• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Carlie's curls
 A stitch in time
 Lost in the woods
 Ponto's lesson
 "That's me, sure!"
 Back Cover






Title: Carlie's curls
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00048512/00001
 Material Information
Title: Carlie's curls
Alternate Title: Charlie's curls and other stories
Physical Description: p. 107-126, 5 leaves of plates : ill. ; 17 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Pratt-Chadwick, Mara L ( Mara Louise )
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: D. Lothrop and Company
Place of Publication: Boston (Franklin St. Corner of Hawley)
Publication Date: c1878
 Subjects
Subject: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1878   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1878   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1878
Genre: Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Laurie Loring
General Note: Cover title: Charlie's curls and other stories.
General Note: Stiff printed paper covers.
General Note: Publisher's advertisement p. 3 of paper cover.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00048512
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001577546
oclc - 22929031
notis - AHK1416

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Carlie's curls
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
    A stitch in time
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Plate
        Page 113
        Page 114
    Lost in the woods
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Plate
        Page 117
        Page 118
    Ponto's lesson
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Plate
        Page 121
        Page 122
    "That's me, sure!"
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Plate
        Page 125
        Page 126
    Back Cover
        Cover 3
        Cover 4
Full Text
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CARLIE'S CURLS.




BY
LAURIE LORING.

AUTTHIOR OF SUNSHINE FOR I .\1. I, .C
"HOI.DAY AI.BUMS," &c.







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BOSTON:
D. LOTITROP AND COMPANY,
FRANKLIN ST., CORNER OF H.1Ail. .





































COPYRIGHT BY

D. LOTHROP & CO.
1878.










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CARLIE'S CURLS.

Two soft, dimpled hands round
rnjalnia's neck, two blue, blue eyes
looking into the dark ones above,
two cherry lips close to mamma's,
whispering:
Don't turl Tarlie's hair now,
mamma, please."
Why, Carlie, papa don't like to
see his little boy at the breakfast ta-
ble with tumbled hair."
107






io8 CARLIE 'S CURLS.

Wait few minutes, mamma, till
Tarlie says his prayer. Tombin'
Tarlie's turls makes him feel naughty
- hurts him so. Tan't you wait,
mamma? Tarlie wants to pray 'fore
he's naughty."
Mamma looked a little sober as
she waited for her little boy. His
pretty golden curls were her delight;
yet could she make him feel naughty
several times a day, that they might
grace the dear head? No, no, she
could not, she would not.
Now, mamma," said baby -Carl,
with martyr-like face, p'ease be tare-
ful. Tarlie's ready."
Mamma was ready, too. She took
a piir of scissors in one hand, the
curls in the other.






CARLIE'S CURLS. 1o9

"Snip, snip, and away they go!"
Carlie clapped his hands and
shouted for joy at the sight. Then
he scampered out to hear what papa
would say.
Why! Whose little man is this ?"
cried papa in real surprise.
Papa's and mamma's !" answered
the little man. Tarlie won't feel so
naughty now his t-urls tut off," he
added gravely.
Mamma had been placing the gold
locks in a box among her choice
treasures; as they entered papa saw
tears in her eyes; so he said gently:
Never mind, dear. We can't
keep him a baby always. Let us
hope that he may grow as manly as
he looks.






Ino CARLIE'S CURLS.

"Is Tarlie a man now, papa?"
asked the little fellow.
Not a big man; but he looks
more like a little man now his curls
are gone.
"Tarjie don't like turls. Tarlie
don't like to be a baby. Tarlie wants
to be a great big man like papa."
'\'ter a pause, and between his spoon-
fuls of oat-meal Tarlie added:
"Tarlie think turls bad
for boys."




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Ild, be e y go into the w s.
,The bu s ill catch i...n that to

I.I no mother! I can't',stop I oI.
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A STITCH IN TIME.

"You had better mrincnd your dress,
Ilda, before youi go into the woods.
The bushes will catch in that torn
place and make it worse."
"0 no, mother! I can't stop now\\. .
And I i be real careful."
IIM






1x2 A STITCH IN TIME.

Away she ran, but soon returned
for a pin. I'll pin it together. That
will do for this afternoon."
Remember, if it gets torn badly,
you must mend it all yourself," re-
plied her mother.
Yes," answered Ilda hurriedly.
She had hardly noticed her mother's
remark, in her haste to join her com-
panions.
It was a merry party, and all had
a merry time except poor Ilda. She
had been in the woods only a little
while, when a bristling thorn bush
clutched her with its many merciless
fingers. She couldn't stop to work
carefully, but twitched her dress this
way and that. When, with the help
of her companions, she at last stood




























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A STITCH IN TIME. I13

free, her dress had not simply one
rent but many, and the original
one had changed to such a degree as
to be past recognition.
She entered the house at night
more slowly than she left it. My
dress caught on an old thorn bush,
and I couldn't get it off without tear-
ing ever so many little places," were
her first words.
"You should have worked very
carefully and slowly, if it was caught
on such a bush."
The girls were all running away
just then, and I couldn't stop to fuss.
I pulled it off. quick as I could."
You must fuss now to mend it,"
said her mother soberly. You'd
better change your dress and begin






iI4 A STITCH IN TIME.

at once. You can mend some before
dark."
Why can't I wait till to-morrow ?
I'm tired."
You have put it off long enough,
Ilda. Get your things and do a part
now.
0 dear I wish we never had to
sew.
You like to wear nice dresses.
Somebody must make them, if you
do. A few stitches yesterday would
have saved many to-day, remember."
Ilda worked until she could hardly
see to thread her needle, yet the dress
wasn't half mended, then.













Sy- 70







LOST IN THE \OODS.

"HERE'S a path, guess we'll try
this. There must be a way out."
0 Frank, I can't go another step,
I'm so tired !"
Poor Johnie!" said the elder
brother kindly. Well, we'll sit down
a little while. Here's a grand seat."
Johnie leaned his head against
Frank's shoulder too tired to speak.
"5







116 LOST IN THE WOODS.

He feared they were really' lost, but
he did not wish to alarm Johhie.
Now as he sat with his arm around
his brother, he noticed with con-
siderable uneasiness that the shad-
ows were deepening among the tall
trees. They would certainly have
to remain there all night unless he
could find his way home very soon.
"Come, Johnie, mother'll be won-
dering where we are. We must
hurry home now."
Do go the shortest way, Frank,"
replied the little fellow, slowly rising.
Suppose I can't find the shortest;
what then ?"
I can't walk all night any way."
0 no. We'll camp out, after
we've walked half the night, Johnie."













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LOST IN THE WOODS. 117

Stay in the woods all night? 0,
I shouldn't dare to, Frank! "
There's nothing in the woods to
hurt us--nothing but mosquitoes,"
answered Frank with a faint attempt
at a laugh.
He was still puzzled. Every path
he tried led deeper and deeper into
the thick woods. Not one led him to
a familiar spot. At last he was con-
vinced that it was useless to try long-
er. He might go further from home,
further from the frequented paths; so
he stopped under a large tree saying
with forced cheerfulness, while his
heart beat loudly:
Here'll be a good place to camp
in; won't it? This tree'll keep off
the damp first rate."






ii8 LOST IN THE WOODS.

Why, Frank, can't you find any
way home? asked Johnie in alarm.
I'm afraid not to-night. Come, sit
down and lay your head in my lap.
Maybe you'll go to sleep."
Suddenly they were startled by
hearing loud shouts. But as they
came nearer, Frank recognized his
father's voice and he sprang to his
feet and gave an answering shout.
In a few minutes both boys were
joyfully clinging to their father's
hand.












.$ i '








PONTO'S LESSON.

Now, Ponto, look sharp! One-
two no, you musn't move your
paws. Catch it in your mouth and
keep your paws down. I've told you
"that a great many times. Now -
one two three There, you've
dropped it again! Why, Ponto, you
are a dreadful dull scholar."
I19







120 PONTO 'S LESSON

Ponto looked earnestly at the white
lump which was again held aloft in
Arrie's fingers. He knew he must
catch it first, however, so he did his
very best, and the dainty white lump
dropped directly into his mouth:
That's a good Ponto! That's
the way to get sugar!" exclaimed
Arrie encouragingly.
"You make a very good teacher,
Arrie," said Mrs. Lee who had been
listening to her daughter's instruc-
tions for some time. Suppose you
learn the same lesson."
What lesson, mamma?" asked
Arrie in surprise.
Attention, promptness and care-
fulness. Could you find three more
important headings in one lesson?"












































.1'




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PONTO'S LESSON 121

"I guess you mean, mamma, that
I need to attend to these things? "
What do you think, Arrie ? "
I know I don't always; but don't
I generally do things promptly? "
Some things you do. But how
about the third head ?"
0 dear, mamma! I know I'm
awful careless sometimes."
If you have several things to do,
you should make a wise decision as
to which shall be done first. Other-
wise your time and labor may be
spent in vain. Suppose you have to
spend an hour on your music and an
hour teaching Ponto each day; which
should receive your attention first ?"
"0 mamma! I don't spend an
hour teaching Ponto "






122 ONTO'S LESSON.

You spent half an hour this morn-
ing and you have been nearly an
hour this afternoon playing with him.
Now how much have you practiced
to-day?" asked Mrs. Lee with a
grave smile.
Why, I'd forgotten it entirely. I
haven't practiced one bit."
I have reminded you of it twice,
but I fear you did not give attention.
Now attend, please, and promttly
and carefully, too."























"THAT'S ME, SURE !"

THAT'S me sure! But if 'tis me,
then I ain't a beauty, that's sure, also,
as the nose on my face. Meant to
make a handsome picture out of it.
Guess Carlos was right after all-
he said I couldn't make a good pic-
"123






124 "THAT'S ME, SURE!"

ture. -It looks like me and yet-
somehow -"
Zeb leaned back in his chair, and
surveyed the picture more critically.
Seems easy enoughh to see Carlos
do it," he mused on, but I ain't got
the hang of it yet. Wonder if 'tis
because I tried to make it look older!
Carlos told me I'd better, then wouldd
look more like me when I got to be
a man. Said he'd touch it up a little.
Wonder'f he has! Guess not though.
'Twould look better if he had."
Zeb's meditations were interrupted
here by the entrance of his brother.
"What! Admiring your beauty,
Zeb ? exclaimed Carlos soberly
enough; but there was a mischievous













































































'"'1






"THAT'S ME, SURE/" 125

twinkle in his eye which Zeb did not
see.
Now, I thought I's handsomer 'n
that," Zeb replied. His earnest, in-
nocent look was too much for his
brother. Carlos laughed long and
loudly.
Shouldn't think you need to laugh
at my work," said Zeb in an inquir-
ing tone.
I'm not laughing at -your
work!" exclaimed Carlos as quickly
as he could. "It's my work. But-
you were sold- so easily "
Zeb didn't speak. He only stared
in surprise. Carlos took a paper
from among some sketches and hold-
ing it up asked:






126 "THAT'S ME, SURE!"

Is this any handsomer? "
How Zeb's face brightened at the
sight! Still, he did not speak until
he had looked from one picture to
the other many times. Suddenly
light flashed in upon his rather slow
mind. Pointing to the picture upon
the easel he said, good-naturedly:
Might have known 'twas your
work! What a cute fellow you are,
Carlos." Then he laughed him-
self.
"Well, if I'm cute, you are a thou-
sand times better than I am Zeb.
You shall have a good picture now,
to pay for this trick."









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a happy ( -..: k.:.!is the prelude to a noble Alanhood
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