Scratching birds

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Material Information

Title:
Scratching birds
Series Title:
Prang's natural history series for children
Physical Description:
16, 2 p., 4 leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 25 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Calkins, Norman A ( Norman Allison ), 1822-1895
Diaz, Abby Morton, 1821-1904 ( joint author )
L. Prang & Co ( Publisher )
Welch, Bigelow & Co ( Printer )
Donor:
Egolf, Robert ( donor )
Publisher:
L. Prang and Company
Place of Publication:
Boston
Manufacturer:
Welch, Bigelow & Co.
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Birds -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Juvenile literature -- 1878   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1878   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1878
Genre:
Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
Publishers' advertisements   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
United States -- Massachusetts -- Cambridge

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
classification by Norman A. Calkins, ... and text by Mrs. A.M. Diaz.
General Note:
Stiff paper covers.
General Note:
Includes publisher's advertisement at end of text and on back cover.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001580356
oclc - 22947422
notis - AHK4262
System ID:
UF00048510:00001

Full Text


0
PRANGS M

NATU RL HISTORY SERIES















L" PR--G' Co -- BOSTON*



ILI
*l, I I'
































































The Baldwin Library
University
StmX ^i










PRANG'S



NATURAL HISTORY SERIES


FOR CHILDREN.




SCRATCHING BIRDS.



CLASSIFICATION
BY
NORMAN A. CALKINS,
SUPERINTENDENT OF PRIMARY SCHOOLS, NEW YORK CITY,
AND TEXT BY
MRS. A. M. DIAZ,
AUTHOR OF "THE WILLIAM HENRY LETTERS."









BOSTON:
L. PRANG AND COMPANY.
1878.





























COPYRIGHT.
BY L. PRANG & 00.
1877.























S'
74~j~
'a" ~w.-

















































WILD TURKEY
al [I b'.inb i1
&lii.d LL;uiJ Ci01 1 1 I












PRANG'S

NATURAL HISTORY SERIES FOR CHILDREN.



SCRATCHING BIRDS.

THE TURKEY. pointing to the red bunches on the
O1! said Nannie, Grandpa's Turkey's neck.
Turkeys are not half as handsome as Those make a pretty appearance
that! in the picture," said Cousin Kate,
That is a wild one," said Cousin but in the bird himself they are not
Kate. Wild Turkeys have' much at all pleasing. Don't you remember
brighter feathers than the tame Grandpa's old Gobbler, and how rough
ones." and skinny these red bunches looked
"Look! look!" cried Tiptoes. on his neck, and how much redder
"His tail's got a fan in it! 'T is and bigger they grew when he got
like Aunt Hattie's fan !" mad at the boys for teasing him,
A Turkey had Aunt Hattie's fan and how he chased that little fat
before she had it," said Cousin Kate, boy? "
" for its feathers grew in some Tur- I do," said Fred. The feathers
key's tail." stood out round his neck, and lie
I should think the ladies would looked twice as big as he was, ann1
start a fashion of wearing feather what a noise he did make with his
dresses," said Uncle Willie. This gobble, gobble, gobble "
Turkey's overskirt is handsomer than And he flew at Minnie Derby,"
any of theirs." said Nannie, the time she had that
The Indians set that fashion long red sack on."
ago," said Cousin Kate. "They used Yes," said Cousin Kate, we
to take the small feathers of tha Tur- thought old Gobbler would n't say
key and weave them into a kind of anything to Minnie, because she was
feathery clothing for themselves. And one of the Derby family, but the red
in Louisiana, one of our Southern sack was too much for him. You
States, it was once a common custom know he would let any of the Derby
to put four Turkey tails together, and family step across the yard, in and
so make an umbrella of them. Your out, but if any of their visitors tried
lady with the feather overskirt might it, he would fly at them. This shows
have a parasol to match." that he had some kind of knowledge
And she could have a locket, a in that small head of his."
double, red locket," said Nannie, O,Turkeys know a thing or two,"









2, SCRATCHING BIRDS.

-.ii1 Uncle Willie, "if their heads are fini.-. a dry place under a log or among
.ill1. TI.-v know how to cheat the some bushes, scratches a li-'lt. hollow
rc;,.:i Horned Owl, for one thing. in the g'loui.1. :in.l lines it w ithldry
In the woods, out West, you find leaves. h,-. lays about a dozen -.i.
great flocks of Wild Tn 1k -', and at whitish in color, cI.-I. I.1 with red
nli-hi. they go to roost among the dots."
trees. Now, the G(r t. Horned Owl "Do Turkeys fly North in the
likes a Turkey dinner as ,vi.il as we p riiir'? a.,k.-l Nanunie.
do, and it is very convenient for him 0 no," said Uncle W;li,:. T1h-y
that his dinner hour comes after the would starve where there are no
"Ti'u.ik,-, have gone to roost. But he woods. Turkeys are not f(i.h--eaLt:r.
is -oimI tilt.- i.:i,,:iniil-d. For in- like thi- water-fowl. Turk:ie'- muu-t
-.i-,I ., suppose that here -taild-. a Iavi\l- tl:ir l:orn::- nli1 seeds, and ber-
t.,ll ti e,- v.ith Turkeys roosting in its ries and grapes, with now and the-
branches, and suppose that in the air a worm or ,- i.-l,:l.II,:'r by way of
;a1...\- if tlii Great Hii:._il1 Owl is sail- dessert."
ing i..uni. and yr,:',ii., with ito.- silent EmP thel d.., mii-'r:at:." said Cousin
wings and its 9tarin" eyes v.i-;l..'en. Kate. I have read am.;:,intr i:,f their
.ulll..nly it diI.' .down upon a Ti tle. migrations."
II 'k a1 H1:t1i tl.- Tik.-y dl.:k- i. 1i W e should ] -_r.,it, if there '..,-,
head ..inl :'e his v.;ir. and turns his nothing to eat in the house, and
tail .1.. ni upon his 1,.-k, .r. .th.t tihe i n.tl'ihi to i1- got," -;,il Uncle Wil-
Owl, instead o: t ttik; i_ its i:l1niv- 1i.1. We should migrate to a pl.,.
into the Ti. k- iy'. fit f!,. li: ,.1, on where there was food. Turki-yv HI. the
Th..-e ,titt t.,il-l-tli. i n.l sl'id,.-s off. same. Fir-i, the Tuirk,-` fathers- '- rt.
L'.-t..>-- it can make another pounce, on foot. You can tell them from the
the Tili k-.yi have all dropped down mothers by their brighter colors and
.J!i 1I.l1.iiu among the bushes." the long tuft of hair in front. T1i-v
And did you know that the tr',el off, from tei to a iliinlir,1 of
Mother Turkey gives her children them in a flock, and the Tink.-y
medicine ? asked Cousin Kate. If niMihers, i;i< : one with her family
v...i.-' Tiirk.- .-... wet, there i1 dan- :ni:out. her, follow I'.-hinl. When t1f e
,.-' that they will sicken and die. So come -to a rivr they wait a ,1L.i or
when it b1i-,.pi.- i. that they do .-- I nwt. tv.. and seem to be lu.1iilin' a sort of
their ii..Ith;i'rs sometimes If-ei tlher ,nit n III-Ii. The Turke-. fathers make a
with the buds of the .siee-liusl t. .r':,l ado lg..1:'.lin., calling, li'Itfin.
keep them from being sick. TuL kys about, as if they were trying to screw
always build thIei nests in dry places. their ( u..,-< i1." -,., tli.. point of liiyni
The birds that we were tnlkiinu- about over the water. At last everything is
the other day-- tl- Swimmers-do settled; no more -tinttiu-, no more
just the opposite of this. They imill n.;-.. The whole company assemble
ina: i-ai.;i.-. so as to be handy to their in theAt,''- of the hii-Ji'-t trees, the
f,,l,. To make her nest, the Turkey leader ,i":\- the.signal, and ;iw-. tl,.-y




S









SCRATCHING BIRDS. 3

fly. When all are over, they travel they let the sun help hatch their eggs.
on as before, till they find a good A number of them stand together in
scratching ground. They scratch a large circle, and with their great feet
among the dry leaves for nuts and scratch the grass and sticks and rub-
seeds of plants. Turkeys have to bish towards the centre. They get as
scratch for their living, you know." much as two'cart-loads, and pile it up
This reminds me," said Cousin there in the form of a haycock. The
Kate, "that I was going to ask eggs are placed deep in this pile of
Tiptoes to look at the Turkey's stuff, the large ends downward. The
feet and see if they are like Duck's pile rots in the hot sun, and gives out
feet." a great deal of heat, and this heat
Tiptoes bent his head close to the hatches the eggs. 0, I forgot one
picture, then asked Nannie, in a whis- curious thing. They leave a hole in
per, what the "piece of somefing" the middle for the hot air to go up.
was between the Duck's toes. He The pile would get too hot without
had forgotten the word. Upon being this. Another curious thing is that
informed that it was a web," he the male Turkeys attend to these eggs,
made known the fact that the Tur- and cover them deeper, or take away
key had no web between its toes. the coverings, as the eggs need to be
That's it," said Cousin Kate. made warmer or not as warm. Some-
"We have been looking at Swimmers. times there will be a bushel of eggs
Now we are looking at Scratchers. in one nest."
A web would hinder a Scratcher from I have heard of a wild Turkey's
scratching as much as it helps a nest with forty-two eggs in it in this
Swimmer in swimming. Swimmers country," said Cousin Kate. "It be-
can stand any amount of water, but longed to three Turkeys, and three
look at Turkeys and other Scratchers Turkeys sat on it. It is said that
in a shower, and you '11 see them they never go to their nests twice in
scampering off to a dry place." the same way. This shows some
"I don't know what the Brush- thought. Also, that when a man
Turkeys would do if they had web- passes the nest in a hasty, careless
feet," said Uncle Willie. I rather manner, as if he were not minding, the
think they would have to sit on their mother remains sitting; but if he goes
eggs and hatch them out the same as along slowly and softly, she hides her-
our Turkeys." self. This too shows thought. When
And how do they hatch them the eggs are pretty nearly hatched, it
out ?" asked Fred. won't do to leave them, and she will
And whose Turkeys are they ? not leave them. She will be killed on
asked Nannie. the nest first. This shows courage.
"They are a kind of Wild Tur- When the young ones are out, she
key," said Uncle Willie, "but they caresses and fondles them tender-
don't live here. They live away off ly, keeps them from the wet, calls
in some of the South Sea Islands, and them under her wings if there is









4 SCRATCHING BIRDS.

.lan1Er, ';1n..1 shows them how to VIRGINIA QUAIL, AND CALIFORNIA
scratch for their living. This shows QUAIL.
mother-love." "HERE are four more Americans,"
It is curious," said Uncle Wfili.- i ail Cousin Kate. Two of ih, in
"to hear the different kiniil-. I 'cluck' have long stockings on, one has half-
thi:- mother Turkey makes, and t,. way stockings, and the :,tilr has very
notice how quickly her children under- -h it stockings. The one with the
stand. If she sees a hawk .'.!\ Itt. 1,ilf-wyv .ic1i,,,l,, the Q.,iI is
like a 1,L.:k speck in the, air, she gives what boys in tl.:h country call FBu
a cluck which keeps Il.'ii from stray- Ilir, .' "
ing away. If the s l-..-1; grows larger, "Hoo! Hoo! Hoo!" :'ril Tip-
she gives a cluck which calls them toes, laughing. Birds wear stock-
closer. If the hawk comes lower :%t 11 i "
begins to circle round, she gives a Yes," said Cousin Kate, warm
cluck which makes themii drop and feather st,'.l.:hiig. Birds which roost
appear to be dead. I have seen litil-. .,i the ground nights, as tli-- dil...
Turke:y -iv slie close to the ground that need t..t.l-:iii- to keep their legs
you would think they were fastened warm. Birds v iiih roost on trees
down." are bare-legged. They keep their 1:,-,
"I read something about Turkeys warm by bending tlhlnt under their
the 4.tl.'r day," said Fi..l: only I bodies."
have forgotten the king's name." "I heard a Quail once," said Nan-
Whnt! Fr. -.jt n king's name ?" nie. "Iwas lii'1. with -*.t,.lm..'. It
.ai T.l ,l Wiih!i:. But let us have said Bob !lil,/ !' Bob l/1!,' .""
the story. But this is a Vir.' !i,i, Qiii." said
It was n't 1 -tory," said Fred. Fred. Y1,i were iiut. iliiin in Vir-
"No king and no story!" cried ginia, Nannie."
Uncle Willie. Well, let us have "It was no doubt the same bird,"
what you remember of whatever it said Cousin Kate. Wiliter about
was." birds speak of the Virginia Q'- l as
I read in a book," said Fred," that the Co:iiiir,-i American Partridge,'
Turkeys were first found in this coun- so it must be found in other places
try, and were carried from here to 1....-ii.. Vir.';liia."
Eim..ip-. ThI:. were ih..ll..1 to be In this country," said Uncle Wil-
.nm'ethiim' wonderful over there, and lie, ".Quails are called Quails in some
the first one ever cooked in France, places, and in other places tih y are
was cooked in. a palace for a king' called Partridges."
r-lldii-' dinner. IwishI I:-.ill thiilk "I am going to tell a Qii.il story,"
of his name." said Cousin Kate. Once there was
Never mind," said Uncle Wil- a man who got some Quails' eggs and
lie. "It is \v..rii 1;:..'wii-' to 'kIlWw hIti li-1 them under a Bantam hen.
that the first Turkeys were Ameri- When the little Quails came out they
cans." followed the hen and behaved ,iim-
























\."7 .. "- -




VIFOINIA
Vfr' i
























"PRAIRIE CHICKEN
PARTRIDGEoPnCJFFEL -o PINNATED
. 4&gZ -ce ..ffv cj ../--a/..r. Z.h.
_aSars t. -ir... ..-<
...OL ... . ., .
PRAIRI C !X
PART~~iD(}EoP RLTF 'JPCE' *PN IE
1 r [jj]
L m CF _[f'' ]:!









SCRATCHING BIRDS. 5

selves very well. Their wings were they are frightened at anything they
clipped, and they became so tame that can scatter at short notice. When the
they would sit on the table while the fright is over, one cluck from some
man was writing, and peck his hand, old grandfather in the flock brings
and run off with his pen." them together again. The Quail often
I know a California Quail story," builds her nest around meadows and
said Uncle Willie. Once there were corn-fields, usually at the bottom of
some California Quails which were a thick tuft of grass. It is made of
hatched out under a hen. I don't leaves and fine dry grass, and con-
know how many, or whether their tains from twelve to twenty white
wings were clipped or not. I only eggs, broad at one end, pointed at
know that two of these Quails entered the other. They are an inch across
into friendship with some cows, went in the thickest part, and a little more
with them to the fields, stood by them than an inch long. The eggs of the
while they were milked, and roosted California Quail are buff, dotted and
with them in the stable." splashed with bright brown. You find
The California Quail, too, is a from ten to fifteen in a nest. It hap-
Partridge, so the picture says," re- pens sometimes in the Northern States
marked Cousin Kate. that after the Quails have settled into
There 's not much difference be- their roosting places for the night,
tween the California Quail and the there comes a heavy fall of snow. If
Virginia Quail, except in their looks," this is followed by sudden frost a crust
said Uncle Willie. "You see they is formed at the top which keeps the
are of about the same size, eight to poor birds prisoners, and they die of
ten, and nine to ten inches." starvation. By this means, during
The California Quail has blue some winters, the Quails over a wide
feathers," said Nannie; and he has extent of country have been almost
a narrow white stripe that comes wholly destroyed."
down like bonnet strings." I know a story of a crazy Quail,"
And a funny bunch of feathers said Cousin Kate. Once there was
on his head that looks like a little a Quail, and he flew with such force
feather duster," said Fred. And against a window that he went through
his bill is longer and narrower than the glass and injured his brain, and
the other one's. See? Look up in was never quite himself again. After
the corners of the pictures!" that, instead of saying,' Bob White,'
"." He is slimmer than the Virginia he said White Bob.'"
Quail," said Cousin Kate," and stands "Is that a true story?" asked
up straighter." Nannie.
"Quails have a curious way of "I have no reason to doubt it,"
going to roost at night," said Uncle said Cousin Kate. It is told by a
Willie. They sit in a circle on the man who spent much time in watch-
ground, all facing out, and move back- ing birds. If the Quail's brain was
wards till their tails touch. Then if injured, why should n't he have be-









6 SCRATCHING BIRDS.

haved a little out of the way ? This forth with lii.;h .-ldl in the air, as much
man says he has often seen a I i i act as to say,' See how fine I am!'- The
diffEr.-,tlHy from the i :t of its klinl. turkey-cock does the same when he
and stay apart by it;'lf,. and go is choosing his mate, and proud e o'u.nl-
through \with all sorts of queer little he looks. I have seen 1:..:i and .irl.,
motions, as if i\t wI\' half crazed." and even older people, do -...im.-hin.-
"I have seen a Partridge act as if of this kind when they hall i 'i clothes
it were crn"v." said 'Uncle \ili:.. on!"
"At least we should think a man "Partridges are not very careful
was crazy to do such a tliii-:. It about hiding their nests," said F-.:id.
was a kind of P ,rtridny, called a I found one once just outside a corn-
Riiqfii Grouse. field and quite near a footpath. It
was only a few leaves scraped together
PARTRIDGE, OR RUFFED GROUSE. under a log. The eggs were yellow-
ish wliif -, and ;il.,nit thie i-'e ,:.f ban-
"SLEL, Tiptoes. That one with long tam's eggs. There were ten of
s.h,.kii-!., standing on the log. I them."
have seen birds of this kind run and But tih.- have a care over their
dive head first into the snow," contin- eggs," said Uncle Willie. I was
ued Uncle Willie. l'.:lin, the other 1.1v of a Partridge
"And did n't they ever come 1 a':k nest which some men found in plough-
ai. ill ? asked Tiptoes, soberly. ing a field. When the furrows almost
N., tlh.- didn't come back; they reached to the nest, the Pat.-l'il- .
crept under tl snow and I".'p'i.,-l up took the alarm, and moved their eggs
several yards ahead. But they often to a distance of f,-Ety ymAl,-. If the
go under the snow at night and stay men had wa ilk:.l1 towards the nest while
there to keep warm. Sometimes it the mother P.t trid;-L was sitting, she
rains during the night, and then, if would probably have flown off ai.l
thlre is a -ui1.l.,n calici- of weather, fallen down and made believe she was
and frost sets in, the poor birds are wounded, and have g..ie tliii ii h with
frozen up, and when the snow melts various odd motions, in order to get
away, there they lie on the ground, all the men to look at her, and not at the
deal ." nest. I have often seen Partridges
TIih. bird in the pi:'lin,.: does not do this. But they don't let them-
show his i'ri." said Cousin Kate. selves be caught. They are swift
"You would see the e',r, if y-ui runners, and once among the bushes
should happen to be near when a Par- it is hard finding them."
tridge is choosing his mate," said "And the reason you can't find
Uncle Willie. At such times he them," said Fr-... is because their
makes his neck feathers stand .it feathers are so near the color of the
like a; ruffle, and -.ie:,l-. his tail, and ground and the stems of the bushes."
stl.-i;:lhen- up his plump little body "Yes," said Uncle Willie, the
as tall as he can, and walks back and Quails and Pa, t i;.1---., themselves are








.SCRATCHING BIRDS.

not quite as bright-colored as these in eggs and hatched out fourteen little
the pictures." Partridges. One day the old rooster
Teacher talked a great deal about went into the coop, and he was so sur-
such things the other day," said Fred. prised and amazed and enraged to see
" Toads are ground-color. Frogs are the hen taking care of a brood of Par-
mud-color. Teacher said that by this tridges, that he flew at her, and almost
means, creatures are kept from being tore her in pieces. And now I'11 tell
destroyed. I mean by being of the a prettier Partridge story. A mother
same colors as the places where they Partridge was once caught in a trap,
stay." and the father Partridge brought to
O, I remember cried Nannie. her tender green plants enough to fill
" Katydids live in the trees, and a hat, and piled them up close by the
they are green, the color of the trap. I think this showed very tender
leaves.' care on his part."
I should like to hear Partridges
drum," said Fred. Grandpa says PRAIRIE CHICKEN.
that on a calm day you can hear them I KNEW a boy who brought home
half a mile off." a nest of Prairie Chicken's eggs,"
Tiptoes looked close at the picture, said Uncle Willie, and put them
running his finger along the log, then under a sitting hen in place of her
looked up and asked soberly, Uncle own. When they were hatched out,
Willie, does he have a drum ? instead of following the hen they made
"Yes," said Uncle Willie, and her follow them. They seemed not to
drumsticks. But the drum is his understand her language at all. No
own body, and the drumsticks are the matter how much she clucked, they
feathers of his wings. He has a way would not come back. They went
of making these feathers very stiff, straying away into the prairies, and
and of beating them ;i..Oin-.I his body. may be straying away there to this
At first these beats come one at a time, day. The country out West is in
and have a bumping sound; but they some places all wild prairie-land
keep coming faster and faster, and roll which stretches out like a floor miles
into each other, so that they sound like and miles, and miles, with never a
the roll of a drum, or like far away hill. Prairie Chickens are plenty
thunder; especially if several Par- enough out there. A flock of them
tridges are drumming at the same will often cover acres of prairie. They
time ? make their nests in the grass. The
How big is a Partridge ? asked eggs from ten to fifteen eggs are
Nannie. grayish white, dotted and spotted with
0, about the size of a bantam brown. They are the size of a small
hen," said Uncle Willie. hen's egg, and are sharply pointed at
I know a Partridge story that has the small end. Can you guess how
a rooster in it," said Cousin Kate. Prairie Chickens find bare 'ground
A hen sat on fourteen Partridge after a deep snow ? "









8 SCRATCHING BIRDS.

"I guess they i.i- tracks," said Chicken De Pr' ,iri- being an Ameri-
Nai,-1, abi-, ii._ can, i'l.1,w the American horn."
Not ix..tly," said Uncle Willi-, "Are th:.y all four Americans?"
"but they melt thI snow .y tlh- heat asked Namiii:..
of trlet bodies, and trample it with "Yes, all Americans. We have
their feet, and so at last make ft Il,.th P.irtri-l.les and Quails in thle
thl..rnl-eils a sort of yard or enclosure woods vi.,ut here. The 1u1;ils are,
of bare ground. If thI .-, happens to much .inallir thal the Parrtrlti-,. an!l
be a farm near theaCe wild 1i.,. aii-., thi- are rounder, and more ]ik.-1: ti, Ie
Prairie Chickens help themselves to V:.,II1i in fli,-:k., inid can fly better."
corn, and the farmer hires boys to "Tint thly are all Scratchers," -iilI
drive them l x v.y with ri:ttl,-. But Ciiissin Kate; "all feed upon -.-.:1-.
the- most curious thing about the berries, i:,r11l-. and insects; ill live
Prairie c'likini, are. their tooting in .1r.\ ila,.,- ; ti1 are swift runners;
horns." ;1i ;al r i:'tt: I' t ItiiR ill 2 tli;ii tt 11Vii2 :
Do they toot with their wings ?" and aill t;k. ,I'v:-t ..ilre of their v,. n '."
asked Flt l. "And all hl\, thlii tails turn
no," said 1Un.-l:. Willie. Lo.,k down," said Uncle Willie.
at the Prairie Chicken in the i;ults.. "And nearly all have short til-.."
Dni,'t you see that 1.un.:h of l-iii.- .. ,I Fred.
isatlhsi-s on II: back of it, neck ? I wsn.i.lr if Partti,1.-l':s could not
Thl:.-.-: 1.i.-' feathers cover a ii.i,;,n.' be tamed and made to lay eggs for
horn. This is not a horn at ;ll,, lat us," said (',:iu;in Kate.
a bag of \--.ll.i skin. There are two "Very likb.ly, by much tryi_.''
I._.-,. one on each side. -li.iistii -disl Uncle Willie; "but it takes a
these skinny bags hang loose, but if long timiit: to get thi:. I,'hi out of at11
their owner wishes to toot, he draws wil;1 creature ; and besides, th i ir eggs
ai! into thrill-in i so blows them up would be much smaller than hens'
to the size of oranges. The noise he eggs."
makes with them can be heard for When Tom Derbywas out West,"
miil-." said Fib:l, "he tried ever so many
"These two birds might give a con- times to raise pigeons by i.tuttinr- \\ ill
iel t." said Cousin Kate. pigeon's eggs under his tame pigeons;
"Yes," said Uncle Willie, and but as soon as the little ones -,,it a
tlie Quails mnl-ih help. Grand Per- chance they flew away. Tom says
formance The Quail Brothers will that out West, wild 1ijel-.n- flHy over
sing their famous .,s,1:'."Bob White," by the skyful."
accompanied by Mr. P,,ii/,;,1l. Di
Woods on the Drum, and Mr. Chicken THE WILD PIGEON.
De Prairie on the Horn!' THAT W1.i Pi'.-.n in the pie-tim
"It ,.s,.ill n't be called the Frrl looks as if he were eager to fly," said
horn," said Fi-,:. Cousin Kate."
"No," said Uncle Willie. "Mr. "You would think they were eager








SCRATCHING BI-RDS. 9

to fly," said Uncle Willie, if you These Pigeons, like other birds, have
could see them rushing through the the eye so made that they can see
air, as Tom says, by the skyful, at objects far off, or objects near them,
the rate of about a mile a minute! whichever they choose. 0, yes, they
One day when I was walking along by know when to light. And when they
a river in Ohio, I looked up and saw do light, what a commotion! Think
what seemed to be a cloud. It came of a flock a mile wide, and two hun-
nearer and nearer, and grew larger dred and forty miles long, rushing
and larger. It overspread the sky through one of those great Western
and hid the light of the sun. At last forests, eating as they go! The front
it reached entirely over. A curious ranks settle down, and those a little
noise came from it, -a. drowsy noise, way behind fly over them; and this
which made me feel sleepy. This flying over each other is done so
endless cloud was made up of Wild quickly that the whole mass seems to
Pigeons, and the drowsy noise was be pouring through the forest like a
the sound of their wings." living torrent. Such a crashing of
Did they all come down and stand branches such a whirring and whiz-
on the ground ?" asked Tiptoes. zing! You can't hear the sound of
0 no," said Uncle Willie. "They your own voice. They bear down
were going on an errand and could n't upon the trees, and beat the nuts and
stop." seeds with their wings and scratch
"Now, Uncle Willie!" cried Nannie. for these among the dry leaves.
"Yes," said Uncle Willie. "And Great branches snap like pipe-stems,
their errand was food. Wild Pig- and even trees are broken down.
eons, like Wild Turkeys, when they The place looks as if a hurricane had
have eaten all the acorns, grapes, ber- passed through.
ries, and seeds, in one place, migrate Mr. Wilson tells of a forest in
to another. Turkeys walk till they Kentucky several miles wide, and
come to a stream, fly over the stream, nearly forty miles long, and every
and go in small flocks. Pigeons fly tree loaded with nests! The people
all the way, and go by the hundred far and near feasted upon Pigeons,
million; and that flock, or procession, and salted down Pigeons to keep.
which I saw was three days in passing These immense flights are not as
over. They flew high, and flew with common now as they were when Mr.
a rush." Wilson wrote.
But if they are so high up, and The Wild Pigeon"s nest is a sort
going so swift, how can they tell of platform made of twigs loosely put
where to light? asked Fred. together, and placed in a forked
"They have telescopes in their branch of a tree. It is not much hol-
eyes," said Uncle Willie. lowed, and has no lining. You find
O, now you are joking!" said in it one or two white, oval-shaped
Nannie. eggs, about an inch and a half long."
Not exactly," said Uncle Willie. I suppose our tame Pigeons must








10 SC' '.ATCHIN G BIRDS.

have come from the wild ones," said and iN. 'lllfi.itl: that it touched !i;
Cousin Kate. heart, and made him long for his old
"Tom Derby says hllat thii kind home and a piia-ncful life. It was
Uncle Willie has been talking about pretty hard to escape, but he did
is the ,. ,i r' Pigeon," said Ftr. :.':-',l: ,lmi went back to his h..w.. :'m
" and that our tame ones came from' Ehi'latl."
another kind called th,.: Rock-dove." Don't you believe he l,.ilt a Pig-
"I have read," said C'.iin Kj, ,te, l-,n-ih:lue vhi i 1ii- _t I:If li. .? asked
"that immense flillt of Wild Pi-:-. N,;Inii. after a pause in the conver-
eons were common even in il I ,atiin.
eastern part of the country before it "If lji- h.1 iiuil. one," -;11 Fi-,.
became thickly .I tlel. One of :i i- and painted it whit.-, he -.,,n :;i:,
old wiitr0.. .-ov-:- Pigeons. Tom Derby says there are
,-;iIhv\s- stray ones I.l.,ki.i, out for
'Here i!, tli.. Fill large flocks of PI'-'-, .h_. 1 .ont
So numerous that they darken all rli.. l:, ho:l.-r to let."
Yes," said Uncle Willie. Pig-
Another writer .-:,v tlht a person eons iuii have homes, for they are
.,:,1i1,1 .-e n,:.ih1r .-.ni.. nor end- t il i,. Husband and wife live
in. t.lh or Ilr-ia:ith. of these mil- t,,:tl r till one dies, and help ..1
il"- .thlr-r ini hatching the eggs and in
lriininL:, food to the lit rln ones. The
THE DOVE,
CousIN EK.l E, are doves pigeons, a time, and lets the tn.:1 i :-, :.'iut to
ann pigeons doves ?" asked Nannie. take thi: ;ii'."
"Doves are Pigeons," said (4':.nin1, "And sometimes, if she stays too
Kate. These birds are all of one long," said Fr-: l. he goes and drives
family; still, I I;. 1.l1l' vi nk we should her home; and if he stays too long,
iall that Wild Pigeon a Dove. We she goes and drives him home. One
usually think i.f a Dove as a quiet, pair of Tom's doves does this w\.y."
..l. ,.:.In.: creature." Pigeons are loving little creat-
": You will find a bird of this kind urf." said Cousin Kate. They coo
in the woods throughout the UniLt-l to each other s,'.-lly, as much as to say,
Stat.-." -*. Uncle Willi... "It is 'My dear, I love you dearly,' and
called TI.,: Carolina Turtle Dove, and touch bills, as if they were 1:;--i_
it looks much like the Dove in the each other. Sometimes if one dies, its
picture." mate almost ,li v itself to death."
Mr. Audubon tells a iiut liil Perhaps it is on account of their
-t.:.r about this Dove," said Cousin loving disposition that they have al-
Kate. There was a pirate vessel ways been so well liked," said Uncle
a;i:h:i:.rl -..ff the coast of Floril;ai, and Willi 1. "Thousands of years ago peo-
one of the pirates, when he went ple kept tame Pigeons. A very old
ashore, iu.,-.1 t.. listen to the cooing of writer, .l ,-kii _-" of them, says,- MI .,n
a Dove. It was so soft, and sweet, are mad with the love of Ili.-.- 1.I.-i..









SCRATCHING BIRDS. 11

They build towers for them on the You begin with a young bird. Carry
tops of their roofs.' Another writer this young bird in a covered basket,
says it is a sign of rain when Pigeons say half a mile from home, then let it
return slowly to their homes before out, and it will fly directly back. Next .
the usual time of day. Did you ever time you carry it a little farther, then
notice that Pigeons drink differently a little farther, and when it is fully
from hens and other birds ? trained, it will fly home from almost
"I have," said Fred. "A Pigeon any distance. Sometimes people going
holds its head down and drinks in all on sea voyages have taken Carrier
it wants, the same as a horse or a Pigeons along in order to send one
cow. Other birds take a few drops, back, from time to time, with a letter.
then look up and wait for the water to When a Carrier Pigeon is first let off,
run down." it rises,-high in air, flies round and
"I once read of a Pigeon," said round in circles, then darts off like an
Cousin Kate," who was so fond of a arrow."
boy that it would follow him all about But how do they know which way
and settle on his shoulder. When the to go ? asked Nannie.
boy went to his work he would let the "That's the question," said Uncle
Pigeon go.only as far as a certain spot. Willie. Some say that these Pigeons
The Pigeon soon learned where this find their way by sight; others say
spot was, and when told to go home, they find it by instinct. There are
it would fly round and round in a cir- people who think that birds and bees
cle, and then go." and other of the animals have a sense
If it had been a Carrier Pigeon, that we do not have a homeing
it might have carried a note back," sense. How do bees far from home
said Fred. find their way each to its own hive ?
How does a cat, carried in a bag
twenty or thirty miles, get back to its
CARRIER PIGEON. home within twenty-four hours? How
"I HAVE heard about Carrier Pig- do dogs and horses find their way?
eons," said Nannie, "but I don't know Some people look down upon ani-
how they carry notes." mals, as if they were hardly worth
The note is written in fine letters noticing, but, after all, they can do a
on very thin paper," said Uncle Willie, great many things that we cannot.
" and tied around the Pigeon's leg." That little hump-nosed, ring-eyed, yel-
But will the Pigeons go just where low-brown bird can beat every one of
you want them to? asked Nannie. us in carrying a message."
O, no," said Uncle Willie. The Do all Carrier Pigeons look like
whole secret of the matter lies in what that one in the picture? asked
is called the 'homeing,' instinct of Nannie.
these birds. Take them where you Some are very much darker than
will and they can find the way home. that," said Uncle Willie," but all have
They need some training, however, the ring around the eye, and the hump









12 R, A T C H I N .; l D11 '.

on the nose. The 1.i--'.-' the hump, after seeing tli.lhlun'rma e of the Phens-
:lII-l..itte ter tl, C'i:,,'; Pi,.:, i dealers ilu t. the fil-,. which kIr.'u wore
used to put 1.it' of cork undi tllh.,.' .--..rne1 of not 1muc11I ancc:ut.
"humps to swell them out, so that the "Let i:e .-,,, what else do I know
birds would bring a great price. Tihv- j;il1t the Pheasant? I know that his
Carrier P'i-...n makes its nest in boxes flesh is thought to be something extra
or dove-cotes i.,:'.ivle1 for it by it-, ii-. -; that he is a wonderfully swift
keel..-r'. inI1i 1 two white i-_'._ runner, and a jn-t as [w[I:..:i'l ilyl:i .:
flyer. I know that he lives on tlih
PHEASANTground, thlt he is a Scratcher, and
PHEASANT.
eats the same kinds of food the other
CousIN K. itR. won't you tell .1,,ut ,,i .the*ll eat. PT.-iaa,,(t-' eggs are .f
thit, I n it. l ,ri, d Li.1 asked Tipti-. li.-it ,.ll,., i.h gray ,:.,,1 and are
"He means, the ,Pheasant." .i.l .ai..,,nnl tlhn i. ns' 'e Tli. nest is
*,1. on the Ar1u.ni,: in !ii":,n the 1,n. li-., and
I think that Pheasant is a beauty," containsi tfni t 1. tl.. f.u it,..-i ,...s."
Ni,i. iii.-.. "if heis'most aIll tail." "" I hn:,,- read," said Cousin Kate,
cHz. iull w;mnt '.-t. :l of room that ti Ph.'-, :,It is ] ,,ia.;tllv t..ndl
to turn round in," said Fred. of buttercup-roots. I should think, to
The Chinese name for him," said look at his picture, that he i;...1t nt
Cousin Kate, -i. tlh ( ...I,l_. -Fl:wer- the 1.uth,-.-,l ih,- lv a 1 pa0n-
Bird.' MaryHowitthaswi itt,-i.,i sie, nil ,:.1i ti.,n. and iik., Liis,
verses to the I'hl.aslnt, beginning: aiin other bright flowers."
'O beautiful bird, in thy a. t.i v 1.!l-. 1" I should like to hai\'- his collar;-
Thou wast made in a 1 .t. .,! l... ,, to hide.' no, his ],l-i,1 n-_ :- no, his back;
Perhaps -Tun.l:1 Willi,- knows some- -no,his tail;--no, the i,-1.,,, ofhim,
tlhii._ lonr. the. Pheasant.' to put in my hat," -Ni.1 NX.Ii.;.
"I know he is one of the handsom- "These pheasants are scarce in our
est birds in the w:irl1," said Uncle country," said Uncle Willie, -" lu. w-v
Willie, "and that his home is away have afew tame 1,.."v-u,,-. Y."ii ii'i.
,iv.-r the other -;.1i of the world in get one of ti.I-.-., if it would be big
Ai, : ;and I know a Pheasant t.-i. y, ,u.ii-.i."
.n i th-ier a king story. Ml king has O,w.n1.1 oi't you be fine !" cried
a name. His namewTi- VC'r-wui. He FV,.l. "Just look at him there, with
was immuii:..ly rich; he had m.,-y his tail spread out!"
Ian.1 jewel., and glittering crownr.;i .1 "Fine f-.l.ih.zl don't make fine
cl..th of silver, and .-...1i of gold, a l.1 i,S,,l." said Cousin Kate. Nannie
everything grand. Oie .i;iy, when he might have fine feathers in her hat,
was set*-.e1i upon his throne, arrayed and still not be a fine girl."
in all his splendor, he asked one of his
wi-. phil:.ih.-u if hle. h.1 : ver beheld THE PEAOO0K.
a-ilythll- so fine. The ilhil'-,s,-hll..' THE Peacock is not a fine 1.,;,."
replied in this fashion, namely, that, said Uncle Willie, if we leave out









12 R, A T C H I N .; l D11 '.

on the nose. The 1.i--'.-' the hump, after seeing tli.lhlun'rma e of the Phens-
:lII-l..itte ter tl, C'i:,,'; Pi,.:, i dealers ilu t. the fil-,. which kIr.'u wore
used to put 1.it' of cork undi tllh.,.' .--..rne1 of not 1muc11I ancc:ut.
"humps to swell them out, so that the "Let i:e .-,,, what else do I know
birds would bring a great price. Tihv- j;il1t the Pheasant? I know that his
Carrier P'i-...n makes its nest in boxes flesh is thought to be something extra
or dove-cotes i.,:'.ivle1 for it by it-, ii-. -; that he is a wonderfully swift
keel..-r'. inI1i 1 two white i-_'._ runner, and a jn-t as [w[I:..:i'l ilyl:i .:
flyer. I know that he lives on tlih
PHEASANTground, thlt he is a Scratcher, and
PHEASANT.
eats the same kinds of food the other
CousIN K. itR. won't you tell .1,,ut ,,i .the*ll eat. PT.-iaa,,(t-' eggs are .f
thit, I n it. l ,ri, d Li.1 asked Tipti-. li.-it ,.ll,., i.h gray ,:.,,1 and are
"He means, the ,Pheasant." .i.l .ai..,,nnl tlhn i. ns' 'e Tli. nest is
*,1. on the Ar1u.ni,: in !ii":,n the 1,n. li-., and
I think that Pheasant is a beauty," containsi tfni t 1. tl.. f.u it,..-i ,...s."
Ni,i. iii.-.. "if heis'most aIll tail." "" I hn:,,- read," said Cousin Kate,
cHz. iull w;mnt '.-t. :l of room that ti Ph.'-, :,It is ] ,,ia.;tllv t..ndl
to turn round in," said Fred. of buttercup-roots. I should think, to
The Chinese name for him," said look at his picture, that he i;...1t nt
Cousin Kate, -i. tlh ( ...I,l_. -Fl:wer- the 1.uth,-.-,l ih,- lv a 1 pa0n-
Bird.' MaryHowitthaswi itt,-i.,i sie, nil ,:.1i ti.,n. and iik., Liis,
verses to the I'hl.aslnt, beginning: aiin other bright flowers."
'O beautiful bird, in thy a. t.i v 1.!l-. 1" I should like to hai\'- his collar;-
Thou wast made in a 1 .t. .,! l... ,, to hide.' no, his ],l-i,1 n-_ :- no, his back;
Perhaps -Tun.l:1 Willi,- knows some- -no,his tail;--no, the i,-1.,,, ofhim,
tlhii._ lonr. the. Pheasant.' to put in my hat," -Ni.1 NX.Ii.;.
"I know he is one of the handsom- "These pheasants are scarce in our
est birds in the w:irl1," said Uncle country," said Uncle Willie, -" lu. w-v
Willie, "and that his home is away have afew tame 1,.."v-u,,-. Y."ii ii'i.
,iv.-r the other -;.1i of the world in get one of ti.I-.-., if it would be big
Ai, : ;and I know a Pheasant t.-i. y, ,u.ii-.i."
.n i th-ier a king story. Ml king has O,w.n1.1 oi't you be fine !" cried
a name. His namewTi- VC'r-wui. He FV,.l. "Just look at him there, with
was immuii:..ly rich; he had m.,-y his tail spread out!"
Ian.1 jewel., and glittering crownr.;i .1 "Fine f-.l.ih.zl don't make fine
cl..th of silver, and .-...1i of gold, a l.1 i,S,,l." said Cousin Kate. Nannie
everything grand. Oie .i;iy, when he might have fine feathers in her hat,
was set*-.e1i upon his throne, arrayed and still not be a fine girl."
in all his splendor, he asked one of his
wi-. phil:.ih.-u if hle. h.1 : ver beheld THE PEAOO0K.
a-ilythll- so fine. The ilhil'-,s,-hll..' THE Peacock is not a fine 1.,;,."
replied in this fashion, namely, that, said Uncle Willie, if we leave out


















-"" - "' -" '' E P C .











_a a..a ..d 36 ~


ANT. A-s I.DV DOVE
atlhmdc Birirds.or
Qalin-aceou dBIrds.









SCRATCHING BIRDS. 13

his feathers. His flesh is poor eat- wild ones lay a dozen or more. The
ing, his voice has a screeching sound, eggs are cream-colored, and are about
and he himself is not very agree- the size of goose eggs."
able." It must be a splendid sight to see
That Peacock Tom Derby's father a thousand or fifteen hundred Pea-
had," said Fred, was so proud that cocks together," said Cousin Kate.
he used to spread his tail and strut "I have read that in Asia, where
up and down before the hens, and if they run wild, you do see such flocks.
they took no notice of him, he would They say it is dangerous to hunt
get mad and fly at them." them, because tigers are often found
And he liked to pilaut. the chick- with them, and the reason of this is
ens," said Nannie. that a kind of plant grows there which
Yes," said Fred," he would drive the tiger and Peacock are both fond
them into a corner, and spread out his of. I have read, too, that in the
tail over them, and rattle his quills so times of long ago, roast Peacock was
as to scare them almost out of their the grand dish for grand parties. It
wits." was set on to ornament the table.
I have known boys to do some- First it was stripped of its skin, then
thing of this kind," said Cousin Kate; the body was cooked with spices, so
"that is, I have known boys who took that it could be kept a long time.
delight in tormenting smaller boys. The skin, with its feathers on, was
And as for pride,wehave all seen peo- then put back on the body, and when
ple, both old and young, who, when the grand dinner party came rourid,
they appeared out in new clothes, the Peacock appeared on the table in
seemed proud as Peacocks." all its glory. Sometimes, to amuse
"I should like to sit on his back the company, the Peacock's bill was
and ride horseback," said Tiptoes, filled with cotton soaked in camphor,
looking close at the picture. and the cotton was set on fire, and
"You might hold on by that little made to burn like a lamp-wick."
stiff plume on his head," said Nannie; That's a roasted Peacock story,"
" and you'd be sure not to fall off be- said Fred.
hind if he kept his tail spread." I'11 give you a live Peacock story,"
Those splendid feathers are not said Uncle Willie. Once there was
really his tail," said Uncle Willie. a Peacock that was determined to
" They grow from his back. His real scratch up the plants in his owner's
tail is behind them, and is a brown- garden. He had been scolded for
ish, common-looking affair, only about this; he had been whipped; he had
six inches long. It is stiff and helps been shut up, but all in vain. And
to hold up the long feathers. Pea- he was very sly about his mischief. If
cocks, though they roost high on trees, any one were looking, he would hold
make their nests on the ground among up his head and walk off in some other
thick bushes. A tame Peacock lays direction; then, as soon as he thought
only about five eggs before sitting, but himself alone, away he would scud









14 SCRATCHING BIRDS.

under trees and bushes to the .:i.rlle I, l .ey-, you know, P-'t tle dryest s.I.-'
and i..-_'i his work. At last he was they can find."
sent away and kept. away a very long "Why are these Icoll-.l ir,,;,...
time. After ,.i :li ;.- back he acted as F.:;, i ?" ;i.k.il Nannie.
if he were ashamed of hIii,-lf. TI Because that country in Africa
would not come near the house; I,-- where they livewhen t1h.-y e athome
slunk into corners, and what is quite is .iieid-' Guinea," said Uncle Willii,.
", ,nih.ri-ll, h, n,-i.-v, .- I- tj ,.,i 1.]i the It is a very hot country, away across
.. .--h M ..,II Si,.,/ ,1 i 'i 14n the A l ,t;.:- .. i ."
scratch in gardens." Here Tiptoes put the tip of his
I suppose the P,.:-.,,-.:. take lin I iii-..' on the Guinea Fowl's big round
:;[t..gllthe. is the most in,:l.-lh-iir:.t eye, and looked up in Fred's face,
i.;l. i;i the world," said Cousin KLt--; while Fred went on to ti-ll wonderful
" but lIe belongs to the same family stories of the hunts he had had for
"-,ith tlh-it sober l1i..1;ini. speckled Guinea Fowls' _--., and ..t il,-
fiithli:-red Guinea Fowl in the next w,.iiilr ftul eggs themselves with th0i.-
picture." wonderful brown shells, so thi. k n i-
so hard.
GUINEA FOWL. "-.' hard you can 1.,1l,,' break
"0, I'VE seen Guinea Fi.wl," said them, I suppose," said Uncle W\\iNll
Fel. ( i'allp,; had some. They placing his hand over the next picture.
have a horny, red i.uiw.l on the 1,-.1. W-.ll. I have under my hand another
and they Imak, a horrid noise. It wl'ii:.ltlf ul bird. If any of you ever
sounds lik. Come back!' Come hl .nl of this wonderful bird, or know
back !' Gnro-n.1ol said he wi:l-dl thlie whi.' it may be fiiiii., or what its
-vI,1I1 come back. 'T'le- are ;l\vIw hi;,;t are, I pray you to tell;" and
straying away off and hiding their he lifted his hand and showed the
nests. 0, but don't they run! I Hen.
clhin -i one once all over the pasture,
and then I couldn't catch it. ThI-;r THE HEN.
..--2s are not quite as large as hens' "0I KNow something about that
eggs, and are not hli:;i'l like hens' wonderful bird," said Cousin Kate.
eggs. They go off to a point, like a "It is a Scratcher, and it may be
top." found all over the world, and it has
Guinea Fowl haven't been tamed a habit of scratching up my flower-
long enough to forget thlir % ill1 \oys." seeds."
said Uncle Willie. In Af ii.-, where "And it cackles every time it lays
they run wild, they flock t,...ethi.- a iii an egg," said Fred.
go roaming about from place to place, And it talks to its chickens," said
as wild turkeys do here." Nannie.
"They are different from turkeys I do think there are many v.,nlil -
in one thing," said Cousin Kate. ful things :l.-lut ti, Hen," said C,.uiin
"They lile wet, marshy places. Tur- Kt-. I think it is w..!lli lii that









14 SCRATCHING BIRDS.

under trees and bushes to the .:i.rlle I, l .ey-, you know, P-'t tle dryest s.I.-'
and i..-_'i his work. At last he was they can find."
sent away and kept. away a very long "Why are these Icoll-.l ir,,;,...
time. After ,.i :li ;.- back he acted as F.:;, i ?" ;i.k.il Nannie.
if he were ashamed of hIii,-lf. TI Because that country in Africa
would not come near the house; I,-- where they livewhen t1h.-y e athome
slunk into corners, and what is quite is .iieid-' Guinea," said Uncle Willii,.
", ,nih.ri-ll, h, n,-i.-v, .- I- tj ,.,i 1.]i the It is a very hot country, away across
.. .--h M ..,II Si,.,/ ,1 i 'i 14n the A l ,t;.:- .. i ."
scratch in gardens." Here Tiptoes put the tip of his
I suppose the P,.:-.,,-.:. take lin I iii-..' on the Guinea Fowl's big round
:;[t..gllthe. is the most in,:l.-lh-iir:.t eye, and looked up in Fred's face,
i.;l. i;i the world," said Cousin KLt--; while Fred went on to ti-ll wonderful
" but lIe belongs to the same family stories of the hunts he had had for
"-,ith tlh-it sober l1i..1;ini. speckled Guinea Fowls' _--., and ..t il,-
fiithli:-red Guinea Fowl in the next w,.iiilr ftul eggs themselves with th0i.-
picture." wonderful brown shells, so thi. k n i-
so hard.
GUINEA FOWL. "-.' hard you can 1.,1l,,' break
"0, I'VE seen Guinea Fi.wl," said them, I suppose," said Uncle W\\iNll
Fel. ( i'allp,; had some. They placing his hand over the next picture.
have a horny, red i.uiw.l on the 1,-.1. W-.ll. I have under my hand another
and they Imak, a horrid noise. It wl'ii:.ltlf ul bird. If any of you ever
sounds lik. Come back!' Come hl .nl of this wonderful bird, or know
back !' Gnro-n.1ol said he wi:l-dl thlie whi.' it may be fiiiii., or what its
-vI,1I1 come back. 'T'le- are ;l\vIw hi;,;t are, I pray you to tell;" and
straying away off and hiding their he lifted his hand and showed the
nests. 0, but don't they run! I Hen.
clhin -i one once all over the pasture,
and then I couldn't catch it. ThI-;r THE HEN.
..--2s are not quite as large as hens' "0I KNow something about that
eggs, and are not hli:;i'l like hens' wonderful bird," said Cousin Kate.
eggs. They go off to a point, like a "It is a Scratcher, and it may be
top." found all over the world, and it has
Guinea Fowl haven't been tamed a habit of scratching up my flower-
long enough to forget thlir % ill1 \oys." seeds."
said Uncle Willie. In Af ii.-, where "And it cackles every time it lays
they run wild, they flock t,...ethi.- a iii an egg," said Fred.
go roaming about from place to place, And it talks to its chickens," said
as wild turkeys do here." Nannie.
"They are different from turkeys I do think there are many v.,nlil -
in one thing," said Cousin Kate. ful things :l.-lut ti, Hen," said C,.uiin
"They lile wet, marshy places. Tur- Kt-. I think it is w..!lli lii that









SCRATCHING BIRDS. 15

she sits so patiently on her eggs; "Let me tell you a Hen story. First,
wonderful that she should turn the there is a Hen. The Hen hatches
eggs over so that they get the warmth out ducks. Ducks take to the water,
on all sides alike, wonderful that she and away they swim. Hen goes dis-
shows so much love for her chickens, tracted; .clucks for them to come
and takes so good care of them. In back. Ducks pay no attention. Hen
snake countries when the Hens go to goes more distracted and clucks more
roost, they make their chickens sit at for them to come back. By and by
the ends of the branches, to keep them walks along a lonely Goose; a lonely
out of the way of the snakes, and they Goose with no mate and no little gos-
themselves take inside seats." lings. Goose says to Hen, 'gabble,
And when a Hen finds a worm," gabble, gabble.' This probably means,
said Nannie, "instead of eating it I'll take care of them,' for'she pad-
herself, she calls her chickens to come dles off, swims round with the ducks,
and eat it." brings them ashore, and gives them
And she talks differently to her up to the Hen. Now I'll ,tell you
children at different times, just as what happened next day. Next day,
the Turkey mother does," said Uncle when the ducks ran into the water,
Willie. Yet they always understand the Goose and Hen had some talk
her." together. The Hen then perched her-
Yes, that is as wonderful as the herself upon the Goose's back, and
rest," said Cousin Kate. When stayed on the Goose's back while the
that loose horse was running towards Goose swam round with the little
the yard the other day, Tiptoes' mother ducks. This happened day after day,
said something to Tiptoes. She did and a great many people came to see
not speak in a. gentle way, and say, the sight. You will find this story
' Come, my little boy, come to mother.' and plenty more in Mr. Wood's book
She spoke up loud,' Run Run into called, Man and Beast.' Mr. Wood
the house! Quick!' Her voice did thinks the reason the young ducks did
not sound at all as it does when she not mind the Hen is that ducks can-
is kissing him good night. Suppose a not understand Hen language. He
Hen looks up and sees a hawk com- thinks they understood the goose bet-
ing. She clucks to her children, Run! ter than they understood the Hen,
Quick! Run for your lives! There's because the Goose being a water-fowl,
a great cruel hawk flying down! Goose language may be somewhat like
They understand, and they mind her. duck language."
Yet her voice does not sound much
as it does when she is feeding them
JUNGLE POWL.
or snuggling them under her wings."
"Little ducks don't mind the Hen," THAT next one looks like a roos-
said Fred. ter," said Nannie.
"I suppose they do not understand "It is a kind of rooster," said Uncle
Hen language," said Uncle Willie. Willie. "It is a Jungle Fowl rooster.









16 SCRATCHING BIRDS.

A jungle is a thick, t:._lll.'1 im:-; of Died in distress, poor-little heart.
lu.-h,.., trees, and vines. TIrt.l- are 0 it was heart-rending.
O sick do I feel ever since.
jl-ntv of them in India, aria.y over I am left-broken-hearted.
the other side of the world; and in She was my own 1,- ir within me.
these ilil_'l.-. live .Tlii ..l' Hens and She had more than common wit."
Juirl..e Roosters-wild, bylv swift- "Perhaps you would like to hear the
running creatures; it is almost im- names of others of thi kind old wn-
possible .to catch them. T1i-y are man's hens," -aMi.l Cousin Kate.
about the size of aiaitiamiii.,Illd s-,iin. Here are some of them: T>-..1ie
1j,-p1!. say tht t lhe B;int.lin came Tainie, Let. ....i. Tirklinl. TeI i.-t.-.:,
frni, these same wild J1nl..:l- Tli.; .. P-.ily Lily, T.-al.,- Medool-
Fowl." ,3i-, Ottee Oppeto, L.-v.n.1iy Lud-
"He is handsome," said Nannie. andy."
"How bright his feathlirs are! and Aft.-i a :-ireat deal more tdlk, anin l
hliat a fine 1.I-" tZlil he has! great deal more -t:'\--t,:.;lliii.- C'luii
"Judging I.y his spurs he is a Kate r.-inbik-,l that since thi Hen
fi.-t'lt,:r." said Uncle Willie. Very had taken the t...iil., to have her por-
likely it is one of this kind that I read trait painted lthe rIi.liht as well look
a. .('ry about. I read of a Cock which at it and see in what ways she was
lived in India, and which used to peck different from the other Scratchers.
its master's ,.klI-, wlhn: it was lmin- Her tail stands up," -'aid Fred.
gry, and one dlay it. pecked a piece of Almost all tli-. olti ::. r at..u -li-'
cloth out of his boot." tails turn down."
"** ('..in F.i:I'." cried Nannie, Thi? Peacock's tail droops when it
"" don't you nin.iiel-ir that poor little is not lpr'al open," said Cousin Kate ;
woman we saw last summer who used and in pictures of Pheasants -ittill
to keep hens in her house and take on trees, their tails droop almost to
care. of them? the ground."
Y.-, indeed, I do," said Cousin "The Hen's Iack is flat," -..
Kate. She used to treat them as if Uncle Willie. The backs of thl.
they were her children. And how she other Scratchers are .-1':o'iiin. and most
mourned when one of them died. Wait of them are rounded."
a moment. I '11 get her Lines.' " But in many things," said Cousin
Cousin Kate then brought a thin Kate, "the v1,...l., tlhiirtn are ;1:J;-
book c.afiiiin a copy of ,the lines The most of them have ti.iri home
w iirt,.n I:y tli- little old woman on I l- iql... the ground; tiy- all have short
rD),ith i 't "P,.iur ITw-ie'lll-Ztljhl-Brl.BI .- bills; they eat about the same kinds
Pinky":- of food; and nearly all of th -n can
"Poor F; h,-, bth dear little 6r t, run much better than they can
She is gone .. .. fly."






















.r
S -,,- -








OUINEA FOWL.
PEACOCK. Gaveotcids O






















cf vewz i Zi /, -^ 'l s.


.C W^ :1 ,', T



Scrachmin Birds or
alThiaceou. Birds.











PRANG'S


NATURAL HISTORY SERIES

FOR CHILDREN.
BY N. A. CALKINS, Suerintendent of Primary Schools, New York City, and-
MRs. A. M. DIAZ, Author of "William Henry Letters," etc.


MESSRS. L. PRANG & CO. have the pleasure of announcing that they have
begun the publication of a series of works in Natural History, for schools and
families, under the general title of "PRANG'S NATURAL HISTORY SERIES FOR
CHILDREN."
These works will include the best features of "PRANG'S NATURAL HISTORY
SERIES FOR SCHOOLS AND FAMILIES," which had the hearty approval and commen-
dation of the late Prof. AGASSIZ, and which has found so much favor in many
schools within the past few years.
It is the aim of the publishers, in issuing these works in the present form, to
aid the efforts now so generally made to elevate the character of the juvenile
literature of the day, by placing within the reach of parents and teachers some of
the interesting facts in Natural History which shall serve not only for the amuse-
ment of children, but which shall tend at the same time to develop their percep-
tive faculties and to enlarge the boundaries of their knowledge. To this end, the
publishers have availed themselves not only of their extensive facilities for pro-
ducing colored illustrations of a high order, but they have secured in addition the
assistance of the best literary, scientific, and educational talent available for the
preparation, arrangement, and description of the various subjects illustrated, so
that they can confidently put this enterprise forward as an entirely exceptional
one in American juvenile literature, and of great practical value in education.
Six works are now issued, with the following titles :-
Swimming Birds, with thirteen colored illustrations of Ducks, Swan, Geese,
Gull, Albatross, Loon, Pelican, etc.
Wading Birds, with thirteen colored illustrations of Herons, Crane, Stork,
Ibis, Flamingo, Bittern, Woodcock, etc.
Scratching Birds, or Gallinaceous Birds, with thirteen colored illustrations
of Turkey, Fowl, Grouse, Quail, Pheasant, Pigeons, etc.
Birds of Prey, with thirteen colored illustrations of Eagles, Vultures, Owls,
Hawks, etc.
Cat Family, with thirteen colored illustrations of Cats, Lion, Tiger, Leopard,
Panther, Lynx, etc.
Cow Family, or Hollow-horned Ruminants, with thirteen colored illustrations
cf Cow, Ox, Yak, Zebu, Bison, Goat, Sheep, Chamois, Gnu, etc.









The s-icction of Qui.arupi.lds and Birds for illIiustr ui:in, and their classification,
has been made by Prof. NORMAN A. CALKINS, Superintendent of Primary Schools
of New York City. The descriptive text has been written by Mrs. A. M. DIAZ,
the author of the "William Henry Letters," and otherwise widely known through
the "St. Nicholas" and other juvenile magazines as a d.lii fl writer for young
people; and further, the publishers have the pleasure of stating that both the
illustrations and text have passed under the supervision of the eminent naturalist,
Prof. J. A. ALLEN, of the Museum of Con,:'i!pr ti e Z.51o[ at Harvard .'i-llge
The object has been in each book to illui-r.,l: L.by .i.!:r.,priite specimens
some of the characteristic features by which certain birds and animals are classi-
fied into families, and also distinguished from other f inilies.
In carrying out this idea, it has been the aim of the authors to make such
selections as would be of the greatest interest to .the children; and it is safe to
say that in no similar works accessible to American youth will there be found so
much valuable knowledge presented in so entertaining a manner. One important
feature to which the publishers desire to call particular attention is lthl. that
the illiut[r'a:luri3 in these works are ,:..,, ,-, so far as it is possible to make them
accurate within the limits of practical publication. Every bird and Quadruped rep-
resented has been carefully studied in its color and form; and in the preparation of
the text, describing their habits, their method of rearing their young, of b,.i .li in
nests, etc., Mrs. DIAZ has gathered her information from the best authorities; and
it is hoped that these works will not only prove of peculiar interest to children,
but that they may serve a still broader p.ii p...sc, .as valuable sources of sound
knowledge.
The kind of reading which shall be put into the hands of children and
youth is getting to be a matter of very serious concern, not only in their intellec-
tual education, but in their moral development. In this enterprise, an earnest
effort has been made to combine attractiveness in pictorial illustrations with inter-
esting knowledge of a substantial kind; and for the support of this enterprise,
the publishers appeal to parents and teachers who would see the early develop-
ment of children's minds turned in the direction of a healthful and *1!.;litfol
study of Natural History..

Price of each work, fifty cents.

L. PRANG & CO., Publishers, Boston, rMass.
















PRANG'S

NATURAL HISTORY SERIES

FOR CHILDREN.
CLASSIfICATION BY
N. A. CALKINS,
Baperintendent of Primary Schools in New Torki City,
AND TEXT BY
4MRS. A. M. DIAZ,
The Author of The William Henry Letters,/" ete.

This Series of Juveniles consists of a number of volumes treating of the
habits and peculiar characteristics of Birds and Quadrupeds in a manner
interesting to children.
The works already published in this Series are as follows:-

Swimming Birds, Birds of Prey,
With Thirteen Colored Illustrations. With Thirteen Colored Illustrations.

Wading. Birds, Cat Family,
With Thirteen Colored Illustrations. With Thirteen Colored Illustrations.

Scratching Birds, Cow Family,
or Gallinaceous Birds, or Hollow-horAed RBminaate,
With Thirteen Colored Illustrations. With Thirteen Colored Illustrations.

PRICE OF EACH WORK FIFTY CENTS.

"L. PRANG & CO., Publishers, Boston.





I.AL
jRA T4'V!7