<%BANNER%>

UFPKY NEH LSTA



xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8 standalone no
fcla dl
!-- new South ( Newspaper ) --
METS:mets OBJID UF00048585_00003
xmlns:METS http:www.loc.govMETS
xmlns:mods http:www.loc.govmodsv3
xmlns:xlink http:www.w3.org1999xlink
xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance
xmlns:sobekcm http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm
xsi:schemaLocation
http:www.loc.govstandardsmetsmets.xsd
http:www.loc.govmodsv3mods-3-4.xsd
http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcmsobekcm.xsd
METS:metsHdr CREATEDATE 2006-10-05T16:47:24Z ID LASTMODDATE 2009-03-04T20:51:04Z RECORDSTATUS METADATA_UPDATE
METS:agent ROLE CREATOR TYPE ORGANIZATION
METS:name UF,University of Florida
OTHERTYPE SOFTWARE OTHER
PreQC Application, 3.4.8
INDIVIDUAL
SMATHERSLIB\ranrenn
METS:note Updated pubdate from serial hierarchy
METS:dmdSec DMD1
METS:mdWrap MDTYPE MODS MIMETYPE textxml LABEL Metadata
METS:xmlData
mods:mods
mods:genre authority marcgt newspaper
sobekcm newspaper
mods:identifier type ALEPH 002042984
OCLC 16156679
NOTIS AKN0865
LCCN sn 87062262
mods:language
mods:languageTerm text English
code iso639-2b eng
mods:location
mods:physicalLocation University of Florida
UF
mods:note dates or sequential designation Began in 1874; ceased in 1875?
"Wise men accept the inevitable, but strive to shape the future."
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 32 (Jan. 16, 1875).
funding Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
mods:originInfo
mods:publisher Adams, Carruth & Co.
mods:place
mods:placeTerm marccountry flu
mods:dateIssued marc point start 1874
end 1875
mods:dateCreated May 12, 1875
mods:frequency Weekly
marcfrequency weekly
regular
mods:recordInfo
mods:recordIdentifier source UF00048585_00003
mods:recordCreationDate 870710
mods:recordOrigin Imported from (ALEPH)002042984
mods:recordContentSource University of Florida
marcorg DLC
FUG
mods:languageOfCataloging
English
eng
mods:relatedItem original
mods:physicalDescription
mods:extent v. : ill. (chiefly advertisements) ; 61 cm.
series
mods:part
mods:detail Enum1
mods:caption 1875
mods:number 1875
Enum2
May
5
Enum3
12
12
Year
1875
1875
Month
May
5
Day
12
12
lccn 85038367
oclc 12368935
mods:titleInfo
mods:title New South (Jacksonville, Fla. : 1874 : Semiweekly)
mods:subject SUBJ651_1 lcsh
mods:geographic Jacksonville (Fla.)
Newspapers
SUBJ651_2
Duval COunty (Fla.)
Newspapers
mods:hierarchicalGeographic
mods:country United States
mods:state Florida
mods:county Duval
mods:city Jacksonville
mods:nonSort The
new South
uniform displayLabel Main Entry
New South (Jacksonville, Fla. 1874 Weekly)
mods:typeOfResource text
DMD2
OTHERMDTYPE SobekCM Custom
sobekcm:procParam
sobekcm:Aggregation FDNL1
FDNLN
sobekcm:MainThumbnail 00001thm.jpg
sobekcm:Wordmark UFPKY
NEH
LSTA
sobekcm:bibDesc
sobekcm:BibID UF00048585
sobekcm:VID 00003
sobekcm:Coordinates
sobekcm:Point latitude 30.31944 longitude -81.66 label Place of Publication
sobekcm:EncodingLevel #
sobekcm:Publisher
sobekcm:Name Adams, Carruth & Co.
sobekcm:PlaceTerm Jacksonville Fla
sobekcm:Source
sobekcm:statement UF University of Florida
sobekcm:serial
sobekcm:SerialHierarchy level 1 order 1875 1875
2 5 May
3 12 12
METS:amdSec
METS:techMD TECHMD1
File Technical Details
sobekcm:FileInfo
sobekcm:File fileid JPEG1 width 630 height 845
JPEG2 850
JPEG3 840
JPEG4
JP21 5460 7320 servicecopy UFDCUF\08\08\05\45\0000300001.jp2
JP22 5481 7392 UFDCUF\08\08\05\45\0000300002.jp2
JP23 5542 UFDCUF\08\08\05\45\0000300003.jp2
JP24 5482 7356 UFDCUF\08\08\05\45\0000300004.jp2
METS:fileSec
METS:fileGrp USE reference
METS:file GROUPID G1 imagejpeg CHECKSUM ae10d7d236768deedbee29b2562062c5 CHECKSUMTYPE MD5 SIZE 366380
METS:FLocat LOCTYPE OTHERLOCTYPE SYSTEM xlink:href 00001.jpg
G2 cb71deca298591cfc86f56efc0b4c3c0 358985
00002.jpg
G3 8e658e1b6fd7b5a9c60a2d33af0b4778 338972
00003.jpg
G4 e1b69b641c2b43fcc8ff2bf6bda0b5d1 350318
00004.jpg
imagejp2 6a579faa2dfad19d4dceeef52ffc00f0 4996005
00001.jp2
c594e109c66e607d24de3d7395936dd2 5064541
00002.jp2
5612927c2d92aff27c2d52514c6fd575 5120918
00003.jp2
374fa05d3835fbe213ad905634562eb0 5040807
00004.jp2
METS:structMap STRUCT1 physical
METS:div DMDID ORDER 0 main
PDIV1 Chapter
PAGE1 Page
METS:fptr FILEID
PAGE2
PAGE3
PAGE4 4
METS:behaviorSec VIEWS Options available to the user for viewing this item
METS:behavior VIEW1 STRUCTID Default View
METS:mechanism Viewer zoomable JPEG2000s Procedure xlink:type simple xlink:title JP2_Viewer()
VIEW2 Alternate
JPEGs JPEG_Viewer()
INTERFACES Banners webskins which resource can appear under
INT1 Interface
UFDC UFDC_Interface_Loader
INT2
FDNL FDNL_Interface_Loader


The new South
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00048585/00003
 Material Information
Title: The new South
Uniform Title: New South (Jacksonville, Fla. 1874 Weekly)
Physical Description: v. : ill. (chiefly advertisements) ; 61 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Adams, Carruth & Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 12, 1875
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval COunty (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1874; ceased in 1875?
General Note: "Wise men accept the inevitable, but strive to shape the future."
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 32 (Jan. 16, 1875).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002042984
oclc - 16156679
notis - AKN0865
lccn - sn 87062262
System ID: UF00048585:00003
 Related Items
Related Items: New South (Jacksonville, Fla. : 1874 : Semiweekly)

Full Text








TlE NEV\ SOTUTH0


.... ;/, ', ; '' "-"WISE MEN A ACCEPT THE INEVITABLE, BUT STRIVE TO SHAPE THA FtJTUR."' ....


VOL. I.. 'JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA. WEDNESDAY.MORNING, MAY 12875. NO.8
I II I I I I i I I i / / ..' ^ ''- '- .


THE NEW SOUTH. Inquiries Abo
PUBLISHED D EVERY WEDNESDAY AND To W. H. Kilty,
SATURDAY. Co., Wisconsin.
t,: B,,NMS, OF. SUBSCRIPTION: Your inquiries are
li SeMI-WlIiKLY, mail subscribers, f.I 5oper annum,
FNe or more copies, s3,oo each; and an extra copy order of proposition.
''wni be sent to every club of ient received at one time. Question 'Fi rSt-I
J WEEKLy, mail subscribers, $2 per annum. Ten is.
'bpies P1.75 each; Twenty copies, $;.6o; Fifty cop- ed a healthful place?
tes, $1.40 each..


',-* .* ADVERTISING:RATES:
*" SEMI-WKKLTY, $t 0o per, inch,-or less, first insertion:
, ech subsequent insertion; 50 cents.
S. WIEEKLY, (t.25 per inch or less, first insertion: each
subsequentt Inertion, 75"chnts.'
S Soer-ial Notke,, 2o ent :fiper line.
T TERMS: CASH' IN ADVANCE.
"/Address ADAMS, CARRUTH & CO.,
.-"' Tacksonville, Florida.

". PROFESSIONAL CARDS, &ac.

j; N. BETTES,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
'-- ", .... :*n'. "Jacksonville; Fla.'
.OFFi.c-Opposite Ocean Hou.e,ecirner of Adams
andOcean streets. 0'6, 7 .67m


W .M.. & ARTHUR A:. BIRNEY,
.-,,.. ATTO R N E Y S, :
-,S "T.,. R EE,:N6 330,
..WASHiNGTON CITY


'*',M/RS. F. M. MURRAY,
PHYSICIAN, AND -SURGEON.
S ... Special aitnmion given to
^.-.DISEASES-OF THE LUNGS.,
S' ROOMS-MITCHEL'S N EW BUILDING,
-Bay street, Jacksonvllle, Fla. :
OFPICE HouRs-9 to Ix A. K., 2 to 4 p. M. Rooms
f i antd.1o.. 3-3 3m.,'

R. R ANNO,
: -ATTORNEY-AT-'LAW
" Office, in Reed'' BlIock, Bay Street,
Yacksosville. Florida'.


S H, A. PATTISON.
P' ATTISON & MEEK,

-; --ATTORNE'


A. R. MEEK.


YS-AT-LAW.


- Office, ReQua's building, Jacksonville, Fla.

SP -E. JOHNSON, M. D.,
S.: HOMEOPATHIC
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
S- ffec, in Mitchell's new building, north side of Bay
.sreqst. between Newnan and Market streets, nearly
.opposkrg the Post Office. xggtt
\ L. COAN,
J JUSTICEE OF THE PEACE
A D. N D


-ROTARY PU B L I C.
Office in SOLAR VE'S BLOCK,
.Corner RAY and PINE stret
S .Jacksonville, Fla.

A A KNIGHT,
ATF-O&NEV AT LAW.
No. 2 H UP OldptUMp
3-25wlY Jflfs5O1WaBC. 8&.


-A. BUESING,
... Respe:tful)y call, the -uend,:,n of the citizens ad mer-
c hans t.)t e BFAUrIFL'L SOAP he manufactures.
S t is the beat Washing, Barber and Toilet Soap ever
made. FThis S&ap is put up in Uoxcs coataig So lbs
and 90 bar;.
Orders sbuld be addre-se. to
.-- A. BUESING, BoE 7ss,
f $Jacksonville, Fla. ,

SICHARD McLAUGHLIN,
"*'L ESTATE AGENT,
yacksonville, FlZorida. .
All sorts of Real Estate bought and sold; Money in-
vested. Taxes paid, Titles examined.
REFERS, av ByERmsssiox, to'William Astor, Esq.,
New Vnrk. Ex.-Gov. A G. Curtin, Bellefonte, Pa.;
Lewis H Redner, Phladelphia. W. Stokes Boyd,
SPhiladelphia. D. G. Ambler, Banker, Jacksonville, Fla.
Henry Tucker, Boiton. Mass. 3-28-Iy-pd

N ORTON & KOOKER,
REAL ESTATE DEATH ER6, corner Ocean and Bay
sireet-, Jacki.ontule. Floida4
Money loaned on Real Estate Secwity. General
Life and Fire tnsurare Agents and dealers it Pioe
Lands, Plantadloni.&, Sprigfield suburb a specialty.
Correspondence so.licited 3--8swtf

j-WHOLESAIGO ORDERS AT SAVANNAH PRICES,

H. ROBINSON,
W#WOLALK & RETAIL
DRUGGIST,
Hoeg's Block, Bay Se.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
| COMPOUNDING PRESCEPTIOMi A SPECIAL1,


PRINTING.


THE NEW SOUTH

JOB AND BOOK PRINTING


- i '2~
"'2' .2


Tlba proprietors, are prepared to -excvne orders 'for
ecM'y description of

PLAIN OR OR9AWElTkL PAINTING. ,

SSuch as BOSlx,CKS','ARb9S,
ViihIriNG CARDS, .
SWEtDfNG CARDS. '
BILL HEADS,


POSBTRS,
BRIEFS,


LETTER HEADS,
CIRCULARS,.


PAMPHLETS,


BLANKS OF ALL KINDS .

.- COLORED PRINTING AND GILT WORK.



'CHEAP, NEAT AND PROMPT. :-


'ut Florida,


, Unity, Clarke

e answered in the

[s Florida count-


.~ _


of going to Florida. Now would you
advise him to settle in your State?
He thinks he ffight plant an orange
grove, but it would take fen years,.of
about that I suppose, for the trees to
get in a good bearing condition.
Now what do you most !readily raise
on .you? ;farms --and, is-t'hie-a- market


We have resided in the State now
for more than seven years, and have
a personal knowledge of a large por-
tion of its territory, and we look upon
it ourselves, and know it to be con-
sidered as healthy, upon the whole, as
is any State in the Union. Its climate
is singularly agreable and uniform, and
the changes of temperature are light
and not severe. The knowledge of its
citizens 'confirms the sanitary conclu-
sIons of .the V. 'S. A. Surgeon,. that
no part of the United States is more
uniformily healthy than Florida.
Second.-At what time of the year
should parties from the North go to
Florida?
SThe best time for visitors from the
North, is to start so as to arrive here
between the ist November and the
middle of January, and to remain till,
at least the middle of May, so as to
experience: in person, the summer as
well as the winter climate of the
'State.
Third.-Would you advise a con-
sumptive person to go there?
We have not the least hesitation in
advising, all who are conscious of a
consumptivetendency, tobetake them-
selves to a mild and genial climate,
and we know of none within the
United States, with the exception of,
possibly, some portions of California,
that can compare with Florida, in the
soothing and healing influences of its
balmy climate upon tender throats and
lungs. For those who need a bracing
air, the Eastern coast at St. Augustine
or Fernandina or Jacksonville, would
be best; for others, and more advanc-
ed cases, the climate of Ocala or
Gainesville, or a camp in the dry pine
woods, would be preferable.
Fourth.-What kind of grain do
you raise?
Florida is not peculiarly adapted
:to the cultivation of grain, but still,
-all -the- --y- -ksi -,si-o_graiE Larec_
raised with moderate success, except
wheat. Fair wheat has Ibeen raised
on the heavier soil, but is not a com-
mon crop. Corn is universally raised
in the northern and middle portions,
anild with thle same fertilization given
t the North does well. Rye and
.a'.s prod" e a good average cfop.
But little atte.n.ttion is likely ever to be
given to grain, 'lec.ause other crops,
-uch.,as vegetabl-es, fruit, sugar cane,
rice an4 tobacco, can be made more
profitable.
Fifth.-I[s it a good stock country?
It is a very fair country for stock,
although the natural grasses are infe-
rior to those farther north, for, the
ease of shelter and the facility of
grass crops throughout the year, fully
counter-balance the lack of good feed.
Sixth.-Is it very warm in the sum-
mer?
No-It is warm, and warm contin-
uosly for many months, but the ther-
mometer is often lower than in New
York, Pennsylvania or New England,
at the same time, and the long con
tinuance ot the heat is counter-bal-
anced by the nniformr coolness of the
nights.
Seventh.-Is there government land
vacant subject to homestead ?
Ves-there is U. -S. land subject to
homestead entry in every section of
the State, and State land that can be
bought at, from $1,oo to $2,5o per
acre ..... .
''"Eighth.-At what price can im-
prored land be purchased ?
-. Lands that have been cleared and
formerly cultivated, can be had
throughout the State at, from $2,5o
to poioo per acre, and ,are the best
-lands for new comers, who can, if
they come in colonies, purchase them
in large quantities at very low rates.-
'Eni NEW SOUTH.
::." i.LYNN, MASs., April 22d, 1875.
.fv.My .Dear Sir:-I write to you to
nquire something about the business
'prospects- of your State, and particu-
larly as to agriculture. What I wish
to know I will state as concisely as
possible. I have a friend who has
been a farmer all his life; is not
wealthy, bu.t has two or three thous-
and dollars,- and he has some notion


A good escape from a tight place is
attributed to George the F6urth.
There was an empty bottle on the
table, and' the King told the servant
to "tak'e away that marine." A guest
sitting nextthe King whispered in his
ear that an officer present belonged to
tba't branch of the service Geotge
the Fourth ascertained his name and
then,- addressing hina' atod, asked
hi'm if he knew why a'n empty bottle
was' called a marine. "No, your
Majesty," replied the officer. "Be-
cause," said the King, "itf has done
its duty, and:is ready to do it againn"


George Willim Curtis.


for what you raise, so that farming
can be profitable?
Are there good farms near your city
of Jacksonville for sale at a fair rate,
and if so, please tell the probable
value per acre, etc., etc.
You will readily understand what I
desire to know, and you have no in-
terest to encourage settling in your
State, when it can only end in ruin to
those who settle there.
SI was in your city a few days, some
years ago, but 1 did not feel an inter-
est in these particulars that I do now.
Do you raise cattle? but I presume
you do not, on account of a want of
good grazing .,
As for myself, (for I write for
another,) I should be right glad to go
also, only I presume you have more
than enough of medical men. Rheu-
matism takes all the comfort out of
my life.' Please answer on receipt of
this,tand write fully as-you can afford
time and opportunity, and oblige,
Yours, Very Respectfully,
SWM. B. REYNOLDS, M. D.
ANSWER.
Our State, although as a matter of
history, settled three centuries ago, is
in fact, a new and comparatively un-
developed State, with peculiar but val-
uable.: resources. She would subject
her immigrants upon the remote parts
of her territory, to many of the pri-
vations and hardships, to which set-
tlers in new regions are usually ex-
posed ; but in her genial climate, her
healthfulness, and in her special ca-
pacity to grow her own peculiar crops
of large value on comparatively small
areas, she offers many strong induce-
mnents. She needs earnest, industri-
ous and persistent workers in all de-
partments, and will give to all such a
hearty welcome and a generous snp-
port.
If your friend is willing to work
and wait a reasonable time, we have
little hesitation, in his circumstances,
in recommending him to come to
Florida. His capital carefully han-
dled, will sustain him comfortably
without loss, till he can work out a
vegetable farm, or a fruit orchard, up-
on the income of which he can sub-
sist, while his improvements will con-
stantly increase in value. He need
not wait the ten years of which you
speak, for he can have a crop of grapes
-orfyc~in thrap *afa'-e' uavags.jlemons
or citrons, in five years, and can, by
budding on sour stocks, possess a
bearing orange grove in three years,
or purchasing sweet seedlings, can
make them bear in five years.
We can raise on our Florida farms,
corn, cotton, sugar cane, rice, tobac-
co, rye, oats, cow peas, pindars or
peanuts, Irish and sweet potatoes, veg-
etables of all kinds, and nearly all
the valuiabl'e fruits of the middle
states with a great variety peculiar to
this latitude.
. On account of the incomplete con-
dition of transition between corn and
cotton, and something else, there are
not many good farms near this city.
Land of fair quality can be bought
within five -miles of here, for, from
five to ten dollars per acre.
You are mistaken in supposing that
we do not raise cattle here, for, in the
middle and southern portions of the
State, very large herds of cattle are
raised at little expense and with a
rapid rate of increase. It is true
that little attention has been paid to
the improvement of stock, but there
are no hindrances to such improve-
ment except indifference. In fact,
the larger portion of the State, cattle
subsist during the entire year upon
the natural grasses, and in any part of
it very little other food is necessary;
and if, as many northern farmers are
beginning to believe, the economical
mode of supporting cattle is by soil-
ing, even where from four to six
months of feeding upon hay is neces-
sary, then this is a most desirable cat-
tle country, because some green crop
may be grown at any.iime of the year.
However it may be with your
friend, if rheumatism "takes all the
comfort out of your life,"you should,
by all means, betake yourself to this
warm and genial clime.
I send you a NEW SOUTH and other
documents.--EDITOR.


WASHINGTON April 'o, 1875.
Looking over in the papers this
morning the long accounts of the
Centennial at ConcOrd and Lexing-
ton, I read and re-read Curtis' bril-
liant speech. Down to the end of his
invocation to the "minute man," that
speech is absolutely perfect 3 further
along there is a flap of spread-eagle-
ism, and an unnecessary allusion to
the public school question which
savors a litile of- Harper's Weekly,
but is redeemed by a graceful, manly
salute to the President, and a fine
peroration. But,:as Byron said, .the
best book ever written is only half
good, and the defects of this superb
oration are only noticeable by the side
of its wonderful beauty. Sublime
in thought, simple in eXpression, in
every exquisitiely-4nished sentence
-there is a throb of true feeling that
must have sent a glow through- the
chilled audience that heard it. I re-
call,
A LITTLE BIT OF GEORGE WILLIAMS
CURTIS' HISTORY,
heard from a friend once, that gives
so pleasant an idea of the man that it
is worth telling. His first association
with a literary set was at Brook Farm.
Precisely what the Brook Farm com-
munity was no one knows; nor will
they ever kuow, for the philosophers
are chary of their secrets, and the re-
sult of this venture was not such as to
court publicity. To its members it
promised a utopian existence, wherein
the wholesome, toils of Arcadia and
the divine inspiration of Parnassus
should blend in harmony; or as Fre-
derika Bremer puts it, "that people
instead of going to heaven as now, by
the thorny path will wander thither
on roses," and more of the same sort.
To outsiders it seemed
A VERY ABSURD UNDERTAKING
of impractical people to do impossi-
ble things. Its earthly site was Rox-
bury (near Boston); its aim was-
somewhere in the clouds ; its result,
.speedy dismemberment, disappointed
expectations, and financial ruin.
Among its members were Dr. Chan-
ning, the Unitarian saint ; Theodore
Parker, his antagonist in creed ; Haw-
thorne, to whom many of its aspects
must have been irresistibly droll ;
Dana, who breathes now a different
atmosphere in the pages of the New
York Sun; Curtis, "the.brilliant young
howadji," as yet untraveled ; Alcott,
I think, and several others. Emerson
though invited, and bound to the
community by many ties, shrewdly
declined joining, but he visited it of-
- t--n K1ALje-the Isis to
Emerson, the Osiris of these new
mysteries, was a frequent guest like-
wise ; and if her host appreciated her
as much as she appreciated herself,
they must have enjoyed her society.
Although Hawthorne positively dis-
claims any description of Brook Farm
in the "Blythedale Romance," still
that will remain to the profane, at
least, a tolerably true record of that
episode. How droll those chapters
are. Miles Coverdale leaving his cosy
bachelor rooms to go into an April
snow storm, and trying to say. "How
pleasant this is !" while the flakes fly
between his teeth ; then Zenobia, an
idealized Margaret Fuller, and whose
sad fate was the paraphrase of a
tragedy on Concord River. Hollings-
worth, too the philanthropist, to re-
tain whose society Coverdale declared
they would have to commit systemati-
cally at least one crime apiece, for
peccadilloes would never satisfy him ;
and happiest of all,
SILAS FOSTER,
their farmer--the practical leaven in
this impractical mixture, who addres-
sed saint, philosopher, or sage in pret-
ty much the same tones he would have
used to his oxen ; who shocked Cover-
dale by mentioning pigs; who gulped
his tea as if it were a decoction of cat-
nip ; who perpetrated enormities with
the butter-plate Fancy this assem-
bly, with every sentiment preterna-
turally refined, in intimate association
with a man whose table manners were
"less like a civilized Christian's than
the worst kind of ogre's !" Was ever
a more ludicrous picture of an un-
natural partnership! Or ever a more
delicate allegory of the triumph of
sense ever theory than Silas' advice
when the fainting girl is brought into
a circle that question her motives, but
offer no help! "Being by this time
fully gorged, he crowned his amiable
exploits with a draught from the water
pitcher, and then favored us with his
opinion about the business in hand.
And certainly though they proceeded
out of an unwiped mouth,' his expres-
sions did him honor. "Give the girl
a cup of hot tea and a thick slice of
this first-rate bacon," said Silas, like
a sensible man that he was, "that's
what she wants."


much. correspondence that it would be
tiresome to go over the ground again.
Mr. Curtis' allusion to the self ablne-
gation of those old revolutionists sug-
gests a trace of that noble spirit still
left. There- used to be a doctor in
that neighborhood who was once call-
ed to a neuralgic patient; and, while
prescribing, the nurse suggested a
mustard plaster. "That, I think,"
said the doctor, sagely, "is too severe;
but my wife has neuralgia, and I'll try
one on her, and see how it works."
Where now is the man who was wil-
ling to sacrifice his wife's relations ?
So much for the soldiers; this as for
the philosophers: A tourist asked a
small boy who was digging-in'the dirt


Authors." Among others of less
note were Hawthorne, "a statue of
night and silence," like "the black
thread of mystery" he wove into his
romances; HenryThoreau, a schol-
astic and pastoral Orson *
charmed us with the secrets won from
Pan in Walden Woods ;Br6nson Al-
cott was perpetually putting apples df
gold in pictures of silterj for such was
the rich ore of his thoughts coined by
the deep melody of his voice; while the
Olympian host, anxious that so much
good material should be spun into
something, beamed smnilling en-
couragement on all parties. "The
philosopher sat dignified and erect,"'
our author continues. "There was a
constrained but very amiable silence,
which had the impertinence of a tacit
inquiry, seeming to ask "Who will
now, proceed ,to say the finest thing
that ever has been said 7"' HTie rec'6rds
at the first meeting "a grave eating of
russet apples by the erect poilosophers
and a solemn disappearance into
night," and subsequently "the club
struggled on valiantly, discoursing
clestially, eating apples, and disap-
pearing in the dark till the third night
it vanished altogether." Let us be
thankful there are some stupid people
in the world.
SATIATED WITH THE COMMUNION OF
LOFTY SPIRITS,
Curtis then turned to the city of New
York and, as you would say of a' girl,
"came out." Young, handsome,
polished, rich, with the prestige of a
literary reputation that was not too
overpowering to awe, New York wel-
comed him with a poem, fashion lifted
him to her daintiest shrine, society
smilingly bound herself to his chariot;
Murry Hill and Fifth avenue fought
over him, and "Flora McFlimsey, of
Madison square," ordered a new
wardrobe on the strength of his ac-
quaintance. In reward for all this
homage, he wrote a book on New
York society, the flavor of whose pages
is fresh to-day-the
POTIPHAR PAPERS!
Why he was not tarred and feathered
for it no one can tell ; perhaps Owen
Meredith is right in calling the world
a nettle, harmless to those who handle
it boldly ; certes it is, that the very
society so relentlessly sketched in
those caustic pages lionized him more
than ever. Many of the Potiphar set
are drawn from life ; the girl who ad-
mired Mr. Dusseldorf moved and
breathed and had her actual being;
and Brown, the sexton of Grace
Church, was also of flesh and blood,
and having assisted at so many fash-
innahie 'weddings that he knew upper-
tendom when he saw it, wasempToye-
frequently by those who wanted to get
into society to make out their lists of
invitations.
ABOUT THIS TIME CURTIS MARRIED
a New York girl, of wealth, beauty,
and intelligence; and more for ap-
pearances' sake than from any expec-
tation of working he went into a busi-
ness firm in the city. So far life had
been very fair to the young writer,
and he well content at the easy sail-
ing ; he was free from the cant of
Brook Farm or Fifth avenue, and if no
one adjudged him to be more than a
gallant carpet knight, it was because
they had never known him as aught
different. But about three months af-
ter his marriage he came home from
his counting-room one evening a
ruined man-the firm had gone to
smash, to speak techically, and by
some quibble the junior partner be-
came responsible for the debt. Here
was the darling of fortune disinherited
at one blow. Society saw it was in-
deed hopeless, and I think she was
not so fickle but that she would still
have cherished her favorite, if he had
begged for her sympathy in his new
circumstances. But not he! He took
off his kid gloves and swallow-tail
then and there, and
WENT TO WORK LIKE A MAN.
His luxurious home was abandoned,
his old acquaintances neglected, and
in a few weeks, with his lecture on
"Sir Philip Sidney in his hand, he
started on a Western tour. A West-'
ern tour in those days was a different
thing to what it is now,.and this first
step was undoubtedly a very hard one.
However, undismayed he climbed the
ladder of labor patiently, and in the
course of some years by his own un-
aided work he paid off the entire debt
of the firm. No less a hero he than
Elizabeth's brave young solder.
So when such a man speaks, even
such graceful utterances as yesterday's
gather fresh interest from some
knowledge of him. Fair spoken
words fall pleasantly on the ear, but
THE CONVICTIONS OF A BRAVE HEART
are a guide in our daily life.
Concord has been the text of so


The Beecher jurymen are appealing
to the New York Legislature to get
their wages raised. If they mean
business, why don't they strike ? Why
resort to this old-fashioned milk and
water style of doing things ?-Boston
Globe. -

A small live alligator had been
stepped in the Post Office. He came
all the way from Florida in a wooden
box lined with wet grass. The little
fellow is in good condition after his
long journey. He was addressed to a
gentleman in,-this City.-NV. Y. Timer.


Forest Culture.


by Walden Pond what he was doing,
and the small boy rolled up hit eyes
and said deliberately, "Searching for
the infiniteit" S. M, i., in lttr
Ocedn.

"Valmaseda's Latest.
Captain-General Valmaseda, of
Cuba, has issued another proclamation
offering free and full pardon to all
rebels, no matter how actively they
may have been engaged in the revolu-
tion, if they will surrelider to the
Royal forces. The terms'of this pro-
clamation are to become inoperative
after the 3oth of May. Deserters
from the Spanish army are excluded
from this arrangement fo the Captain-
General, who alludes in bitter lan-
guage to Spanish soldiers who are in
close union with the insurgents a"ind
-.aiding in shedding the blood of their
former companions and brothers. This
movement on the part -of -the new
Captain-General proves two things:
First, that he is not strong enough to
stamp out the patriots with the heel of
his military boot; and secondly, that
desertions from the Spanish to the
Cuban army are far more numerous
than have been reported by the au-
thorities. Valmaseda landed at
Havana with the intention of closing
the war by his brutal method in a
short time, and thus gaining the spe-
cial notice and favor of his Royal
master. His proclamation is an ac-
knowledgment that the task is not so
easily performed. He found the
patriots under General Gomez and
other leaders west of the fortified line
of the Trocha, in the sugar districts of
the island. With troops from Spain
and desTgnated volunteers from Hava-
na, he constituted a column of ad-
vance and started it in the direction
of Macagua. When the first battalion
reached the vicinity of that place it
was attacked by the patriots and badly
defeated. In other localities the
Spanish forces were more successful.
But the expedition- is a recognized
failure, and parties of the patriots are
now within fifty miles of Havana,
with the sword in one hand and the
torch in the other. Ten of the largest
sugar estates in Colon were burned in
the first half of the month of April
and other fires of a similar character
have taken place since that time.
Since March in the district of Santa
Clara nine estates have been destroyed
which produced 8,60oo hogsheads of
sugar.- The whole, value of these es-
tates is set down -at $1,460,ooo. In
Cientuegos six estates fell by the torch
in the same time ; value of property,
$1,9oo00,000ooo ; number of hogsheads of
-rugar prutl cu,lv4,7su. D'.;,.
states are reported destroyed in Sagua
La Grande, which produced 45,7o00
hogsheads of surgar in 1874. In Re-
medios property has been rendered
utterly worthless which before the war
was estimated to be worth $7,200,000.
The ante-war value of all the estates
and property in Cuba now non-pro-
ductive is computed at $25,000,000,
the avowed policy of the patriots is to
burn "all the estates belonging to
Cubans, and Spaniards,- to lay waste
the country, and deprive the Govern-
ment of resources for carrying on the
war." They say if they should only
burn the estates belonging to the
Spaniards the Government would
seize those belonging to the Cnbans,
and still have means to carry on the
war. This is a desperate policy. Bot
the Spaniards have driven these peo-
ple to desperation, and they are deter-
mined to uvse all the means in their
power to win their independence
from Spanish tyranny and spoliation.
The proclamation of Valmaseda will
produce no effect in the way intended
by ..the Spanish Government. The
war will continue until the island is-
free, and in the meantime it material
resources will be reduced tn a.ruinoas
degree.--Philadelphia Times.

Hans Christian Andersen.
Hans Christian Andersen completed
his seventieth year on the ad day of
April, and all the world paid him
homage. The King sent on the first
day of the month-one of the. royal
carriages for him, to convey him to
the palace, where he conferred the
Grand Cross of Dannebrog on his il-
lustrious subject. On 'the next day
the princes of the royal family called
on him, as also did deputations from
all parts of the country, and among
them the committee which- has col-
lected funds for his statue. Among
his presents was a volume containing
one of his stories in fifteen languages.
Telegrams poured in on him from
foreign lands. Blessings on the head
of the dear old man If his stories
have charmed the young, he has
charmed the old still more, by the
most beautiful jirbduct'ofhis life-the
example of his sweet, affectionate na-
ture.


distance, and still further away, skim'
ming over the bonnets, I. s"pluhie and
white heron, the snake bird, .with its
furry plumage, and.the dehltk.egret,
Here, over this magnificent fiid' of
four hundred acres, sweep a peasant
breeze on the hottest da.y,' an here
the birds carol their welcdme, but
there is no human voice 'to send an
echo to my own. Surround this ori-
ental picture with a frame*ork6f for-
est, so dense in foliage that the sun
can only work it sway through in
isolated rays, and-. it is complete. In
all Florida I hay#4riot, n.t its :equal,


ESTABLISHMENT.


__ I


A reckless waste- 'f our forests has
been characteristic of oaf population
from the earliest settlement of the.
country; We have made haste to cut
them away in the most indiscriminate
manner, as if they were the chief bar-
riers, t0 the progress of civilization ;
and not content with what the wood-
mah's ax could do, they were, in. the
earlier days of Western settlement,
burned 'by the thousands of acres,
without the least regard to any possi-
ble value which they miglt ever pos-
sess, or to any harm which their des-
truction might occasion to the .
maleriaji interests of the country. 'The -
history of this arboreal waste,'md,
it be fully written, would -how an im-
mense national loss, occasioned by
mere wanton- recklessness. It is con-
tended, nay demonstrated, by scienti-
fic men that this prodigal destruction ,
has wrought ,changes in the tlimnate
and rendered the soil less productive,
in some places, than 'it otherwise
would have been. In th6 newer re-
gions of the country, and especially
along the path pursued- by the0 west-
ward march of our population,''the
forests, next to the Indians, have been
regarded as the chief enemies ofcivi-
lized ma-n. They have been destroyed
together, though as the, trees outnuim-
bered- the- red men, we still have
rather more'of-them left. In Illinios,
within the last forty years, streams
which once permitted the passage of
light steamers, are now.'for a consid-
erable portion of the year' dry, or
nearly so; arid such has beer6tthe
change in the Hudson river thait;he
Legislature a year ago made ar'-ap
propriation for the purpose'of enabling
the Canal Commissioners to make
surveys, mnaps and plans for danmminsg'f
the outlets; of lakes and constructing
reservoirs on the head of-waters of the
Hudson. It has been found feasible
to divert from the St. .Lawtence a
volume of water five-fod greater 'fan'
that which flows into the Hudson
from its present source. The 'whole --
subject is important, and thffot orio nly
as it relates to those navigable ri'ersp
but to the agriculturalist. T-Uridei{the"
laws of the United Statesi any -erson
may pre-empt 240 acres of land-,,- pon
condition of planting ,certain area'
wiih trees. Already o20,oooooo trees'
have been planted under these provi--
sions. There is no question that the
trees will grow, none thai they'will
prove profitable I the diiraw baci is
that they do not- come to sufficient
maturity for cutting in less tha6i 20
years. But even so, the wel--to-do o
agriculturist, it might be supposed,
would be willing: to do: something to-
wards forest culture tor, the saKe oV----
those to come after him. Attheltas#
meeting of the State Agrieulturaf o&-
ciety ot Minnesota, an interesting es-
say was read, The essayist painted a
rather doleful picture of what Minne-
s6ta, will be if her forests are destroyed.
in the future as they have been in the-
past, and he urged, as a remedy, forestt
culture, which had not thus far"'ffade
very satisfactory progress. 'It appears
that 1,11x6 persons have applied for
land in that State under the provisions'
of the law, by whom the required, pro-
portional part -of 170,307,50 acrese'
(partly estimated) have been planted-
with trees, or equal to the area of
about one county, The fact, .now
pretty well authenticated, that the cut--
ting down of forests is among the
chief causes which have spread sterili-
ty and desolation over regions of
Eorope that were once protiductive of
harvests and crowded with population,-
ought to be an admonition to'-is not
only to arrest the wholesale destruc-
tion of our forests, but to use allU pos-
sible efforts- to increase their culture'
and growth.-N. Y. Shippng List

A correspondent of the Newark
Advertiser writes from- Lake Orange,
Fla. Th-tere:is a field here which has.
Asipped out from Arcadia or some
place of equal beauty and renown. I
am standing on'the summit of a hill
looking to-wards the clear- waters of
Orange Lake, whtch mirror the sun
about a mile away. Thehil may be'
a hbl itded feet in height, or it may be
not more than fifty, but it .slopes off
towards the lake with its rich, smooth
lawn so gently that in traversing it
there is no fatigue: My eye falls up-
on beautiful live oaks and noble pal-
mettos which have sprung uip here and
there with a true artistic disregard- for
straight lines, yet not' one of therrm
where it-is in the way,: or whie.-tcoutld
be dispensed with without marring
the picture. There are clumps of
trees and groves in: which fawats and
fairies might disport themselves ;
groves with little lakes cmbosomed
therein; groves througW hcli purl--
ing streams of white water flows '
groves where the giants shelter the
saplings and where the tal and-stately
magnolia is making ready-to perfume
the air. Cattle are browsing. in the


After thistaste of transcendentalism,
Curtis went traveling as "A Howadji
on the Banks of the Nile." Then he
came back to Concord and riyed there
a while in a house still standing on
the banks of the river. Rarely has so
remarkable a society gathered in any
place as was then assembled in this
little town. But, lack a day I The
uselessness of virgin gold is a cruel
allegory of the impracticability of un-
alloyed genius, and we have but to
open Curtis'- pages to learn this truth.
Read the record of
THE CLUB THAT USED TO MEET I1
EMERSON'S STUDY,I
as it is told in "Homes of American


~~J'^ t











THtE NEW SOUTH: WEEKLY. JACKSONVILLE, WEDNESDAY, IMAY 1 [871,.


..THE NEW SOUTH.
1.S. ADAMS. 1
ao. CARIUTH. ADAMS, CARRUTH & CO.
-nB. BURNSIDR. )
J. ADAMS, EDITOR.
.-. -. ._ __ -_ _
TO CbORIRESPONDENTS AND OTHERS.
,Items ofL.-..l ;ner,- .-r ; 1].l fr.-.i- -.I :.arn .fnl,.
interest, especially educational social and ndustrnal
topics. Corrgpoiideiats. 'lfotlxdinake their letters as
brief as the facts and circumstances will permit.
Were 'not responsible f'r iop'riioini .expressedby our
S:eorrTespondents.,. Rejected. n, .riu.-,-.L' ,: r-,;tler
'be returned nior pre'tr e- t An :,r'. ', u :d'[r ,l: '
!Vill incIi ben nunicad ''

Tiihe Florid;, State Ag'.ru 4ltural College.
;' The' present' prospect that- this' institu-
'ti6hb'of-g g'eamll'u,, ssiit'h el tot Itile St nIe,
may,- witlr-nb grieafatl 4:-ay, be1 put in
o'-pei'atfn;' will attr'ict the nutnti.-iin and
ndrease tlie interest of all. So many
:ol nacles ha\e fn,om nni,: to time inter'-
yenRed to pn'v'ent lie p)revinus ri.:re8s
andiembarra:'- the efi',rtr; .4I th Triis-
-, -tees having thie e-iiia.ini-hunttn andI sup-
port of the CuIlege in -rlInrg ,., th:al u nrix-:
vptvted ilae'nydass enn'ued, and,-this-has
.::gien riseto,.inquiry : and. Eeearlks _that
\1d.6 not indic:,:e rptfi'ial friendliness to
-the insititulinii or' its curators. 2:'
Jstisfee to -the- Collt go, a nd 6o tho-se
'who ae he--ld r ,fc-,--spotisibr v r itS pngre.l s
will uiake :ippr'opr'iane sketchfol' h:-l
S"'has been doim, aind of the (iilietuhnii.
Sencouiinct'edi a expla'rilt<)ry' if.the lack
of farther adt\anceeient. '
.'.,AT.te oroiginil Agricultural College Bill
-,w43,enacted by CinIgr'ss in- 1862, and
by it, 90.000 ackues of land wer granted
ithe-State for theestablishinet, of. one or
-more Colleges, "whcre IhL Iladingy obhjict
~ :shatl be, without xecluding ot/hc rst iitifi,.
Sand classical studies, iW'd ichluding mili-
t *" aryi tactics, to tede -suhbranches of
learniftg as ar' rel" ted to agriculture
and lechaniic arts, in such manner as
'the- Legislatures of II/o' State may res-
1.,,.pectvely prescribe," ,as tilc act declar" ;
thus indicating the sptpci:il and..peculiair
character tlio I gv;eu to -he instittuli.,n
0 oiginating frointr iii gr:tnt. .
-:-iF.,;Notliing Wai thdone in Florida to profit
-- by this 4unali',iu' till 1s, whc-n the
S tlate, by lhgi-I:nti e ciira tnirnt., aceci ptel
the'grant w ith the 'pl'esci'iled c6inditions
and limint.ati.,ns and provided by INgi la-
tion for the fultilmieint of the same, and
establishing a Bo:urd of 'r,'t stee. -
Q.. uesl ion-. imnmedi:it.ly 1 i-irose as to the
prope' official recipients of the- fund,
F and the sul.ijel \was, iunplic.ittd I ycon-
-: flictingsubsequent en ctmnents, to such
degree a- to prteclid., the r:,oe;pt of the
Savaiilk oIlf te I't in I, tfll 187.- -In the ses-
sion of 1872, the necessary legislation
tb perfect- and Famend -the previous
enactmtents was had and the present
SBoard of'Pl'umi'.ei was selected, and or-
Sganized on th,: ;'[h ,.1. rir i"t'oi. 1872,
Congr'eis Intving "xttnm.Iel tile time
within which t1h,.' College must..bQ-o put
in actu.l ,)pernition tl-. s..-curd tho..d-)ni
tLion made -,-. '
___ -- Bv-lhii act the Truitcj.-t 'C.anrnit-
ed with corporate power-' wiith perpetual.
succession. ,As'directed the\ -were in-
corpi.'atdl i," thie .pei.il purpiiose .of
S 'leachinig Iuch branche-s of' I'qari t',g as
are related to a(riut',w'tnir- ,tiid t/'F me-
chanic arts, m/ildarq I,'tic'*, and other
Scientific ad cif"si.'.-l s/ tli.' in "order
t, promote ihe U&h- -r,al ,-1.-l ,racticnl edu-
S ca411i1 of .the ilul'tri,tl clad,ses iPi the,
..,general pur.!,,iiial i,,ii',.'ote.'sit'io Of iilc.;
':; The- Agricultur.il College scrip to
W: which the State. was itinnitlel by the a. t
A .- of 186- ,was- train f1in ` ed to -and- vested
i- n the Trustees and thnir sutieessoro for-
ever,'to be used in! carrying out the pro
visions lI thi'- .1 t, but with al ipe'i.,I pro-
v vision th.tIt "''no portion ol tlie prin'cip.l
Sor interest .Of thefudiid .h.ill lihe -'aplied,
.direc'ily or inlir'ccily, uhder -any pn'e-
tence whatever, to .the pi-I'i:se,', erec-
Lion, preservation or repairs of any
building 'or buildings" for the use of
the Coliege. BuL tl.u .per *cent of thie.
avails of the- scrip e null be ccxp.n.iled for
-" the purchase of' a -site :ft'r'an- expelri
*' menial 1.r ,"m flis rehaai' idir to bI, .nv-


should go into operation, the largest
attainable donation in aid. of its funds


that co-uldbe obtained on condition of
its location, became at one ea leading
ohj,'.'t of the Board. Accordingly, soon
after b'rganhi~aton, public notice was
givr-i that donations would be received
b" ilh Ti'Trustees from any section that
desii-ed Tn 'thisway to secure 1t'ir itself
the location of th lie.C'd log. In retsp:)nse
to quch ntieC, steve-ral proffers of.-con-
,linonnal donations \ cr', received. The
eilizen-s of Alachua county and Hlion. D.


L. Yulee; proffered- a- liberal .sum: of


money and 20,000 acres of land on con-
dition of locating th.e College in Alachua
county. Hon. D. Eagan and- M. L.
Taylor, offered atlarge donation of land
conditioned upon its location in Oi'ange
county and- this offer was supplemented
by an additional donation from A. J.
McD,'in.ld. But the laids offered by
the citizens of Alachua .and, by Messrs.
Eagan and Taylor, were tax-title lands,
and in the opinion of Attirney-General
Cocke, did mit i.ffer aI suflicieruly sound
basis for the location of a State Institu
tio-n. A liberal offer was also made by
Myron L. Mickles, :Esq., of land near
Duinr's Lake conditioned upon locating
the College-there with a building cost-
ing $25,000 wtihin one year and with
this l:,t c,.nditiun coinplian e 'was inn-
possible. -
.In 1873 the .Trustees endeavored to
obtain frunm Ili.- United States Govern-
ment the grant of the Government.reser-
vation and buildings .thereon, situated
hear Tampa,- but without- success.! By
delays of .opposition and litigation,
much time having been consumed, it-
became evident, at the opening of the
present year, that some positive steps
must soon be taken to insure retention
of the fund for thie purpose for which it
was granted. and a determination'was
announced if possible to make a speedy
location of the College, the most desira-
ble tlIat c'.uld blic- made. In the. entire
lac k 6" any propoiitioiin from. Middle or
W-est-Floridnl, East Florida--:seemed to
feel ile gl'eate-t interest. .: -
Fit-.'!ing -forced to immediate action
_h_-Tj'anl LeA i-'_.'.i e1 jjuix1i he'aLosfei&
from lIIn. \W.-TI.- season -and W. R.
Anno, Esq., of lands situ'ated .upon In-
dian Rixer, conditioned upon thi6'loca-
tion .of tihe College in that section. These
propositions w ill ,- be fomtijil in another
;eolunt.i and will attract general atten-
tion, ppl i,,,,-ud then upon speedy -ac-
tion, as dI.n,.,ind,l i under the cirncum-
stances,tli-' Trni-t.'. at" thei't meeting
in March 1875, apintimmt-il a- Committee
consisting of Governor Steamrs,- Super-
ititeiffdent Hicks and Tr'easurer Varnum,
*and i'equested them to -make a personal
ex. imntl tin rtand report in reference to
the lands Itl'i-td upon Indian River.
,Such examination has been ;- made and
the report of 'the committee will be
found in another column. "

The Loyal Democracy.
,-;We reproduce one of the most con-
elusive demonstrations that have been
give-n o.f tnhe, devoted loyalty of the
Democracy .to the "Constitution as it
was:" .: ; '
The New': Orleans 3/in hly Review
THE ONLY MAGAZINE IN TIlE ENTIRE
SOUTH, '


......... .. .... ...........i.. '- "... .'.' deelar-es in its: last number :under -the
vested in ixs pen' cent. stocks" ot lihe query, "Were the Confederates guilty
United States0 o _some of the States, of treason ?" as follows: ..:
Thie Trustees were directed, within The, act .of withdrawal of the seceding
the time pscibed by Congres States was as-solemn, formal, and vol-
";ifetime pce,'i'bed bhy :con-e-ss, to ".... adv-
untary, in every respect, as was their
determine upon the lo.cation,:f the original accession to the Union, and, in
Col lege at snome he.?,ithy nnd nonvuenienily both instances, was accoritplished by
accessible point, whith lncalin.ni shall be virtue of their- sovereignty, which has
as near the centre of thei State as p,, i n.-er', even to this moinment, been sur-
Si ad ae m t' f.. endercd. The result of their secession
Sible -and lake meanur-s toopen the %as not only that the Union of' the States
F Collee "lo1 the; reception of stud entsl was 'sundered. but th-'government over-
Immedi:ttc'lv after or'gauiizkiion, the thrown.', and -the Constitution rendered
Trustees institiun d 11e:tsures to ol-taiu innoperative,-and ceased to beobligatory
,-.,. ?upora any ot the. Sate'.< Cniigrt.-.s e,>uhli
agricultntal College scrip beioning ,tog ,pon any ofgtheialt. Cnne un,..r the
no longer legally colntacime Imnnnk- th
the College, but fora long time without provisions i' that instrtnm,-ut; its war-
success. The efforts ol the previous making power, anId aill ils mtniiii.ni-
Biard to obtain. the scrip had been ef- were gum.i 1 an.ud no Ulnited States with-
ectardy IO 'ust'aited qrip the bm~nniet e- its ext-x, utiVe, legislative, and-jpdicfia
fectually frusr.ited the conflict odepannents olgovernment.,any; longer
;official authorities hlieretol)reneitiinied. -exi.-led0 against :which. treason; the of-
S- The application was at first denied on tine ground that a committed.. ..
'balance of account %% .istie tine Uit'ed heiruth is. the late war was a war
S n d h U bletweeW`n the. .,.i- of people who com-
Stites froiu ihia Stale ,tn ac, ount ofl posed the Northern States on one side,
Indian tri's fundt, .ad p:tv inent ailing without -right'-and without, the
was pos.itivel relns.-e.I, except it should authority of- a'legitimately organized
be requir'edI by Conmg'resi'i,-nhd Act. Il government atid tilie Corn&.dtrat- nt.>t.
wilh a requlargon'crumnennl againn.-t which
the meanwhile ac minditioual eontrnic lor a e so'ercign ptnccr riaso, could be corn-
the sale.of the scrip, when obtained, hi.id mnitd on Ithe theirr msli. Tle mt'j'ct of
hben effeeted bl W. D. Blux.hni.tLhc ViC-ie- lie War u-th'ins to l o esrthrow tilne scvert-igmiiiy
President of the Board, at ninety ets hf theeSouthein States and reduce them
I.) the condition of conquered provinces
peracre, thie thea highest going )price. whnieh the-,assailants were able to0ac-
'Tlhrough lie iefftorts o( tur di-legatiuu imn cognpjjsh aginitst all principles ef Amer-
COugress,;t.' ant wa- p ufseti d'e,.'milng IhIe eCan l igI. by the force Qve:wlielmuing
t'i uniber_. 771S e'as trarcasu Ito the'South-
;^leliveti' to the Trw -te,... J.f the scrip be- r 8 aeL n,.I 7 ,,ti ,,i gs
:*: ,:* ., .1 Ionging to Flori.-i, tnil, a. 'i oon aj prae.- -vS..'fn e ,tnniries,; i nor'a-ts the
j () VI1--c --i I"
ieable, "thfie scri) slwas, dehritied it ihi truasomn dirnitnished by the fact that in
Treasurer of the 'Bo.'id, whou'then coin- eonscqu'eCc: ifl'thr defeat, tieywere un-
'pleled tt conJi ioni:dlcointran' li.rits sle able to punish the treason.
.atninety ctnts, ad by di're,'iiin ,,I th- Thi differs silighitly in general. tenor
i Bolrd and up.1, the advice ul the CInnip- from lh. I le -inal a i I nd pacificato"y .as
trolter o th.e St:te,"the eprLuel'iS nn- wll a1t, l intueii-ly loyal ltoni nt' the
ing to 460,)(t was itnested in Florida- "Grtieley Platfo,'-n" .but, as the more
-StaUtbodsdi a't' 8.aSattqilit,"cnents, which recent, utterance ijUst.. cumniind the
S nettel.'s4,nrfiethintr-,vei.$100.0uO in itlee'-greatlcr credence. How stiante that
bonds, all of whitI are now on depo.-it any should doubt the entire loyalty of
intact in the bands of the State Treasurer. ihe good old Democracy.


Rippey has made the attempt to ride
two horses at the same time, and while
they were moving in an opposite di'ec-
tion. The result for him is bad. The
"Hon. ,J. S. A." should comewto his res-
cue. R. must be troubled with-a- :nan-
mi 1 cast of mind.--Union.
That this' advice comas from a con-
tent source, none who are acquainted
with it can doubt. It the Onion's ad-
vice oi triminminiig' as a matter of busi-
ness, when it' pays, is not entitled to
adoption, experience goes for nothing,
and skill will'be unrecognized.

The Semi-Tropical Monthly.
The Semi-Tropical Publishing Asso-
ciation is the name of a company re-
cently incorporated, having for its ob-
ject the publication of-a periodical to be
devoted to the development of the agri-
culturali resources of the State, and the
South generally, by furnishing reliable
anid practical information. -Thie name
of the new magazine suggested by the,
venerable Solon Robinson, is to be."The
Semi- Tropical; a- monthly journal de-
voted to Southern agriculture and horti-
culture, and immigration.'" It is to be
of at/least 64 double column octavo
pages, -not including advertisements,
printed on good paper and in the best
manner. Each number will contain an
illustrated article, descriptive of various
sections of Florida" and other Southern
States, and departments devoted to fruit-
growing, market-gardening, bee-keep-
ing, entomology, household economy,
etc. Ex-Governor Harrison Reed will
be the Editor, assisted by an able corps,
comprising some of the best known and
most practical agriculturists and fruit-
gi'owers of the South. Mr. Charles W.
Blew, formerly of the Republican, has
been selected as publisher. We are
gratified to know that the enterprise has
the hearty support of a number of our
best citizens, and thllat it has a sound
financial basis, enabling its conductors
to make a liberal outlay in securing
valuable contributions to its columns,
and to issue it in a neat and attractive
dress. The first number will be issued
9n or before the first of September next.

"Survey or aC- al T Across the Ilsth-iusi
In the act making appropriations for
the repair,.pr3servation, and completion
of certain public works tin rivers and
harbors, and for other purposes,', the
following provision was inserted on the
motion of Senator Conover:
The Secretary of War is hereby di-
rected to cause surveys to be made to
ascertain the most eligible line on which
a canal across the Isthmus of Florida
can be constructed, and whether a safe
land-locked navigation between the
waters of thie Mississippi and the Gulf
along the coasts of Alabama, Louisiana
and Florida, and through tlie latter State
to the Atlantic coast can be had. To
estimate the probable cost and pratica-
bility of construction of such works, and
of any artificial water-routes found
necessary to provide safe inland naviga-
tion between the Mississippi river and
one of the seaports on the east coast of
Florida.
We take the above from the Floridian
,and are right glad to see that now at
last, a matter of so great interest, as
well to the general commerce '-of the
country, as to-the business and develop-
ment-ofthis State, is put in the way of
receiving its just share of attention.
SThe necessity of relief for Western
commerce, the almost continuous land-
'locked navigation along the Northern
Gulf coast through natural water chan-
riels, and the remarkable natural adap-
tability of the peninsula to the construe-
tion of land and water routes of trans-
portation and travel; all combine to in-
vest the survey ordered with far more
.than usitf]limportance.
SThe peculiar natural facilities for
tianpnpot.ttion that characterize our
State, only require isuch publication as
thiis survey will give, to secure for them
universal attention.

- The Louisiana Coup d'Etat.
The peculiar and somewhat .charac-
teristically Democratic termination of
the "late unpleasantness" in Louisiana,
which' to the unsophisticated observer
has very muci the appearance of a gross
breach of faith, was as it now" seems
not' entirely impromptu. Judging by
the tenor of the following extract from
a late editorial in the Mobile Register,
the end was seen long ago, which fact,
however, does not in the least excuse
the dtmplicity involved. The' Register
says: .
The last coup de'etat of the true and
loyal people of Louisiana was the crown-
ing and finishing one. Without the
slightest "disturbances" the blow was
struck, anti Louisiana has conquered a
peace. -Its effects were to unite the


-)emocratic party solid 'and to heal all
'the divisions of feeling, and opinion
that grew out of the so-called Wheeler
Compromise; to give the Legislature
in both houses into the keeping of a
Democratic majority, to put Kellogg
under bonds to k6ep-the peace as figure-
head Governor of Louisiana forithe rest
of his term; to lay Senator West, and-
would-be Senator Pinchback quietly on
the shelf where they can cease from


location is selected for the institution,
will r'evive,'.and as we trust, increase


the general.,interest in the success of
such an institution. Wherever in the
State such location might have been
made, adverse criticism from other sec-
tions would naturally be expected, and
although the proffered donations to in-
duce location, were all conditioned and
few in n-umber, such animadversion has
already long been foreshadowed.
It is meant that the inducements upon
which the action of tihe Board was based,
should be generally known, and we ac-
cordingly publish below the propositions
made to the Board by W. H. Gleason
and W. R. Anno, which, with other con-
siderations influenced- the final action
of the Board.
We give in our editorial columns, a
sketch 9f thie efforts made by the Board
to expedite the inauguration of the Col-
lege, and of some of the obstacles en-
countered.
TALLAHASSEE, FLA., April 10, 1875.
To the Honorable the Trustees of the
State Agricultural College: .
SGENTLEMEN :-My attention has been
attracted to a notice published by your
Board in the Tallahassee Sentinel, and
other newspapers, requesting proposi-
tions from different localities desiring
the location of the College, for contri-
butions to aid in its construction.
I presume that it is your design to
locate the College at the place offering
tihe greatest pecuniary aid towards
building the College, all other things
being equal,and in accordance ei %,h lt,:
design" of establishing a nursery of
semi-tropical plants, as already adopted
as there policy of your Board, and made
public. As Florida is the only State in
the Union possessed of a semi-tropical
climate, and the only one where a botan-
ical experimental garden for the accli-
matization of tropical plants can be
successfully established, and the practi-
cal study of the products of the tropics
can be entered into, it is of paramount
importance that this College should be
located at the most favorable place for
such a garden, which is acecssable, with
a due regard to its healthfulness and
the beauty and picturesqueness of its
immediate surroundings. My knowl-
edge of the peninsula of Florida,
which is the only portion of the State
which is tropical or semi-tropical in its
character, enables me perhaps, to make
sm. s ^ tos wlli hkhz-ill h.-n-asr-..
vice to you in making a proper selection
for the location of thie College. The
eastern coast, of the peninsula of Flori-
da,-is more agreable in its temperature
and less subject to frost, in the same par-
allel oflatitude than the western coast.
For statistics upon that subject, I refer
yom to Blodgetl's Climatology (of the
United States; according.to it, theromno-
metrical observations which were made
at the different military posts, demon-
strate the fact that it is colder in winter
at Fort Brooke, (Tampa,) upon the wes-
tern coast, than at New Smyrna, on the
eastern coast, although New Smyrna is
some eighty miles north of Tampa,
This is occasioned by the Gulf Stream
which flows along immediately in close
proximity to the shore, from Cape Flor-
ida to Jupiter Inlet, thence in a mnorth-
easterly course or direction. TIhe influ-
ence of the Gulf Stream upon the cli-
mate, and the vegetable kingdom is very
marked, and no where more so than
alongthe south-eastern coast of this State
where the trade winds, which there pre-
vail, from the east, before striking the
mainland have passed over the warm
waters of the Gulf Stream, The Gulf
Stream after passing through the Car-
ribean Sea, passes through the Gulf of
Mexico close to Cape St. Antonio, the
most western extremity of the island of
Cuba, thence through the straits of Flor-
ida, between Cuba and the Florida reefs
at the rate of from 5 to 6 miles per hour
with a temperature of .from 79 to 80
degrees; it then spreads itself among
the Bahalma islan'Js, hugging the Flori-
da coast as far north as Jupiter Inlet, and
diverges in a north-easterly direction,
passing the Bermuda Isles, which fire
situated off the coast of Virginia, giving
those rocky islands and thie Bahamas a
semi-tropical' verdure. The trade winds
which are constantly passing over the
Gulf Stream, which Stream is over 150
miles in breadth opposite of Cape Ca-
naveral, are quite perceptible at times
as far no'th as Port Orange, but the
region of the trade winds properly ex-
tends, only as far north as the 28th de-
gree of latitude, which crosses the
peninsula at Cape Canaveral. The air
south of Cape Canaveral is soft and
balmy, and vegetation assumes immedi-
ately a tropical character. The man-
grove, mastic, gum-elimi, cocoanut and
other trees, natives of the tropics ate
indigenous along the coast, from Cape
Canaveral southward; there are cocoa-
nut trees that have sprung fonom the nuts
whjch have washed ashore from vessels
wret'kt'd along the ca'st, which have
planted themselves, and have grown to
the height of 40 feet,-ahd are now bear-
ing fruit. The cocoanut is very sensi-
tive to -the frost, and the cocoanut and
the .mangrove only flourish south of the
frost line.. In view of these facts, I
think that Eau Gallie is the most eligi-.
bli site for the College, all things taken
into' consideration. Biscayne Bay is
more topical and the only objection to
it is its inaccessability. Eau Gallic is
is about 40 miles south of Cape Canav-
eral and is as far north as the College
can be located and have the advantages
of a semi-tropical climate. Here the


lime, lemon, guava and sugar-apple
grow to perfection. It is only six miles
from Lake Washington, which is 'the
head of steamboat navigation upon the
St. Johns,-and is the place where the
Southern Inland Navigation and Im-
provement Company have. located their
canal connecting the St. Jou's with
Indian river.


Full acconulnt of these transactions, to- The Fernandina Line their disturbances; to secure two
gether with the accompanying corres- Advices from Mr. Gelpcke brings the Demniocratic Senators in Congress all in
good and due time, and to pave theway
pondence were published in the report information,: .that the negotiations..- for, g..thn et f Pim,: Sanrd pav ohe a
for thbe exit' of Phil, ..l'Sh'id:inlfrom
of 1873 of the Superintendent of Public the purchase of the first-class steamers field where his "occupation is gone,"
Instruction. Soon after the deposit with Huntsville and Montgomery are closed, and above all, to draw from Gen. Grant
the Treasurer was made, and while the and those two boats will.take their an inipatlient but.strong hintthathe had
Board were endeavoring to secure a p'aces-itfimediately-on this newand pop- ha hi ill and wated hi -baynet or
lbfrk in the Louisiana "c-hicken pie no
donation of lands.for site and l.niid suf- ular line, The Montgomery, Faircloth, more." At l-it, through p.init'uc and
ficienteffectually to aid the College fund, master, will sail from New York on the pluck. forbearance, time-biding and
suit was broUght by ,partiesin the State I3th instant, and will 1...>ve Fernandina true manliness., Louisiana has won her
courts,'contesting the 'va'idityadcon-oni-'19th ... victory, and in! the present state of the
_courts, Contestingthevau hid y and con-:on li,- 19th. .... .. "*: -.... .- ... .
political -atmosphere of- the country,
.-tiiini,,.n.il' of the bonds in which the The steamers of this'line seem to be from ocean to ocean, there are ndne to
college fund hiad been invested andthus rapidly gaining in favor, and are taking: make her afraid.
another and effctual obstacle was inter- full freights of passengers and goods.. -.
posed Iili. in.iitUUtiii,,in I-' the College. Early applicatibns are iiue-t:zary to e- 'Florida- State Agricultural College.
Restricted hy law to a sole reliance. cure state-rooms.- The recent action of the trustees of
upoa the iffcomeI of the fund: for the the State Agricultural College by xihi;h.
regular snort of the ole after it u c c a Probably Sound. -
-regularsupport of the Collegeo after it .under cer-tain conditions, a permanent.


military art and tactics shall be imparted
to all. ",
Fourth-It shall be- the constant pur-
pose-of directors aud instructors to adapt
-the college to its special purposes, and
-likewise to provide thorough economy
in: its management by regularly devot-
ing a portion of the time ot teachers and
scholars toithe regular and practical pur-
suit of' agriculture, horticulture and the
mechanic arts, -making it in fact, to
some extent, a manual-labor school, and
enable it thus, from the results of i 'own
labor, to contribute as largely as possi-
ble to its ow-n support and maintenance.
Fifth--It shall -also be a matter of
special effort to-adapt the college, in its
agricultural and horticultural char'acti-r,
to the peculiar and unique semi-tropical
character of the vegetable capacity of
Florida, and thus inculcate among the
people a strong and intelligent deter-
mination to avail themselves as fully as
possible, of the valuable climatic ad-
vantages of 'the State.
.With the assistance and advice of the
Cinimissioiine- of '.Agriculture, and tith
his co-operation, the' directors shall es-
tablish an extensive nursery for the in-
troduetion and cultivation of those 'rare
and precious tropical and semi-tropical


Here also is good building nt.uarialj
consisting of a fine quality of Coquina
stone, easily worked, and buildings ban
be erected -here cheaper, than at any
other place in the State; -there is also
plenty of limestone, which makes a
good quality of lime. The Indian river
at this place 1 i two miles wide and the
belt of land between it and the ocean is
less than a mile in width; geographi-
cally, it is the centre of the peninsula,
north and south, and is situated in town-
ship 27. In case you should determine
to locate the college at Eau Gallie, I
will donate to it lots numbered 2, 3, 5, 7,
9, 11,13 and 15 in each of the following
sections, 10, 11, 22, 23 and 32 in town-
ship 27, range 36, and sections 6 and 7
Sin -township 27, range 37, also 80 acres
to be selected from lots 1, 2, north-west
quarter of north-west quarter of' section
11; as well as a park in the village
* plat of Eanr Gallie, fronting on Indian
river, with six lots fronting on the park
for College buildings, also all of the
village lots numbered 3 and 8 in each
block of the village plat of Eau Gallic,
situated on section 16, township 27,
range 37, plats and maps of the same
which are herewvith submitted for your
inspection, making in all 2320 acres, in
addition to village lots./
In case this proposition should be ac-
cepted by your Board, the said propo-
sition to be made a matter of .record,
and a copy oef-the same to be published
in two newspapers In this State.
Upon the acceptance of this proposi-
tiomi by the Board, I will enter into such
contract as the board may desire, by
which the location of the College, on
: the one hand, and the perfecting of the
titles to these lands as above specified,
on the other hand, shall be made the
mutual consideration.
Respectfully, Yours,
W. II. GLEASON.
JAcKSONVILLE, FLA., April 29, 1875.
To the Honorable Board of Trustees of
the Florida Agricultural College.
I desire to propose to you as a dona-
tion, for the benefit of the Agricultur'al
College, one thousand acres of land on
Indian River, in Volusia County, from
what is known as Joseph Delespine
Grant, which grant lies adjacent to, and
immediately south of Sand Point, pro-
vided you will locate the College build-
ings at a point anywhere on Indian Riv-
er, between Sand Point and Elbow
Creek. .
I have sold land there during the past
winter, by the section, for five dollars
per acre, and therefore consider this do-
nation equal to a sum, not less than five
thousand dollars,
The lands I offer you are of the very
best in this State for the growth of trop-
ical and semi-tropical fruits, and if the
object of this great institution is fori the
development of tropical fruit, any other
location north or west of the Indiao
river region, would certainly defeat the
prime motive of the institution.
Respectfully Submitted,
WM. R. ANNO.
To Honorable Board of Trustees, of the
Agricultural College :
GENTLEMEN : The Committee appoint-
cd by you at a meeting of your Honor.
able Board, held at Tallahassee, March
8, 1875, for the purpose of examining
proposed locations for the Agricultu-
ral College in the State of Florida, begs
to present the following report:
Your Committee was put in possession
of one proposition only, a proposition
.- Jrade-,Un Ja .h?.-_Bni':ud by tha
HIon. W. H. Gleason, offering a location
for the College, on conditions prescribed,
at a point on the banks of Indian River,
in the county of Brevard, known as Eau
Gallie, situate and lying on the 28th
parrellel of latitude, about three miles
distant from the Atlantic ocean; frotn
Sand Point or Titusville 40 miles; from
the head wvaters of Ihe St. Johnls river
at Lake Washington 6 miles, and geo-
graphically near' the centre of the State,
North and South.
Your Committee had to consider the
purpose and specific objects of' the pro-
posed College, as well as facility ot ac-
cess, and desired geographical position,
as set forth by 3 our tlonorable Board in
report made to the proper authorities in
the following words, to wit:
Resolved, First-That the Florida
Agricultural College shall, in general
as well as in all necessary particulars,
specially aim to adapt its ministrations
to the educational necessities of the
practical working classes, by thle selec-
tion of such topics for thought and
branches of study for instruction therein
as will most directly and most certainly
fit them for industrial persuits, whether
agricultural or mechanical, which the
majority ot such classes, whether from
choice or necessity, will be apt to follow.
Second-It shall, in order to obtain
this result, give special prolninence and
constant attention to arithmatic, alge-
bra, surveying, geography, natural his-
tory, English language, natural philoso-
phy, chemistry, geology, botany, and to
other similar and kindred brancles,
which most particularly relate to and
are most directly necessary in the suc-
cessful prose.cUtion of the mechanical
and agricultural labors to which the in-
dustrial classes in this State habitually
apply themselves, without excluding
classical and other scientific branches,
that in the future may become desirable,
Third-It shall be a leading aim of the
College at all times to aid in the develop.
ment of physical strength and symme-
try, awd at the same time do its part in
endeavol'ing to train its students in hab-
its of due. subordination to proper and
rightful authority, so isdispensabl, to
republican citizenship, by placing the
new college under regular and steady
military discipline, while instruction in


plants -ain i'ruits that eanu in alf Ithe"
United States be only raised by open-air
culttiure in Florida, and thus endeavor
to furnish a valuable adjunct to the na-
tional department of agriculture.
It was represented to your committee
that the location of the College nat Eau
Gallic was desirable for several reasons
-a few of which, may be properly pre-
sented in ths report:
1. Its' being located sufficiently har
South,, and in temperaturr- .umLi-tri, pical
to nui.-ei ihi, ]ri'iiii einerits -t u- l tih ii 0 1our
plan, and towarrant also thlieestablish-
ment of experimental farms, horticuiltu-
ral and botanical gardens, wilinut lear
of ft'rost-:thus securing a most important
feature, and enabling the College; in the
sense of a manual-labor school, b--
come largely if not entirely, sb If sus-
taining. ; -
2. The salubrity of its climate, its
proximity to the sea, and the centre, in
the near prospect of a Very large indus-
trial p ,pUlaiii '. its' p-ri l.. h l itnailiiii lni --.
togetih.r % %i ih ll- i,- .LUlitr fitlie-- L-t theI '
soil tor the kinl .,Il .gi Itullure t .'i ,,-n .'.d,
and desirable in connection with the
scholastic and .scientific-departments of
the college, were considerations sug-
gested in hi' ar orf this selection. -
3. The abundance of' building mate-
rial-the famous nand admir.al.'e coquina
rock-close at ih.,,nl.
4. As to accessibility. -The projected
lines of communication which have, be-
canse of rapid increase of. population,
become a necessity, and which, it is be-
lieved, will be undertaken and complet-
ed with a lh:,i t pri',d i. time,. naiu-ly
a railway from Lake Harvey to S.und
Point,' and a large canal fruomr Lake
Washington to Eau Gallie, thence_ d,,wn
Indian River southward via:Lake Worth
to the waters of the Gulf of Mexico-
were discussed before: your committee.
These and kindred considerations ac-
cupicd the thoughts of, and were duly
Weighed, by your committee in connec-
tion with a careful and thorough explo-
ration of:-the country along the proposed
routes of commerce; and at, and adjacent
to, the proposed location tfor the Col-
lege. .
In general, therefore, your committee
reports that the land, at and above Eau
Gallic and extending to the head waters
of the St. John's river, is of a most ex-
cellent character, and cannot possibly
remain unoccupied a great length of
time, especially if industry and n.;'pil.tl
shall combine, in answer to a strong ap-
peal of an increasing and thrifty popula-
tion, to open i:up such lines of communi-
cation as are projected.
Along indian River the land is high,
attractive, varied in quality, 'and easily
subjected .. ,
On approaching the St. John's river
the land is more level, and exceedingly
rich, well-calculated for the production
of all kinds of vegetables, sugar cane,
bananas &c; but requiring a system of
drainage for thie recovery of there best
portions of it, which will be greatly
lacilited and simniplified by the proposed
canal, the route of which has been al-
ready surveyed.
From citizens residing at and. near
Eau Gallic your committee obtained
.ample evidence of the healtilfulness of
tihe climate without intermission, while
their orange groves and seni-tropical
fruits and vegetables, sugar cane and
corn, gave proof of the fertility, the
capacity, and the character of the soil.
The Eau Gallie or Elbow Creek, af-
fords a safe and beautiful harbor lor
_small .,- n f t-, as -ply-the waters of
Indian River, and, with a little outlay
of skill and money, could be made a
convenient port for vessels of as heavy
tonaoe as can navigate the channel of
the river.
The coquina rock, already. referred
to as a valuable building imaterial, forms
the base of that country, and attracted
the attention of your committee. When
quarried it is soft so as to" be easily cut
with a sharp instrument, but when ex-
posed to the atmos1'here soaw-ha'rdens
into the consistence of flint. When burnt
it makes an excellent lime suitable for
all building and plastering purposes,
and is a very genel'ous and cheap fer-
tilizer of the soil. :
Of its durability there can be no ques-
tion-the old Fort at St Augustine is a
monument of its addptahility for build-
ing purposes-thougih the material of
which that Fort is built, being the same
in character, is much coarser in fibre,
than the rock at Eau Gallic. -
In short, your. committee, without
presuming to offer a recommendation,
other than the simple statement her'ein
contained, confining the statement to the
consideration of the, only proposition
before it, and without prejudice to other
portions of the State that -might be
thought to be well adapted to and avail-
able for the. purpose's h-rein' described,
-declares with emphasis, that for sa brity of climate, qualities nf soil, geo.
graphical position, and picturesqueness
of situation, E'au Gallic is pre-eminent;
that, because of the rapid settlement of
that country, by persons of' industrial
habits, it mlst in the very nature of
things, become an important centre of
population and influence; that, for thi
same reasons, it is clear .that the wealth
of the capitalist seeking profitable in-
vestment, as well as the industry of the
husbandinan. and the skill of the
mechanic, must more and more, and
with acceleration mnake known that
beautiful and productive country to the
world; and that it i.s therefore well sit.
hated for great agricultural, horticultu-
ral, and botanical operations.in connec-
tion with a College, whose specialities,
apart- from high aims in the arts and
sciences-must be adaption "to- the pe-


FERNANDINA
..SU.EA lIiP UNE;


FERNANDINA, FLA., _Octi be'n, 1974.
NORTH POINT,
Cpt. SMITH. ;.
:-: L E6, ;:.,
Capt. DANIELS,


CAN


ACCOMMODATE FIFTY, FIRST.
- CLASS PASSENGERS.


These steamers .sail from New York, Pier 2, North
River, every Th'ursday, and from Fernandina Railroad
Whart every : -" -. ,
WEDNESDAY.
MdTGOMERY,
Capt. FAIRCLOTH-,;
'Will"1eavWNew York on the- z -3tshran iernandina
on the x9th.
For freight or passage apply o '" "--
HERM. GELPCKE, Agent,
5 Williams st.. New York.
S. P,,McQUAID, Agent,
Polk's Block,'Bay St., Jacksonville.
prW-.J. WQQOODWARD,
Represening LhiATER i KiNGA iqts,
10.10 sw tf Fernandina, Florida.

DISTRICT COURT OF THE
UNITED STATES FOR THE NORTH.
EKRN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA. In Bankruptcy.
In the matter of James J. Holland, Bankrupt,
Northern District of Florida.
This is to give -notice that on the ist day of May
1875, a Warrant ofBankriptcy'wasiseued.ot of the
District Court of the United States for the Northe"
District, of Florida, against the estate of James ,. Hol-
land, 'of Jacksonville, iin he County 'of Duval, in said
District, adjudged a Bankrupt, on his own petition.
That the payment of any debts and the delivery ofany
property belonging to such Bankrupt, to him or for
his use, and thi'transirof anipidpertyr by forbidden by law ; and 01 a meeting of the Creditors
of said Baikrupt, to prove heli debts, and to choose
one or more Assignees of his estate, will be held at a
Court of Bankruptcy, tb"be holden at Jacksonville, in
said District, at the Register's Office, before W.
A. McLean; -si.-, Register in Bankruptcy, for said
District, ont the J7th day.of May, A *D. 1875, at 10
o'clock A. M. SHERMAN CONANT,
a 5-5 2w. U. S. Marshal for said District.
SN BANKRUPTCY.' Iih'teA matter
Sof Charles Fridenburg, IBankrpt; a
By order of the United States District Court, for the
Northern District of Flb6id;*',iecopd and third gen-
eral meetings of Creditors in the above case; will be
held, at:the office oafW A.-Ictltan, Esq., Register in
Bankruptcy, at Jacksonville. on the t7th and iSth days
of MAy, 75,, at 1o o'clock A. M., on said days for
the pufpoase iam~enihU'thi a7th itt kSgtion 1 of the
Bankrupt Act of March 2, 867. "
L. C. GREELEY, Assignee.
Witness Hon. -Philip Fraser, Judge of the said Dis.
trict Court, and the seal thereof, at Jackson-
SL. s.] vi.le in said District, this 4th day of May, A.
'. -D.,St5'. "- ,' IPHUAP WALTER,
5-5 aw, Clerk DbIstrict Court said District.


A


1


"their exertions to make alnil appropriate
arrancngeuienis. The same were complete
as could be made, or expected. On tbe
arrival of the excursion train at the de-
pot, the gay party was met by our in-
del'aitigable fremen ; -(they having.left
their engine in the engine house,) where
they heartily received their l'eliow fire--
men, and where'a general'Und-sbaking
commenced.
-Many of the excursiaiuiat- ttookt-mn-
vevance ftr the cijty while a ntuber
remained to '.paiali ,n town imih the
fire conipaniesi, which headed by the
Union Brazs Band, of jat'cksonville'. nd
the Aneinnt -'ity Fire Eugine Co., J. D.
Tannehill, Foreman, were es-orted to
our eily. As they neared the-city, the
band burst lorth, and the parade turned
into St. George street, in the following
-od-er: First, the band, the "'Ancient
City" firemen, .with its forenman and that
of the XEtna marching, together, bearing
a handsome bouquet of flowers, present-
ed to the latter. Next came the "aEuta
Steam Engine," drawn by. four horses,
followed by Ihe firemen ot said engine.
F1olloinig thLlie.- ecanme tint-h lremu:ani of
the Phcenix- Hose.-Ccmpany," withAtheir
Hose I('arnrn.ig5, drawn b 'y t hor's, be-.
--inrgnext in order. -Cnompleting t, bt. ro-
cession u as the...Etn tFuel Cyoru pany ;"
their Carriage being drawn byjuveniles.
The line of march w.as up,St. Geop'ge
street, to Cuna, ihln'iugh Cnrra or Ghar-
lotte, down Charlotte- Linong'sli'Haill,
where the pr'ocessio i hatted and par-
took-of :acollation, and where, after a
few moments rest, they proceeded down
Chfarlotte to St. Francis street, through
St. Francis to St. George st eel. Thence
to tie4Plaza an:d ending at th e fo I of
the wharf. .
Here prepArmion s wer'e- commenced
by the "'EDiua," to throw a streani. At
a signi.l thie "Phocni'c Hose" eame run-
ning, at hill spetd, from a short distance
off, where they were-in- waiting for-the
"2Etna's" signal. 'Ihee hose was' un-
reeled, and attached to( the Steatii En-
g-inc. and a scream thrown in 'leispace
of a few moments.
The witrnessing asisemblage was large,
and many l unir citizen were mboroughly
d.lighi,.d, and astunnded-'sucbh ailing
on % h-tel,,"''OhIll my! ." 'How pretty 1"
&c. -
After all this, the firemen withdrew to
theirrespective quarltrs to. prep.ire for
the hop in the evening, at tli, Florida
Loou-., nlnich was a grand success;
mt.re so ih.thn any thing of the kind we
have ever witiessedl in St. Auguiisline.
The .N.ioun fair Ones Ifromn the pl.nce,
lmrnmil iou in lull; and the hall was well
filled with :grace and beauty', from -both
J.i.k-n,\ %ini anid St. Auguii-tinc.' -iHug-
gins' SLring B.ind, -,fr1m .JacksitUI .ille,
catered to the dancer's, on this occa:siou.
During the,-rir.-t of-the evening, as
many a one huindi'red.6couples were up-
on theflour at-ntice, .ialldancing. .iBut aa
night wore on, the tired ones withdrew,
At 2.30 a, in.,, the last dancer crossedd
the threshold of their hall. Th hop
was enjoyed by ally and everything pas-.
sed Qff.nicely, ,,.. .-
During part of Thursday morning the
exoutrsionists and firemen visited their
friends and points of interest thraighi-
out the city; and, at 11.30, the process.
sion again formed in .Treasury street,
and was escorted to the deputy the
"Ancienit City" firenienl Op their ar-
rival at the depot, a farewell address
was di-liviered by Mmr.'Tanietijli-.Tho
train was soon loaded witilh it pr'eiouSs
freight; amid as it steaimedzaway, shout
aftilfr shnut W"ent up ftrom the large as,
semblago who had repaired to the depot,
to see their friends-the firemen-=-->ff. -
Many were tlheregi.'_t expressed by
thise departing, who univertsallytpres.
sed themselves gi'artly pleased with
their trip.
In all, the excursionn wa4 a grand suc-
cess, and great credit is due 1to the
Committee of Arrangements f-espeeial
ly Messrs. Geo. H, Emery and Ramon
"Hernandez, for shi'cessfully carrying
out the programme. -
All conducted themselves creditably,
and nothing transpired to mar the least
the pleasure of the occasion. -
It was evident that oUr citiiens, gen-
erally,'exerted themselves to make the
"Fireuman's Excursion" pleasant. We
only hope they have succeeded.-St,
Augustine-Press.-- ..


7


culiar and unique semi-tropical characq--
ter ol the vegetable capacity of Florida.'
Very respectfully submitted,
W.Watkin Hicks, Committee.
S John yVarnum, .5 .y
Atthe request of the Boa3d 'of Trus-
tees of -the Agricultural College. I
accompanied the committee whose
report I have read. I endorse what is
therein said in regard to the clidiate and
country described, leaving.it to the wis-
domr of the Trustees to decide in what
manner their trust should be executed.
M. L. Stearns,,
Governor.
Tallahassee, Fla. May 1st; 1875.

State News.
How -the Ancient City liked the
Firemen's Excur-sion.
On Wednesday last, our quiet little
hamlet was suddenly thrown into an un-
precedented. excitement, cause. by the
appearance in our streets, of the AEtna
Steam Fire Engine, and the Phoenix
Hose Company, of Jacksonville; both
on a pleasure excursion.. -
The announcement was made here,
some -weeks' ago, that such an event
would certainly take place, )nd our
"A-ncient City Firemen" have nut, since -
the announcement was made, ceased in


NEW YORK AND









"5, i~r~rslrm-u 2 PdY. P. ~slliil~~:-,P '__"..-'_' 1 ''


THE NEW


;
Nassau County Fair. J
+/'A ... J- .. .
A number of our citizens have.gone
Sto Feran4dhna'ts attenW the CountyFair
which opels toidayl-'We 4;'e glad to
see so much interest displayed, and
hope soon to have the pleasure of an-
'.:ilottncing a like exhibition in .this coun-.
ty. Among those who will exhibit their
products at Fernandina, are Mr. Beatty,
who wrlt display a handsome lot 'of
Strawb AI*s'; M. 'Geo. M. Sith, ma-
sical, instruments; and A, G. Grant,
"*photograph.'>rc"'l.^ ;^ -

Ballad, Concert.
S,,: Aivery pleasant entertainment, if we
maybe permitted to form an opinion
from ihe progranime and the parties
/i-uttering-it,is to be given this evening
Sin. Metropolitan Hall, 'under the aus-
pices of Mrs. J; M. Stone, assisted by
.the officer and memiberrs of Evergreen
Chapter, Eastern Star.4 The performers
; have taken great pains in their-prepara-
Stions and rehearsals, and are determined
to make the concert a success. Mr.
M-ilford will give several solos on the
flute ..,.: .: : '. ,. : ;-
Wetrust there will be a large audi-
.... en ci ,: ... ....* .; ,. ... + ,: .

:The Pic Nic of St.: Joseph's Academy.
The beautiful grounds about the
neighborhood '0t Halliday's -mill have
been chosen this year fort:he jaiinual
p'i pic ef ofthe pupils of St. Joseph's
-'Academy. The steamirr Rtickway will
leave her wharf at 9, 10:30'and'2 p. m.,
to-morrow, for the grounds, returning
at 5-:30 and at,6O :,.0i ,-in. During the,
.- day,. the. pupils- will give literary Ti-
SIteatria!s, declamnations, &e., a;tdaa band
of music will be in aLltnd.trine Tickets
foitthe round trip 6I0 cents.' Chiildri-en
over six years oll 2b cents.

The City Park :.
The city park really L.pgiins to.pres.-nt
quite a creditable appearance, and by
S the next season'will beconie a place of
fashionable -,"resirt," more I.'p,.'ii.lli
among the lady viitors atl'te St. James
Hotel, wh09can hardly I'.il to take ad-
vantage of this ch.urning i lodality.
SVariou. trees have been transplanted,
and we believe that a variety of charm-
ing flowers will be inade to add to
the attractions ot the place. True'
the park occupies but a single square,
S but smniall'as'.it is, it can blie nm.i,_ a very
plh.:isant spot, and'we trust that our city
authorities will take proper steps for
having it kept in the best possible order
throughout the year.

Fire! Fire!
Upon every ailarmru of fire thler'? is
great cause for coulplhini,, Ironm the
fact. that thei Fire Department is vvry
inefficiently supplied with hosec, antl-
what little tihey now h:ive in ileiri poi-
S : session is cumul)'traively worthless, aiid
liable to burst thlie moment w.itor i.,
forced through it. The dipartnient Ii.I'
jot even a rack upon which to dry their
.oe,.b coming I'froni a, fir', an i It is
.' : ot to be Wondered at, that deprived of
.ill faciliteu for talf.l care of sauxh.
property, it should soon become val-
Lneless. ; -; -
.--L: :f( fire breaks out in the ubiitrbs of
'the city. thle etigils, a're doing as i ,ilti
good safely housed, as they could do at
a fire, stlnply bt:te:u+':- itheri;e i' ni. ,-. i- s
h" which they .can. be iun.l.lieIl %Nith
,'ater,nor-will there Ie until the city
lutlorities tiie isome action upon the
< r -wcc We tbink .it would be an ad-
1 1nir.ble -,:WI for the forema, assistant
tCflr'tia and *ingineers.of tii- ditf-r>--iiit
stelnmers, and the three--first,offieers of
S the Hook and Ladder and 1iose C,.'nml.':-
-: ies to lucet forthwith, canrna Ithe sub-
Jeet !thoroughly, d'ecideQ upio whrht, nit-
r" triall is actually indispensable for the

-proper wo,'king of the Fire Pepartaetit.t
,and then lay their aeiorie" "f.o- ie.
Chief and his assistants, to be by them
eubniitted to the Common Council,
'yrng for immediate relief.
.. ai.lifig in thi* application, let a eom-
nmittheee raised in each company, who
may be einpowercd t,- c;:ll upon every
: property owner and tax payer and so-
licit '-om jhte 01voluitn try suhscY;ptdiiit
stiffident.to 'roeure suIK manari.tl as
may place the Fire Dep irtiii:nt in giil
working conr.dition tntnii.li.itety. Lel
the racks to be remt.nibhtrtd. so ,thao
when good and sufli,-ient hose hIs heen
procured,'it may be kept at all ti/nesin
a serviceable condition. ,, .-
The recent fires' which have nc('urrbiI
in our .ity ought to te:teh our pt,.pe't.y
owners a lesson. In the case of all
that we know anylthing about, rnteh \';il-


unable property has been lde-titycd that,
in all probability, w ..ol iha\,jbe-elt iv '-
ed had there beI ho enongh.to se>, ure
a full supply ofw:.at&. il we wait iin-
til a really dis!t-ou~r-'o 'uir.s. it M.ill
be too late to puss the m:ttAe ad% an-
tageously, and:-Wbhere,.uro-ihope JDuk
firemen will act th-eIm-v-s in the miat.
ter. Without hose, nlhat is'hn'reiginK
good r,4 -
-' -tT he 'Ascenislo^ huday sevic~e, ,,,

the Catholic Churchwt.:c diverted this
time of much ofl'ThE -tliadltlonat jilbela-
Lion generally surrounding ihe cornm-
memoration by the church of the lasi
':.anlt'afour Savior's life on earth. In hi
".:-abdence of Father Dutfin, the service-
c =wede confined to the celebration of a i,)w
'Uafss and 1the reading of the reflection-s
jprbper Tor the day.

.-The City Point, Irom Charlestor
With excursionists, will leave this city
for Palatka at 11 a. m., next Sunday
,':" Fare frofi Jack onville to St. Augustifn
'. one dollarr" 'rt .. -

. ;.. ... ._

_-> -:,:.


Our Firemen in St. Augustine
Editor New SouthA-To-aday (Wed-
nesday,) is just-,ore week, since our
.gallant firemen "enjoyed their gala
day, and-from the beginniiing to the end,
,their excursion to St; Augtstine was a
Continual success ana as'vet, I have not
heard one single word of complaint
from. any among the number of those
who stood on the steamer RBekavay
bound for the Ancient City.T Tlli. 'tx,.tr-
sion party left Jacksonville about twenty
minutes after'time, having been delayed
by the usual "slow folks" who came
puffing and : blowing up the, gangway
and many climbing over the taff-rail
just as we were about to start, and.many
others were left behind for being slow
in their preparations. At. any rate, as
soon as the boat got fairly into the
stream, the cabin was cleared and the
dancing began at 9 a. m., and from that
time until we reached Tocoi, our party,-
enjoyed themselves on the light itt..s-
tic toe to their heart's content, as the
day was-delightfully cool at.'i-t the 'rain
.of the'previous evening and just cool
enough to r'ike dancing agreeable.
Reaching Tc.-,i :tb.,ut 4 p. im., tlir
work olt it-rliirrping th rPITT'rr'T an'i-h6se
marriage from the boat to the train was
expeditiously performed- snd. in a ahurt
time after our arrival,, everything being
in readiness, we moved from Tocoi aat
about 3:30 p. m., and reached our -des-
tination a little after lour o',I,.-ek. Look-
ing out-from a iinldow of a passenger
calr', about a half mile from the Ancient
City depot, I espied an an'xio'us crowd
some looking for old friends.and others
disposed to make new ones. As soon
as we reached the station, we were met
by the Ancient City Fire C,..nti-ny. Mr.
Tainniehill, Foreman of thu An. inot Citys,
in a few and appropriate remarks wel-
comedus ta St. Augu-ii,,, and offered
us the liopil0ii.i-,s of the city. Col.
Win. B.iAya, Foreniaini of the -Etna, res-
ponded and said that ho and his friends
tlhe exceursionists,;, w ere altogether tin-
prepared for the display of kindness,
and he trusted that at some future time
lii.e "\'.,l'il be able'to reciprocate. Mr;
Cooper, ot the Phoenix, also returned
thanks in a short but very impressive
address. The companies then formed
in c,.lu in headed by the Union brass
band, followed by Ancient Citys, the
.Ztna engine and company, the Phonix
.carriage and company, and fuel cart
con 1p.iny.3 They then marched from the
depot through the principal streets of the
city as far as Lyon's Hall, where they
halted and were ordered to break ranks
for the purpose of partaking of an ex-
cellent dinner provided by the local
firrit, n. and it was a repast that would
have certainly done credit to the best
kept liutl table in this city or elsewhere.
Afcr par.i kii ing ofthe delicacies, the
eonp.ari-3 ;,giin formed in column and
tiriii'li1 ii'fnl --TiTe-fTraTG me rier wtseiu
the .Etna and Phonix displayed their
skill in the management of their ma-
chines,- much to the enjoyment and
.amusemnent of the citizens who crowded
to witness the scene. The engine at the
tchte of tihe pl.ri rni li. Wi,- taken in
charge by ilh- Ai.i'-nt 'iyCitys and'housed
for the-rMight.
From this time until 8 o'clock, the
hours were wiled away among the ro
mantic old scenes surrounding the city,
and at 8 p. m., the ball opened at the
Florida Housoi, an.d was kept up until
about 3 o'clock in the morning.
At about 11:30 at. in. on 'I'lir-l.iv the
companies again formed and marched
to the depot in the same order as on
.arrival, much to the apparent regret of
the citizens of St Augustine. On arrival
JLt tei-dep,,t, at'1 when the party were
in.readinesp for departing, three com-
plini.tr:, .li-i'-t' 'were given for the
Ancirit City Fire Company, which was
unil er-d with a hearty -respgonse.*
Ri .iliin, Toeoi the excursionists em-
birkrt' again on the Rockaway, and as a
closing scene the voyage homeward was
quite in keeping "with the rest of the
entertllinnllcntsld.tnlLcing b.inl bg.iln the
_order of the day uniil our arririal at
Jeffreys':wharf. Taken on the whole
a better organized excursion never left
Jalk~onvile. nor. one nmo.,r' pleasant to
allf'c6B~er'ned. ---
SI' :ea'iot& .close this report without
making especial mention of the kind-
ness of Geo. .H. ;Emery;; Ramqrn Her-
"nandez, manay other citizens, ,and the
l,,nely ladies of the Ancient 'City, who
wi-re untiring in their exertions to'make
t, s Jacksonvillians ,.cntirrly at borne.
-T:['he last ssene Mat the Metropolitan
ihall, a reception'b'y the members of the
.Etna whi could rnlt possibly avail them-
s-ielse, i of the excursion, was a good


supper provided for their returning
, Ilyiends, with welcome speeches by Gen.
- ldwith and W. R. Anno. Esq. This
wound up t.wo days of pleasure, only
to be ,-emeilbireil as among the pleasant
Sincidents of the season of 1875.
S.-. J.C. A.


The AEtna Engine Company.
At a special nuetiiiig of the _tna
St.eatn Fire, Engine Colip:ltn, held at
thcTr roomsi ou Monit'if y evening last-, the
Il.ih inst., the following resolutions were
unanitously passed:
\VHE REAS, The Etna Steam Fire En-
gine Company having returned from
ilheir pleasant visit to th Ancient City,
det'n ii proper ito give ef.xprt-littn to the
feelings ,l gratitlide iand to atknthu lmege
their appretl:,iitn of' th,-se o ho so ge-i.
eriuzly c,',nirilbuted to th.ir e ,njiyuient,
bc it therefore: '.;;;' ;
Resolved, That the .Etna's thinks afib
due to the officers t'f dihe steamer
Rockaway, for their able .and seaman-
like manner iu an.igiuvg'the boat and
taking their precious freight saie to
Tocoi and hacuk Sk
Reslotted, That,we are rnde similar


..... ... .. .. * ... + 2 y ,P 5 +. ; -..,,.*'=. %->..-.


- Or 13. 1 -, 1 .1 0,'


Clh'ronet, flute and all Brass and Sfrieged Instru-
zents. Termis $q5 per quarter of 24 lessons. Apply
at Smith, Norton & Co's., Music Store, or'address P.
0. Box log- : 5-12 t f.
CALL AT
Smith, Norton & Co's., and see their $60 Organs.
5-12 if.
INK, INK, PENS, PENS.
Pencils, Pen-Holders, Pencils, at Smith, Norton
& Co's. 5 '2 tf.
TWENTY-FIVE OLD PIANOS WANTED
in exchange for new ones, at SMITH, NORTON & Co's.
NOTICE. :.
BUCKY will plec'ge to sell Clothing, Gentlemen's Un-
derwear, Blankets, Overcoats, Cloaks, Talmas, Cover-
lets, Trunks, Valises, Silk and Fur Hats, and myriads
of other articles too numerous tomention at very low
prices. II. -i4tf
FURNITURE.
Just receiving from the schooner McDonald, over
Ten Thousand Dollars worth of Furniture, int such va-
riety and styles as will suit the demands of all, at
Northern prices, with freight added Call and exam-
ine, at the, old stand, south side of Bay street, between
Pine and Laura' streets, Jacksonville. .
i 30 tf C. 0. LIVINGSTrON.
SOLON ROBINSON,
In his address delivered at the late meeting of the
Florida Fruit Growers' Association, says: In all that
makes 1fe desirable, florida k not only. the eer.
butt:ze superior, o f any ofthe States of the Great
West." The proceedings of the Fruit Growers' Asso
ciation are iow being published in the Florida Agri-
cul. urist. Copies for sale at the office, Ocean street,
two doors from Bay. Address
CtAs. H. WALTON & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
1E. Sehnd io cents for a specimen copy.
ONLY CALL,
as others have done, and be convinced that Cheaper
Bargains can:he obtained, aahd with greater satisfaction.
Polite asd atrentive salesmen to wait upon every one,
great and small, at THE GRtE;AT SOUTHERN BAZAAR.-
-. 1-4 tf
BUY BOOTS WITH
-A. K. PERCIVAL's-stamp upon them. They are supe-
-ior to all others. io-3itf

;. STUPENDOUS SACRIFICES : .
'Daily, h.urly. anq momentarily 'disposed of 4t )hf,
I..4tf R. GiA.T SO5JiIHERN BAZAAR.

: ... :3HE PARENTS- ;
-Of all well regulated families purchase ileir groceries of
Rich,. Polk's Block, Bay street. o10.21 tf


FJIFgST NATIONAL BA.NK
Q OF FLORIDA::
- ,.. JAC-SONVILLE.
;TA. oso/y Natioa/ E.I,: *'..u nr.'.i;/,e in, tJe State.

' ExchAnge on Savannah wad New York sol4,.nd Ex-
.ihafige o all Northern points bought, .; "
T CUP.RFEFT RATES.-.

Q1RECTORS AND STOCKHOLDER'!- '-
Foreign, f"..Hame.
JOHN CLARK, Esq.,
Hon. F. E. SPINNER, W. A McLEAN? Esq.;
PHILO REMINGTON, Esq., C. A. FAIRCHILD,', Esq.,
SAM'L REMINGTON, Esq., DAMON GREENLEAF, Esq;,
W. C. SQUIRS,, *Esq,, W, ,M. Bo.STWp, Esq. '
September a6,'1874. 1-4-iy

THE FLORIDA PHOTOGRAPH
AND

FERROTYPE GALLERY,


ATLANTIC BtLuic, BA STRFT, JACKSONVILLE.
Is the o-nly' place in the State where every branch of
the Art is Successfully Conducted. Qpen for business
from io A'. M., until 5 P. M. '
"A. G;"GRATviii attierd t.'.the taking of all
Photographs until further r i;.: Otut-door'. Photo-
graph orders attended to as.ustual, on duffe'notice being
. ,. .. .." 5 tf. .


JACKSONVILLE, WEDNESDAY,


__


V SOUTH.: WEEKL)



obligation to the Superentdndant and
officers of the St. Johns Railroad.
Resolved, That words fail to express
the sense ot appreciation of the rie'-I'tion
which we met from the AIiviiati
City No. 1,, of St. Augustine, and the
Citizens generally of that hospitable
City, and the memory of those happy
hours will ever be engraved on the
hearts of the 'Etna boys. That to th'e
fair ladies; of lthe Ancient City, .who
greeted us with their presence and
cheered us With their smiles, we tender
the homage :of `our' a"dvratibo' and
the pleasant memories ot their associa-
tion W-ill .ever linger in our heart of
hearts
7?. ".',1 That we tender our brothers
of the ZEtna, who were unable to at-
tend the excursion, our sincere thanks
for the- reception and refreshments on
our return home, also to Gcn. Ledwith
and W. R. Anno, 'Esq., for their wel-
come addresses. "
.Resolved, That the acknowledgments
of the Etna are due and are hereby ten-
dered to Mr,. J; B. Togni for the use of
his|Hall on the evening of our return,
to- the' papers ot Jacksonville 'and St.
Augustine for the complimentary notices.
extended to the excursion
* Resolved, That the Secretary .be. in-
structed to .prepare a copy of these re-
solutions, to be'signed by the Foreman
and Secretary, and presented to the
A.t il-nt, City's No: 1., the entertainers
of the M]tna's, as a slight nomdmeito 'of
the enjoyment of the .Etna's during their
visit to St. Augustine, and also that the

above resolutions be published in the
City papers of this Cliy tid the pan.?is
in St. Augustine.
,WMi BAYAj J.,C-. AN-TitF.T.
Foreman. Secretary.
,' *I :. -" : -.
That's So.
'Mr. Cheney, of the Granite Slate Free
Press, thus goes for .
THAT MOSQUITO:
What do yiu tliink of ;a place where
even the mosquitoes are too lazy to
bite.? That is the query which passes
around this morning; for, -although we
retired last evening with at least two or
three hundred mosquitoes' in our room,
(the first we bad seen, save now and
then a stray one,) they seemed as re-
luctant as we, to enter upon an aggres-
sive warfare,.and we awoke this morn-
ing unharmed, the army having dis-
ofth-el and qii, tly r, tir' ,I1. under cover
of the'night. Whether they will return
to the attack or not, remains to be'seen,
but we intend to be better prepared to
repel them. The conclusion I reach, is
that there is as much difference between
the Florida mosquitos and our ferocious
:1, i.. Il- i,,:l-rs .at, .homt. as: between a
live Yankee and a Florida cracker.

WANTED:
Six good, active white boys. Apply to the under-
sined,. East, Ji.:1.. s. il'- next doort to F, Canepa's
store.
W. A YOUNG

MORE NEW AND BEAUTIFUL SHEET MUSIC.
Messrs. Smith, Norton & Co.. seem determined to
keep '"p with the times, so far as Mfusical Merchan
disc may be concerned, and have just received at their
elegant store in Mitchell's block, on Bay Street,.a.
magnificent. stock .of fine mu Jcal gems, recently pub-
lished, that cannot fail to elicit the admiration of every
lady performer upon the piano-forte in this city.
5-i1 tf.
MUSICAL-PHILIP MILFORD


CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA
STEAM PACKET CO.


CHANGE OF SCHEDULE.:
QUICKEST ROUTE TO THE NORTH.
On and after the 19th inst. the steamers on this route
-will run as follows : .
THE STEAMER DICTATOR,
CAPTAIN LEO VOGEL, ..
Will, 'until further notice, leave CHARLESTON
-every TUESDAY evening. and SAVANNAH every
WEDNESDAY afternoon, for FERNANDINA,
JACKSONVILLE AND PALATKA and internie-
diate landings. ....
RETURNING:
Will leave PALATKA every 1 H iR' ,'AYV evening
and JACKSONVILLE ever I KIL'AV morning to
suit the tide, FERNANDINA same day, arriving in
SAVANNAH and CHARLESTON every Sunday.
THE STEAMER CITY POINT,
CAPTAIN J. W. FIT?'r 1;PN ,, .
Will leave CHARLESTON eyery FRIDAY eve-
ning, SAVANNAH ev.-, AT I KDIY aitn.:r'r,
for FERNANDINA, J.- i-'._K's\ ILLL. F'ALA r.
KA and intermediate findings.'
SRET.URNING:;
Wi I leave PALATKA 'every' SUNDAY -evening,
JACKSONVII.LE -ever MONDAY .mraorning to suit
the tide, FERNANDINA same day, arriving ,at
Savannah and Charleston evecy -Tuesday evening.
THROUGH TICKETS AND BILLS -F LAD-
ING GIVEN TO; NEW YORK, PHILA-
DELPHIA, BALTIMORE,
These Steamers make close connections at Savan-
nah Charleston with the New York steamers.
AGIINrTS. -
RAVENEL & CO. Charleston.
BRAINARD & ROBINSON, Savannah.
SJEFFREYS, BRO. & SON, Fernandina.
JEFFREYS & BKO., Jacksonville.
R. J. ADAMS, Palatka.
C. H. BOHN, St. Augustine..
So10-21 tf


IN TIHE DISTRICT COURT OF THE
UNITED STATES.
FOR THE
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA
IN ADMIRALTY.
Albert Jones, Thos. Evans, Sam'l James, Archie
Haywood and Adam Brown,
vs.
The Steamer Charleston; her boits, tackle .apparel
-. and furniture. -
THIS IS TO GIVE NOTICE to'all persons ciaim-
ing the above mentioned Steamer Charleston, her boats
tackle, apparel and furniture, or knowing or having
anything to say why the same should not be condemn-
ed" .as prayed for in the libel that they be and appear
before the District Court of the United States for the
Northern District of Florida at the Court Ro'om, in
the city of Jacksonville, on Saturday. the ioth day of
April, A. D,, 1875, if the same shall be a day of juris-
diction, dtherwise,- on tthe 'neAt da'y of jurisdiction
thereafter, then and there, to interpose a claim, and
make allegation in that behalf. .
SHERMAN CONANT, U. S. Marshal,
5-5 2W. Northern District of Florida.
IN BANKRUPTCY. In the Dis
Strict Court of the United States for the Northern
District of Florida. In the matter of Charles Friden-
berg, Bankrupt. :"
Notice is hereby given that tre above named Charles
Fridenberg, who has been adjudged a Bankrupt upon his
own petition, under an act of Congress entitled, "An
Act to establish a uniform system of Bankruptcy
throughout the United States," approved March 2,
1867, has filed in said Court his petition, praying to be
.discharged from all his debts and other claims prova-
ble utinderisafd Act ;and that'a hearhig be had apon
the same at a Court ofBankruptcy to beholden before
W. A. McLean, Esq., Register in Bankruptcy, at his
office in the City of Jacksonville, in said District, on
the 19th day of May, A. V. 1875, at to o'clock A. M.I
at which time and place all Creditors who have proved
their debts and other persons" in' interest, mayattend-
and show cause why'the prayer of said-etitioner should
lft,, gl Ten ;" ---- ^
Witness Hon; Philip Fraser, Judge of said District
Court, and the seat thereof, at Jaksonville. in
rL. S.] said District, the 4th day of-May, A D. 1875.
PHILIP WALTER,
W.5-5 w Clerk Distriet Court oftsaid District.


Office GREAT SOUTHERN RAILWAY Co.,
(Comrsoiidated.)
71 Broadway, New York.
SHIE r THIRD ALLOTM.INT,
( designating for redemption 2500. of- the First
Mortgage Land Grant and Premium Bonds of the
Great Southern Railway Co., (Consolidated,) will take
place at Metropolitan Hall, City of Jacksonville, Flor-
ida, on Saturday, May Ist, 1875 at 1o o'clock, A. M.,
in accordance with the plan of redemption.
'T.W. OSBORN, President.
J.W. JOHNSON, Treasurer.
5 5 It. W. F. WHEELER, Secretary.


DISTRICT COURT OF THE
UNITED STATES FOR THE NORTH-
ERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA.. In Bankruptcy.
In the matter of Henry Van Dohlen, Bankrupt,
Northern District of Florida; ss. "
This is to give notice, that'o6n the'3oth day of April,
1875, a \Warrant of Bankruptcy was issued out of the
District Csourt of the United States for the Northern
District of Florida, against the estate of Henry Van
Dohlen, of Jacksonville, in the County of Duval, in
said District, adjudged a Bankrupt on his own petition.
That the payments of any debts'andtthe delivery of any
property belonging to such Bankrupt, to' hin, or for
his use, and-the transfer of any property by. him, are
forbidden by law;-and that a meeting of the Creditors
ofsaid Bankrupt, to prove the~r debts, and to choose
*one or nibre'Assignees'of his-estate,'wll-ibe held ar a
Court of Bankruptcy to be bolden at Jacksonville, in
said District, at the office of the Register, before W. A.
McLean, Esq., Register in Bankrnptcy for said Dis-
trict, on the 28th day of May, A. D. i?- -. at 1- 'clock
A.M. S E SHERMAN-.1,IN ',
5-5-2w U. S. Marshal for said District.


MAY 2i, 875.


FLORIDA SAVINGS BANK

AND REAL ESTATE EXCHANGE.

[Incorporated July 6th, 1874.] .

OFFICE IN LOVERIDGE'S. BUILDING, OCEAN STREET, .
.... ..... .. ."-.JACESONVILLE, FLA., J
"INTEBRST.-Interest at .the rate of seven and three-tenths per cent. (or two cents per day on $roo) will be paid
annually, upon all deposits which shall have remained three months or more in the Bank, to be added .annually
to the principal of the Depositor.
LoANs.-All moneys received on deposit shall be invested in first.rnortgages on real and personal property in
this-State of at least .double the value, or in-other ample.collateral securities. .
REAL- ESTATZ.-Thjs corporation will act as trustees or the 'purchaseand' sale of real: estate or the renting
and management of estates and property generally --- ,


JAMES H. PAINE,
P.. .. resident.


SAM'L SPEARING,' JONATHAN C. GREELEY,
"i Vice-President. : "' -- 1 Treasurer.


STATE, 'CO()UNTY AND CITY SCRIP SOLD AT CURRENT RATES.

SEMI-ANNUAL STATEMENT :
., : *- .. + OF* "r TH B: .. "+* ** .'" .;' .- + ; "

FLORIDA -SAVINGS BANK AND REAL ESTATE EXCHANGE.
;'' -' : "- Jaacksonville, Florida.. .
.Incorporatefd July 6, 1-84 Capital Stock$20,000. -


ASSETS.
Office Furniture and Fixtures...................... .................................. ..................... $ 2,25 c 0
SC ash o:1 har-d ... .. ......... .. .... ......... ..................................... ........................... 10 .504 30
State, (C.'rtI, .."1 Ift,.' 1 e ,ur'W-'arran. face value,'2;496.46-cash value 1,758,0o7,
Real E.t ni .:,F -.." l.' .. ,li...... .... .... .. ...... .......... 5,898 5
State, Counity'arl d Cfy Tax. (.'rir : ares ............. .......... ........ .............................. 1,195 25
Notes and Mortgages, secured by pledge of real estate and- personal property of the alu .c .
$31 99-- ...... ......... .. .. .. .... ......... : ,P 6 72
Rent,&c, p .,d n 1,ar.,.. ........ ... ...... .................. .. ... .... 6o o
Unexpired Insurance Premium ............... ... ...................................................... o 6 ,
Tot .. ........ .......... .... ............ ... .............. ......... .... op? o9. 7
S* '"~ "+ : "'" LIABILITIES-. : .; ;i .; ;: ;
Individual deposits ...............................................$24,169 74 : -
Capital Stock paid int 2 : ................... 000 00 .
Undivided Profits ...... ...... ........................... .....,.... k,.. ~foo "O ,
Profit-and Loss account........................ ....................... o08 3S-732,978 ogr
.STATE OF- FLORIPA, .. -. ,. :
Duval County. .
I, James H. P'aine. President of the Florida Savings Banit and Real Estate Eqthange,
do solemnly swear that the-foregoing statement is true to the best of my knovwledge arid belief. .
"' ..... JAMES H. PAINE, President.
STATE OE FLORIDA, "
Duval County. '. '"
Sworn and subscribed before me this 23d day of April.A: D.:-875.:. : : : .
H. JENKINS, jr',
Correct Attest: JONATHAN C. GREELEV, Treasurer. 9-30t1' :: [sEiAL] Notar) Public


A'0 0. lHUSSEY. "" ; N. W. HOWELL.


HUSSEY' & HOWE>lL, ;r
S! +' i WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS-IN .



BOO.,.TS, SHOES,

LEATHER & FINDINGS.i..


A complete assortment of New York and Philadelphia fire
Goods always on hand. :-::
Sole agents in Jacksonville for Samuel Drnbar & Co.'s
Misses' and Children's Fine Shoes. -.: ...-
Goods sent by mail or express to all parts of the State.

Bay Street, near Laura, Jacksonville, Flr, -:


RAILROADS.


A .G, & W. I. T. CO.'S RAILROAD.
FROM
FERNANDINA TO CEDAR KEYS.


GOSINt SOUTH.
ARilVR. 'LEkAVtE. AARIVE. LEAVE.
Fernanrdina.......... a. ni.,-, 4 45...... a. mn...... 4 45
C~ll.an ...--..--- fi 2- ..... 6 0...... 6 2...... 6 6o


Baluw ..............-.. 7 40...... u0...... 7 u4...... 9 00
Starke-- 56 it02 26.................. 56"...... 2...... 6.... o 31
Gainesville....,.-..-2 .5. 6..... 56-.....,T2 03
Archer................ 2 20.. 2 o...... 007...... o ...... I 05.
Bronson;.....'......- 3-5 ....305. 3 22-.... i 33...... 1 39
Cedar Keysj........ 5 53...... p. m...... 3 33.-. p. m.
GOING NORTH.
ARRIVE. LEAVE. ARRIVE. LEAVE
Cedar Keys........... a. m...... 8 5...... a. 8 ma,;..r..o 30
Bronson................ 1o 43...... 50......12 25......I2 31
Archer.................. Ii 2 8 1.... 35...... 12 58...... 30
Gainesville......... ...i 2 54...... 14 ...... i 57...... 2 04
StarVe................ 256. ..... 3 ..... 3 29... 3 34
Baldwin.......... 4 50..'.. 5 15.--.. 5 co...... 5 15
Callihan .......... 6. 35...-.. 6 42-4.. 6 35.....-. 6 +2 -
Fernandina-i.......... 8 .. .40 -... p. ..:.. 8 40...... p. mn.
CONNECTIONS.
At FERNANDINA, wtTi Steamer City Point from'
Charleston and Savannah, Mondays at 4 a. min.; steamer
Dictator from Charleston and Savcr*nat Thirrsdays at
4'a.-ri. With steamer'Lizzie Baker, from Savannah,
Brunswick and St. Mary's, Mondays at 6 a. in; for
those points on Fridays at 8 a. m.
At BALDWIN. with J P & M. R. R. from Jack-
sonville at 4:07 p. m ; forJacksodrille at 9:o02 a. m;
At, GAINESVILLE, with. in-weekly stage Hle for
Tnmpa; with stage line for Newnansville, Tuesdays
and-FridayS. i -
At CEDAR KEYS, with steamers to and from New
Orleans, every' Saturday. With steamers from Key
West and Tampa, Fridays; from these places. Thurs-
days.'- With Steamer Cool, from Tampa, Sundays: for
Tampa, Mondays. With Steamer Wawenocki, fro't
Suwannee Fridays; for Suwannee, Tuesdays.
S D. E.MAXWELL,
5-3 .. Superintendent.
-.. ', : : -. '. ; 5 : .


Balmorals, Bustles, and Chignons, at BUCKY'S.


J ACKSONVILLE, PENSA&OI.A AND
MOBILE RAILROAD CO.


D DISTRICT' COURT OF THE G GENrRAL SUPERINTENDENT'S OPFICE,-
UNITEI STATES F 1OR THE NORTH- TALLAHASSEE, December 19, 1874. '
ERN DISTRICT OI FLORIDA. In Lankruptcy. Ortand-after SUNDAY, ,DEC. 20 874, Passen-
In the matter of.,larles L. Mather and Frank E. ger trains en this iroad will run as'follows: r
Litti ;comprising the fin of Charles L. Mather& Co., DAY PASSENGER, Daily, Sundays excepted,
Bankrupt Northern District of Florida, ss. ---. .-. I -. -
This is to give .notice, that on the first day of May, A.. IV!. A A a .. M.0
1875, a Warrant of Bankruptcy was issued out of 'Leaive Jacksonville.-. 74o Leave Savy- ahoaoche 6. o
the Iistrict Court of the United States for the Baldwin........"85o Cattahoocee 6.56
Northern District of Florida, against., the estate of Lake City .... .5 o. .oQuincy...........3
n-{If P M lalialssee. t1030
Charles L. Mather and Frank E. Little (firm of Charles P .. i i O.see..... 3
of r,-i-veOak ... 3
L. Mather& Co.) of Jacksonville. in the County of Du- ., ds o n Madlio.. 2
val ih aid District, adjudged bankrupts on their own Mladihass....* 6.. .3 "Mtok........ :2.5
petition; that the payment of any debts and the deliv- ....e 3_ L ak ........ 0-
ery of any property belungiug to such bankrupts, to Quincyh..ocee ".. Lake CityB...... 8.o
them or for their use. and the transfer of any property A, r"ive Chattahoochee 9.5 Baldwin.. ........ o
by them are. forbidden by las; and that .a meeting of Savannah ...... 9.5 Arrive Jacksonvile..., 9.15
the -rbciiors of said bnkrupts, to prove their debts, Passengers can-go through to St. Marks .Mondays-
and to choose one or more Assignees of their estate, Welnesdays and Fridays, and return Tuesdays', Thurs,
will be held at'a Court of Bankruptcy, to be holden at days and Salurdays.
Jacksonville in said District, at the Register's office be-
fore W. A. McLean, Esq Register'in Bankruptcy lor NIGHT EXPRESj, Daily.
said District, on the 29th day of May, A. D. 1875, at- .
5o o'clock a.im. SHERMAN CONANTP. P" ., .M.
5-o2w, U. S. Marshlforsaid District. Leave JackFsonville.... 400Leave Savannah....4;00oo
Baldwin.,. _5 -" A. M.
Lake City-. 8.32 Live Oak. 3.00
I[STRICT- CJUR O- F .THE Arrive Live Oak.... io.o LakeCity 4.33
L.UNITFD STATES FOR THE NORTHERN. "A. ". Baldwin.. 7.45
DISTRICT OF FLORIDA. In Bankruptcy. "' Savnnaah.-.... 5o'Arriive Jacksonville... 9.10
In the matter of T1'. B. Simpkins, Bankrupt, North- TE-A Special Train will leave Tallahassee Sat
ern District of Florida, ss Pt, No pecialNTraiwu ea le ak Tanaassee .a.
This -is to:give',notice, that on the 22d:day of April, 'urdays at 3.40 p. in., arrivnjat aLivne Otak 9.35 P i-leaMv.,
1if. Warrant of Bankruptcy was issued out of the connecting .with Savannah rain. Returning. 'leave
t't.,r o.-t r" of -the United States for the Northern. Lv Oak A.., arrvingat Tallahassee at. -"o .." m. -
listrictf ef Florida, against the estate of T. B. Simp- ROBERT WALKER.
kins, of MonilcellO, in the County of Jefferson; in said Receiver and Gen'l. Supt.
District, adjudged a 1Bankrupt on his own petition; i C. SPOONER, Master Transportation. 5-2
that the payment of any debts and the delivery of any
property eioigitng to such Bankrupt, to him, or for his
use', and t'ihe transfer of any property by him, are for- WAT
bids-en bylaw; and that a meeting of the Creditors of .I S. SWA":* -M
said Bankrupt, to prove their debts, and to choose one '.I .- ,.
or more.. assigtilees of hi estate, wil ber held at at PRACTICAL JEWELLER
Court of Bankruptcy, to be holden at Jabiksonville. in ....
.i-1 Iisltrict, at the Register's Office before W. A And W STCHMAKER, late'with J. J. Holland, has
Nl.:Lean, E'sq., Register in Bankruptcy for said taken a window in WALTER'S tIGAR STORE.
District, Cr, the 3ist day of May, A.'D. 1875, at10 otwo doors west of the Post-office, where.he is prepared
o'.clo~k, .\ N;. SHER.AN, CONANT, wiih a good stock of tools and miiaterial to do any kind
55 P.r-..., I. S.'.Marshal for said District. of work in his line.

TN BANKRUPTCY. In the Dis ... Extra Fine Mounting of Florida
J. tsilt Couri of the United States foxie Northlern -. Curiosities
District of Florida. 1 the m#iiiieir of'l'hos. W. Hart,
Bankrupt. heeb -g h a To .specialty. Fine watches carefully, thoroughly and
Notice 'is herebygiven'that he abe nn.d Ths pomptly repaired. '
W. Hart, who has beeadjudged a Bankrupt upon his l'. B.-If it's worth doing at all it's worth'doing well.
own petition, undei an 'act of Congress cbtitled "An
Act to establish a uniform system of Bankruptcy -' "' "aa3o-lsod aQIjo sA
throughout the the united States," approved-March '...:i v aiO.'s ,5j1eA se '-jrVsIH VAM puY
2d' 1867, has i aledm said'Court li p petition playing to '" -"'
beifiscliarged from all his debts and other claims prov- -,.I M f .- T, V
able under said act; and that a hearing be had upon the A IViJVli
samee at a Court of Bankruptcy to be holden before W. t.. .* I
A.McLean, Esq., Rkegister in Bankruptcy, at hisof- ". .IVAI
flce in the City of Jacksonville, in said District, on the "
Ipth day of May A. D. 1875, at so o'clock a-,r .a.. "
which time and place all creditors whocehave proved 7"' 0 R SA L E .
their debts, and other persons in inter$t,,mnay attend F .
and show cause Why tl;e prayer ?f said 1eptitPer obpsjd
not be granted. A half interest in one of the most nourishing and pro-
Witness Hon. Philip Fraser, Judge of the said Dis- ductive xr rrV
trict Court and the seal theieofat Jacksonville in UORANGE GROVESlrU
[L.S.] this District this 4th day.of May A. D. 1875. '
S PHILIP-WAL'TER, In East Florida. For particulars apply at'this office..
5-5-2w Clerk of Diitric .Courflo said District, t-a m


-HOT-ELSAND BOARDING HOUSES.


MANSION HOUSE. :

PORT ROYAL, 5. C.,


The NEW. CITY, si.tuate on the South Atlantic coast,
and at the terminns-ofsihe Port Royal Railroad. The
great desideratum, so long requited there is now de-
veloped.
Respectfully the' Soperintendent undersgiged, lately
of Augusta, Ga.,. announces that on .the a5th inst' she
NEWLY. CO INSTRUCT AND 7--#L1-FU


NEWLY CONSTRUCTED AND NEWLT FUR
NISHED
'MAN SI ON.


For private andtransient: boarders. Confident of her
ability, from past experience, she will 'zealously
consultt the comfort of: all who may pat onize,- and at
terms the most favorable.
"rANNIE.BUSSE.
.Dated March I, 1875. ; 3 3-24 tf


TamsadPee Jaceta BUCY-


COLUMBIA HOTEL, S. C.
THE COLUMBIA HOTEL, S. C., the first and
finest Hotel in the State, continues to be the resort of
all northern and Sout'hern travelers-: has the most spa-
cious rooms and the best table the market affords. In-
vites visitors and invalids sojurning- at Florida to stay
'over a day or two and visit this delightful section of
country, situated midway.between the extreme North
and South. T1he proprietor pledges tkat neither time
n'or'expense-skal be.spared to' ,make his guests cornm-
fortabie..
All the modern improvements -Baths, Billiards and
telegraphic communication, are to be found in the
House.
4-1o-3m -WILLIAM 60RMAN, Proprietor,


Fine Cassimere Sirts,styislh and durable, at'BuaekyVs'


R IDDELL HOUSE, ;
FERNANDINA, FLA' ;

SAMUEIT: IIIDDELL,- PROP)itETOR.

*MVagnificent drive ot eighteen.miles on the finest
Atlantic Beach. ,
,wjRefreshing sea breezes.
OPEN SUMMER AND WINTER.
B OARD: .' "
- Per day .. $300.
SPer-wek :........ from $12 to; 5.oo0
Satisfactory arrangements made with families. "
SFine livery a&commodations.. .-4-tf


NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.

J P. C. EMMONS, -

ATTORNEY AND1 COUNSELLdR AT LAW.
Freedman's Bank Building. Jacksonville, Fla.
Mr Emmons having dissolved his professional rela-
tions with J. P. & M Railroad, will receive miscellane-
ous business n his profesAon. 5-5" 305.


PROPOSALS FOR MILITARY SUP-
: .PLIES. .
O cpr, CHIEF, Q 14 DRP'T OF.TrH Sboij,
Louielltie, Ky Marsh ''. 1'75.
SEALED PROPOSALS,-?'N- TRlP-.
n.j'li]ate,'nnder rhe ta-ual conditi6nr-,'lhl lhi received
at this office, and also at the officesof.tle U S. Ouar
termaterwa t t, e ,eeral poiss named below until .11
..'c NI.:.k M., ,:..ia 'edr.edAy. the tth day of lazy.'r8,"
arn, tch time and police they wll be opened hi the
presence of. bidders, -for the delivery of military supplies
du ins the fiscal ear, beginning Jul)- i, 1875, and end-
ing Junt 30, 1E 76, as follows .
Wood,-Coal, Conr,; Oats, :Hay,. and btraw,4at the
following named posts: Louisville, .Liebanon; Lancas-
ter, and Frankfort, Ky Nashville;. Hosibpldti and
Chattanooga, Tenn., Huntsville, -Mount Veraow, and
Mobile, Ala., Atlanta and Savannah,. Ga.,.Charheston,
Columbia Yorkville, and Newberry,. S: C., Fiort John-
son, Fort Macori, Marion, and Raleigh; N.G-i;-ad St.
Augistine, Iflorida .. ,. !-. *i
Bids for any portio of the supplies il be. eft-
ta in e d J t d r -
SThe Goverminent'reserves tl right to :ejSeI';sy o0
all bids. : ; .
A preference ;il be gisen to arficles of domes'14c pro-
dctction. -"
Blank proposals and printed circulars,' sho'wi.g the
estimated quantities required at each, post,- s-c:givng
full instructions as to the manfiner of" blddiagand the
terms of contract aud payment, can be obtained;by per-
sonal or written application to the Quarteppraers at
the various posts, or to this office. "
sw4 JAMES A. EKIN, Chief Quartermaster.


N O TICE..-:'; : .i -
U. S. INTERNAL REVENUE. SPECIAL. TAIX LS
MAY x, :875,',T&-APRIL-30o, z876. ,
The Revised. Stattes-of the United State,,;Sctions'
3P3. q237, 338, and 323%9,requireevery-persbon engaged'
in any business, avocatio6nor empto7mreit'#lSi ren-
ders him liable t, a Special Tat, to -proure'nda place-
cocn.wpicu:.uuly ii hi;s e tbiih',e.',t ...r place of business
a trrnp de-rring ihe pa) rnnt ,'f s.,- pecial Tax for
the Spec..l 'fa N eat beginning Ma ,i, 185 before.
commencing or con jroming business alter April 31, 1875.
The taxes embraced' within the provisions of'tthe law
above quoted are the following, viz: -
Rectifier .... .... ....... ... ........... ........... .-o o
liealr- r.n.-.i liht r................ ................... 25 oo0
I] -al h' vh' le,.Ile I.laUr ........ .................. roo oo0
'Dealers jn malt ;lquprsi wholesale........... ". 50 oo0
Dealers in malt liqufrs, retail 20 00
Dealers in leaf tobaco 25 00
Retail ds-le- in le.,l'l.cba : .......... ..... .... 500 oo00'
And ..*i -Al:. .:" -J ;r'' .i*.:-., fi'l) cents fr ;
every dollar in excessof i6; -.'.': li;
Dealers In manufactured tobacco ................., 5 00o
Manufacturers (rt;s ..... ........ ........ ..... 5000
Anid for each ill manui.a.:iured ........ :..;'. 2o 00-
And for each wbr.n manufactured.'; .-;,- s 20 o o
Ml.,nufai:ureo Lbacco ..... o oo4
M nubtiu- ., c'ears ............................ .. _
Ptdllers '1 l.h,,:,:,:, first cr-.h ,more than tw6f
horses or other animals) '". o So 00
Peddlers of tobacco, ;second class (two hprses og
other animals)-..... 25 06
Peddles of tobacco,. third -clasa (one. horseco
c et-e animal ............. ...... ....... 15 : 0So
Pe1.llers t. I.. Iba,..', fourth class ion fot,),r pub-
S IK c :n yrTe ........ _.. .....................- 1o oo
Brewers of less than 5- ,. barrel .... ........ ... 500 o
Brewers of 5o bar it-.cr more..........z....,.. 00oo o
.Any perbow,.so liable., who shall fail to p.qmply with
:the foregoing requirements will 'be subject" to sever"
penalties, '
SPersons orS-msa liabletopay anyqfsheslpeial Tase"
named above must apply toA- A. KNj!H.I;olector.
of Intermial Rvenhue at Jaeksomniklt,it-'a_1ryfor and"
procure the Speia-Tax Stamp or S.aio ..thty need,"
priol'to May 1, 1875, and without fixfihe..notise.
t J W. DOUGLAS.
C om rm ssioner'of 'lnte.itrfal 1e Mti
-Office of Ihteral Revenme, -* it-;il.
Washington. D, C. Febrary I. 147j. .
Application Ra, aba be made to aiad'starpth pw-"-
cured of S. GC THOMI&SON, Deputy .-CoBctor, at
Jacksonville. .. .IA.'A. KNIGHT, Collectqr.
Jacksonville, Fla., Aprijist, 11875. 4-3 I m


Carpe'tbags and Ladies' Companions at'BUCKY'S.'


WITE RESORT


WINTER RESORT.
SPENCER HOUSE, ST..MARYS, GA.
Opposite Fernandina, Fla., now offers First-Class ac-
commodations at .
$3 per day-$12 to $18 per week,
With all the comforts and conveniences "of a Northern
Home. St. Marys issituated nearihe mouth of the St.
Mary's River. The location and healthfulness Qf the
place is not surpassed on the Southern coast. STR.
LIZZIE BAKER goes direct to the:-House. Parties
having through tickets can have them exchanged by
iurser of steamer to stop over at St. Marys or any
other point desired.- Liberal terms, made with parties
jlesiring to make a permanent stay. Send for circular.
LA TOURETTE HOUSE. Be'gen Point, N.J., will
open Mayist, 1875.' J. BOWMAN, Proprietor.
Fine Business Suitsat BUCKY'. "
Fine Business Suits atBUCKY'S9. '


BENNETT HOUSE, :
S PORT ORANGE, FLA.,

By MRS. BENNETT & MRS. DOBBINS.
This new house is now ready to receive guests. It is
comfortably furnhihed throughout, and is capable of ac-
commodating 24 guests No pains will be spared to'
make the table satisfactory to its patrons.
S. The schooner
ELIZA BENNETT
Will leave Foster's wharf, Jacksonville, for Port Or-
ange once in two weeks, affording parties.pleasant and;
safe facilities for-reaching that place. Comfortable
Cabin Accommodations. For particulars apply at
1" "; : DOBBINS' GUN SHOP,
Corner Bay and Hogan streets, Jacksonville, Fla
4i-Due notice of the time of arrival and departure of
the schooner will be given in the paper. 1-23 3m


NOTICE.
The Steamer jockaway will discontinue her daily
trips to Tocoi on and after the 2oth ofApril 2875. The
SltOamer eao .e ."re4 at reasonable rates for" Ft
cursions either by day mfoonlight, or contracts can
be' made for carryIng freight' it 'te unablee terms, by
applying to,. -.. M. A get
-I7-2W,. ack ye, 'a


Tr O CONTRACTOR,. .A,.4.'p I D-
I E R S,, ,:., "- '" :. .
SHavin completed, an extensive new n-ill in connec-
lotr, ith my fornmer one, I am prepared to furinnish alk
kinds'offinishimng mativid,'suchas Brackefc,.Balusters,,
Piazza Colunmns,/ Mouldings,Scroll Saw Work, Lath
Flooring Planed, Tongued and Grnooved and Beaded if
desired. Weather 'Boards, Be'veledt:dr Squiiare Edged,
Dressed,,or 'Rough, as desired. ;;.Ptan.k.oqf.Wl sizes,
either Dressed or Rough, in any quantity, IDoor and
Window Casings, Pickets of every and" an:yh pattern.
In a word, evftyshing- in'.the 4uiribedrliBH" the builder
wants,. My Machines are -lL new,and of:the latest
patterns and are used by'skillked *6rck'en."Call and
satisfy yourselves as; to price_ 'before purt ing else- -
:where. I- guaraistie -sat-tfa ion' :oqr nship as
well as quality of materi l. L' E W LA --E
- 2-27,tf -ALEX.VWALLACE.


W ILU CO X J:... .rc
Dealer it :'::-!'
TB.UIT AND-'yVEQETAltgES.
MAGNOfIIA MARKET. ,'
'yamtnlias supplied at.i regular marlcket rate&,.

*' ..-.. .Also,.h< stll'keOlpk *'.": "
A STALLInN 'TlE OLD MARKET,
For the accommodation' of down- t, n cusl'mers.
It will PAY to come and see me. '' '
4-7 Iy f H. E. 'ILCOX.


Ladies' underweare tii be obtained at BUCKY'S.


TICKET OFFICE

FLORIDA STEAM PACKET CO.

COR. BAY AND PINE STS.

Tickets sold to all points North by Rail and via
Steamships from Savannah and Charleston.' Also,


RETURN BXCTJ RSION TICKETS
' t s .'* .- +++'. 1 II-
for salt to.l. ?i9B'f4 9 J WE ,'', .t '. _
** -* ._; ,.. ;,'%.' f. i .fr o'


LEGAL.


,U UNITED STATES MAll,;
: POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT
: ; .:.. :. Washington. April T4, t87S
Proposals will be received at the C.ontra:t Office of
this Departfient ui413S o'clock p. m. ,4 Ma, ;,isr. j87S,
(to be, decided b% J're o10, 175, lor carr rng the mails
ofihe'United 'Iate t'rom July i'75, Ji'lune 30o,
-c.-. on the'f..llo,. rig route.. in the Stite ot FIriC ,a,
aria b\ the schedule" o1 departures and arrivals he'rein
specified, i-t, r ;:,:,
- .,:'. ; ;. Service 1875 tO ,876.., -
16031 FromJasper to Ancrum, 14 iiles and back, once
week. .'
: Leave J.asper Saturda, at-8 am;- .,
A' Atrive at Ancrum_ i m, ~ : 2 in
'LeaVi Ancrumn S&turday-at x. p:in ;I : .. i)
Arrive at J.asperby 5p m. P ; p m- ,
Bond re,,uttel with bid, 2. '0:'0
i,.4o From Bail,'s M;lsi to Micco-ukee, ,asz ejsnd
bad.k, once a seek
] leave Baile's' Mills Saturday at p aP '
Ar 'Ar;rve at M:.:tiLket by i p in ,'
l.eaie Mc.:<.iulee Saturday at 8 a mi n
Arrnie .at BE .il1 'i M I'ii bL 1i a mn.
B.:.nd requ.rd whhbid, l $2 0.
16&66 Frohm Freeport to6' Point Washington, in 'hlea
and back. once a weec.k 7 .. '[ -
Leaje rreeport e.aturday at I p-m; .
Arrive tI Point W%%'hlngton by 4L.3dp mli;'*'*
Leave 'Pointf.Washington Saturday at3..i' i;
Arrie at Freeporlby.op in. ;8 "p-.m
Bund required with bid. tack.
t6o65 From Saint MaNrks to Saint Theresa (n. o) 35
miles arid back, three times a week. from July.i4t to
N..ember 15. 1875, and f6rhi May-iS'Jta.;lr!33o.
4876." : o .
Leave "Saini Mfark's Tuesday, Thursday,'.nd
Saturday at 7a m ;
SArtive at Saint I heresa by' 6p m;
,- Lease at Saint 1 hercsa i.,nday, Wednesday,
and FridA) at 7 am.,
1 nArrve at Sa1nt Marks by 6 p in.
boi d irequirea ih, bad, k6uG. ,
1607t1 From Pilaika, by Woodland, tolwino, -as miles
*- and back., once a week. -,-
Lea.'e Pilatka Saturday at 6 a m:
Arnve at Iwirn by m; in;
S Leave Iwin Saturday at I p m; j-, .
SAsri\c at Platka by 7 p imn.
Bond required th bid, 3oo. .
j6092 From Saniford to Lake Jessup, r( mfle and
:' back,oncea teek. A '
S Leave Sanford Sartwday at 6 a m?, ''if"
S, Artz,ve at Lake Jesgup by 12 m: "
Leave Lake Jetlsup Saturday at Ip m *I '
Arrive atSamifoifd by 7-0 1.' -i I -z;',- -it"
B,.. ;Bo)d required with bid, j3oo. ." .
16bo9 From Pensacola by Town Point (n, o.),t A Mary
' Esther, 45. miles and bak, :,nce a week.
Leave Pensacola MNondiy at 6 a min: -
Ariveat'Maxty Esther Tuehay aL't, m;
Leave Mary Esther next day by o a.mi .
Arrive at Pensacola next day by z p m:"
.' Bbnd required with bid 6oo.
For lam ; relating 'to the postal service, form.-of pro-
posal, bond and certificate, and-for iisaea "enoand
;condi ons 1t be embraced in the contract, sqe advcr-
tisemnt :.f this date in pamphlet rorm, to be round at
the termini of each route, ,r by addressing the BSiond
A-5isant Postmaster General -.
Bid. shouldd be -ent in sealed envelopes, suiperscribid
"Mail proposals, State of ,'. and ad-
dressed to the Second Assistant Postmaster;Ge*ral,
Washingtoii,D- C. MARSHALL4 JWELL,
421-ow Pct master General.


STEAMERS.


_____


.. . .. L_


I i~t I I I -" f-I 'llAlg~l--" ; -. .1


. .





Talmas and Peedee Jackets at BUCKY'S.


Balmorals. Bustles, and Chignons, at BUCKY'S.


Ladies' underwaterr; to be obtained at BUCKY'S.


Percale shirts, so nice, at Bucky s.


I










. THE NEW SOUTH: WEEKLY. JACKSONVILLE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, [875.


Connrecticut and New Hampshire.'
So much nonsense, has been set afloat
in attempting to prognosticate tor the
next. National campaign, its probable
Results as indicated by data drawn from
,recent results of elections, that we in-
vite the consideration of Republicans to
Sthe following reasoning of the Buffalo
Express which says:
We gained New Hampshire and lost
Connecticut. : Both were fought on na-
tional issues and with opposite results.
This seeming contradictory decision can
be rie6oncllbd, we think. We undertake
to say tlht. the Republicans carried New
Hampshire Onw radical Republicanism,
and that the' Denm.'cr.its carried Con-
necticut on radical Democracy, and that
the lesson of both elections is the same.
1. New Hampshire.-Lying Demo-
crats and mollusk Repuhlicans and
superficial observers generally have
construed the New Hampshire election
to be a rebuke to the policy of' the Re-
':p.lican "administration and Congress
Sand. a'demand tor a conservative (i. e.
Democratic) Republicanism. Harper's
Weekly is one such false mean that: page in the Weekly which is
Opposite Nast's cartoons, in more than
one sense. The reverse is the truth.
New Hampshire W tu-orgt-nir-plat-
- forms, 'Local issues'-and tche:character
of candidates bad little influence. "Hon-
ors were easy," so far. :SSo we must
look at the two platforms. On nine of
the twelve divlinetive declarations of the
campaign the two pl;ttl,,rms were iden-
lical; on only' three did they divide and
fight. The nine points 'which were so
plain that hno one in 'N Hatmpshire
disputed them were these:,.
1. Both parties pronounced -for equal
Sights antid exact. justice .
2. Both condemned tlie use of the
military power for unconstitutional pur-
poses.
3. Both declared against a thiril term.
.. ,44.,,Bpth denounced public subsidies to
corporationsn. re mp t n o : ,
6. B,,th favored resumption of specie


payments.
6. Both demnianded free banking.
,-. 7f Both denounced official corrup-
,tion.
8. Both condemned official rapacity
__and mal-administrilion.
9. Both talkedtl non-committal on the
liqu,, question.
It'he Repulblicans won by virtue ot
Those principle.-s, the D.-inoeralts lost by
-. :the same. It tlhe people of New Hamnp-
shire ratified one platform for ^these
planks, they conldemnetl the eOther plat-
form for ithe same reason; they said
S"yes" and "no" to them at the same in-
stant. In so far the result is as much A
triumph lor- Demuocratic principles as for'
Re' Bpul"ilcatn principles. Men did not
change their votes from last year becnauce
They saw a similarity between the two
Platforms. Sine-thing else recalled
them to the Rlepublican fold.
We mint look Ii," thi differences, the
(-'oantagonim iin of the two -plattrms to
Find the cause of:-the, changed result.
And here are the differences, the real is-
sues of that canlp.tign :
.: T;.the Republicans denounced the
'. 'While Leaguer-" .idl Ilie intimidation
of and outrlges on Unim men in. the
SSouth-and the Dvi-ocr.tis didn't. The
., former were indor,-rd and the latter
c- onde mned-at.lhepofls. ... ._ __"
2. The Republicans idel-indei-l for all
Sthe people ot the South (blavk as well
--as white) the same peace, protection,
prosperity they-1hemiselves. enjoyed-
:::and the Democrats didn't. For this the
Former were t-n,lors'il -and the latter
condemned by the people.
-v .3. The Republicans called upon Con-,
_.:,gress to give pea,'e and a Republican
t'orm of government to Louisiana with-
-., .-ut delay-the Democrats denounced
,all Federal interference with anything
That may be done in Louisiana or. other
SSouthern States. The one was voted
u' p and the other down by the people.
If anything in national polities was
-- passed upon by New Hampshire, it was
an endorsement oft the rights of every
Citizen of the South to federal protec-
Slion; the duty of the government to lay
Sits hands on all who violate these rights,
Sthe duty of Cungress to sanction such a.
restraint by law. New Hampshire voted
Sfor federal supremacy and force bills. It
declared that we are one7 nation,, one
government, and have a right to rule
that which we conquered. That's what
New Hampshire decided if it decided
anything.
li Connecticut, Senator Eaton's speech
S was the key note of the Connecticut
campaign. It was a bold, consistent
'* proclamation of the foundation princi-
,, pies of the Demeci-atic, partly, State Sove-
S* reignty. As the Republicans of New
Hampshire went back to first principles
and declared for fcdera:tl supremacy, the
Democrats of Connectincut went back to
.. first principles and declared lor Staite
..Sovereignty. Both won, as radicalism,
pluck and consistency always win with
the people. '-God hales a coward,"and
so. do the American people. 'The Re-
publicans circulated Eaiton's State Sov-
ereignty speech as a cainpaign docu-
Mehl ent,. and called every Democratic
voter in the State out of his hole.. It
was Democratic gospel, meat. dI-ink,
lile, inspiration. They swarmed like
clansmen to the blast of Roderick Dhu's
horn.
S What distinctive Republicanism had
the other side to offer to inspire hope?
What noblu inspiration of a grand
principle, a lofty faith waq given them ?
Not a word Who'e bugle horn sound-
---ed the charge? General Hawlehy'-
:whose claitim tI Republican s3mpalhy
was his opposition io Republican tef
legislation for, -the protection' oft' the
dearest vital rights of American citizens
: oppressed because of their Republican-
ism. Speaker Blaine, fresh from a ban-
quet given hlim by the Democrats in
Philadelphia because of his opposition
to Republican measures in Congress
and his great. se, ices to the Democratic
minority. General Garfield, another
Advocate of lthe "'let us alone" policy
l or the South which Jeff. Daiis
-demanded in '61. Over against this we
have only (lthie echoes of the hundred
guts fired by the Republican candidate
lor Govternit ov,.t;r. Grintit's Loui.aiiaa
Policy. Th t it' s last January. Three-
inonth's-eld echoes and smoke are not
S substantial lonindations to build a great
party on. What had the Rcputilictns of
Coneclicut to fight.-for? :
Talk not to us of Gran.i-.in being im-
proved in New ItrumpAhire and con-
demned in Connecticut. The people
d bn't care lor Grant or any other iman.
They do care for principle--clear, dis-
tinct,.towering principles. whi-h no one
isa: D mistake ori .Demoera-c any more
than they can lake grand old Mount
Marcy-iu'a pile of garbage. Give them
S n- organizationn resting deep on bed-
'p.k principles, and they will fight to the
dtuh. whoever leads. Nothing but a


great cause can fire thousands with one
common purpose, : Politicians have frit-
tered away and toned down the Repub-
lican faith until Republicans seriously
ask, "Why are we Republicans?" New
Hampshire called loudly for a Repub-
lican policy and Republican principles.
Connecticut declared that, the party true
itsfoundation principles can always whip
the party that is emasculated of these.
'Moral-The next Presidential election
is to be fought on the issue, Federal su-
premacy vs. State sovereignty, and the
Republican party must take an early,
radical, unmistakable position on one
side of that issue. There is only one
side that it can take. The lines are al-
ready formed on the other side and a
skirmish has been won by them.

MISPRINTS.-Mrs. Stowe, in one of
her stories, says that it is good for a
careful housekeeper, now and then, to
see her neighbor's cracked china, for
she may thereby be helped to grieve
less about her own. We sometimes
get sick over misprints that we notice
in The felho,/icst, after all' care taken;
but when we look over the work of
our brother editors we recover again.
Week before last we caught, when too
late, a paragraph on which several
marked corrections had', not been
made. We will not go back to them
now. A paper or a book is like man
himself, who will never be perfect in
body and'mind till he enters a second
edition, "revised and improved by the
author."'-
'-Ye printer hath a devyle, that
doeth all manner of mischiefe. This
devyle hauntetn the cases, and mixeth
the types, cloudeth ye printer's eyes,
and maketh him drowse when he
should be well awake. Ye printer
keepeth therefore a learned sage, call-
ed a proofe-reader, to drive out this
evil sprite, yet with all his pains he
cannot wholly put him away. For
the spirit hath such nimblenesse,eand
lurketh in so many places, that no wit
of man can 'follow him through all;
wherefore ye printer sprinkleth his
types much with water, forasmuch as
all spirits have dread of moisture, but
-eftsoois is this demon back again.
And so ye printer spendeth his days
in a war with the 'wicked One, and
thereby has become. almost sorrowfull
man." .
So discourses an ancient writer of
this great affliction of human life. We
can only .accept his philosophy, and
conclude that man is born to spend
his days in warring with evils which
he cannot- wholly' overcome.-The
MAethodist.
7*
Prominent among the distinguished
strangers who have honored Washing-
ton during the past session with their
presence was Professor Price, or, as he
preferred to be called, "Professor
Bonamy Price, of Hoxford." He
was a fussy, egotistical fellow, and
those to whom he brought letters of
introduction from Sir Stafford North-
cote (who was -here,- ,n--the-HigphJointl-
Commission), were very soon tired of
him. One day, after his disagreeable
qualities had become generally known
he was a guest at a dinner party, with
so.ne of the highest officials, and, as
.usual with him, he was determined to
lead and monopolize the conversation.
After a while he said, or rather shout-
ed : "Now, all you listen. I want
every one to give me his or her views
of heaven !" and he proceeded in a
loud tone to ask the question succes-
sively. The answers were various,
but brief, and finally it came to the
turn of the host, last of all, who thus
answered : "Well I hope that heaven
is a place where people can dine
without money anti without Price."
There was a general roar of laughter,
but the Briton did not see the point
of the reply, and 'said : "Oh! oh !
You regard heaven as a free dining
hall. "Pon my word, I don't see
what there is amusing in that."
There was a general feeling of relief
in Washington when the professor re-
turned to teach political economy to
the students at "Hoxford."

A RURAL CRITIC.--A gentleman
from beyond the suburbs of Fort
Wayne thus describes Mine. Carreno-
Sauret's performance on the piano, to
a reporter of the Sentinel: "I tell
you, mister she was a slasher. Our
Gennie couldn't hold a candle to her.
When she first sit down she looked
kind a wild, then with a howl dug her
finger-nails into them ere rough notes,
and shot', em like lightning up into
the thin ones. Then she paused for
a reply, mister. She then com-
menced at the right hand side, went a
rippin' down hand over fist, tell she
got clean down, rnakin 'a noise like
thunder. She then yanked a handful
out of the center and planted them at
theend, then wiggled around with
tws^ fingers, grabbed up another fist-
,ful, punched right and left? went
ripety-hopety-scotchy up and down,


and I tell you that ere planner howled.
She then gave another snort, and
when she went she busted in like mad,
raised up off her chair, stuffed three
fingersful there, crammed six more in
the corner, gobbled up a few more
tunes and settled their hash in about
a minute.' After that she tackled it
with her left hand' alone. Between
you and me, mister, the man that
owned that ere piano went shiftin'
around on his chair as though he had
a carpet tack under him. Good night
sister,"

AFTER THE POUND OF FLESH.-
S.ome time ago, when moneywas less
'plenty, a Boston merchant subscribed
$5oo to a theological enterprise and
paid $200 of the amount at the time.
Recently, finding it convenient, he
forwarded the remaining $3oo. By
return mail he received a letter of
acknowledgment and a request for
$19 and some odd cents interest on
the $300 from the date of the original,
subscription.r A fact.-LBoston Com-
mercial Bulletin.


GROCRIftig AND PROVISIONS.


J OHN CLARK,

FORWARD


P'tJRNirflIS


MISCELLANEOUS.


F FURNITURE WAREROOMS! H F. COtLCRD,
*' Sudcesaof to Hide and Skin business of


DING


AND


COMMISSION MERCHANT
AND DIALER IN


ROCERIEM,


PROVISIONS,


HAY, SEGARS, &c.
Sole Agents for Florida for
Averill's Chemical Paint, and
White's Patent Money Drawer
Agent for
STBAMBx LIZZIE BAKER,
VOLUSIA.
AND
Van Brunt & Bro's. Line Sailing Packets,
FROM NEW YORK.
tw36-1ga Bay Street, Jacksonv i ltFlorida.


W I LLSON &'WHITLOCK.
Successors to Thos. A. Willson,
WEALnRSIN

GRAIN. FLOUR, AND FEtD,
manufacturersrs of


CORN MEAL, HOMINY, CRACKED
CORN, RYE MEAL, GRAHAM
FLOUR, CRACKED WHEAT,&c.

SCROLL SAWING & WOOD TURNING
TO ORDER.
Wood Sawed, Split, and Delivered

by Cord or Load.
Ross' Block, Bay Street, opposite our Mill and Whar


T. WILSOs


FRANK W. GOLDEN.


2ACKSO NVILLE, FLA.
t5-66 w. A. WHITLOCK


FRANK M. ADAMS.


GOLDEN & ADAMS,
DEALERS IN
FINE GROCERIES,

FRENCfH CONFECTIONERY,

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC FRUIT, ALE,
WINE, LIQUOR, CIGARS,
TOBACCO, ETC.,
Have in store and to arrive
FIRST-CLASS GOODS,
Which, by making TERMS CASH, they offer at the
LOWEST PRICES.

Special Attention of the Ladies called to our
MAILLARD'S SUPERIOR CANDY,


R


And to our assortment of
PRESERVES, JELLIES, ETC.


PIC-NIC PARTIES will find it advantageous to
call, as we shall make the replenishing of LUNCH EON
BASKETS a specialty.
ArPurchases delivered gratis.
GOLDEN & ADAMS,
Ross" Marble Front Building, near Grand Na-
11-14 tf tional Hotel, Jacksonville, Florida.
Very stylish Ladies' Hats at BUCKY'S.


MISCELLANEOUS.


K


EARNEY'S

FLUID EXTRACT


BUCHU !
The only known remedy for

BRIGHT'S DISEASE,

And a positive remedy for
GOUT, GRAVEL, STRICTURES,
DIABETES, DYSPEPSIA,
NERVOUS DEBILI-
TY, DROPSY,
NON-RETENTION, OR INCONTINENCE OF
URINE, IRRITATION, INFLAMMATION.
OR ULCERATION OF THE

BLADDER AND KIDNEYS

SPERMATORRH(EA,
Leucorrhoea or Whites, Diseases of the Prostratu.
Gland, Stone in tha Bladder, Colculus, Gravel, or Brick-
dust Deposit and Mucus or Milky Discharges.


KEARNEY'S


EXTRACT


BUCHU


Permanently cures all Disea es of the
BLADDER, KIDNEYS, AND 'DROPSI-
CAL SWELLINGS,
Existing in men, women and children.

NO MATTER WHAT THE AGE!

Prof. Steel says: "One bottle of Kearn-y's Fluid
Extract Buchu is worth more than all other Buchus
combined."
. Pice On-eDollar per Bottle, or Six Bottles for Five
Dollars.-


DAVIS & DREW.


J. H. CROWELL,
corner Bay and Ocean streets.
Highest cash price paid for Hides, Skins, Furs,
Wax &c. 7-iSswiy


GRAIN. PARLOR SUITS. CHAMBER SUITS.


'SAMUEL B. HUBBARD,


MOSQUITO BARS & FIXTURES
MOSQUITO BARS & FIXTURES


Parlor
Suits.
Parlor
Suits.
Parlor
Suits.
Parlor
Suits.


DAVIS & DREW,
corner of
BAY AND LAURA STREETS,
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Chambe
Suits.
Chambe
Suits.
Chamber
Suits.
Chamb
Suits


EXAMINE OUR LARGE STOCK.


101 101
.10 ** 101
101, '. 4** 101
101 ... B 101
Bay St., *
101 1, 101
10 JACKSONIVILLE, 101
k FLA- 101
101 101
101..* : .*,..11
101 ; 101
101 *** 101
101 101
101 101
010101010 D &D 0101010101
1016..'Oe 101
0lOco DAvis & DREw, ool01
101 1010000 FURNITURE OOO0101
101 101 101
101 lOlooco FURNITURE oooooooll
1 1 lOlooo WAREHOUSE ooolO1
101 lO lo-OOOOOoooooooooc'lOl
101 1010101010 D & Dt1OI010101
101 101 101 101
101 101 101 101
101 101 101 101
101 101 101 101
101 101 101 101
.....101 101 ......101 101
101 101
101 101
101 101
101 101
S......101 ......F101



THE FINEST AND BEST SELECT-


Parlor
Suits.
Parlor
Suits.
Parlor
Suits.
Parlor
Suits.


ED IN THE SOUTH.


RICH, PLAIN,
and

SUBSTANTIAL
FURNITURE.


Jacksonville, Fla.,


Importer and Dealer in

HARDWARE, IRON AND STEEL,

EDGE TOOLS, TABLE and POCKET
CUTLERY,
Nails, Glue, Putty, Glass, Paints, Oils,
LEATHER BELTING, RUBBER PACKING,
STOVES, TINWARE, CROCKERY, PUMPS,
Lead and Iron Pipe,
DOORS, SASH, BLINDS, MOULDINGS. SUGAR

.Mills, Evaporators, &c.
Gas-Fiting,.Jooflng, yobbing, and Tin
Smithine done te order. dxly


Dra ers and Undershirts, very cheap, at BUCKY'S.


B BUILDERS'
FURNISHING MILL,

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

The undersigned would respectfully call the atten-
tion of those contemplating building to their establish-
ment. They are prepared to furnish at short notice all
kinds of ,
Builders' Material
consisting of
Rough and Planed Lumber,


Mouldings,


Brackets,


Scroll and Turned Work,
Sawed and Rived Shingles, Lath, Fencing.
&c. at lowest rates.
We have recently enlarged our mill and increased
our facilities for executing all orders with dispatch.
Give us a call before going elsewhere.


4-14


Cl amber
Suits.
Chamber
Suits.
Chrmnber
Suits
Chamber
Suits


We are prepared to offer our stock at
remarkably low prices.

-::--


DAVIS


& DREW,


DEALERS IN
All kinds of FURNITURE, CARPETS,
- 'MA-TTREsgeEuwIIITE rIvE, WA---
NUT, and CEDAR LUMBER, etc.

JACKSONVILLE. FLA-


COFFINS AND UNDERTAKERS


m


E T A L I, 1C
BURIAL CASES,
AND
WOOD COFFINS,


OF ALL SIZES AND QUALITIES.
LADIES' AND GENTLEMEN'S ROBES.
EMBALMING DONE WHEN REQUIRED.
ALSO,
MARBLE AND MARBLEIZED
SLATE MANTELS,
SLATE HEARTHS, &c.,
MANUFACTURED TO ORDER
AND FOR SALE BY
CALVIN OAK,
Forsyth-Street. between Laura and Hogans,
tw36-io0 Jacksonville. Florida.


NEW LOAN


ON A NEW PLAN.


Invest your money at home in the

FIRST MORTGAGE LAND GRANT
PREMIUM BONDS.
Now offered for sale by the

GREAT SOUTHERN RAILWAY
[Consolidatedl
Every bond when redeemed will receive a premium
in place of interest, according to the plan of redemption,
in amounts of from
$1.oo00 o $25.00ooo or $50.000


DEPOT, 104, DUANE ST., NEW YORK. On each bond.


A Physician in attendance to answer correspondent
and give advice gratis.
"SEf ND STAMP FOR PAMPHLETS, FREB,"6i


TO THE

NERVOUS AND DEBILITATED

OF BOTH SEXES.
NO CHARGE FOR ADVICE AND CONSUL-
TATION.

DR. J. B. DvoTTrr, graduate of Jefferson Medica
College, Philadelphia, author of several valuable works,
can be consulted on all diseases of the Sexual ar Urin-
ary I ;rgans, (which he has mode an especial study)
either in male or female, no matter from what cause or-
iginating or of how long standing. A practice of 30
years enables him to treat diseases with success. Cures
guaranteed. Charges reasonable. Those at a distance
can forward letter describing symptoms and enclosing
stamp to pay postage.
Send for the Guide to Health. Price ioc.

B. J. DYOTT, M. D.,
Physician and Surgeon, 104 Duane St., N. Y.


Blankets and Coverlets of every size and quality at
BUCf'I S.


D R. P. E. JOHINSON, IloMCEOPAiTHisT
Has removed his office to Mitchell's- new buigitt*.,
north side of Bay street, between Naw a' and' Market
nearly opposite the Post Offee. -tlf


Bonds redeemable by allotment. Six allotments of
bonds. Six distributions of premiums in 1875.
Apply to
EMIL HAAS & CO.,
Financial Agents
71 Broadway, New York City.
HARVEY GRANGER, Gen'l Agent,
J.L. EDWARDS Agent.
Office, Mather & Little's Bookstore, Jacksonville.
I-9 tf


F OR ST. AUGUSTINE.
STHE SCHOONER

~Magnolia
... Will make regu lar trips
"..... between Jacksonville &
St. Augustine.
F i Freights at low rates.
For freight or passage
apply to WILLSON & WHITLOCK,
Jacksonville, Fla.,
O1to JAMES COSS,
5-6tf St. Augustic, Fla.
Trunks and valises at Bucky's.


ALL PAPERS QUOTE FROM IT.
T'HE DETROIT FREE PRESS
The liveliest of family newspapers, full of interesting
news, literature, humorous sketches,,spiey paragraphs,
etc. Sample Copies free. SiAbscription $2 a year,
postpaid. A'dd-ts" ,
S i TkOIT FREE PRESS,
3-10 Dettroit, Mich.


2 24 3m


PENNIMAN & CO.


BUCKY takes the lead in the latest styles of Silk and
Fur Hats. iI-7tf


THE JACKSONVILLE


SALE AND LIVERY


STABLES,

C. B. McCLENNY, PROPrlETOR.

Notice is given to the public that I have purchased
the well-known HARTRIDGE STABLES, opposite
the METROPOLITAN HOTEL, and have on hand
A VERY LARGE STOCK OF HORSES AND
MULES FOR SALE.
Those desiring to purchase will find it to their ad-
vantage to examine this unusually large and .attractive
stock, adapted to all uses. I am also receiving
A COMPLht iJ. L Ork T-rr

BUGGIES, PHOTONS, AND
OTHER CARRIAGES,
of the latest styles,
FOR LIVERY SERVICE,
which will be furnished
AT THE SHORTEST NOTICE,
and on the
MOST REASONABLE TERMS.

Mr. G. M. BRITTAIN is my authorized Agent
and Manager, and will always be found at the Stables
ready to attend to all business appertaining to the es-
tablishment. C. B. Mc(LENNY.
Sept. x6, 1872. ss-a2tf


Gentlemen's underwear at BUCKY'S.


FRESH ARRIVAL
OF NEW AND FASHIONABLE GOODS
R
GENTLEMENS' FAL AND WINTER WEAR,
'EMBRACING
FRENCH, ENGLISH, GERMAN ITALIAN
AND AMERICAN FABRICS,
SUCH AS
FINE BROADCLOTHS, CASSIMERES, VEST-
INGS AND GENERAL FURNISHING
GOODS,


. at the store of


J. BARATIER,
Merchant Tailor,
Laura Street, just above Bay Street,
11-21-6m JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Fine black dress coats and fancy neck wear at Bucky's.

B ILLIARD SALOON.
(The Largest south of Washington.)
BAY STREET, OPPOSITE POST OFFICE.


2'- 5,
^ |. l <
~cj



A
s c -. Q 0









1s. B. OGI, rpS~r
-1-2 2t -
a..S






I. B. TOGNI, Proprieter.


J. H. NORTON,
IAttorney al Las and Notary Public.


fS H'. IWOOKER,


NORTON & KOOKER..
F DEALRL INV*.
R E:AL ES TA.T E
".- '.O .F AL KI DS
.. O F A L L K IN D S ';:: ; *; "' "'*]v


GENERAL INSURANCE AGENTS, representing the qlohgl 'mi
pahies .
Fr(ANKLIN, OF PHILADELPHIA, t With com&ismod asses of over -
S CONTINENTAL, OF NEW YORK, ,
MANHATTAN, OF NEW YORK,' s (Hill Un III
PENN, OF PH1LADELPHIA, ,' $'9 '
LOANING MONEY ON REAL ESTATE AND CONVEYANCING A
SPECIALTY,


We'give below a few of the many choice places (or safe by us;
No,73. TWo'-atory'howieconAshley sttet' near St. No. to. Dounawton Plantation: o
James. Hotel, pleasantly :situated, in .one .f the best seven miles north of NMoICquio inlet,
neighborhood In the city; h.,upe isnetw, *%.' I'I; rooms, ,1ix0 acres, 1,150 acres .ritrh hammock
plenty of closets, and good servant't room: lot 52%x from river. 5o acres Jiigh, shell land,
1o5 feet, good fence, good sidewalk, and the street the rlisr bank. having iront of about
shelled ; grapet in bearing: a fine lotof young orange with large, to-mory, frame 'hoot, i
trees; flowers and shade. trees growing thriftily ; igod :finished. l huse commands view of tie
well, with pump on back porch, which is covered with and is' urTounded lLh large, beanri
flowering vines. Will be sold cheap. ': some -.s- to o-,in number: good we
N. B. To capitalists desiring a big thing" there .. -, gallon, in yard. .ho
is a fine opening in Springfield; a few thouasand.dollars and drai ed; canal from sugar-hiouie
will go a great way just now. For particulars enquirte rIver r -rani;p.r-i.rn crr.:p. imm' e
of Norton &Kooker, corner Ocean and Bay streets. Wild orage Ir, P on the place: the .of
HAND E R C 'O A.- rbesi sugar lands Cuba,sto which
No. 74. HANDSOME RESIDENCE FOR SAL.-SX limele s- is ahundan. Thi lace is
large rooms and kitchen, double bay window on the choicest places in F lorida, a was kpi,
west, large double parlors, double piazza on the south, fore the war.
commanding one of the finest views in Jacksonville .' "
windows filled with four lights of 40-inch glass and nung N.B.1,Do you want a tiug wit
with cords and weights on pulleys and reaching to the orange* trees- and flowers in Fluridd.l
floor, with blinds; all casings are finished with mould- a beautiful lot, 7o0 I6 feet, in Sprini
ing and oIled and varnished, making a beautiful finish; healthful, and within ten minutes wall.
ceilings high, walls hard-finished, open. stairs, double, on which I-, make it, for 25-. For pa.
glass, front doors. mortice lock on every door in h :.uc; of Nortcn & Kooker.
china closet, store-room; plenty of clothes-presses, bath-
room; hip roof, with cupola, from which a charming No.; "g. A tract.of8. acres; ,6oac
view Is to be had of the city, the river and surrounding mock land: fine front"" St'. John's rive
country ; three lots, making I57x2og feet; good well : facfki.c.nV'l. Thisi,one ,f theKmo
young shade trees started; halfa mile from p-t-odice. .ir.si. mithe ki"nity of Jacksonvill.
Forsale at bargainn. : desi re.-d. ::
No. 96. A large, two-story house with ten large :iNo. i46. Six acres on Arlington riv
rooms; thoroughly built, and flnlshed In first-rate style, Flurida Home, containing the old winl
with twelve. feet ceilings; one acre of ground, covered at a bargain. ,i :-
with fruit trees and flowers; pleasantly located; within .
five minutes walk of the railroad depot. Price $zoooo;' No.i147A. MrEROaA OrrvT.
,4,500oo down, balance on long time If desired. ntraly located, built l he best Fier
a i' "t.clas hrmse in every m cl.
No., 99. 400 acres In Orange county; one mllefrom trn app t.Nortn & Koor.,
Melonville. Price, $5 per acre. t rms a -: o : .rn o s.


Call on or write to us, and state your wants;
OFFICE COR. OCEAN AND BAY STS. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
AWVisitors always welcome Latest papers on file.


n Halifax river,
at Port Orange;
k, lying one mile
- imimedlately oil
one fourth mile,
,8 .6wn, teerly
rivex and occam
T orange trees,
e1, and a .fserni
roughly ditched
running 10o the
me puantisies of
I S t 0mlw to the
I is fully eqal-;
really one o ed
own as suh be-

ter home, with
S'Voui ag.et a
field, high and
i the potl-office,
rticular enquire

res cleairVdaam-
r; two miles west
st desirable-river
Will be divided

er, s2(itiing the
W ard. For sale

.-This hotel i s
r.ch brick, and is.

8-.'re6r as

:- ns f


THE SINGER MANUFACTURING COMPANY'S CELEBRATED


SILK-TWIST.1',;';
This company now having in full operation at Newark, New Jersey, the largest BILK WORKS In thd
world, propose to furnish a superior article of Silk Twist "
AT GREATLY REDUCED PKRICE.S.
For the convenience of the public thi. celebrated Twist s
PUT UP ON SPOOLS OF DIFFERENT SIZES, ,
The finest quality being thereby offered on spools~in quantities :
FROM FIFTY' YARDS U1, W A;RD -; S ;


The above unequaled twist is manufactured especially-for the use of all kinds of sewing machines and Agents
for different machines through the country are using this twist in large quantities, and as :'"


SPECIAL INI)UCEMENIN r
are offered to the trade, all those about to purchase will do well to send for our price list.


THE SINGER


AGAIN TRIUMPHANT.

133,254 MAJORITY.

STATISTICS OF SWORN SALES FOR 1873:


Companies. Sold in 1873.
THE SINGER 232.444
Whee'er & Wilson 119,180
Domestic 40.114
Grover & Baker 86.I79
Weed 21,760
W ilson ............... ................. ................ 21,247
Howe No returns
Gold Medal 16,431
Wilcox & Gibbs 15,88z


Companies. Sold in z873.
American, B. H. 14,152
B & Howe 1 3,919
Remington Empire 9,183
Florence 8,96o
Davis : 8,86z
Victor 7,446
Blees 3,458
Secor ........................ 3,43
AEtna, J. E. Bramesdorf 3,081


OUR NEW FAMILY MACHINE
Embodies New and Essential P.inciples-Sioplicity of Construction: Ease of Operation; Uniformity. p.Prccise
Action at any Speed; Capacityf or Range and Variety of Work, Fine, or Coarse-
LEAVING ALL RIVALS BEHIND IT. : : : -.

TEST THE SINGER BEFORE PURCHASING ANY OTHER.
TERMS EASY-PAYMENTS LIGHT.

Besides the WORLD'S FAVORITE we keep constantly on tand a large supply of:
CLARK'S O. N. T. SPOOL COTTON, four spools for twent)-five cents. :;
SINGER'S STANDARD MACHINE TWIST, from twenty-five cents up-all sizes an4coo am,
ACME MACHINE TWIST, 1oo yard spools, 2 for aS cents;. 56 yard ools, 3.for.- cents.
SINGER'S LINEN AND FLAX THREADS, OILS, NEEDLES, &C.,- &C.


The Singer ManufaCturing Co.,
No. 172 BROUGHTON ST., SAVANNAH, GA. ''!
c. A, VOSBURGH,,Manager.


G ORGE W. FRAZIER, Agent,
S.-rytf JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


4


.* i*" ( ** : .


ESTABLISHED IN 1868...


A. K. PERCIVAL.,
SUCCESSORl TO J. H. CROWELL.


5ft
!5
C


S
0


Boots and Shoes, neat and durable, at BUCKY'S.


SIVERY, SALE AND FEED STABLES








The best and most stylish livery teams in the city
ean be found at the Stable of the undersigned, near the
Florida Home, corner of Cedar and Forsyth Streets.
Horses boarded and well cared for on reasonable
terms.
Strong teams'for hauling purposes always on hand.
lW.H AVERY.
Jacksonville, Fla., May 30, 1874. tf.


d


DEALER IN

BOOTS, SHOES, LEATHf-ER,


AND FINDINGS.


"' Percival's Stamp" Ha'ndf Boots
Burt & Mears' "-,
Philadelphia, and Baltinore '
Vienna Medal' cable sewed. "
Percival's Stamp Hand' Congress
Burt & Mears' "
Philadelphia -
Vienna Medal cable sewed "


- -. 1100
8 SO
8'5

80o
-, o-: .."-1 o
-;*** :. *-: '- 1 0 0 .


*


B MAL- '-'-- .. -
GOODS SENT BY MAIL AND, EXP S, -.; -,
To alt parts of timhe State.
AT THE OLD STAND, COR. BAY and OCEAN STS., JACISONVILLE, LA. 3-1,. .

S.t. *: *" '


~-d~-"'


/: