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mods:note dates or sequential designation Began in 1874; ceased in 1875?
"Wise men accept the inevitable, but strive to shape the future."
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 32 (Jan. 16, 1875).
funding Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
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mods:title New South (Jacksonville, Fla. : 1874 : Semiweekly)
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Newspapers
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Duval COunty (Fla.)
Newspapers
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The new South
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00048585/00004
 Material Information
Title: The new South
Uniform Title: New South (Jacksonville, Fla. 1874 Weekly)
Physical Description: v. : ill. (chiefly advertisements) ; 61 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Adams, Carruth & Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 19, 1875
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval COunty (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1874; ceased in 1875?
General Note: "Wise men accept the inevitable, but strive to shape the future."
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 32 (Jan. 16, 1875).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002042984
oclc - 16156679
notis - AKN0865
lccn - sn 87062262
System ID: UF00048585:00004
 Related Items
Related Items: New South (Jacksonville, Fla. : 1874 : Semiweekly)

Full Text






S.01
/. / J : *!1 1 *'' / -










:, .. "WISE MEN ACCEPT THE INEVITABLE,. BUT STRIVE o SHAPiP THE FUTURE."



VOL. II. JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, WEDNESDAY MORNING, MAY I9,-1875. NO. 9.


THE NEW SOUTH.
PUBLISHED. EVERY WEDNESDAY AND
SATURDAY.
TERJS .0PF SUBSCRIPTION:
SzMt-WEKL't, mail subscribers, $3.50 per annum,
Five or morg copies., j3,60o each ;, and an extra copy
will be sent to every club often received at one time.
WEEKLY, mail subscribers, $2 per annum. Teti
copies $S$'each; Twenty copies,'S$.6o; Fifty cop-
tes, lt.40ach. ,
iADVERT7SING 'RATES:
SEMI-WEmELv, $z oo per inch, or iess, first insertion :
each subsequent insertion. 5o cents.
WEEKLY, $1.25 per inch or less, first insertion: each
subsequent'insertion, '75 cents. '
SoeciatlNofie:, 2o cents perline.- '
TEtbs.:; CSHi t N ADVANCE.S
Address;; ,ADAMS;CARRUTH & CO.,
... ,, lacksonville. Flurila.

PROFESSIONAL CARDS, &c.

j N.BEf
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
Jacksonville, Fla.
OFxc---Opposlie OceanHoube, cornea of Adam,
and Ocean streets. 6-7.6m


WVM. & ARTHUR A. BIRNEY,
ATTORNEY S ,..
4,- STR'EET, NO 330
WASHINGTON CITY

W R. ANNO,
ATTORNEYN' -AT-LAW\
Office, in Reed's Block, Bay Street,
TYacksonviJVe, Florida.
H. A. PATTISON. A. R. MEEK.
P ATTISON & MEEK,


. ;'.:': ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW.


Office. ReQua's building, Jacksonville. Fla.


N ORTON & KOOKER,
REAL ESTATE DEAI EKS, corner Ocean and tiay,
Streets, Jacksunville. Fi.:.rda.
Money loaned on Real E-tate security General
Life and Fire Inurar.ce Agents and dealers in Pne
Lands, Plantadions.&c Springfield suburb a -peLialh5
Correspondence solicited 3 ;i6dtf'


P E. JOHNSON, M. D.,
; :' :* : .. ... ; *', "
HOMEOPATHIC
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Office, in MNitchell's new biildng, north side of Bay
street, between Ne. nan arnd MI.rkCt streets, nearly
opposite the P,.,L Office. i99tt


A A. KNIGHT,

S ATTORNEY AT LAW,
No. a Hoeg's Block, up stairs


3-25swly


Jacksont lle, Fla


A. BUESING,
Respectfully calls the attention of the citizens and mer-
chants tot e BFAU1 IFUL O)AP he manufactures.
It is the best Washing. Barber and'Toilet Soap ever
made. This Soap is put up ;n boxes contains 8o lbs
and 9obars.:...
Orders should be addressed to
A. BUESING, Box 721,
5-l6tr I Jacksonville, Fla.


RICHARD McLAUGHLIN,
S. .REAL ;ESTATE AGENT,


., Yacksonville, Florida.
All sorts of Real Estate bought and sold; Money in-
vested. Tax,'s paid, Titles examined.
trtas. By pEu.l5"ioN. t.,' William Astor, Esq.,
lew ,ork: E,.Gov. A G Curt;n. Bellefonte, Pa.;
Lewvji' H. Redner, Philaieplh'a., W. Stokes Boyd,
Iuls&gIpii)i D, G. Ambler, iL'lker, jacksonville, Fla.
IiHene ll#kw, BW&nu, Mahs. S;3-28-Iy-pd

W L. COAN.
-JUSTICE OF THE PEACE.


-NOTARY:


P U B LC .


&mfice SOLARSTE'S KOO3KV,
COrnt3, BAY and PIN aeeu
Hnn, CO R soa,.

H.F. COLCORD, _
: .Successor.to .H-de an SltSn thaess of


,. H-CROW ELL.
Corner Bay said s Oceman f cts,
Highest cash prico paid for Hides, Skias, Furm,
Wax &c. 7-8iswly


L OUIS EMILE MOURGEON,
From Paris, Trance. (lately F..reman of di Stae
Island Dyeing estabhlihmentj.
NEW DYEING AND SCOURING ESTABLISH
MENT. ,
Ladies' and Gendemen's Wearing Appareld,
Lace Curtain,
Lace Shawls.
and other fine labricd most carelullc leaned and r'yed.
FORSVTH S'ITREET. between Newnan and Mar-
kel street&, '.a"6"tl


P RINTING.


THE NEW SOUTH

JOB AND BOOK-PRINTING

ESTABLISHMENT.


The ptoprietos are prepared ta/ eeoate orders fo,
every deriptiom of

PLAIN OR ORNAMENTAL PRINTING.

Such as BUSINESS CARDS,
VISITING CAR tS,'
WEDDING CARDS.
... BILL HEADS,
LETTER HEADS.
CJR(1JL'AKS,
POSTERS,
BRIEFS, ,
PAMPHLETSTS,
:' 'BLANS OF ALL KINDS.

COLORED. PRINTING AND GILT WORK.



CHEAP, NEAT AND PROMPT.


Letter ftom Florida.
APRIL 8, .1875.
Homeward ';bound, and, for a
change, by schooner, this time. Our
vessel is the Schooner, T. H. Living-
ston, Capt. G. A. McDonald, of Bel-
fast, Me., and bound for that port.
She is new, t4is being her second trip,
a three master, registers 235 tons,
length 130 feet. She has a very good
cabin, accommodating a few passen-
gers, and has the Captain's family on
board, with whom we have formed
a pleasant al'quaintance at Jackson-
vile during the winter. My better
half 'chooses to make the passage by
steamer. '
We dropped down to the mouth of
the river, yesterday afternoon, to-
find half a dozen other vessels waiting
to be towed over the bar. Four of
them got out to-day, and we are hop-
ing,to do so to-morrow. This bar of
the, St. Johns river is the great
nuisance for Florida. Even at high
tide, it has to be very smooth to al-
low a vessel drawing twelve feet to go
over. The channel is narrow, and
constantly changing. Last winter,
forty vessels or more were accumma-
lated here at onetime, some of which
including our Captain, waited over
forty days. There was a succession of
low or rough tides. One of the ves-
sels which went out to-day was badly
damaged in an,attempt to do so nearly
two months ago, and has been all this
time repairing, at Jacksonville. The
damage to shipping and to the busi-
ness of Florida, is very serious, and
complaints long and loud are made
that the Government does not remedy
the matter. Floridians are hoping
Congress will find out by-and-by that
there is such a State with commercial
interests worth preserving and stimu-
lating. A million of money ;s needed
-not all at once-to improve the
mouth of the St. Johns, and I hope
they well get it. These Southern
harbors all have sand bars, and the
Government ongnt to pursue a liberal
policy towards the South.
ANOTHER YANKEE
has made his mark down here, just
opposite where our schooner is an-
chored, and I have to-day improved
the opportunity to pay him a visit
promised long ago. Six years ago,
Mr. John F. Rollins, Esq., formerly
of Concord, finding his health failing,
sold out his interest in the apothecary
business, and began prospecting for a
new huine in the South. He finally
purchased Fort George Island, at the
mouth of the St. Johns. His lands
embrace about 11oo acres of hammock
land, formerly a cotton plantation,
where the famous Sea Island cotton
was raised. The war and the change
in the labor system caused these lands
to be abandoned, and they were
thrown upon the market.
Mr. Rollins now has xooo orange
trees started, some of them quite
well advanced, and 3000 grape vines.
His grounds are very attractive. Pal-
metto Avenue, along which I rode
this afternoon, probably has no rival
on this continent. It has two lines
of the finest palmettos I have seen,
and must of course have been the work
of former owners. The various ave-
nues leading through the island, af-
for4 some of the finest possible drives.
They are lined with the live oak,
water oak, magnolia, hickory, holly,
myrtle, cedar, two or three kinds of
bay, palmetto, pine, and a great many
other varieties of wood, some of them
of most curious growth. Another
t wonderful feature of this island, is the
immense deposit of oyster shells It
covers two or three hundred acres,


and is many feet deep-in some places
I think, 40 or 5o. How they came
there is the question. Mr. Rollins
thinks them to be the work of a
fornmer race of nmen who ihnhbitied this


country, as well as a place of winter
residence for Northern people. Two
other New England gentlemen are as-
sociated with Mr. Rollins in this en-
terprise. The view from Point Ia-
bella is one of the finest on the coast,
and Mt Cornelia,. 94 feet high, is
said to be the highest point on the
coast South of New Jersey. The Coast
Survey has a station here. Both these
points are near Mr. Roilins'. They
are simply little mountains of shell
and sand thrown up from the sea and
covered with forest. And here, pro-
bably, endeth my Florida correspond-
ence, which has doubtless become
wearisome to the readers of the Free
Press. E. H. C.

Conciliation.
It is gratifying to notice an increas-
ing effort on the part of the patriotic
public men, north and south, to bring
the opposing sentiments of sections
into harmony. At the recent Cen-
tennial celebration in Massachusetts,
the words of General Bartlett, of
Richmond, Va., and other public
speakers, who dwelt upon this theme,
are worthy of all commendation.
Now that slavery-the original and
only real cause of a division of na
tional sentiment-has been removed,
the past should, as far as possible, be
forgotten, and every man and woman
should labor to remove our remain-
ing impediments to universal har-
mony. As the States are politically
controlled by one general government,
so the communities throughout the
Union should be inspired with the
grand idea of concord in all their so-
cial and progressive interests.' If this
is not now, we trust the day-is not far
distant when it will be the aim of
every individual, North and South.
All can speak and labor for this ob-
ject. Some can do much, all can do
something toward its consummation ;
and when the Centennial day arrives
it will be a grand spectacle to see the
communities of the South and the
North, clasping hands, not "across a
chasm," but with the chasm filled up
and obliterated, and all impediments
to universal harmony of social senti-
ment removed. We do not expect a
millenniumm just now, but we may be
lieve the day is not far distant when
all antagonistic social sentiment will
be removed, and when individuals
will strive to perpetuate a spirit of
concord and good will among all
classes, without regard to nativity,
color, or previous condition.
The South is a vast agricultural
area, With an auxiliary aid to develop-
ment in the colored population, of
great power. In this is its future
strength. In order however to facili-
tate development, immigration and
capital are required. These will come
when reconciliation has accomplished
"its good work, and the people of the
North and the South manifest one
common interest in our national pro-
gress. With harmony fully restored,
the South will present strong attrac-
tions to immigration and capital. The
opportunities for the profitable occu
pation of both are almost unlimited.
The profits from the cultivation of
cotton are temptingly large. The
sales of that article alone, for export
during the last year, amounted in
value to $215,527,420. Yet not over
a tenth of the area of these cotton
States are under cultivation, as the
following figures will show ; Acres cu
Acres 'cut-
States, Area-Acres, tivated.
Virginia..................26,240,000.....................8,165,040
North Carolina........32,45;56o.....................5,258.742,
South Carolina.........2X,76o,ooo000................. ... 3,010,539
Georgia..................37,120,000ooo.....................6,331,806
Fiorida.................. 37.931,520..................... 736,171
Alabama................. 32,462,o0o0.....................5,062,204
Mississippi ............. 30179.840................ 4 209,146
Tennessee.......,.......29,184,000.................. 6,843,278
Arkansas ............,33,406,720.....................1,859,821
Louisiana...... .., 3,2 ......6 o' ...... ..2,645,640
Teoa 75,587,A .......................2,964,836
ee lcky ... 2....... ...24,115,200o....................8,o13,859
Total...........o6,740.,960o.................55,001,124


country in the indefinite past, and of Virginia may not strictly beclaised
whom no history is left. The theory among the cotton States, yet it yields
is confirmned by the finding among annually a considerable quantity of
them numerous specimens of pottery, cotton, and under proper cultivation
and other rude utensils, such as a race is capable of producing a large return
of men of simple habiis may be sup- of that valuable article. The figures,
posed.to have 'used. They 4)robably however, show the entire per centage
for hundreds and perhaps thousands of of land under cultivation fbr cotton
years, gathered oysters at the mouth and all other crops, and reveal the
of this river. That race of men has fact that not over ten per ceiint. of the
long since passed away, but Floridians fertile acres of the South are improved
luxuriate on St, Johns oysters yet. and only about six or seven per cent.
An: avenue the entire length of the of the whole under cotton. If, from
island, three miles, is being shelled this limited tillage, after' supplying
ii'iih this material, and all the. roads the home consumption, we can ex-
are, in time, to be treated in like man- port over two hundred million dol-,
ner. A very gtod concrete is made lars' worth of cotton annually, what
by burning thbse shells, forming a would te the result if with twenty-five
weak lime, an4 rnixing this with the or fifty per cent. of the entire area un-
unburned shells. Several buildiig- of der successful cotton tillage'? It is,
.this material have probabJy, been true that this quantity of cotton is not
stain'diig scores of 3pars. They in, now required, yet the constiumption is
clude a dozen, or movie negro huts, steadily increasing, and must con-.
mostly unoccupied. The lauds are tinue todo so without cessation., With
everywhere. impregnated with shells, better educated skill and improved
which are an excellent fertilizer,. machinery the cost of cultivating this,
It w6old hot be strange if the most valuable product will be reduction,
famous watrelng place of the South and a reduction in cost, of any staple"
were to spring up here. The ocean product, is invariably followed by a
side of the, island has a fine beach of corresponding increase in'the quantity
the purest.white sand, commanding a consumed,
view ofamos't the entire ocean stretch 'But cotton is only one of the staple
between Fernanridina and the' St. products of the South. 'Man'y of.
Johns. Along this the main Avenue these States are admirably adapted for
is being coistructed, and the whole 'the cultivation of wheat,' and-the crop
island is being laid into town lots is always earlier in the market than
with broad avenues. Three or four the*wheat from colder sections. Those
houses are already built by Northern States' are also adapted'for the suc.
people,'and several are to be built this cessful 'cultivation of rice,., .corn,
season. A good hotel is in process of tobacco, vegetables, and tropical
con-truction, and will be 'opened fruits... .
in July. This will be the most con- Again, the advantages of those
veniie:; summer watering, place ,for States for successful development are
Jacksonville, and all the St. Johns lar-gely increased by their peculiar


facilities for an extensive home and
foreign commerce. From Delaware
to Texas we have eleven sea coast
States with an Atlarftic and Gulf
water base of two thousand five hun-
dred miles, while all the other sea-
board States have only six hundred
miles of sea coast. What facilities
are thus afforded to tlhe;South for an
extensive foreign com9nerce. Then
there are the Mississippi and other
magnificent rivers peIltrating thou-
sands of miles int', the interior, and
open the year round, while the rivers
of the Northern arid Northwestern
States are ice-bound,' niany of them
during the entire wintqr season.
But on the other nd, while the

States in other sections of the Union
have peculiar resources in which their
strength and means of development
lie. .. .
These peculiarities of sections are
the best evidences of the necessity for
a harmonious whole, and, under this
desirable condition, they point to an
interstate commerce, the vastness of
which can scarcely be estimated. ,The
time is now here when no State. can
afford to disregard the commercial,
political and social ties that bind the
whole in one common interest and
material progress.
We are glad to give space to the
above calm and well considered edi-
torial from the Washington Chronicle.

The Land of Oranges.-' .:
The Boston Jozirnal of Chemistry,
for April says:
"A friend in Florida hiads'srit us the
printed' proceedings of: the iFlorida
Fruit Growers' Associatidhn,' which
we have read with unusual interest.
The convention, which met last au-
tumn to discuss fruit and fruit-grow-
ing, embraced a large number,,of( the-
most intelligent and-:' entlihusia'lic
farmers:and horticulturists in Florida
and in their report they: .have em-
bodied a large amount of Information
useful to every one interested in- the
prosperity of the State. Of course the
leading fruit discussed wa's oraniges;
how to grow the trees, improve t)'iV e
fruit, and find ifor it a.market.. With-
in the past ten years the production.
of oranges in Florida' has increased
immensely, and the importance 6f the
crop in the future can hardlybe yover-
estimated. It was stated by hgentiep-
men at the convenlumhaLthejiroduict
in two years woulTd, if no disaster oc-
curred, reach to 400,000,000. To
convey the fruit to Northern ports,
for a market, a semi weekly line of
large steamers will be required. A
new line of freight steamers owned by
New York parties has commenced
regular trips between that port and a
port on the St. Johns river, and the
success of the line is placed beyond a
doutt.
The future of Florida is promising,
if political and social troubles Iare not
allowed to dividend distract the
people. The climate is delightful in:
winter, .and we predict that in a
quarter of a century it will be as m ich
a matter of course for well 'to-do
Northerners to spend their winters in'
Florida, as it is for them to go 'to the
seaside or the mountains in summer.
We learn that '.the land of, oranges"
is crowded with strangers at the present
time, and if this winter flight con-
tinues to increase as it has for the last
ten years, there will hetmouths enough
at home to consume, fl .the nice fruit'
the farmers can raise, arid so steam-
ship will not be needed to expPrt it,.
Beside oranges, bananas and grapes
can be grown there in great perfection.
The frosts come occasionally to an
noy the frtiit growers but statistics
show the risk is. small, even in the
northern portions of the State.., We
say, success to the fruit rgroiers of
Florida. .: :

King Death in Command.
Yesterday afternoon the mate; ,o1,
the .,,bark Mendota,. Mr. 'Fredrick'
Adams, ruddy of face and, broad of
shoulder, sat in the cabinr ofhi, ves-
sel, a. .cigar in his mouth and the. og
otfthe Mendota .before hm.. Every-
body was neat and shipSl'idp abov
and below, and the vessel showed no
signs of'a' four'months'vOyage. '" '
"We left Batavia; on ^the-rIta'tit ,of
Javasionr the ,3d of last December,','
said the (mate. "When- we .started,
'Captain. Perry and one.':seaman was.
sick with the Java fever, a sort of bil-,
-ious.fever, with' :hills., ;Un,pn h.ti(7^1.i
of January the second1 .mate, Jqh0
wolte, and the steward were taken
down with the, sami~edise'ase., on the
.i zth another seatpiap was''prostr~at~ed.
Tl@e' all were vejy .sick fot"'tveeks:
j-er'e, in the entry, for' Jaii'nrvii'iii,"I
'have written, 'Captain not 'extperted


to-recover. On the',oth-of January
iwas attacked with-the feversawking'
theififth man sick:O ut ,.{otpr, ;iUtl.
crewf pf.ten, JD.haA.e Ybep, thg,.Qopy
one able to navigate the. vessel,, p
after my attack I had to continue my
work. The fever use4 a man up
mighty quick. The captain and sec-,"
ond mate were unable 'tpo" move-per
fect skeletons, I used to crawl out to
the cabin on my hand and knees to
'get the sun,' and then crawl to the
ship's chronometer to get. the time,
arid then -1 worked out our position,-
Y,o9 couV mel the fever on 'ainy parj-t
of the ship, On the 13th of February
the -e'ond mate died and ,we :buried
him that- alteo90n .It was too


hot to keep the body. I had decided
to make for St. Helena for medical
aid, though it would take us 300 miles
out of our ':ourse. We reached there
on the 19th of Feburary, and soon Dr.
Fowler, the hospital surgeon, was on
board. He knows all about Java fe-
ver, for nearly every vessel from the
island touches at St. Helena with sick
men. He helped us all, and on the
271th we started for New York. We
had a rough passage,, crossing the
equator on the 22d of March. We
were within 500 miles of New York
for sixteen days, baffled by west'winds
and big seas that swept the decks.
I've seen some hard voyages," con-
tinued the mate, "but this last was
j.Jhe tou _s. .Jjs hard enough to go
to seai l to e sick hlirough6it a
voyage wiili Java fever, which will
shake the 1 feo it (. you, is to much."
-New York Sun.

A Game in Which Two Aces and a
Revolver Beat a Full Hand.
An incident occurred on a recent
trip which I made over the Union
Pacific, which may be of interest to
your readers, as it was at one time of
uncommon interest to me.-- We were
rolling along between Salt Lake and
Omaha, when I made my way into
smoking-car to enjoy a cigar. I no-
ticed a group gathering in the center
of the car, and crowding my way up,
found two men gambling. One was
a well-dressed man, but bearing the
appearance of a black-leg; the other
was a-veritable miner, just as he came
from the mountains, with long, griz-
zly' beard, roughli, coarse and dirty
clothes, 'but with lots of gold. The
play was for quite large stakes, and I
heard it whispered that the gambler
was about to fleece the miner, and
much sympathy was manifested for
him.
SThe gamne-draw poker-still went
on wih'ihardly a word spoken by the
jplayeri, till finally, when a large sum
;vas on .the board, the gambler, being
called to show his hand, threw down
three aces'and two queens, and reach-
edfor the money. The miner stretch-
edvi'er his'hand, and laid down two
aces, showing, of course, five aces in
the paqck. He then reached back and
drew a, large navy revolver, cocked
it, placed the muzzle directly between
the.eyes of the gambler, still holding
.his hand. Not a word was spoken,
butieach looked steadily into the eyes
o'f the- nherlr .remn the. hand h eraan


to move quietly from the money, -the
form of the gambler to draw back,
and still the revolver followed. He
stepped into the aisle, and here the
scene became so interesting to me and
several others present that we drop-
'ped under the seats.
The gambler slowly backed toward
the door, with the revolver following
till the door was reached, and he
passed out. The miner coolly let
down hammer of his revolver, replac-
ed it in his pocket, swept the money
from the board into his pouch quietly
lighted his pipe, and settled back 'in
his seat, as if nothing had happened.
The strangest part of the whole busi-
ness was that not a word was spoken
fromin the time the gambler laid his
three cards on the board till he pass-
ed .Out of the door.- Youngstown (O0.)
Banner.

The Silk Weavers of Southern France.
Their number is about -xz15,ooo, of
:whom 35,000 live in Lyons and its
vicinity, and the remaining 8o,ooo in
the Departments of the Rhone, the
Ain, the Iser, and the Loire, there are
large manufactories of woven goods,
as well as many private looms operat-
ed., for the manufacturers of Lyons.
Of the 115,000,-56,350 are men, 50,-
636 women,: and 8,o015' ,children.
There are two classes of weavers--
master weavers, who own their mi-
chines, and journeymen working un
der them for half the price paid for
weaving. The silk belongs to the
manufacturer, who sends it to the
weaver, also to the dyer and winder,
apd pays per weight or length Ifor the
labor on each. 'Thi weaving is us-
'allyjperformied'in'a room of suffici-
"e'nt size o accommodate three or four
ioo0ms-aqd adjoiiisassmnall room (bed-
robmandikitchen combined) for weav.
'er 'and' family. The gross earnings of
the' imAster are from.four to six francs
(86 pP.nts ,o $I.2oj, and the journ-
eymnp from rtwo to three francs per
iday. 'All extra expenses are ,defrayed
'byi the master. Journeyman dyer,
[work"by' day (of ten hours) and earn
from$'x teflsto For work that
does',t':require special skill, work-
metn eanii fromi' 66 to 87 cents'per day
of eleven hours. ; Feniales are em-
'ployed in some ofthe-operations, and
e'me 'from*4' to' 50 'cents per day of
elueme hours. For over-time, men
receive 16 "to_-2- :enfts, and women
and .apprrntices, si. cents per hour.
Front, he daily wages a deduction is
-,iaeifor'.ost't~ime,.ihe, moral influence
e;whtchii as injurious as the material
19-s. In ILyons, two-thirds of the
hands empl6)oed in dyitig lose, on an
average, twenty days' "in a year, and
other third fqrty or fifty days. Oper-
atq'ves without work live on credit at
first, become involved jn debt, then
discourage, and are soon reduced to
poverty.-

The Russian Governmerit has signed
a Convention ,tith Japan, by which
the Japanese part'o.f the'Island of Sag-
ballen is ceedd to Russia. ,,.


Oatmeal.
Oatmeal is principally used in two
ways-for the making of mush or por-
ridge and of oat-cakes. Porridge is
a principal article of food of the Scot-
tish peasantry, generally accompanied
with milk, when milk can be obtain-
ed, although when milk is scarce-
butter is sometime used, sometimes
sugar, and sometimes molasses.. For
most people in a sound condition of
health there is no more wholesome
article of food than oatmeal mush and
milk; none contains a larger propor-
tion of flesh-forming and heat-produc-
ing substances; while to almost all
who haye ever been accustomed to its
use it is extremely palatable. Gener-
ally speaking, there is no better arti-
cle of food for the nursery, none more
likely to maintain a healthy condition
of the stomach or to give vigor to the
frame, although there are exceptional
cases, both among the young and
among adults, in which the use of
mush or porridge is unsuitable, pro-
ducing painful distention of the
stomach and indigestion. While the
caprices of children ought not to be
heeded in such a matter, the actual
conditions of their constitution ought
to be careful observed and regarded.
Mush is generally made by simply
boiling oatmeal in water, stirring all
the while to prevent singeing, and to
secure the thorough mixture of the
oatmeal and water into a homogenous
mass without knots. The quality of
mush very much depends on the
amount of boiling which it receives.
It can not be too thoroughly boiled.
Imperfectly boiled oatmeal is a very
coarse article of food; and, unfortun-
ately, much of the article used by the
poorer classes in Scotland and else-
where is of this character, and that
prepared for the nursery is often no
beapr, through the carelessness of
servants, who wish to get through
their work with as little trouble as
possible. It is not nearly so digesti-
ble, and~therefore not so nutritious, as
when really well made. A common
mistake in the making of the mush
must also here be noticed, as tending
much to the deterioration of its qual-
ity-the adding of meal by de-
grees, while the boiling goes on, un-
til the proper thickness' is acquired,
the result is that part of the meal is
imperfectly boiled. The cook ought
to know the proper' proportions of
meal and water-knowledge not very
difficult to acqiire-and mix them at
-onre,-so--tilar all the meaI-m-ay be-
equally boiled. But it is to be ob-
served that the water must be boiling
before the meal is put in, which is not
to be introduced in a mass, but, as
it were, strained through the fingers
handful by handful, as quickly as
possible. I
A Wonderful Retention of Heat in a
Mine.
The Virginia City Enterprise says:
On the 3d of October last, about two
o'clock in the afternoon, the large
new air-shaft in the Belcher mine,
then completed to the 1,ooo-foot
level, took. fire and was destroyed.
The timbers of the shaft all burnt cut,
and the rock fell in and blocked it up.
After mature deliberation it was
thought that it would be better and
cheaper to sink a new shaft than to
try to clear out the old one, so badly
were its sides caved and so great was
the quantity of rock that hid tumbled
into it. The new shaft was sunk a
short :distance to the west of the- old
one. It has now reached a point
near the i.ooo-foot level where it will
be continued down on an incline.
The incline was started at the .i,ooo-
foot level, and carried up to meet the
vertical portion of the shaft. The
course of this incline carried it
through the remains of the old verti
cal shaft, but as soon as it was lapied
the men found they could do nothing
in it on account of the ashes, burtit
earth and rocks that poured down
into their incline. A tunnel was then
run until it had reached a point a
short 'distance west of the old shaft
where a vertical praise was made to
the line of the incline, to be run up to
meet the new shaft. The men then
began working down on the incline in
order to reach the point from which
they were driven intrying to come
up. They have succeeded in getting
into the bottom of the old shaft,
where much to their surprise, they
find the rock still red hot. In trying
to put in "timbers they were set on
fire, and in order to work at all it is
found necessary to bring a line of hose
into the place and play a stream of
water on the rocks wedged in the bot-
tom of the old shaft. There is no
timber on fire among the rocks.
They seem to have been heated to a
degree, so intense at the time of the
fire that they have remained red hot
ever since.. When we find so small a
mass of rocks as can be contained in


the bottom of a shaft remaining red
hot for over five months after having
been heated to whiteness, should we
be incredulous on being assured by
scientists that the center of the earth,
once a molten mass of rocks, still re-
'mains in a molten state after untold
ages? Nearly three years after the
great fire in the Yellow Jacket mine,
places were found in the lower levels
where the rock. wn still nearly red
hot,
The lion. Mi. T. Jugg has written
a poem about Tilton. He handles
his subject in a one-,sided moinnr,


A Notable Curiosity.


Among the many curious consign-
ments received in this market by
commission merchants, the one re-,
ceived yesterday by S. H, Long, at
178 South Water street, takes the lead.
It consists bf a petrified rattlesnake,'
measuring ten feet, and shows dis-
tinctly the formation of twenty-five "
rattles amid a button, the forming of; :'
an additional rattle. It was taken
from a coa! mine in the vicinity of r.
Upper Alton, 111., some thirty feet .
under ground. The formation is per- -
fect, and represents a snake in the act
of creeping. A prominent city official
has examined the curiosity, and pro-
nounced it very valuable. The party
in question has asked for the refusal of
the pirchae of it, and it is-quite fte- '
ly that it is wanted for the Academy
of Sciences. Mr. Long asked $4oon
for this curiosity. 'Should this be the
serpent which tempted Eve in the
Garden of Eden its value would be
unituld, but it is more than probable..
that it antedates that historical snake .
-Inter Ocean .....


Ticonderoga.


FORT TicoNDEROGA, May :io-The
Cent-nnial celebration of the capture
of Fort Ticonderoga by Colonel Ethan:,
Allen took place:here to-day, and pas-,
sed off with great spirit. At sunrise .
one hundred guns were fired from the
old fort. People poured in all the !
morning from the neighboring towns
in New York and Vermont, 'by car- -
riage, railway and steamboat, so that
at noon over six thousand pick-nicked
in the grove. The procession formed
at 1.30 P. M. It consisted of military
and civic organizations from "Ticon-
deroga, White Hall and Port Henry,.
New York, and St. Albans, Wiliooski,
Burlington, Vergennes and Rutland,
Vermont. The procession moved to;:
the tort grounds over the route taken:
by Ethan Allen in 1775, with'bands
playing, banners flying, and followed
by a large crowd. Arriving at 'the
plateau of the fort a line was formed '
around the platform, anrid the proceed-
ings began with music by thecon- .
solidated bands. Prayer was offered'
by Rev. L. V. Price. An address of
welcome' was made by Colonel Win.
E. Calkins, president of the day. Rev.. _
F.-.J., Cook delivered the'iati6n,'
which was historical in character, ex-
ceedingly patriotic in spirit, and a.-
tribute to the heroofthecommemora- -
-tion, Ethan Allen. Speeches were -
made by Colonel W. C. Joyce, of
Rutland, General Cole, of Troy, and.,
other guests. Letters were read from
Governor Tilden, of New York, Gov-
ernors Peck, Paige and Stewart, of'
Vermont, Colonel Ethan Allen, of
New York, and Abel Ripley Torrey,
of Detroit, a son of one of the brave
patriots who accompanied Colonel. .
Ethan Allen in his celebrated exploit,
and from others. With music and
salutes the celebration closed and the
large crowds dispersed.

Measuring Growing Timber.
To those unaccustomed to measur-
ing timber, it appears a laborious un-
dertaking to, measure and value two or
three thousand .growing trees. It is
not so difficult, however, as many.
imagine. An expert band will easily'.
measure from 8oo to 1,ooo trees in a
day. We keep a staff of six or eight
laborers to show the lots and assist in
measuring the timber, and, a few days
before the sale, the whole of them are
employed by different, parties. Eac4; ,
timber merchant requires two assist-
ants; one carries a long pole ;marked ,..
in feet, and the other a leather 'strap,
which indicates the side of the square.
Ingoing to work, the man with the
pole declares the height of the tree in -
feet; the man with the strap the side:
'of the square in inches; and the tim,.,
ber merchant refers to. his sliding,rule....
for the contents. The measure, has
to allow an inch, and sometimes more
for the taper of the tree from where
the girth is taken, to the center of the
portion he is measuring. OQf course,.',.
this is measuring with a center girth;.-
but an experienced measure never -
goes'higher than' half the circumfer : ;.
enice of the but, and adds the numnbe: *
of feet he considers the tree containsft '
above the point. All these things'are "
puzzling to a beginner, but it is as .
tonishing how accurate an old prac- .
titioner's work is,: Some contend,
says Mr. A. Peeble, in the Arboricul-"
tural Society's rranactions, that it
is impossible to give an approximation,
of the contents of growing timber y ;
means of a pole and strap. They ar-
gue that an experienced judgment and
practised eye are more to be depend- .
ed upon. If those using the pole and l
strap were to discard the eye and judg--
ment, there might be some force in ,s '
this reasoning, but as they do not,
the whole argument falls to the-.
ground. I speak from experience-
when I assert that there is seldom a-.'..
difference of five per cent. in th',
measurements of the various purchas'.-"
ers, and when the lots are aftewards
tested, most of them are actually with- /
in five per cent. of the truth.-G4 U '
den.

"Cut this out; it may save your ,
life," is the heading of an advertise- *
ment in the Portage Register. A
Portage man cut it out, pasted it in
his hat, and the same day was kiAed
by a brick which fell freu the top QL
a building. ; "


a


_VL l Ut[7_ nL -I W %


J6











TIE NEW SOUTH:. WEEKLY. JACKSONVILLE, .WEDNESDAY, MAY


19, '1875.


THE NEW SOUTH. tiev cannot he depended upon for steady once. I am, sir, in the realiztion of
wol'k. tar more than my wildest anticipations
3. S. ADAMS. As one who was for many years ac- allowed me to believe possible from the
OR. it. CA^RUI.. "') ADVA'S,'*ARRUTH1 & CO. As one who was for many years ae-
oo CKIt. jm t eo ADAmMaS, CARRUTH & CO. bit- product ot a small grove, and I am con-
EO, BURNSIDC. ) customcd to the use of the labor habitu- fident fom in.lica.iitii.- too pla to be.
ADAMS, EDITOR. ally resorted to in the North, we beg misunderstood3 that I have only began
.. leave to correct this prevalent and un- to see what is yet to come. I have not
TO CORRESPONDENTS AND OTHERS. founded notion, by expressing our be- the slightest doubt that my grove of
Items ofaeld o f thei s a five hundred trees will give. nile -one
efLocal interested solicited a parts lief that the colored labor i s reliable I i,,,, i barrels lor shipment, and they
State. AI~o, communications on subjects ofigeneral
intersLi, .p,,.i.;l) edu,:.,t; nAl, ..,.:ial and industrial as any agricultural labor common in the will bring me reidil3 ten dollars per
refasthe' rrcts and circumstances'rwill permit. NTesNorth, with possibly ..the exception -of .,',in.'l What a i' -ull from five acres
We are not re. -: ..ni,; fr ..i,,r expressed by our the Germans. Such as it is, tle develop- of land that would hardly produce corn
correspondents. Rejected manuscripts can neither enough t pay for planting. The frit
be returnednorpreserved-. Anonymous contributions ment of the South is now, and for many nough to pay fotrees will mantig. of them re-uit
will not be noticed. now on my trees will many of them re-
years will be largely dependent upon it main there until the first of October next
Correspondence from Florida and its character-is to be improved and it allowed to do so, and will improve
We are-ften i mused t';the ci, ine- general development hastened by en- in flavor each dav until plucked, and I
We re~flen musd t te cn, un- S11rtocvel, and tfteeo -en i wit all con, den.ve, that the day
tious ton,', with whichilu' correspond- c., r igiiig and not- d 'ir, iig the predict with all confidence,-that the day
is not distant when the fruit will hang
ent hor Flolrida coses his letters hupn, labor upon which, at'all events, reliance perpetual from year toycarin mygrove.
as though, after having been aigri-e.ill niit be had. What other fruit, in what other country
Cud s.h1esuts6e chieved -a, this'
disappointed with many things and hav- In time orango-e culture is destined to could such results be achieved as this
ing enjoyed himself much more thAn he become a great industry. Everybody I think I can confidently say there is
is crazy for a grove. Hundreds of a're~s none in the United States if there is in


had anticipated or indeed intended, he a
felt the necesiy of -qualifying his per-
chance too glowing a picture, in order
to presmerv'fhis character for that digni-
fied impartiality which becomes an ex-
perienced' and knowledgeable traveler.
We take such aIletter from the Elk
Democrat, a Pe.nnsylvania paper, atid
endeavor to soothe th.e,evi.dent qualms
'of couficientiousness with which the
'closi ag po'rtios at:iinpt to palliate the
evident, enthusiasm 'of the prior para-
graphs, ;by interpilating here :i[inl there
a remark pertinent to the current sub-
ject: "- -
LETTER FROM LTHE SUNNY SOUTH.:
JACKSONVILLE, FLA., Api'il 14, '75.
Alter an absence of 'cotipleo' wei ks,
spent mostly iil tltie ''Aiii'i tit City." it
seems alilllst like g"t'ing hlime to find
nitv.eil again occnul, in he theh id ph.isih
quailtter in Jail at hlle; anid licre 1,3
the way,; I cordi:Illy recom0im-erld antiy
I'rien'l.6 who nfay visit .the "Fl,'we'r
Land" uto i:make their abidling place< while'
in Jacksonville, at the genteel p.ri\ai-
bo.rtllilg house of Mr. N. M. F FI-,n,
assuring them a pleasant hime, gener-
ou itare, coiurteous ti'eatenteit; aind sur-t
roundings every way agreeable.
In these two weeks important ehangzs
have t.tkeni plaee in the situation. Wil-'
ter is gone, spring i- i' l.-ing .ind sum-
mer Treleps on ap.tie. T.i." nmrciury
daily is eoqnelting-amnI thi. -eighti.:',
andI, i Mth atl\ iceS I'ia ti.e NithO il:i
the -.iiow-.s ar.- melted :iind -tiein-It le-
leased Irom tht.ir 'icy lie'lteis, tih,- I'h.u-
saridswho have I\'e\\ l,.itirtii- in ard
roaming over Fliridla tile pt-,! t five
months are now.leaving for their homes
in numbers inme:isui'ed onIv by. the car-
r) ing ctp:tenv ol Ih-- et.ver .il r iilM :>\
andi t:ta,,usip lite. f ['lie stir a" il IU--
tie in conseqnui'n'- i ai.,t ni,.., ii.i e .tlh.il
thle curiosity h-.ps art-e ihron,-ed; ihe
m irket itor soi'ciir's 'and .i.neneintoeis
excitt-ed; tile Itt' i. i .illi tiii-. so .i te-
13 that itc OliilIlr ha.', ieen: made ii the
llmarket, :tId ei.uIgl' ,"ol' :tiai e'\ ti'mf.iz .
blitcks are taken a;ay t,-', c:iane tlhe Ih,.l,'
Nirthliern coiimuUlniiv. 'Tiie B:ak-i
gent`%, the manilul.i;o'.; id Ilie Bid,'n-
B.Ail'nll ga;lmesUS-tili lit ',e-:irld moulte
men, and all tile \:tilotn nlh,.r siind-
ling oit-erni tih.tt have held high car-
nival here icthe past winter, are quietly
filing tlhir ti lents, at,,1 even Morrissey's
fintincial manun, g:aiiet of then all, finds
hlis oc ni|,;ttilon g, ie."'
Th" l.i-t p ira'i_'I:iph ii worthy of the
spe-cial nttetlinitiiiii i' tir city officials.
L:mndli'rd-, lbit iiliig hotiise. keepers,
re1-lhturint propriet,'ir-, livery stable
mien, andil all who have shared in thle
fine pri litsi dI r-tied ir'Iii the visit of' this
vzjrt Ihrtu' l wal ,i'er-r-, c'iillpl.ti';inily
snilt muorin tl'ir 'deitarling friends, con-
templating a season of rest for them-
selves and ant opportunityt- t tluorouglhily
reorganize for the next campaign, sait-
guine in their anticipations of a greatly
increased harv-t next season-and
they'll h I ve it, iho. -'' ;: ,:
Speaking:.of wanderers reminds me
that the. saie.faces arc seen fall over
Florida.J Go whcr*-e 3, i n ill'. 'ou find
numerous pol|,i,, hlion \.'uI fir-L met
in J.irk.o'n\ illi.. Ilit ile St. J.i n ,i\,'-
at Augn-tine, ill thi t sililnde-'s aoirh
O)vkl.iw:,ha. up at Mtell.-nville, in the
Indian river eounlir\--w -i''rt- r \*iu got
roialinIg ahll.it here-. thi'ie 'iIndl e\eit-
where, Th.-ir tru'Vels ire iio., h.i% -
ever, all Iln l le li''ctti.,l--h'line'w.trl
bound; And illn two Peks h'r.in tinhe
pr -eilt tinm e J.ck-'.n ill.e :ii1l Fl.ilid-i
will be, like a I anqu -I hali, de-.ere'l.
Ill '.inu light iif1 i t experience i oitlier'
years. I mucli leair thlii r.apidI taikig i.fl'
may be a little pr-'nl:itire. One r'-
dtui't make a -.unnimer, \itlu kn,,v, nuor
the lirat rlaitii a sprin' -u-itle.-s Ihe're.' a
bug artounld.
%'ell, Florid.% i'st a great cuntrv. She
can boa-t the largest and limni.'si river.
entirely within her own lior 'ler-'s, oftin.
Stale in the Union, ands the -'nirst-,won4
derlul .prilt.z, in til- world. he hali.is
the Ocklawuha theree caii b' libut ont'
such,) a eliliu:le tilte peer of Italy, a soil-'
in which flourish almi'-t, everIt" vuietly
of de.ir'eil iropical Iruit. In addilimI toI
sugar cane. rie, ciIt,.,n. &c., s h'e has
als, th t orange, (inaiig..nus here,) wilthli
m.tiny other gre.tl n;Ilmral adlv:tnt(.tge
that miiht'.be tmenlionledl. But. uril,'r
tullately, the.-e resourceS .ire aillio-t en.
tirely u.udevlc hoped ai thier'e ti ) me
seemid.weiii.'hty rao e-i; wlir V-'. irIS nunl-
el.tpse betjyie Flori'iti il bee.'u'e a
prosperous and thri' iing State.
W ej.niu'ark upon this that the vrer
xtenit uf areta oaf so de~i'ah1 a t country
that is unnrleveliped, ihe intensity autd
extent of the interest :mlrcadv by in tIe
quate/mtiani arout-'l in reg uid ao Flhr
iila, couplehdwith the factii liht Flhuid.i
madeh mire ,n.nterial pi'ogres in tle 'I.tt
sleason than an' otierr Si uit'rui St ate,
with two exceptions. all cmu.iiii t.t
dispro've and. contradict the weighty
doubts of "W'anderer.'t .-
One *<'l the inm.t impl.r'tltnt, t le'hrlip-,
is the' qime.'.liont ol tllle, as, iia cotillt'-
qimencu i1 ihe ol, Sp.iish li.itnd ti riant
under whic)|I large il' ,et-. weae eceiltd-t,
inilividtnala'. itlh. c are vetv d' ili cliii- lit
much of' he l:hitls in tlie Shit.h, and lIrU-
dent partljin'u ,t'cuihiu :,h;tut in\ estlig.
Aq at luaist:thlirt3 .nihitmiins ol acres of


are being put out this season, and there the world. But sir, -l- cave long oeen
is little doubthut the business will prove esteemed mad on this subject andthe only
highly remunerative as well as pleasant, comfort I have is to. know. that some
provided no such contingencies occur as others are. rapidly catching the conta-
the severe frosts of 1835 and 185 ,or gion. Hoping to hear from you soon,
some insect appears to blight the orange. I am sir, very truly yours,
as the potato bug and gi i-,-lihppci WILLIAM EDWARDS.
have appeared in the North 'and West. J. A. Harris, Esq., of whose grove
Florida is a great country. ; I believe gs well as that oftthe Rev. Mr. Bishop,


I adi read somewhere m-at -it was- tne
sportsman's paradise. So it is. All atre
hutitir.g 'J i n here just now, even wo-
men and childr'en- after fleas.,..
Andhd the festive im ,-,'itii (his name is
lfi,,'ii.) and the ais.mtfliet, and even the
l.iiitili. r little g at, are c\er read) to
tender:you polite attentions.. "
According to our recotillection, there
are at least ten fleas in Sali Fi'ancisco to


one in i'i, -.li,1 area here, and many a
Fl..i itli:hn is glad to reach home from
New Yotrk or Naw Jet'sev to obtain a
*respite from sultry nights and the "po-
lite attentions" of the .bill-ious insects of
those parts.
After a rather vicious fling at the
crackers induced. by. Solon Robinson's
remarks that Florid:a was just the place
for a poor nitman, "Wantd'r'er" goes-on to
the following ratherish jolly coctlusion
which is creditable enough "as things
go"-" ".
And in conversation, a few days since
with a geiutlemiin. fornmerlv a citizen of
lthe extreme northeastern State in the
Union,: but for the past sixteen year's a
re'i,leit of Ja'ksonivill(, he enthu-tiastji-
tally exclaimed : "Winy. d-n it, I'd rath-
er die in Florida tlian live up thl-ri'e I"
This, possibly, was a little strong. way
of putting it, yet I hardly think hiim
entirelyv a Main-e-ack alter all.
The Norihern chaps are just now-the
most pleased looking set ot fellows you
ever saw. Before taking- finial leave
they all.step in at Beltelins' and indulge
in a la.-t social smile, then smile again,
.i1.'l 11'-tit' smile all around.
Now the ''season" has closed here the
inly **g. iiiil Ihps' itor a while will be
IA, gr -hi'l'il, i s and fleas ..
It ,- >Iiitt amusingg to observe the
varying expression ot the experiences
of many who ..0,tl- here ifor the first
tinl'. Having 1h It -nIM. place up North
where the snow was two or three feet
deep and everythir,_ Ir,'.entin ,. thl'.
step ftronm tihe steamer,; perhaps, eii-
veloped in heavy overcoats and furs;
Walking along Bay street in the warm
sunlight, where everybody are prome-
nadinog in light attire and palmetto hats,
they begin to realize the change, and by
degrees off comes the surplus w'rap-
pinitrs. Gleefully rubbing his hands,
one will say: ."Well, now, this is
nlice !"' Another will ,hiitle in : Well.
if I ever: stay-and freeze to deItth up
there another winter, you'll catch a
weasel asleep," and a-l subscribe to the
sentiment that Florida is perfectly
vl':iriiin,. andyoui will find them there
every winter after this. WVell, they se-
cure quarters in the. next few days, look
the town over, I see the sights and ad-
mire the flowers, and have fun. "with
the boys" generally, till the novelty
wears a little ,Off. and -they strike for
M11 -biit% ill' aand L-ike'.I--11i11. the Indian
river and St. Au.tuslinei; explore the
0' kl.'w. ha, the lakes, the woods, and,
alter exh.uiiiting their curiosity, anId,
i,-,-.flily, nearly so their stamps, find
mtin mselves again in Jacksonville.. Meet-
i.,L tiieni ia, day or; two after, you gently
qu. r3 : ?':Well, .how tdo you like Flor-
iItL i1Y' llhisi time ?", The. response .-is
Iki\ it, be sIgomething .atei' this'style:
'Ohi, t't i a nice place e,nou'h in some
tre-pelS'." The climate is good for' sick
to!k-. They have sonie very pretty
fl,,wer-' here,too, and I like the. oranges;
blut ibeln thigis is sand. I don't believe
I he. can raise, anything much, and then
tle money they manage to get out of a
'ellIow, ;1u tlih, n,,-quite-, and the
fie-., ;,nil-:tnd--h, .\\ell, d--n Flor'ida,
anylhaw I''
I lt rit North to-morow night.
-;:" :";-. .'" WANDERER.-

The Groves of MicanOpy and,.Orange
..... .- Lake. ,*
-, Oancge, Sumter, .Marion and Al.ichlu.i.
ciuunties, aie all in the line of:wbatmay
called the true or.inge-belt-of the -State,


tli. ain lnr:tl habitat of ilu1 citrus b.inlv.,
We receive god news of Ihe ipr'.-erit
crops. both fruit amid others from the
whole ol ihis region. *Judge Edwards,
who was i niji ir licj vi'iTv liiats '*n'i V 1iI


we gave a description not long since,
in a letter of, a jate date,. remarks: -
"Our groves are doing finely this
year. I will have seventy-five or a hun-
dred thousand oranges this year. Mr.
Bihop has several hundred trees -bear-
ing finely, less than two years from the
time they were budded. I have pine-
'apples bearing this year. We did not
have frost enough last winter to kill
anything, not even tomato, pumpkin
vines, &c."
Answer toInquiries About Florida.
Wi LMiNGI-'N, DEL., April 29, 1876.
J. S. Adams, Esq--I am indebted to
Mr. Thomas McClary, of this. city, for a
copy of your paper of the 17th inst.,
containing a description of a cotton
factory about to be started in Tallahas-
see, by a citizen of Reading, Pa. Con-
versation with Mr. MeClary, who spent
some weeks in your town the last win-
ter, gives the impression that yours may
be a better location fpr such business,
and I take the liberty of asking a few
questions, repliesto which are necessary
to form an intelligent opinion.
1. Referring to the "cotton in the seed"
to be ginned at the factory, how near
are you to the cotton producing part of
(uir State? and would the carriage bo
by wagon, water, or railroad? As.you
.are without coal for steam power, what
does wood cost delivered in your town ?
Do your saw mills hurn large quantities
ot their slabs and other offal, or have
they an market for it and the price ? Of
your poor or laboring, (white and black,)
how do they live, and is there employ-
ment for their children from twelve to
sixteen years old. Wouhl your citizens
welcome such maiufactories among
them and would your capitalists assist.
to any considerable extent in getting up
a good sized mill ?
1I am Senior in a firm here, which is
runnhig several thousand spindles and
upwards of' a hundred looms, and would
probably increase its profits by locating
'Ot -."r-r reh-- otOiTr g-ro'weT 'aid-Etlor- t"e-
midst of heiaper labor. Areply at.your
convenience will oblige
S. N. PUSEY.
This, the Easterly portion of East
Fhlorida, is not to any considerable ex-
tncut a cotton producing region, first,
-because the soil in this immediate vi-
cinity is not as good nor as well adapt-
ed to the growth of cotton as is that of
Middle Florida. which is second to no
part of' the country for cotton. In the
second place, the low price of cotton and
the i'epeated destruction of the crop by
the caterpillar, have, in conjunction with
the stimulus given by an increase, of
transportation facilities, induced a substi-
tion of fruit and vegetables, which the
lack of transportation has made difficult
in.Middle and West Florida.
'W e cannot therefore, truthfully, re-
commend this section for the ginning
braincl of your enterprise, although the
establishment, in this vicinity, o'f a cot-
ton tfactoryIwould largely stimulate and
increase the culture of cotton.
Jac1sonnville is located upon the St.
Johns river which with itstributaries
stretching quite into the interior of the
peninsula, giyes easy, sate and cheap
access-to a large cotton producing re-
gion., The J., P. & M. Railroad extend-
ing two hundred miles to the Chatta-
hoochee river- and crossing the Fernan-
dina and Cedar Keys Railroad at Bald-
win, twenty miles from Jacksonville,
thus gives the benefit of three hundred
amid fifty miles,'of railroad transporta-
tion available -for all put'poseh; conse-
quently transportation would be by
wagonm water and railroad. .
Wood', whether, pine or oak, delivered
ii the city, costs; from $3 to $4 percord.
SWe have ;several saw-mills in opera-
i.tion.in the -near vicinity, and.hitherto
the slabs or refuse lumber have been


th:tt the .aire priptect of transportation disposed of by hre and I presume much,
,tf ilie Frn.dindm line, has ,rhd t fif n ot aloft the-fuel required for asteam
o lt- Fe" "in; line; has breaith..dth'
brIeath 1new I into the hole e- manrfactoty uul be contracted for at
gion along the Flouiia Railroad, and avetry-low figure:. .
th.it the pl.ttlu ini, of the det.are We' ha a large class of'laboring
-" -. f -he ,depot-_ .are m .... ."..
ldiwljd wth crate-- pf vegetablesof van- men, oi those who: with occupation,
ou- kirnil. lIe :stvS the breadth ft oul wo.uld:1become smO, and whowould gladly
1u114 iln melons and g.triln %6Le- )Il.e's aectpt the opportunity that such a man-
uotiniinm :at tl.ithl nd..ree o uftr would give. I apprehend that
imninse will be lor'.tal r in lastrof. it ip.P d Georgia, s. here, there
ks: it happened in Georgia, so hereto~
njlueit,n. will Lbe forwarde-d in tho hlit-of re ". "


Mh.y. I, a centt private etTer to us;
-M r. Kil\\jrd, S>13-4;..'


MIL'ANOPV, April 1t. 1875.
HoN. J. S. A,\-.s, Dear .-ir.:-Yoir
r.itriiieId t I-I or uidtl.r date of'thie l5th
ilN., i, mIaI, antd i reply pt-imit me to
S,\, ltlwithl-L-lidiu g llll s.ilt- of .trfgit
lha. c.e li ,l ii qit- laitire-.;atid highly 'remn u.
i-eif itl 1 ill hi% 0 ill(-c or twenty


I .- ll' lSol ,ln.1 e I ,,1 ,a ndLm-ilent: I, f |l elt.II
Fl, -ridat ad-I ti' i.rreIy unecumierlAd l r r. t I ti gt
: -' :, s fi n e ;I -, .v % r- r u r %% a n d %% i ll t ctki g alt
with anv tiBirueri.n- from Sp.inilh plI.:suie ill tilling yc,,ur ortir a-j soon a.s
gri'ntS, vMi'iilv lihr-apprehengions of' I :ain snficientlv iiilurin.d ol I he-i route
*\V.tkre" suI~. n-"jy otihe'S are ex, ;io i %%-eli tp hip l I .-enl hY FerFnn.
"'. '' unw lso ine aiid New York, itcwilll.e-necesatry
c l, n t.. .u U nuoi 1%ee ." "', a, ,i,,,_-,.he at ithe ltler plice
degreA. ,'... -" .. "to iush tlie liuit Ir'ward and pay any
'Flien omrfg4-lui labor qnatlon. M st ex'lp"ii-- thir n t\ aid u,.i r l'ati ring..
ot thee .5ct lteorv "ig..priini'wed by Ifie A-,you diid ir ii,.li t l i'any routi lori the
o ed 'lo .*i tplde, .Lind ti iy ar v 1ry i-u rc-, .-liipMuiL1it, you iU lt h:v e, tihiie other in
haltile. W Iihile on ilit e :tti',gi-e i lt.ii,, tei"lp,.'l'-Pe g,.fse m 'ln.,iruvtiii.ns lor
respe-t.vlqe ,'i I;tsW abidJig P'lp:o ,aleiipl'ing Uiroi l)c ago shallf g'fo6h at


need!be -nt.f ear whatever of: a lack of
labor whether of white or colored.
.Our citizens are intelligent and pub-
lic-spi iteil, anid we are confident would
inot only welcome tihe inauguration of
viny such m.mnulacturing enterprise, but
to thle full extent of their means would
heartily co-oparate; hut we are sorry to
add that our means are not equal to our
gI.dI wishea.. Still, if, as seems to, be
i.'.,e. sucs scope only is given to an en-
terprise of' this character, as befits -a
pi, r projectt, necessarily 6f atn nx-
pritineil:al character, we think that
the fair-and just proportion of stock
necessary to secure, all desired identifi-
e-t i- n of local interest could be secured.
We deem this letter -nse- of possibly
cobimm.adlingiimportanct.,Xo this region,
anil '-publish the letter and answer to
elicit mlui lthier di.cusmion of the 'subject
hvii orhvri through 'utjr .olumns.---D
NEW SOUT4. ''


Heavy Taxation.
We take the following extract from
and Illinois paper:
It is a marvel to us that owners of
Mound City realty are not bankrupted
by taxes. For instance: The delinquent
tax list, published in the Pulaski Patriot,
Aixes the State and local taxes on the
late homestead of Mrs. M. E.'Rawlings
at nearly one thousand- dollars. The
property will not produce a rental of
over $400 a year, and would not sell to-
day, fer $4,000 cash. The tax upon I)r.
Casey's homestead and adjoining
grounds. will reach $1,600-at least
seven hundred dollars more than the
property would bring in as rental.
How our neighbors are to meet such ex-
traordinary exactions, we cannot divine.
And yet the Democratic-Western Press
is unhappy, exceedingly so, at the severi-
ty of taxation imposed by Republican
mis-rule upon Florida and the rest of
the unfortunate South.
It is well tor our peace that we are
not compelled to pay taxes in the propor-
tion that rules in some of these very


sympathetic States.


.FloridakCedar.


Few of our citizens are aware of theta
comparative excellence of quality of
the 'Cedar of Florida. It is for many
purposes the most valuable in the world.
The Savannah News recently remark-
ed as follows:
Active efforts are being made to ac-
climatise the FloTida Cedar (Juniperis
Virginiana) in Bavaria. Its wood is
superior to all other kinds of cedar, and
is in great demand in the manufacture
of lead pencils. As this industry is
largely carried on in Bavaria, the man-
ufacturers are striving to secure a home
supply of the material so necessary to
their operations. Seeds have been sown
in the Royal forest, and about 5,000
young plants have been grown on one
private estate. The cutivation of the
tree is also being attempted in other
parts of Germany.
Every effort should be made to work
up a public sentiment that will stop the
wasteful methods ot procuring the need-
ed supplies of this valuable timber, and
demand adequate husbanding and re-
generation of the cedar forests of Flor-
ida, now so rapidly diminishing.

Marveloutly Credible.
United States Senator Dennis, of Mary-
land, who recently visited the South and
Southwest, has returned home, deeply
impressed with, and expressing a pro-
found sy)mpathy for, the distressed con-
dition of the great body of the Southern
people. He represents the impoverish-
ment of the country as extreme, the
finest old plantations in South Carolina
and in the Sea Islands are running to
waste and are becoming overgrown
with brush and wilderness, and says the
white people have a forlorn and deject-
ed appearance, as it they had lost all
hope. Hfe found agriculture for the
most part in the rudest condition, and
says that he saw but little land anywhere
J- -t-* "I rjyrn& 1 mu11d -mi Loui-iu-nu-that
would compare favorably with that of
Somerset county on the Eastern Shore,
where he resides. He thinks one acre
ot Eastern Shore land will produce four
times as much of anything that the cli-
mate will allow of, as one acre of land
in the Southern States.
Floridla impressed him less favorably
than any other State, and he thinks it
not. worth to-day the price our Govern-
ment paid Spain for it years ago. It is a
flat mixture of marsh and sand, mala-
rious and arid, whose much vaunted
orange groves are but small clusters of
a dozen or so trees, bearing no compar-
ison to the fruit orchards ot his State,
the largest one he saw consisted- of four
hundred trees. This belonged to a
wealthy New Yorker, who had hand-
somely established himself at St. Angus-
tine and kept things in trim condition.
Senator Dennis complains of the want
of provision for personal 'omntort and
even food at the hotels in Florida. He
-says that at Pensacola he had to send
out and buy coal off of a locomotive,
and beef from an army commissary.
while,.paying $3 per day board, at the
principal hotel, and the climate, was so
cold he was'coripelled to keep his over-
coat on all day in the house. His pre-
vious good opinion of that paradise of
the world the Eastern Shore, has been
very much enhanced by these experi-
ences, and he returns more contented
with his home than ever. Like Judge
Kelly, he believes the financial condition
of the South to be its present greatest
trouble, and that without the stimulus
of fresh capital, it cannot recuperate.
His apprehensions are that -thhitgs are
growing worse, in an economical point
of view, instead of better, and that sev-
eral generations must elapse before the
South regains anything of its former
prosperity. :
We take the above from the Daily
Critic of Washington and publish it that
its utter falsehood may correct itself.
Senator Dennis does not agree with
the Union Berald of Columbia, who
says he is tired of the. gushing orators'
expressions, idown4rodden South,"
"'ruined South." :It says: "The South
is- not ruined, but, on the contrary, is
wealthier than before the war, with the
certainty ot an increasing prosperous
future."
His miisrepresentations of Florida are
so outrageously false that they are only!
explicable by the tact that the Senator is
a large owner of lands on the Eastern
Shore of Maryland and the strong tend-
ency of immigration to Florida lessens
the market price of Maryland sand..

The People Against Placemen. :
Mr. Evarts. in his adulatory speech to
Carl Schurz, at- the 'banquet recently
given in his honor, attempted a concise
definition of the significance of the-im-
pending contest when he'.said: ,
"We know we want no better evl-
dence that this contest is between the
placemen and the people than what is
exhibited to our notice every day: that
When ai contest is by. the. people against
a puplic man, and he is displaced from
his representative capacity, the place-
men. rush, in; rescue hiti ftrom the field
of battle, wrsp him' up in thei American
flag amid send him 'out ot the country.
Now, sir,-they didn'tvoffer' that to 'you
wIett y'ou -oit your place iu the Senate,


and resolutions, duly authenticated, bt
published in the city papers, and a copy
'be sent to Headquarter D)epartmet 1ol
New Jersey. WM.'A. SMITH, P. C.
S. H MARSH, Adjutant.
April 27, 1876.

The Agricultural College.
The ,Monticello Constitution bhas thl
following amiable notice of the location
of the college:
Several of our contemporaries are ex-
pressing great indignstion because ol
the location of the proposed Agricultura
College at. Eau Gallie, South: Florida.
To our mind the Cullege might as well
be located at that point as elsewhere,
as, in all probability, it will never re-
fleet any credit on the State.' By th(
nature of 'the Congressional :ippropria-
tion, its doors will be open to children
of every color or "previous condition,'
and -consequently, ;'when the colored
element, enters, the whites will reth'e
and leave Atrica in. undisputed posses-
sion. Therefore, we are inclined t, tha
belief that the Board ot Trustees acted
wisely "in selecting a location beyond
the bounds of civilization. :

SGeneral Breckeiiridge is lying atthe
point'of death. .'


and that shows you lIo't yeo- pl.u l -1y
the placement, and not by the people
against the placemen."
A glance at the political history of
Mr. Schurz, as.given in one of the
Western papers, shows that Mr. Eva'ts
hit closer to the mark than ever he was
aware of .
Mr. Schurz came to this country jn
1852. He was first heard of as a defe-
gate to the Chicago convention of 1860.
The following year he asked for and
received a "place"--the missi,,n to Spain.
Soon after the war of the rebellion
broke out, he came home and asked for
another "place" lie did not receive it
immediately, but he did not resign his
ministership until the new place-a
brigadier generalship-was provided.-
Meantime, while waiting the appoint-
ment, he did not enlist in the ranks of
the Union army, but continued to
draw pay as a titled idler, constantly
besieging the President and the' War
Department for' a commtnision-a place.
He entered the army and "was present"
at the second battle of Bull Run, at the
battles of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg
and Chattanooga. It is no injustice to
Mr. Schurz 'to say that as a military
man he was a failure. He retired trom
the army as he.entered it, a brigadier
general, and nobody thinks of referring
to him as "General Seliurz.) After the
war he sought and-obtained another
"place"-a commissionership to visit
the Southern States and report upon the
affairs of the Freedman's Bnreanu. He
tried Journalism as a correspondent of
the New York Tribune. From ti he'Trib-
une he "graduated" to a newspaper
office in Detroit, Mich. Ile failed even
there, and emigrated to Wisconsin. He
failed irf Wisconsin, and emigrated to
Missouri. There he secured another
"place',-a seat in the United States
Senate. This is, in brief, the history of
Carl Schurz. For, during a six years'
term in the United States Senate, he
originated only a single measure-the
investigation into sales by the United
States Government during the Franco
Prussian war. And even of this meas-
ure it may be said that he was too cow-
ardly to introduce the resolution he in-
spired, but turned the scheme over to
the late Mr. Charles Sumner. The his-
tory of Mr. Schurz is a record of "place-
hunting''-from "place" to "place," one
official term lapping another in nearly
every instance. In the light of these
hard facts, let the American people re
fleet upon and judge of the effrontery of
the foregoing declaration of Mr. Evarts.
Yes. Mr. Evarts was right; the con-
test of '76 will be fought by a people
who love the country so providentially
preserved, and who will hesitate long
before they restore to power a party
that have demonstrated to the world
their willingness to sacrifice honor,
patriotism and country itself, in their
inordinate greed for "place."

The Blue and the Gray.
CLASPING HANDS OVER THE CENTENNIAL.
At the regular mrneeting of Phil. Kear-
ney Post, No. 2, G. A. R., held Tuesday
evening, the following preamble and
resolutions, offered by Comrade Geo. R.
Halsted, were unanimously adopted:
WHEREAS, The approaching Centen-
nial celebration seemnis an appropriate
occasion to bury differienctes resulting
from the late war, and when soldiers
who wore the blue, and when soldiers
who wore the gray may agree that by-
gones shall be by-gone, others should
not hesitate to hold out the hand ot re-
conciliation.
WHiEREAS, As veterans, members of
an association for benevolent purposes,
known as the Grand Arm3y of the Re-
public, assembled in a Post of our order,
bearing the honorable name of "Phil.
Kearney," bravest ot the brave, whose
gallantry in the battle was only excelled
by his generous magnanniaity to a fal-
len foe, feeling that in imitating his ex-
ample we can honor his memory; there-
tore, most sincerely and heartily -
Resolved, In ord-r that the celebra-
tion at Philadelphia in 1876 may be tia
tional, not sectional', thinking our efforts
in this regard may be beneficial, we
hereby cordially invite to come up to
that holy spot, allwaurviving soldiers who
wore the gray, and who with us on
many hard fought fields, now to their
success, now to ours, helped equally to
illustrate the national valor.
Resolved, That ten years having pas-
sed since the armies of the con federates
yielded, it cannot be otherwise than a
national benefit, if the victors can con
vince the vanquished that the fri'iner
have forgiven and will meet thl latter,
w-ith the right hand of fellow.vhip. ex-
tended, and with the motto of' otir or-
der, agree in fraternity, charity and
loyalty to the Union.
- Resolved, That we ask and hope fot'
the co-operation in this good work of all
soldiers, both in and out of the G. A. H.,
and invite comrades to give ext)ression
to their sentiments, not dotubting but
that they will agree with us in the pro-
priety and benefit ot this movement.
:Resolved, That tilfs Post respect fully
recommends to the Depar'rment Com-
mander, G. A. R., Department of New
Jersey, to issue a circular to the Posts
in his L)epartment, hn 'aectsrdaBce with
the sentiments herein expressed, that
New Jersey may early be found enga-
ged in the work of reconciliation be-
tween the sections.
Resolved, That the above preamhbl


Blow at the Pilots.
SThe Court of Appeals has just deciiled
against the validity of off-shore pilotage.
The following are the terms of the de-
cision of Chief Justice Church, as tele-
Sgraphed from Albany: "Tfhere is no
i proviion in the law compelling atvvessel
to accept the first pilot speaking h.er, or
to compel her: to pay. for services not
i' rendered, In the case of Cisco against
SRoberts, the decision has been reversed
by subsequent laws and is no longer
i binding, It is unjust, and ernriot hold
good-, that a vessel shall be compelled
Sto pay pilots where no service is ron-
Sdared or needed." This piece of tardy
justice-will be hailed with satjifaetion
by ship oyvners and by captains who.
Frequent. thi, port.--N. Shipping
List.
Miss Caroline M. Crane, oe of those
lost bh the Shiller disaster. was: a niecc
of the' wife of Senator Edomwds, of Ver-,
mont, with, whom she passed the. wintWr
in Wahington.. She.was a highly ac-
'eomplishedyoung lady, and waf on her
way to Eur'oe to`6pend'tW. yea-s with
Stht family of.Minister Marsh;-, and study.
art in Italy.-.-. "' '


.A Terrible Wreck..-
New York, May 8.-The Eagle line
steamship Schiller, Captain Thomas, c
which sailed from New York April 28,
tor Hamburg, by way of Plymouth and
Cherbourg, has been wrecked off the t
Scilly Isles, and it is reported that 200
persons have perished.
The Schiller sailed from here with 149 (
cabin passengers, t
THE SCILLY INLAND-S, -
a group of about 140 islets and rocks, a
lie off the southwest coast of Engoland,
about 30 miles from Land's End, and in F
latitude 50 north, loiigiude 6 west of
Greenwich. The larger of the. group
are St. Mary's, Tresco, St. Martin's,
Brechar, St. Agnes, and S.imLp.|I'. The
aggregate area is 5,770 a i re-. The is-
lands rise abruptly from a deep sea in a 1
limited circumference of thirty miles,
and consist for the most part of solid c
uninhabitable granite. In a few places(
the soil is sufficiently fertile to enabled
the few people who attempt existence
there to raise small crops of rye, oats,
barley, etc. The chief means ot sub- I
sistence, however, is fishing 'lnd the
manufacture of kelp. :'
The location has always been a dan-
gerous one for shipping and
THE ACCIDENT OCCURRED AT 10 O'CLOCK ]
.LASTXIGHT, ,
at which hour the steamship struck one t
of the dangerous Reterriere ledges near
the Bishop's Rock. The disaster was
caused by the (lense fog, which pre-
vented either of the Scilly lights ,being
seen. .
The officers of the Schiller were:
John G. lThomas, commander; H. -Hil-
ler's, chief officer; E. Poleman, second
officer; G. Freeze,. third officer; R.
Heintze, fourth officer; L Fahrig, chief
engineer; F. Conrad, second _engineer;
H. Roenne, third engineer; J. Kundel,
fourth engineer; Dr. A. Ball, physician;
E Schmertan, purser; C. Rtifarken,
chief steward, first cabin ; A. Felsknow,
chief steward, second Cabin.
The crew, including officers, num-
bered 124 men.
The agents here of the Eagle line say,
that Captain Thomas, of the ill-fated
steainer Schiller was the oldest com-
mander in their line; was for many
years in the s service of the Penin-
sula and Oriental Company; occupied a
high place among British sailors, and
was with difficulty induced to leave the
British service to enter that of the Eagle
line.
Captain Thomas was a man of middle
age and unmarried. lHis residence was
in Hamburg, and, although most of his
life had been passed in British vessels,
he is said to have been a native of
Germany.
It was reported yesterday that
THERE WERE 103 WOMEN' ON BOARD.
1he survivors were taken to-day from
Penzance to Plymoutlh, whence they will
sent forward to H tinimi'..r, where there
is the greatest excitement. It is assert-
ed that life-saving belts were issued to
the women. It is certain that most of
the passengers found none. An order
Was given that the first boat should ta-'e
the women and children. This boat
capsized. Poleinan says seven boats
were launched and only two lived. The
others were staved and swamped im-
mediately. The cries for help lasted
until 3 o'clock. The last voice was that
of a little child in the cabin. It is not
probable that the boats could have lived,
even if they had been successfully filled.
The whole number saved is tforty-four.
The total number of lives lost is .311.
The Herald. correspondents succeeded
in interviewing Mr. Polem:tn, the sec-
ond officer of the Sch Iler, and Henry
Stern and Mr. Frohm, first-class pessen-
ger's. From their narrative we gather
that the voyage was moderately good
Until May 4. The last three days it was
impossible to take observatioas.. The
ship was
OUT OF InER COURSE.
half a mile at the time otf th va.taistro-
phe. Captain Thomas was omrdeck night
and day for ifour entire days. At 7
o'clock in the evening of thle seventh
there was a dense hfog. The sails were
tak n in, the engines pu.t ojil half speed,
and the fog-bells used. Bishop's light
was unseen, though ouly a halt mile dis-
tant. At, 10 ,'clock we struck on a reef,
and after fiur bumps the steamer set-
tied down. There was a violent sea,
and the tide was rising. The darkness
was intense. Most of' hk> male passen-
gers were awake, and themo was the
usual rush lor tihe boats, but nearly all
thle boats w.re staved. One boa, with
a few sailors, le't the ship, the occu-
pants cowardilv refusing to aid. The
cant-tin endeavored to coaiipel ole'd.eii by firing a revolver overt hei-r hl adt.. Dar'-
ing two hours six cannon shots were-fired.
when the powder thrmpened. Distres
signals, rockets and blue lights were un-
answered. At midnight the fog lilted
ill a minute, revcaliuig the light house.
The waves were sweeping the decks and
CARRYING AWAY VICTIMS.
At 2 o'clock the deck house, in which
were the women and childrei,- was
t swetp aw-ay. The cries and shrieks of
" the victims were' heart-rending. Then
followed a ghastly silence. Aft, the
smokestack t~ell c.ushing some of the
floats, and two. others were carried:
away. The reinainder followed the
s .captain to the forward bridge. Each
t .-uccee(liug wave took 'rresh victihis.
t Some sought revlge oh the mainmast
Sanol S. me on the -hremnast.
At 3 o'clock the ciaptaln and.two other
officers were on the bridge. The cap-
t .tain dletsce.idod for a motmuent to .render
, assistance and was swept away. "Thus
* perished a hrave man," says Mr. Stern.


There is an old idage which'ruAis,' -
"When thieves fall out honest men get
thleitr due." Ah extreniely animated
discussion upon the subject of the ex-
horbitance of the charges of the papers
having the official printing of the city of
St. Louis, has resulted in awar4ipg.,t..
contract to the lowest bidder.*-.The'-
competition was so brisk that the adver-
tising was awarded to the DspateA for- .
21 cents a line.

The latest assertion of the historical ,
inconoclasts is that -documentary evi-
dence exists to prove that the Boston
patriots of 1773 emptied nothing but
painted oats into the harbor), the British
tea being takepn a.ahreand economically
used in the ordinary .way-
SThrift, thHift, Horatio." -,....
We don't believe the story. The oats
would have cost them something,.and if'
was cheaper to throw away. vWrr Vqo-
pie's tea than their own oats.. .The9Bos-
tonians are very patriotic "i'd' philan-
,thr.opic people, and in the tea business,
as, in thei anti-slavery crusade; they-
demonstrated their willingness to sacrn-
feie any amount of other-people's pro-
perty in the maintenance of their prin-
Aelos.-SavaWX. 2fws. 2q ,'" 3 '-


0


-~U;- -- -~- ~' -`-- -' ~~ ~1~-~~~ ~r---~-~~~ ~ ~~ --r ~L -L----------~ ~LI II--~- I


___


kJ &~ 'lLC mC'S.
CIVIL APPOINTMENTS.-The follow"g'
civil appointments have been-made
luring the week:
Commissioner of Deeds-Robert Scott,
o be commissioner of deeds for the
State of Illinois.
. Madison-Robert Cray,-to be county
commissioner, vice Edwmad Murray,
term expired.
, Levy-S.,C. Beddick, to be inspector
anir.d measure of lumber and timber.
Volusia--J.B. P.Parkins, justice of the
peace, removed.
.Banta 'Rosa-W. B. Gaines, to be
county Surveyor, reappointed; Hanni-
abAl Rowe and W. W. Potter, to ,be
county commissioners, reappointed. -
Orange-Walter Gwyn to be notary '
puldic. .
'al/on-I-lHenry -Call, to be county,., -, -
conmissioner, vice Robert Garnett, tefi'-*l l"
expired ; John L. MeKinnoin, to beconn-
ty commiia.ioner, vice H. Stucky,- term: .
expired. : :-
The Key of the Gulf says: We learn
that Col. Best, f r several years in com-
mrand of our fortificaiionz, on this Island,
has received; a furloihugh to enable him
.to visit Europe. The Col. will carry
with him the kind rt-gards orinl who
lave made his acqnaintanee .'-'/2 -
The health of Key West is reported.:-
to'be all that its citizens could desire. ,
The estimate value of Exports fromt f
Key West to New York, for two weeks
ending May 5th, amounts to $131,000,
chiirfly cigars-and sponge." '
ORANGE COUNTY.
.Mr. H. L. DeForest is making prepara-
tions to put out another grove, the-place
selected is just beyond Bel:ir. -
The new hotel will qoon begin to:-puLt,
in an appearance; the building is to be .
200 feet front. : -"
Mr. Solary of Jacksonville is erecliin'g"".. I
a nhe wharf near Mitchel'Ps, on Lake :
Jessep. It is we hear one of the finest -
on the St. Johns. "
The crops in this:county have rcAdv-
ered from the blighting'effects of the
cold weather, two weeks ago. and are
now looking remarkably well. The
planters generally haie gooI stands of
cotton, and if favorable seasons assist '
their efforts, they will re;i)ai rich harvest
in the fall. We always iiake an abun-
dance of corn in this county, for home
consumption, without much effort, and
frequently supply our clever neighbors
over the line in Thom.istconht'y.-Montdi- '
cello Constitution ..., s, .
A panther, seven feet 'izx inches loigi,
and weighing one hundred and eighty
pounds, was killed by a colored iua:n.
one day .last week, near the Aucill.a in -
this county. The-skin can -be seen at
Mr. WVeil's Store. It was-'a monster-
the largest,vwe presume, ever killed in .
this portion of the couitry.-Constitu-
tion. :' i
Dr. T. M. Palmer drove a horse to
Thomasville and baek one day las, -..
week. lie was a valuable animal, bti.
harness will never be thrown across his"
back agnin. Ile died without -much
effort.-Constitution. .!-
We hope the Dr.%s business was suffi-
ciently tirgent to warrant the. drive
which caused the deatb of r is. rorse.
MeLin is r, ported as having told an
Eastern editor that he was compelled: by .
Stearns and Walton to make the recent,, -
redesi~gnatmon of "official papers," and in
the E turner he did. Can this beso? -It
does not at all agree with McLini's letter.
to the editor ot the Cedar Kevs Journal,.
in which he said that he had be'en guided
by the express, wish of Republican Sena- .-
tors. It is a very conteipt)tible business-
alli around, and the noi'e it is stirred' the
worse it appears.-Floridian. 4J
The S;.ate Sasage Maker had better
talk less and keep his cleaver in order.
lie will betray State secrets the first he- &
knowss, and then Charles the Silent will.,
issue a writ of ejectment. :
Several prominent -Jacksonville mer-
chants made ship-wreck of their finances ':
last week. Tot) mucn business -or the
town and a failure to seek interior trade. /-
by judicious advertising.-Floridian.
We should like to see Brother Dyke
demonstrate that proposition. ;. .
ALACHVlA COUNTY.
The prospect is quite flattering for the
reaction of a .$2Ii..i0 hotel "here soon.
$5oO was subscribed the first day the.
subscription paper was offered.
James Monroe, the ()ioted t'ifan co- s -
victed th" last term of the Cirt'uit Court l &
lor the murder of Mrs. Smith.. is- to'-to
hung oh Friday the 2R1stI at this place.
Cu-untbeirs, beans and Ir'ish potatoes,
are Icing shipped in Lhrgo quantities.
On' Wednesday a Qar load lelt Gaines-
ville depot, and bearlb as many more
the day before, bound for New York"' .'
via Fer'nandina Steamship Line.. -
The first shipment of watermelons fbi'
the season, passed Gainesville depot on' '
Wednesday last, consisting of' four blr- -
rels. The, melons were shipped by .
Messrs Wonull' & Rogers, of Cedar Keya, -"--
'and consigned to Messrs. Faulk & Co.7, -
of Savannah. *-. .:. .A."

"Found drowmwd," :s, the verdict' o.-ie ;.;,
the coroner's fury oB, the' Sehilhet' vic-:' .
tims. Who disputes that tact? The
public are anxious to kniowthe cause -of
the disaster. Was it stupidity., recklesf.. ,^_'
ness, tr one of ltinse mysterious acts of ,A.
Providence, which no human sagacity
could have prevented P These word
"Found Drowned," will hardly, -atisfy
the public mind.


C*tjp W .--










S*'"TH NE SOUTH I "E -. ,-.,...NIL i ... ..__ .. .....M Y...
THE NEW SOUTH' WEEKLY... JACKSONVILLE, WEDNESDAY, MAY, 19, 1875.


I_


STEAMERS.


I


WHOLESALE ORDEIRS'AT SAVAN14AH PRICES.

' ; H. ROBINSON,
,WHOLESALE & RETAIL
DRU G-G IST1 ,. --
Hoeg's Block, Bay St.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
COMPOUNDING PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTy.


Beautiful Silk Scarfs,in variety of color, at BUCKY'S


COR. WASHINGTON AND ADAMS ;STREETS,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA,
Will build in first-class style, Carriages, Buggies and
Light Wagons.
Repairing neatly done. Come and see my work.
10-21 Jl.

Talmas and Peedee.Jackets at BUCKY'S.


HAY, SEGARS, &c.
Sole Agents for Florida for
Averill's Chemical Paint, and
White's Patent Money Drawer
Agent for
STEAMER LIZZIE BAKER,
V_ [I- 1 .\__%
AND
Van Brunt & Bro's. Line Sailing Packets,
FROM NEW YORK.
tw36-192 Bay Street, Jacksonv i ;!t ,Florida.

Fine black dress coats and fancy neck wear at Bucky's.

WILLSON & WHITLOCK.
Successors to Thos. A. Willson
DEALERS IN

GRAIN. FLOUR, AND FEED,
.VManufacturers of

CORN MEAL, HOMINY, CRACKED
CORN, RYE MEAL,; GRAHAM

FLOUR, CRACKED WHEAT,&c.

SCROLL SAWING & WOOD TURNING
TO ORDER.

Wood Sawed, Split, and Delivered

by Cord or Load.

K 2}A CKSON VILLE. FLA .
T. X1V.LS,0. 5is-66 W. A.'WHITLOCK

BUCKY takes the lead in the latest styles of Silk and
Fur Hats. 1n.7tf


"I'HE FLORIDA PHOTOGRAPH
AND


Fine Business Suits at BUCKYS. i : ::


FERROTYPE GALLERY,
ATLANTIC BLOCK, BAY STREET, JACKSONVIL-LE.

Is the only place in the State where every branch of
the Art is Successfully Conducted. Open for business
from 1o A. M., until 5 P. M.

A. G. GRANT will attend. to the taking of all
Photographs until further notice. Out-door Photo-
graph orders attended to as usual, on due notice being
given. 5 5 t

B OAT BUILDING.

A. G. CHAPPELL, -"
BAY STREET, near the Cable Crossing,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

YACHTS-:AND- WHITEHALL
BOA rs,
Built to order.
STEAM YACHTS
With the most approved machinery. Will build of
any size, from 25 to 10o feet Call'and get my prices.
NEW 28-FOOT YACHT
or sale. 9-36 tf

Ladies' underwear, to be obtained at BUCKY'S.


Percale shirts, zo niceakillt. ky i. ; .; :.l


"IL;C p :".X.-. ,- .'.: ..; {^*,
""* Dealer f (6 **'"* *'* ''*/-

FRUk T AS' VEGETABLE ES, "-,.,,
MAGNOLIA MARKET.M ::, '*-:>
; Tantwile otpplied *t; .. *-:. AIp, h -tflllwepy, ,,.f:si '..< ,; *r:- ;

ASTALL IN THE OLD MARKET,:
For the acconmiainiott.of down-own isrpxtpr. ; o i<;<
It will PA~Y uio V dfw m. 41) pce *>!I-gir.'
.4i7 :y 1 P' ; 17.^.X ^IC 1.,
:4.1 IT *'


-


CITY NEWS:

Post Office Notice. __
Until further notice the;., northern nd
western mail will close at 3.80 p. m.,
railroad time. i i /

Off for Europe.
Capt. H. T. Baya, H. D. Bounethiau
and C.-G.,Elri6lti: leftobnthe City Point
last Sunday for Europe. The good
wishes of a large circle of friends follow
them /,,,, - *: s '

Discontinued.
By order '-o _the, Postmiastir-General,
the post-office at Yellow Bluff has been
discoutined. Hereafter; mail for- that
place will be held in -the office in this
city for distribution.'

Armeric4i- Hook anid Ladder Company
At the' annual-election of 'officers for
this very live arm of -the& Fire Depart-
ment,' the following- gentlemen were
chosen for the corning year:'
Foreman, Joseph Marzyck; Assistant
Foreman-",A,. N. Dobbins; Secretary,
Alfred Horn; Treasurer, A.;Zacharias.

"; The Pony Dixie.
Our 'young friend Gdo. F. Acosta, of
the firm ,of Canova & Acosta, has pur-.
chased'.bhe Arabian pony Dixie, tor-
merly'owned by H. T. Baya. On.Mon-
day afternoon Dixie was driven by Mrs.
Acosta,' and from Iis handsome appear-
ance in the buggy, we should judge that
be is perfectlyy atisi AA with hi- transfer
of owners. .

Bad Weather.
A letter received by Mr; A. G. Rouse,
of this- city from a friend in New York,
written on the 8th instant, h*s this item
about the weather: "I am very sorry I
did not heed your advice and l;ta" a few
weeks longer, for it is quite cold here-
y et." :. T : .- .. --
The 'second edition of winter with
which the Norlhern State: w this year cau.ird ;a great deal of discom-
fort to such invalids as weot home early.

The New Era Advertiser.
We omitted to nolk'e the advent of
this ne.,ca.ndidate for the suffriages of
our community. The editor has had
many ears" expeiieinoe in the. business,
and evidently knows how tormake a
newspaper, even under the. most ad-
verse circumstances. Hi6st cojid num-
ber madle it. al~ppearance lt_-t Sjnird!;:V,
and is a readablc,-handkome sheet. We
predict for him-a lively time when he
once gets his hand in and his house
properly set in order. Miye have a
long life and a longer it.bank account,
than is usually the lot Uf we U1s.

Pic-Nic.

The annual pie-nic ol St. Joseph'%.
Academy took place hlst Thursdtay, and
was a very well manag,.t afti.r. Mr.
Ilusted kindly give the Sistters permis-
sion to use the beautiful, grove which
surrounds hik house foi thle purpose, and
afforded every facility t,. those in clirg The Rocha,'" waei w ,rlC t-.e'red for ihe
occasion and made several trips during
the day. The young people were-,well
behaved and happy; the exercises in-
nocent and in good taste, crtiisishllg of
acted charades, singing and a dance in
the open .tir. The only occurrence that
threw anything- like, a damper n the,
general enjoyment was a shower iii the
evening. The pic-nic nuty be set down
as a seccess .

The Fernandina, Fair.,
This inithil exhibition -of agricultural
products, seems to have p'oOd;-,a suc-
cess, and we feel encouraged tO IIhIK.t
for a similar 'display..in this cuuniy.
TheI friendly competition thus indued
, will lead oa better :System. of produ67
tion and to a greateri varkiey hf-eCrois.
We-are glad that our -county was
so well and so numerously represented,
and shali expect, lo see Ihe citizens of
Nassau pay us back in our ownecoin
upon some future occasion. Among
those from Jacksonville who exhibited
at the fair "we re S millh, Norton &oC0.,
musical instruments ; God. W. Frazie-r,
ein .a h n s Air. ". .u "a.t, "hi.'-u


all spo~ka well of the management, andl
of the hospitality of thie Islaud City



Our late associate, Mr. E. B. Kellogg.,
has embarked for Builtn on I)xl't the
schooner A. K. Bohtlly, in emnpainy
with several otherplrspn., reking quite
a pleasant party. He purchased a spet'ial
outfit for t~he voyage, consisting ,if a Eet ol


false whiskers, two flitinel hirts, (n:avy
style, highly embelished with while
tape,) a good sized medicine cheel.-bol-
ties all bearing the same label--and q:
meerschaum pipe. Notknowg"ii-;what
might turn up, he arranged hi; tretnpo-
ral affairs with solemn deliberation, and
is now prepared for even wias they may
come to hand. Philip Walter will con-
duet the news business, C. 0. D., ani1
put the tnetylwfee'ilwl d&fthe luosl
good. Intll Tioe I ai o June r" f friend :
address will hu Bunker HilltMouument,
2d story. Hail and farewell.

-Genins manifests itself in innumer-
able ways, but atne of the most simple,
utile inventions we ever had the pleas-
ore of extmining, is the Magic Needle
Threader, Which is advertised in another
column.'I Mr. Shepard will remain in
the city foi a week, during which time
he will ofter'these uselul little stroke!
fftmenius for sale at the corner of Bay
and ]ine streets, near the.ba Favurita
igar store.-


Homestead Exemption.
Judge Bradley, in the case of J -C.
Greeley, assignee in bankruptcy of the

estate of J. W. Scott, v6. J. W, Scott
and wife el al., has made the following
decision:
? J. C. -GRgELY, ASSIG1EE ROF JosEss id SorTT, vs.
JOSEPH W. -COTT AND WIFE, tt 41.
The assignee in this ca. e filed the bill to prevent the
debtor and his wife from setting up the right of home-
stead to a certain tract of land in the neighborhood of
Jacksonville, which they' claim as such The whole
tract consists of about forty acres in an unincorporated.
suburb called East Jacksonville, much of which has
been laid out into building lots, and on which the bank-
rupt resides and has a steamwsaw-mill which he has
operated for. many years as his principal business.
.1 hei onstitution of Floridaj adopted in i868 reserves
to every head of a family residing in the State, his
homestead and one thousand dollars worth of lpersonai
'property, free arom the claims of creditors. If not in
an incorporated city or town it may be a homestead to
the extent of one hundred and sixty acres of land; if
in such city or town, half an acre, without any limit as
to -value in either case. The reservation, however, is
only that of the homestead, and embraces no more.
although the party may own m. re i, iti,;r the presribe J
limit of quantity. It is .very niaiirial, Iherek.r j, t.:,
know what is meant by and embraced in a homestead.
Within the meaning of the Constitution of Florida, how-
ever it may be elsewhereit certainly embraces more than
a house for a shelter; for it may extend to one hundred
and sixty acres of land, which could never be needed
for that purpose alone. As one hundred and sixty
acres of land is the usual quantity for a farm in this
country, the policy of the constitution seems to be, to
allow a ma such quantity of land with his house, as
he is accustomed to use therewith in the pursuit of his
occupation. In other words, the object seems to be,
not only to preserve to the unsorunate debtor his house
for shelter but his usual mean of employment by
.Iih 1., ecrn his livelihood, and support his family.
I he _-Nat a,. well a- the ni. iduni- h-l hn.-n i interested
in his labor and ihau-tr) .ino th-elf -re, tokes care
that he shall not be deprived of the power 'to employ,
them.
In the case of a farmer; therefore, it is clear that the
exemption embraces his house and alarm not exceeding
the amount limited ; of course it includes (and so the
constitution declares) the improvements thereon.
Those improvements, however, must be such as to
make'them properly a part of the homestead, such as
outhouses, barns, sheds, wagonhouses, fences, &8c.
They would.not emnrace terci't 1` h L-, l`.-AJ.,,h ^.l *:-.
the tarm, fur the-e Ivt-il.3 t.e. P .[- r. -.I,-r p.,n ...I the iMa-n.
homestead. They constitute capital, separately invest-
ed. 'They produce a revenue of their own distinct
from that of the farm. "
For the same reason the farrm-r'. h-.r-e-[ejd would
not include a saw-riil, or a gr. r mill, ,..r a carding
arid fulling-mill, though erected .. .,, p 4[...r.... sF ,e
tract of which the farm is a part I te4 ire _-pcrtt
enterprises in which the farmer h_ i,; :i.:. ,-,it..,:J i..,
invest his surplus capital. They are no part of the
farm. If he runs them he does it as a separate busi--
tess -i'om that of his farm, and he cannot claim both as
appurtenant to and part of his homestead. They con-
stitute the basis of outside and sepa ate industries.
A mill-owner, i, l;l.e m inner may have a farm at-
tached to his it.ll ..inJ 'w. r k it as a separate and second-
ary business ,He may claim his mill as a part of his
homestead, but not the farm also. Otherwise by muld
plying his branches of business and trade a man
might have a large domain, consisting of many estab-
lishments, and claim them all as'incident to his home-
Steadi This never could have been th.: intent of the
constitution. It would be an unreasonable construction
of its terms. Those terms must be fairly construed so
a 1 f,1i ". ,r,.) out the policy of the constitution, and
y.t I,... .. E,,ulhoy all obligations of a debtor to pay his
That the preservation of a house-bolder's means of
carrying on his business, as well as a house tor
shelter, is within the constitutional purpose is evident
from the clause relating to city property, namely that
in a city or town the exemption shall not extend to
more improvements_ or buildings than the residence and
business house-of the owner, showing that the business
house as wed as residence is included.
But While the cases which we have supposed are
comparatively easy of solution, a great many others
will arise presenting greater difficulty and embarrass-
ment. The amount of property which the necessary
interpretation of the exemption will sometimes embrace
widl undoubtedly .appear as a great hardship and in-
justice to creditors. It is a great stride from that state
>)thi'ihg in which the sanctity of a debt induced the
I,.auLar.. not only to take ir'on the debtor all his pro-
perty, but even his liberty itself. It may be a question
wlhsther it is not carrying the principle of exemption
too far for the public welfare It is true that the lirmner
without his farm, the blacksmith without his forge, the
; I.-: ir,;i'.r *;it. ,jI i-i.. mill, the trader or business man
.1ih *Eu hi,' ,h.p, ,[, line any citizen without his place
to work and labor, or pursue his -ordinary calling, i
deprived ,f-the powcr t, npport himself and his family,
.ilud Lb,: .-n :' .1. LrJ-d., r, tc...i of a help to the com-
mina,i -t I h.-.,. ,:.t *bn.'.n...t, or places of labor or
occupation are respectively adjuncts of a man's home-
stead,'- and, within the intent and meaning of the
.n: I|T..no*: FI ,rrid. I,-.rrr, a part of it. W whether
thl. pr..v-,or, I? p l-A i, ,,or Inp litic is a question with
%h;cn It-c c ,url. <.c p.-i c.tir,,:rned In the eye of the
phill... .t .. ... .i' "r. I, .kt,,d a broad viei ,I'l" the ..
leie-i arid objects ',urn.,n i .r. et 't hl; P r.)',
-rtftsori ,n it' l.Iv.:.r aind IhI .redih .r c innot complain
ofmjoutice i.,r ,ie uoJdr-wi.d- ihe .. ndiLions when he
LI^C the crcdt I1 1 : a i-aic Iut. .3 ,n of policy, name-
1) % -'r-l t rie ..d\, r.c., bL .i-.e by the exemption
ir ,:qu., ,I..nt I., tnt- ,: -\\ ,,t,,r.,arising from the
i inlingrnc.s I apir i>,.. rein m r.in a community
% lIru ,it..t .in : [n .. a ,1 %. I: r whether from the
L .Micr >::ttlc t le 1., ,tl rio perate too depressingly
nip-... tnir.rpr,--.. pc.:r.f ti-.i however, is unneces-
sary 1 tw f -.-f' 1! .'I Li o. the i of Florida have, in their
L'Crn-,i'nti.-.m, declared what their will is on the subject,
irn, that declaration i- binding on both the people and
1h, O, ut I n *
i. tihc"ase under consideration the debtor claims to
follow the business and trade of sawing lumber, and
asks to I.,i 1 h,- ,ril. \,h ,.h A aoi..., -- his -dwelling, re-
;eif d .,- a p.rt ,.I ,. ,.e-te [r ..ur .im:.., this
*.l ,ri I :UpF.- i ICd e h, lhe C .. i,. -i., l pr..,l r, T he
m ill 1i, [ite -r-:r -I Eh141 (-.',.,n tI- .ri i r ;pp ur-.o.r ,i to,
an-! p 0r it ,th: Jclhtrr'- h...ni.stead. If it be objected
ihit hiev.!,. r v ,.,c..ui~tl. great, we answer that
the l i-.it ,,:,,, pr-:,. rih,- no limit of value and the
( ..uort c i, .I .pre., r;h: ,- e A;. b.-i:orh.r- *t t.: ,wethink
this a I ih': '.'t L rce ,..r rill Iri i t nnti h lie pursues
his usu..l trade or ayocation, (as well as the farmer's
farnm) Is connected with and adjacent to N/is dwelling, is
intended to be included in his homestead It i. the
stand, or place on which and by means of which he
may continue to pursue his industrial labor, and be a
useful citizen; and is within the object which the Con-
stitution has in view.
But the debtor cannot ask to retain those portions of
the forty acres tract which are not ancillary to bis
homestead, considered as ti!"' homestead of a lumber
man running a saw mill. !hose portions will be for
the assignee under the direction of the District Court
to separate from the rest. -
Under the- circumstances we do not think that the
debtor has pursued such a course as to throw undue
embarrassments in it,-. .f hi- .,.-;&^iiec which need
h n_,e rein.. -.al r-y'ihn nincr erri,,: ..i a ,. ; urt ot equity.
I I..n- AIti .t,; 'f ..h.:h h h .1- m., ih, ,aw-mill, we
think he is enitled t- claim, Unless there is some found
ation.:fur he allegation of the bidlthat, debts to a large
amount, which have been pr .v'ed, were .incurred in the
iereci...nr ,..n" improvements un the mill, and fur labor.
A'itli,, It we'vet'. wti be a matter which the District
Co,,uit can better investigate, when marshaling the
as-t, ,-i thie bankrupt estate,'arid enforcing any liens
whtch particular creditors may have on particular par-
ceis oi pr perty, we do not think there is any calL for
th, i ;,,ticrp. :;tii .1 his court.
S lhre in. t, .,, ir ,.ln ti,, is denied and the bill dis-
[ missed; without i,'., *arn-.l without prejudice to the
complainant, as to any part of the property except the
house and s~w milh,-and such reasonable extent o land
:about the same as may ,be n-cessary and proper for
i. tt.ir enj.. irn:rit Lr. a l-,..-r,,>.iead b') the debtor and his
I~nnly,, Ji-, dih.u plt..'t 1'J,.iJ,,:e as ':... Lhe effect of debts
,:,_.ntiiadLed ]s-T imk.-r.L',,e,,t and'la~bor.
\\ W donoruthihin. that any decree should be made
authorizingg the assignee to sell the reversion of the
h.r.,m-...ited, a* thle ..ir.itaiuiui e .p.L-.;..M dl,:l.,rea that
theexempti'.,n ,'hdl jctrae tu the herr- ,1" thie t-arty
haiing tnj,^^ 'd. ,..r t.,keii tt, b. L ,i:rit th'erc,'1 This,
h,., vCer. ,_-a.j a ,: ^,ui.ai *nbwich the District Court
c~tn a). n<.l diecitd o- thi ,:.,urt, and 'resents no ground
Uor the interference ot'a court ofeqity.
BtlJ dismissed.


LEGAL.
=---= ---- 7--
U UNITED STATES MAIl,.
POST OFIICI DEPARTMENT
oa-hington. April 14.184i 5
Proposals will be recei--:d at the C.:-.nra-.:t Office of o
this Department un il3 o'c t k p m l")Ma> .1", -875,
it.:, b, d:i. de -l t. b Jane z-c, iss i-.r carr m ing ihe maus
of ihe initp ,J :t.t.iis from Jul.i F i:7-, to June 3o,
-8766 on the following r..uic in l li, StIt of Flh ri fda
and by the schedule.ot deportuie- and arrivals herein
specified, viz:;" :''.-".. *" ':{ .-*;.i^
3-evcc 18775 1-3 1676. : :
,t~op From Jasper to Ancrum, 14 m;les and bak, one, ....
a week.
Leave Jasper Saturday at 8 a in; : .
Arrive at Ancrum by z2- -L -t .
Leave Atncrum saturday at x p m ;
Arr!%tc .T.L J ter b) 5p m.3 0 i : *. ;
B...nd re uilr.d ih L.,d. $a o. -.
16040 From Bailey's Mills to Miccosukee, ai mie'ss ndJ :
back oh ce a w eek. *"' .1 o :
Lr:i.e B;.;le\'s M:ls StutdKay at t..pm-o; : ?. ; L
Arr e at Mk,:liokec -%. 4 P m .
ease Mlc.:u'ukee Saturdav at 8 a mz F n '", *^'-
Artiie i B ;ilt'Mi 5 t*. laT :i:by Li a n.
B.: nd required i ,th bi I. 2.00.
t6o6o From Freeport to Point Washington, to miles
and back ',.n ,:e a % -ek "
S Leaie rt rnp.rt "arurda) at I p rI,, :. :
Arrive tL A P,:.,ni \V'.shlrgion by 4 3: P m .
S L ae ,-_.t Waastanggt.-.r StIurday at 5 p m;;1/ -";.j
'Arrive at Freeport by 8.30 p m.
Bond required with bid, $2oo,
i6o65 From Saint-Marks tor Sain Theresa (n".-'^.i r
miles and back, three Limes a %eek, from Jul) ist to "
November 15, 1875, and froim Maiyr to June 3G.
1876, -,.
-:.L Leave Sain tiark'6 Tuesday, Thursaay, md
Saturday ay 7 a m : i
Arrive at Saint Theresa b3 6pp m ; ,
Liave 'at Saonit 'Ihelesa Monday, Wednesday,
and Friday at 7"am; ,- -* ^ ,
Arnie at Saint Marks by 6 p m. .
Bo. d required with bid, o ::" "
i6071 From Pilatka, by Woodland, tolwin, it mile s '
-*and back, once a week. ...-;.;s ',* -
L eave Pilatka Saturday at 6 a m ; -" '.*'
Arrive at Iwin by r2 m; '
.Leave Iwin Saturday at x p m, .
Arrive at Pilatka by 7 p m. -
Bond required with bid,* r6.
16o92 From SafuOrd to Lake. Jrssup, iB miles and
., blck.,once a wetk
Lea% e Sanfrod Saturday at 6'a mi; r". '
A rri e it Lake lessup tiy l~ m. y -- M-. '='
Lea,e Lake J.sup gSaturday at ip'm;
A rrTn e at S a n fn rd b y 7 p m .:: .: .
Bond required with bid, 3oo. '., ; : -
16ioi From'Pensacola-by Town Point (q. QL.to Mary
Esther, 45 miles and back, once a week. .
Leave Pensacola Monday at 6 a f ;i .. .
Arrive at Mary Esther Tuesdayl at 9 a,m; ;.,.:.. ~
Leave Mary therer next day by io ai m;
Arrive at Pen. ...I next day b z p in -;
B o n d r e q u i:-. ,t b id b o u f. .o; ..
For laws relating i1I the postal service, forms of pro-
posal,'bond and .ertificare, and for insTruction and '" '
conditions to be embraced in the contract, see adver- _. "
tisement of this date in pamphlet form, to be found a
the termini of each route, or by addressing the Second
Assistant P:.,miia-,ttr General
Bids should be sent in sealed envelh.pes, superscribd
"Mail propIsal State ',f ," and ad-
dressed'to the bec..nd As;i'ldnt Postmaster General,
Washington, D C. MARSHALL JEWELL,
4L21-ow Postmaster General


business in this locality is being pur-
sued with much ardor, especially by
people from the Northern States.
-A new time table for the A. G. &
W. I. T. Co's., railroad, will go into ef-
fect next week. The mail train will
leave Fernandina at 5 o'clock a. m.,
reaching Baldwin too late to connect
for Jacksonville unless a change should
be made on J. P. & V. road.
-The new iron steamship Montgom-
ery, will leave Feruandina in the New
York and Florida Steamship Company's
Line, for New York direct, this evening
-after the arrival of the 4 p. m. train from
this city. Many thanks are due to the
energetic proprietors of this line for
providing such .elegant vessels as the
Montgomery and Huntsville for the
accommodation of the public.
-Schooners F. S. Seabury, Capt.
Trim, of Ray's line, carne in Monday
morning from New York, with a full
cargo of merchandise consigned to Geo.
R. Foster. The schooner F. E. Halcock,
ot Providence, R. 1., Capt. Mould, in
ballast, came up the same time. The
schooner Katie S. Cook, is n6w'loading
at Clark's whart for Nassau, N. P. Judg-
ing from the number of vessels in port,
loading with lumber- for Northern and
West India ports, we should say that
the shipping interest of Jacksonville is
in a healthy condition. No less than
twenty-one vessels are loading or wait-
ing to load. t

EVERY LADY
.Should have one of The Magic Needle T. readers.
Will thread a needle in the dark as well as in daylight.
For hand needles or for sewing machines. Price 25
cents. Will be for sale on the corner of Bay and Pine
street-,for one week.
TO THE PUBLIC.
On and after the 2oth itst all papers and periodicals
formerly supplied by E. B. Kellogg will be supplied by
Philip Walter, two doors west of the Post Office
Contracts by subscription made with said Kellogg will
be completed by said Walter, until further notice.
E. B. KELLOGG, News Agent.

TWENTY-FIVE OLD PIANOS WANTED
in exchange for new ones, at SMITH, NORTON VCo's.

CALL AT
Smith, Norton &'Co's., and see their $6o Organs.
5-12 if.

INK, INK, PENS, PENS.
Pencils, Pen-Holders, Pencils, at Smith, Norton
& Co's. 5 12 tf.
THE PARENTS
Of all well regulated families purchase their groceries of
Rich, Polk's Block, Bay street. 10.21 tf
WANTED:
Six good, active white boys. Apply to the under-
signed, East Jaoksonmilie, next door to F. Canepa's
store,
W. A YOUNG "

NOTICE.
BUCKY will pledge to sell Clothing, Gentlemen's Un-
derwear, Blankets, Overcoats, Cloaks, Talmas, .Cover-
lets, Trunks, Valises, Silk and Fur Hats, and myriads
of other articles too numerous to mention at very low
prices. .. "%I-i4tf

MUSICAI,-PHILIP MILFORD
Of England will give lessons on the Piano, Organ,
Claronet, Flute and all Brass and Stringed Instru-
ments. Terms $15 per quarter of 24 lessons. Apply
at Smith, Norton & Co's., Music Store, or address P.
0. Box i.9 5-12 tf.
BUILDERS AND CONTRACTORS
Will find a complete assortment of lumber, dressed
and undressed, mouldings, shingles, etc.. at the Depot
Lumber Yard. Orders to be delivered at landings on
the River receive especial attention.
Address Louis J. BRUSH.
FURNITURE.
Just receiving from the schooner McDonald, over
Ten Thousand Dollars worth of Furniture, in such va-
riety and styles as will suit the demands of 411, at
Northern prices, with freight added Call and exam-
ine, at the old stand, south side of Bay street, between
Pine and Laura streets, Jacksonville.
r 30 tf C. 0. LIVINGSTON.
MORE NEW AND BEAUTIFUL SHEET MUSIC,
Messrs. Smith, Norton & Co.. seem determined to
keep up with the times, so fair as Musical Merchan
dise may be concerned, and have just received at their
elegant store in Mitchell's block, on Bay Street, a
magnificent stock of fine mu ical gems, recently pub-
lished, that cannot fail to elicit the admiration of every
lady performer upon the piano-forte in this city.
5-12 tf.
.AN EXCELLENT HOMESTEAD FOR SALE.
I offer my homestead with, if desired,- two, three or
four acres of adjoining land, the whole now set with the
best seedling oranges, the only reason for selling being
a pecuniary inability to improve the place as it deserves.
Forty or fifty of the orange trees will undoubtedly bear
in the coming season. The whole, place offers the best
chance in the vicinity of Jacksonville for a first-class
hotel with spacious grounds, or for a circle of friends
who wish to lhve in vicinity, as the grounds will easily
admit of sub-division rote three or four private resi-
dences, in a wholesome and every way drsirable locality.
J. S- ADAMS.
SOLON -ROBI NSON, "
In his address delivered at the late meeting of the
Florida Fruit Groweors' Association, says : In all that
makes life desirable, lorida is not only the pleer,
but the superior, of any of thre States of .the Great
W~est."' The proceedings of the Fruit Growers' Asso
elation are now beiug published in the Florida Agri-
cil uwist. Copies for sale at the office, Ocean street,
two doors from Bay. Address
CHAS. H WALTON & Co., Jacksonville,-Fla.
<@. Senrd 10 cents for a specimen copy.
ONLY CALL,
as others have done, and" be convinced that Cheaper
Bargains can be obtained, and with gi eater satisfaction.
Polite and attentive salesmen to wait upon every one,


great and small, at THE GREAT SOUTHERN BAZAAR.
11-14 tf

BUY BOOTS WITH
A. K,.PERCIVAL'S stamp upon them. They are supe-
rior to all others. t0o-3itf
STUPENDOUS SACRIFICES
Daily, hourly and momentarily disposed of at the
n1-14tf GREAT SOUTHERN BAZAAR.

METEOROLOGICAL RECORD.
Observations taken at 7 A. M 2 P. M. and 9 p. M.
daily, by the Signal Service U. S. Army, in this city.


CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA
STEAM PACKET CO.


CHANGE ,OF SCHEDULE._
THEi STEAMER DICiTATOR, /
CAPTAIN LEO VOGEL,
Will leave Charleston every Tuesday evening and Sav-
annah every Wednesday, for Fernandina, Jacksonville,
Palatka, and intermediate landings. -
RETURNING:
Leave Palatka every Thursday evening, Jacksonville
every Friday morning to suit the tide. Fernandina
same day, arriving at Savannah and Charleston every
Saturday; '
Through bills of lading given to Baltimore, Philadel-
phia, New York and other points.
T e Dicta or will connect with New York Steam-
ships every Saturday, both at Savannah and Charles-
ton. Connection is also made with, the St. -Johns Rail-
road at Tocoi, and at l*alatka with steaamer for the
.Upper St. Johns and the Ockla'waha river.
AGENTS,
RAVENEL & CO. C arleston.
BRAINARD & SROBINSON, Savannah.
JEFFREYS, BRO & S,_-:N, rr.-n,,n;,
JEFF'REYS & BkO., J.i.,- .ri.ll.:
R. J. ADAMS, Palatka.
C. f. BOHN, St. Augustine.
10-21 tf


NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.


POST-OFFICE NOTICE.
ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE OF MAILS,,,
ARRiVE. CLOSE.
Northern and Western, daily, 9:00 A. M. 3:30 P. M.
Fernandina and Florida Rail-
road, daily ................ ..... 9:00 A. M. 3:30 P. ,t
Saint Augustine and Palatka,
daily, (Sundays excepted)... 4:00 P. M. 8:00 A. M.
Key West, arrives every Mon- .
day................ ... ......... 9:00 A. M .
closes every Monday and i
Thursday.......... .............. 3 30 P. M.
Enterprise, Melonville, Hali- -
fax and Indian river arrives :
Tuesday,Thursday and Sat- \
urday 4:30 P. M.
Enterprise, Melonville, Half-
fax and Indian river mail, "- ,*
leaves on Monday, Wednes- ......
day and Friday.......... ....... 8:00 A. M.
Fort George, and Mayport
arrives 'I uesday and -riday 4:00 P. M.
leaves: Wednesday and Sat-
urday............................... 8:00 A. M.
St. Nicholas ........................ 10:00 A. M. 10:00 A. M.

OFFICE HOURS.
The post-office will be open daily (Sundays excepted)
from 8 A. M to 6:30 P. M.
The office will be open on Sundays from 12 to 1:30
o'clock P. M.
The general and, box deliveries will be open at all
times'during the regular hours, except when the mails
received are being. distributed. .
MONEY ORDER OFFICE.
The money order office will be open from 9 A. M. to
1:30 P. M. and from 3 to 4 P. M.
Money orders are issued at this office payable in any
part of the United*States, and Elso orders payable in
Great Britain, Switzerland and Germany.
The following are the rates ofcommission:
DOMESTIC MONEY ORDERS.
On orders not exceeding $10, 5 cents.
Over $io and not exceeding $2o, in cents.
Over $20 and not exceeding $30, 15 cents.
Over $3o and not exceeding $40, 2o cents.
Over $4o and not exceeding $50, 25 cents.
FOREIGN MONEY ORDERS.
On orders not exceeding $to, 25 cents.
Over $io and not exceeding $29, 50 cents.
Over $2o and not exceeding $30, 75 cents.
Over $3o and not exceeding $40, $i.oo.
Over $4W and nolexceeding $5o, $i 25.
J. b. ADAMS, Postmaster.
Jacksonville, May 1, 1875.


Gentlemen'.urlerear at I;lUC K\I'

.M ASONI. >^

SOLOMON- LODGE, NO. 20.
Regular meetings first, and third Wednesdays in
each month. -
GEO. W. JONES,.W. M.''
CHAS. G. ELLIOTT, Secretary.

Balmorals. Bustles, and Chignons, at BUiCIY'S,

T. s. SWAIM,


PRACTICAL JEWELLER
And W TCHMAKER, late with J. J. Holland, has
taken a window in WALTER'S UGAR STORE.
two doors west of the Post-office, where he is prepared
with a good stock of tools and material to do any kind,
of work in his line.
Extra Fine Mounting of Florida
Curiosities

a specialty. Fine watches carefully, thoroughly and
promptly ifepaired.
N. B.-If'it's worth doing at all it's worth doing well.
"a:)jo-:}SO alp JO
'an101nS .tD s reaatlV_, 3'0- '_d-XVWH)J.WVA PuV

"aaTn ahiaf rtvDyveaa



Dra ers and Undershirts, very cheap, at BUCKY'S,


Blankets and Coverlets of very size and quality at
llUL&.% S.


GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS.


Of the condition of the "'
FI RST NATIONAL B.A N K'OF F LO R I DA '
at.Jacksonville, in the State of Florida, at the 'clue of
business, May Ist, 1875. "I "
.... -RESOURCES. -" :_
Loans and ditcounts- $52,8475 74 '*
Overdrafts..... ... .. ....... ........ ......... 42_13
L S B.Bonds to ecu"e Ciru aL..n............. A,00-1 4 '
U S. Bonds-on hand.,............... ...........;.... .. 2 oK 'c L .
Due fi om approved reserve agents.. .....:..... 10,637 6t
Due from other National Ban.si........... 2,158ty 72
Due from State .anks and Bankers ......... 1,58005
Real estate, furniture and fixturesl......... 2,vo5 8S
Current expenses and taxes paid- ....-. .. 1- z357 3.a
Premiums paid.. ....... ................ .......... -813840 40
Checks and other cash items ................. ,, 281.01
Bills of other National Bank ................... 1.7,59,oO .
Fractional currency, (including nickels)..... '3,.2 9o
Specie (includinggold and treasury notes)eas : "7 50 '.
Legal-tender notes 36,700 oo
Redemption find with, U -S-. Treasurer : "
(5 per cent of. circulation)-................. 2,25O.00
TOTAL ...... ............ ............... $2o2 ,a28 73
--- -- = = : LIABILITIES. : .
Capital stock paid in........... ..........,.........-5050,000o00i
.O their Undivided profits : a" -" "
National Bank notes outstanding .............. 45%9W poo ;
Individual deposits subject to check........... 9i,322 17r.
Demand certificates of eposit................ "iTe3 o5 "
Due to other National.Banks ............. e.... 742..49 :._.
TOTAL ..... .,............................... tf20 ,289 73 "
STATE OF FLORIDA, COUNTY OF DUCVAL, SS: : -:"
I, JAMES M_ SHOEMAKER, Cashier of tlhe above- ,,
named bank, do solemnly swear that the al-.,vc siate "
meant ,s true to th best of my knowledge and belief, : : ';.
JAMES M. SHOEMAKER,-Ca-hier.
Subscribed and sworn to before" me this 14Lh j,*y of
Miy, 1875. r :
J. H. H. BOURS. Notary Public.,"
CORRECT-Attest:
T. W-.C. MOORE, E :
JAMES M: SHOEMAKER, Directors.
CHAS, A;" FAiRCHlLD, ..

HOTELS AND BOARDING HOUSES.

/[ANSION HOUSE. / ..

PORT ROYAL, S. C.,
The NEW CITY. situate on-(he-South Atlantic coast,
and at the terminus of the Port Royal Railroad. The -
great desideratum, so long required there is now de-
veloped. .... ,
Respectfully the Soperintedent undersigned, lately ...
of Augusta, Ga., announces that on the 25th inst, she ','
will open the ;. -' ,
NEWLY CONSTRUCTED AND NEWLA ?UR"
NISHED -
"' :- M A NiSP I 0 N I -'0' "

For private and transient boarders,. Confident of her ,
ability, from past experienhce'"she`will zealously
consult the comfort of all who may pataonicz, and at
terms the most favorable.
..... ..... -- { ANNIE B.US.Slt. Y
Dated March x5,1875. ." 3-24 tf',.,

Fine Cassimere Shirts, stylish aud durable, at titEwl -'"

R' DDELL HOUSE,, :

FERNANDINA, FLA -;,*-: *,,

SAMUEL t. iDDELL, I PROPHIMMRO.

A-tMagnificept drive ot eighteen miles- oR. the 6n&t
Atlantic Beakch. r ,
4GO~Refivshing'sea breezes. *-
O-YE$ SM ER WN INTE R."'"

Per day '" tj~oo : .'
Per.week *" ......_from Ssa to o15.00" ?*;.-
Satisfactory arrangements mia4e with families. ,
Fine liery accommodations. 1".. t-4-if "-


.DING,


AND

COMMISSION MER: C H A N T

AND DRHALER IN


F OR SALE.,,.--
A halfinterest in one ofthe most flourish:ig and pro-"
ductive
ORANGE GROVES
In East Florida. For particulars apply.at this office
1-232 mI


ROCERIEo,


PROVISIONS, GRAIN!


CARRIAGE SHOP.


V


GEORGE I. LE;,

CARRIAGE MAKER,


A G., & W.I. T. CO.'S RAILROAD.
*9 /
FROM ---.'

FERNANDINA TO CEDAR KEYS-
GOING SOUTH.
ARRIVE. LEAVE. ARRIVE. LEAVE.
Fernandina ............ a. m -...... 4 45...... a. m...... 4 45
Callahan ............... 6 25 ...... 6 30o...... 6 2.j...... 6 30
Baldwin ................. 7 40 ...... 9 oo0...... 7 40o...... 9 oo
Starke .................. 11e 56. .t 02 ......o10 26 ..... io 31
Gainesville ............ i2 50...... I o6 ...... it 56 T... 2 03
Archer ......... ....... 2 2o...... "2 27 1 oo...... 1 05
Bronson ................. 3 05 ..... 3 22 1. 33 ...... 1 39
Cedar Keys ........ 5 53 ...... P. mn ...... 3 33 ...-- P.p. m.
GOING NORTH.
ARRIVE, LEAVE. ARRIVE. LEAVE
Cedar Keys............ a. mi..... 8 15 ...... a. mi ......1io 30
Bronson ........... .....1io 43 ......l1o 50 ...... 72,25..12. 31,
Archer........ ......... ,28 ...... it 35....... 2 58:..-.. 30
Gainesville ......i...... 12 54- ...... 4..... Z 57 ...... 2 04
Starke.......... ... 7 56.... 3 02...... 3 29...... 3 34
Baldwin................ 4 50...... 5 15 ...... 5 0o ...... 5 15
Callahan............. 6 35 ...... 6 42 ...... 6 35 ...... 6 42
Fernandina ............ 8 40...... p. m...... 8 40o...... p. in.
,-ICONNECTIONS. .-. -..
At FERNANDINA, w-th Steamer City Point from
Charleston and Savannah, Mondays at 4 a. m.; steamer
Dictator from Charleston and Savannah, Thursdays at
4 a. m. With steamer Lizzie Baker, from Savannah,
.Brunswick and St, AMary's,' Mondays at 6 a. mi; for
those points on Fridays at 8 a. m.
At BALDWIN. with J P & M. R. R- from. Jack-
sonville at 4:o7 p. m ; for JacKsonville at 9:02 a m.
.At GAINESVILLE, with mi-weekly ptage line for
Tampa; with stage Iine- for Newnansville, Tuesdays
and Fridays.
At CEDAR KEYS, with steamers to-arid from New
Orleans, every Saturday. With steamers from Key
West and Tampa. Friday ; from these places. Thurs-
days With Steamer Cool, from Tampa, Sundays : for
Tampa, Mondays. With Steamer Wawenock, front
Suwannee Fridays; for Suwannee, Tuesdays;.
D. E. MAXWELL,
5'13 Superintendent.


Have opened a first-class
SHAVING SALOON,
corner of Bay and Pine streets, where all the modern
appliances used by the best saloons in the country can
be tound. They also furnish at all hours
HOT AND COLD BATHS.
Tickets entitling the bearer to eight shaves, for sale
for $i .0o; eight shaves, hair cutting and shampooing.
$1.5o. .9-9tf


Carpetbags and Ladies' Companions at BUCKY'S.

"A- FREE HOME.
o I will give a building lot in the new town of '
ROSEWOOD .

To any one who will improve it. ; .
GOOD GOVERNMENT LAND =
Can be entered within a half mile ol the, depot; andI
STATE LAND
Bought at $i.25 per acre. ; .' "
Sit if believed. that no, government lhnd can be found
in the State so accessible.
Apply to me at the WAVERLY HOUSE, or ad.
dress.at ROSEWOOD, LEVY COUNTY. :
: C. B.. DIBBLE.
Jacks.onville, January 26, 1875. 1-30 w&sw


IANK M. ADAMS.


FRANK W. GOLDEN. FR

G OLDEN & ADAMS,
DEALERS IN


FINE GROCERIES,
FR ENAC)H CONFECIONERY

FOREIGN AND .DOMESTIC FRUIT, ALE,
WINE, LIQUOR, CIGARS,
TOBAC JO, ETC ,
Have in store and to arrive

FI R S T- C L A S S GGOODS,

Which, by making TERMS CASH, they offer at the
LOWEST PRICES.

Special Attention of the Ladies called to our
MAILLARD'S SUPERIOR CANDY,
And to bur assortment of
PRESERVES, JELLIES, ETC.

PIC-NIC PARTIES will find- it advantageous to
call, as we shall make the replenishing of LUNCH EON
BASK ETS a specialty.
*WSPurchases delivered gratis.
GOLDEN & ADAMS,
Ross" Marble Front Building, near Grand Na-
il-14 tf tional Hotel, Jacksonville, Florida.


:**-- ;In Short. .
-Excursi'ons are, in order, and the
Rockawayq seems to have a special mis-
SlIUI iu that, direction.
'"-Seven large schooners Toading at
ihe'lRailroad whatrf'with lumber at one
lintmc, give the place a lively-appearance.
-Eppinger, Rus.ell & Co., are clear-
ing awyV the debris fritin their mill lot,
\\% hope to see this mill do the phcanix
-in lirl-clas style.
-E. J. Ta) lor, in Mitchell'a block,
Bay streett, lia.ju.t put up a nice $250
soda fountain, mn.kiiig it good place in
which 10 okep cool,"
.W-Wer hear of a large number of
northern-muvn.wlho c)utemphtle comi/ig
"to otur-city I,:>,1 the purpj-,,.>- el e ngaging
in busine-s lthe coming fa!l. Some are
already looking for suitable locations on
Bay street.
-The Citizens' Gas Works seem to be
an event fixed. The Ilarge number of
castings and mysterious, looking pieces
of' machinery bearing their name and
unlading from the schooner Dora M,
French, look like cheap gas and lots of
it. We hope so. '*,. ;: > : *
-Mr. Bidwell, or Arlington NUrsery,
sold last week five thousand or-ange
trees, (two }cars old,) to a party trom
Lake George. The orange planting


T ICKET OFFICE

FLORIDA STEAM PACKET CO.

COR. BAY AND PINE. STS.

Tickets sold .to all points North by Rail and .via
Steamships" from Savannah and Charleston. Also,

RETURN EXCURSION TICKETS


DENNETT HOUSE,
PORT ORANGE, FLAIR ,


By MRS.-BENNET, & :MRS. .DOBBIN'. L, .'
This new house is now ready to receive Lnauts. 'It iq
comfortably furnished throughout;and is capable qf-ac-,-
commodatag 34 g2pests No pains will be. paired tq-
maik-the table satisfactory. to its patrons. '
T h e sc h o on e r .. .

ELIZA BENNETT- ,ET.''
Will leave. Foster's wharf, jacksonville,;for Port Or; .
anye once in two weeks, affo~ding parties s pleasant and.,
s facilities for' reaching thaIt place. Comfortable, -'
Cabin Accommedations._.For part'cular aply at !
DOBBINS" GUN SHOP, ,
Corner Bay and Hogan stree.Jacksonville, 4 .
0-UiDue notce of the tire of arrival and departurt pP ,,,
the schooner will be- veri h the Paper.' i-413 ".


for sale to the NORTH and WEST.


3-ao tf


o.oo Fair
o.oo Cle. r
o 0o f'dy
o.oo ralr
o co air,
q.o! l'dy
o'Q9 LtR'n
Qp 4!air
o~qp ,fair
o~qo Fair:
o~oo C'lear
o,qo Clear
o.Q Clear
9 Fair
q.no CI'dy
q6o- Fair,
o.pp .Fair
600 Clear
Q.O0 Clear


ag co
April ,' '

1875.

Tues 2,2p !m. 3
.gpm 30.00
7.am 30,o6
Wed. 2pm 2997
9 P m 30.02
7am 30.02
Thu. 2pm 30.00
9Prm 30.08
"' 7 am jo i l
Fri. 2pM p.c 7
9 PM 30,10
7 aianm 3o.o09l
Sat. 2pm 39'o3
9p m 30.04.
7 a-m 3o66
Sun. 2pm 30 R
S;:9prmo 30.09
7am 30.10
Mon..12 p m 30.14
-".9,B m 39.13
Thur. 7am 30.-6


83
74
91
72
75
82
66
P:
-73
77
,79
71
74"
71
C8
68
69
63


42
85
72
58
go
81
58
85


71
75
56'
52
66
6o


Very stylish Ladies' Hats at BUCKY'S.

D R. P. E. JOHNSON, IIoMCEOPATHIST.

Has removed his office to Mitchellrsnew building,
north side of Bay street, between Newnan and Market
nearly opposite the Post Office. ir-Ittf -


. Wind.
a. o1
I a


E Fresh
N F Gentle
SW Fresh
SW%' Fr, sh
SW Fresh
S Light
NE Brisk
SE Brisk
W Light
NE Fresh-.c
NE Gentle
NE Gentle
SE Fresh
NE Gentle
N 'Fresh
"NE--Brisk
NE Fresh
NE BrisH
NE Brisk
N F'esh
N Gentle


TO CONTRACTORS AND BUILD-
E R S': .
Having completed an extensivie new mill in connec-
ion with my former one, I am prepared to furnigh all
kinds of finkhing material, such as Brackets, Balusters,
Piazza Columns, Mouldings, Scroll Saw %Aork, Lath,
Flooring Planed, Tongued and Grooved and Beaded it
desired. Weather Boards, Beveled or Square E~dged,
Dressed or Rough, as desired. Plank qf al* sifes.
either Dressed or *kough, in any quantity. Door and
Window Casings, Pickets of every and y' attern,
In a word, everything in the lImtber line the builder
wants. My Machines are all new and of the latest
patterns and are -used' by skilled wprkmen. Call and
satisl yourselves as to price before" purchasig: else-
where. I guarantee satisfactiqp in workmanship as
-well as quality of material. '
- 2-7yt? LEX. WALLACE.


ATTORNEY ANP .C0y^-Sl;LI.R AT LAW.
Freedman's Bank Building. Jacksoqnille, Fla.
Mr Emmons having dissolved.his professional rela-
tions with J. P. & M Railroad, will. receive wiscllane-
ous. business in his profession. S-$'3m.


Baromtcr corrected for temperature and erIation-


FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF FLORIDA.

JACKSONVILLE.
The only National Bank in operation in the State.

Exchange on Savannah and New York sold, and Ex-
change on all Northern points bought,
AT CURRENT RATES.

DIRECTORS AND STOCKHOLDERS:
Foreign, Home,
JOHN CLARK, Esq.,
Hon. F. E. SPINNER, W. A MCLEAN, Esq.,
PHILO REMINGTON, Esq., C. A. FAIRCHILD, Esq.,
SAM'L REMINGTON, Esq., DAMON GRBENLEAP, Esq.,
W. C. SQui PES, I sq., W. M. BOSTWiCK, Esq.
September 26, 1874. 11-4-'y


THE JACKSONVILLE
SALE AND I VERY


S T.A.:BrLE S,5

C. B1. -.1cCLENNN, PROPrIlTOR.


Notice is given to the public that I have purchased
the well-known HARTRlE, 'PF S' ABLES. opposite
the METROPOLITAN HMi.l EL, ar.d, have on hand

A VERY LARGE STOCK OF HORSES AND
MULES FOR SALE.,

Those desiring to purchase will find it to their ad-
vantage to examine this inu,.w-,i large and atirnikie
stock, adapted to all uses. I m al,- re.:n, ,ng

A COMPLETE .OUTFIT OF

BUGGIES, PH-TONS, AND
OTHER CARRIAGES,
of the latest styles, o

FOR LIVERY SERVICE,
which will be fitrnushed
AT TttE SHORTEST NOTICE,
and on the :
MOST REASONABLE TERMS.,

Mr. G. M. BRITTAIN is my authorized Agent'
and Manager, and will always be found'at the Stables
ready to attend to all business appertainingto the es*_
tablishment. C. B. Mc Sept. x6.1872. 11; ; n-2Ltf.


EW YORK AND :


FERNANDINA
STEAMSHIP LINE.



FERNANDINA, FLA., October 1, 1874.
NORTH POINT,
Capt. SMITH.

LEO,
Capt. DANIELS,
CAN ACCOMMODATE FIFTY FIRST-
CLASS PASSENGERS.
These steamers.sail from New York, Pier 2, North
R iver, every Thursday,,and from Fernandina Railroad
Whart every
WEDNESDAY.
MOTGOMERY,
Capt. FAIRCLOTH,
Will leave New York on the 13th and Fernandina
on the 19th.
For freight or passage apply to
HERM. GELPCKE, Agent,
5 Williams st.. New York.
P. McQUAID, Agent,
Polk's Block, Bay St., Jacksonville.
Or W. J. WOODWARD,
Representing CHATER & KING, Agents,
10.10 sw tf Fernandina, Florida.

RAILROADS.

JACKSONVILLE, PENSACOLA AND
MOBILE RAILROAD CO.
GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE,"
TALLAHASSEE, December i9, 1874. f
On and after SUNDAY, DEC. 2o, 1874, Passen-
ger trains on this road will run as follows :
DAY PASSENGER, Daily, Sundays excepted.
A. M. A. M.
Leave Jacksonville... 7 40 Leave Sav nnah ... ... 8.oo
Baldwin......... S.5o Chattaho(ochee 6.50
Lake City.......10.50 Quincy........... 8.30
P.M. Tallahassee....1o 30
Live Oak ...... 12 35 p. M.
Madison ..._.. 2.25 Madison ......... 2.25
"' Tallahassee ... 6.3- o Live Oak ....... 4.30
:" Quincy ......... S.0o -Lake .City ...... : 6.oo
Arrive Chattahoochee 9.50 Baldwin........... 8.1o
Savannah ...... 9.15 Arrive Jacksonvile ..... 9.15
P- ..... ....-n go through to St. Marks Mondays-
- ...... "*----,, di-ays,au a cltuitn'Csa.ays)l-hursi
days and Sa daysy.
NIGHT EXPRESS, Daily.
P. M. P. M.
Leave Jacksonville.. 4.00 Leave Savannah...... "'4.0MO
a Baldwin,........ 5.55 A.M.
Lake City ..... 8.32 Live Oak ...... 3.0o
Arrive Live Oak .... 1o.oo0 Lake City..... 4.33
A. M- Baldwin........ 7.45
Savnnaah: ..... 8.5o|Arrive Jacksonville.. 9. 0o
NOTE.-A Special Train will leave Tallahassee Sat
urdays at 3 40 p m., arriving at Live Oak 9.35 p. m.,
connecting with Savannah Train. Returnin, leave
Live Oak 3 a. m., arriving at Tallahassee at 8. 5o a. m.
ROBERT WALKER.
Receiver and Gen'l. Supt.
T. C. SPOONER, Master Transportation. .15-2.


REPORT


OHN CLARK,

FORWtR


OBERSON & MAPSON


EPOT LUMBER YARD.

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS,
VI L L F IN D A "
FULL ASSORTMENT OF *

DRESSED AND UNDRESSED LUMBERi.
MOULDINGS AND SAWED
PINE SHINGLES,
CHEAP FOR CASH AT -

THE DEPOT LUMBER YARD.
- Lumber delivered in all parts of the city and vicinity,
and at all landings on the. river at low rates All'or-
derr rqeivjc prompt attention. ; '
'LOUIS, J. BIPSH
76e ,as iithll, Ms, --.6.,A874-. ,
r- tf A'"Per Day at home Tnerms free.
? to r0,{ AddrMf&G. ST,,wt&Co,


SP.. C. EMMONS,











THE NEW SOUTH: WEEKLY. JACKSONVILLE, WEDNESDAY, MAY


19, 1875-


A HUNDRED VOYAGES ACROSS THE
ATLANTIC.-A complimentary ban-
quet was tendered last night to Capt.
H. F. Schwenisen, commander of the
Hamburg-American Packet Com-
pany'ssteamship Pomerania, at Seigh-
hortner's ,restaurant, in Lafayette
place, in commemoration of his one
hundredth voyage across the Atlantic
in the service of the company.-[N.
Y. Times.

A young Scotch girl inquired of a
gentleman, in broad Scotch, the road
to the Tremont House, Boston. He
,desired her to follow him,. and asked
her how long since she had arrived
from Scotland. "Sax weeks, your
honor." On their arrival at their
'destination she very coolly inquired :
"Noo sir, wull ye just tell me hoo ye
Jkenned:I was frae Scotland ?"

In. one of the courts lately, there
was a long and heated discussion be-
tween the counsel as to whether a
witness should be allowed to answer
the following question : "What did
Mary say ?" Three judges took near-
ly an hour to decide the point, and at
last allowed it.- The question was
put to the witness by the defence, and
the reply was short and sweet-"Not
.a word." ;

CANON KINGSLEY AND HIS PIPES.-
Among the personal peculiarities,of
the late Canon Kingsley is mentioned
a curious habit ofleaving his countless
pipes about in all sorts of unexpected
places. He was a devoted smoker,
and it is said by one of his friends that
wherever you went in his parish neigh-
borhood you might find a pipe of his
in a hedge or other nook, the rustics
knowing arid respecting "parson's
pipe," turn it up where they might.

HONEST IF IGNORANT.-At a recent
examination of class in chemistry, in
a professional school, the first- two
questions were : "Define the word
'chemistry' and the word 'atom. .
On colleting- the students' books the
following is all the professor found
written in one : "Chemistry-a very
important study,, in which I have not
made sufficient progress to warrant
my attempting any solution of its rid-
idles' An atom many be said to ex-
press, in a figurative way, the state ot
my feelings when I reflect that the
confession implied in the above state
ment is as true as it is humiliating.'
-Boston Advertiser.

Anr Episcopal minister named
Clark, who served as a missionary for
his church in Greene county, N. Y.
recieving a salary of $200 and num
erous donations, died at Hudson, N.
Y., last week. He lived in extreme
poverty, and when hedied a subscrip
tion was taken up to pay the funera
expenses. After the funeral, his rooms
were-examined, and a will found, to
gether with a package containing
$94o000 in government bonds, aid
bank-book showing a-deposit of $1io,
0oo in a bank in New York City. Thi
will gave half of his property to hi
relatives, and the rest to St. Luke'
hospital and to churches in which hi
had preached.

COLUMBUS, OHIO, May 2.--Rich
ard Connell, an Englishriian, a saw
maker by-trade, was fatally poisone<
to-day, and died inwgreat agony a few
hours after. Connell had been il
with fever for some days, but he wa
getting better. To-day his nurs
went to a prominent physician and
was given a prescription calling fo
two ounces of castor oil and on-
drachm of turpentine. This pape
was taken to a drug store and, al
though very plainly written, the dru
clerk misunderstood it and instead <
castor oil put up croton oil. Th
sick man soon after took half am ounc
of this terrible mixture, and was
corpse ii, a few hours. .. .

A LIVELY OLD LADY.-Madam
Patterson Bonaparte, says a writer i
Scribener's for May, is still: living i
Baltimore, at the age of ninety year
She says she has no intention ulf dyin
until she is a hundred. She hasbee
to Europe sixteen times, and contend
places another trip this summer. S
is antique in cost'utie, not attractit
and.bitterly cynical; thinks all sent
ments a weakness; has little or n
confidence in men, and a very pot

opinion of women the. young ladi,
of the present day, she says, all ha,
thie "homo mania." She kept a dia
for forty years, and recorded h
.opinions about European and Anmel
*can society. It will be publish
after her death.
t *! /' ,


"Pauperism in England,
The return of pauperism which w
,issued lately, in England, shows, wh
is the invariable course in the wint
season, that the -relief lisis increase
as the new year advanced. At Chris
mas the number of in-door paupe
was 750,415; in the first week of Ja
uary the total was 757.512; in the se
ond week, 76',900; in the third we
764,830; in. the fourth week the nut
ber receded about i,ooo, being 763
847 ; and in the fifth week, 765,40
so that. January closed with 15,o
more recipients of poor relief in En
land than on tWe, hands of the guar
ians at Christmas, 1874. Paupers
lunatic asylums and vagrants are n
counted in these numbers. Compa
ed, however, with llte correspondi
date of 1874, the present docume
offers a satisfactory 'contrast. -At t
close of January last the decrease
compared with the-same week
1874, was not much under 25,000,
3.2 pe' cent. The decrease of pa
perism -was general throughout t
diviusipW of the kingdom, though
one.. two instances the dirrinuti
was infegnificant.- Pall Mall Gaeit


..'..- .1


t

)t

e






)r



e


is

g




a








is


1


w

A


ill




Dr

ef


HAIR TURNED WHITE IN A NIGHT.
-The Augusta (Ga.) Chronicle of a
recent date says : Father Leckner vis-
ited, Ike ,Hopper, the condemned
murderer, 'early 'yesterday morning
and informed him of the refusal of
Governor Smith, to grant executive
clemency. Hooper was at first much
agitated, and trembled like a leaf
shaken by the wind, but soon became
more composed, and during the day
seemed to become more reconciled to
his fate. A remarkable fact in con-
nection with this case is an exemplifi-
cation of the oft-told story that men's
hair sometimes turns gray in a single
night. When Hooper was sentenced
by Judge Potter last month, his hair
was perfectly black. The morning
after the sentence was imposed Mr.
Bridges, the keeper of the jail, noticed
on entering the condemned man's cell,
that a portion of his head was perfect
ly white. He immediately asked him
where he had obtained flour to put on
his head. Hooper was surprised and
said he knew nothing about it. Mr.
Bridges then went up to him and dis-
cqyered that a large part of his hair
immediately on the crown of his head
had actually changed from a deep
black to snowy white during the night.
The agony of a few hours had done
what years generally accomplish.

A. MAN DIES OF THE HICCOUGHS.-
About one of the most singular cases
of death that ever came- within our
province to mention is that, of Milton
r o. Blair, of Louisa county, who died,
last week, in California, of the hic-
coughs. Mr. Blair is an old merchant
of Louisa county, but has not been
erygaged in business for a number of
years.- He has been residing near the
Morning Sun, since retiring from
Business. Last Fall he was attacked
with a fit of hiccoughing, which con-
tinued for some weeks with scarcely
any intermission. Becoming alarmed
at the long continuance of the spell,
Mr. B. came to Burlington to consult
with a doctor, who, after treating him
awhile, declared he could give him no
relief. From this city be proceeded
to Chicago, and consulted the best
t medical authorities there, who did all
t in their power for him, but could not
relieve him. By their advice he went
to California, accompanied by his sis-
Ster, thinking that the change of clim-
ate would help him, remaining in
that State to the time of his death,
hiccoughing almost continually, and
having but few intervals of rest. The
continued strain, and distress wore him
to a mere shadow of his former self,
and last week his sister telegraphed to
r friends and relatives in this and
' Louisa counties that he was dead and
she was bringing his remains on for
e burial.-Burlington Hawkeye.

" USE OF SILENCE.-It is a pity that
so few people understand the full ef-
s fect of well-timed silence. How
g eloquent it is in reality f Acquiesence,
g contradiction, deference, disdain, em-
Sbarrassment, and awe, may all be ex-
e pressed by saying "nothing. Should
s you hear an assertion which you may
s deem false, made by some one of whose
veracity, politeness may withhold you
e from openly declaring your doubt,
you denote a difference of opinion by
remaining silent. Are you receiving
N a reprimand from a superior? You
d mark your respect by an attentive
d silence. Are you compelled to listen
l to the frivolous conversation of a fop
I You signify your opinion of him by
s. treating his loquacity by contempt.
e uous silence. Again, how much do-
d mestic strife might have been
r prevented, how often might the quar
e rel which by mutual aggravation has
Ir perhaps, terminated in bloodshed,
- have been checked in the commence
g inent by a judicious silence Those
f persons only who have experienced
e them are aware of the beneficial effect;
e of that forbearance, which, to th<
a exasperating threat, the malicious
sneer, or the unjustly imputed culpa
*. ability, shall never answer a word. A
le soft answer turns away wrath; bu
n sometimes erring humanity can no
n give this soft answer in moments o
s. irritation ; in such cases, .there stand
g the fortress of silence, with doors wid
- open, as refuge for the tired spirit
i- until calmer moments come. "Thin
ie of this seriously, you who glory i
'e having "the last word."
i- -
10 ;1 HEPHERD DoC.s.-In Southern Ca
or ifoirnia you may see on the plains an
es hills thousands-ofsheep,;but not a ma
ve to watch them.-- Around' each: floc
ry or band of, say a thousand sheep, ai
er half a dozen dogs whose progenitor
ri- were imported from the sheep pasture
ed of the old world. These dogs tak
the entire care of the sheep, drive
theit to the pasture in the morning


pttfNItURk


FURNITURE WAREROOMS !
~ _


DAVIS & DREW.


PARLOR SUITS. CHAMBER SUITS.



MOSQUITO BARS & FIXTURES


Par
Sui
Par
Sui
Par
Sui
Par
Sui


lor
its.
rlor
its.
tlor
its-
lor
ts.


DAVIS & DREW, Chabeuits.
Chambe
corner of Suits
Chamber
,BAY AND LAURA STREETS, Suits.
Chamb
JACKSONVILLE. FLA. Suits


EXAMINE OUR LARGE STOCK.


,*,
101* 10
101 ** 101
101 101
101 ** 101
101 *JACKSONVILLE,: 101
101 FLA 101
101 101
101 101
101 ** 101
101 #*,* 101
101 101
101 101
010101010 D & D 0101010101
101o000 000000 0101
lloo DAVIS & DREW, olOl0
101lO oo. 101
101 l0loooo FURNITURE oooo101
101 101 oll01
101 loloooooooooooooooooooolol
101 101ooo WAREHOUSE ooO101
101 lo) oooooooooc-oooooooooolOl
101 1010101010 D & DO0101010101
101 101 101 101
10] 101 101 101
101 101 101 11)
101 101 101 101
101 101 101 101
......101 101 ......101 101
101 101
101 101
101 101
101 101
......101 ......101



THE FINEST AND BEST SELECT-
ED IN THE SOUTH.


Pa
Si
Pa
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Si
Pa
Su
t Pa

Pa
Si


rlor
lit'..
aits.
nrlor
aits.
nrlor
Sits.


RICH, PLAIN,
and

SUBSTANTIAL
FURIfITURE.


01 amber
Suits.
Chamber
Suits.
Chrmbe
Suits
Chanib
Suits


:I
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We are prepared to offer our stock at
remarkably low prices.

-:0:-


DAVIS & DREW,



All kinds of FURNITURE, CARPETS,
MATTRESSES, WHITE PINE, WAL-
NUT, and CEDAR LUMBER, etc.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA-


COFFINS AND UNDERTAKERS


I








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ETA ,L 1 C
VI BURIAL CASES


AND
WOOD COFFINS,


)F ALL SIZES AND QUALITIES


FLO-R IDA


SAVINGS


BANK


AND REAL ESTATE EXCHANGE.
[Incorporated July 6th, 1874.]

OFFICE IN LOVERIDGE'S BUILDING, OCEAN STREET,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA., .
INTEREST.-Interest at the rate of seven and three-tenths per cent. (or two cents per day on $0oo) will be paid
annually, upon all deposits which shall have remained three months or more in the Bank, to be added annually
to the principal of the Depositor. '
LoANs.-All moneys received on deposit shall be invested in first mortgages on real and personal property in
this State of at least double the value, or in other ample collateral securities.
REAL ESTATE.-This corporation will act as trustees or the purchase and sale of real estate or the renting
and management of estates and property generally.


ST




Fl


SAM'L SPEARING,
Vice-President.


JONATHAN C. GREELEY,
Treasurer.


'ATE, COUNTY AND CITY SCRIP SOLD AT CURRENT RATES.

SEMI-ANNUAL STATEMENT
OF THE
LORIDA SAVINGS BANK AND REAL ESTATE EXCHANGE.


Jacksonville, Florida.


Incorporated July 6, 1874.

ASSETS.


Capital Stock $20,000.


Office Furniture and Fixtures........... -.............. 2- 25 00
Cash on hand 10.........................................,504 30
State, County and City Treasury Warrants, face value S2,496.46--cash value 1,758 07
Real Estate in the city of Jacksonville...... 5,.891 5
State, County and City Tax Certificates ................... ,95 s
Notes and Mortgages, secured by pledge of real estate and personal property of the value of
$31,199.50. ........................ ..........13,316 72
Rent, &c, paid in advance... 60.......... 6o
Unexpired Insurance Premiums...........2. 0 60
Total........................... .............. ................ $32,978 o09
LIABILITIES.
Individual deposits................................................................................ ... $24,169 74
Capital Stock paid ini.................................................................................. .. 2,000 00
Undivided Profits.............................................................................. ......... 6,00o 00
Profit and Loss account....................................... ......................................... 808 35- 32,978 09
STATE OF FLORIDA,
Duval County. I
I, James H. Paine, President of the Florida Savings Bank and Real EstateExchange,
do solemnly swear that the foregoing statement is true to the best of my knowledge and belief.
JAMES H. PAINE, President.


S1

Cc


TATE OE FLORIDA,
Duval County.
Sworn and subscribed before me this 23d day of April A. D. 1875.


rrect. Attest: JONATHAN C. GREELEY, Treasurer.


9-30tt


A.'O. HUSSEY. JN


HUSSEY & HOWE
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN


BOOTS,


LEATHER


SHOE
& FINDINGS.


H. JENKINS, Jr.,
[SEAL] Nptary Public.


10. W. HOW-LL.


LL,



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0


J. H. NC RTON.
Attorney al Law and Notairy Public.


S. H. KOOKER.


NORTON & KOOKEi'."


REAL ESTATE
OF AL.L KINDS.


GENERAL INSURANCE AGENTS, representing the following com- -,
pansies: .: 4T '. .
FRANKLIN, OF PHILADFLPHIA. '%Vith combined assets of over
CONTINENTAL, OF NEW YORK,
MANHATTAN,. OF NE W YOR K, .7 000 000
PENN, OF PHILADELPHIA,. 9
LOANING MONEY ON REAL ESTATE AND CONVEYANCING A
SPECIALTY. ...


HE SINGER MANUFACTURING COMPANY'S CELl


SILK


TWIST.


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wc


S


A complete assortment of New York and Philadelphia fine
Goods always on hand.
Sole agents in Jacksonville for Samuel Dunbar & Co.'s
Misses' and Children's Fine Shoes.
Goods sent by mail or express to all parts of the State.


Bay Street, near Laura, Jacksonville, Fiv.


MISCELLANEOUS.


FRESH ARRIVAL
OF NEW AND FASHIONABLE GOODS

OGET-I-,EMIENWTAI, AND WINTER WEAR,
EMBRACING
FRENCH, ENGLISH, GERMAN ITALIAN
AND AMERICAN FABRICS,
SUCH AS
FINE BROADCLOTHS, CASSIMERES, VEST-
INGS AND GENERAL FURNISHING
GOODS,


J. BARATIER,


Merchant Tailor,
Laura Street, just above Bay Street,
nx-2x-6m JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


AMUEL B. HUBBARD,

facksonville, Fla.,


Importer and Dealer in


HARDWARE, IRON AND STEEL,


at












. H


LADIES' AND GENTLEMEN'S ROBES.
EMBALMING DONE WHEN REQUIRED.
ALSO,
MARBLE AND MARBLEIZED
SLATE MANTELS.
SLATE HEARTHS, &c.,
MANUFACTURED TO ORDER
AND FOR SALE BY
CALVIN OAK,
Forsyth Street, between Laura and Hogans,
S twa36-ro Jacksonville. Florida.


J


A NEW LOAN

ON A NEW PLA1


Invest your money at home in the


FIRST MORTGAGE LAND GRANT
PREMIUM BONDS.
Now offered for sale by the
GREAT SOUTHERN RAILWAY
rConsolidated1,
Every bond when redeemed will receive a premium
.in place of interest, according to the plan of redemption,
in amounts of from
$1.00 to $25.oo0 or $50.ooo
On each bond.
Bonds redeemable by allotment. Six allotments of
bonds. Six distributions of premiums in 1875.
Apply to
EMIL HAAS & CO.,
Financial Agents
S7 Broadway, New York City.
HARVEY GRANGER, Gen'l Agent,
J. L. EDWARDS, Agent
Office, Mather & Little's Bookstore, Jacksonville.
1-9 tf


FOR ST. AUGUSTINE.


THE SCHOONER


E1


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C


EDGE TOOLS, TABLE and POCKET
CUTLERY,
Nails, Glue, Putty, Glass, Paints, Oils,
LEATHER BELTING, RUBBER PACKING,
STOVES, TINWARE, CROCKERY, PUMPS,


Lead and Iron Pipe,


K


MISCELLANEOUS.


EARNEY'S

FLUID EXTRACT


BUCHU
The only known remedy aor


BRIGHT'S


DISEASE,


And a positive remedy for
GOUT, GRAVEL, STRICTURES,
DIABETES, DYSPEPSIA,
NERVOUS DEBILI-
TY, DROPSY,
NON-RETENTION, OR INCONTINENCE OF
URINE, IRRITATION, INFLAMMATION.
OR ULCERATION OF THE

BLADDER AND KIDNEYS

SPERMATORRHCEA,
Leucorrhoea. or Whites, Diseases of the Prostratt
Gland, Stone in tha Bladder, Colculus, Gravel, or Brick-
dust Deposit and Mucus or Milky Discharges.


KEARNEY'S


EXTRACT


BUCHU


Permanently cures all Disea es of the


DOORS, SASH, BLINDS,.MOULDINGS. SUGAR BLADDER, KIDNEYS, AND DROP
CAL SWELLINGS,


Mills, Evaporators, &c.
Gas-Fitting, Roofing, Jobbing, and Tin
Smi.thine done to order, d ly


BUILDERS'


FURNISHING MILL,

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

The undersigned would respectfully call the atten-
tion of those contemplating building to their establish-
ment. They are prepared to furnish at short notice all
kinds of
Builders' Material
consisting of
Rough and Planed Lumber,
Mouldings, Brackets,

Scroll and Turned Work,


I-


Existing in men, women and children,

NO MATTER WHAT THE AGE!

Prof. Steel says : "One bottle of Kearn-y's Fluid
Extract Buchu is worth more than all other Buchus
combined."

Price One Dollar per Bottle, or Six Bottles for Five
Dollars.

DEPOT, 104, DUANE ST., NEW YORK.
A Physician in attendance to answer correspondence"
and give advice gratis.
49rSEND STAMP FOR PAMPHLTS, FREn.-"


TO THE


NERVOUS AND DEBILITATE


OF BOTH SEXES.


dHalifax 'tve4.
SPoit Orange.:
, l)ing one mile
immediately on
ne fourth mile,
I room, nearly "
river and ocean
g, orange trees,
I, and a clsier'- ;...
roughly ditched
running to the. .
ise quantities of
is similai so the
it is fully equal; :
really one of tde
own as such be-
ltei hoie, witk
You can get a
fIeld, high awd
t the post-office,
ticulars enquire

es cleared talr!&'II
two miles west
st desirable river' '
W bdidd ,b

er, adjoining the
yard. For sale
.-.ihs hotel is
ch brick, amd is
For prices and



-BRA6mT
EBRATED


Tris compay rnow having i full operation at Newark, New Jersey, the largest SILK WORKS in the
orId, piopose to furnish a superior article of Silk Twist
AT GREATLY REDUCED PRICES.
For the convenience of the public this celebrated Twist is
PUT UP ON SPOOLS OF DIFFERENT SIZES,
The finest quality being thereby offered on spools'in quantities Ie
FROM FIFTY YARDS UPWARD S.


The above unequaled twist is manufactured especially for the use ot all kn.1 of sewing machines and agema
for different machines through the CLuntry are sing this twist in large quartres, ad a 2


SPECIAL INDUCEMENTS
are oftred to the trade, all those about to purchase will do well to send for ow prike EiM.


THEE SINGER



Av
o' ... .
-,.. ,


s. -


AGAIN TRI UMPHANT.

133,254 MAJORITY.

STATISTICS OF SWORN SALES FOR 1873: .....


Com"p.a :. .... CI .


Companies. Sold in 1873. Companies. Sold in i3.
THE SINGER 232,444 American, B. H. ... 24, 8
Whee er & Wilson 119,18o B & Howe 13,919
Domestic 40.114 Remington Empire 9,i 3
Grover & Baker 86,179 Florence 8960.
Weed 21,760 Davis
W ilson....................... ....... ............. 21,247 Victor 1 '
Howe No returns Blees 3,4
Gold Medal 16,431 Secor................ -- 3 -
Wilcox & Gibbs 15,881 AEtna, J..E, Bramesdorf 30. i.

OUR NEW FAMILY MACHINE
Embodies New and Essential P.inciples-Si .iplicity of Construction: Ease of Operatins. Uniformity t l i ...
Action at any Speed: Capacityf or Range and Variety of Work, Fine'OrCo -- s -
LEAVING ALL RIVALS BEHIND IT.


TEST THE SINGER BEFORE PURCHASING ANY OTHER. !
TERMS EASY-PAYMENTS'LIGHT.


Besides the WORLD'S FAVORITE." we keep constantly on band a large supply of
CLARK'S 0. N. T. SPOOL COTTON, four spools for twenty.five.cents.
SINGER'S STANDARD MACHINE TWIST, from twenty-five cents up-all sizes and coors
ACME MACHINE TWIST, zoo yard spools, 2 for 25 cents; so yard ools, 3 for s5 cents.
SINGER'S LINEN AND FLAX THREADS, OILS, NEEDLES, &.&, &C.


The Singer Manufactuing CO.,
No. 172 BROUGHTON ST., SAVANNAH, GA;
C. A. VOSBURGHI, Manager.
6' ORGE W. FRAZIER, Agent,
i -i tf JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.

ESTABLISHED IN 1868 : .


A..O.K..PERCIVAL
SUCCESSOR TO J. H. CROWELL. .- .


Sawed and Rived Shingles, Lath, Fencing, NO CHARGE FOR ADVICE AND CONSUL-
TATION.


We have recently enlarged our mill and increased
our facilities for executing all orders with dispatch.
Give us a call before going elsewhere.
4.14 PENNIMAN & CO.

BILLIARD SALOON.


(The Larges
BAY STREET,


I


-Will make regular trips
between Jacksonville &
St. Augustine
Freights at low rates.
For freight or passage
apply to WILLSON & WHITLOCK,
Jacksonville, Fla.,
Or to JAMES COSS,
5.6tf St. Augustie, Fla.
'Tiunks and valises at Bucky's.


A LL PAPERS QUOTE FROM IT.
THE DETROIT FREE PRESS
The liveliest of family newspapers, full of interesting
news literature, humorous sketches, spicy paragraphs,
etc. Sample Copies free. -Subscription $. g. year,
postpaid. Address


3-10


ETROIT FREE PRESS,
Detroit, Mich.


a 24 3m


OPPOSITE POST OFFICE.



' .0 0
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B .! TS rpt c


DR. J. B. DYOTT, graduate of Jefferson Medica
College, Philadelphia, author of several valuable works,
can be consulted on all diseases of the Sexual ar Urin-
ary t organs, (which he. has mode an especial study-
either in male or female, no matter from what cause or-
iginating or of how long standing. A practice of 30
years enables him to treat diseases with success. Cures
guaranteed Charges reasonable. Those at a distance
can forward letter describing s mptoms and enclosing
stamp to pay postage
- Send for the Guide to Health. Price zoc.

B. J. DYOTT, M. D.,
Physician and Surgeon, 104 Duane St, N. Y.


Boots and hoes, neat and durable, at BUCKY'S.


.4.


: DEALER IN" ,.


BOOTS, SHOES, LEATHER

AND FINDINGS.


VERY, SALE AND FEED STABLES


a
a
a
0'
I-'


The best and most stylish" livery teams in the, city
ean be found at the Stable of the undersigned, near the
Florida Home, corner of Cedar and Forsyth Streets.
Horses boarded and well cared for on reasonable
.terms; '. c
Strong teams for hauling purposes alwayson hand.
Jacksonville, Fla., May 30, 2874. If.


Percival s' Stamp" Hand Boots $ oo,
Burt & Mears' : -::: ,o .: ,;,
Philadelphia and Biltimore -. -, to: i
Vienna Medal cab]l sewed .- : 5 i?
Percival's Stamp Haiid Congress .-. .iS.:::
Burt & Mears' "' 8 ,
P hiladelphia :, :, ,.. .- - 7. ?, ] ;i a sil
ienna Meal cable sewed ,. ,

S GOOb$,SENT. B MAIL AND EXPkESS, I "
S... "To' partsfiheState.
AT THE OLD STAND, COR. BAY and OCEAN STS., JACKSONVILLE, FLA. *-st.


NO. W. HOWELL.


t the store of


&c. at lowest rates.


(The Largest south of Washington.)


a



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T. B. TOGNI, Proprfetcr.


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We give below a few of the many choice places for sale byus:
No. 73. Two .i:.r h.':ae .:.n A.hley street near St No; o05. Diinlawtni' Plantationu oil
James Hotel, -.lea -., -[y iinuated. n one ...f the be.t seveii:miles north of Mosquito inlet, a
neighborhoods i.. ihe o,.'. ..ue i- ne Lth _.sr....imns, tIioo acres, x,50o acres rich hammock
plenty of closet, 5n.J g...d -r rai'- r....m' lt 1? from river: 50 acres high, shell land,
105 feet, good fence, good sidewalk, and the street the river bank. having tron: of abouLt o
shelled; grapes in bearing : a fine lot of young orange with large, two-story, frame hou., i8
trees; flowers and shade trees growing thriftily; good finished, br.oa-e commands view or the
well, with pump on back porch, which is covered with and i_ surrounded ith large, bearing
flowering vines. Will be sold cheap. some 75 to to', in number: good wel
N. B. To capitalists '"'desiring a big thing," there that holds i,2oo gallons, in ard. thor
is a fne opening in Springfield; a few thousand dollars and drained; canal from suzar-house
will go great way just now. For particulars enquire riser r ir.n~p-,rtati.n ofcrrc.p. immer
of Norton & Kooker, corner Ocean and Bay streets. .Id orrange ir,.e' on the place: the soil
h.s ,ugar lands f Cuba, to which, it
No. 74. A HANDSOME RESIDENCE FOR SALE:-Si lme,st..ne .s aburdant This place is r
large rooms and kitchen, double bay window on the chon.eti places in Florida, and was kno
1e',t large double arlO'rs, double piazza on the south, bre the iar.
commanding .n i.fi the -finest views in Jacksonville;
nind.-.s. filled mith ibur lightsof 40-inch glass and nung N. B. Do you want a snug wini
with cords and weights on pulleys and reaching to the orange trees and flower., in Fkirinda?
floor, with blinds: all casings are finished with mould- a beautiful lot, 7s11,,6 feet, in Spring
ing and oiled and varnished, making a beautiful finish: healthfuil,and within lenminates walk o
ceilings high, walls hard-finished, open stairs, double, on which to make it, ,,r 5as. For par
glass, front doors, mortice lock on every door in house; of Norton & Kooker.
china closet, store-room, plenty of clothes-presses, bath-
room; hip roof, with cupola, from which a charming No. xxg.' A tract of 88 acres 6.saer
view is to be had of the city, the river and surrounding t*ocllaudd: fine fronton St.John's river
country; thrA~ lots, making x5tox ov feet ; g d w cll. fro t -sin vle Thin sisof.neofksyhlem
young shade trees started; -,half9 ue from p...st-v.ffce,. frons.inhe vicinity of. Jacksrpnvlle.I
For sale at a bargain. f esred.
No. 96. A large, two-story house with ten large No. 146. Six acres on Arlington rivi
rooms; thoroughly built, and finished in first-rate style, Florida Home, containing the old vine
with twelve feet ceilings ; one acre of ground, covered at a bargain. :
with fruit trees and flowers; pleasantly located; within
five minutes walk of the raisroaddepot. Price $io,ooo; .No 147. M ETROPO LITAN HOTeLr.
$4,500 down, balance on long time if desired. c-ntraily I.:.cated, built n the best'Free,
a frst-class house in every respect..
No. 9p. 400 acres in Orange county; one mile from terms apply to Norlo & Keeooker.
Melonvitle. Price, $5 per acre.
Call on or write to us, and state your wants:
OFFICE COR. OCEAN AND BAY STS., JACKSONVILLE, FLA,
A.^iVisitors always welcome. Latest papers on file.


0


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+


I


JAMES H. PAINE,
President.


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f
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e
it
k
n


l-
d
n
k
re
rs
es
e
ve

he
t.
or
do
ey

en
re
ts
Id
he
p,.
s-
it
et
h,
to
to
al-
1l-
is
he
me
is
he
ee
be-
by
nd


keep them from straying during ti'
as day, and bring them hbme at nigh
at; These dogs have inherited a talent f<
er keeping sheep; but the shepheds d
ed not depend wholly on that. The
st- cultivate it in this way :
;rs When a lamb -is born it is take
n- away from the mother sheep befoi
fc- she has seen it, and a puppy put in i
ek place. When the puppy grows ol
m- enough to eat eat, it is fed in th
3,- morning and sent out with the sheep
8; It stays with them becauseit is aciRt
oo tomed to be with its mother, but
g- cannot feed with them., As they ge
rd- full, the dog gets hungry. At length
in impatient to return where it hopes
ot get another piece of meat, it begins
ar- tease and worry its mother, and final
ng ly starts her home; the other sheep fc
-nt follow, and thus' the whole flock
he brought in. ;f the dog brings tl
se, sheep home too soon, or comes hon
of without them, he gets no snppler, or
or punished n some, way: Hence 1
au- soon learnib when to come, and to se
he that none of his charge are left b
in hind. These animals are .trained I
on taking advantage of their instinct at
If. appetite.


Y







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J.H. NO