
0.14


n


Clear
Cle:r
Clear
Fair
Clear
Fair
Fair
Fair
Fair
Fair
Lt rn
Lt rn
Lt rn
CI'dy
Fair
CI'dy
CI', fl
F'res
Clear
Fair


Barometer corre cted lor temperature and elevation


PIRST NATIONAL BANK


/L OF FLORIDA.
JACKSONVILLE.
T.e only National Bank in operation in the Stale.

Exchange on Savannah and New York sold, and Ex-
change on all Northern points bought,
AT CURRENT RATES.

DIRE CTORS AND STOCAKIOLDERS:
Foreign, l Home,
JOHN CLARK, Esq..
tion. F. E. SPINNER, V. A McLEAN, Esq.,
PHILO REMiNGTON, Esq., C. A. FAIRCHILD, Esq.,
SAM'L REMINGTON, Esq., DAMON GR KENLaAF, Esq.,
W. C. SQUtRES, Isq., W. M. Bos-TwicK, Esq.
September 26, 1874. -I-4-Iy


NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.


ALLIGATOR STEAM SAW AND
PLANNING MILLS.
Has constantly on hand and for sale at lcw prices
rough lumber cut in dimensions to suit builders
Planed lumber of every grade and description in quan-
tities to suit customers. Turned work of every fid
all descriptions. Scroll work of any pattern. Pailings,
Lath, Mouldings and all other wood material required
tor builir.g and furnishing purposes. Satisfaction in
workmanship and material guaranteed. Call before
purchasing elsewhere or send for price list.
ALEXANDER WAI.LACE.
5 26-tf.
S TEAM FERRY.

The Steam Yacht DAISY will, until further notice,
run between Jacksonville and the South Side of the
river, as foiiows : leave the city for Arlington at 7 and
i o'clock a. in., and 4 o'clock p. m.; and for Philips'
Point at 9 a. mn., and i and 6 p. m. Returning, will
leave Arligh it 8 and i2 a. m., and 5 o'clock p. m ;
leave Phiip- Point at o10 o'clock ,a. mn., and 2 and 7
p. m., toucliig at Reed's Landing nd all other
wharves betweti thet above points, both ways.
The DAISY will a!so be for charter for moonlight
and Sunday excursions, at reasonable rates.
5 26 ix m.. AUBURN ERWIN.


PROPOSALS FOR DREDGING.
U S. ENGINtER'S OFFICE, 38 Church street,
MoBnI.F, ALA.. May 7. 1875.
Sealed proposals, in duplicate, for dredging i6.ooo
cubic yards more or less, through the b:,r at the month
ofth harb r of Cedar Keys, and in thie channel between
the bar and Cedar Keys, Fla., will be received at this
office until 12 o'clock, M. Saturday June 26. 1875; and
opened immediately thereafter.
A guarantee will be required, that within ten days
after notification of the award of the contract, contract
shall be entered into.
Printed blank forms of proposals and guarantee,
specifications, instructions to bidders, and any desired
information, can hbe had on application to this office.
A. N. DAMREI.L.


5z64







s H C


2


'.5-,

t)

a)


*
7W' C
















-e



U,

i's


'I








r


POST-OFFICE NOTICE.
ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE OF


a0


MAILS.


ARRIVE. CLOSE.
Northern and Western, daily, 9:00 A. M. 3:30 P. M.
Fernandina and Florida Rail-
road, daily................ ...... 9:00 A. M. 3:30 P. I.
Saint Augustine and Palatka,
daily, (Sundays excepted)... 4:00oo P. M. 8:00 A.M.
Key West, arrives every Mon-
day................................ 9:oo A. M.
closes every Monday and
Thursday........................... 3"30 .- Mt
Enterprise. Melonville, Hali-
fax and Indian river arrives
TuesdayThursday and Sat-
urday 4:J P. .M-
Enterprise, Melonvilie, Hali-
fax and Indian river rail,
leaves on Monday. Wednes-
day and Friday........... ...... 8:00oo A. It.
Fort George, and Mayport
arrives TIuesday and friday 4:00 F. M.
leaves Wednesday and Sat-
urday................................ 8:oo A. iM .
St. Nicholas........................ 10:00o A. M. 10xo:oo00 A. iM.
OFFICE HOURS.
The post-office will be open daily (Sundays excepted)
from 8 A. M to 6:30 P-. M.
The office will be open on Sundays from 12 to x:3o
o'clock p. m.
The general and box deliveries will be open at all
times during the regular hours, except when the mails
received are being distributed.
MONEY ORDER OFFICE.
The money order office will be open from 9 A. M. to
1:30 P. M. and from 3 to 4 P. Mt.
Money order; are issued at this office payable in any
part of the Un.-td States, and also orders payable in
Great Britain, switzerland and Germany.
The follow o, are the rates of commission:
DOMESTIC MONEY ORDERS.
On orders not exceeding O10, 5 cents.
Over $1o and not exc,'eding $o20, 1o cents.
Over $so and not exceeding $30, 15 cents.
Over $30 and not exceeding $40, so cents.
Over $40 and not exceeding $50, 25 cents.
FOREIGN MONEY ORDERS.
On orders not exceeding $io, 35 cents.
Over Sto and not exceeding $so20, 5o cents.
Over $2o and not exceeding $30, 75 cents.
Over $30 and not exceeding $40, $s.oo.
Over $40 and not exceeding $50, $ 125.
J. S. ADAMS, Postmaster.
Jacksonville, May 1, 1875.


r- Per Day at home. Toenrs ree.
5 2 V c Portland, Mahie.


STfAftlRS.


CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA
STEAM PACKET CO,


CHANGE OF SCHEDULE.
THE STEAMER DICTATOR,
CAPTAIN LEO VOGEL,
Will leave Charleston every Tuesday evening and Sav-
annalh every Wednesday, for Fernandina, Jacksonville,
Palatl. and interMlediate landings.
RETURNING:
Leave Palatka every Tlhtrsday evening, Jacksonville
every Friday morning to suit the tide. Fernandina
same day, arriving at Savannah aid Charleston every
Saturday.
Through bills of lading given to Baltimore, Philadel-
phia, New York and other points.
T e Dictalor will connect with New York Steam-
ships every Saturday, both at Savannah and Charles-
ton. Connection is also made with the St. Johns Rail-
road at Tocoi, and at Palatka with steamers for the
Upper St. Johns and the Ocklawaha river.
AGENTS.
RAVENEL & CO. Charleston.
BRAINARD & ROBINSON, Savannah.
JEFFREYS, BRO & SON, Fernandina.
JEFFREYS & BRO0., Jacksonville.
R. J. ADAMS, Palatka.
C. H. BOHN, St. Augustine.
10-21 tf


TEW YORK AND


FERNANDINA
STEAMSHIP LINE.



FERNANDINA, FLA., October z, 1874.
NORTH POINT,
Capt. SMITH.


LEO,
Capt. DANIELS,
CAN ACCOMMODATE FIFTY
CLASS PASSENGERS.


FIRST-


These steamers sail from New York, Pier 2, North
River, every Thursday, and from Fernandina Railroad
Wharf every
WEDNESDAY.
MOTGOMERY,
Capt. FAIRCLOTH,
Will leave New York on the x3th and Fernandina
on the x9th.
For freight or passage apply to
HERMI. GELPCKE, Agent,
5 Williams st., New York.
P. McQUAID, Agent,
Polk's Block, Bay St., Jacksonville.
Or W. J. WOODWARD,
Representing CHATER & KING, Agents,
10.10o sw tf Fernandina. Florida.


RAILROADS.

TACKSONVILLE, PENSACOLA AND
MOBILE RAILROAD CO.
GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE, "
TALLAIHASSEE, December 19, 1874.
On and after SUNDAY, DEC. 2o, 1874, Passen-
ger trains on this road will run as follows:
DAY PASSENGER, Daily. Sunday excepted.
A. M. A.M.
ILeave Jacksonville... 7.40 Leave Sav nnah...... 8.oo
SlBaldwin......... 8.5o Chattaho,-chee 6.5o
Lake City......5o.50 Quincy........ 8.30
P.M. 1 Taliahassee.... 10 30
Live Oak..... 12 35 P. M.
SMadison ...... .25 Madison......... 2.25
STallahassee ... 6.30 Live Oak....... 4.30
Quincy ......... 8i.zo Lake City...... 6.oo
Arrive Chattahoochcc 9.50 Baldwin.......... 8.1o
Savannah ...... 9.x5 Arrive Jacksonvilc..... 9.t15
Passengers can go through to St. Marks Mondays-
Weldnesdays and Fridays, and return Tuesdays, 1hurs,
days and Saturdays.
NIGHT EXPRESS, Daily.
P. M. P. M.
Leave Jacksonville... 4.oo00 Leave Savannah...... 4.00
Baldwin........ 5.551 A. M.
Lake City..... 8.32 Live Oak...... 3.00
Arrive Live Oak.... io.<"o Lake City. 4.33
A. Mt Baldwin........ 7.45
SSavnnaah...... 8.5oArrivc Jacksonville... 9.o10
NOTE-A Special Train will leave Tallahassee Sat
urdays at 3.40 pi m., arriving at Live Oak 9.35 p. m.,
connecting with Savannah T'rain. Returnin, leave
Live Oak 3 a. m., arriving at Tallahassee at 8. 5o a. m.
ROBERT WALKER.
Receiver and Gen'l. Supt.
T. C. SPOONER, Master Transportation. 5-2

A G., & W. I. T. CO.'S RAILROAD.

FROM


FERNANDINA TO CEDAR KEYS
GOING SOUTH.
ARRIVE. LEAVE. ARRIVE. LEAVE.
Fernandina............ a. m...... 4 45...... a. mI ...... 4 45
Calalian ... .......... 6 25...... 6 3o0...... 6 25...... 6 30
Baldwin................. 7 40...... 9 .o ...... 7 40...... 9 00
Starke......... .........to 56......ix 02,...... o 26..... 10 o 31
G.inesville............12 5o0...... I o6...... It 56......T2 03
Archer......... ...... 2 20...... 2 27...... I 00o...... 1 05
l;ronson................. 3 05 ..... 3 22...... I 33...... I 39
Cd-r Keys........ 5 53...... p. m...... 3 33...... p. m.
GOING NORTH.
ARRIVE. LEAVE. ARRIVE. LEAVE
(',.."r Keys ........... a. mIn...... 8 15...... a. mIn......o10 30
P.ionson........ .......to 43......10 50......12 25 ......12 31
A: che.r............... 11 28..... I 11 35......1 2 58...... 30
G -inc 1!11......... ...12 54...... 1 14...... 1 57...... 2 04
.a.3.......... ....... 2 56 ...... 3 02...... 3 29...... 3 34
,. .w .. ............. 50..... 5 15...... 5 o0 ...... 5 15
C.!. .............. 6 35...... 6 42...... 6 35...... 6 42
t ori..,..: ........... 4...... p m...... 8 40...... p. m .
(CONNECTIONS.
At i.'L'''ANLlNA. w.th Steamer City Point from
C.u i -. ,vid Savannah, Mondays at 4 a. m.; steamer
Lic.or -i,:.i C.airleston and Savannah, Thursdays at
4 k m. 71 ;V!S steamer Lizzie Baker, from Savannah,
'r anic i d St Mary's, Mondays at 6 a. m ; for
6'.-oe poirt, on Fridays at 8 a. m.
At BALDWIN, with J P & M. R. R. from Tack-
sunville at 4:07 p. mn. : for Jacusonville at 9:0o2 a. m.
At GAINESVILLE, with tn-weekly stage line for
Tampa; with stage line for Newnansville, Tuesdays
and Fridays.
At CEDAR KEYS, with steamers to and from New
Orleans, every Saturday. With steamers from Key
West and Tampa, Fridays ; from these places. T'hurs-
days With Steamer Cool, from 'Tampa, Sundays: for
Tampa, Mondays. With Steamer Wawenock, from
Suwannee Fridays; for Suwannee, Tuesdays.
D. E. MAXWELL.
5"13 Superintendent.


"1'HE FLORIDA PHOTOGRAPH
AND


FERROTYPE GALLERY,
ATLANTIC BLOCK, BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE.

Is the only place in the State where every) branch of
the Art is Successfully Conducted. Open for business
from 1o A. M., until 5 P. M.

A. G. GRANT will attend to the taking of all
Photographs until further notice. Out-door Photo-
graph orders attended to as usual, on due notice being
given. 5 5 tf.


BUCKY takes the lead in the latest styles of Silk and
Fur Hats. 11.7tf


OAT BUILDING.


A. G. CIHAPPELL,
BAY STREET, near the Cable Crossing,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

YACHTS AND WHITEHALL
BOATS,
Built to order.
STEAM YACHTS
With the most approved machinery. Will build of
any size, from 25 to 1oo feet Call and get my uri-es.
NEW 28-FOOT YACHT


Ladies' underwear, to be obtained at BUCKY'S.


D R. P. E. JOHNSON, IIoslzOrATIUsT
Has removed his office to Mitchcl's new buildling,
north side of Bay street, between Ncwnan and Market
nearly opposite the Post Office. t-,,tf


GROCERIES AND


OHN CLARK,

FORWARD


PROVISIONS.


:DING


COMMISSION MERCHANT


AND DRALKa 1N
ROCERlEa. PROVISIONS,
HAY, SEGARS,
Sole Agents for Florida for


GRAIN.
&C.


Averill's Chemical Palma, and
White's Patent Money Drawer.
Agent for
STRAM*R LIZZIE BAKER.
VOLUSIA.
AND
Van Brunt & Bro's. Line Sailing Packets,
FROM NEW YORK.
tw36-192 Bay Street, Jacksonv ilt .FIot6ida.


Fine black dress coats and fancy neck wear at Bucky's.


WILI.SON & WHITLOCK.
Successors to Thos. A. Willson.
UEALCRS IN

GRAIN. FLOUR, AND FEED,
manufacturers of

CORN MEAL, HOMINY, CRACKED

CORN, RYE MEAL, GRAHAM

FLOUR. CRACKED WHEAT,&c.

SLROLL SAWING & WOOD TURNING
TO ORDER.

Wood Sawed, Split, and Delivered

by Cord or Load.

toss' Block, Bay Street, opposite our Mill and Whar
7ACKSONVILLsK. PFLA.
T. WVtlli 15-66 W. A. WHITLOCK


HE JACKSONVILLE


SALE AND I,IVERY


STABLES,

C. B. McCLENNY, PRorrpiroa.


LZOAL.


UNITED STATES MAIL,.


POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT
Washington. April 14, 1875.
Proposals will be received at the Contratet Office of
this Department un il 3 o'clockdt pm. of May 31st, 5875
(to be decided by jur.- 1o, i85, for t carrying the mails
of the United States ftom July t, 1875, to June 3,
1876 on the following routes in the State of Flordar
and by the schedule of departures and arrivals hereig
specified, viz:
Service 1875 to 1876.
16031 From Jasper to Ancrum. 14 miles and back, onc -
a week.
Leave Jasper Saturday at 8 a sk;
Arrive at Ancrum by 12 m ;
Leave Ancrum Saturday at i p ;
Arrive at Jasper by 5 p m.
Bond required with bid, $2oo.
x6040 From Bailey's Mills to Micosukee, is milis and
back once a week.
Leave Bailey's Mills Saturday at I p m;
Arrive at Miccosukee by 4 p m ;
Leave Miccosukee Saturday at 8 a m;
Arrive at Bailey's Mills by it a m.
Bond required withbid, $2So.
z6o6o From Freeport to Point Washington, tsail-
and back, once a week.
Leave Freeport Saturday at I p m;
Arrive at Point Washington by 4.30 p m;:
Leave Point Washington Saturday at s p i;
Arrive at Freeport by 8.3o p m.
Bond required with bid, 9200.
t6o65 From Saint Marks to Saint Theresa (n. o) 31
miles and back, three times a week, from July ist to
November x5, 1875, and from May z$ to June 30.
1876.
L76ieave Saint Mark's Tuesday, Thursday, and
Saturday at 7 a mn
Arrive at Saint 'liTeresa by 6 p m;
Leave at Saint Theresa Monday, Wednesday.,
and Friday at 7 am; ,
Arrive at Saint Marks by 6 p m.
BoWd required with bid, i6oo.
16o71 From Pilatka, by Woodland, tolwin, at mlse
and back. once a week.
Leave Pilatka Saturday at 6 a m:
Arrive at lwin by 12ta m;
Leave Iwin Saturday at z p-m;
Arrive at Pilatka by 7 p m.
Bond required with bid, $300.
i6o09 From Sanford to Lake Jessup, iA miles a"d
back, once a week.
Leave Sanford Saturday at 6 a m;
Arrive at Lake Jessup by 12 m;
Leave Lake Jessup Saturday at z p m;
Arrive at Sanford by 7 P m.i.
Bond required with bid. 4300.
1611o From Pensacola by Town Point (n. o.), to Mary
Esther. 45 miles and back, once a week.
Leave Pensacola Monday at 6 a m;
Arrive at Mary Esther Tuesday at 9 a m;
Leave Mary Esther next day by xo a m;
Arrive at Pensacola next day by i p m.
Bond requited with bid, $6oo.
For laws relating to the postal service, forms of pro-
posal, bond and certificate, and for instructions and
conditions to be embraced in the contract, see adver-
tisement of this date in pamphlet form, to be found at
the termini of each route, or by addressing the Second
Assistant Postmaster General.
Bids should be sent in sealed envelopes, superscribed
"Mail proposals, State of ," and ad-
dressed to the Second Assistant Postmaster General,
Washingtcn, D C. MARSHALL J I.WELL,
4-2i-ow Postmaster General.


Blankets and Coverlets of every size and quality a#
BUCKV'S.


HOTELS AND BOARDING HOUI.*,


Notice is given to the public that I have purchase'
the well-known HARTRIDGE STABLES, opposite 1M MANSION HOUSE.
the METROPOLITAN HOTEL, and have on hand


A VERY LARGE STOCK OF HORSES AND
MULES FOR SALE.

Those desiring to purchase will find it to their ad-
vantage to examine this unusually large and attractive
stock, adapted to all uses. I am also receiving

A COMPLETE OUTFIT OF

BUGGIES, PHOTONS, AND
OTHER CARRIAGES,
of the latest styles.
/
FOR LIVERY SERVICE,
which will be furnished
AT THE SHORTEST NOTICE,
and on the
MOST REASONABLE TERMS.

Mr. G. M. lIRITTAIN is my authorized Agent
and Manager, and will always be found at the Stables
ready to attend to all business appertaining to the es-
tablishment. C. B. Mi LENNY.
Sept. 16, 1872. 1-a2itf


Gentlemen's underwear at BUCKY'S.

M ASONI1L.
SOLOMON LODGE, NO. 20.
Regular meetings first and third Wednesdays in
each month.
GEO. W. JONES, W. M.
CHAS. G. ELLIOTT, Secretary.

Balmorals. Buistles, and Chignons, at BUCKY'S.


TS. SWAIM,


PRACTICAL JEWELLER
And W \TCHMAKER, late with J. J. Holland, has
taken a window in WALTER'S CIGAR STORE.
two doors west of the Post-office, where he is prepared
with a good stock of tools and material to do any kind
of work in his line.
Extra Fine Mounting of Florida
Curiosities

a specialty. Fine watches carefully, thoroughly and
promptly repaired.
N. B.-If it' worth doing at all It's worth doing well.
'*3O30SO-J dto JO 1.SJA.
'aos .1T21e s.) 5I20A le i 't ,IVWHD.LVA PVY

'XHaT3Axaf '"IVDIJDVId


'WIVMS 'S IL


PORT ROYAL, S. C.,
The NEW CITY, situate on the South Atlantic coast,
and at the terminus of the Port Royal Railroad. The
great desideratum, so long required there is sow de,
veloped.
Respectfunly the Soperimendeat vmdersigned, lately
of Augttat, Go., aaiuxnees timl on Ihe a25th inst. she
wilt open the
NEWLY CONSTRUCTED AXD i NEWLY FUV
NISHED
MANSION.

For private and transient boarders. Confident of her
ability, from past experience, she will zealously
consult the comfort of all who may pati onize, an4 at
terms the most favorable.
ANNIE BUSSE.
Dated March 15, 1875. 3-24 if


Fine Cassimere Shirts, stylish aud durable, at Bucky's'


RIDDELL HOUSE,


FERNANDINA, FLA,

SAMUEL T. RIDDELL, Pnornurrox.

*j'-Magnificeot drive ot eighteen miles on the finest
Atlantic Beach.
AW-Refreshing sea breezes.
OPEN SUMMER AND WINTER.
BOARD:
Per day $3-.
Per week ........................ ........from i12 tols.P-O
Satisfactory arrangements made with families.
Fine livery accommodations rt--ff

Fine Business Suits at SUCKY'S.


JENNETT HOUSE,
PORT ORANGE, FLA.,


By MRS. BENNETT & MRS. DOBBINS.
This new house is now ready to receive guests. htie
comfortably furnished throughout, and is capaLle of an,
commodaung 24 guests No pains will be spared to
make he table satisfactory to its patrons,
Tlie schooner

ELIZA BENNETT-
Will leave Foster's wharf, Jacksonville, for Port Or-
ange once in two weeks, affo,ding parties pleasant and
safe facilities for reaehing that place. Comfortable
Cabin Accommodatior, For panitlars apply at
DOBBINS' GUN SH0"I,
Corner Bay and Hogan streets., Jacksonville, F
0Due notice of the time of arrival and departure ofC 4
the schooner will be given in the paper. 1-23 3m


Talmas and Peedee Jackets at BUCKY'S.


Dra ers and Undershirts, very cheap, at BUCKY'S. ROBERSON & MAPSON


F OR SALE.
A half interest in one of the most flourishing and pro-
ductive
ORANGE GROVES
In East Florida. For particulars apply at this office
1-232 m

WHOLESALE ORDERS AT SAVANNAH PRICES.

H. ROBINSON,
WHOLESALE & RETAIL
DRUGGIST,
Hoeg's Block, Bay St.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.

COMPOUNDING PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY.

Beautiful Silk Scarfs,in variety of color, at BUCKY'S


CARRIAGE SHOP.


GEORGE I. LEA,
CARRIAGE MAKER,

COR. WASHINGTON AND ADAMS STREETS,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA,
Will build in first-class style, Carriages, Buggies and
Light Wagons.
Repairing neatly done. Come and see my work.
o10-21 3m.


Percale shirts, so nice, at Bueky s.


W ILCOX,
Dealer in
FRUIT AND VEGETABLES,
MAGNOLIA MARKET.
Families supplied at regular market rates.

Also, he still teep%
A STALL IN TIE OLD MARKET,
For tie accommodation of down-town customers.
It will PAY to come and set me.
4-7 ly H. WILCOX


Have opened a first-cLam.
SHAVING SALOON,
corner of Bay and Pine streete, *here all the modern
appliances used by the best saloons in the country o
be bound. They also furnish at all hours
HOT AND COLD BATHS.
Tickets entitling the bearer to eight ssavese,-for said
for S1.oo; eight shaves, hair cutting and sh.mpoolta
$t.5o. 9-po C f


A FREE HOME.
I will give a building lot in the new town of
ROSEWOOD
To any one who will improve it.
GOOD GOVERNMENT LAND
Can be entered whhmn a half mile of the depot, aW
STATE LAND
Bought at (1.25 per acre.
It is believed that no government land cam be foau
in the State so accessible.
Apply to me at the WAVERLY HOUSE, or ad
dress at ROSEWOOD, LEVY COUNTY.
C. B. DIBBLE.
Jackonville. January 36, s75. 1-30 w&saw

Very atylish Ladies' Hats at BUCKY'S.

D EPOT LUMBER YARD.

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS

WILL VIII A
FULL ASSORTMENT, Or

DRESSED AND UNDRESSED LUMBER,
MOULDINGS AND SAWED
PINE SINGLES,
CHEAP FOR CASH AT

THE DEPOT LUMBER YARD.
Lamber dReredt Ia ll prwoftOn d a l vT"i
and at all landians o the ritr, at lok mates All
-den reeerv prompt atMndon.
"k *L^ OUIS J. lDRUSf6.
J7ltsekon'illi March, 6. l8?.


Y~j


- :.( .-- -- -jig


-V


__ _


Fine Cassimerc Shirts, stylish aud durable, at Bucky'r


Carpetbags and Ladies' Companions at BUCKY'S,


or sale.


9-3o tf


Capt. Eengineers, U. S. A.








'WflA.W'A~~W' '-.4.-r, '-N -- .--'.,- .I- g


THE NEW SOUTH: WEEKLY. JACKSONVILLE, WEDNESDAY, MAY


26, 1875-


The Tichborne-Remase.--
Recent events in England seem to
promise that the sequel to the famous
Tichbori'e case will be quite as re-
markable and exciting as were the
many, talrtHng -nicidents of its trial,
the abIlity with which it was con-
ducfda," dIffd its peculiarly dramatic
ending. Indeed, from the begin-
ningeof the case to its close the whole
proceedings were a romance as in-
teresting as Gulliver's Travels. As
the suit went" bn we traveled half
round the globe. We sailed the seas
in tie Bella ; we saw between us and
the horizon the mysterious cordage
and the dirp sails of that mocking
phantom-barquem, the Osprey. We
were with Castro in the Australian
bush w6e watched Arthur Orton's
marvelous featt of horsemanship; we
were landed, all dazed and bewildered
upon the quay at Melbourne; we
rested awhile under the glowing skies
-of Rio; we exchanged a word in pas-
sing"'with Captain Burton- in the,
Andte, as the-shepherd going out of
the gate in the _'Odyssie" calls his
greet'li'igtb"'tlhe shepherd coming i-.
Far back we were borne among the
youthful philosophers of Stonyhurst,'
where' ihe ingenuity of counsel con-
jured up for usvisions of Jesuitical
plotting and dr.ksome moulding of
youthful character which might have
suite ,he .,terrible ecclesiastic in
Eugene Sue's Wandering Jew. Every
grove and path in or near the ancient
residence of tihe Tichbornes was fami-
liar ground. We studied .death's-
head. shirt-studs and peculiar pipes.
Every phase of the story had its dif
ferent sceae, There was Wagga-Wag-
ga and there was Wapping. The wit-
nesses ranged themselves in geologi-
cal and ethnological groups. "My
carabineers," as Dr. Kenealy styled
them called up associations quite dis-
tinct from'the Hamphshire witnesses
and the Melbourne witnesses. Then
there were all the various episodes
which; 'had in turn such elements of
excitement. The contempt of court
episodes, the Luie episode, the episode
of te dmudgad.pld o tograp1, _and all
the rest of, them-each in its turn,
like the stories introduced into "Don
Quixote," seemed to have interest
enough of its own to stand indepen-
dent of the main narrative altogether.
But though it is fully twelve months
since, we have heard all about the tat-
tooirtg, the sealed packet, Mr. Bogle,
and, all the rest of the various topics
connected with the Tichborne trial
that were for a time the daily food of
the BritiSh newspaper reader, England
is not done with her burly claimant
yet. England now presents to the
civiized world the extraordinary
spectacle of a staid law-abiding, and
conservative people divided into two
bitterly hostile factions by the result
of a-criminal prosecution. We see the
leading counsel for the defense, first
disbenched, disbarred, and stripped
of his silk gown, and then trium-
phantly elected to Parliament, there
to plead once more the cause of a con-
victed impostor, with all the authority
of a representative of the people. We
see. the Lord Chief Justice of Eng-
land arraigned before the bar of pub-
lic opinion,. as a tool of the Jesuits
and and an unrighteous judge, and
driven .to defend his character at a
festive gathering. We see London
and other cities get up monster meet-
ingsand demonstrations in favor of a
criminal legally tried and sentenced,
by a jury of his countrymen, and tens
of thousands petitioning the Queen to,
restore to the alleged "Sir Roger"
his'liberty and the Tichborne estates.
We see-all these strange and unwonted
things, and ask ourselves in vain for a
reasonable explanation. Can it be
possible that hundreds and thousands
of English people really believe that
the man whom an outraged justice has
consigned' to the felon's call in Mil-
bank Prison is innocent, and the vic-
tir ,ofa Jesuitical conspiracy? Or
is the whole agitation merely another
phase of that religious conflict with
Dsraeli has so long foreseen in the
Old-W-or-d? -Whichever it may be,
it is certain that we have not yet
heard the last of the Tichborne case,
the most extraordinary legal drama on
record.-Inter-Ocean.

The Carnation, Through a Microscope.
ft is well known that the examina-
tion of flowers and vegetables of every
description by 'the mlcrosco5e opens
a new and interesting field of wonders
tocthe inquiring naturalist. Sir John
Hill has given the following curious
account of what appeared on his ex-
amining a carnation; ,,"The principal
flower in an elegant bouquet was a
carnation; the fragrance of this led
me to enjoy it frequently and near.


The sense of smelling was not the on-
ly one affected on these occasions;
"while that was satisfied with the pow-
erfW,. weet,.the ear was constantly
assailed by an. extreIely soft, but
agreeable murmnring sound. It was
easy to know that some-anlimal within
t-tecoVett &tasribe*'tb musician, and
thJ1 the it444e noise must come from
some little Cfeature- suited to produce
it. j'stiaftly distended the lower
part of t lower,' and placing it in a
full light couldjdjscovertroops of .lit-.
tle-insewts frisking with wild jollity
among the narrow, pedestals 'that sup-,
ported its leaves and the little threads
thlif -oeddpietl itS'.cettree What a
perfect security from all annoyance in
the dusky hush tfiat surrounded the
scene ofacti-ori'Aiiapting'a-microscope
tomtake "iin; at ene view, the whole
base of th1e'flowef', I gave myself an
opportunity' of contemp rating what
.they wererAabout, and..this for many
days,'ogelther, without giv.ing. them
Sti'fleasr~li'tur'ince: Thus I cotrid
Oieaw"et,ic econery% their passions;
a'id th ."rt' enjbyrh'en4. The pcro-
se,e44t this ocdassini had given what
:. natTre seemed to'have detild to ob-


jects efeofonempltation. Thy base of
"the flower extended itself under its in-
fluence to a vast plain; the stenms of its
slender leaves became, trunks of so
many stately cedars; the threads in
:the middle seemed columns of massy
structures,- supporting at the top their
several ornaments; and the narrow
spaces between Were enlarged into
walks, partierres and. terraces. On the
polished bottom of these, brighter
than Parian marble, walked in pairs,
alone, or in large companies, the
winged inhabitants.: These, from lit-
tle, dusky flies-for such only the nak-
ed qve could have shown them-were
raised to glorious, glittering animals,
stained with a glossy gold that would
have made all the labors of the loom
contemptible in the comparison. I
could at leisure as they walked togeth-
er, admire their elegant limbs, their
velvet shoulders, and their silken
winEs; their backs, vying with the
empyrean in its blue; and their eyes,
each formed of a thousand others,
outglittered the little planes of a bril-
liant, above description, and too
great almost for admiration."

-The ady wept;
The mother took it from the nurse's arms,
And soothed its griefs and stilled its vain alarms,
And baby slept.
Again it weeps,
And God doth take it from the mother's arms,
From present pains and future unknown harms,
And baby sleeps.

Ex-Commssioner Douglass.
The facts which are daily develop-
ing iri connection with the recently
discovered whisky frauds, sustain the
conclusion that the ex-Commis'sioner
of LInternal Revenue. is clear of all
complicity with the rascals engaged
in the perpetration of these robberies.
Had the Secretary's order, made in
pursuance of his advice, to change the
field of labor of each of the Internal
Revenue Supervisors, been firmly car-
ried out, it is now clear that these
and possibly other frauds would have
been di covered months earlier. Let-
the Senators and Representatives in
Congress, through whose influence this
order was rescinded, take their full
share of responsibility for the losses
which have occurred through their ill-
advised interference with the execu-
tion of the laws.
The framers of the Constitution
evidently intended that the Legisla-
tive, the Executive and the Judical
Departments of the Government
should be independent of each other.
It is well enough for Senators and
Representatives, when consulted by
the President and heads of depart-
ments, to give any information in
their possession in relation to the
character and qualifications of those
who desire to hold subordinate execu-
tive positions. To this extent their
recommendations for appointments may
be very useful. But when they under-
take to control the manner of the en-
forcement of the laws, they clearly
get beyond their legitimate province.
They are responsible, as legislators,
for the character of the laws; but their
responsibility for their faithful enforce-
ment belongs to the President and the
courts. Better let the responsibility
remain where the Consuttution places
it.- Washington Chronicle.

MEN WHO LIVE WITHOUr SPEAKING.
-Charles Warren Stoddard writing
to the San Francisco Chronicle, says:
"Away up on the hill that overlooks
Naples stands the Carthusian monas
tery of San Martino. The monks who
once inhabited the glorious palace--
for it is. nothing less-were men of
noble birth and vast fortune. The
church is now one of the most mag-
nificent in Italy. Agate, jasper, la-
pis-lazuli, amethyst, Egyptian granite
and fossil wood, together with mar-
bles of every tint, are so blended in
mosaics that line the whole edifice, and
the carvings are so rich and graceful
that the interiors of some of the
chapels seem like Eden bowers trans-
fixed by a miracle and frozen into
stone. And in this spot lived a broth-
erhood who came from the first circles
of society and buried themselves in
this gorgeous tomb, for it was little
:else. The monks took a vow of per-
petual silence, lived apart, ate apart,
and met only for the unsocial hours
of prayer, when each was wrapped in
his own meditation, and no one ut-
tered a syllable.
"Each of the little cells where they
slept had a small window or closet
communicating with one of the cor-'
ridors, and in this closet was placed
the frugal meal which was then taken
into the cell and eaten in solitude.
Every quarter of an hour a bell
struck, to remind the listeners that
they were so much nearer their death.
In the garden the railings are orna-
mented with marble skulls, and the


only sounds that used to disturb this
splendid solitude were the tread of
sandaled feet, the rustle of long, white
robes, or the clang of the bell that told
off theirsolemn lives in brief moments,
that yet might have seemed long to
them. These monks, like most others
in Italy, have been driven from their
retreat, and all their treasures confis-
cated by Victor Emmanuel."

The New York Times punctures one
bubble of misleading words, in this
paragraph about the fallacy of suppos-
ing a system, of education to be "irre-
ligious," because it does not in a for-
mal way inculcate religion:-
It is.vain to call a school "godlest"
because it is secular. A bank is not
"godless"-provided it is honestly
managed-even if it is not opened and
closed with daily prayer. A shoe-
maker is not "godless" because he
refrains from pronouncing the benedic-
tionfin:-cO'nnection with the delivery
of a pair of boots to his customer.
Enough that his leather is good, his
threItt' strong.-, his work faithful, -and


-which, unhappily, is not always the
case-his promises are punctually
kept. A school-master is not "god-
less" who teaches arithmetic, reading,
and the'-other branches accurately,
and deals with his pupils in a truth-
ful and kind spirit.


FURNITURE


UF RNITURE WAREROOMS!



DAVIS & DREW.


'FLORIDA SAVINGS BANK

AND REAL ESTATE EXCHANGE.
[Incorporated July 6th, 1874.]

OFFICE IN LOVERIDGE'S BUILDING, OCEAN STREET,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA., J
INTEREST.-Interest at the rate of seven and three-tenths per cent. (or two cents per day on $ioo) will be paid
annually, upon all deposits which shall have remained three months or more in the Bank, to be added annually
to the principal of the Depositor.
LOANS-All moneys received on deposit shall be invested in first mortgages on real and personal property in
this State of at least double the value, or in other ample collateral securities.
REAL ESTATE.-This corporation will act as trustees or the purchase and sale of real estate or the renting
and management of estates and property generally.


JAMES H. PAINE,
President.


SAM'L SPEARING,
Vice-President.


JONATHAN C. GREELEY,
Treasurer.


PARLOR SUITS. CHAMBER SUITS. STATE, COUNTY AND CITY SCRIP SOLD AT CURRENT RATES.


MOSQUITO BARS & FIXTURES


Parlor
Suits.
Parlor
Suits.
Parlor
Suits.
Parlor
Suits.


DAVIS & DREW, Chambe
Chambe
corner of Suits.
Chamber
BAY AND LAURA STREETS, Suits.
Chamb
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. Suits


EXAMINE OUR LARGE STOCK.



101 A 101
101 101
101 101
101 ** Bay St., 101
101 101
101* JACSONVILLE,* 101

101 *101
101 ***** 101
1 1 o** t
101 101
101 101
010101010 D & D 0101010101
101 o oooooooooooooooo 101
101o DAvis &DREW, oo101
10101 oooo1oo ooooooooolO1
0101 lOloooo FURNITUNITrE oooolOl
101 101oo1oo ol01
101 lOlooo WAREHOUSE. oool01
101 0l1oooooooooo ooooooooo' 101
101 1010101010 D & D:0101010101
101 101 101 101
101 101 101 10,
101 101 1mi 101
101 101 101 101
101 101 101 101
......101 101 ......101 101
101 101
101 101
101 101
101 101
......101 ......101



THE FINEST AND BEST SELECT-
ED IN THE SOUTH.


Parlor
Suit-.
Parlor
Suits.
Par lor
Suits.
Parlor
Suits.


RICH, PLAIN,
and

SUBSTANTIAL
FURNITURE.


Cl amber
Suits.
Chamber
Suits.
Chrmber
Suits,
Chamber
Suits


SEMI-ANNUAL STATEMENT
OF THE
FLORIDA SAVINGS BANK AND REAL ESTATE EXCHANGE.

facksonville, Florida.


Incorporated July 6, 1874.

ASSETS.


Capital Stock $20,000.


Office Furniture and Fixtures........... .....................$ 225 00
Cash on hand ..................... 10,504 30
State, County and City Treasury Warrants, face value $2,496.46-cash value 1,758 07
Real Estate in the city of Jacksonville .......................... 5,898 15
State, County and City Tax Certificates...................... 1,195 25
Notes and Mortgages, secured by pledge of real estate and personal property of the value of
$31,19950 ...............................13,316 72
Rent, &c, paid in advance ................... 6o0 00o
Unexpired Insurance Premiums................. ...... 20 6o
T otal........................................................................................... $32,978 09
LIABILITIES.
Individual deposits... ........................ .................. ... .... ........................$24,169 74
Capital Stock paid ini......... .................................................. 2,000 00
Undivided Profits ........................................................................................... 6,000 00 o
Profit and Loss account................................................................................ 808 35-32,978 09
STATE OF FLORIDA, j
Duval County. i
I, James H. Paine, President of the Florida Savings Bank and Real Estate Exchange,
do solemnly swear that the foregoing statement is true to the best of my knowledge and belief.
JAMES H. PAINE, President.


STATE OE FLORIDA,
Duval County.
Sworn and subscribed before me this 23d day of April A. D. 1875.


Correct. Attest: JONATHAN C. GREELEY, Treasurer.


A. 0. HUSSEY.


HUSSEY


9-3ott


H. JENKINS, Jr.,.
[SEAL] Notary Public.


JNO. W. HOWELL.


& HOWELL,


WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN


BOOTS,

LEATHER


SHOE
& FINDINGS.


S


A complete assortment of New York and Philadelphia fine
Goods always on hand.
Sole agents in Jacksonville for Samuel Dunbar & Co.'s
Misses' and Children's Fine Shoes.
Goods sent by mail or express to all parts of the State.

Bay Street, near Laura, Jacksonville, Flo.


MISCELLANEOUS.


F RESH ARRIVAL
OF NEW AND FASHIONABLE GOODS


We are prepared to offer our stock
remarkably low prices.

o:0:


DAVIS


& DREW,


DEALERS IN


All kinds of FURNITURE, CARPETS,
MATTRESSES, WHITE PINE, WAL-
NUT, and CEDAR LUMBER, etc.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA-


COFFINS AND UNDERTAKERS

M E ETA 1 L I C
BURIAL CASES,


AND
WOOD COFFINS,


OF ALL SIZES AND QUALITIES.
LADIES' AND GENTLEMEN'S ROBES.
EMBALMING DONE WHEN REQUIRED.
ALSO,
MARBLE AND MARBLEIZED
SLATE MANTELS,
SLATE HEARTHS, &c.,
MANUFACTURED TO ORDER
AND FOR SALE BY
CALVIN OAK,
Forsyth Street, between Laura and Hogans,
tw36-o2 Jacksonville. Florida.


NEW LOAN


ON A NEW PLAN.


Invest your money at home in the

FIRST MORTGAGE LAND GRANT
PREMIUM BONDS.
Now offered for sale by the

GREAT SOUTHERN RAILWAY
[Consolidated]
Every bond when redeemed will receive a premium
in place of interest, according to the plan of redemption,
in amounts of from
$I.oo0 to $25.ooo or $50.000
On each bond.
Bonds redeemable by allotment. Six, allotments of
bonds. Six distributions of premiums in 1875.
Apply to
EMIL HAAS & CO.,
Financial Agents
71 Broadway, New York City.
HARVEY GRANGER, Gen'l Agent,
J. L. EDWARDS, Agent.
Office, Mather & Little's Bookstore, Jacksonville.
1-, tf
Trinks and valises at Bucky's.


FOR ST. AUGUSTINE.


apply to


THE SCHOONER

Magnolia
Will make regular trips
'- between Jacksonville &
St. Augustine.
Freights at low rates.
For freight or passage
WILLSON & WHITLOCK,
Jacksonville, Fla,,
JAMFS COSS,
St. Augustic, rFla.


S NTLEMENS'FAL ANWINEREAR,
at CENTLEMENS' FAL AND WINTER WEAR,


EMBRACING
FRENCH, ENGLISH, GERMAN ITALIAN
AND AMERICAN FABRICS,
SUCH AS
FINE BROADCLOTHS, CASSIMERES, VEST-
INGS AND GENERAL FURNISHING
GOODS,


J. BARATIER,


Merchant Tailor,
Laura Street,just above Bay Street,
xx-2i-6m JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

S AMUEL B. HUBBARD,

Jacksonville, Fla.,

Importer and Dealer in

HARDWARE, IRON AND STEEL,

EDGE TOOLS, TABLE and POCKET
CUTLERY,
Nails, Glue, Putty, Glass, Paints, Oils,
LEATHER BELTING, RUBBER PACKING,
STOVES, TINWARE, CROCKERY, PUMPS,
Lead and Iron Pipe,


MISCELLANEOUS.

/ EARNED Y S

FLUID EXTRACT


BUCH U !
The only known remedy for

BRIGHT'S DISEASE,

And a positive remedy for
GOUT, GRAVEL, STRICTURES,
DIABETES, DYSPEPSIA,
NERVOUS DEBILI-
TY, DROPSY,

NON-RETENTION, OR INCONTINENCE OF
URINE, IRRITATION, INFLAMMATION.
OR ULCERATION OF THE

BLADDER AND KIDNEYS

SPERMATORRH(EA,
Leucorrhcea or Whites, Diseases of the Prostrate
Gland, Stone in tha Bladder, Colcults, Gravel, or Brick-
dust Deposit and Mucus or Milky Discharges.


KEARNEY'S

EXTRACT BUCHU
Permanently cures all Disea es of the


DOORS,SASHBLINDSMOULDINGSSUGAR BLADDER, KIDNEYS, AND DROPSI-
CAL SWELLINGS,


Mills, Evaporators, &c.
Gas-Fitting, Roofing, 7obbing, and Tin
Smitiine done to order, d ly


B BUILDERS'
FURNISHING MILL,

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

The undersigned would respectfully call the atten-
tion of those contemplating building to their establish-
ment. They are prepared to furnish at short notice all
kinds of
Builders' Material


consisting of
Rough and Planed Lumber,


Mouldings,


Scroll and Turned Work,


Existing in men, women and children,


J.H. NORTON,
Attorney al Law and Notary Public.


NORTON & KOOKER.
DEALERSIN

REAL ESTATE
OF ALL KINDS.

GENERAL INSURANCE AGENTS, representing the following , panies:
FRANKLIN, OF PHILADELPHIA, $ With combined assets of over
CONTINENTAL, OF NEW YORK, (
MANHATTAN, OF NEW YORK, v9000 000
PENN, OF PHILADELPHIA, 9 9

LOANING MONEY ON REAL ESTATE AND CONVEYANCING A
SPECIALTY.-"


We give below a few of the many choice places for sale by us:
No. Two-story house on Ashley street, near St. No.o105. Dunlawton Plantation; o
James Hotel, pleasantly situated, in one of the best seven miles north of Mosquito inlet,
neighborhoods in the city; house is new, with six rooms, i,moo acres, 1,r50 acres rich hammocl
plenty of closets, and good servant's room: lot 52%x from river: 50 acres high, shell land,
xo5 feet, good fence, good sidewalk, and the street the river bank, having front of about
shelled; grapes in bearing; a fine lot of young orange with large, two-story, frame house, I
trees; flowers and shade trees growing thriftily ; good finished; house commands view of the
well, with pump on back porch, which is covered with and is surrounded with large, bearii
flowering vines. Will be sold cheap, some 75 to loo in number: good we
N. B. To capitalists "desiring a big thing," there that holds 1,2oo gallons, in yard,- thr
is a fine opening in Springfield; a few thousand dollars and drained; canal from sugar-house
will go a great way just now. For particulars enquire river for transportation of crop; imme
of Norton & Kooker, corner Ocean and Bay streets, wild orange trees on the place; the sil
best sugar lands of Cuba, to which
No. 74A HANDSOME RESIDENCE FOR SALE.-Six limestone is abundant. Thisplaoe is
large rooms and kitchen, double bay window on the choicest places in Florida, and was kfio
west, large double parlors, double piazza on the south, fore the war.
commanding one of the finest views in Jacksonville;
windows filled with four lights of 40-inch glass and nung N. B. Do you want a.snug wiV
with cords and weights on pulleys and reaching to the orange trees and flowers, in Florilda
floor, with blinds: all casings are finished with mould- a beautiful lot, 76x156 feet, in Sprin;
ing and oiled and varnished, making a beautiful finish; healthful, and within ten minutes walk,
ceilings high, walls hard-finished, open stairs, double, on which to make it, for $25. For pa
glass, front doors, mortice lock on every door in house; of Norton & Kooker.
china closet, store-room, plenty of clothes-presses, bath-
room; hip roof, with cupola, from which a charming No. ii9. A tract of88 acres; 6oact
view is to be had of the city, the river and surrounding iockland: fine front on St. John's rive
country ; three lots, making I57x2o9 feet; good well ; f Jacksonville. This is'one ofthemo
young shade trees started; half a mite from post-office. fronts inthe vicinity of Jacksonville.
For sale at a bargain. if desired.
No. 96. A large, two-story house with ten large No. 146. Six acres on Arlington riv
rooms; thoroughly built, and finished in first-rate style, Florida Home, containing the old vin,
with twelve feet ceilings ; one acre of ground, covered at a bargxan.
with fruit trees and flowers; pleasantly located ; within
five minutes walk of the railroad depot. Price $io,ooo; No. 147. METROPOLITAN HOTEL
$4,500 down, balance on long time if desired, centrally located, built of the best Frer
a first-class house in eveiy respect.
No. 99. 400 acres in Orange county; one mile from terms apply to Norton & Kooker.
Melonville. Price, $5 per acre.
Call on or write to us, and state your wants:
OFFICE COR. OCEAN AND BAY STS., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
*JWVisitors always welcome. Latest papers on file.


THE SINGER MANUFACTURING COMPANY'S CELEBRATED


SILK TWIST.
This company now having in full operation at Newark, New Jersey, the largest SILK WORKS In the
world, propose to furnish a superior article of Silk Twist
AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICES.
For the convenience of the public this celedrateb Twist is
PUT UP ON SPOOLS OF DIFFERENT SIZES,
The finest quality being thereby offered on spools'in quantities
FROM FIFTY YARDS UPWARDS.
The above unequaled twist is manufactured especially for the use of all kinds of sewing machines and agents
for different machines through the country are using this twist in large quantities, and as
SPECIAL INDUCEMENTS
are offered to the trade, all those about to purchase will do well to send for our price list.

THE SINGER



L





-7,









AGAIN TRIUMPHANT.

133,254 MAJORITY.


STATISTICS OF SWORN SALES FOR 1873:


Companies. Sold in 1873.
THE SINGER ...... 232.444
Whee'er & Wilson 119,180
Domestic 40,114
Grover & Baker ...... 86,179
W eed ........................ 21,76o
W ilson ................................ ................ 21,247
Howe No returns
Gold Medal 16,431
Wilcox & Gibbs ............. 15,881


Companies. So
American, B. H{...................................
B & Howe
Remington Empire..
Florence................... ....................
Davis ..................
Victor
B lecs ............................................- -......
Secor ................ ........
2Etna, J. E. Bramesdorf


OUR NEW FAMILY MACHINE
Embodies New and Essential P.inciples-Simplicity of Construnction: Ease of Operation; Uniformity of Precise
Action at ally Speed; Capacityf or Range and Variety of Work, Fine or Coarse-
LEAVING ALL RIVALS BEHIND IT.

TEST THE SINGER BEFORE PURCHASING ANY OTHER.
TERMS EASY-PAYMENTS LIGHT.


NO MATTER WHAT THE AGE! Besides the WORLD'S FAVORITE." we keep constantly on hand a large supply of


Prof. Steel says : "One bottle of Kearnmy's Fluid
Extract Buchu is worth more than all other Buchus
combined."
Price One Dollar per Bottle, or Six Bottles for Five
Dollars.
DEPOT, ro4, DUANE ST., NEW YORK.
A Physician in attendance to answer correspondence
and give advice gratis.
AGWi'SEND STAMP FOR PAMPHLETS, FREE. "


TO TIIE


Brackets, NERVOUS AND DEBILITATED


OF BOTH SEXES.


Stwed and Rived Shingles, Lath, Fencing, NO CHARGE FOR ADVICE AND CONSUL-
TATION.-


We have recently enlarged our mill and increased
our facilities for executing all orders with dispatch.


Give us a call before going el-sewaere.


4-14


PENNIMAN & CO.


ILLIARD SALOON.
(The Largest south of Washington.)


BAY STREET, OPPOSITE POST OFFICE.





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H Ii -^i5^


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*a
it
10


DR. J. B. DYOTT, graduate of Jefferson Medica
College, Philadelphia, author of several valuable works,
can be consulted on all diseases of the Sexual ar Urin-
ary Organs, (which he has mode an especial study)
either in male or female, no matter from what cause or-
iginating or of how long standing. A practice of 30
years enables him to treat diseases with success. Cures
guaranteed. Charges reasonable. Those at a distance
can forward letter describing symptoms and enclosing
stamp to pay postage
Send for the Guide to Health. Price ioc.

B. J. DYOTT, M. D.,
Physician and Surgeon, 104 Duane St, N. Y.


Boots and Shoes, neat and durable, at BUCKY'S.

L VERY, SALE AND FEED STABLES


0
CI;s


.2

.1
0


'0
ic 0r


2."4 311


The best and most stylish livery teams in the city
can be found at the Stable of the undersigned near the
Florida Home, corner of Cedar and Forsyth Streets,
Horses boarded and well cared for on reasonable
terms.
Strong teams'for hauling purposes a] syon hand.
W. H. AVERY.
Jackscmville, Fla., May 30, 1874. tf


CLARK'S 0. N. T. SPOOL COTTON, four spools for twenty-five cents.
SINGER'S STANDARD MACHINE TWIST, from twenty-five cents up-all sizes and co ors,
ACME MACHINE TWIST, 1oo yard spools, 2 for'25 cents; 50 yard oos, 3 for s5 cents.
SINGER'S LINEN AND FLAX THREADS, OILS. NEEDLES, &C., &C.


The Singer Manufacturing Co.,
No. 172 BROUGHTON ST., SAVANNAH, GA.
C. A. VOSBURGH, Manager.
G EORGE W FRAZIER, Agent,
i .-7tf JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


ESTABLISHED IN 1868.



A. K. PERCIVAL
SUCCESSOR. TO J. H. CROWELL.











DEALER IN

BOOTS, SHOES, LEATHER,

AND FINDINGS.


"Percival's Stamp" Hand Boots
Burt & Mears' "
Philadelphia and Baltimore "
Vienna Medal cable sewed "
Percival's Stamp Hand Congress
Burt & Mears' "
Philadelphia -
Vienna Medal cable sewed "


$110 o
II 00
100 oo
8 So
5o
S- So
7 o
- 4 Sc


GOODS SENT BY MAIL AND EXPRESS,
To all parts of the State.
AT THE OLD STAND, COR. BAY apd OCFAN STS., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


S. H. KOOGK R


n Haliax river,
at Port Orange;
k, lying one mile
immediately on
one fourth mile
8 rooms, nearly
river and ocean
ing, orange trees,
ell, and a cistern
roughly ditched
running to the
nse quantities of
I is similar, t.thn
it is fully equal:
really one ofl th
own as such be-

ntr home, with
T Yov.can get a
field, high iald
ot th x rticulars enquirt

res cleared ham-
r; two miles west
st desirable liver'
Will be divided

er, adjoining the
yard. For sale
.-This hotel Is
nch brick, and is
For prices and



8-x16m


ld in x873.
14,18.
13,919
9,183
8,960
8,861
7,446
3,458
3,430
3,o081


C


V.- 7--


at the store ot


.-I


dh


7f _


&c. at lowest rates.


a