Little blue shoes

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Little blue shoes
Alternate Title:
Little blue shoes and other stories
Physical Description:
p. 127-146, 5 leaves of plates : ill. ; 17 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Pratt-Chadwick, Mara L. ( Mara Louise ) ( Author, Primary )
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher:
D. Lothrop and Company
Place of Publication:
Boston (Franklin St. Corner of Hawley)
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1878   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1878   ( rbgenr )
Baldwin -- 1878
Genre:
Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Laurie Loring.
General Note:
Cover title: little blue shoes and other stories.
General Note:
Stiff printed paper covers.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisement p. 3 of paper cover.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001577545
oclc - 22929008
notis - AHK1415
System ID:
UF00048511:00001

Full Text














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LITTLE BLUE SHOES.





BY
LAURIE LORING.

AUTHOR OF : SUNSHINE FOR BABYLAND,"
HOLIDAY ALBUMS," &c.








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BOSTON:
D. LOTHROP AND COMPANY,
FRANKLIN ST., CORNER OF HAWLEY.




































COPYRIGHT BY
D. LOTHROP & CO.
1878.












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LITTLE BLUE-SHOES.

THIS is what papa calls our little
Georgie. I will tell you how he
came to give him such a funny nick-
name.
Our Georgie has soft, silky yellow
hair, the most wonderful blue eyes
you ever saw, and, to match these,
the prettiest pink and white complex-
ion you would care to see on a baby
boy.
127






128 LITTLE BLUE-SHOES.

Of course when dressed in white,
- as we always dress our Georgie -
nothing. would be so becoming as a
blue sash and blue slippers; so, un-
til he was old enough to run out on
the ground, he never saw any but
blue shoes on his plump little feet.
But one day, after he got to be
quite a big boy, papa said he must
have a pair of little black boots;
then he could run out of doors with-
out soiling his stockings so badly.
And he thought the black boots
would last longer than the blue slip-
pers, too. You see, our Georgie is
very extravagant on shoes.
"Well, we took him to the store
and papa selected a nice soft pair of
little black boots and began to try






LITTLE BLUE-SHOES. 129

them on to be sure they fitted nicely.
Would you believe it 'The fas-
tidious little fellow wouldn't have
the ola 3Ak things near his feet."
Boo-shoes I Boo-LA-,s I" he cried
in such heart-rending tones, tnat T
suggested that we take the offending
boots home and let him get used to
them a bit, before trying them on
again.
Come along, Blue-Shoes!" said
his rather indignant papa, as he took
him in his arms and left the store to
avoid a more exciting scene.
A few days after I put them on -
rather against his will, to be sure-
and took him into the garden.
There the determined boy he's
like his papa in some things de-







130 LITTLE BL UE-SHOES.

liberately sat down upon the ground
and refused to take a step in the
black boots.
Boo- shoes Boo- chocs !" he re-
peated over and over pathetically. I
couldn't leave him out of doors all
night, so I took him upon my back
and carried him in.
Blue-Shoes!" he has been with
papa ever since.





















JESSIE'S "FOUNDLINGS."

JESSIE DUDLEY was one of the
most tender-hearted little girls in the
world. She disliked to see any
creature treated unkindly; but her
special sympathy was expended upon
cats.
Now this was well for the cats-
they, no doubt, would have been
ready to sing Jessie's praises in their
131







132 yESSIE'S "FOUNDLINGS."

most melodious accents,-but Jes-
sie had a mother. Mrs. Dudley
really felt that she had a right to be
consulted before turning the house
into an infirmary for Jessie's "found-
lings," as Bert termed them.
This brother Bert was a great trial
to Jessie. He did so delight in vis-
iting her patients. I do not mean
that he was cruel,-simply mischiev-
ous and full of fun.
And Bert wasn't far from right
when he said they couldn't step any-
where in the house, without stepping
on fur.
"Cats to the right of us, cats to
the left of us! Kittens to the front
of us, kittens to the rear of us!" was


















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yESSIE'S "FOUNDLINGS." 133

his provoking cry whenever Jessie
came in sight.
But there was no open rebellion
until Jessie came home with the
seventh "foundling." Then war -
war against the cat invasion-was
declared at once. What could poor
little Jessie do against three?
Bert mischievous Bert was the
one who came to her relief, after all.
Now, mother, I suppose Jessie's
heart will be entirely broken if we
turn them out into the cold; so, if
father's willing, I'll put up a tempo-
rary hospital. When it overflows,
perhaps father '11 take them to his
office and administer ether. How
would you like that, sis?" This to







134 JESSIE'S "FOUNDLINGS."

Jessie as she entered the room fol-
lowed by her retinue of cats.
"Wouldn't it hurt them?"
No. Their death would be as
tranquil as the setting of the sum-
mer sun.
There was nothing for Jessie to
do but submit. Bert built a rough
little house, and the cats were ban-
ished to it. Now and then a num-
ber of the hopeless and infirm cases
were transferred to Dr. Dudley's of-
fice, and Jessie saw them'no more.
Promoted to the cat paradise!"
Bert told his sister.


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PLEASURE FIRST.

DAN has the care of a flock of
sheep which belong to Mr. Bruce, a
neighboring farmer. He is a kind
master and pays good wages to all
who work faithfully.
Dan knows this perfectly well, and
he means to please Mr. Bruce; but
he has one bad habit he often for-
135






136 PLEASURE FIRST.

gets that work should come before
play.
He can't see why his father, mother,
Mr. Bruce, and everybody should be
continually telling him this. He
much prefers pleasure first. And he
can't see any harm in -sitting on the
fence and making whistles, if Maj is
on the lookout for stray sheep.
To tell the truth, his dog Maj is
the most faithful of the two. His
sharp eyes are not turned from the
sheep long at a time.
One day after Dan had been in
Mr. Bruce's employ for some time,
he sat on the fence trying a famous
whistle which he had made the day
before. Dan really had quite a
knack at such things.





























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PLEASURE FIRST. i37

He knew the sheep were wander-
ing further and further from their ac-
customed haunts. But he knew,
also, that Maj was watching, so he
sat contentedly until the sheep were
nearly out of sight.
Maj was far more uneasy than his
master. He tried several times to
call Dan's attention to the flock, by a
low bark. At last he could endure
it no longer. He saw a commotion
among the sheep in the distance,
and with one quick, sharp bark of
warning to Dan, he bounded away to
attend to the flock which was now
running wildly in every direction.
The last bark of his dog roused
Dan from his whistle reveries; and







138 PLEASURE FTRST.

he ran swiftly after Maj as soon as
he comprehended the danger.
A strange dog had attacked the
flock. And Mr. Bruce would have
lost one or more valuable sheep, if
Maj had been no more faithful than
Dan.
Mr. Bruce had seen Dan's. care-
lessness from a distance. And, as it
was not the first time, the next day
She dismissed him. He was unwill-
ing to trust his sheep longer in Dan's
care.




















VISITING THE MENAGERIE.

PAPA! Won't you let Albert
and me go sailing with the children
to-morrow ? "
Mr. Whiton looked at Ella's eager
face a moment, then his own grew
sober.
Who will manage the yacht?" he
asked.
"The boys said Otis Sherman
139






140 VISITING THE MENAGERIE.

was going to take them out," replied
Albert.
Now, children," he said, after a
few minutes thought," if you will give
up this trip cheerfully, I think I can
give you a greater pleasure the last
of the week. I'm not quite sure, yet,
so will not speak more definitely
now.
"We'd rather go with you, papa,
than with Otis!" exclaimed Ella,
quickly.
"Why can't we go with both? in-
quired Albert, who dearly loved the
water.
Simply because I do not consider
him the proper person to take out a
party of children. You shall take a















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VISITING THE MENAGERIE. 141

sail as often as you like, Albert, when
we go to the shore for the summer.
But I think far too much of my chil-
dren to trust them in careless hands."
His pleasant smile as he kissed
them good-by, removed all clouds
from their faces. Soon they began
to wonder what the coming pleasure
would be. They thought of almost
every thing but what was in their fa-
ther's mind. When he returned from
his office at night, he had many ques-
tions to answer; but he kept his se-
cret until the next day. Then he
brought home a large handbill.
"0 good! A menagerie! Lots
of wild animals! 0 papa! won't you
take us to see them ? asked Albert,
excitedly.






142 VISITING THE MENAGERIE.

"That's just what I propose do-
ing," was the smiling reply.
That's what papa meant yester-
day," said Ella, almost as delighted as
her brother.
Two happier children could not
have been found anywhere, than those
which sat in the carriage beside Mr.
Whiton the next day, when they
started to visit the menagerie in the
neighboring town.
Ella and Albert long remembered
their pleasant visit to the menag-
erie.


















WISE POMP.

WOULD you let Pomp go, Rex?"
"No. He'll only be a bother. We
can't fish with a dog in the boat."
But just see how he begs! I
can't bear to deny the good, faithful
fellow."
Pooh! You're too chicken-hearted
by half, Will. Suppose he does beg,
can't you say no?"
"Not to Pomp. Come, let him go!
143






144 WISE POMP.

I'd rather stay at home, than disap-
point him."
Do as you like, then. But I tell
you, he'll bother us."
"Never mind, if he does a little.
You may have all the fish, any-
way.
Neither Will nor Rex were very
skillful rowers, and it took them
some time to get to that part of the
pond where they wished to fish. And
their labor was not very well re-
warded even then, for they waited in
vain for a single bite.
We'll go over to the south cove,"
said Rex, drawing in his line with
some impatience, I don't mean to go
home till I get some, if I stay all
night."

















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WISE POMP. I45

They were obliged to turn the boat
round, and somehow, in their awk-
ward hauling, the boat was upset and
the boys suddenly found themselves
in the deep water.
Both sank. When they rose, drip-
ping and terrified, they tried to cling
to the.boat. But it was wet and slip-
pery, and they could not keep a firm
hold.
What was to be done? Neither
could swim, and they were quite a
distance from the shore. They would
have been in great danger without
the wise Pomp. He put his wisdom
to most excellent use.
He leaped from the water, and
planted his paws firmly upon the up-
turned keel. Will and Rex managed






146 WISE POMP.

to raise themselves up and get astride
the bottom of the boat, by clinging to
those strong shaggy paws.
The current set towards the shore
and drifted them slowly into shallow
water. As Rex jumped off to right
the boat, he said:
You'll always be a welcome pas-
senger, Pomp, when we go fishing,
hereafter. Dog, instead of fish, was
a most excellent change for us to-
day."









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