• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Right of way
 Going to school
 The hedgehog
 The little walk
 Odd or even
 Skipping
 The old woman's stall
 The salute
 Maying
 The bird-catcher
 Flying the kite
 Afternoon tea
 When the geese came over the...
 The peg top
 The orphans
 Bread and milk
 The runaway ring
 Play-time
 Bubbles
 Scandal
 The quakers
 The nursery chair
 Up a tree
 Forbidden fruit
 The sick child
 Bathing
 An uninvited visitor
 The puritan's daughter
 The young heir's Easter visito...
 The young musician
 The proposal
 She stoops to conquer
 In the meadows
 The cochin China chickies
 The puffed-up smoker
 Charity children preparing fo the...
 Back Cover






Group Title: Afternoon tea : rhymes for children
Title: Afternoon tea
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00048507/00001
 Material Information
Title: Afternoon tea rhymes for children
Physical Description: 64 p. : col. ill. ; 26 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Sowerby, J. G ( John G ) ( Illustrator )
Emmerson, H. H ( Illustrator )
Frederick Warne and Co ( Publisher )
Dalziel Brothers ( Printer )
Brain and Co ( Printer )
R. Clay, Sons, and Taylor ( Printer )
Donor: Egolf, Robert ( donor )
Publisher: Frederick Warne and Co.
Mawson, Swan, and Morgan
Place of Publication: London
Newcastle-on-Tyne
Manufacturer: Dalziel Brothers ; Brain and Co. ; R. Clay, Sons and Taylor
Publication Date: [1880]
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1880   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
England -- Newcastle
 Notes
Citation/Reference: Osborne Coll.
Statement of Responsibility: with original illustrations by J.G. Sowerby & H.H. Emmerson.
General Note: Cover and half-title: Afternoon tea / by J.G. Sowerby and H.H. Emmerson. According to Sowerby's daughter Amy Millicent (Illustrators of children's books (Boston, 1947), p. 362)) he was "engaged in writing and illustrating books for children" in the 1880s, and so may have been at least joint and perhaps sole author of the verses.
General Note: Publication date from English catalogue, III, p. 6 (listed under title; 4to, 6s.).
General Note: "All rights reserved" printed below border on t.p.
General Note: Binding: quarter green cloth, col. pictorial paper-covered boards (front and back identical), all edges stained green; green floral endpapers.
General Note: Baldwin Library copy donated by Robert Egolf.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00048507
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002221877
notis - ALG2107
oclc - 25819296

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Half Title
        Page 5
    Frontispiece
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Right of way
        Page 9
    Going to school
        Page 10
    The hedgehog
        Page 11
    The little walk
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Odd or even
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Skipping
        Page 16
    The old woman's stall
        Page 17
    The salute
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Maying
        Page 20
        Page 21
    The bird-catcher
        Page 22
        Page 23
    Flying the kite
        Page 24
    Afternoon tea
        Page 25
    When the geese came over the lea!
        Page 26
        Page 27
    The peg top
        Page 28
        Page 29
    The orphans
        Page 30
        Page 31
    Bread and milk
        Page 32
        Page 33
    The runaway ring
        Page 34
    Play-time
        Page 35
    Bubbles
        Page 36
        Page 37
    Scandal
        Page 38
    The quakers
        Page 39
    The nursery chair
        Page 40
        Page 41
    Up a tree
        Page 42
    Forbidden fruit
        Page 43
    The sick child
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Bathing
        Page 46
    An uninvited visitor
        Page 47
    The puritan's daughter
        Page 48
        Page 49
    The young heir's Easter visitors
        Page 50
        Page 51
    The young musician
        Page 52
    The proposal
        Page 53
    She stoops to conquer
        Page 54
        Page 55
    In the meadows
        Page 56
        Page 57
    The cochin China chickies
        Page 58
        Page 59
    The puffed-up smoker
        Page 60
        Page 61
    Charity children preparing fo the harvest home
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
    Back Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
Full Text

















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J DEDICATION.


i ^AFTIERNOON TE--that pleasant hour
i /.W \Vhen children are from lessons free,
"i. _;. '
And gather round the social board,
..
Brimful of mirth and childish glee;
',.. 'If to that hour they may, perchance,
": : Another guileless pleasure add,

By offering this little book,
SArtist and Author will be glad,

SAnd trust their labour thus may come

S' @ A welcome guest to many a home.








P e,..
RIGHT OF WAY
-9
*, GOING TO SCHOOL ... .10
""[, THE HEDGEHOG .. ... II
*:* THE LITTLE WALK 12, I
ODD OR EVEN. 14, 15
SSKIPPING ... .
', THE OLD WOMAN'S STALL .7
A- THE SALUTE 18, 19
IAN MAYING. 20, 21



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2 THE BIRD-CATCHER .22, 23
-. fFLYING THE KITE 24
AFTERNOON TEA 25

"<^ WHEN THE GEESE CAME OVER THE LEA 26, 27
THE PEG-TOP .......... 28, 29
THE ORPHANS. .. 30, 31

BREAD AND MILK 32,33

V THE RUNAWAY RING. ...... 34
PLAY-TIME 35
BUBBLES .36, 37
SCANDAL . . . 38

THE QUAKERS 39

THE NURSERY CHAIR . 40,41
UP A TREE 42

FORBIDDEN FRUIT .. 43
THE SICK CHILD 44, 45
BATHING . 46
AN UNINVITED VISITOR .. 47
THE PURITAN'S DAUGHTER .. 48, 49

\ i i THE YOUNG HEIR'S EASTER VISITORS ... 5, 51
f THE YOUNG MUSICIAN ....... 52
THE PROPOSAL .... 53

p SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER 54, 55
IN THE MEADOWS . 56, 57

THE COCHIN CHINA CHICKIES . 58, 59
THE PUFFED-UP SMOKER ..... 6I 6
CHARITY CHILDREN PREPARING FOR THE HARVEST
SHOME . 62, 63
iJ IN S 64





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GOING TO SCHOOL.


SLOWLY to school, slowly they went,-
His eyes on his book were downward bent;
S/he looked on the ground as they went along,
But neither looked willing to sing a song.
S/he was thinking of pudding and jam !-
lie was spelling Seringapatam.
Oh for a kite, or a top, or a ball,
Battledore, shuttlecock, hoop, and all!



















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THE HEDGEHOG.

W" iWHERE are you going so fast away?
* ,Where are you going ?" the children said.
"To seek my dinner, this summer day,
To seek my dinner," the hedgehog said.

"You've got long prickles, so sharp and fine!
Such terrible prickles!" the children said.
"Don't I tell you I'm going to dine ?
Let me be trotting," the hedgehog said.

Nay, nay, now stay; don't hurry away!
Don't run away!" the children said.
"What will you get for your dinner to-day ?"
S"A little fat snail," the hedgehog said.

And do you gobble your snails quite raw?
Do you not cook them ?" the children said.
Such inquisitive children I never saw !
SOf course I don't cook them the hedgehog said.



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THE LITTLE WALK.

OH, dear me! what a great big hat!
Suppose we were all to wear hats like that!
And see Mab's bonnet and peacock plume,-
I hope her head will find plenty of room !
But Mab is kind, and gives Baby a ride,
The Baby that wears the hat so wide.
They won't have to walk too far or too long
Unless Sister Mab is uncommonly strong,
'. For Baby looks heavy, and so does her hat-
The Baby who's sucking her fingers so fat!























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ODD OR EVEN.

HOPPE'TY, hoppety, hop!
How many stones have I got ?
Odd or even's the game we play;
Come, make haste! which do you say?
Cherry-stones, cherry-stones, which shall it be?
"Suppose you toss first, and then we'll see!"
Hoppety, hoppety, hop!

Whackety, whackety, whack!
Oh! what a terrible crack!
"I'll teach you to play odd or even all day
'Tis no good to send you on errands away,
S While I wait for water to boil for the tea:
The next time you do it you'll see where you'll be!"
Whackety, whackety, whack!














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SKIPPING.

AIRILY, airily, skip away:
Set to work, all of you, trip away!
Over your head, and under your toes,
That's the way the merry rope goes!
Aprons flap in the breezy air;
Fly away, lessons, this holiday fair!


















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S.... -How do you do, Sir? Fair good morrow'.
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SSun for gladness, shade for sadness,
-" e meet them both upon our way.












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Over the fields and down the lane,
Into the copse, and back again;
Such a ramble, such a scramble,
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THE BIRD-CATCHER.

LAURENCE has set such a wonderful trap,
It has a long string, and goes to with a snap;
He has carefully scattered some grains of corn,
And see! there's a bird coming over the lawn,
Away it comes chirruping, chirping, and hopping
Into the trap it will soon be popping!
Helen and Gisha take part in the sport,
It is so exciting to see a bird caught!
Don't stir from your places, and don't speak a word,
Or else you will frighten away the bird!























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FLYING THE KITE.

FLY away, fly away, comical kite,
Up in the sky to a terrible height;
When you come back tell us where you have been,
Where do the stars live, and what have you seen ?



















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AFTERNOON TEA.

WHO wouldn't like to drink afternoon tea
Out in the garden just like these three ?
With the song of a bird, and the hum of a bee,
And the sun-flowers looking all eyes to see.

The little girl's stirring her tea so sweet;
Tea in the garden is such a great treat,
With a cool breeze blowing, and not too much heat-
And doesn't the tea-tray look charmingly neat ?






25










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WHEN THE GEESE CAME OVER THE LEA!

OH, we talked and we laughed,
As we went to the Sea.
We were a merry company
Just we three ?
But oh what a panic
We were in to see,
An army of Geese
Coming over the lea!

With a cack, cack, cackle,
And a pat, pat, patter,
They looked as if they wondered
What could be the matter.
Which were the greater Geese ?
Just we three,
Or the army of Geese
That came over the lea ?




















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THE PEG TOP.

SPIN away, spin away, round and round,
The hum of the top has a merry sound ;
The peg top's journey is just beginning,
Ever so long it will go on spinning.
Up in my hand, or down on the ground,
Still the peg top goes round and round.
Baby looks on with eyes so bright-
Is'nt top spinning a wonderful sight ?


























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THE ORPHANS.

CAREFULLY, gently, does Martha tread,
For sister Anna is ill in bed:
Martha is bringing the toast she has made
And tea on a tray so neatly laid.

Their father and mother died long ago,
So Martha and Anna are orphans you know;
And yet, oh yet, they are happy these two,
For kind friends took pity and helped them through.

They live in an orphanage near to the church,
With trees in the garden where wild birdies perch
And all of the children wear aprons so white,
And tippets and mobcaps so pretty and bright.





















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BREAD AND MILK.

BREAD and milk, bread and milk, fit for a king,
Plenty of sugar has been put in;
Mix it up well with a silver spoon,
Wait till it cools and don't eat it too soon !

Milk and bread, milk and bread, isn't it nice?
Why! The whole basinful's gone in a trice!
Oh! There is many a poor little boy
To whom bread and milk would be a great joy















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THE RUNAWAY RING.

Bow-wow, Bow-wow, run for your lives,
The little page comes to the door in surprise,
The little King Charlie too, roused from his sleep,
Has run to the front door to get a sly peep.
The old lady comes to the window to see
Whatever this wonderful tumult can be;
The little girl leaves all her school things behind
She's too much afraid that they'll catch her, to mind ;
One boy round the corner is looking with glee
To see if the others in danger can be !
While I, the poor doggie, am running like mad-
If I get safe away with my tail I'll be glad.
And all this to come from a runaway ring,
Oh! Bow-wow, pray how could you do such a thing?



34
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LE-N are done, hurray, huni av'
game ,1 h.:.r, 'l ha-ve to) d :
Sr 'Ll.a, kC L I :p, 'Om" V talo-p ia k.1%
\\h1k, I ram.dn ,:.th r ,-tch,-` u at ..ur .
,. T .Lv -hall Lark, an, u ,-.. ,d [III.


GraniJnm i1, t-ur hoise can' t r1un t c,.
AXlthou.:igh that old ,hecl -,: .un, -I._, .C'
W\Vhen you sit pinnin Adl da, a.ll day.







35

















BUBBLES.

HERE is a picture, look at it well,
There is more in it than I can tell;
Look at it, tell me, what can you see ?
Bubbles, and flowers, and children three ?

Yes I but there is a story inside-
Look at it well, the picture is wide.
Through the churchyard winds a funeral slow,
The bell tolling sadly as on they go.

And here, 'mid the flowers, three children so gay
Are blowing the bubbles away, away !
One, two, three, away they go,
But one has burst, Ah! They all do so !

Man's life is a bubble as light as air,
Floating away now here, now there,
The bubble looks likely to float all day,
But man's life sooner doth fade away























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SCANDAL.

WHAT do you think?"
"I'm sure I don't know I"
Don't tell anybody !"
Oh no! Oh no!"
"Somebody told me,
That someone else said
That so and so told them
(You won't tell what I said ?")
"Oh no! I won't tell.
What is it? Oh dear !
The way that you tell it,
Is really so queer:" !
"Oh yes I But have patience,
I'll tell you in time,
But I have to make it
All fit into rhyme.
Now don't tell anybody,
Because if you do,
My secrets, the next time,
I'll not tell to you!"


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THE OUAKERS.
SC.\L l.',', se.lately, '

The e t." Ir,:m m -tn- _in; lai\,.i.--t no:, returned :
W ith ai m- linl.d.l to:-eth,-r,
He'- a.illFi her i hcther
She can rememb,--r the thin.- they ha- e leaIrne. 1.

I-l I a .ldi neatly f:Ming,
ionath.in's hoil.d in t:_
A little umbrella in c'.- it m i- rainl :
.-\rAn tlicn [-annali'- bo:innt
\\ill not get upon it
A drop, ,:r a sprinkle, a spot, or a -tain.





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k THE NURSERY CHAIR.

EDITH sits up in her chair so high,
How busy she looks with her downbent eye.
What is she doing ? Can you not guess ?
With her little bare feet, and her little night-dress.
She is plucking the raisins so rich and so nice,
From out of her cake that is flavoured with spice.





















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UP A TREE.

PUSS, puss, pussy, puss, puss, pussy,
Where are you going with your tail so bushy ?
Up to the top of a great tall tree.
When you get there what will you see ?


Wait till I catch you, puff, puff, puff;
It's tough work climbing, tough and rough,
And a long way up to this tall tree top;
Don't go so fast pussy, stop, stop, stop I


It's no good bird-catching up in this tree,
The birds will all fly away you'll see;
And I'll give you beautiful milk and sop,
If you'll let me catch you, pussy, do stop!










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SOH, the apples golden and red!
"We mustn't touch them," the gardener said.
SDon't they look tempting? so round and bright,
We can't help looking at such a sight.
See those sunflowers all in a row,
Nodding their heads at us you know,
All with their faces turned this way,
And great eyes staring as if to say,,
Don't forget what the gardener said,
Don't touc t he apples so rosy and red!"






43



























THE SICK CHILD.

OH, Minnie is a famous nurse, and a famous cook is she,
She makes such splendid sweet-cakes, and girdle-cakes for tea,
She's such a clever little nurse for Harry who is ill,
She is so good and active, so gentle and so still.
Now Harry is her brother, and I think he had a fall
While climbing up a cherry tree that was too wide and tall;
Although it was a dreadful fall, I think he's not much worse,
He will be getting better soon with Minnie for his nurse.
Oh, Minnie is a famous cook, and a famous nurse is she,
For no one nurses little boys so well and patiently.

















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BATHING.

HE didn't like bathing, oh dear! oh dear!
The sea was so cold, and the waves came so near.
But sister was gentle, oh, sister was kind,
She whispered of beautiful shells they would find.
She told him the waves sing a wonderful song,
SThat only to wavelets and ripples belong.
"And will you not bathe, and make friends with the sea ?
And would you not like a merman to be ?"
Then slowly the frown faded out of his face,
And a smile like a ripple came back in its place.








46









































ROSIE was breakfasting out on the grass,
When two pigs on a walking tour happened to pass.
One pig with rude manners came boldly in front,
And first gave a stare, and then gave a grunt.
As much as to say, What is that you have got ?
Just let me have a taste out of your pot 1
But Rosie said, "Go away, horrid old pig!
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THE PURITAN'S DAUGHTER.

LONG, long years and years ago
Lived this Johanna,
Sweet was her face, also
Sweet was her manner.

Reading as she went to Church,
This was her manner;
The very birdies on their perch
Sang to Johanna.





















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THE YOUNG HEIR'S EASTER VISITORS.

LITTLE Sir Peregrine stands to receive
His guests who are coming this Easter Eve,
That sweet little doggie (Floss is its name),
Who stands by his master, is doing the same.

First comes Judith Eleanor, sweetest and best,
And then-after Judith there come all the rest.
Now Judith is cousin to this Peregrine,
Such sweet little cousins have never been seen.

Then comes little Godfrey, with large round hat,
And wide-awake face, and lace collar so flat;
And that's little Sophie has hold of his arm,
With her face so sedate, and her manner so calm.

And wee little Bessie, who's holding her muff,
Is staring as if she could not stare enough.
From the coach steppeth Hilda, take care, not too fast!
I think these are all, save nurse Susan the last.













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(1h. dear me. I aim tircd"
Ir li lou ,li the miu-ic I've admircd.) :I
_l lin:, thlis book ,,r you this lon -, long il /, i
.\nd 'lhat wouldl d Grandpa say f.
I" 1:nc knict \ c'dJ ben at play, '
SPla g his idd in such a i amIus st



52







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-OH, will you be my little wife?
My little wife"? he said.
She only pulled the rose to bits
And gravely shook her head.
"I'll give you all my tops and balls,
My beautiful new kite."
But still she pulled the rose to bits.
So the butterflies took flight.
S"I'll buy a great big waxen doll,
With real eyes and hair."
But still she pulled the rose to bits
And said she did not care.
Oh, look how even doggie begs,
He cannot talk, and so
He sits upon his hinder legs,
And.thinks he's quite a beau "
Then Lawrence said "Good-bye," aind i i
And left her sitting there.
"The moon was watching all the time.
Then she began to care.
"I'l uya ret igwaendol











"SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER."


"MISTRESS NELLIE, fair good morning! "Dear Mistress Nellie you distress me,
To night I go to see the play; For long I've counted on this play,
We have a box, will you go with us? And if your sisters do not like it
I beg you will not say me nay !" Surely they can stay away!"
"Oh, no I I could not, pray excuse me, "Dear Master Lacy, I will go then,
Whatever would my sisters say ? And I will join your party gay;
You know they are so stiff and mighty, I dearly, dearly love a frolic,
They will not go to see the play." To night I'll go to see the play I"


























54
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54











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I '~B~lrr C La w; '
-77^^^i^^^















_- = .^ -.^ ^; -=_- ^ ---- -























IN THE MlE.ADOWS.


Sitti r- c l. all in a heap,
A d. suL in g .her b-i u.r, *t .:.c: asleep;
"a ," said tis Lamb to this little Bo-peep.
N. -ite ie opened her eyes,





SAr -hi Ielt lme\lll at k'igtcned, and shy besides-
SIf di Limirbkin tuNr1 r-I.Y. oh, where shall I hide?"
""-t, bn nt te b in that field so wide.t
- .% --* ,



















-It zt od gazing coletmly. ba.iii away
"A \; if it Ou11- _l e .,L-mething to say,
And 1:-] st1:1I-p 1 pull MEg the flowers so gay;
Th nie little thiep 1ia tll.ut of was running away.
S' S i li cs in i a c.-.ttla-. l-, .. u al i n some trees,
r-
I- A [nd s in her iner, but a, a hive full of bees,









S-b-,-p p quite ide l.d r-i.end her neyes
r Tta s'meit b.icitiened and shy besides-



















"- {--NE O
""' 1 A. i' ai olemnl. bi:iir away








.- ":--5-"6-
S4// She liT R' in a cttae.e:.t I. Ii lup in somlte trees,
*'--.-... ,- ^ .-- v\n -Sitti hira-a. .1 l ,ite c.it atI a hive full of bees,
"... ...\- L *-- ". | -.- "--' l P '-'i -li feil t -:,- t ii.ini cn, t I v. 's another one toso,
Si i... ,ii Tita, a- si:ciet b-t,,>;cii me and you.


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57
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TIHE COCHIN CHINA
CHICKIES. 4 "

EDITH is scattering grains of wheat .
For the Cochin China chickies to eat;
See, how they're flocking around her '
feet,
With a clack! clack! clack! and a loud .
loud crowing, "
Feathers and tails in the breezes
blowing,
All pecking away and looking so
knowing. -

The Peacock comes also, walking so ... t :f
grandly: ?'1 \
His long tail behind him trailing so
blandly,
Doesn't he look like a haughty king, XV. .
With his crown, and his tail, and his
brilliant wing? Y4 1.:




S58



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58















































I.




























































59--

59
















," .




THE PUFFED-UP SMOKER.

OH, GORDON, how naughty
,Now, don't look so haughty,-
"\ .. That's Uncle's pet pipe you've got in
your hand.
If you go on smoking,
WVe'll soon have you choking,
\\'li then have to bury you under
the sand.


SSaid Gordon to Nellie,
Si "Go home and cook jelly,
And don't interfere so with me and
my pipe!
Or else go and -garden,
First begging my pardon,
And see if the plums have begun to
/ get ripe."
















60



















































































S, ------ --- -- "--


6 1 .






















CHARITY CHILDREN PREPARING FOR THE
HARVEST HOME.

IN mob-cap and apron as white as the snow, !
What are they doing? Heigho! heigho!
Wreathing a pillar with garland of posies
Of green leaves and jasmine, and red and white roses.
They are dressing the church for the thanksgiving day;
The old village church is not often so gay.'
So that's what the children are doing, heigho! '/
In apron, and mob-cap as white as the snow. \ /

Soon will the church bells go pealing and ringing, \ /
Soon will the Charity Children go singing
Into the church where the wreaths are all twining, '--
Where lilies and roses are blooming and shining;
\Where the rich Autumn light through the windows i, i
streaming,
Till old and young faces light up with its beaming.
In apron and mob-cap as white as the snow,
There sit the Charity Children, heigho!
















62










































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63
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BRAIN AND CO to
CLAY, SON AND TAYLOR 41 to
,ALZIEL BROTHERS, 57 to 64


64





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