Rattle and prattle for little carriage makers and young car builders

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Material Information

Title:
Rattle and prattle for little carriage makers and young car builders
Physical Description:
12 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Murphy Varnish Company (Newark, N.J.) ( Publisher )
Publisher:
Murphy & Co.
Place of Publication:
Newark N.J
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Alphabet rhymes -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1878
Alphabet books -- 1878
Bldn -- 1878
Genre:
Children's poetry
Alphabet books
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New Jersey -- Newark

Notes

General Note:
Paper covers.
General Note:
1878 Christmas advertising gift-book presented by Murphy & Co., varnish makers.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001582810
oclc - 23076678
notis - AHK6742
System ID:
UF00048513:00001


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RATTLE AND PRATTLE.

FOR LITTLE CARRIAGE MAKERS AND YOUNG CAR BUILDERS.

Christmas, 1878.

CHRISTMAS BELLS.






















HARK the Christmas bells are ringing-
Ringing through the frosty air-
Happiness to each one bringing,
And release from toil and care.
How the merry peal is swelling
From the gray old crumbling tower,
To the simplest creature telling
Of Almighty love and power.

MURPHY & CO. wish you a Merry Ckrzstmas.








2 RATTLE AND PRATTLE



THE STORY OF GUM1 COPAL.

HARRY, what's a mummy ?
Why its a dead people, aint it ?
Say a dead person, my dear, and don't say aint
it."
Well that's what I meant, a dead person-one
what's been dead oh, ever so many years.
S\Tommy what's your idea of a mummy?
Oh, that's easy. A mummy's one of them fellers
that the 'Gyptians preserved.
How old do you think mummies are, Charlie?
SAce Oh I don't know.-as old as your great, great,
SGREAT, GREAT grandfather!
S no Zanzibar Did any of you ever see afly mummy or a moth
Angola )soar mummy ?
SA fly mummy? what's that Uncle John?
Well I will show you. You see
this piece of gum: do you see
the fly in it?
Yes, I can see its eyes plain
as anything.
So can I and its wings.
Well my dears, how long do
you think it has been there ?
Two or three years ?
Well children, what would
you think if I told you it had
been there as long as the mum-
mies of Egypt have been em-
balmed.
We'd think you was lyin'.
Why Tommy aint you 'sham-
ed to be so saucy to Uncle.
Well it has probably been in
this gum twice as long as the
The Copal District of the World. mummies have been embalmed.
Well but how do you know Uncle?
Well, I will tell.you all about it, if Tommy wont think I am lying.
Oh no, Uncle John, I was only funnin'.
Well then, in the first place, how did this little fellow get in here ? But before I tell you that I must
tell you about the gum itself. It is called Gum Copal, and is what they use to make varnish of.
Is varnish what they put on carriages to make them shine so ?
Yes on carriages, cars, pianos, furniture and a great many other things.
Gum Copal is dug up on the coasts of Africa, in New Zealand and the Manilla Islands. If you will
look on the map you will see where I have marked it.


We use the best Copal,








FOR LITTLE CARRIAGE MAKERS. 3


Well but hurry up and tell us about the bugs Uncle.
-- ~Yes dears, I am coming to that. The Natives in these coun-
--- tries go prodding about with spears after the rainy stason
....... ....--___ when the the earth is moist and when they feel the gum they
dig for it. When the earth is hard and dry they are too lazy
to dig. Now you want to know about the bugs. But first how
did this gum get in the ground ?
I guess its a kind of crystal.
- - : Cant some of the rest of you guess a little closer.
I should think, Uncle, that maybe the bugs crawled into
Coal Digging.-9 A. M. the gum when it was on the tree, and got stuck there, and
somehow the gum got into the ground.
Very good, Lucy. but how did the gum get into the ground ? That's the great question. Well I guess
I will have to explain that part to you. You couldn't hardly guess that; it has puzzled older heads than
yours. There are Copal trees at this moment growing in Africa and other countries; there is gum on
them too and plenty of bugs get caught in it; but it is a very different gum from this and could not be
used for making varnish any more than resin could. No, the fresh gum will melt in your mouth, but the
old gum-the fossil gum as the Geologists would call it,-will not.
But you haven't told us how it got into the ground, Uncle.
Well, Charlie, how could it if it didn't fall off the tree?
I don't know I am sure.
Well I should think if the gum didn't fall down and yet is found
in the ground that the 4ree must have fallen down, and tree, gum
and all been buried. -.
Oh yes, I never thought of that.
But what buried them Uncle ? How did they get into the ground? ---
Well that's a long story Lucy that I couldn't stop to tell you
now. When you come to study Geology you will find out how Copal Digging.--2 M.
the surface of the earth has been tumbled about a good deal at different times.
But to go on. Now we have got the bug into the gum, and the gum and tree into the ground, the next
question is what becomes of the tree? for when the natives dig they find nothing but the Copal and no
sign or vestige of any tree or even bits of wood, although sometimes they find little twigs or leaves in
the gum.
.,_ What has become of it Uncle?
S"T It has decayed and disappeared. That is one of the ways
in which we know it is so old. But why didn't the gum decay
--. too then? Because the gum is not of a perishable nature;
-- and that I cannot explain but only tell you that Gum Copal,
like Coal and Diamonds, has hardened by age and by laying
in the earth a great many years become precious and valuable.
You have all seen Amber?
S- Oh yes, that's Amber on the mouthpiece of your Cigar Hold-
er; and Lucy's necklace is Amber, I heard Aunt say so.
Copal Digging.-- P. M. Well dears, Amber is a kind of Gum Copal too, although
probably not so old as the Copal they make varnish of. It is found on the sea shore, and has probably
been washed up from the bottom of the sea, which at one time, you know, was all dry land and had Co-
pal trees growing on it. But I guess I cant tell you any more stories to night, its quite bedtime.


Do you use the best VARNISH?







4 RATTLE AND PRATTLE.


THE BATTLE FIELD.

ONCE this soft turf, this rivulet's sands,
Were trampled by a hurrying crowd,
And fiery hearts and armed hands
Encountered in the battle-cloud.





















Ah never shall the land forget
How gushed the life-blood of her brave,-
Gushed, warm with hope and courage yet,
Upon the soil they fought to save.
Now all is calm and fresh and still;
Alone the chirp of flitting bird,
And talk of children on the hill,
And bell of wandering kine, are heard.
No solemn host goes trailing by
The black-mouthed gun and staggering wain;
Men start not at the battle-cry,-
O, be it never heard again!


Now is the i/me for sleizhing.







FOR YOUNG CAR BUILDERS







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Varnish your Sleihs wz/zit the MURPHY Vartish.







6 RATTLE AND PRATTLE.


THE LITTLE CARRIAGE MAKER'S A, B, C.

A stands for Axle-tree round which the wheels swift turn,
B & C are Bolt and Clip, which hold the axle firm;
D stands for Dog-Cart, E for Elliptic-Springs,
F stands for Fifth-Wheel and lots of other things;
G's the part they call the Gear, which means the under-carriage,
H the Hub, though not the Hub that sweethearts get by marriage;
I don't stand for anything, except to make up rhyme,
J Japan which painters use to make the carriage shine;
K stands for King-Bolt, on which the fore-part pivots,
L for little Landaulet which the attention rivets;
M of course for Mail-Coach with merry winding horn,
N a Nut don't let the wheel, slip off the axle-arm;
O you '11 guess for Omnibus with always room for more "
P they call the Panel,-you 'If find a panel in the door;
Q the Quarter, varnished well, makes the painter's heart rejoice,
R my dear's the Rumble, but it don't make any noise;
S a Spring, a Step, a Seat,-all give the carriage ease,
T half spells a T-cart, which never carries teas;
U and I we 'll treat alike, and agree to let alone,
V-quite right, is Varnish, which gives a carriage tone;
W Wheel has turned until, the alphabet we're through,
X Xcels, and so we hope our little friends will do;
Y my dears, you surely don't expect from me more rhyme ?
Z 's the end, and I must stop until another time.



ENIGMA.
My 16, I 9, 3, 15 is the name of our highest civil officer.
My 17, 11, 18, 9 is what you ought to find this enigma.
My 2, II, I is for head wear.
My 7, 14, 13 is sharp and sticky.
My 5, 6, 13 is used to hold the ashes of dead people.
My io, II, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 is what night does when day comes.
My 4, 5, 18, 18 is what you should always avoid.
My 13, 14, 7 is what my 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 is very much opposed to.
My 8, I 12, 4 is what we hope will never come to you.
My whole is what should be found in every paint shop


Begin right, use the







6 RATTLE AND PRATTLE.


THE LITTLE CARRIAGE MAKER'S A, B, C.

A stands for Axle-tree round which the wheels swift turn,
B & C are Bolt and Clip, which hold the axle firm;
D stands for Dog-Cart, E for Elliptic-Springs,
F stands for Fifth-Wheel and lots of other things;
G's the part they call the Gear, which means the under-carriage,
H the Hub, though not the Hub that sweethearts get by marriage;
I don't stand for anything, except to make up rhyme,
J Japan which painters use to make the carriage shine;
K stands for King-Bolt, on which the fore-part pivots,
L for little Landaulet which the attention rivets;
M of course for Mail-Coach with merry winding horn,
N a Nut don't let the wheel, slip off the axle-arm;
O you '11 guess for Omnibus with always room for more "
P they call the Panel,-you 'If find a panel in the door;
Q the Quarter, varnished well, makes the painter's heart rejoice,
R my dear's the Rumble, but it don't make any noise;
S a Spring, a Step, a Seat,-all give the carriage ease,
T half spells a T-cart, which never carries teas;
U and I we 'll treat alike, and agree to let alone,
V-quite right, is Varnish, which gives a carriage tone;
W Wheel has turned until, the alphabet we're through,
X Xcels, and so we hope our little friends will do;
Y my dears, you surely don't expect from me more rhyme ?
Z 's the end, and I must stop until another time.



ENIGMA.
My 16, I 9, 3, 15 is the name of our highest civil officer.
My 17, 11, 18, 9 is what you ought to find this enigma.
My 2, II, I is for head wear.
My 7, 14, 13 is sharp and sticky.
My 5, 6, 13 is used to hold the ashes of dead people.
My io, II, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 is what night does when day comes.
My 4, 5, 18, 18 is what you should always avoid.
My 13, 14, 7 is what my 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 is very much opposed to.
My 8, I 12, 4 is what we hope will never come to you.
My whole is what should be found in every paint shop


Begin right, use the










II



















B .









- . .



















OU. A SALL







FOR LITTLE CARRIAGE MAKERS. 7


A REBUS AS EASY AS A. B. C.






A. B. C. SYSTEM OF SURFACES.












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If the Little Carriage Makers cant guess the above Rebus, they will have to get their Fathers
to help them.


A. B. C. SYSTEM OF SURfFACERS.








8 RATTLE AND PRATTLE.















































LUCY GRAY.

OFT I had heard of Lucy Gray: "That, Father, will I gladly do !
And, when I crossed the wild, 'Tis scarcely afternoon-
I chanced to see at break of day The minster-clock has just struck two,
The solitary child. And yonder is the moon."
To-night will be a stormy night- At this the Father raised his hook
You to the town must go; And snapped a faggot band;
And take a lantern, Child, to light He plied his work ;-and Lucy took
Your mother through the snow The lantern in her hand.
A poor Varnisk thoug cheap is a toor economy.
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You to the town must go ; And snapped a faggot band ;
And take a lantern, Child, to light He plied his work ;-and Lucy took
Your mother through the snow The lantern in her hand.



,4 oor Varnish 1hzough/z cheaA zj a ] oor economy.








FOR LITTLE CARRIAGE MAKERS.



Not blither is the mountain roe: Then downward from the steep hill's edge
With many a wanton stroke They tracked the footmarks small;
Her feet disperse the powdery snow, And through the broken hawthorne hedge,
That rises up like smoke. And by the long stone wall:
The storm came on before its time: And then an open field they crossed;
She wandered up and down ; The marks were still the same;
And many a hill did Lucy climb; They tracked them on, nor ever lost;
But never reached the town. And to the bridge they came.
The wretched parents all that night They followed from the snowy bank
Went shouting far and wide ; The footmarks, one by one,
But there was neither sound nor sight Into the middle of the plank;
To serve them for a guide. And further there were none !
At day-break on a hill they stood -Yet some- maintain that to this day
That overlooked the moor; She is a living child ;
And thence they saw the bridge of wood, That you may see sweet Lucy Gray
A furlong from their door. Upon the lonesome wild.
And, turning homeward, now they cried, O'er rough and smooth she trips along,
" In heaven we all shall meet! And never looks behind;
When in the snow the mother spied And sings a solitary song
The print of Lucy's feet. That whistles in the wind.




































The Stranger.


We hope the MURPHJF Varnish is no stranger.







I RATTLE AND PRATTLE



















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SA little Sulky.





















When the Cat's away the Mi/ce will play."


Ask your Fatler to begin the








FOR YOUNG CAR BUILDERS. ii



THE WICKET KEEPER.














zw

























This little fellow is called the Wicket Keeper." You know the Wicket Keeper is the
one who stands behind the wicket and catches the ball, the great object in the game of Crick-
et being to bowl down the wicket. Cricket is the great national game of England, just as
Baseball is of this country. It is a very different game however. In Cricket there are two
wickets, two bowlers, two men at the bat and a number of fielders. The men at the bat de-
fend the wicket from the ball swiftly delivered by the bowlers.


New Year with the MURPHY Varnish.
New Year wit/z t/e I2UI PHY Varnis/z.








12 RATTLE AND PRATTLE.



NEW YEAR.


THERE is an old man that I know
In whose garden sweet things grow,
Every year he plants it new,
Every year with gifts for you.
Every Spring he sows good seeds,
Every day there shoot some weeds,
Yet the flowers of every Spring
Every Autumn harvests bring.
Shall we reap in rain or shine
That Garden's gifts this "seventy nine"?
Friend, for you the sky is fair
Not a cloud hung anywhere,
But such fruits, such flowers I see
Droping low from every tree.
One, a rose of love, denied
Till now, another, friendship tried
Made surer; one is added faith
That takes all sting from pain and death,
And wills fulfilled and dreamings bold
Made real and fruitful, manifold.
































MURPHY & CO. wish you a Happy New Year.




























































































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