<%BANNER%>

UFPKY NEH LSTA



xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8 standalone no
fcla dl
!-- new South ( Newspaper ) --
METS:mets OBJID UF00048585_00002
xmlns:METS http:www.loc.govMETS
xmlns:mods http:www.loc.govmodsv3
xmlns:xlink http:www.w3.org1999xlink
xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance
xmlns:sobekcm http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm
xsi:schemaLocation
http:www.loc.govstandardsmetsmets.xsd
http:www.loc.govmodsv3mods-3-4.xsd
http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcmsobekcm.xsd
METS:metsHdr CREATEDATE 2006-10-05T16:46:36Z ID LASTMODDATE 2009-03-04T20:51:04Z RECORDSTATUS METADATA_UPDATE
METS:agent ROLE CREATOR TYPE ORGANIZATION
METS:name UF,University of Florida
OTHERTYPE SOFTWARE OTHER
PreQC Application, 3.4.8
INDIVIDUAL
SMATHERSLIB\ranrenn
METS:note Updated pubdate from serial hierarchy
METS:dmdSec DMD1
METS:mdWrap MDTYPE MODS MIMETYPE textxml LABEL Metadata
METS:xmlData
mods:mods
mods:genre authority marcgt newspaper
sobekcm newspaper
mods:identifier type ALEPH 002042984
OCLC 16156679
NOTIS AKN0865
LCCN sn 87062262
mods:language
mods:languageTerm text English
code iso639-2b eng
mods:location
mods:physicalLocation University of Florida
UF
mods:note dates or sequential designation Began in 1874; ceased in 1875?
"Wise men accept the inevitable, but strive to shape the future."
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 32 (Jan. 16, 1875).
funding Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
mods:originInfo
mods:publisher Adams, Carruth & Co.
mods:place
mods:placeTerm marccountry flu
mods:dateIssued marc point start 1874
end 1875
mods:dateCreated May 5, 1875
mods:frequency Weekly
marcfrequency weekly
regular
mods:recordInfo
mods:recordIdentifier source UF00048585_00002
mods:recordCreationDate 870710
mods:recordOrigin Imported from (ALEPH)002042984
mods:recordContentSource University of Florida
marcorg DLC
FUG
mods:languageOfCataloging
English
eng
mods:relatedItem original
mods:physicalDescription
mods:extent v. : ill. (chiefly advertisements) ; 61 cm.
series
mods:part
mods:detail Enum1
mods:caption 1875
mods:number 1875
Enum2
May
5
Enum3
5
5
Year
1875
1875
Month
May
5
Day
5
5
lccn 85038367
oclc 12368935
mods:titleInfo
mods:title New South (Jacksonville, Fla. : 1874 : Semiweekly)
mods:subject SUBJ651_1 lcsh
mods:geographic Jacksonville (Fla.)
Newspapers
SUBJ651_2
Duval COunty (Fla.)
Newspapers
mods:hierarchicalGeographic
mods:country United States
mods:state Florida
mods:county Duval
mods:city Jacksonville
mods:nonSort The
new South
uniform displayLabel Main Entry
New South (Jacksonville, Fla. 1874 Weekly)
mods:typeOfResource text
DMD2
OTHERMDTYPE SobekCM Custom
sobekcm:procParam
sobekcm:Aggregation FDNL1
FDNLN
sobekcm:MainThumbnail 00001thm.jpg
sobekcm:Wordmark UFPKY
NEH
LSTA
sobekcm:bibDesc
sobekcm:BibID UF00048585
sobekcm:VID 00002
sobekcm:Coordinates
sobekcm:Point latitude 30.31944 longitude -81.66 label Place of Publication
sobekcm:EncodingLevel #
sobekcm:Publisher
sobekcm:Name Adams, Carruth & Co.
sobekcm:PlaceTerm Jacksonville Fla
sobekcm:Source
sobekcm:statement UF University of Florida
sobekcm:serial
sobekcm:SerialHierarchy level 1 order 1875 1875
2 5 May
3 5
METS:amdSec
METS:techMD TECHMD1
File Technical Details
sobekcm:FileInfo
sobekcm:File fileid JPEG1 width 630 height 844
JPEG2 850
JPEG3 830
JPEG4 840
JP21 5458 7308 servicecopy UFDCUF\08\08\05\45\0000200001.jp2
JP22 5356 7225 UFDCUF\08\08\05\45\0000200002.jp2
JP23 5518 7272 UFDCUF\08\08\05\45\0000200003.jp2
JP24 5351 7133 UFDCUF\08\08\05\45\0000200004.jp2
METS:fileSec
METS:fileGrp USE reference
METS:file GROUPID G1 imagejpeg CHECKSUM 91825474fc7aed81b6680bb24d711bfa CHECKSUMTYPE MD5 SIZE 337613
METS:FLocat LOCTYPE OTHERLOCTYPE SYSTEM xlink:href 00001.jpg
G2 b1d5b9c3fabf01e9ca025ff27b78770b 373540
00002.jpg
G3 de1fadb3de252ee58a3a509bf84ef3ab 342508
00003.jpg
G4 bb0332dc0fdb69631516c5e860d22ebd 335013
00004.jpg
imagejp2 c2211421f7b2df642f378bc90f8c6fa6 4985976
00001.jp2
b0cb02677c2aa9ee1f15ea15cab6dfdd 4837248
00002.jp2
222d512fde139fca39d5edbd1e975b85 5015968
00003.jp2
fbc5fe0f388085e354d4bd0b884256f7 4771190
00004.jp2
METS:structMap STRUCT1 physical
METS:div DMDID ORDER 0 main
PDIV1 Chapter
PAGE1 Page
METS:fptr FILEID
PAGE2
PAGE3
PAGE4 4
METS:behaviorSec VIEWS Options available to the user for viewing this item
METS:behavior VIEW1 STRUCTID Default View
METS:mechanism Viewer zoomable JPEG2000s Procedure xlink:type simple xlink:title JP2_Viewer()
VIEW2 Alternate
JPEGs JPEG_Viewer()
INTERFACES Banners webskins which resource can appear under
INT1 Interface
UFDC UFDC_Interface_Loader
INT2
FDNL FDNL_Interface_Loader


The new South
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00048585/00002
 Material Information
Title: The new South
Uniform Title: New South (Jacksonville, Fla. 1874 Weekly)
Physical Description: v. : ill. (chiefly advertisements) ; 61 cm.
Language: English
Publisher: Adams, Carruth & Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 5, 1875
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval COunty (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1874; ceased in 1875?
General Note: "Wise men accept the inevitable, but strive to shape the future."
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 32 (Jan. 16, 1875).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002042984
oclc - 16156679
notis - AKN0865
lccn - sn 87062262
System ID: UF00048585:00002
 Related Items
Related Items: New South (Jacksonville, Fla. : 1874 : Semiweekly)

Full Text
^


TT-IE


NEW


SOUTFI.


: "WISE MEN ACCEPT THE I\EL'IT.4BLE, BUT STRIVE TO SHAPE THE F'TLRE."
.. . . . .. .. .-_


:iVOL. II.


JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA, WEDNESDAY MORNING, MAY 5, 1875.


.THE :NEVt SOUTH.
PUBLIS-iED EVERY WEDNESDAY AND
SATURDAY.
TERMS OPFS. 5BSCR,'P,r.'C'.:
SRMI-\\'BeKLV, mail ;ubbriber;, so50 per annurn,.
Fise ..r m,:e ...pe.. I.':.' eah and an extra c-py
SWill be sent to every club often rectii.d at .:.ne time.
WEEKLY; mail. subscribers, $2 per annum. Ten
eopiei .'7, eachi, Tseni' c:.p.e-, $i.6o; Fifty cop-
lei, t1.40 each. '
Dl'ER r.'S.'XG RATES:
SEMI-WEEKLY, $i oo per inch, or less, first insertion:
each subsequent Insertion. 50 cents.
WEREKLY, $P.25 per inch or less, first insertion: each
subsequent insertion, 75 cents.
Special Xoe-i-s, :.o. CenL: per line. ..
TERMs. CASH IN ADVANCE.
Address ADAMS, CARRUTH & CO.,
Tacksonville, Florida.


PROFESSIONAL CARDS, ,&c

j N. BETTER, '
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,


Jacksonville, Fla.
OirtcE.-Oppousite Ocean House, cornet of Adams
and Ocean streets. .,-'r.


w M, & ARTHUR A. BIRNEY,
.. ATTORNEYS,
4" STREET, NO 330
WASHIN6TON CITY


MRS. F. M. MURRAY,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Special attention given to
DISEASES OF THE LUNGS.


.OOMS-MIT.CHEL'S NEW BUILDING,
.Bay street, Jacksonville, Fla.
OFFICEc HouRS-9 to ix A. M., 2 to 4 P. m. Rooms
8,9 and to, 3-13 3m.
wI R. ANNO,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Office, in Reed' sBlock, Bay Street,
Yacksonville, Florida.


H. A. PATTISON.
PATTISON& MEEK,


A. R. MEEK.


ATTOR NEYS-AT-LAW.
Office, ReQua's building, la,:k.,:,niille. Fla.


p E, JIOHNSON, M. D.,
"HOMOCEOPATHIC
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
Office, in Mitchell's new building, north side of Blay
street, ,et ter. N., n3n and Market streets, nearly
opposite the P.:..t;t e ig9tt

W e L. COAN,
. JUSTICE OF THE PEACE


AND
-N 0 T P- 1-1-ti [i. -1. C_
OCffi.:e ;n SOLARYE'S I:L':' K ,,
Corner BAY and PINE streets.
Jacksonville, Fla.

A A. KNIGHT,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,


No., 2. H,:,j' BEl.ck, upstairs
3-,25swy


Jacksonville, Fla.


A BUESING,
Re-peiritlv C.il~ tie ai.ti, tlon 1,' he citizens and mer-
chan tot e e FA.L TT I F iU L SOA.\P he manufactures.
It iw &b.- bh.t aiung. BrL,.,: and Toilet Soap ever
laade. Thi. S.:iap n pit up in boxes contain 8o lbs
And 9o bari.
Or.drs iol bL addxerwd to
A. BUE-'ING. ,i -,21,
:5.-

RICHARD McLAUGHLIN,


REAL ESTATE AGENT ...___
yacksvnille, Florida.
All sorts or R.FaLEtate-b.-;..-.t ,nJ :.ildj. Money in-
vested, Taxe pa,.d, TI- ex,.Ti.d.
REsPERS,; BY PeR' iiel:-N. 1-a Vidh,-. A;I Esq.,
tew York Ex.-C.o). A G C-iini lt.:ii'.nt., Pa.;
Cwis H. Redne.r, Ph.,:W.dl[.h, W. Stokes Boyd,
Phladelf.l,i., D, G Ambler. t.Uanker, Jacksonville, Fla.
-IHenry IL u.cker, B i.-. Ma U g-28-ty-pd

N ORTOM & HOOKER,
AEAL ESTATE DEAI ERS, o.n.rOceaea.d Bay
ilreeti, Jack-..nniole. Fi-w.rdJa.
M.oney Ioaned o ReAl Eiae ie,iAty.A. Gelgeal
Life and i-ue in rar.,i'e Ageins and dealers in Pine
Land-i, Phntatiwrs,& e 3pr.girld idlturt, -i.-ilt.
.C o r r e s p o n d e n c e : ,.,l n o te J 3 : ,:.- l


WHGLESALB ORDER- AT rAANNAH Pf ICE-.
H. ROBIZSOY,
WHOLESALE & RETAIL
DRUGGIST,
Hoeg's Block, Bay St.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
'C< P.:lNDING FRE&S RfPTICNS A 'FEi.IALTN.

PRINTING.


THE vEII' SOUTH

JOB AND BOOK PRINTING

S ESTABLISHMENT.



"The propreioas are prepared to execute orders for
,very de-icrlpLion ofA

PLAIN OR ORNAMENTAL PRINTING.

*Such-as-BUSINESS CARDS,
VISITING CARDS,
., WEDDING CARDS.
... ;, .BILL HEADS,
LETTER HEADI ,


POSTERS,,
BRIEFS,


CIRCULARS,


PAMPHLETS, -
BLANKS OiF ALL KINDS.


,COLORED PRINTING AND GILT WORK.


:,. HEAP, NEAT AND PROM PT.


A large proportion of both State
and United States lands lying upon
and near the St. Johns and other
navigable rivers, and along and near
the lines of Railroad, have been se-
lected and occupied, but a small pro-
portion can still be had, though not
of the best quality.
In addition to these lands, there
are large bodies of lands belonging
to the bond-holders of the railroads,


that are accessible and can be had on
very reasonable terms. The change
in the character of labor in the State
and the corresponding change and
restriction of cultivation, has left
large bodies of formerly improved but
-no-w a-aTduo.rd--ax,.di, uf guud quality
at low prices, for less than the cost of


original improvement, say from $2 to
$5 per acre.
These improved but abandoned
"old fields" furnish the best oppor-
tunities for investment, and particu-
larly for colonies, who can imme-
diately avail themselves of their crop
capacities, and rely upon them for
sustenance at once.
Corn is raised very generally in this
State but is not specially adapted to a
climate of such equably high temper-
ature so long continued as to give a
much more lucrative return in other
crops vore suitable to the soil and
climate.
The average corn crop of the whole.
State .does not exceed twelve to fifteen
bushels, but with careful culture would
probably give a.n average of twenty
bushels to, the acre. Still, on alluvial
lands fifty to sixty bushels has been
raised. The average crop of John F.
Rollins, on Fort George: Island, last
year, was thirty-five bushels, some
acres producing fifty-five bushels.
No better country exists within my
knowledge for poultry of all kinds.
The climate is somild that little shel-
ter of any kind is needed, and some
green crop may be grown at every
season -of the year.. Poultry always
46o well with anything like fair care.
Eggs/in this city will average 'through
the year from thirty.-five to.for'ty cents
per dozen, and chickens :well grown
will average fifty cenis at least.
I send you .a copy of the NEW
SoUTH, containing a general report of
.the International Chamber of Com-
merce upbn the character and resour-
ces of the State.-ED. NEW SOUTH.

The Smithsonian Institute has eight
Alaska mn6mmies, 'taken from a cave
on .one of the Aleutian Islands.


Inquiries About Florida Answered.
BOONVILLE, Mo., Feb. 14, 1874.
Sir :-I would like some informa-
tion concerning Florida, and not be-
ipg acquainted with any one in your
State, I take this means of obtaining
the same. Six of my friends and my-
self are desirous of locating in Flor-
ida, but before coming, would like to
know something of its productive
qualities. We would like to know if
there is any land lying along the St.
Johns river belonging to the Govern-
ment that may be homesteaded or
pre-empted, and whether it is good
land ; also whether corn can be raised
there and about what is an average
crop; whether poultry, such as chick-
ens, turkeys, ducks and geese, canh be
raised there and whether they will do
%%ell. I would like to know about
the ave'rige price of eggs and chickens
in your city. Any other information
you may be able to give me will be
thankfully ,received.
If you will have the kindness to
give me the above or any information
concerning your State, upon any of
the above subjects,. I shall be under
many obligations to you.
: Very Respectfully,
WALTER MOORE.
ANSWER.
Florida is of about the size of the
State of Missouri, and contains nearly
6o,ooo square miles, and, as she has
less than 2oo00,000ooo inhabitants, has a
large extent of unoccupied lands.
There are, surveyed and unsurveyed,
about twelve millions of acres of
United States lands scattered through-
out the State. The United States
lands in Florida cannot be bought
outright at any price, but are all re-
served for homestead entry, and in
that way only can be had.
There are also, within the State,
some five millions of acres or more of
State lands, also widely scattered in
every part of the State. The State
lands can be purchased in any desired
quantity now, at from $i to $2.50 per
acre, the price of the State land proper
varying and diminishing with. the
increasing amount purchased. Many
of both the United States and State
lands are of a fair quality, averaging
well with the.general character of the


-t- is- trtewe-haave-ir r-some-locIa-tons a
poor soil to contend with but the


Rivers, woods and swamps, abound in
an abundance of material for fertiliz-
ing, consisting of muck, leaves, shell,
fish, &c. Although the culture of
the vine is yet in its infancy, we may
congratulate ourselves that the time
is not far distant when thousands of
acres will be devoted to its culture, and
the grape will form an inportunt arti-
cle of commerce. Not only is it one
of the most delicious and easily-
raised fruits, but it also gives quick
returns; and in conjunction with
orange culture, planted in rows inter-
mediate between the orange trees,
would form an important auxiliary,
and give speedy returns while the
orange trees were arriving at maturity,
and the advantages Florida possesses
over all other States, in point of early
ripening, places us beyond competi-
tion. While the Northern grape-
grower is content with three to ten
cents per pound, we can safely expect
to realize from twenty to forty. -
The increasing interest manifested
in its cir ltpye induces a corresponding
desire fox information with regard to
details of the various operations con-
nected with it. It is not my purpose
in this paper to give an exhaustive or
lengthy account of the operations
necessary for the formation of a vine-
yard, but a few general directions,
which may be a guide to the planter
or amateur grape-grower.
In selecting a.situation for a -vine-
yard the main point should be to avoid
0s far as possible low situations. If
,the roots be exposed to stagnant water
the vines are liable to becomediseased
and the grapes .rot. All of the higher
lands, both hammock aud pine,.are
suitable. New hammock lands are to
be preferred to either pine ox those
that have been in cultivation. After
having selected a proper location for
a vineyard,'the next step will be the
preparation of the soil for the' recep-
tion of the young vines. In all sandy
soils there is usually a want of organic
materials, and that want-should be
supplied by applying a o. most of
leaves, muck, rushes and marsh-grass,
or stable manure. "-If the soil is not
naturally good, or has been cropped


Grape Culture in Florida.
In the earnes, attention now being
specially attracted to the growing of
oranges, as a crop for which our State
has very special adaptation, there is
more than a little danger that the be-
lief will prevail that this is the only
crop which can be cultivated with
any promise of success. There is in
fact no foundation for such belief, but
it results naturally enough from the
undue prominence given to one or
two specialties.
As a matter of fact, the adaptation
of our State to the growth of several
other important crops, is as notable
as its orange'capacity, and we think
it a good plan to keep this fact before
the public as an evidence that, with
all our enthusiasm about oranges, we
are not hobby-ridden in that direc-
tion.
In order to this end we shall publish
such matter relating to other crops as
is derived from that most authentic
of all possible sources, the practical
experience of those who have actually
raised them and can speak authenti-
cally of what they personally know.
With this view we publish again
what was said by Mr. A. I. Bidwell,
one of our most judicious and sucess-
ful cultivators, in regard to grape cul-
ture, at the meeting of the State Fruit
Growers' Association, held at Palatka
in November last a; follows :
ON GRAPE CULTURE.
Gentlemen of the Convention: Every
one who has read or studied any of
the numerous works on vine-culture
is aware that the grape has been cul-
tivated and esteemed as one of the
choicest of fruits from the earliest
ages. In America, from its very first
settlement, the cultivation of the
grape attracted the attention of the
colonists. In Flortda, previous to
i86o, several vineyards had been es-
tablished on the St. Johns river, but
during the war they were neglected or
abandoned, and up to 1866 their cul-
tivation had not been resumed, with
the exception of a few vines of Scup-
pernong and Augustine grapes, which
grew mostly untrimmed and uncared
for. Grapgeculture has received but
little attention.
When I came to the State in the
fall of 1867 and planted out a small
vineyard, it was with some misgivings
that the results would prove a failure.
Although the abundance of wild vines
growing in the hammocks was proof
conclusive that the vines at least would
grow luxuriantly ; but from the fact
that they would ripen in the rainy
season, I had fears that they. would
mildew and rot, but now, after an ex-
perience of seven years, I can say that
my endeavors have been successful ;
and the abundance of grapes in the
markets of Jacksonville the past sea-
son is also abundant proof that others
have been equally sof and what is
more surprising, I find an entire ab-
sence of mildew on either leaf or fruits
and with the exception of a few varie-
ties, a remarkable freedom from rot.


yard, -the. next important step is train. p
ng. The first season-only one cane if
should be allowed to grow-all of the t
other shoots should be rubbed off. n
rhe after culture the first season con-
ists in keeping the ground free from ir
reeds and the vines tied to the stakes, a
n December following, .the cane that s,
was allowed to grow the: past season t
should be 'cut back to one foot, and s
wo canes allowed to grow tbe follow- ui
ng season-all other shoots being o
ubbed off;. ajso any bunches of fruit fr
should they mriake th'pir appearance, t
The after treatment for the second a
eason being the same as in the prt- t'
'ious year.' You can now decidehow n


I


o driving) that the timber will shrink ri
o0 more. v.
Many kinds of farming implements, a
n the manufacture of which white oak b
nd -ash are employed, render very un- C
atisfactory service, simply because is
he seasoned timber was not allowed to V
shrink before the tenons were driven ti
ato the tportices. In like manner, p
Dak chaairs'and other oak furniture will tl
frequently shrink to such an extent a:
hat the pummels, rungs, dowel pins g
nd banisters will all work loose, if E
he precaution we have described is ai
ot observed.-Am. Builder. h


'Sumter dCounty.'.


for some considerable time, a compost
of the above named materials should
be spread upon the land and plowed
in. On new hammock lands it is not
necessary for the first year or two. If
the soil is/not dry it should be made
so by drainage, but it is better to
avoid all)such locations.
JThe distance apart at which vines
should be; planted depends much' on
the varieties and circumstances. -As
a general rule I should prefer to set
them eight feet apart in the, rows,
running north and south, and the rows
ten feet apfir. This distance gives
plenty of room to cultivate, and is
sufficiently far apart to allow room to
piss through witli mule arn'cart for
the u[ipose of fertilizing the land,
&c.
In regard to choice of varieties
much depends, although a'large pro.
portion of Northern varieties succeed
well here. After testing some forty
varieties in the past seven years on my
grounds, I would recommvnd Hart-
ford, Delaware, Creveling, Ives'
Seedling, Concord, Rogers' 4, 15, 19,
and Telegraph for early, and Salem
and Rogers' No. i for late. Of the
above Hartford is the earliest. Bunch
large, compact; berries large, black:
vines vigorous, productive, and
healthy ; ripe June 16 the past season.
SDelaware-Bunch small to medium;
berries rose-color ; flesh juicy, very
sweet; fruit of best quality for both
table and wine; healthy ; ripe June 25.
Creveling-Bunch loose; berries
medium, black, sweet and juicy;
quality good ; ripe June 25.
Ives' Seedling-Bunch medium to
large ; berries medium, black ; vines
vigorous and healthy; a good wine
grape ; ripe June 25.
Concord-Bunch large ; berries
black; good bearer; but ripens-some-
what unevenly; ripe July i.
Rogers' No. 4 (Wilder)-Bunch
lage; berries large ; black, first qual-
ity ; good grower ; ripe .
Rogers' No. 15 (Agawam)-Bunch
large ; berries large; red or amber;
strong grower ; ripe July i.
Rogers' No. 19 (Merrimac)-Bunch
large; berries very large; black;
vigorous grower; first quality; ripe
July .
Telegaaph-Bunch medium ; com-
pact, black, very vigorous ; early and
productive ; ripe June 25.
Salem-Bunch large ; berries large;
nearly round ; red ; firstnt nalit.rjipe

Rogers' No. i (Gcethe)-Bunch
usually large; berries large, oval ;
color green, tinged with red ; vigor-
ous ; best quality ; ripe July 8.
The season for planting in this
climate is from November 15 to
March i, as the vine, although inac-
tive for the formation of new wood
and leaves in the winter months, is
never so. as to new roots. For that
reason a vine planted'previous to Janu-
ary i will become established before
the ensuing spring, and make a much
more vigorous growth than one plant-a
ed later in the season. It is also bet-
ter able to withstand the dry weather:
that we are sure to have in April and
May.
Before planting, cut back all of the
longer roots to at leasteighteen inches,
and the stem to about eight inches.
Dig there holes at thile required dis-
tances, which should be three feet in
diameter; and from six to eight inches
deep, according to the size of the
vines. Put a few shovelfuls of the r
compost previously mentioned in the t
hole, and'incorporate it well with the
subsoil. Spread the toots o'it care-
fully, and place the vines at such a b
lepth that the crown of the roots will h
be three inches below the surface- -
the ends of the roots should be a few s
nches lower. Use the surface soil to ,
ill up. A few handfuls ofbone flour,
or some thoroughly decomposed
manure, will not come amiss if mixed r
vith the soil in filling up, and will ,
give the vines a vigorous start in the i
spring. When planting vines the first v
ime in Florida, my instructions from c
he nurseryman were to plant so that v
he crown of the root would be eight 1-
nches below the surface of the
around; but from a press of other c
york I was somewhat neglectful of his s
instructions, and planted a portion e
hallower. The result was, that those a
)lanted shallow made much the best i
growth. And a few years af'er, hav- y
ng occasion to remove some of the g
'ines, I found that those planted deep s
iad thrown out new roots near the y
yrface, and that the old roots were o
n tmuch the same condition as when s
planted out.. a
Before and after planting, a good,. s
tout light-wood stake, seven feet e
ong, should be driven down twelve I
riches from the vine. Having en- t
leavored to give the necessary details v
or laying. the foundation of our vine- n


un,:is very elevated, embracing some et
ery fine pine and hammock lands, th
nd many beautiful lake views and c(
building sites. About a mile from ol
7apt. Phares,.put in the pine.wodds 61ol
s the nursery and grove of Maj. di
Videman, containing about' 500oo0 se
rees three and four years cold. This T
lace is an encouraging exponent of w
he productiveness ofpine land. There yt
re about 7560' trees in the orange cc
roves between Okahumkee. and E
)ouble:run. Crossing the latterwe pi
re upon Corley's island, named in bi
unor of our.distinguished representa- th


you will train your future vines,
.whether to stakes or trellis. The
method that I have adopted is to train
to stakes, both for economy and be-
cause I deem that the best results can
be obtained in that way on our light,
sandy soils. Also, when trained in
that manner, nearly all the fruit is
shaded by the overhanging leaves, and
ripens more evenly than when exposed
to the direct rays of the sun. Should
you decide to train to stakes, cut back
each of the canes grown the previous
season to two or three eyes ; if to tril-
lis, cut each cane to about four feet
in length, and bend down in opposite
di-reciions and tie to the lower bar of
the trellis to form arms. You may
expect this, the third season, a few
pounds of grapes to each vine, but it
is well not to allow them to bear too
much-a judicious thinning out of the
smaller bunches is advisable. It is
better not to overload the vine while
young, as it will gotten seriously in-
jure its future growth Each succeed-
ing season cut back the growth of the
preceding year to two buds, not for-
getting in the meantime, that a judi-
cious application of fertilizers is neces-
sary to maintain a healthy and vigor-
ous growth. .
The reading of this essay was list-
ened to with intense interest and
quietness, and at is conclusion, in res-
ponse to inquiries from the audience,
Mr. Bidwell stated that he plants
melons between grape vines. For the
last five years he has shipped melons
to New York, and last year he netted
forty cents apiece on his melons. He
grows the Augusta stripe melon ex-
clusively. He does not consider the
Northern seed good. .In shipping by
the Savannah line he had always lost
some fruit-from five to twenty-five
per cent. Had to pay the freight in
advance. Thinks that early melons
can be profitably raised on new land.
He plants about the ioth of March.
Considers clean culture best. The
growing of melons alone lihe considers
would be profitable.
These remarks are valuable from
their own fair and reasonable charac-
ter and as coming from one who has
learned here in Florida, what he knows
about this special cultivation, and
w IutCul.uLtLSb in ralsitig a iaigci vdAimLy
of grapes by open air culture than, as
we think, can be grown in any other
character, give more than usual weight
to his opinions. Mr. Bidwell is the
President of the Duval Agricultural I
society.
Shrinking of Seasoned Timber.
The various kinds of oak, and some
other kinds of valuable timber, will
shrink more or less eve;-y time the t
surface is dressed off even a small
fraction of an inch. Wheelwrights, r
accustomed to work in oak, are well i
aware of this fact, and a correct ap-
preciation of it often enables them to
turn out work of a superior character.
even with ordinary materials by first
blocking out the pieces roughly, then .
allowing the timber to season, and af- s
terward working the various parts by c
degrees, as the seasoning process be-
:omes more and more complete. r
White oak spoke timber, for ex- I
ample, may be allowed to remain in 1
rough state for half a score of years, c
under shelter without becoming sea- a
ioned so thoroughly that the timber a
will not shrink after the spokes have v
been dressed out. Carriage wheels c
have often been made of the choicest s
quality of oak timber after every r
;poke had been seasoned for several I
years, and to the great surprise.of the g
vheelwright every spoke would work c
n the joints before the vehicle had a
run three months. The defect in such L
instances could not be attributed to g
inferior timber, nor to perfunctory I
workmanship, but simply to this one t
:ircumstance-that the parts of wheels Y
vere put together before the timber i
iad ceased to shrink. I
To prove that the best quality of 0
iak will shrink, after a spoke is dres-
ed out, let a tenon be made on one s'
nd, and be driven immediately into h
t mortise; after a few day's exposure'
n a warm workshop the spoke may be I
withdrawnn with little difficulty. The ti
ame fact will hold good in the manu- F
acture of wood-w.ork af any kind 0
here oak is employed for.tenons. In e
irder to make joints that will never 0
tart, the piece on which the tenons ti
re, to be made should be dressed P
several times, until the shrinking has b
eased. Then let the tenons be made.
.fter these have shrunk while exposed a
o the drying influence of a warm nt
,orkshop, the spokes or other parts s'
nay be driven into 'their respective li
laces, with the assurance (especially y
F they are dipped in oil paint previous w


rs of the host declared thnt, m l1
hat is asserted on this subject ig in-
.rrct.an to --". -I..l;
correct, and to prove their, statement.
Tffered.to proyi'de"i'dinner, cbih6edf
f the visual numbei of co'rses 'e'ch "
ish t' be cooked by the ladie's'ithem-, >
'lves'without aid from ihe, satvaritsi :
he offer was accepted. The diantei ,- ..;
as provided ,a day or 'two, after, I the o',-
oung ladies acting as-waitresses, i.Th-6
cooking was declared to be-excellent; .:'
ach o( the ,yp.ung la4.djes have been
resented with A ,pair of h.nisoim
bracelets as a mark of appreciation a1
he cupjwyskidisL ,


'---s1~' /


NO. 7.


I I ~C ~L ~llsY~C-~ ~s --__rL~~_~.C~-J;\-I~_ ~__~~_


I II __ _*_


____ ~_______ _~~ _~_ ___ ~_ ~ I___ __ __I


ORANGES, ORANGE GROVES, LAKES, ETC.
LEESBURG, SUMTER C--, Aj-I 1875.
Mr. Editor:-According 'to m'y
plan, though unavoidably delayed ini
its execution, I now present-you a few
facts with regard to the present -con-
dition and future prospects of lake
Harris. It- is immediately South of
la'ke:Griffin, from which it is separated
by a narrow strip of land from' three
fourths of a mile to three miles, broad
and five or six long, anditlough thus
juxtaposited (excuse the word) their
waters are not immediately cbhnected.'
Harris finds its outlet into Eustis,'and
Eustis empties into Griffin, the three
being thus bound together by a; liga.
ment that must always give them a
community of interest.' It is pr.acti-
cable to connect Griffir)n and H.irris by
a canal .three fourths of a mile long .i1
this point-a work which is only a
question of time if the promise 'of this
region is' not broken to' 'he hp11e.
Lake Harris has a water front ofhearl-v
or quite sixty miles, and with 'its
islands and bays its elevated bluffs
and its miles of white sand beach,'
presents a variety and pictureeqnueness
of scenery, I.have not elsewhere seent,
in the State-. :
Being more inaccessible than Lake
Griffin it did not attract inmigrarnits
early, nor has it as yet to the same
extent. Still its fine .sour orange
groves, rich hamnmocks, generous pine
lands, and coMiMniii-li.'g building sites
have not failed "tof the usual effect;
and the rnany'young groves 'clearings
and incipient homes betoken the faith
of those who have linked, their mate-
rial destiny with that of this ''glint-
ing-, -glancing, silvery mere."- :
Let us make a.circuit of the.Lake,
commencing at this point and. going
in a Southeasterly direction, gathering
items as we go. We observe the
groves of Messrs. H1olt, Naylor, John-
soln, McClellan, of tliec Mmtiln., father
& son, of Marshall, Cunninghamii, and
the magnificent unim-proved sour
grove of .the Benlisers-all .within
four miles of this place, and..embrac-
ing ten thousand budded trees. Mr.
Holt has been located only nine
months, still his place is a perfect
model of neatness and taste,- lit -ur-
passed, I'll undertake to say 'in the
later particulars by any in the'State.
Dr. Milam's grove of 8oo trees has -
been budded only two years' this 1
sprin. vet manv' of them are'mrn 'r-red
With .)l.oom5s anl young ruit, a no:t
uncommon thing, in this 'section, i
Capt. Geo. W. Marshall's. splendid (
property of 2000 orange trees, almost s
is many banana plants, and. a care- v
fully selected variety of other tropical t
fruits, is at present the most desirable a
property on the lake. The Captain s
vill have a million of oranges to ship $
n three or four years. Mr. Johnson,
of Cincinnati, has recently purchased g
he Hanson property, a beautiful tract .c
)f 500oo acres, fronting one and a half e
niles on the lake and has conmmrnenced s
improving. Mr. Cunningham sold s
luring the winter, a half interest in d
his grove to Mr. R. E. Lowther, of v
Memphis, for $3500. Mr. C. paid v
$500oo, for the place about four years fi
ago. All of the groves mentioned are a
situated on hammock land of the'beft r
quality. .
Crossing Dead River which con- r
lects, lakes Harris and Eustis, and t
passing to the Southeast side of the e
ake we reach Capt. Hayne's place, n
commandingg an extensive lake view, ,t,
.nd constituting with its surroundings e
.s satisfactory a home as onewou'ld si
vish to see. Six hundred seedling
orange trees in the grove and 'thou-
ands in the nursery, 250 pirine apple
plants, a quantity of cassava (Jatiopha c
'anihot), guinea grass,; a -perennial .i
growth of tomatoes; egg plants, cu- a
umbers, cabbages, turnips, beets &c., P
re some of the items., To this must. n
me added.skillful arrangement and a 0
generall air of thrift and enterprise. c
n going westward in the direction of d
he 'Double Run, we pass several P
'oung groves, some of which are bear- a
ng5 embracing I00o trees. Crossing 0
doublee Run, to the Southwest side '-
f the lake and going in thedirection w
f the Okahumkee run, we pass the n
settlements of Messrs. Joyner, Stack- h
house Hooker,, Spicer, Cottrell &
)uncan, Kendric, the two places of T
laj. James-Drake, those of Dr. Gas- 0
on Drake, of Capts. Phares and Mc- 1c
^ady, Dr. Kent, the Waldo property s,'
f Dr. Drake, and the promising and b:
extensive grove of Mr. Hooks. Many ir
f these places deserve special men- 0i
ion. In natural beauty Maj. Drake's
lace is not equaled, in my judgment,
y any other. sc
Capt. Phares' place, besides being c
n exceedingly handsome and com- n-
handing site, has upon it the 'oldest Y
sweet grove in this region. .Capt. tu
kcEady has a cozy home and -a fine. tl-
oung grove. The country over which w
*e have passed, since leaving Double m


tive in the Legilature, H. A. Cori-lej,"-.
who resides Upon it. ;-
..On tnis large tract of verY fertile
hammock there are several settle-
ments, upon all of which the orange-
and other tropical fruits are growing
-of the orange about one thotlsand
trees. Okahumkee, on Lake Dun-.
ham, which is an arm of Lake Harris,
in an embryo town, and here are '
about one tihousandl orange trees. :-
Leaving Corley's island, and coming
in this direction, we pasi several set-
tlement%, having upon them all about
.500 orange trees, and then we are at
Le,:ehurg again.' Do not infer front
the prominence given the orange that
other Iruitl are neglected. Many
6t'het varieties- of tropical fruits are
receiving attention'.- ,:-- .
Tlhis estimate gies. us very nearly
25,000 orange trees ii the groves inm-
incdi.iilv on Lake H.arris, and. the
work tf'transpklanting and building
still goes on. Not one hundredth par't
ol the available land is yet under cut'-
tiva tio n ...... .... .. ,, ,, _;, ,
SIn: view of the immense freigihts
which: the'near future must develop
on the lakesin this section and in-the
fine country surrounding them, the .
question of quick tranSpnrtatiin is en- '
groossUng atICintion. \W& must have -
it, we will have it. either the Great ,
Southern,';;or a R. R. to the St. J',hns. ;
Our two hundred miles of lake- 'fro-at,':r,-
thousands of acres of-th'e most ele:at- .
ed- and prodtir.e lands'; in South :
Florida, our Tinlaraleleil.Climate'anTd'
comparative fre'edoni froin iiiiec,:i, are ;
advantages not to be eclipe1 by the'.
caprices of the Ockla..alur river, when
the St. Johns can be reached by a'-
road only eighteen miles long which
will, place-us sixty hours nearest market:.
than we.can ever be by the Ok.-la--
waha. In fiveor six \eirs fMere will
not be annually Iess than 50o.ooo,0000ooo00"
oranges alone to ,eW shippedl fromI this
section. These at one cehit 'a piece
will be worth $500,0oo.o06 and oi0e half .'
tbissum wfil gie us first cl.iss' traisu,
pprtation. If you 'and.your readers
are not wearied with thiscorrespond-
ence I have a few items on other lakes
not yet noticed and some ;miscell-',f,
neous data which mtight-be'iler estifng.
-G, ', ,.A, -,",','/ Palatka H, ra '

THE COAL MINERS.-The .strike -of.
;lhe.Pennsylvama miner sis not certain,.;
y justified on the score of insufficient,-
,;m r,e q s tio n fo T tli" rh f l u o r. rv sta ,- -. .
Iient olt ie net earnings of the miners'
n one of the principal mines in
Carbon county .lor November list,' "
shows that they) average $,i6,o6 per'
veek, while some of the most indus"
rious run up much beyond that
amount.- -Thus one man,' with his''
on-, a boy of fourteen Years,; getst'
$177 in twenty-one days, orfover, $50,;"
per week ; and the same man andi boy
got, in October, $323 n :twenty-six .
lays Two others, in Nov.ember,.go .
'ach.$[I2i, in twenty-three-days; and'
till: two others $-8: eaoh in twenty-
ix days. And s6 through the list,
down to earnings which brig :the
hole average of -weekly earnings, as
we have stated, 'to $16'6. Thie
figures for December" are the same ; '
rind with such good" wages ahd-siuch -
egular employment it-'is not to'.be
wondered at that public sympathy is
hot very largely invested in the spehd-':
hrift policy which is now.wastingtlbe-
arniings of these: men. and bringing,
misery :-and wart upon their, friili's-
o promote the _selfish and wicked
nds of the demagogues who pik-e
uch willing tools of ignorant men'.

They have a club-at the national
capital called "Ours.:" This: orga,--.,
tatioa, is-comrposed entirely of lads, -s
nd its exclusive business is the pro-
ounding of conundrums. At a recent
iecting, according to a correspondent
f the Courier-jourtdl, the following
onhundrums took the lead "'When
o the two Houses of Congress ap-'
ear most ludicrous?'1- "When'the
yes-are oin the one side, andthe noes'
oi the p'rher." Next, ":When' ,isva.
'oman; wetter then when she has a>
'.aterfall on her head, a crick in het:
eck, a cataract i.n her eye, drops in,
e.r ears, and springs in her skirts"?"
When she has a notion'in her head;,'
'here was considerable commotion
ver this riddle, some of'the ladies"
'aring 'for'th'e i'itellectu -l ton' cf the'
iety.'. The storm which has' ee'n'
rewing clea-red away; although-'a-n.,
npression :still' remains that-:it was'
nly "so so.'` ** ,.*'- .- ** *:. ,: ,, ,;i;;


KNOWLEDGE OF COOKERV.-At "!
)cial gathering Of gentlemen heldire-
ently at the residence of one xof-the:
umber on Marray Hill (says the.New.-
ork E.xfress), the comieaesatibn
mrned on the -lack' of knowledge .ft
ie. pracital details, of, housetieepig.
which is said to be: displayed Ab-yi tLI
majority of young ladies The!.e.da..vg[it


. ,


C-L^~L^


/


n
S,
h
n
1;1
tja

I
p


I


C










THE NEW SOUTH:


WEEKLY.


JACKSONVILLE,


WEDNESDAY,


MAY


5, 1875-


THE NEW SOUTH.
.S. .ADAMS. )
(iO. R. CARRUTH. ADAMS, CARRUTH & CO.
CGEO. BURNSIDE. J
J. S ADAMS, EDITOR.

TO CORRESPONDENTS AND OTHERS.
Items of Local interest are solicited from all parts ofthe
State. Also, communications on subjects of general
interest, especially educational, social and industrial
copies. Correspondents should make their letters as
brief as the facts and circumstances will permit.
We are not responsible for opinions expressed by our
correspondents. Rejected manuscripts can neither
be returned nor preserved. Anonymous contributions
will not be noticed.

Noble Words Fitly Spoken.


The paternal and manly expressions
of the ex-Union General Bartlett on a
recent notable occasion of common na-
tionalAinterest at the North, are fitly and
as grandly re-echoed back from the
South. Memorial day in honor of the
Confederate dead, was commemorated
by public processions with music, ban-
ners and addresses. One, and the best
received of all the speeches, was by ex-
Confederate General Evans, who among
other things said:
"Let us do ni'ihing to keep alive the
passi,,ns ,.f w:,r. To study its lessons
is prudence; to profit by its teachings is
wisdom -4 but to stir up the old animosi-
ties is madness. The voice of this mon-
ument will not be for war but for peace.
It will say to us: 'The Confederacy has
expired. Its great life went out on the
purple tide of blood that flowed from
the heart, of its sons. We have buried
it-we do not intend to exhume its re-
mains. We were utterly defeated, and
we dinmii-s iur rt.-enilmenits. Sadly we
parted with the di,'.'r ,Iil i:ross of stars
whichwe lllowi .l Ihrr,,ugh many a storm
of shot and shell; but we take with the
true hand of Southern honor the staff
that holds the flag of Stars and stripes.'
I respond with truest feeling to-day to
the fraternal words of General Bartlett,
spoken at the centennial of the first bat-
tle of the ol'l R:.\ oltmion." Aftierward
the Ladies' 3Im'ni,rmial Associattiin deco-
rated with flowers the graves of the
Confederate and the Federal dead in the
Augusta Cemetery.
Such interchanges of manly feeling
are honorable to the speakers and reflect
equal honor' upon the whole people.
The special mislortime of the period, is
the exaggeration in different directions
of ithe factrs by extremists of both parties,
for partisan political purposes alone.
For the other matters the truth lies be-
tween the varimit extremes.
On the one hand., it is not true that the
South enjoys the same freedom of
thought and opinion in matters political
that obtains at the North and West.
Neither, on the other hand is the South
in as uneasy and dangerous a situation
as has been represented. There are
Northern and Western men resident
South. who are every whit as good as
those who havsewnr-on- I-.- .. .
joined in the indiscriminate abuse lav-
ished upon "carpet-baggers."
There are Southern born men here
who are actuated by motives as high
and patriotic as urged their fathers into
the revolution, or led themselves, dazed
by the ignis fatuus of State rights, into
the seething cauldron of secession.
Let the people compel the politicians
to confess these facts, and ceasing to
judge whole classes by the meanest
deeds of their worst elements, to talk
reasonably and sensibly about the solu-
tion of the difficult problems of to-day.
A man of innate meanness was never
enabled yet, by any accident of nativity.
and the derivation of no man should be
allowed to entirely eclipse his confes-
sedly good traits
Carpet-bagism is as respectable at the
South as at the North and West, and
Southern men are no more soured and
embittered than Northern men would
have lceni under the same circumstances.

The Industrial Machine Works.
We have dealt so often and so long
upon "what may be done" in Florida, as
to subject ourselves somewhat to ridi-
cule, and our speculations of the busi-
ness possibiliiit s existing in this region
have been mentioned as too theoretic
and imaginary for practical use.
We have, in good faith, spoken of
cotton manufacturing, the making of
W-.nodeu ware, the manufacture of
leather, soap, sugar, cigars, and of the
drying of fruit, and ship. building, as
easily possible branches of business that
could be pursued equally to the profit of
those particularly engaged and to the
advantage of the community; but had
never looked upon the manufacture of
iron and the building of machinery as
entitled to be ranked among the proba-
bilities of loc.l business. But, making',
a day or two since, a visit to the Indus-
trial Machine Works in Brooklyn, near
this city, and giving them a careful
and critical examination -we own that
we were moat egrei'ahly surprised to find
close at hand, a fundry and machine
shop, that lor cunvenience of location,
perl'feclness of equipmennt, thorough
adaptationn to business', ingenuity and
skill iu arrangement, surprises sanylhing
that we have seen in the Southern coun-
try, or had supposed likely to exist in
ibis line of husiness.
This establishment not yet entirely
completed, though in active operation
as f'aras the machine shops are concerned,
is located in Brooklyn, less than one.
fourth of a mile Irom the Railroad wharf,
on a new and substantial wharf on the
water frout of one of the beautiful lots


known as the ,'Fairbank's lots" just
over the city line, and is the property of
our friend and neighbor Frank R. Pond
and has been constructed by him alter
plans of his own, skillfully adapted to
all the wants or what promises to be-
come a business of great magnitude, and
as we hope of corresponding profit.
The wharf is strong and thoroughly
aBuOmtated, is npArly square and is


about one hundred and twenty-five feet
in face breadth extending from about
eight feet in depth of water back to the
bank which is graded down to meet it. The
machine shop is a heavily built and
strong, but very neat building of about
forty by seventy feet, and has a sigularly
neat and tidy appearance externally. It
is nearly completed and is to be made
fire proof by a metalic roof. As you
enter the machine shop, you find it full,
but not crowded with machinery.
The .motive power for the work of the
shop is furnished by one of Bradford's
"Excelsior Engines" manufactured by
the Watertown Steam Engine Company,
of Watertown, New York, and is in
every respect a model engine. It is of
15-horse power and as a work of art
and mechanical skill well worth ex-
amination, driving all the powerful
machinery of the large shop with no
screeching nor jarring and with scarcely
more noise than is made by an ordinary
sewing machine.
These engines take rank for excel-
lence of work and adaptability to a great
variety of situations, among the best in
the country. Mr. Pond is sole agent
for the sale of these engines in the State.
Without sufficient mechanical know-
ledge to give a detailed description of
all the varied and ingenious machinery
in the shop, we noticed six turning
lathes ot various sizes and different
adaptations, where iron is made to as-
sume as many shapes and with as appa-
rent facility, as does wood in an ordi-
nary carpenter's shop. There are two
boring machines that perform their allot-
ted work as effectually as do the loung-
ers about an editor's office, but differ
from them in this, that they bore to some
useful purpose. There is.also one large,
upright, power drilling machine, a mar-
vel of mechanical skill, and near by is
an iron planer. Aside from these prin-
cipal machines, the shop is abundantly
supplied with all those minor tools,
appliances and contrivances, the con-
veniences of which none but a machines
can well describe. And yet with all
this variety of machinery and crowds of
strange tools, there is an air of neatness
that shows the band of a master in ar-
rangement and supervision.
We were- as much interested as sur-
prised at the amount and character of
the work of this shop, but recently
erected and not yet entirely finished.
Among others we noticed a steam-engine
of 30-horse power, just nearing comple-
tion, intended tor a large steam yacht
to ply upon the river for pleasure travel.
And then, which also is nearly com-
inor i'a a n ,nl2Ine.-.6refcte r a side-
wheel steamer for J. Rockman, of Fort
Meade, thus giving pleasing evidence of
the estimation in which the skill of one
of our Jacksonville mechanics is held
away from home. Another engine of
60-horse power is being constructed for
Mr. Boyd, of Palatka, for milling pur-
poses we suppose.
We noticed a curious looking craft
hauled up by the side of the wharf that
attracted our attention and on examina-
tion disclosed it to be a steam-pile
driver, provided with one of Pond's own
engines so arranged as to propel the
curious looking craft, it being supplied
with side-wheels, or, by a slight change
it can be turned on to the regular work
of pile driving.
In the rear of the machine shop, stands
another quite large new building, in-
tended for a foundry, and is to have a
cupola-furnace in the centre with a crane
that reaches into every corner ot the
building to do the heavy work of the
business. This building is some thirty
by forty-five'feet square and when com-
pleted the shafting for motive power for
the two buildings will extend more than
a hundred feet.
We noticed, among other evidences
of Mr. Pond's handiwork, specimens of
varieties of iron fence, of various prices
front 75 ects to $2.50 per foot, one of
which, a special contrivance of Mr.
Pond, struck us as the most ingenious
and servicable iron fence we have ever
seen.
The present wharf, near the river
edge on which stands the machine shop,
faces on the river for a breadth of one
hundred and fifteen feet and is soon to
be completed by the extension for one
hundred and twenty feet into the river
of addition wharves from each and, so
as to leave an inclosed slip one hundred
and twenty feet in length and fifty feet
in width, with a depth of fourteen feet
at the entrance and capable of receiving
the largest vessels, to lie in perfect
security while receiving their machinery


from the shop at the end of the slip.
We give more space to this matter
on account of the surprise as well as
pleasure afforded us by the short visit
made, and we advise every citizen
who is- capable of receiving pleasure
from the inspection of a good local en-
terprise thoroughly well carried out,
to go and take a look for himself and he
will find it pleasant to leave with a feeling
of gratification that one of our own fellow-
citizens has so well inaugurated an enter-
prise in the successful conduct of which
every one of us may teel a just pride.
Mr. Pond is one of our quiet, intelli.
gent and respected neighbors-who with
little talk has accomplished much, not
only for the promotion, as we hope of
his own private interest, but also for the
general encouragement of manufactu.
ring and the mechanic arts.
We sincerely wish for him the success
which his skill and persistence deserve
and commend him to those abroad who
do not know him, as a first-tlass work-
man And an upright iau,


International Chamber of Commerce.
The members of the Jacksonville
Branch, are informed that "The natural
facilities of transportation to, through
and from Florida" has been selected
as the topic for thought and discussion
at the next meeting to be held on the
last business day in May. By request of
HON. J. J. FINLEY, President.

Cool Weather North.
Private correspondence corroborates
the reports of the press of unusually
severe weather at the North, and un-
doubtedly the fruit prospects through-
out the North and West are precarious.
An Illinois correspondent writes from
'Urbana, closing as follows:
You Florida people will, perhaps.
smille when you hear murcury was 12
below the freezing point, last Saturday,
and several squalls of snow fell in this
semi-arctic region. I think we shall
commence importing Esquimaux next
year if the climate don't change.

Mr. Alden's Pamphlet.
Alden, of New Smyrna, has got up
an extensive correspondence about Flor-
ida, so-large as to make the effort to
keep it up by letter impossible, and is
soon to publish a pamphlet for the in-
formation of outsiders who will be
purchasing supplies here for their col-
onies next fall.
The major requests us to remind all
who wish to advertise in his book, that
it will be necessary to hand in their
advertisement very soon to J. S. Driggs,
of this city, as the demand for the book
is urgent.__

A Florida Invention.
Taking for granted that what redounds
to the credit of any citizen of our State,
and elevates the character of our home
mechanics for ingenuity, skill and in-
ventive capacity, will be interesting to
all our readers; we are glad to call at-
tion to an important improvement in
picket making machines, invented and
patented through the American Patent
Agency, by Isaac Levy, of Ellaville in
this State.
The object of the machine is to dress
and shape the heads of pickets or palings
and the new points consist in the appli-
ances for supporting and clamping
pickets of different lengths while being
shaped by revolving cutters. The
Scientific American making very favor-
able mention of the invention, among
other things says:
"The device can easily be attended
by a single man, and it is claimed, can
cut 5,000 pickets per day. From the
adjustability of its various parts, it is
capable of executing a large variety of
work, leaving the same in condition fit
ble for the purpose above described, or
for a tenoning machine, by simple
adjustments of the heads and carriages;
and by suitable changes of the knives,
picket-heads of any desired patterns
may be formed- The machine, we are
informed, is the first which has been
devised for producing the picket-heads
in complete state."
We are glad thus to chronicle the suc-
cess of one of our Florida mechanics and
hope for him -a round profit as the re-
sults of his ingenuity.

Interesting Correspondence.
ELLAVILLE, FLA', April 28, 1875.
EDITOR DAILY ADVERTISER : Having
changed base to Ellatville for a few days,
I will give the readers of the Advertiser
a brief sketch of this wide-awake little
town. Situated on the southeast banks
of the Suwannee and Withlacoochee
rivers (within a few hundred yards of
their confluence,) with a population
ranging from 500 to 1,000, representing
nearly every race, color and nationality,
though Africa claims the largest repre-
sentation-but none are allowed to re-
main here long unless they go to work
and stick to it. The white population
are composed principally of industrious,
intelligent mechanics and laborers,
drawn hither by the extensive saw mill,
the largest and most complete in the
State. Everything is carried on by ma-
chinery, propelled by a powerful engine
with huge fly-wheels fifty feet in circum-
ference. These mills furnish employ-
ment to the entire village, besides a
large number of hands engaged in cut-
ting and rafting logs for many mills on
both rivers, and others getting logs on
the line of the Jacksonville, Pensacola and
Mobile Railroad to be hauled to the mill
by donkey engines built for the purpose.
Chartered trains leave here daily for
Jacksonville laden with heavy ship-
ments of lumber for Northern and Euro-
pean markets. Drew & Bucki, the pro-
prietors of these mills-one of the most
enterprising firms in the South-have
done more to develop the resources of
Florida than all the commissioners of
emigration that have humbugged the
State since the war. Instead of bring-
ing into the State a set of lazy, worthless
negro idlers to invade hen roosts and
barnyards till election comes on and
then vote into office their inferior col-
leagues, the carpet-bag and scalawag,
to do the efficient stealing, this firm has
introduced a class of workingmen who


earn their bread by the sweat of the brow,
and have brought capital to furnish
them employment as well as others who
are willing to work. 'Ihere is not a
State in the Union that offers greater in-
ducements to the capitalist than does
the Land of Flowers, and monied men
are beginning to open their eyes to the
fact, and profit by it.
We are glad to republish the above
extract from a Florida letter to the Sav-
annah Advertiser, on account of the fav-
orable mention made of one of our most
enterprising firms. But, after having
thus purported to land so highly the
course of the firm, the fling ot the clos-
ing paragraph is quite too cruel.
Drew & Bucki are both carpetbaggers,
and probably have done more to collect
about them and retain a crowd of col-
ored men than any other existing firm.
But they ought not to be stigmatized
for what in reality, they could not help,
as the labor of colored men wa essen-
tial to the success of their enterprise,
LTpright, energetic asud successful, we


the very essential principles of national
union and supremacy, be given, with
its leaders of certainly no more than
common honesty and patriotism, once
more, the opportunity to sacrafice the
common union and the general safety,
to prosecute solely, a sectional interest
and a partial good ?
This is to be the question of the next
campaign, and something more than
mere mouthing phrases and oratorial
flights about "Setrenchment, reform
and state rights, or home rule," will be
required to hoodwink, once more, an
intelligent people. They have had all
of Democracy of the Buchanan stripe,
that they deem essential.

The -Bishop of St. Augustine's Visit to
the Seminoles
Bishop Verot, of the Diocese of St.
Augustine, returned from the Everglades
to Key West on the 24th ult, The ob-
ject of his visit was to ascertain the
most numerously settled localities with
view to the immediate dispatch of a
Catholic missionery, The Indian popu-
lation is variously estimated at between
three and four huadrod.


do not know but they ire entitled, as
outsiders by birth, to mnre, rather than
less courtesy than if fortunately born
and raised in this hospitable State.

No Time for Side Issues or mere
Negations.
The attempt on the part of the Demo-
cratic party, by the ostentatious parade
of simply collateral or unimportant, or
worse than these, of false issues, in-
tended to draw general attention from
the real and vital questions that must
dominate the next Presidential strug-
gle in this country, are not destined to
be eminently successful. The American
people is entirely capable of grasping
the living and intensely important
questions involved, and by the history
of the last fifteen years, they have too
habitually accustomed themselves to
doing their own thinking, to drop that
entirely safe habit with undue haste.
* The difficulty of discerning and prop-
erly defining, any political dogmas or
doctrine that may be characterized as
the peculiar and exclusive possession of
the "Great Jeffersonian Democratic
Party" of to day, is confined entirely to
the party.
In political, as in natural history, a
clear and definite description of an indi-
vidual, in order to be intelligible, re-
quires something positive; mere nega-
tions are not sufficient for a pleasing and
satisfactory comprehension, and will not
suffice to distract nor disturb the popu-
lar understanding,.
It will not satisfy the earnest inquiries
of intelligent men, simply to repeat,
however so many times, the usual
simple negations that constitute the
ordinary stock in trade of Democratic
orators and writers. The parrot-like
cries of "anti-greenback," "anti-cen-
tralization" and "anti-extravagance,"
have from their senseless and insincere
repetition, lost much of their force.
The people of this country are no
mere gudgeons to be taken by any
shining baits or political "bobs" of this
description. They have too distinct a
recollection of another assortment of
antiss," that have each in time, consti-
tuted shining items of the blazonry
upon the Democratic flag, such as "anti-
union," "anti-war," anti-emancipation,"
anti-reconstruction" and "anti-suffrage
to allow themselves once more to be
led astray by such antiss" or antics.
They have a terse, but very intelligible
way of summing up the pretensions of
the Democracy as an "anti-everything-
but-spoils" party, which seems to be
comprehensive and satisfactory.
With the exception of a bitter and
and most intense opposition to the exist-
-t-rig- govei 11 Hif t l,_-Rf'F ,--^^^4,p
universal suffrage, and a devoted adhe-
sion to the most extreme doctrines of
the state-rights schi)ol, nothing positive
and definite can be pointed out as dis-
tinctively democratic doctrines or posi-
tion. Democracy means hard money
in the East, and unlimited paper money
in the West; it goes for peace, kindly
feeling and reconciliation in the North,
and "a white man's party)' "anti home-
rule" in the South. It is of a scriptural
tendency, so tfar as it is "all things to
all men," but is ready to stake its hopes
of success, rather on opposition to every
thing that has been done to save and
strengthen the Union, than upon any
expressed preference for any positive
policy of its own.
Democracy, with all of its fine phrases
and glittering generalities, is rapidly
retracing its steps towards the danger-
ous position it held from 1850 to 1864,
and it is penetrated with shame, at the
recollection of having trotted out the
Democratic wolf, in 1872, dressed up in
the sheep's clothing of the Greely
platform and ornamented with
the turkey plumes of big political liber-
alism. But now that is all done with.
The liberals can serve them no longer,
they have accomplished their purpose
in breeding some degree of confusion
in the ranks of Republicans, and the
"Glorious old straight Democracy" goes
back to its first love of pure State Rights.
To use an expressive Southern phrase,
the Democracy having "no use for
them" any. further, they are left out in
the cold, and will, in the main, drift
back to the Republican party, as nearest
in theory and practice to carrying out
the principles ot human justice and
fraternity that lent to the Greely plat-
form its chief attraction. Baffled, as
well as betrayed, the Liberals can no
longer consort with their treacherous
and two-thced clleagues.
"Shall the Democracy, with its inef-
facable record of bitter opposition to


Vice Presidents have been named in all
the civilized countries of the world. The
object and intent of the association has
been made known by circular from Lon-
don away to the furthest part of Aus-
tralasia and in Ceylon. The objects of
the association are the reform and codi-
fication of the law of nations. Its rela-
tions with the Institute of International
Law, founded at Ghent, shall be such as
were determined by the Conference at
Brussels in October, 1873. A series of
questions has been submitted to cham-
bers of commerce, bankers, bill brokers,
jurists and mercantile houses in different
countries, in order to elicit their opin-
ions as to the desirability of adopting
one uniform system in the laws, usages
and forms as to bills of exchange, and
there is no doubt that Mr. Field and his
associates will be able to accomplish a
great good for humanity by effacing
many of the causes which at present
tend to irritate people and nations against
each other.-.New York Herald,

London, April 28.-GiIIery Piggott,
Puisne Baron of the Court of Exche-
quer, died to.-day,


An Unfortunate City.
Three times, within the last four years,
the city of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, has been
visited by fires of the most destructive
nature, laying waste large areas in the
heart of the place and destroying hun-
dreds of thousands of dollars worth of
property each time. But the conflagra-
tion of the 28th of April is a calamity
which may well stagger the enterprising
and energetic population of that most
active of Western towns, as it is the
fourth time which has seen the business
portion of the place swept clean by fire,
and this last calamity is so overwhelming
as to almost paralyze human effort.
Below we give a short sketch of the fire
taken from Chicago sources:
CHICAGO, April 29.-The latest intel-
ligence received from Oshkosh last night
is as follows: The fire commenced at
the corner of Pine and Marion streets,
and spread eastward and northward
through Hancock,' Pearl, Warren, and
High streets, destroying the depot of the
St. Paul Railroad, and extending to
Main Street, where the principal busi-
ness houses are located, and on the nor-th-
line of the above limits, southeasterly,
across Fifth, Waugoo and Otter Streets
to Ceape street, the South line being the
river, with the exception of a block or
two about the foot of Mail street. Two
lives are known to have been lost. The
thieves were in possession of the city
last night, and special policemen were
detailed to prevent depredations.
The building in which the fire origi-
nated was the saw-mill of Morgan &
Bros., on the north side of the river. It
was as dry as tinder, and filled with
most combustible material. The heat
was so intense that the firemen were un-
able to approach sufficiently near to
render any service. The neighboring
number piles fell an easy prey to the
flames. Millions of feet of seasoned
lumber were immediately enveloped.
A dozen other saw and shingle mills and
lumber piles yielded to the fury of the
flames. The brisk winds fanned the
flames, which were whetted by thesmall
frame houses of the mill employes. Few
of the families saved any of their effects.
The firemen for a time fought bravely
in the face of terrible odds to stay the
progress of the fire, but were driven
back step by step. One after another of
the business buildings on the main street
were licked up by the insatiable flames,
and crumbled into masses of shapeless
ruins from Algomato Ceape street, where
were located all the principal dry goods
stores, banks, hotels and newspaperof-
fices. All of them went down before
the resistless hurricane. The merchants
had time to save but little, for their fa-
cilities for the transportation of goods to
places of safety were limited. A few
succeeded in carrying some of their
most valuable wares away from the
track of the fire, but a great number lost
their all. The Beckwith Honse and
Adams House, two hotels of large capa-
city, finely furnished, with all modern
improvements, were destroyed in almost
the twinkling of an eye. Nothing worth
mentioning was saved. The loss on
_-the -forn-Air--will_k aboutt and
on the latter is $32,000. The newspa--"
per and telegraph offices shared the late
of the surrounding buildings. The
Northwestern office was probably the
most valuable. The Norlhwestern is a
daily paper, and the office was fitted tup
with all the facilities for its publication
and for the execution of job printing.
Nothing was saved. The loss will lie
about $18,000.. The Times, a sprightly
weekly, published by D). W. Fernandez,
had also all the conveniences of a first-
class office. His loss will reach $10,-
000. Three men are reported killed by
falling walls. The names could not be
ascertained in the confusion. Rumors
of further loss of life were also preva-
lent, but were not authenticated up to a
late hour last night. Over two hundred
residences, large and small, were
burned, and over one hundred stores,
hotels, banks, &e., were also burned"
The Opera House, a valuable structure,
costing nearly $100.000, and the finest
in Wisconsin outside of Milwaukee, was
also-destroyed. The loss is variously
estimated, the most moderate estimate
being $750,000, and the highest $2,000,-
001). The city is in the utmost confu-
sion. Hundreds of families are homeless.
Women and children are lying a bout the
streets or roaming around in search of
places for shelter. The heavens were
lit up with the lurid glare of the fire,
which, up to a late hour last night, was
bn'ning fiercely. Gangs of desperadoes
were prowling about, seeking plunder.
They succeeded in creating the greatest
terror, aud the citizens organized for
mutual protection. The police were
powerless to suppress them or to quiet
the fears of outrage. Ths flames began
to yield to the persistent efforts of the
firemen and citizens at 9 o'clock. It is
anticipated that the insurance companies
will withdraw their patronage from
this eity, they having threatened this
step last summer. Arrangements will
be made to organize the newspaper of-
fices in the unburnt district. Tele-
graphic communication was severed at
an early stage of the fire.

The Law of Nations.
The association for the reform and
codification of the law of nations, of
which David Dudley Field, of New
Yo'k, is President, and Count Frederick
Sclopis, of Turin, Vice-President, is
actively engaged in laying a substantial
foundation on which it may prosecute
intelligently and usefully the great work
which its members have taken in hand.


To THE PRESIDENT:
SIR: I hereby resign the office of At-
torney General of the United States, to
take effect on the 15th prox. I cannot
dissolve our official relations without
thanking you for the many acts of
friendship and confidence with -which
you have honored me and expressing
for you personally my very high regard
and esteem. Very respectfully,
GEO. H. WILLIAMS.
EXECUTIVE MANSION,
WASHINGTON, April 28, lg75.
To Hon. GEO. H. WILLIAMS, Attorney
General of the United States:
DEAR SIR.-In accepting your resig-
nation of the office of Attorney General
ot' the United States, to take effect on
the 15th of May, 1875, as tendered by
your letter of the 22d of April, allow me
to express my appreciation of the ability.
zeal and efficiency with which the trust
confided to your charge has been per-
formed. My sincere friendship accom-
panies you in the new field of life you
have chosen, and best wishes for your
success, Very respectfully,
[Signed.] U.S. GhANT. -
Gen. Williams authorizes and requests
the statement that this resignation was


State News
The editor of the Apalachicola Times
pitches into the Rip-VanWinkles of that
seedy village in this wise:
CAN'T SEE IT,-We have not been
able to find more than one man with
enough life to open his mouth in favor
of devising means to induce the immi-
gration of agricultural settlers to this
section. And yet we saw a gardener on
the street one day this week asking fifty
cents for one beet. It is true it weighed
sixteen and a half pounds, but it was
grown on pine land.-Times
OYSTERS.-To such of our citizens who
are fond of these bivalves,-and who is
not-we would advise to call on Andrew
L. Wing, whose advertisement appears
in this column. Where there is so much
idleness, it is refreshing, to see a little
boy with energy enough to advertise his
business;and if the idlers who frequent
Andy's shanty and fill themselves at the
expense of his hard labor, would hand
him a dime semi-occasionally, he wiuld
feel more encouraged to go on with his
work.-Times.
Go for them again, brother Saurman;
you will yet hit one where they are vul-

The rite of Confirmation was confer-
red last Sabbath by Rt. Rev. Bishop
Verot, on a large number of candidates
at the Catholic Church in this city. The
building was crowded to its utmost
capacity, and the Bishop officiated in
his usual happy style.-Key of the Gulf.
The UT. S. steamship Arbutus, belong-
ing the U. S. Light-house establishment,
was sold at auction on Tuesday last by
Watson & Coleman, auctioneers, and
:was knocked down to Mr. Charles Tilt
for the sum of $4,535.-Key West Dis-
pate&.
On Monday morning the Rev. Father
J. L. Hugon arrived by the steamer
Clyde. The Rev. gentltemunr is to aid
the Rev. F. LaRocque in the duties of
ithe sacred ministry. His long residence
in different parts of Florida makes himn
no stranger to our climate aml to the
sympathy of oUr public. We extend to
the Rev. Father a cordial greeting, and
we hope that while regrettinghis rfrmer
home, he may find among us sufficient
to repay the sacrifice in our disire to
render his sQojourn agreeable and happy..
-Key West Dispatch.
It is now an establish fact, that orarges
can be raised in, Jeffersaon county, with
a little attention, of as large size and
delicate flavor as it is poss-ible for the
Indian River country to produce. Mid-
dle Florida is as good a country for the
growth of oranges as the eastern portion
of the State, and the fact will soon be-
come patent to the world.-Montecello-
Constitution.
Mr. Robert Marvin has shipped, the
present season, large quantities of Irish
potatoes to the Savannah and Jackson-
ville markets, and has realized from the
same an average of $5.00 per barrel.-
Montecello Constitution.
The NEW SOUTH boldly asserts that
the papers of Jacksonville have uni-
formly given as much space and effort
to the drawing of attention to the re-
-m 4 "'- .-- atitr ctiop.A i f"
Middle Florida as has been done byv-or
own local press. Bro. Adams, say that
over again and say it very slow, be-
cause we want to know if you really
mean it. But we will say that the news-
papers down there have never evinced
unkind spirit towards this section, and
we have never heard any complaint or
seen any charge in that direction.-Flo-
ridian.
FINE WHEAT.-Through the kindness
of W. Chapman, Esq., we were the re-
cipients of a few stalks of wheat, gi own
on his place, measuring five and a hall
feet with full and perfect heads, show-
ing to what degree of perfection almost
any crop for the sustenance of man or
beast can be produced upon the soil of
our beautiful and fertile land. He has
also growing a most luxuriant plat of
blue grass, which with present indica-
tions will prove a success.-Marianna
Courier.
We believe that it is a settled fact that
Col. H. LL-Hart-has sold outhi-tes i-r-
interest in the Putnam Hotel. Hereaf-
ter the Putnam will be run by one ot the
co-partners, F. H. Orvis, of Manchester
Vt. Mr. Orvis is a cultivated gentle-
man and knows, if anybody knows, how
to keep a first class hotel. The Putnam
is now closed for the summer.-Palatka
Herald.
BURIAL OF JACK PARRISH.-Jack
Parrish, the colored man, kil-led by
Hodge (white), was buried last Sunday
evening. There was quite a turn out of
our citizens, especially the whites, who
throughout the whole affair, evinced
the deepest interest in his behalf'.
Jack had his faults like other men,
but he was regarded truthful and honest,
and these good qualities won him many
stanch friends amongst the leading men
of the place. He was a member of' the
Board of County Commissioners, and
though possessing but little education,
ie was diligent and attentive in the dis-
charge of his duties. His burial expen-
ses were defrayed by Capt. Willard and
other citizens of Cedar Keys.-Cedar
Keys Journal.

General News.
The following is the correspondence
between the President and Attorney
General Williams, relative to the lat-
ter's resignation:
DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE,.
WASHINGTON, April 22, 1875. S


NEW YORK AND

FERNANDINA
STEAMSHIP LINE.


FERNANDINA, FLA., October-, 1874.

NORTH POINT, .e
Capt. SMITH.
LEO,
Capt. DANIELS,
CAN ACCOMMODATE FIFTY FIRST-
CLASS PASSENGERS.
These steamers sail from New York, Pier 2. North
R iver, every Thursday, and from Fernandina Rallroa4
Wharl every
WEDNESDAY.
For freight or passage apply to
HERM. GELPCKE. Agent,
5 Williams st.. New York,
P. McQLJAIDi; Agent,
Polk's Block, Bay St., Jacksonville.
Or W. J. WOODWARD,.
Representing CHATER & KING, Agents,
10.10 sw tf Fernandina, Florida.

M ASON1C.
SOLOMON LODGE, NO. 20.
Regular meetings first and third Wednesdays in
each month.
GEO. W. JONES, W. M.
CHASE. G. ELLIOTT, Secretary.

CARRIAGE SHOP.

GEORGE L LEA,
CARRIAGE MAKER,
COR. WASHINGTON AND ADAMS STREETS,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA,
Will build In first-class style, Carriages, Buggies and
Light Wagons.
Repilring neatly done. Come and. see my work.
Io-aB -31


I I I I- -IIIII


I


entirely uninfluenced by considerations
of political preferment from Oregon.
The sole cause of his resignation wasd S
desire to attend to private business and
to build up a law practice in this' 6ieyr
especially in the United States &ttpreite
Court. .;.
The President to-day deeliiied an in-
vitation to attend the annual banquet of
the New York Chamber of Commercey-.
to be held May 6.
Washington, April, 28.-Judge Ed-
ward S. Pierrepont, of New Yprk, has
accepted the position of Attorney Gen-
eral, and will enter up,,n the discharge
of his duties on May 15th. at with date
th- r,.'ignaiion of Atlurney Geineral
Wili.im- %ill lake effect. ..
The President to-da. appointed Major
Robert McFeely, now on the staff of
Lieutenant General'- Shei idan, to be
Commissary General of Subsistence,
vice Chiras, deceased .-
Memphis, April 27.-The planters are'
complaining greatly oftheunprecedenlt-
ed destruction of mules, horses and
cattle by the Buffalo gnat. It is esti-
mated thatwithin the past ten days one ..
hundred thousand dollars worth of stock
has been killed by them within aradius of
a hundred miles, taking Ihis city as the
center of the circle. -
Sing Sing, April 29.-Thffe Nelsorr,
Empire and Mansion .,ouses wem dTes-
itn'3 ed by fire last night. L6oss, $30,
0 i.'ii

POST-OFFICE NOTICE.
ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE OF MAILS.
ARRIVE. CLOSE.
Northern and Western, daily, 9:o00 A.,S 3:eo P. M.
'Fernandina and Florida Rail-
road, daily..................... /.o A. M. 3:0oo i,
Saint Augustine and Palatka,
daily, (Sundays excepted)... 4:400 S:oo A. U.,
Key West, arrives every Mon-
day.................................. 9:00 A. M.
closes every Thursday...... 3:o00o r. I.,
Enterprise, Mefonville, Sand
Point, arrives Tuesday and
Saturday 430 P,. S-.00A. U,
Fort George, Yellow Bluff and
Mayport arrives. Tuesday
and Friday 4:oo'p. 1W.
leaves Wednesday and Sat- -
urday............................... 9:0oo A. S1
SL. Nicholas.................. ..... 10:00 A. o10:00oo A.
OFFICE HOURS.
The.post-offce wili'Be open daily (Stundays excepted)'
from S A. M to 6:10 P. ht.
The office will be open on Sundays fron3 t's.t:.3
o'clock p. I,
The general and box delirvcries wilftl opec ar all
time during, the tegtla, homs except Whlfn fthe mial *
received are leing distriTted.
mONEV OkElR"- OFFICE. .
T'ie soney ordev office-will be open, froamgoA. A tV
1:30 P.M and fronr' 3 o 4 P. St.
Money orders are isuedar tltifs office payable in anyT
part of thmeUnited States, and also orders payableim
Great Britainl, Switzerland' and Germany.
Telwfolbwmis are the rates of- ommisstonL. ,. .
0* oetas-geta4ot- E 'OeiE R5, 4 .
Over $ao and i -a A--e'.J.g --, t.: Ceil5-
Over ,$o ad not e4ceXtdit $3o-, 15 Cents.-
Otre? $3o0and notre4ce'$40, 20 ee~ts.-;
Ovsr $4o andnot exceedi-agr$so, 25 cent- ,
PItc E3otfnl' CEsaRS.,
Ox orders not exceeding $wo f, edtsg..
Over io aad nor exceeding 2o; 50 cent/ ,,
Over l& and trno e"esdog,$ib, r5 ents.
Over $3o and not exceeding $4, $-.oo. :
Over $40 and not exceeding $o, S I1.
J. S, ADAMS, Postftastef,
Jacksonville, January r, 1875, ;..

STEAMERS.

CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA
:UTF5\M-P-ACKET CO. ... .


CHANGE OF SCHEDULE.
QUICKEST ROUTE TO THE NORTH,
On and after the 19th inst. the steamers on this route
will run as follows:
THE STEAMER DICTATOR,
CAPTAIN LEO VOGEL,
Will, until further notice, leave CHARLESTON
every TUESDAY evening and SAVANNAH evely
WE)DNESDAY afternoon, for FERNANDINA,
JACKSONVILLE AND PALATKA and interme-
diate landings.
RETURNING:
Will leave PALATKA every THURSDO evening
and JACKSONVILLE every FRIDAY morning to
suit the tide, FERNANDINA same day, arriving in
SAVANNAH and CHARLESTON every Sunday.'
THE STEAMER CITY POINT,. .
CAPTAIN J. W. FITZGERALD,
Will leave CHARLESTON every FRIDAY eve.
ning, SAVANNAH every SATURDAY afternoon
for FERNANDINA, JACKSONVILLE, PALAT.
KA and intermediate landings.. .
RETURNING: :
W"I-1-1-: PALATKA every SUNDAY evening,
JACKSONVILLE every MONDAY morning to suit
the tide, FERNANDJINA same day, arriving at
Savannah and Charlesto6ftvery-i-esday-evening.
THROUGH TICKETS AND BILLS OF LAD.
ING GIVEN TO 'EW YORK, PHILA-
DELPHIA, BALTIMIORE.
These Steamers make close connections at Savai-
nah Charleston with the New York steamers6. ..
AGENTS.
RAVENEL & CO. Charleston.
BRAINARD & ROBINSON, Savannah,.
JEFFREYS, BRO. & SON, Fernandina.
EFfREYS & BKO., Jacksonville.
C J. ADAMS, Palatka.
C..H. BOHN, St. Augustine.


__


j


I











THE NEW SOUTH: WEEKLY. JACKSONVILLE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 5, 1875.


CITY NEWS.

-Herbert Reed, brother of ex-Gov.

Harrison Reed, of this State, died at his
home Arena, Wis., on the 25th ult. The
deceased was well known in Jackson-
ville and universally respected.

Nassau County Fair.
This fair will be held on the 12th and
13th instants at Fernandina. the railway
and, steamship companies issuingt tickets
at half fare.

News Stand and Library.

The newspaper business and the Cir-
culating Library will be continued in
the store of C. L. Mather & Co., as here-
tofore, during the summer, No change
of location to be made.

Religious-A Correction.
We have been requested to correct
the term worship as applied by a local
newspaper to the May devotions in the
Catholic Churla in honor of the Blessed
Virgin. Catholics worship no one bUM
God.

Early Vegetables for Northern Markets.
The Dictator hence for Savannah and
Charleston on the 30th, besides one hun-
dred saloon passengers, had several
tons of early vegetables for the Northern
markets, consisting of beans, cabbages,
sweet and Irish potatoes, cucumbers
and green peas.

Musical Instruction.
Mr. Philip Milford, the well known
solo clarionetist has been engaged for
the season' by Smith, Norton & Co.,
music dealers. Bay street, for the pur-
pose of forming a musical class for in-
struction on the piano, organ, flute and
all brass and string instruments. Though
Mr. Milford is quite a young man, he is
a thoroughly competent musician and
well fitted by past training to teach
music in all its branches, having been
for years a pupil of Nichlin the celebrat-
ed English artist's. No better opportu-
nity than this has been offered to local
pupils for instruction under a brilliant
hand.


Personal.
W. E. Cramer, Esq., founder and
editor of the Milwaiukbe. Daily Wicon-I
s=, one of the most successful news-
papers of the North-west, spent a few
days in our city, on his way home from
a tour through Mexico and the Southern
States. He wa; very forcibly impressed
with the live appearance of our little
city and the general appearance of
prosperity of the State.
F. fi. Fildes, Esq., of the Monticello
SConslituon, paid our city a visit last
week. We are indebted to him for a
very pleasant call.
Major Walker and G. T. Raney, of
Tallahassee, have arrived at the Grand
National,

Monthly Weather Repo't.

Daily and monthly means of barome-
ter and thermometer, monthly velocity
:of wind, and amount of rainfall, with
the prevailing direction of wind, &c.,
at Jacksonville,'for the month of April
1875;
Higet barometer, 80.865; lowest
barometer,-'29 598; monthly range of
barometer, 767; highest temperature,
860; lowest temperature, 440; monthly
range of temperature, 420; greatest
daily range of temperature, 31 mean of
asaximam temperatures, 77.2; mean of
ontisimum temperatures. 54.5; mean
daily rang" of ter per:iture. 22.7; tolal
frainfall, or rn-iei- snow, 2.9, inches;
prevniliig windJ, south-west; total num-
ber of milHes traveled, 58.98; maximum
velocity of wind, 24 miles; number of
cloudypagys, other than those on which
rail QI, 8'; number of days on which
rain or snow fell, 4; numher of auroras,
sione; number of solar halos, none;
number of lunar-halos, 4.

ew Book sad Statlvnry Warebhouse.

In connection with the projected pub-
lication of The New Era Advertiser, the
publisher, Mr. W. W. Warner, has also
established a wholesale and retail book
and stationery warehouse, in Mitchell's
block, Bay street. Asia former editor
and proprietor of a No6 th-westeru news
paper,'Mr. Warner brings to his busi-
ness an acquaintance with the cheapest
anid .best markets of the book and sta-
tionery trade-an acquaintance which
peculiarly belongs to veteran proof
readers. BeAides the representative
literature of thetimeboth foreign and
American, the stock comprisesthe usual
: miscellaneous publications and -notably,
works on educational subjects. The
whole are now beirg sold at half the
publishedprice, and as a specimen Mr.
Warner showed us a Colton's General
S School Atlas, sold at seventy-five cents
a copy which is a marvel of chea;pness.
S The stock of stationery .is unusually ex-
tensive and will be sold equally cheap.
As a publishers' empolrium lor the book
and stationery trade with the best of in-
troductions-cheap cash sales, we pre-
dict for the house a very fair share of
the patronage of the State.

A Burglar Shot and Arrested.
About 2 a. m., on Friday morning, Mr.
Davis, who resides at the house of Mr.
J. H. Dove, on Forsythe street between
Hogan and Julia, was aroused from his
slumbers by the presence of an unwel-
come visitor in his bed-room. Mr.
Davis by his belligerent preparations,
giving ample proof of meaning business,
the thief thinking that discretion was
the better part of valor, immediately
beat a hasty retreat followed up by Mr.
Davis unarmed and by Mr. J. H. Dove
with a Smith & Wesson. Of the three


shots fired at the vanishing burglar one
took effect, the ball slightly entering the
back of his neck about two inches to the
right ot the spine. He, however, made
good his escape until arrested by police-
men Pelot on Bay street on Friday under
suspicious circumstances. When taken
into custody he was barefooted, and
failing to give a satisfactory account of
himself, was lodged in the city jail.
Being fully identified, he was committed
by Justice W. L. Coan, in default of
two thousand five hundred dollars bail
to take his trial for attempted burglary
at the next session of the circuit court.
The prisoner's name is Edward Smith,
a native of St. Johns, New Brunswick,
and one of the crew of the schooner A.
K. Bentley which arrived here from New
York on the 25th of April.

Destruction of Messrs. Eppinger & Rus-
sel's Mill by Fire.
The trade of Jacksonville sustained
an almost irrecoverable loss on Sunday
morning. We regret to have to record
the total loss of the mill of Messrs.
Eppinger & Russell,- sit uaat-at-East
Jacksonville-names good for a million
of dollars on every lumber market in
the United States and out of it from
Quebec to Jacksonville-and involving
property to the amount of ninety thou-
sand dollars. From the statement ot
the watchman it appears that the fire
originated in the sheeting over the boil-
ers and that before assistance could be
provided the entire mill was enveloped
in flames at 2 a. m.
The fire companies of the city were on
the ground as soon as possible, but
owing to the great distance and the
nature of the ground over which the
machines had to be drawn, were
not in time to be of any service
at the mill, but we regret to say
that the loss of three millions feet of
prime lumber on the wharves of the
company, betrays the secret by which
so many recent fires in this city have re-
sulted in unfailing destruction. While
the fire companies of this city are as
well organized as any other in the
United States, they have not been sus-
tained by the City Council, which has
pursued a very short-sighted and ruinous
policy which will yetlead to still more
disastrous results, unless altered for the
better. From the reports of Chief Par-
cells, in February 1874, and of Hoey in
1875, to the City Council, particular at-
tention was drawn in both reports to the
utter worthlessness of the hose then and
now in use by the fire department, and
to this inattention must be attributed
the loss on Sunday morning of the entire
lumber on the wharves of the company
estimated at $45,000. We make this
statement only after much reliable in-
formation, leaving to those interested
'its refutation. It was certainly a vexa-
tious sight to see section after section
of the hose give way, and valuable
property left to certain destruction which
might have been saved had proper appli-
ances been provided.
The total loss is estimated to be about
$90,000, about one-fourth of which is
covered by insurance.

Duval County Agricultural Society.
The Society met at 10 a. m. on Satur-
day last. President Bidwell in the chair.
The Secretary read the minutes of the
meeting of the 10th of April which were
adopted.
Mr. Deane moved that the report of
the Finance Committee of last year be
-raerred back to them so that a report
in detailed items be presented to the
Society. He made this motion without
any intentional reflection on the Com-
mittee, but he thought it hardly looked
like business to present a report showing
only gross items of receipts and expen-
diturea.
On motion of Mr. Jameson, a new
Committee composed of Mr. Parker,
Mr, Robinson and Mr. Deane, was ap-
pointed to audit the accounts of last
year
"With a view to effect a permanent
business organization, Mr. Deane moved
that the following Standing Committees
be eriated to whom shall be referred all
subjects pertaining to their respective
departments;
Transportation, Membership,Finance.
Health, Fertilizers and Soil, Horticul-
tural Products, Fruits, Farm Products,
Farm Stock and Poultry, Farming Im-
plements and Seeds.
On motion of Mr. Codrington a Com-
muittee of four was appointed including
the chairman to appoint other Commit-
tees for the several subjects above
named.


Mr. Bidwell suggested Messrs. Dale,
Deane and Codrington. Adopted.
The meeting then adjourned.

In Short.
-On dit that H. L. Hart, of Palatka,
has disposed of the Putnam Hotel.
Price $50,000.
--Negotiations are in progress for the
sale of several tracts along the shell
road for market gardening purposes.
-The plant and machinery for the
Citizens Gas Company's Works on Pine
street, have arrived from New York.
-Daily' average teniperature in Jack-
sonville as recorded at 3:30 p. m., for
the week ending Saturday May 1st, 75.
-The yellow flag at the quarantine
station at Mayport, the mouth of the
river, was hoisted for the first time on
Saturday last.
-The Leo, of the New York and Fer-
nandina Steamship Line, sails for New
York direct to-day immediately after
the arrival of the 4 p. m. train from this
city.


-Apropos of the approaching sum-
mer vacations, the pupils of St. Joseph's
Academy propose to make an excursion
to Black Point on, the 13th inst.
-T. B. Walsh has tWo stores 50 by
21 to let on Bay street between Liberty
and Market, either by the month or
year. The locality is about one of the
best in Jacksonville. For terms apply
to Mr. Walsh on the premises.
-Mr. J. S. Parker, of East Jackson-
ville, showed us last Sunday some small
bonanzas in the shape of Irish potatoes
planted in March, which speak volumes
for the producing capacity of the land
on the shell road.
-We went to a certain hotel yester-
day to note the latest of the distingue
and were met with the information that
the chief window-cleanist. of the estab-
lishment had retired for the season. We
shan't go there again-for some time.
At last Saturday's meeting of the
Duval County Agricultural Society, a
vote of thanks was unanimously passed
to Mayor Jones for his kindness in
tendering the use of the Monosief race
course for the projected State fair.
-The railroad and steamship com-
panies have consented to issue tickets
at half the usual fare, to visitors of the
Nassau County Agricultural and Horti-
cultural Fair to be held at Fernandina
on Wednesday and Thursday next, the
12th and 13th insts.
-Will some of our local physicians
invent some kind of a disinfectant for
that meat market of ours ? The smell of
carbonic acid emanating from it about
noon last Friday was enough to gener-
ate typhoid fever in whole state.
-About the Constitutional Amend-
ment meeting which was to have been
held on Monday night, we have to say
that we went there and found the editor
of a local newspaper, a prominent New
Yorker, and some ten other gentlemen,
but not a ghost of a meeting could we
see. We infer, therefore, that the Con-
stitutional Amendments require no fur-
ther amending.
-From our experience of last Friday,
we can't help thinking that hunting Bp
"locals" in Jacksonville, when a south-
wester introduces us to all the horrors
of a sand storm, is the nearest approach
on this earth to the voyage from Tim-
buctoo to Cairo across the desert of
Zahara as described bv Gerard the fa-
mous lion hunter when he describes a
tornado there as, "Sand under you,
sand over you, sand behind, you sand
before you, sand through you, driving,
pittiless choking, pelting, sand, sand,
sand."

TWENTY-FIVE OLD PIANOS WANTED
in exchange for new ones, at SMITH, NORTON & Co's.
THE DAY OF JUBILEE
Has come to Piano and Organ owners. They can
be tuned and repaired at SMITH,NORTON & Co's, in
"appie.pie order 4-21
GREAT, GREATER, GREATEST.
Bargains in Pianos and Organs, at
4-2i SMITH, NORTON & Co's.
a
A FIDDLE
For sale at SMITH, NORTON & Co's.
EVERYTHING YOU EVER SAW
Or thought of, in the Music Line you can find at
4-21 SMITH, NORTON & Co's.
THE FINEST COLLECTION
Of Sheet Music in the South, at
4-21 SMITH, NORTON & Co's.
NOTICE.
BUCKY will pledge to sell Clothing, Gentlemen's Un-
derwear, Blankets, Overcoats, Cloaks, Talmas, Cover-
lets, Trunks, Valises, Silk and Fur Hats, and myriads
of other articles too numerous to mention at very low
prices. II-i4tf
THE CITY MARSHAL
Called at Smith, Norton & Co's Music Store and re-
quested them to re-nove the large pile of Piano and
Organ boxes in front of thetr store, as they had become
so numerous that they were obstructing the street.
They have removed them to a large lot in rear of their
store and are about to ship a cargo cf them back to the
factories for a new invoice of instruments. You can
buy some of them cheap. 4-21
FURNITURE.
Just receiving from the schooner McDonald, over
Ten Thousand Dollars worth of Furniture, in such va-
riety and styles as will suit the demands of all, at
Northern prices, with freight added Call and exam-
ine, at the old stand, south side of Bay street, between
Pine and Laura streets, Jacksonville.
230 1 C. 0. LIVINGSTON.
SOLON ROBINSON,
Ia his address .delivered at the late meeting of the
Florida Fruit Growers' Association, says : In alt that
makes life desirable, Florida. is not only the leer,
but he superior, of any f /the Slates of The "Great
West." The proceedings of the Fruit Growers' Asso
elation are now being published in the Florida Agri.
culsurist. Copies for sale at the office, Ocean street,
twodoors from Bay. Address
CeiAS. H. WALTON & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
@. Send 1o cents for a specimen copy.
ONLY CALL,
as others have done, and be convinced that Cheaper
Bargains can be obtained, and with greatersatisfaction.
Polite and attentive salesmen to wait upon every one,
great and small, at THE GREAT SOUTHERN BAZAAR.
11-14 tf
BUY BOOTS WITH
A. K. PERCIVAL'S stamp upon them. They are supe-
rior to all others. 2o-3itf


STUPENDOUS SACRIFICES
Daily, hourly and momentarily disposed of at the
1-I4tf GREAT SOUTHERN BAZAAR.

THE PARENTS
Of all well regulated families purchase their groceries of
Rich, Polk's Block, Bay street. 20.21 if


F FIRST NATIONAL BANK


OF FLORIDA.
JACKSONVILLE.
The only National Bank in operation in the State.
Exchange on Savannah and New York sold, and Ex-
change on all Northern points bought,
AT CURRENT RATES.
DIRECTORS AND STOCKHOLDERS:
Foreign, Home.
JOHN CLARK, Esq.,
Hon. F. E. SPINNER, W. A McLeAN, tsq.,
PHILO REMINGTON, Esq., C. A. FAIRCHILD, Esq.,
SAM'L REMINGTON, Esq., DAMON GREENLEAF, Esq.,
W. C. SQuIREs, sq., /W. M. BosTwiCK, Esq.
September 26, 1874. 2-4-Iy


AMERICUS H. & L. CO. NO. .
There will be a regular meeting on Friday May
7=, at 8-o'clock p. m., for the purpose of electing
officer. M.J. SLATTERY, Secretary.
it.


NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.


J.


P. C. EMMONS,


ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW.
Freedman's Bank Building. JacksonTille, Fla.
Mr Emmons having dissolved hii professional rela-
tions with J. P. & M Railroad, will receive miiscellane-
ous business in his profession, 5-5 3m.


THE FLORIDA PHOTOGRAPH
AND

FERROTYPE GALLERY,
ATLANTIC BLOCK, BAY STREET, JACKSONVILLE,
Is the only place in the State where every branch of
the Art is Successfully Conducted. Open for business
from io A. M., until 5 P. M.

A. G. GRANT will attend to the taking of all
Photographs until further notice. Out-door Photo-
graph orders attended to as usual, on due notice being
given. 5 5 tf.
N THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE
UNITED STATES.
FOR THE
NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA
IN ADMIRALTY.
Albert Jones, Thos. Evans, Sam'l James, Archie
Haywood and Adam Brown,
vs.
The Steamer Charleston, her boats, tackle, apparel
and furniture.
THIS IS TO GIVE NOTICE to all persons claim-
ing the above mentioned Steamer Charleston, her boats
tackle, apparel and furniture, or knowing--we having
anything to say why the same should not be condemn-
ed as prayed for in the libel, that they be and appear
before the District Court of the United States for the
Northern District of Florida at the Court RnQm, in
the city of Jacksonville, on Saturday, the roth day of
April, A. D., 1875, if the same shall be a day of juris-
diction, otherwise, on the next day of Iurisdiction
thereafter, then and there, to interpose a claim, and
make allegation in that behalf
SHERMAN CONANT, U. S. Marshal,
5 5 2w. Northern District of Florida.
IN BANKRUPTCY. In the Dis-
trict Court of the United States for the Northern
District of Florida. In the matter of Charles Friden-
berg, Bankrupt.
Notice is hereby given that the abeoe named Charles
Fridenberg, who has been adjudged a Bankrupt upon his
own petition, under an act of CongreSs entitled, "An
Act to establish a uniform system of Bankruptcy
throughout the United States," approved March 2,
1867, has filed in said Court his petition, praying to be
discharged from all his debts and other claims prova-
ble under said Act; and that a hearing be had upon
the same at a-Court of Bankruptcy to beholden before
W. A. McLean, Esq., Register in Bankruptcy, at his
office in the City of Jacksonville, in said District, on
the 19th day of May, A. D. 1875, at io o'clock A. M.,
at which time and place all Creditors who have proved
their debts and other persons in interest, may attend
and show cause why the prayer of saidpetitioner should
not be granted.
Witness Hon. Philip Fraser, Judge of said District
Court; and the seal thereof, at Jaksonville, in
rL. s.] said District, the 4thday of May, A D 1875.
ri t LIoP WALTER,
5-5 2W. Clerk District Court of said District.


Office GREAT SOUTHERN RAILWAY Co.,
(Consolidated.)
71 Broadway, New York.
T HE THIRD ALLOTMENT,
designating for redemIption 2500 of the First
Mortgage Land Grant and Iremium Bond3 of the
Great Southern Railway Co., (-onsolidated,) will take
place at Metropolitan Hall, Ciy of Jacksonville, Flor-
ida, in Saturday. May Ist, ill5 at 20 o'clock, A. M.,
in accordance with the plan of -edemption.
T. W. OSBORN, President.
J. W. .'UHNSON, Treasurer.
; 5 It. W. F. VHEELER, Secretary.


DISTRICT COURT OF THE
UNITED STATES FOR THE NORTH-
EKN DISTRICT OF FLOFIDA. In Bankruptcy.
In the matter of Henry 7an Dohlen, Bankrupt,
Northern District of Florida, is.
This is to give notice, that in the 3oth day of April,
1875, a Warrant of Bankruptcr was issued out of the
District 'ourt ol the United ixates for the Northern
District of Florida, against the estate of Henry Van
Dohlen, of Jacksoiville, in the County of Duval, in
said District, adjudged a Bankript on his own petition.
That the payments ofany debuand the delivery of any
property belonging to sucn Barkruipt, to him, or for
his use, and the transfer ofanyproperty by him, are
forbidden by law; and that a meeting of the Creditors
of said Bankrupt. to prove their debts, and to choose
one or more Assignees of his cttace,--will he held at a
Court of Bankruptcy to be holcen at Jacksonville, in
said District, at the office of tho Register, before W. A.
McLean, Esq., Register in Baqkrnptcy lor said Dis-
trict, on the 28th day of May, ,i. D 1875, at 1o o'clock
A.M. SHERMAN CONANT,
5-5-2W U. S. Ma-,hal for said District.

DISTRICT COURT OF THE
UNITED STATES FOR THE NORTH-
ERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA. In Bankruptcy.
In the matter of Charles L. Mather and Frank E.
Little comprising the firm of .harles L. Mather & Co.,
Bankrupts Northern Distritt of Florida, ss.
This is to give notice, that on the first day of May,
1875, a Warrant of Bankrutcy was issued out of
the District Court of the United States for the
Northern District of Florila, against the estate of
Charles L. Mather and Frank E. Little (firm of Charles
L. Mather & Co.) of Jacksonville, in the County of Du-
val in aid District, adjudged bankrupts on their own
petition; that the payment of any debts and the deliv-
ery of any property belonfiug to such bankrupts, to
them or for their use, and he transfer of any property
by them, are forbidden bylaw; and that a meeting of
the creditors of said bankrupts, to prove their debts,
and to choose one or more Assignees of their estate,
will be held at a Court of Bankruptcy, to be holden at
Jacksonville in said District, at the Register's office be-
fore W. A.. McLean, Esq, Register in Bankruptcy ior
said District, on the 29th day of May, A. D. 1875, at
io o'clock a. mn. SHERMAN CONANT,
5-5 zw. U. S. Marshal for said District.

DISTRICT COURT OF THE
UNITED STATES FOR THE NORTHERN
DISTRICT OF FLORIDA. In Bankruptcy.
In the matter of T. B. Simpkins, Bankrupt, North-
ern District of Florida, ss :
This is to give notice, that on the 22d day of April,
1875, a Warrant of Bankruptcy was issued out of the
District Court of the United States for the Northern
District of Florida, against the estate of T. B. Simp-
kins, of Monticello, in the County of Jefferson, in said
District, adjudged a Bankrupt on his own petition;
that the payment of any debts and the delivery of any
property belonging to such Bankrupt, to him, or tor his
use, and the transfer of any property by him, are for-
bidd'.en by law; and that a meeting of the Creditors of
said Bankrupt, to prove their debts, and to choose one
or more assignees of his estate, will_ be held at at
Court of Bankruptcy, to be holden at Jacksonville. in
said District, at the Register's Office before W. A
McLean, Esq., Register in Bankruptcy for said
District, on the 3oth day of May, A. D. 1875, at 10
o'clock, A.M. SHERMAN, CONANT,
5 5 aw. U. S. Marshal for said District.

DISTRICT COPRT OF THE
UNITED STATES FOR THE NORTH-
ERN DISI'RICT OF FLOIIDA. In Bankruptcy.
In the matter of James :J. Holland, Bankrupt,
Northern District ot Forida.
This Is to give notice that on the ist day of May
1875, a Warrant of Bankruptcy was issued out of the
District Court of the United Mtates for the North rn
District of Florida, agnlust the estate of James J. Hol-
land, of Jacksonville, in the County of Duval, in said
District, adjudged a Bankrupr, on his own petition.
That the payment ofany debts and the delivery of any
property belonging to such Bankrupt, to him or for
his use, and the transfer of any property by him,. are
forbidden by law ; and that a meeting of the Creditors
of said Bankrupt, to prove their debts, and to choose
one or more Assignees of his estate, will be held at a
Court of Bankruptcy, to be holden at Jacksonville, in
said District, at the Register's Office, before W.
A. McLean, Esq., Register in Bankruptcy, for said
District, on the 27th day oflMay, A D. 1875, at 1o
o'clock A. M. SHERMAN CONANT,
5-5 2w. U. S. Marshal for said District.


SN BANKRUPTCY. In the matter
of Charles Fridenburg, Bankrupt
By order of the United States District Court, for the
Northern District of Florida, a second and third gen-
eral meetings of Creditors in the above case, will be
held at the office ofW. A. McLean, Esq., Reg.ster in
Bankruptcy, at Jacksonville. on the s7th and 18th days
of May, 1675, at io o'clock A. M., on said days, for
the purpose named in tha 27th and 28th Sections of the
Bankrupt Act of March a2. 1867.
J.C. GREELEY, Assignee.
Witness Hon. Philip Fraser, Judge of ihe said Dis-
trict Court, and the seal thereof, at Jackson-
[L. S.] vidle in said District, this 4th day of May, A.
D. 1875. PHILIP WALTER,
5-5 aw. Clerk District Court said District.

N BANKRUPTCY. In the Dis-
tiict Coun of the United States for the Northern
District of Florida. In the matter of Thos. W, Hart,
Bankrupt.
Notice Is hereby given that the above named Thos.
W. Hart, who has been adjudged a Bankrupt upon his
own petition under an act of Congress entitled "An
Act to establish t uniform system of Bankruptcy
throughout the the United States," approved March
2d, 1867, has filed in said Court his petition praying to
be discharged from all his debts and other claims prov-
able under said act; and that a hearing be had upon the
same at a Court of Bankruptcy to be holden before W.
A. McLean, Esq., Register in Bankruptcy, at his of-
fice in the City of Jacksonville, in said District, on the
ix9th day of May A. D. 1875, at 1o o'clock a. min. at
which time and place all creditors who have proved
their debts, and other persons in interest, may attend
and show cause why the prayer of said petitioner should
not be granted.
Witness Hon. Philip Fraser, Judge of the said Dis-
S trict Court and the seal their eof at Jacksonville in
[t,*.] this District, this4thday of May A. D. 1875-
[ t D c PHILIP WALTER
5-5-aw Cle&t of District Court o staid District.


FLORIDA SAVINGS BANK

AND REAL ESTATE EXCHANGE.
[Incorporated July 6th, 1874.]


OFFICE IN LOVERIDGE'S BUILDING, OCEAN STREET,1)
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.,


INTEREsT.-Interest at the rate of seven and three-tenths per cent. (or two cents per day on $z00) will be paid
annually, upon all deposits which shall have remained three months or more in the Bank, to be added annually
to the principal of the Depositor.
LOANS.-All moneys received on deposit shall be invested in first' mortgages on real and personal property in
this State of at least double the value, or in other ample collateral securities.
REAL ESTATE.-This corporation will act as trustees or the purchase and sale of real estate or the renting
and management of estatesand property generally.
JAMES H. PAINE, SAM'L SPEARING, JONATHAN C. GREELEY,
President. Vice-President. Treasurer.
*


STATE, COUNTY AND CITY SCRIP SOLD AT CURRENT RATES.

SEMI-ANNUAL STATEME-*iW
OF THE
FLORIDA SAVINGS BANK AND REAL ESTATE EXCHANGE.

Jacksonville, Florida.


Incorporated July 6, 1874.


Capital Stock $20,000.


ASSETS.
Office Furniture and Fixtures ..................... 22500 oo
Cash on hand ............................................. 10.504 30
State, County and City Treasury Warrants, face value $2;4,96.46'-cash value 1,758 07
Real Estate in the city of Jacksonville........ .......... 5,898 15
State, County and City Tax Certificates.................. 1,195 23
Notes and Mortgages, secured by pledge of real estate and personal property of the value of
$31,199.50 .. ..................... ..........13,316 72
Rent, &c, paid in advance ...................... 60 no
Unexpired Insurance Premiums ............... 20 6o
Total................................................ ................................... ........$32,97O 09
LIABILI TIES.
Individual deposits- -.................. ................................ $24,169 74
Capital Stock paid in ..................................... 2,000 00
Undivided Profits ......................... ................................................ 6,ooo 00oo
Profit and Loss account.................... .................. ....................................... 808 35-32,978 09
STATE OF FLORIDA,
Duval County, I
I, James H. P'aine. President of the Florida Savings Bank and Real Estate Eexchange,
do solemnly swear that the foregoing statement is true to the best of my knowledge and belief.
JAMES H;.: PAINE, President.
STATE OE FLORIDA, t
Duval County. -
Sworn and subscribed before me this 23d day of April A. D. 1875. H. JENKINS, Jr.,
Correct. Attest: JONATHAN C. GREELEY, Treasurer. 9-3ott [SEAL] Notary Public.


A. 0. HUSSEY.


JNO. W. HOWELL.


HUSSEY & HOWELL,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN


BOOTS, SHOE

LEATHER & FINDINGS.


S


A complete assortment of New York and Philadelphia fine
Goods always on hand.
Sole agents in Jacksonville for Samuel Dunbar & Co.'s
Misses' and Children's Fine Shoes.
Goods sent by mail or express to all parts of the State.

Bay Street, near Laura, Jacksonville, F/Iv.


RAILROADS.

A G., & W. I. T. CO.'S RAILROAD.

FROM
FERNANDINA TO CEDAR KEYS.

GOING SOUTH.
ARRIVE. LEAVE. ARRIVE. LEAVE.
Fernandina............ a. inm...... 4 45...... a. inm...... 4 45
Callahan ............... 6 25...... 6 30...... 6 25...... 6 30
Baldwin................. 7 40 ......9 oo00...... 7 40...... 9 00
Starke..................20 56...... it o02......o 26..... 20 31
Gainesville............12 5o0. o6...... 56......12 03
Archer......... ....... 2 ......0 2 27...... 0 00...... 05
Bronson................. '3 05 ..... 3 22...... i 33 ...... 39
Cedar Keys.......... 5 53 ...... P...... 3 33 .....P. inm.
GOING NORTH.
ARRIVE. LEAVE. ARRIVE. LEAVE
Cedar Keys........... a. min...... 8 15...... a. inm......o 30
Bronson.................10 43......I0 50......22 25...... 2 31
Archer..................ii 28......It 35......12 58...... 1 30
Gainesville............ 12 54..-. I 14 ...... 57...... 2 04
Starke......... ........ 2 56...... 3 02...... 3 29 ......3 34
Baldwin............... 4 50 ......5 15 ...... 5 00......5 15
Callahan............... 6 35...... 6 42......6 35...... 6 42
Fernandina............ 8 40...... p. m...... 8 40...... p. m.
CONNECTIONS.
At FERNANDINA, with Steamer City Point from
Charleston and Savannah, Mondays at 4 a. min.; steamer
Dictator from Charleston and Savannah, Thursdays at
4 a. inm. With steamer Lizzie Baker, from Savannah,
Brunswick and St. Mary's, Mondays at 6 a. inm ; for
those points on Fridays at 8 a. inm.
At BALDWIN: with J P & M. R. R. from lack-
sonville at 4:07 p. min ; for JacKsonville at 9:02 a inm.
At GAINESVILLE, with tn-weekly stage line for
Tampa; with stage line for Newnansville, Tuesdays
and Fridays.
At CEDAR KEYS, with steamers to and from New
Orleans, every Saturday. Wi;h steamers from Key
West and Tampa. Friday; from these places. Thurs-
days With Steamer Cool, from Tampa, Sundays ; for
Tampa, Mondays. With Steamer Wawenock, frora
Suwannee Fridays; for Suwannee, Tuesdays.
D. E. MAXWELL,
5-13 Superintendent.


Balmorals. Bustles, and Chignons, at BUCKY'S.

ACKSONVILLE, PENSACOLA AND
MOBILE RAILROAD CO.
GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE, 1
TALLAHASSEE, December 19, 1874. j
On and after SUNDAY, DEC. 2o, 1874, Passen-
ger trains on this road will run as follows :
DAY PASSENGER, Daily, Sundays excepted.
A. M. A.M.
Leave Jacksonville... 7.40 Leave Sav.wnnah...... 8.oo00
SBaldwin......... 8.5o Chattahoochee 6.50
Lake City......10.50 Quincy........... 8.30
P.M. Tallahassee....o 30
Live Oak......i2 35 P. M.
Madison........ 2.25 Madison......... 2.25
Tallahassee ... 6.30 Live Oak....... 4.30
Quincy ......... 8.o Lake City...... 6.00oo
Arrive Chattahoochee 9.50 Baldwin.......... 8.1o
Savannah...... 9.15 Arrive Jacksonvile..... 9.x5
Passengers can go through to St. Marks Mondays-
Wednesdays and Fridays, and return Tuesdays, Thurs,
days and Saturdays.
NIGHT EXPRESS, Daily.
P.M. P. M.
Leave Jacksonville... 4.0 Leave Savannah...... 4.00
Baldwin....... 5.5s A. M.
Lake City..... 8.32 Live Oak...... 3.00oo
Arrive Live Oak .... o.oo Lake City. 4.33
A. Baldwin........ 7.45
Savnnaah...... 8.5o|Arrive Jacksonville... 9.10
NOTE.-A Special Train will leave Tallahassee Sat
urdays at 3.40 p. m., arriving at Live Oak 9.35 p. m.,
connecting with Savannah Train. Returnin, leave
Live Oak 3 a. m., arriving at Tallahassee at 8. 50 a. m.
ROBERT WALKER.
Receiver and Gen'l. Supt.
T. C. SPOONER, Master Transportation. 5-2


T S. SWAIM,
PRACTICAL JEWELLER
And W \TCHMAKER, late with J. J. Holland, has
taken a window in WALTER'S LIGAR STORE.
two doors west of the Post-office, where he is prepared
with a good stock of tools and material to do any kind
of work in his line.
Extra Fine Mounting of Florida
Curiosities
a specialty. Fine watches carefully, thoroughly and
promptly repaired.
N. B.-If it's worth doing at all it's worth doing well.
aoo-Isod ai111jo SA
'a;o-S 108100 s,amelA 'B a'XaVIHVVMA PuV
xariraMaf 'vo3Iiov.dv

'NIVMS 'S I


FOR. SALE.
A half interest in one of the most flourishing and pro-
ductive
ORANGE GROVES
In East Florida. For particulars apply at this office
1-232 m


HOTELS AND BOARDING HOUSES.


M MANSION HOUSE.
PORT ROYAL, S. C.,


The NEW CITY, situate on the South Atlantic coast,
and at the terminus of the Port Royal Railroad. The
great desideratum, so long required there is now de-
veloped.
Respectfully the Soperintendent undersigned, lately
of Augusta, Ga., announces that on the 2Sth inst. she
will open the
NEWLY CONSTRUCTED AND NEWLY FUR
NISHED
MANSION.
For private and transient boarders. Confident of her
ability, from past experience, she will zealously
consult the comfort of all who may pati onize, and at
terms the most favorable.
ANNIE BUSSE.
Dated March 15, 1875. 3-24 tf


Talmas and Peedee Jackets at BUCKY'S.


COLUMBIA HOTEL, S. C.
THE COLUMBIA HOTEL, S. C., the first and
finest Hotel in the State, continues to be the resort of
all northern and Southern travelers; has the most spa-
cious rooms and the best table the market affords. In-
vites visitors and invalids sojurning at Florida to stay
over a day or two and visit the's delightful section of
country, situated midway between the extreme North
and South. The proprietor pledges that neither time
nor expense shall be spared to make his guests com-
fortable.
All the modern improvements -Baths, Billiards and
telegraphic communication, are to be found in the
House.
4-20-Im WILLIAM GORMAN, Proprietor.


Fine Cassimere Shirts, stylish aud durable, at Bucky's


RIDDELL HOUSE,


FERNANDINA, FLA.

SAMUEL T. RIDDELL, PROPRIETOR.

.i"Magnificent drive of eighteen miles on the finest
Atlantic Beach.
AO'Refreshing sea breezes.
OPEN SUMMER AND WINTER.
BOARD:
Per day $3.00
Per week.................................from $12 to $15.oo00
Satisfactory arrangements made with families.
Fine livery accommodations, 1-4-tf


Carpetbags and Ladies' Companions at BUCKY'S.


W INTER RESORT.
SPENCER HOUSE, ST. MARYS, GA.
Opposite Fernandina, Fla., now offers First-Class ac-
commodations at
$3 per day-$12 to $18 per week,
With all the comforts and conveniences of a Northern
Home. St. Mary is situated near ,he mouth of the St.
Mary's River. The location and healthfulness of the
place is not surpassed on the Southern coast. STR.
LIZZIE BAKER goes direct to the House. Parties
having through tickets can have them exchanged by
purser of steamer to stop over at St. Marys or any
other point desired. Liberal terms made with parties
desiring to make a permanent stay. Send for circular.
LA TOURETTE HOUSE. Bergen Point, N. J., will
open May Ist, 1875. J. BOWMAN, Proprietor.
za-6 -am


Fine Business Suits at BUCKY'S.


BENNETT HOUSE,


By MRS. BENNETT & MRS. DOBBINS.
This new house is now ready to receive guests. It is
comfortably furnished throughout, and is capable of ac-
commodating 24 guests No pains will be spared to
make the table satisfactory to its patrons.
The schooner

ELIZA BENNETT
Will leave Foster's wharf Jacksonville, for Port Or-
ange once in two weeks, afoding parties pleasant and
safe facilities for reaching that place. Comfortable
Cabin Accommodations. For particulars apply at
DOBBINS' GUN SHOP,
Corner Bay and Hogan streets. Jacksonville, Fla
.-Due notice of the time of arrival and departure of
the schooner will be given in the paper. 1-23 3m


Percale shirts, so nice, at Bucky s.


N NOTICE.
The Steamer Rockaway will discontinue her daily
trips to Tocoi on and after the aoth of April 1875 The
Steamer can be chartered at reasonable rates for Ex-
cursions either by day or moonlight, or contracts can
be made for carrying freight on reasonable terms, by
applying to P. McQUAID, Ageut.
4.17,w. Jacksonville, vFla.


LEGAL.

U UNITED STATES MAIL. .


POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT
Washington. April 14, 1875.
Proposals will be received at the Contract Office of'
this Department un il 3 o'clck p.p m.ofMay 31st, 1875,.
(to be decided by June io,,xS;5, for carrying the mails
of the United'States from Jully x, 17". 1to June 30,
1876, on the, following routes in'the Statie .:, Fl..rida,
and by the schedule of departures and. arr,'aln herein
specified, viz : -
Service 1875 to 1876. .- .
16o31 Fiom Jasper to Ancrum, 4+ miles' andback,.oifiW
a week.
LeaveJsgper Saturday at 8 a m';;
Arrive at Ancrum by 12 m .
Leave Ancrum Saturday.at i p mf;
Arrive at Jasper by 5 p m .. :
Bond required with bid, $2oo.
16040 From Bailey's Mills to Miccosukee, 12 miles and
back, once a week. .
Leave Bailey's Mills Saturday at pm;
Arrive at Miccosukee by 4 p m; I'
L eavee Miccosukee Saturday at:8 a mu;-.
Arrive at Bailey's Mills by ii a m.
SBond required with bid, $5oo.
r6o6o From Freeport to Point Washingtonio 20miles
and back, once a week.
Leave Freeport Saturday at r p m;
Arrive at Point Washington by 4.30 p mn';
Lsave Point Washington Saturday'at 5 p mi;.
Arrive at Freeport by 8.30 p m.
Bond' required with bid,$200. ..' .
z6065 From Saint Marks to Saint .Theresa; (h. o) 35
miles and back, three times a week, from July rst to
November r5,. 187.5, and from May 15 to June 30.
1876.. .
Leave Saint Mark's Tuesday, Thursday, and
Saturday at 7 a m ;
Arrive at Saint 'I lheresa by 6p m; '
Leave at Saint Theresa Monday, Wednesda',-
and Friday atI7am; : '
Arrive at Saint Marks by 6 p'm,.
Bo, d required with bid, $6oo00. :
16071 From Pilatka, Iy Woodland, to twin, 22 miles,
and-back, once a week. : .
Leave Pilatka Saturday at 6 am;. i
Arrive at twin by 12Im; n; .
Leave Iwin Saturday at i p m;. .
Arrive at Pilatka by 7 p m,
Bond required with bid, $30o. -
x6092 From Sanford to Lake ,essnp-,-S miles and!
back, once a week. -
Leave Sanford Satrday at 6 a rq
Arrive-at Lake lessup by 12 m;
Leave Lake Jessup Saturday at z p m;r
Arrive at Sanford by 7 p nm.
Bond required' with bid. .. 30.
i6iog From Pensacola by Townt Pbint (n. o:), to Mlary
Esther, 45 miles and back, once a week.
Leave Pensacola Monday at 6 a; a '
Arri-ve at Mary Esther Tuesday at 9 a mi.
Leave Mary Esther next day by xo a m;.
Arrive at Pensacola next day by 3pim.
Bond requied with bid, $6oo00.
For laws relating';,tothe postal service, forms of pro'
posal, bond and certificate, and for instructions and
conditions to be embraced in the contract, see adver--
tisement of this date in pamphlet form, to be found at
the termini of each route, or b' adde,?ing tihe Second
Assis' ant Postmaster General. -
Bids should be sent in sealed envelopes, superscribed
"Mail proposals, State of ,' "atid-ad-
dressed to the Second Assistant Postmaster General,
Washington, D C. MARSHALL J WELL,
4-21-ow Postmaster General. .


PROPOSALS FOR MILITARY SUP-
PLIES.
OFFICE CHIEF Q. M., DP'T. OF THE SObtrrH,
Louisville, Ky., March 31. 1875.
SEALED PROPOSALS, IN TRIP-
licate, under the usual, conditions, will ibe received
at this office, and also at the offices of the U S. Quar
termasters at the several posts named below, until 1x
o'clock M., on Wednesday, the a2th day of May; 1875, -
at which time and place they will be opened in the
presence of bidders, for the delivery of military supplies
du ing the fis al year, beginning July I, x875, and iend-
ing June 3o0, 1876, as follows :
Wood, Coal, Corn, Oats, Hay, and btraw, at the
following named posts: Louisville, Lebanon; Lancas-
ter, and Frankfort, Ky Nashville. Humboldt, and
Chattanooga, Tenn., Huntsville, Mount Vernon, and
Mobile, Ala., Atlanta and Savannah, Ga., Char'eston,
Columi.ia Yorkville, and Newberry. S. C:, FortJohn-
son, Fort Macon, Marion, and Raleigh, N. C and St.
Augustine, Florida.
Bids for any portion of the supplies will be enter-
tained.
The Government reserves tl .e right to reject any or
all bids.
A preference will be given to articles of domestic pre-
duction.
Blank proposals and printed circulars, showing- the'
estimated quantities required at each post. ,nd giving
full instructions as to the manner of, bidding, and the
terms of contract aud payment, can be obtained by per--
sonal or written application to the Quartermasters at-
the vanous posts, or to this office.
sw4 JAMES A. hKINfChiefQuartermaster.


N OTICE.
U. S. INTERNAL REVENUE SPECIAL TAXES
MAY 1, 1875, TO APRIL 30, 1876.
The Revised Statutes of the United States, Sections'
3232, .237, 3238, ar.d 3239, require every person engaged
in any business, avocation, or employment which ren-
ders him liable to a S.pecial Tax, to procure ,and place
conspicuously in his establishment or place of 'business
a stamp denoting the payment of said special Tax for.
the Special Tax Year beginning May i, r875, before
commencing or con inning business alter April 30, 1875.
The taxes embraced within the provisions of the law
above quoted are the following viz:
Rectifiers .................. .....2.....$200 00
Dealers, retail liquor ......... .25' o00
Dealers, wholesale liquor 10oo 00o
Dealers in malt I quors, wholesale............... 50 oo
Dealers in malt liquors, retail 20 00oo
Dealers in leaf tob',cco 25 o00
Retail dealers in leaf tobacco......................... 500 oo
And on sales of over $i.ooo, fifty cents for
every dollar in excess of i,oo,."
Dealers In manufactured tobacco.................... 5 o
Manufacturers ofstls .............. ................... 50, 00
And for each till manufactured................. ."20ob
And for ,- ch wor-n manufactured......-... ....... 20 o00
Manufacturers o t.bacco............................ o oo00
Manufactur., s i cigars:. :1 0o o00
Peddlers of tobacco, first class (more than.two
horses or other animals) 50. o00
Peodlers of tobacco, second class (two horses or .
other animals) .... 25 00
Peddlers of tobacco, third class (one horse or
other animal)..... ......... ..... ............ 15 oo
Peddlers ot tobacco, fourth.class (on foot or pub-'
lie conveyance) 20- .o 00o
Brewers of less than 5-xo barrels ...................... 59 o00
Brewers of 5,o barrels or more 100 0b
Any person, so liable, who shall fail to comply with
the foregoing requirements will be subject to severe
penalties. -
Persons or firms liable td pay any of the special Taxes
named above must apply toA. A. KNIGHT, Collector
of .Internal FPevenue at Jacksonville, and pay for and
procure the Special-Tax Stamp or Stamps they need,
prior to May 1, 1875, and without further notice.
J. W. DOUGLASS,
Commissioner 9f Internal Revenuue..
Office of Interal Revenue,
Washington, D. C. February i, 1875,
Application may also be made to and stamps pro-
cured of S. C. THOMPSON, Deputy Collector, at
Jacksonville.;. A. A. KNIGHT,-Collector,
Jacksonville, ta., April ist., &75. 4-3 I in


TO CONTRACTORS AND BUILD-
ERS.
Having completed an extensive new mill in connec-
ion with my former one, I am prepared to furnish all
kinds of finishing material, such as Brackets, Balusters,
Piazza Columns, Mouldings, Scroll Saw Work, Lath,
Flooring Planed, Tongued and Grooved and Beaded if
desired. Weather Boards, Beveled or Square Edged,
Dressed or Rough, as desired. Plank of all sizes,
either Dressed or Rough, in any quantity. Door and
Window Casings, Pickets of every and any pattern.
In a word, everything in the lumber line the builder
wants. My Machines are all new and of the latest
patterns and are used by skilled workmen. Call and
satisfy yourselves as to price before purchasing else-
where. I guarantee satisfaction in workmanship as
well as quality of material.
2-27 f ALEX. WALLACE.


W ILCOX,


Dealer in
FRUIT AND VEGETABLES,
MAGNOLIA MARKET.
Families supplied at regular market rates.

Also, he still keeps
A STALL IN TIHE OLD MARKET,
For the accommodation of down-town customers..
It will PAY to come and see me.
4.7 sy H. E. WILCOX.


Ladies' underwear, to be obtained at BUCKY'S..


TICKET OFFICE

FLORIDA STEAM PACKET CO.

COR. BAY AND PINE STS.

Tickets sold to all points North by Rail and via
Steamships from Savannah and Charleston. Also, .

RETURN EXCURSION TICKETS

for sale to the NORTH and WEST.


_ L -- I 'I ~s I st ~s ---- I I;





_





PORT ORANGE, FLA.,


~___ __~








THE NEW SOUTH: WEEKLY. JACK$ONVILLE, WEDNESDAY, MAY 5, 1875.


Immortality of the Eye.


Of course, we do not, in this con
riection, use that great word in it:
full, unmeasured,. and incomprehen
sible significance. As such, it is inap
plicable to material objects ; and, leas
of all, to the animal organism, which
is constantly undergoing change. Bu
we speak of the, eye as the feature
which, more than any other, retain;
through life its peculiar characters
tics. It is nearer immortal than anj
otber part of the face.
By it we often recognize friends
from whom we have been separate
many years, and who have change
so much, in all but the eye, that wet
can detect no likeness to their former
selves.
Not long ago, we met an old friend
whom we had not seen for twenty-five
years. We had been boys together,
had attended the same village school,
and were in the same class at the
Medical College. Our friend is now
one of the leading physicians in the
city of Washington. Learning that
he was -in this city, we called to see
him. Thinking of our old schoolmate
and classmate-a lively, jolly, mis-
chievous fellow he was-we felt a chill
of disappointment as we stood in the
presence of a portly, dignified gentle-
man, and pronounced our name.
He greeted us kindly, but it was not
the face or the form that we expected
to see; it, was not the voice that we
had come to hear; there was nothing
in the whole appearance of the man
that was like the student whom we
remembered. Nothing-? Not until
he laughed; and then came thai
same old, genial, merry twinkle ol
the eye, which, in the schoolhouse
and at the,-village gathering,' always
promised fun. That was enough tc
establish the identity of our old
friend.
We often meet in the streets young
men %honi we knew ten or fifteen
years ago as boys. They have changed
from childhood -to manhood. The
boyish face-is- now covered with the
manly beard, cut perhaps into some
of the many fainlaitic i nd incoinimienI
styles of. whiskers. \Ve say the bo)
has'grown entircly'out of our recol-
lection ; we could not recogn ize a
single lineanient of his countenance;
but % hen %we detect that 'something
in the e)e," hliich we can neither
describe nor forget, then we konw
him. -
Whether we take the period of life
reaching from childhood to manhood,
or the tweriy'five or thirty years 0o
nlaturit'y,-before the individual lapses
into the decadence of age, we find
that, in the changes wrought by all
these years, the eye is affected last and
least. In it the sparkle of childhood
mingles with the fire of youth, and
both give peculiar lustre to the power
and "expression" of the eye of thie
men.
It is said that "the eyes are the win-
dows of the soul." Through them
the soul looks out from .its earthly
house,; through them it speaks with-
out the aid of words. Perhaps because
they are so intimately connected with
the soul, and seem to be its favorite
organs, they take from that ever-liv-
ing spirit a little tinge of immortality.
Hall's journal of Health..

Cure for Drunkenness.
There is a curious prescription in
England for the cure of drunkenness,
by which- thousands are said -to have
been assisted in recovering themselves.
The receive came into notoriety
through the efforts'of John Vine Hall,
father of Rev. Newman Hall- and
Capt. Vine Hall, commander of the
Great Eastern Steamship. HIe had
fallen into such habitual druukenness
that his utmost efforts to regain him-
self proved unavailinig, At length he
soughtthe advice of an eminent phy-
sician, who gave him a prescription
which he followed faithfully for sev-
eral months, and at the end of that
time he lost all desire for liquors, al-
though he had for many years been
led captive by a most debasing habit.
The recepe, which he afterwards pub-
lished, and by which so many have
been assisted to reform, is as follows :
"Suphate of iron, 5 grains; mag-
nesia, IO grains; pepperment water,
ji grains-; spirit of nutmeg, t drachmn
-to be taken twice a day."' '
This preparation acts as tonic and
stimulint, and so partly supplies the
place of the accustomed liquor ard
prevents that absolute physical and
moral prostration that follows a sud-
ddn breaking off from the Use -of
stimulating drinks. :. : ...

A remarkable natural teacher in
Pennsylvan-ia is described by the New
York Teacher. 1l his man who was
a shoemaker, had such unusual intelli-
gence and infornlation that the
.children of his village would, gather
around to listen to his talk. Pre-
sently, divers families surprised him


by entreaties to teach -their children,
and upon his refusal returned to the
charge with the request on paper
signed by every man and woman in
the village. He according by began a
school in an old blacksmith's shop,
and soon becanie so interested in his
work that he had no thought of end-
ing it. He became known, though
not through advertisements, pupils
were brought Irom a distance, a good
schoolhouse was built, and since r82o
he has educated t896 scholars frori
abroad. The elements of his success
are stated to be a sincere intere.,t in
the welfare of every student placed
under his charge, his eulhusiasin for
everything of a scientific character,
and his desire and intention that -his
pupils shall really know what is
brought before them. He spares no
.expense for apparatus, drawings, and
every kind of illustration, especially
such as i ill entertain as well as sOW
the seeds of science.


FENEBERG'S LOAN TO THE LORD-A
. poor man with an empty purse came
s one day to Michael Feneberg, the
. godly pastor of Seeg, in Bavaria, and
begged tree crowns, that he might
finish his journey. It was all the
money,.Feneberg had, but as he be-
sought him so earnestly in the name
of Jesus,he gave it. Immediately after,
s he found himself in great outward
need, and seeing no way of relief he
prayed saying, "Lord, I lent Thee
three crowns; Thou has not yet re-
turned them, and Thou knowest how
I need them. Lord, I pray Thee give
them back." The same day a messen-
ger brought a money-lettera which
Gossner, his assistant, reached over to
Feneberg, saying, "Here, father, is
* what you expended." The letter
contained two hundred thalers, or
about one hundred and fiftyitollars,
which the poor traveler had begged
from a rich nman for the vicar; and
the childlike old man, in joyful
amazement, cried out, "Ahl, dear
-Lord, one dare ask nothing of Thee,
for straightway Thou makest one feel
so much ashamed-."-Praying and
Working.

When Mr. Chase was charged with
having amassed, while in office, great
wealth, he replied in a letter to a
friend,"I should be glad if I could say
that I was worth one hundred thousand
dollars." This was after handling
millions upon millions of public
money. And now General Spinner
retires from the post of United States
Treasurer, which he has held so long,
declining a testimonial, with this
modest statement.: I have but three
children to provide for. Having
always believed that $10,000ooo left to a
child is as well as, if not better than,
-a much larger sum, I have therefore
never desired 'to be rich, or to leave
each of my heirs more than that
amount of money."
!The history of the United -States
Treasury is full of just such examples.
Hamilton, who restored public credit,
was sometimes pinched to raise $50.
Albert Gallatin left office with-a stain-
less name. And so we have had a
succession of Secretaries of the Treas-
ury who have served the country with
the rarest disinterestedness. Contrast
this with' Colbert, Louis XIV's great
Minister, who retired with a fortune
of ten million francs. We are not a
nation 'of rogues, though appear-
ances are sometimes much against us.

Prominent among the decorations
contributed at Concord was the
old and weather-beaten American
flag, showing only twelve stars, and
bearing the inscription : "The flag of
the good ship Bon Homme Richard."
This was presented in person by Miss
Sarah Stafford, of Trenton, who is
the only surviving relative of Lieut.
Stafford, who served under Paul Jones
on the Bon Homme Richard. Miss
Stafford is now past seventy years of
age, and still as vivacious and active as
a maid of eighteen summers. Her patri-
otism is of that honest and intense type
which always infuses itself into those
with whom she comes in contact,
and her great desire is to be permitted
to enjoy in full health the pension she
now receives from the General Gov-
ernment until after the close of the
Centennial Annivesary of 1876.-
Newark Courier.

ST. PETERAND THE BROOKLYNITE.-
They are telling the story, since Dr.
Talmage's sermon, that a Brooklyn
resident, name not given, appeared
at the gate St. Peter guards, for ad-
mission to Paradise. The saint turn-
ed to the register pages : "Where are
you from?" "Brooklyn." "I don't
think we can admit you; rules very
strict. In fact, can't do it. Think
of that scandal." It is said that the
Brooklyn man looked steadily at
Peter and crowed three times. His
saintship colored, fumbled his key a
minute, then said, "Well, you can go
in; but don't you do that again to
me." -Brooklyn Union.

A SWEET ANSWER.-A little boy
and girl, each five years .old, were
playing by the roadside. The boy
became angry at something and struck
his playmate a sharp. blow .on the
cheek, whereupon she sat down and
began to cry. The boy stood looking
on :a minute, and then. said: "I
didn't mean to hurt you, Katie ; I'm
sorry."
The little girl's face brightened in-
stantly, the sobs were hushed, and
she said: "Well, if your are sorry, it
don't hurt me."

SMr. Willard Carpenter, of Evans-
ville, Ind., who has donated $1,000ooo,-
ooo lora free college for poor students,
is;seventy-two years of age, and is
said to resemble in appearance Horace
Greeley. He was born in Vermont,
and began life as a. pedler, traveling


over the New England States and New
York with a pack on his shoulder.


ROBERSON & MASON
Have opened a first-class


SHAVING SALOON,
corner of Bay and Pine streets, where all thae modern
appliances used by the best saloons in thencountry can
be found. They also furnish at all .hours

HOT AND COLD BATHS.
Tickets entitling the learer to. eight shaves, for sale
for $.oo; eight shaves, aitr cutting and shampooing
f ,. 9.n, "


VLUIS EMILE MOURGEON,
L : .. . _-
From Paiii rar., Fr.e, larc Frr-man of the itaien
W Land lE'v-ij,'ei; :.t!,i -lh mer, i.
NEW DYEING AND SCOURING ESTABLISH-
MENT.
Ladies' and Gentlemen's Wearing Apparel,
Lace Curtains,
Lace Shawls,
and othimr fine fabrics most carefully cleaned and dyed.
F'KSVY I R- STREET, between Newnan and Mar.
Let Ltr.ets. -6-tf .


Per .Day at home. Tnerms free.
to 1 Address G, STINSONr& Co.,
S-.V "Portland,.Uaine.


GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS.


OHN CLARK,

FORWARDING


AND
COMMISSION MERCHANT
AND DEALER IN


ROCERIEo,


PROVISIONS,


HAY, SEGARS, &c.
Sole Agents for Florida for
Averill's Chemical Paint, and


FURNITURE


FLURNITURE WAREROOMS! H.F. COLCORD,


DAVIS & DREW.


MISCELLANEOUS.


Successor to Hide and Skin business of
J. H. CROWELL,
Corner Bay and Ocean streets.


J. H. NORTON,
Attorney al Law and Notary Public.


S. H. KOOKER.


NORTON: & KOOKER.
DEALERS IN

REAL' ESTATE
OF ALL KINDS.


-ignest cash price paid for Hides, Skins, F'urs,
wax &c. 7-i-,swiy 'GENERAL INSURANCE AGENTS, representing the- following corn-


GRAIN. PARLOR SUITS.- CHAMBER SUITS.


MOSQUITO BARS & FIXTURES


White's Patent Money Drawer


Agent for
STrAMER LIZZIE BAKER,
VOLUSIA.
AND
Van Brunt & Bro's. Line Sailing Packets,
FROM NEW YORK.
tw36-ioe Bay Street, JacksonvilleFlorida.


W ILLSON & WHITLOCK.
Successors to Thos. A. Willson,
DEALERS IN

GRAIN, FLOUR, AND FEED,
Manufacturers of

CORN MEAL, HOMINY, CRACKED
CORN, RYE MEAL, GRAHAM
FLOUR, CRACKED WHEAT,&c.

SCROLL SAWING & WOOD TURNING
TO ORDER.
Wood Sawed, Split, and Delivered

by Cord or Load.
Ross' Block, Bay Street, opposite our Mill and Whar


T. WILSON.


FRANK W. GOLDEN.


[TLOCK


FRANK M. ADAMS.


OLDEN & ADAMS,


DEALERS I


Parlor
Suits.
Parlor
Suits.
Parlor
Suits.
Parlor
Suits.


DAVIS & DREW,
corner of
BAY AND LAURA STREETS,
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Chambe
Suits.
Chambe
Suits.
Chamber
Suits.
Chamb
Suits


EXAMINE OUR LARGE STOCK.



o101 ,** ** f
101 *, 101
101 101
101 Bayst 101
101 JAcK SOVILLE, 101
01 FiA.
S ** 101
11, ** 101
01101
101 *,** 101
101 101
101 101
010101010 D &DO0101010101
101oo000000oooo000000oooooo00o01
101oo DAVIS & DREW, oolOl
o0lOIoooooooooooooooooo 0ol
101 loloooo, FURNITURE 00oooo101
101 l01 ooo ooooooooo00000oo101
1 1 lOloio WAREHOUSE ooolo0
101 101Oooooooocooooooooo 101
101 1I0101010 D & DO101010101O
101 101 101 101
101 101 101 101
101 101 101 101
101 101 101 101
101 101 101 101
..... 10I01 ....101 101
101 101
101 101
101 .101
101 101
.,,,101 ....101


FINE GROCERIES,


FRENCH CONFECTIONER Y,

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC FRUIT, ALE,
WINE, LIQUOR, CIGARS,
TOBACCO, ETC.,
Have in store and to arrive
FIRST-CLASS GOODS,
Which, by making TERMS GASH, they offer at the
LOWEST PRICES.

Special Attention of the Ladies called to our
MAILLARD'S SUPERIOR CANDY,
And to our assortment of
PRESERVES, JELLIES, ETC.

PIC-NIC PARTIES will find it advantageous to
call, as we shall make the replenishing of LUNCH EON
BASKETS a specialty.
.-Purchases delivered gratis.
GOLDEN & ADAMS,
Ross' Marble Front Building, near Grand Na-
i-144 tf tional Hotel, Jacksonville, Florida.


Very stylish Ladies' Hats at BUCKY'S.


MISCELLANEOUS.


K


EARNEY'S

FLUID EXTRACT


B UCHU !
The only known remedy for

BRIGHT'S DISEASE,

And a positive remedy for
GOUT, GRAVEL, STRICTURES,
DIABETES, DYSPEPSIA,
NERVOUS DEBILI-
TY, DROPSY,
NON-RETINTION, OR INCONTINENCE OF
URINE, IRRITATION, INFLAMMATION.
OR ULCERATION OF THE

BLADDER AND KIDNEYS

SPERMATORRH(EA,
Leucorrhoea or Whites, Diseases of the Prostratt
Gland, Stone in tha Bladder, Colculus, Gravel, or Brick-
dust Deposit and Mucus or Milky Discharges.


KEARNEY'S

EXTRACT BUCHU
Permanently cures all Disea es of the

BLADDER, KIDNEYS, ANDD.DROPSI.
CAL SWELLINGS,


Existing in men, women and children,


THE FINEST AND BEST SELECT-
ED IN-TIMl SOUTH.


SAMUEL B. HUBBARD,

Jacksonville, Fla.,


Importer and Dealer in

HARDWARE, IRON: AND STEEL,

EDGE TOOLS, TABLE and POCKET
CUTLERY,
Nails, Glue, Putty, Glass, .Paints, Oils,
LEATHER BELTING, RUBBER PACKING,
STOVES, TINWARE, CROCKERY, PUMPS,
Lead and Iron Pipe,
DOORS, SASH, BLINDS, MOULDINGS, SUGAR

Mills, Evaporators, &c.
Gas-Fitting, Roofing, -y.obbing, and Tin
Smithint' done te order. diy


DaM ers and.Undershirts, very cheap, at BUCKY'S.


BUILDERS'

FURNISHING MILL,

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

The understgrned would respectfully call the atten-
tion of those contemplating building to theif establish-
ment. They are prepared to f grrtsla at short notice all
kinds of
Builders' Material


consisting of
Rough and Planed Lumber,


Mouldings,


Brackets,


Scroll and Turned Work,
&Sawed and Rived Shingles, Lath, Fencigg,
&c. at lowest rates.
We have recently enlarged our mill and increased
our facilities for executing all orders with dispatch. .
Give us a call before going elsewhere.


4-14


Parlor
Suite.
Parlor
Suits.
Parlor
Suits.
Parlor
Suits.


RICH, PLAIN,
atd

SUBSTANTIAL
FURNITURE.


Cl amber
Suits.
Chamber
Suits.
Chrmber
Suits
Chamber
Suits


We are prepared to offer our stock at
remarkably low prices.




DAVIS & DREW,

DEALERS IN

All kinds of FURNITURE, CARPETS,
MATTRESSES, WHITE PINE, WAL-
NUT, and CEDAR LUMBER, etc.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA-


COFFINS AND UNDERTAKERS


M ETALLIIC
BURIAL CASES,
AMD
WOOD COFFINS,


OF ALL SIZES AND QUALITIES.
LADIES' AND GENTLEMEN'S ROBES.
EMBALMING DONE WHEN REQUIRED.
ALSO,
MARBLE AND MARBLEIZED
SLATE MANTELS.
SLATE HEARTHS, &c.,
MANUFACTURED TO ORDER
AND FOR SALE BY
CALVIN OAK,
Forsyth Street, between Laura and Hogans,
twa6-To' Jacksonville,. Florida.


NEW LOAN
A


ON A NEW PLAN.


Invest your money at home in the

FIRST MORTGAGE LAND GRANT


PREMIUM BONDS.
Now offerrkd for sale by the


GREAT SOUTiHERN RAILWAY
NO MATTER WHAT THE AGE!


Prof. Steel says : "One bottle of Kearn-y's Fluid
Extract Buchu is worth more than all other Buchus
combined."
Price One Dollar per Bottle, or Six Bottles for Five
Dollars.


[Consolidated]


Every bond when redeemed will receive a premium
in place of interest, according to the plan of redemption,
in amounts of from
$1.00 to $25.00o0 'or $50.ooo


DEPOT, 0o4, DUANE ST., NEW YORK. n each bond.
On each bond.


A Physician in attendance to answer correspondence
and give advice gratis.
,W SEND STAMP FOR PAMPHLETS, FREE.-"'


TO THE


NERVOUS AND DEBILITATED

OF BOTH SEXES.
NO CHARGE. FOR ADVICE AND CONSUL-
TATION.

DR. J. B. DYoTT, graduate of Jefferson Medica
College, Philadelphia, author of several valuable works,
can be consulted on all diseases of the Sexual ar Urin-
ary Organs, (which he has mode an especial study)
.either in male or female, no matter from what cause or-
iginating or of how long standing. A practice of 30
years enables him to treat -diseases with success. Cures
guaranteed. Charges reasonable. Those at a distance
can forward letter describing symptoms and enclosing
stamp to pay postage.
Send for the Guide to Health. Price zoc.

B. J. DYOTT, M. D.,
Physician and Surgeon, 104 Duane St., N. Y.


Blankets and Coverlets of every size and quality at
BUCKY'S.


S R. P. E. JOHNSON, HOM(EOPATHIST
Has removed his office to Mitchell's new building,
north side of Bay street, between.Newnan and Market
nearly opposite the Post Off.oe. ni-tf


Bonds redeemable by allotment. Six allotments of
bonds. Six distributions of premiums in 1875..
Apply to
EMIL HAAS & CO.,
Financial Agents
71 Broadway, New York City.
HARVEY GRANGER, Gen'l Agent,
J. L. EDWARDS, Agent.
Office, Mather & little's Bookstore, Jacksonville.
1-9 tf


FOR ST. AUGUSTINE.


1,/ THE SCHOONER

Magnolia
,"I I .- Will make regular trips
I T between Jacksonville &
St. Augustine.
Freights at low rates.
For freight or passage
apply to WILLSON & WHITLOCK,
Jacksonville, Fla.,


5-tf


Orto JAMES COSS,
St. Augustie, Fla.


Trunks and yalises at Bucky's.


ALL PAPERS QUOTE FROM IT.

THE DETROIT FREE PRESS
The liveliest of family newspapers, full of interesting
news literature, humorous sketches, spicy paragraphs,
etc. Sample Copies free. Subscription $z a year,
postpaid. Address
ETROIT FREE PRESS,,
3-10 Detroit, Me.


PENNIMAN & CO.


BUCKY takes the lead in the latest styles of Silk and
Fur Hats. 1-7tf


HE JACKSONVILLE


SALE AND LIVERY


STABLES,

C. B. McCLENNY, PaoPrlETOR.

Notice is given to the public that I have purchased
the well-known HARTRIDGE STABLES, opposite
the METROPOLITAN HOTEL, and have on hand
A VERY LARGE STOCK OF HORSES AND
MULES FOR SALE.
Those desiring to purchase will find it to their ad-
vantage to examine this unusually large and attractive
stock, adapted to all uses. I am also receiving
A COMPLETE OUTFIT OF

BUGGIES, PHLETONS, AND
OTHER CARRIAGES,
of the latest styles,
FOR LIVERY SERVICE,
which will be furnished
AT THE SHORTEST NOTICE,
and on the
MOST REASONABLE TERMS.

Mr. G. M. BRITTAIN is my authorized Agent
and Manager, and will always be found at the Stables
ready to attend to all business appertaining to the es-
tablishment. C. B. Mc.LENNY.
Sept. 16.I 1872. ii-2itf


Gentlemen's underwear at BUCKY'S.


'RESH ARRIVAL


OF NEW AND FASHIONABLE GOODS
R
GENTLEMENS' FAL AND WINTER WEAR,
EMBRACING
FRENCH, ENGLISH, GERMAN ITALIAN
AND AMERICAN FABRICS,
SUCH AS
FINE BROADCLOTHS, CASSIMERES, VEST-
INGS AND GENERAL FURNISHING
GOODS,


at the store of


J. BARATIER,
Merchant Tailor,
Laura Street, just above Bay Street,
rl-21-6m JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Fine black dress coats and fancy neck wear at Bucky's.


BILLIARD SALOON.
(The Largest south of Washington.)
BAY STREET, OPPOSITE POST-OFFICE.


FRANKEIN, OF PHILADELPHIA.ii W;ih c.mbned a ._Lt cf.over
CONTINENTAL, OF NEW YORK,
MANHATTAN, OF NEW YORK, f:
PENN, OF PHILADELPHiA, .


LOANING MONEY ON REAL`ESTATE AND CONVEYANCING A
SPECIALTY.
We give below a few of the mandih'oice places:for salesby us .
No..73. Two-story house on Ashley street, near St. N. i Dit,nlu,I .- .PI:latcr. : on Hal;fax river,
James Hotel, pleasantly situated, in. one'of: the bbst se. n id, I n-oir .1. M,:.1.eui r.-:., at P.:-It Orange;
i.-. .,. :,. ihe. ,:.;t, house is new, with six rooms, 1,1:: -c-.r.-. I.i -,. ac:r..r n.:h t.,ar.m :.ck, I) ing .:.ne mile
S..' ,:1 ,n. *I servant's room: lot 5 xx 'frobr., .: .,:rc i, hgtr., .t 1 M e.--., .irrn-,llarti ) on
105 feet, good fence, 'good sidewalk, and the street the -,r I.,r' rt a*,ng ir.:nt .-r ab..ut one 1,-urLt, mile,
shelled; grapes in bearing; a fine lot of young orange with. large,'two-story,.frame, hou -. z2 r. oe-ms. c.ecrly
:trees; flowers and shade trees growing, thriftily;, good, finished; house comrarnds' .. the, r. cr and oc,:ean
well, with pump on back porch, which is covered with and is surrounded with 1 .re, bLari ,..,range trees,
flowering vines. Will be sold cheap, some 75 to ioo in number g.:..:d m it, 3rI a ternn
N. B. To capitl3Tt- .1eiring n big thing," i., : re iIt .200 oogallons, in yard: thoroughly ditched
is a fine opening i fp'r.,i,:.l, a iw thousand d iri 31 i.- Jr] ,-- .-ianal fi.. 1 ,r-h-:.,-e r rnini t,:, the
will go a great way just now. For particulars er.quac ,. r' I r ir..n f-lait .i: cr p irr.mer-se raTnti.,es fr
of Norton & Kooker, corner Ocean and Bay streets. ',; I ir. ..n tl, pl.nc i.'.ii .mi.,l. ,:, the
... .. 1:F ."-_ r l- i Jr *f Cl ,a r ,,.:h Ctia fulr- e. ual;
No. 74. A HANDSOME RESIDENCE FOR SAL.E.-Six limestone is abundant. I C ,, plac... i really onp oi tha
large rooms and .kitchen, double bay windowon the choicest places in Fl.:.ria, and a- knc.an asa uch be-'
west, large double parlors, double pin-a n, the '-nth, I th wa-. .. --


commanding one of the fnr,.:zti ,e- -n J .:t -:., ii,. -
windows filled with four lights of 40-inch glass and hnung
with cords and -weJ .. .. ....ll ,. e CL -
floor, with blinds: ail ,:.,-.r. arc rir.iv:-. l r.t. m-.:.uld-
ing and oiled and arn.;-hndi, 1. 1 ., t-. ,r.ti.,,i In,.
ceilings, high, walls hard-finished, open- stairs, double;
glass; front d-.:.:.., arr. i.. :- 1..k r, .:. '. door in house;
china closet, -t r'-r.: m, -p..r.itl .-:1 vi. .-presses, bath-
room; hip roof, with. cupola, from which a charming
view is to be had of the city, the river and surrounding
country; three lots, making -t :- fr-i good well:
young shade trees started; h.la rm.'m Irya' post-office.
For sale at a bargain. '
No. 96. A large, two-story, house with ten large.
rooms; thoroughly built, and finished in first-tate style,
with twelve feet ceilings; one acre, of ground, covered
with fruit trees and flowers-; pleasantly located ; within
five minutes walk of the raHroad depots Price $xo,oco;
$4,500 down, balance on long time if desired.
No. 99.. 400 acres in Orange county; one mile from
Melonvile. *Price, $5 per acre. .


SN. B. :Do you i ant a. snug 'winter home, with
orange trees' aiid fl .nr-, Cr, -r I-,, Vl: Yocn get a
A beautiful lot, ':,\",6 feet. in Springfield, '-gh ,iib d "
-healthful, and within i.. n minute alko i'.e post-oflice,
on which to make it, :.r :5 Fo E- .ankulkur eoqure
of Norton & Kooker,
No. 11g. -A tr,ct o,:i3 acre6; 6searem cleared hlustli'A-
xrock land : finr. ', : .on Si J ..-h's river; iwor mIdes west
uf JacksoiV. Ik h-Th. i one .fihi mo-i desirable river
-fronts in:the6 i-.:ity .1 Jt,.ins1ll, Wiil be divided -
if desired.
INo. 246. Six i- ...n Arlne.-..n river, adj..inirig th"'
Florida Home, c-ntnrng the old ioeyaTd. Fo sal-
at a bargain.
No. 747- .1Mr......:.-it\'r Hi-mi1s-Tls is'ctel ir
centrallydlocated, built of the best Irerich bliick, and is -
a first-class house in every respect. For prices an>
terms apply to Norton & Kooker. .-.- -: f


Call on or wrfte to as, and state your wants:
OFFICE COR. OCEAN AND' AY STS., TACKIONVILLE, LA ..
A-gVisitors always welcome. Latest papers on file. .


THE SINGER MANUFACTURING COMPANY'S CELEBRATED


SILK


TWIST.


This cetpanry rn'w ha-vng in rulf operations at Newa-rb, New Jersey, the largest SILK WORKS 1 tf-i
world, propose to furnish a superior article of Silk Twis ... ...
AT GREATLY R E D C EDPRICES, -
For the corwenience of the public this ee'bratetdiTwist i
PUT UP ON SPOOLSiOF DIFFERENT SIZE
The finest quality being thereby offered on spools.in quatit es". .
FROM FIFTY YARDS UPW-ARDS, .
The above unequaled'twist is manufactured especially;f6r the use ot all kinds of sewi maciaines adtes agena -
for different machines through.the country are. using this twist in large quantities, and as ,.
SPECIAL INDUCEMENTS
are offered to the trade, all those about to purchase will do well to send for our price list.



THE SINGER

N5-
..6-,

/ .. .. .












AGAIN TRIUMPHANT.

133,254 MAJORITY.


STATISTICS OF SWORN SALES FOR 1873:


Companies. Sold. in 1873
THE SINGER 232,444
Wheeler & Wilson 119,180
Domestic 40.114
Grover & Baker 86,179
Weed 21,760
W ilson ................................................ 21,247
Howe No return;
Gold Medal 16,431
Wilcox & Gibbs 15,881


. Companies. Sol
American, B. H. ...
B & Howe
* Remington Empire
Florence...................
Davis ...............
Victor
s Blees...........................
Secor-.................. --.....
JEtna, J. E. Bramesdorf


d Il 1873.
14,182 -
13,019,

8,960
8,86x:
7,446
3,458
3,430
3,081


OUR NEW FAMILY MAC-I1NEF
Embodies New and Essential P.inciples-Simplicity of Construction: Ease of Operation; Uniformiq of 'Precis,
Action at any Speed; Capacityf or Range and Variety of Work,.Fine or Coarse-. ,-
LEAVING ALL RIVALS. BEHIND IT. .

TEST THE SINGER BEFORE PURCHASING ANY OTHEE-
TERMS EASY-PAYMENTS LIGHT. : -

Besides the WORLD'S FAVORITE." we keep constantly on hand a large supply of
CLARK'S 0. N. T. SPOOL COTTON, four spools for twenty-five cents. -,. ..
SINGER'S STANDARD MACHINE TWIST, from twenty-five cents up-all sizes and co ors,
ACME MACHINE TWIST, 100o yard spools, 2 for 25 cents: 5o yard tools, 3 for s5 cents.' _
SINGER'S LINEN AND FLAX THREADS, 'OILS, 'NEEDLES, &C.,. &C.


The Singer Manufaoturing .Co.,
N6. 172 BROUGHTON ST., SAVANNAH,' GA.
C. A. VOSBURGH, Manager.
'E W. FRAZIER, Agent,


GRORG


i ,-7tf ":-


JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.; :


ESTABLISHED IN 1868.,


A. K. PERCIVAL
SUCCESSOR TO J. H. CROWELI,5 .- ,


I -






- C-

. /


DEALER IN :.. .

BOOTS, SHOES, LEATHER,

AND FINDINGS.


"Percival's Stamp'" Hand Boots
Burt & Mears' "
Philadelphia and Baltimore "
Vienna Medal cable sewed "
Percival's Stamp Hand Congress
Burt & Mears'- "
Philadelphia '
Vienna Medal cable sewed "


t0o
- ob
- o10
8 o "'
&5o.

-- 7 0oo,
- 6 50,6


GOODS SENT BY MAIL AND EXPRESS,
To all parts of the State.
AT THE OLD STAND, COR. BAY and OCEAN STS., JACKSONVILL.E,;"TA.' -t


.A CKSONVILLE, FLA.
S s-66 W,. A. WH]I


The best and most stylish livery, teams, in the-city
can be found at the Stable of the undersigned near the
Florida Home, corner of Cedar and Forsyth Streets,
Horses boarded and well cared for on reasonable
terms.
Strong teams'for hauling purposes always on hand.
W. H. AVERY.
Jacksonville, Fla., May 30o, 1874. tf. .


*-


tam"





'i I


; ; ;


i\


-A, -:- -!A 47- T-T,'A


panic


I


I