Pictures and prattle for the nursery

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Pictures and prattle for the nursery
Physical Description:
2, 284 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
Wells Gardner, Darton, and Co ( Publisher )
Stangeways and Sons ( Printer )
Publisher:
Wells Gardner, Darton, and Co.
Place of Publication:
London
Manufacturer:
Stangeways and Sons
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1880   ( lcsh )
Readers -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Readers   ( rbgenr )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston

Notes

General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
General Note:
Frontispiece printed in colors; some other illustrations by Weir.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002224558
notis - ALG4824
oclc - 62121050
System ID:
UF00048504:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text











"" i I


i* . *









--.'.
i

























A




















































0 .
1!














-4;




























































The Bald ;iE r'.Iv
I UmrB




































































































1.."
...

1.- , -


























































J 6r-m
"- .


.. . ... -..
SH
gV








-r
Al



A SUMME HOLIDA































OR THE U FSE Y.





















LONDON:
WELLS GARDNER, DARTON, AND CO.,
2 PATEIlNOSTnE BUILDINGS.
CQ W






























































































'S






























LONDON:
PRINTED BY STRANGEWAYS AND SONS,
Tower Street, Upper St. Martin's Lane.














C1 TE 1T S






PAGE PAGE PAGE
ASTONISHMENT! 2 A SCOTCH RAM 240 Enic READING TO THE WORKMEN 75
A YOUNG SHAVER 3 A MILK-GIRL IN THE MOUNTAINS 254 ETTY READING TO GRANDMOTHER 77
A Swiss HUNTER. 11 A SHIP LAUNCH 260 ELFIE CROWNED WITH FLOWERS. 79
A SHOCK FOR SWEET SLEEP 16 ASKING HIS WAY 263 ERNEST AND HIS FATHER 159
A FRUIT-SELLER OF VENICE 22 ANNETTE LEAVING HER HOME 274 ELSIE IN THE PARK 167
A SERMON IN THE SCHOOLROOM 26 'A BIRD' ON THE BLACKBOARD 277 ESCAPING FROM SCHOOL 229
A CANADIAN GIRL .43 ESCAPING BY THE WINDOW. 279
ARTHUR AND HIS DOG 46 BIRDIE'S LESSON 1 ETHEL AND AUNT LILY 280
A DEAD SALMON 47 BERTIE AND CARLO 25
A YOUNG DRUMMER 49 BABY ERNIE 36 FRITZ DRAWING A JUG 76
A PIKE FISH 55 BEHIND THE SCENES 40 FRAU FROHSINN AND HER CHIL-
A HUNGRY CHILD 71 BROTHERS CAUGHT IN A STORM 57 DREN 93
A RAINY DAY 82 BABY IN DANGER 74 FRITZ SINGING 117
A NEGLECTED ARTIST 84 BABY AND Puss 147 FOUND DROWNED. 173
A CLEVER MONKEY 89 BESSIE IN THE SNOW 156 FARMER HODGES AND THE THIEF 228
AN ITALIAN GIRL 97 BOGIE 175 FISHING PARTY .. 248
ARCHED ROCK, ISLE OF WIGHT 99 BIRD'S NEST IN THE GARDEN 224 FOUND KEYS 278
A MORNING RIDE .100 BLACKBERRYING 262
A TELEGRAPH-BOY 101 GATHERING PRIMROSES 4
A BRAVE BOY 102 CHRISTMAS PUDDING . 8 GIANT STEAM 54
A FLOOD 110 CHARLIE'S PHYSIC .. 107 GONE! 60
A PLEASANT HALF-HOLIDAY 120 CASABIANCA 118 GOING TO ST. PAUL'S . 81
A GOOD HOUSEMAID 122 CHASED BY WOLVES 152 GOING TO WORK 116
A CHINESE AND HIS SERVANT 124 CATS IN HARNESS. 170 GRACE DARLING 119
A YOUNG NURSE 131 CHIMNEY SWEEPERS 179 GERALD'S LETTER 160
A CLEVER MONKEY 133 CHRISTINA ON THE ROAD TO TOWN 240 GRANDFATHER'S WATCH 188
A PRESENT FROM OVER THE SEA. 135 CONNIE AND HER FATHER 268 GOOD NEWS FOR HUGH 237
'ALWAYS TELL THE TRUTH, TOMMY' 136 CHARLEY DREAMING OF HIS GERTY AND FRANK 270
A BIRTHDAY PRESENT. 137 MOTHER 272
ABYSSINIAN SOLDIER .139 HINDU CHILDREN AT DINNER 5
AUTUMN 150 DICK HADLEY IN THE SHIP'S HOLD 34 HIGHLAND SHEPHERD-BOY . 18
A STUDENT .157 DICKY'S FUNERAL 65 HAPPY TIMES IN THE WOOD 31
A KIND SISTER .158 DORA AND LION 91 HARRY BRUTON THE FISHER-BOY 45
A FARM SERVANT 169 DOLLY DAWDLES 95 HANS AND THE BULLOCK-DRIVER 59
ASKING FOR PARDON 171 DRESSING THE CHRISTMAS-TREE 106 HUNGRY AND COLD 86
AN AMERICAN TRAIN 172 DALECARLIAN PEASANT-GIRL 112 HAROLD AND HIS MOTHER 113
AN ITALIAN LETTER WRITER 176 DAVY STEERING THE BOAT 121 HALLO, MISSILE !' . .165
A PEEP AT THE SEA 187 DICK SHOVELLING THE SNOW .128 HOMELESS BOY 220
A SWING ON THE GATE 190 DRAWN FOR A SOLDIER .161 H.R.H. THE PRINCE OF WALES 222
A KIND HAND 191 DOLLY AND THE WATCH 168 H.R.H. THE PRINCESS OF WALES. 223
AFRICAN DONKEY-BOY. 198 DONALD, A HIGHLAND LADDIE 189
AN EGYPTIAN SPHINX. 200 DOING HIS BEST 213 IDLE JOE ASLEEP 19
ALF NOT DOING HIS WORK 202 DABCHICK 218 ITALIAN PIPE-PLAYER . 145
AN ODD MISER 203 DICK'S DRAWING 225 IDLE TI 194
ARTHUR FAINTING 207 DONALD THE PIPER .257 IT'S Too HOT 196
A VISIT TO THE ZOOLOGICAL DONALD THE GUIDE 282 IN PERIL 238
GARDENS 226
AT THE WELL 227 EMMA AND HER SISTER 7 JACK THE FISHER-LAD . 9
A WELCOME RIDE 239 EVA AT WORK ON THE COUNTER. 63 JULES, FRIENDLESS AND HUNGRY 50

a iii









CONTENTS.

PAGE PAGE PAGE
JOHNSEN CROSSING THE ATLANTIC 56 OUR BRAVE FRIEND 185 THE RUNAWAY HORSE 41
JACK AND THE WASP -. 62 ON THE LAKE 208 THE SULKY BY 42
JOHANNES SETTING OUT ON HIS OUR WOODEN WALLS 216 THE BATTLE IN THE PLAYGROUND 44
TRAVELS 68 ON THE MARCH .. 252 THE PRINCESS OF WALES AND
JOHN IN THOUGHT 90 OVERTAKEN BY THE TIDE 267 HER BOYS 92
JUSTINE AND HER GRANDFATHER 123 THE LILY 94
JUST IN TIE 177 PERCY'S SWING 52 THE SEABOY'S DREAM 103
JEM BLUNT AT NIGHT-SCHOOL ..241 PICTURES AND STORIES 67 To0 IN DANGER .105
JOHNNIE CARRYING IIIS FATHER'S POOR GEORGE ROWLEY 72 THE SAILOR-BOY'S RETURN HOME 126
DINNER. 251 POOR GRANNIE IHEADLER 115 THE WOUNDED SOLDIER 129
PRINCE NAPOLEON'S SWIMMING- THE DOCTOR'S VISIT 141
KATIE ARNOLD SAVED BY THE MASTER 130 THE RECRUIT 142
MILLER'S BOY 27 PAUL'S HORSE 138 TOM'S SUPPER 143
KING FREDERIC & THE PLOUGHMAN 109 PET RABBITS 146 THE ORGAN BOY 154
KARL AND THE GEESE 163 PRINCESS LOUISE AND HER HIUS- THE STRANGE BOY 178
BAND 105 THE PRINCEANDTHE OLDWOMAN 180
LOOKING OUT FOR LAND 14 PRAYING FOR BREAD 221 THE BIRDS' FRIEND 182
LUNCH IN THE PLAY-GROUND 66 PIG*STICKING iN THE JUNGLE 259 TIRED BESSIE 184
LITTLE OWLS 87 POOR OLD PEGGY 271 THE FISHING SMACK 186
LOTTIE'S CHICKENS 88 THE POOR OLD BALLAD SINGER 193
LOST AND FOUND 125 QUEEN VICTORIA 134 TIT FOR TAT' 197
LOOKING OUT FOR PUNCH 127 THE SISTERS. 199
LAME CHARLIE 144 RUPERT LISTENING TO THE CON- THE WATCH-FIRE 204
LAME LIZZIE. . 205 SPIRATOS 35 THE MARKET-CART 209'
LILY AND THE ROSE 217 ROSIE GRAY AND CHARLIE 166 THE SLIDE 210
LITTLE PRINCE BALTHAZA 232 ROGER AT THE POST 234 THE CARRIER PIGEON 214
LISETTE WARNING THE STRANGERS 242 THE FISHING-BOATS 215
LAzY LARRY AWAKING 283 SAILING-BOATS IN THE RIVER 30 THREADING A TIRESOME NEEDLE 219
SAM'S TEMPTATION 48 THE BATTLE-FIELD 231
MARTIN LUTHER SINGING IN THE SAVED BY THE OLD TREE 51 THE BOAT-BUILDER 233
STREET 20 SIMON IN A FRIGHT .104 THE DOCTOR'S LIKENESS 245
MARY AND THE BEGGAR-MAN 21 STUFFED MONKEYS 108 THE POULTERER AND THE TURKEY 250
MISCHIEF AT WORK 23 SAVED FROM TROUBLE 111 THE IIAIR-CUTTER 255
MARK SHOWING HIS BOAT 28 SHADOWS ON THE WALL 114 'THIS LITTLE PIG WENT TO
MARTHA, A FLOWER-GIRL 61 SAVED FROM THE BEAR 140 MARKET 256
MR. PELHAM AND HIS GUEST 69 SPRING. 148 THE LAST OF THE SWALLOW' 269
MATANLA, A SLAVE BOY 73 SUMMER . 149 Two YOUNG MUSICIANS 276
MARY GATHERING FOSSILS 78 SUSAN THE HOUSEMAID 155
MARY AND HER LAMB '. 83 SOKERS 174 UP IN A BALLOON 10
MAT GOING ALOFT 85 SABO, THE BLACK BOY 181 UP FOR'PUNISHMENT 275
MRS. WOOD ON THE ICE 98 SAVED FROM DROWNING 206
MOTHER MARGARET 164 STABLE FRIENDS 211 VISITING THE SICK WOMAN 243
MUSIC,VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTAL 201 SORRO 246 VISITING-DAY IN THE HOSPITAL 281
MARIE FOUND IN THE MILK-CAN 236 SMILES . 247
MAUD AND GERALD 244 SHARING WITH THE DOG 253 WILD FLOWERS FROM THE WOOD. 6
MACKEREL-FISHING 261 SPIDER LOOKING OUT 258 WILLIE AND SAMBO 24
SHOEBLACKS OF ALGERIA 264 WILHELM AT THE CASTLE . 39
NORMAN AND HIS DOG 15 SAILING OVER THE SEA 266 WATCHING FOR FATHER 53
NOISY BOYS 80 STOLEN GOLD 27 WAITING FOR MOTHER 64
NETTIE IN TROUBLE 132 WINTER .. 151
NELLIE AND HER FATHER 183 THE WRECK 12 WILL WILSON AND HIS FATHER 153
SNow I'M FATHER' 235 THE LIFE-BOAT .13 'HEN THE WIND BLOWS' 192
NUTS AND BLACKBERRIES 284 THREE CHEERS FOR HARRY MIT- WRECK OF THE BOTHNIA 212
CHELL 29 WORDS OF COMFORT FROM A SON 230
' OPEN YOUR MOUTH AND SHUT THE MAIL-BOAT 32 WAITING TO BE DRESSED 265
YoR EYES' 17 THE TRAIN 33
OLD ANTOINE AND HIS SON 58 THE SISTERS 37 YOUNG INDIAN FISHING 70
OUR HAPPY UNCLE 96 THE INVALID FROM INDIA 38 YOUNG LISTENERS 162

iv








PICTURES AND PRATTLE.








S 1i I I two






















Sli; iu
\V~
















BIRDIE'S LESSON.
1











I















































ASTONISHMENT!

THIs little boy sees something that frightens See how his milk is running away! His
him. Silly boy! It is only a shadow made master will be very angry with him, I am
by the moon as she peeps through a chink, afraid.

2






































Fil



















A YOUNG SHAVER.

BOB has been watching his father shave, and smooth chin with his father's brush. Let us
he thinks that he will shave, too. We see him hope that when he comes to try his father's
standing before the glass laying the soap on his razor he will not cut himself.

3

































































GATHERING PRIMROSES.

PRIMROSES! Even baby Bessie loves them; to-morrow, he says. It is quite right of
so fat little Maggie puts hers into the out- Johnnie to remember his kind friend, who
stretched hand. Johnnie is going to make a does so much for him.
big bunch, to give to his Sunday-school teacher


4
I i



















17-T






















-------






























HINDU CHILDREN AT DINNER.

THIS is the way in which some children in the and sitting round, they dip in a morsel of bread,
East eat their food. They cook a kind of por- roll it up, and toss it down their throats. But
ridge made of rice, butter, and many other this is not the way English children should
things. They put this into a dish on the floor, behave at table.

5 c2
9















-VUI




SI __ _


7






































WILD FLOWERS FROM THE WOODS.

ANNIE and little George have been gathering mother!' Annie is holding up her flowers,
wild flowers. George is catching hold of his too. She is going to put them in a glass of
mother's apron, and saying, 'Smell! smell, water, and keep them as long as she can.


6
















8-111
1N J'J I J il
I _o Io















































EMMA AND HER SISTER.

EMMA is nursing her little sister Rose, who is out her name. Rose is the only sister she has,
weary with her play. The name Emma' and she is very fond of her, and makes a great
means a nurse,' and our Emma likes to act pet of her.
~21 ~
_~53I5



EMAAN ERSSTR

EMMAis ursig hr litlesiser Rsewho s ot he nae. ose s te ony sstershehas
weary with her play. The name 'Emma' iiandsei er odo hr n.mae ra
mean 'a urse' an ourEmmalike to ct pt ofher


7















"N "

IN












"" ;


















SO
















CHRISTMAS PUDDING.


LITTLE Alfred is spending his Christmas at a farmer's wife is bringing in Should you not
farm-house. What a big plum-pudding the like to taste it?


8





















i~ ~-C~-----




















NI



*4



) --



















JACK THE FISHER-LAD.


THIS is the picture of a brave fisher-lad, named I little, after his hard work. How thoughtful he
Jack. He feels very tired, and he is resting a looks! I wonder what he is thinking about ?



9



































------4f;7-- n-


























UP IN A BALLOON.

THIS man was a prisoner in a big town where him prisoner couldn't get at him. After many
a balloon was kept. He managed to loose the wonderful adventures the balloon landed him
ropes which held it down, and go off with it on a lonely island, where he lived many years
into the air, so that the men who had taken before a ship came by to take him home.


10






















































-- =---















A SWISS HUNTER.


WHAT a dangerous position this poor man is he does not know how to get down again. But
in! He is a chamois-hunter on the Swiss see there is another man in the picture. He
mountains. While chasing a chamois he has sees the hunter's danger, and he will find some
climbed up on to a ledge of the rock, and now way of helping him out of it.


11
ii=/


























































----- -----





























SI

































THE WRECK.

THIS is the picture of a shipwreck. The to fetch some, while others are being brought
brave men on shore are doing all they can to to shore in a 'cradle,' swung on to a stout rope.
help the poor frightened people of the sinking One man is clinging to a mast. Let us hope
ship. A boat is going out over the big waves that very soon all will get safely to land.

12









































































THE LIFE-BOAT.


' THE life-boat! the life-boat! shouted the Quickly the boat was got ready, and now
people of a little fishing-village one day, as her brave crew are rowing with might and
they caught sight of a ship in distress beating main towards the fast-sinking ship to save the
about helplessly, at the mercy of the waves, poor creatures on board of her.
--- --------~-_--
EEEis1
EpF
9THE0LIFE-BOAT2

























13 C-~













---------- 1:1










_----------












































LOOKING OUT FOR LAND.

THIS sailor-boy is looking out for land. He young sailor catches sight of her white cliffs he
does not see it yet, and he is rather disappointed, will be very glad indeed, for he wants to get
But England cannot be far off now. When the home and see his dear mother and little sister.


14




















I5-
__ -- -_ _- __ ______ _



























































NORMAN AND HIS DOG.


NORMAN is a young Highlander, as you may see giving his collie a bone, having just finished
by his dress. He lives with his grandmother in his own dinner. The dog has a fine name; he
a cottage on a hill. In the picture we see him is called 'Rob Roy.'
Z) 15
-r

~2i i

NORMANAND HS DOG

NORMAN is a young H~~~~~~iglanea o a e inghscli oehvn utfnse

























IN, /

._ -': ibq" K \\ :'" >' """
In'







































,f // / ., ____ I /; 11
ME'r;




























A"- -V%,
-_..--










































A SHOCK FOIZ SWEET SLEEP.

16










.3l
"1 .- ..- y .,-w
\, 7 -: iI
\ S 411
'N Mi I:
` I .. . " ii, '.<.






71)1
.. ".. : ". . :< -. 4.,. __ __ _



.-,t -4.- 1 _it







,.: ., ... ... ..,,. .: ......,.,.






,Ix
,I' -, _____ t ,' :,!- i




















17
17c
I, ",."":,."' Ir -.-- ..
., :. : ..- '.
,.. , ... -- ,:"
, .:.... ,,..":. ... .. : .; .'


: iI .? ,~ ~
": ,.," ,
'i 'j I
:, : '. : ' '\,
~~~~~ ::- li,
,J-- 'L- .

'"' "' r" "
I' I ': '","1 :, k" : ,
.: '' :X
-- , "<,,
"r; '" ",iN


z.. ~ ,

"~ --.

, -- -
':' :, -- '"- '


~~~o ,._.



M. ').e ii ._:l~~\1;


-J _: ... f"







OPEN YOUR },IOUJTH ANJD SHUT YTOUR EYES."

17 c 2



























=------- --













































HIGHLAND SHEPHERD-BOY.


WRAPPED up in his plaid, eating his dry oat- though he has no one to cheer him on the
cake, this Scotch laddie is minding his flock lonely hill-side, with the keen wind blowing
of sheep. He seems happy and contented, over the snow.


18
~-~Z---- -_______ _ _


-IGL-N -HPEE--BY

-RPE ,Pi i lietnohsdyot hu ehsn n ocerhmo h

cske ths Xotc ladie s mndigr hs fock lo~ly ill-ide ffth he ken indbloli\




































































IDLE JOE ASLEEP.


IT was a hot day: Joe felt very idle, and at master, came along. He soon woke Joe up,
last he let go his spade and lay down to sleep, and gave him a good scolding. Don't you
He had not slept long when the farmer, his think he deserved it?

19
4-~-

































19

























,CI










































MARTIN LUTHER SINGING IN THE STREET.

THIS is Martin Luther, the German youth who him. Martin grew up to be a brave, good,
sang so sweetly in the streets of Eisenach. and famous man-so famous that his name will
Dame Ursula has come to her door to listen to never be forgotten as long as the world lasts.


20











___---------r__ ______--- ____________________ W ~ ~ i~iIII;, 7















































MARY AND THE BEGGAR-MAN.

HERE is a kind little girl giving a piece of members that the Bible says, He that hath
bread to a poor old blind man. Mary does pity on the poor lendeth unto the Lord.' Let
all the kindness that she can, because she re- us try to be like her.

21
HERE ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~, is a kin litl gir giin a ic f mmestatteBbesy,'ethaht
brea toa por od blnd an. arydoes pit on the poo endeth unto th od. e
allth kndesstht hecanbcasesh e- us try to be lik her.
'''~ '~ti Ij i'II2 t/



























































--L_ :. .7 ..
- --- -..-_=---.-





























S,




A FRUIT-SELLER OF VENICE.


IN the beautiful city of Venice the streets are in. It is a common sight to see these boats
canals, and instead of horses and carts, the people bringing loads of peaches, grapes, and other
use boats called 'gondolas' to carry things about fruit to the market for sale.


22













.- -._--- ------ 7-

















ZIN








1 /I`--_ ___

















_______________-----_--_---- I-i--(--
Z---- _- _---.







MISCHIEF AT WORK.

How fond boys are of snow-balling! They I we see Robert and Edward teasing little Lucy,
are rather fond of teasing, too. It is a shame. i by flinging snow-balls at her. Make haste
No brave boys tease little girls. In the picture home, Lucy, out of their way!


23













:- ___ ___ -- -- -_ -- -~- ^______________________________^






























_! /
















/ M/I











WILLIE AND SAMBO.


BLACK Sambo is very fond of little white No wonder Willie puts his arms around
Willie; he carries him about, and plays with Sambo's neck and kisses him, and says, 'I do
him, and makes all sorts of pretty toys for him. love you, Sambo !'


24

































V.

































BERTIE AND CARLO.

CARLO thought it was getting late, so he came had his breakfast, he and Carlo will go into
upstairs to waken his little master. But the garden, and there the two friends will have
Bertie was awake already, and just going to a good game together.
have his bath. When he is dressed, and has

2o 1)









V. I







4VI II, I






..- ...- .
























A SERMON IN THE SCHOOLROOM.
MR. AINSLIE is preaching a children's sermon, with Clara, and twelve o'clock with Maud and
He has a watch for his text, a schoolroom for Richard; and he wishes them all to remember
his church, and Harry, Percy, Richard, Hugh, that their years are so many nours given to
Maud, and Clara for his congregation. It is them by God, in which to do some work for
five o'clock with Percy, half-past six with Him, and that they will have to give account
Hugh, eight o'clock with Harry, ten o'clock at last of the way in which they spend them.

26























S I




































KATIE ARNOLD SAVED BY THE MILLER'S BOY.

KATIE ARNOLD was playing near the mill- was strong, and he could only save her by
stream. She saw some meadow-sweet near 'the holding on to a branch which hung over the
edge of the water, and, reaching over to get it, stream till Mr. Arnold's strong arm helped
she fell in. Her scream was heard by the him and rescued them both. Katie will never
miller's boy. He could swim, and in he forget the miller's boy.
jumped: not a minute too soon, for the current

27


























i --__























MARK SHOWING HIS BOAT.

MARK has got a boat of his own. His kind Alice Fisher, and to anybody else who will
big brother made it for him. Here he is on care to look. The kind big brother thinks
the beach, making a joyful display of it to himself well repaid by the pleasure which Mark
all the boys and girls ; to Ned Houghton and gets out of his boat.

28






























































HARRY MITCHELL has the highest marks for back, accompanied with three cheers. Harry
the month. He is a great favourite with the is not proud, but he thinks how pleased mother
rest of the boys, and they are showing their will be when he tells her; for Harry's greatest
delight by giving him a ride on Charlie's joy is to please his dear mother.

2J D2
iiI,


















































29 '

























M












P I








-- - -- - -- ' r '

























SAILING-BOATS IN THE RIVER.


THIs is the river Mawddach, in Wales. Two turn back soon though, or the tide will be
sailing-boats have come up the river from going out, and there will not be enough water
Barmouth. The people in them are admiring left for the boats to get along in.
the beautiful mountain scenery. They must


30































N

































HAPPY TIMES IN THE WOOD.

SPRING has come, and Lottie and Minnie and keeper is laughing at their joy, and Mary, the
Dolly have asked mother to let them go to gamekeeper's daughter, has come out to see
Coombe Woods and gather primroses. Mother what all the noise is about.
has said Yes and here they are. The game-


31
























---_ --. .. ---_ _-__________________----- -_





---























Si t l p ge a t S of w s g h c h h i
_. .....- - - - ----
-. -_ : -:. 7. ----_= -- -" ,








way arshAaifoNY--'k- t'e fhmef esyesalnttl i
























--;----_ -==; %-S































































-- -- -jii








THE TRAIN.


PUFF! puff! There goes a train, and in the are some happy little boys going home from
train are a number of people. A great many school, and in one carriage there is a sailor
of them are going to the flower-show at the going down to Portsmouth to join his ship.
next town; some are travelling on business; We will wish them all a very pleasant
others are going to see their friends. There journey ?


33
-*= = =L^~- -= -~~
= =~== = =- ==~~~~_-_-L


























































DICK HADLEY IN THE SHIP'S HOLD.

DICK HADLEY had vowed he would go to sea. fairly off he will show himself, for he will need
He went down to the Docks, but nobody would some food. The captain will be dreadfully
engage him. At last he sneaked on board a angry, but he will have to keep him till the
merchantman, and, going below, he hid amongst ship touches land, for he must not throw him
the barrels and merchandise. When the ship is overboard. Dick is a bad boy to act like this.

31















-- -- -_ _

ill --





-1 O




























RUPERT LISTENING TO THE CONSPIRATORS.

THIS little boy was called Rupert. He lived what he heard the men say, and his father
in Germany. One day he went out to sail his went at once and told the magistrate, who sent
tiny ship. Some bad men came by in a boat; soldiers to put these bad men in prison, where
they were planning mischief; they did not see they had no chance of carrying out their
Rupert, but he saw them. He told his father wicked plans.

35































--- --- --




*















---

.---- =_ _= -
























BABY ERNIE.



THIS is our dear baby Ernie. Is he not a loving, thoughtful look on his dear little face!
beauty ? What large eyes he has! and what Don't you think you would like to kiss such a
soft, smooth cheeks! And what a sweet, little pet?



36































- --






































THE SISTERS.


ADELINE is teaching her little sister to write. encouragement. Let us all try to be gentle,
She is a very gentle teacher. As she guides and patient, and loving, like Adeline.
the little hand she speaks loving words of



37

























































THE INVALID FROM INDIA.
CAPTAIN ARNOLD has been in India for many and the page from the carriage to the door
years. India is very trying to the health of of his mother's house. But the very thought
English people, and Dr. Stuart has ordered the of that mother's love and care puts heart into
captain home to England. Even the sea him, and he feels certain of soon being well
voyage has failed to make him strong; he can when once in her hands.
hardly stand, and has to be led by the footman

38

















-W-
""':11 11


































ILIHE L31 AT THE CASTLE.
3ut before he starts e travoaes sthe te t orld. I
^ vew't s h eg o e to th e C a ,8 I' B rer1 a" th um b are q uit ,
ia. While h ladies who have been so kind to the PYoer, 'Lead us ie eadys t jr s
. W ie h e s waiting he sees money on cormes into his mind He y into temptation,'
>tld be n rs te11pted to take a. piece. I heart The teapt as o reathe a s e e t i
i

I~ N,
iN


_
:~>



'''i .






~-~rI


























































BEHIND THE SCENES.

THIS is the inside of the Punch and Judy show we have been watching Punch's funny doings,
which you are so fond of looking at. Little and the hat is passed round, we should not
Nelly is holding the dolls, and handing them forget the family inside the show, who get
to her father as he wishes them, while the their living by amusing us.
mother is nursing a live doll-a baby. When

40






















JIM





































THE RUNAWAY HORSE.

HARRY and Ernest had been left in the dog- whip, and the horse did not like it, and started
cart while their father went into a house to off with the little boys. Happily he was
speak with somebody. Harry had often been stopped by some men on the road, but Harry
told not to touch the whip, but he was not an was never left in charge of him again.
obedient boy. He began to fidget with the

41 E 2


























Z ---- - -




































THE SULKY BOY.

ROBERT has a fit of the sulks. His mother bring down her silly boy's temper, and that
hands him his bread and milk, but he does not when he comes back from school his first act
take it. 'He doesn't want any breakfast,' he will be to go to the cupboard and look for his
says. 'Very well, Robert, you must go with- now despised breakfast.
out.' Mother knows that hunger will soon


42



























I'I

























S-' >











A CANADIAN GIRL.

AMY HUTCHENCE is a Canadian girl. She was other big bits knocked against hers and pushed
crossing the river on the ice one day, when it it against the shore, and she sprang off, and
suddenly broke up, and she was drifted many kind people took her safely back to her mother.
miles on a big block. She was dreadfully God took care of Amy all through that terrible
frightened, you may be sure. At last some danger.


43























V---- --I----I













~E~EEEEE i-------- --- -t
---


































-- --




THE BATTLE IN THE PLAYGROUND.


'SNow! snow! jolly, jolly snow!' sang the One party defended, and another party attacked.
boys of St. John's School, as they turned out After a while the rampart was thrown down
one afternoon and filled their pockets with and the besieged boys were obliged to sur-
snowballs. Then they planned a sham fight, render, for it was growing dark, and there
and fetched a spade and threw up a rampart. was little time left.


41



























-- --X








.- \ > _________= ___- ___--__-____ ____








sitr ese ascm ont ep, ad umin uto _mohe' arms _ithoy_
i-i:
NAAI


































-ohrsad ntebahwthn thm sein ',arry again.
x 5
----~-.'
-~-41







_U -W -7



'LI77 q


HARR BRUTI THE FISER-OY
o!; ,I Z-,~:












HAPRRY BRUTON, and his father and one or with the baby in her arms. Harry is laughing
two men have been out catching fish. Now all over his face because baby sees and knows
they are carrying the tackle ashore. Harry's him, and is clapping his hands and nearly
sister, Jessie, has come down to help, and jumping out of mother's arms with joy at
mother stands on the beach watching them, seeing Harry again.


45














4













































ARTHUR AND HIS DOG.

ARTHUR VICKER lives in the country. His left to keep house. He is trying to teach
father is a carrier, and sometimes he takes Carlo to beg, but the dog doesn't seem to un-
Arthur with him on his rounds. But to-day derstand. Never mind ; try, try, and try
mother has gone, and Arthur and 'Carlo' are again, and perhaps you will succeed, Arthur!


46

















--------------~-~-~I









_._ -- Z













-, ,








i tIt




















.- ,.








A DEAD SALMON.


HERE lies a dead salmon. He was jumping great leap, and leaped right out of the water.
about in the water so cleverly that he grew Now his friends are wondering what has
quite vain, and said to his brothers and sisters, become of him. Poor fish! they will never
'See how far I can jump!' Then he gave a see him again.


47













RE































--4I
......... ------














SAM'S TEMPTATION.

SAM STIMPSON saw some nice grapes lying on no one saw him; but the little birds saw him
the table. Some kind friend had brought with their bright eyes; and God saw him,
them for Sam's sick sister. Naughty Sam and He was grieved to see His little boy for-
took nearly all of them. He thought that get that He had said, 'Thou shalt not steal.'


48


























































A, YOUNG DRUMMER.

THIS is a bright young drummer, who is mother who loves him dearly, and prays night
making a great noise. He thinks it very fine and day that no harm may befall her darling.
to wear such a gay coat and to call the soldiers And that is all I can tell you about this
together by the rattle of his drum. He has a drummer-boy.

49



































































JULES, FRIENDLESS AND HUNGRY.

JULES could not pay his rent, so the bailiff he is wet, cold, and hungry. Yet he does
turned him out. Jules wandered over the not give up all hope. 'Things will mend
country, now doing a job of work, now begging some day,' he says to himself. Friendless
a crust of bread. His only friend was the tame as Jules seems, God sees and knows all
bird you see in the picture on his shoulder, about it, and Jules is in His wise and loving
Jules has been caught in a snow-storm, and hands.


50
----- '~,.-.- 7







JUES FREDESAN UGY
JULES~~ ~ BLS'RPIMI~~ col o a i et otebiif h swt od n ugy e ede




turnd hi out Jues wonder oer te no giv upall ope.'Thngs ill end
contyno ding jb f ork nw eging soe ay' e systohisel. rindes
a~~~ crs fbed.Hsol ren a h am sJls*ees o es n nw l
bi~^rd you see-~=~ iniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii th itr nhs hudr bu tadJlsi nHi ieadlvn

Jue a be agh nasowsom ad hns

I~=I~50










ZNN -


















S. :7'






















-~7-













SAVED BY THE OLD TREE.

'I WONDER what use I am!' said a stunted old saved a boy's life. IHe was slipping down the
tree, growing high on a barren rock. 'I am old, rock, and he would certainly have been dashed
and tough, and lonely; I bear no fruit, a'nd to pieces if the old tree had not caught and
have very few leaves; no birds build in my held him .till some one came to his rescue.
branches.' So the oak said, till one day it did So, you see, nothing is too ugly, or lonely,
something which was indeed worth doing. It or little, to be useful.


51





























































PERCY'S SWING.

PERCY is having a swing. To-day is his birth- spending the morning in the garden, and this
day, and his father says he need not do any evening he is going to have a birthday party
lessons, but may have a holiday. So he is of his little friends. Happy Percy!


52


































































WATCHING FOR FATHER.


LITTLE Ethel's mother is holding her up at Father loves his little girl, and feels as much
the window. Ethel is patiently watching for pleasure in seeing her at the window as she
her father's return home from his daily labour, does in looking for him.

53 2
53-I 2












53~ 2












I 5I











;--- -=












-- --- ~ T
~---_----------

















































GIANT STEAM.


SOMEBODY was shut up in the kettle. He did roof, and escaped. Was he not a clever Some-

not like it at all: it was far too warm to be body? His name is Steam, and he does many
pleasant, so he just burst open the door in the wonderful things on land and sea.



54














~-~z -























_- .

































A PIKE FISH.


I HOPE no one will ever catch this fish. His peeping into a cave, to see what pretty things
is such a happy little life, down there in the he can find there, or what nice things he can
cool green water. In the picture we see him find to eat.



55




























































JOHNSEN CROSSING THE ATLANTIC.

A MAN named Johnsen crossed the Atlantic at last he got her righted and got himself on
Ocean in a little boat called the Gloucester. board. It was not a minute too soon, for in
One day a big wave struck the boat and turned the water, close to him, he saw a shark. Then
her upside down. For about twenty minutes he fastened a knife to an oar and stabbed the
the sailor was on the bottom of his boat; but shark, when it left him.

56
M W
























JOHNSEN CROSSING THE ATLANTIC.

A M.AN named John-sen crossed the Atlantic at last he got her righted and got himself on
Ocean in a little boat called the Gloatcester. board. It was not a minute too soon, for in
One day a big wave struck the boat and turned the water, close to him, he saw a shark. Then
her upside down. For about twenty minutes he fastened a knife to an oar and stabbed the
the sailor was on the bottom of his boat; but shark, when it left him.


56























-Zzz Z-05R M 5- -
E MI

















I- ------------ ------- -z- --- --- --- -----.----- -- ^=-~r~~ __ ___~~ "-^'

'/





~;~I~i~~"-~- ~- C~~----'












BROTHERS CAUGHT IN A STORM.

Two lads went out to sea in a little boat. same time speaking cheery words of comfort
While they were on the sea there came a to his terrified brother. Both boys prayed more
great storm. The younger lad was very much earnestly than they had ever prayed before.
frightened, but the elder behaved bravely. He And before night came on they were picked up
managed the boat as well as he could, at the by a steamer, and so reached land in safety.


57







































17i

















- -





OLD ANTOINE AND HIS SON.

OLD Antoine wished very much to see his son, liked to go and see his own son, but the
from whom he had been parted for a number French officer was too truly noble to be
of years. His brave son had risen to be an ashamed of his good old father. The picture
officer in the French army. Antoine, in his shows you how he welcomed him in the
peasant's dress and wooden shoes, hardly presence of his soldiers.


58











































































sore. He has sat down to rest. Presently bullock looks more pitifully at Hans than his
he hears wheels, and then he sees a bullock- master does. We should never lose a chance
waggon. How he wishes the driver would of helping each other, even in little ways.


59
1~ / / ____












-~ /








































59













I NN,

13\1















































GONE !

IT is Saturday afternoon. Father and mother no light in the room except the fire. Ellen and
have gone to market, and Ellen and Joseph are Joseph are obedient children, and always do
watching for their return, for it is growing as mother tells them, and she can always
dark. Mother has said they must not touch leave them without any fear, because she knows
the lamps for fear of an accident, so they have that she can trust them.


60









S










"I I




































MARTHA, A FLOWER-GIRL.

THIS young girl has been buying flowers in the her uncle, with whom she lives, is very poor,
market. She wishes to sell them again in the and sends her out to earn her own living by
streets, so she is sitting on a step while she selling things in the streets. It is a hard life
-- i





























ties them up into bunches. Martha has no for so young a girl. Are you not very sorry
kind father or mother to take care of her, and for her ?
61 1
- -









MARTHA, A FLOWER-GIRL.

THIS young girl has been buying flowers in the her uncle, with whom she lives, is very poor,
market. She wishes to sell them again in the and sends her out to earn her own living by
streets, so she is sitting on a step while she selling things in the streets. It is a hard life
ties them up into bunches. Martha has no for so young a girl. Are you not very sorry
kind father or mother to take care of her, and for her ?

61 0










iV
,, I
























ONE day, as little Jack Hoer was eating The wasp paid no attention to Jack, and did
























buzzed round his plate. Jack brushed it knife it stung his hand, which sent him
....-. ...,, ,-..



















JACK AND THE WASP.

ONE day, as little Jack Horner was eating The wasp paid no attention to Jack, and did
his dinner, a wasp flew in at the window, and dare; and when Jack struck at it with his
buzzed round his plate. Jack brushed it knife it stung his hand, which sent him
away, and said, 'Come again if you dare !' screaming to his mother.

62
























L





I\,\







































EVA AT WORK ON THE COUNTER.


EVA's mother keeps a shop in a country town, little girl. Of course she does not. But Eva's
and Eva likes to sit upon the counter. When brother George will be home from school soon,
customers come in and see her there, they and then Eva will jump down and run off
often ask her mother if she wishes to sell her to have a game with him.


63
il-'-N,


















"-- -------c- _--_-_-"



















IN






















WAITING FOR MOTHER.
WAITING FOR MOTHER.

THESE children in the donkey-cart are waiting children will not be kept waiting much
for their mother, who has gone round to a longer, but that they will very soon be at
cottage to see a sick friend. It is a cold home, sitting over a cosy fire, in a warm and
and windy day; so let us hope the poor pleasant room.


64


















_- I---

S-----





.1.. -- -=-- = = "


















































X
''











































DICKY'S FUNERAL.


DEAR little Dicky is dead, and the children be placed in it, and covered over with the soft

have come to bury him. Johnny is crying, dark earth. Wild flowers will be planted on
',,'' ''N.








































dug a little grave, and very soon Dicky will Tom has written, 'Here lies our dear Dicky.'



65 2















I

































L L













LUNCH IN THE PLAY-GROUND.


ToM and Jack, and Hugh and Alf, are eating him a potato dipped in nice gravy for a bit of
their lunch in the play-ground. Tom has some the turnover. But Jack is not quite sure i
meat pudding, and Jack has an apple turnover, whether he will make the exchange or not,
Tom thinks Jack's lunch is the best, and offers as he seems to prefer his turnover.


66
: 'il "
Illlii

.76~I-'














































66s






















































































big book to her little brother and sister. Little him ? And his sister has to tell him the
Eddie is highly delighted with a picture of whole story, which you will find in the First
David and Goliath. What a great big man!' Book of Samuel.


67
I ,f I



.1111~

',,;-~~~~


--'--

\i\\
~=F~'~ ~


























-I.- {---I 7/---,
















the village church, and the grave where his them.













































(
'MEN,


























MIRR














h n ; but akn is guest to takl ,
S rand he is not onotbegin forNo quite
er without it; so zo use premsing Lim. hail ill IX) but
--lear t sa)rn to ay 'i'.' It i s it is

""w----














































"__ A
....- ..-- ..








N1

















,______ _____ ______________ ____. \f 7"__
--- ---------













YOUNG INDIAN FISHING.


YOUNG 'Setting Sun' wished some fish; but dropped the fish-line down the hole, and
the lake was covered with ice, so 'Setting Sun' patiently waited for the fish to bite. It must
fetched a hatchet and broke the ice away, then be very cold work.



'70















/










i t
-- -



















































A HUNGRY CHILD.


ELLEN wondered very much to see a little she felt very sorry for the poor hungry little
girl sucking the dog's bone. She thought it girl, and ran into her mother's cottage to ask if
was very kind of the dog to let her do it; but she might give her apiece of bread and butter.



71
_____ !/iLJ I
























































71
























No





































POOR GEORGE ROWLEY.

GEORGE ROWLEY lives at Washington, and when he was a child. He is very poor,
earns money by showing English gentlemen but he says he would rather be poor and free
over the Capitol. He is free now, but once he than live in a fine house, with plenty to eat
was a slave. He does not know where his and drink, and yet be a slave, who could be
brothers and sisters are, for they were all sold bought and sold.


72

























































MATANLA, A SLAVE BOY.

MATANLA was stolen away from his home in her forced the Arab trader to give up his slaves
the middle of Africa by cruel men, and packed, to them. Then they took the poor creatures
with a great many more black people, into an to Frere Town, and Matanla was placed in the
Arab slave-ship. But on the sea they met an Mission-school there. He is now a very merry
English ship, and the Englishmen on board fellow, as you see by this picture.

73 I
























































BABY IN DANGER.

DAME TOURNIER 'went out one morning, leaving out of the wood and twisted itself round baby's
baby Josephine in her cradle. The cradle arm. But by the time she reached the cradle
stood near a bundle of wood which had been it had coiled itself up in the corner of the
brought in to dry. When the good dame blanket, and baby was not hurt a bit, but
came back and peeped in at the window she lived to be an old woman and to tell the story
gave a scream of horror, for a viper had crawled about herself.

74
,.




; ;, - ; Q-,"






























BABY IN DANGER.

DAIME TOUNIERa ent out one morning, Ieaving" out of the wood and twisted itself round baby's
baby Josephine in her cradle. The cradle arm. But by the time she reached the cradle
stood near a bundle of wood which had been it had coiled itself up in the corner of the
brought in to dry. When the good dame blanket, and baby was not hurt a bit, but
came back and peeped in at the window she lived to be an old woman and to tell the story
gave a scream of horror, for a viper had crawled about herself.

74























""i t




































ERIC READING TO THE WORKMEN.
i, ,.































ERIC READING TO THE WORKMEN.

ERIC's father had a great number of men and after asking their permission, Eric'would come
boys working for him. They used to meet to and read them some good story or brave bit of
drink and smoke at night when work was done. history, and in listening the men forgot their
Eric thought he could help them to some- pipes and ale, and had something good to think
thing better than the foolish talking and jest- about when they went to work again in the
ing in which they spent their time. So, morning.


75











































1E













FRITZ DRAWING A JUG.

FRITZ is drawing a jug, and his mother and he gives as much time as he can spare to his
sister have ceased their lace-making to glance drawing, for he knows that without practice
at his work. Fritz wishes to be an artist, and he will never be made perfect.


76
)T



















Id












































ETTY READING TO GRANDMOTHER.


ETTY is reading to her grandmother as she busy elsewhere. Sometimes grandmother tells
works. The old woman and the little girl are Etty a story of the time when she was a little
together a great deal, while Etty's mother is girl. Etty likes that very much.


77 H 2

























S- 0:5





































MARY GATHERING FOSSILS.


AMARY is knocking fossils out of the rocks to heavy. Soon it will be filled, and then Mary
sell to the visitors at Stonytown-on-Sea. Her and her father will clamber down the rocks
father holds the basket, which is getting rather and go home to dinner.


78
N




















-~-- _ _ _














































ELFIE CROWNED WITH FLOWERS.


LITTLE Elfie is being crowned with flowers. I a posy of flowers with them for their mother's
She and her brother are spending a day in the table. How good God is to make the flowers
woods. When they go home they will take grow which give so much pleasure !


79





























































NOISY BOYS.

HERE are a number of school-boys trooping in to their lessons. The foremost boy is
upstairs. They have been having a good turning rouni to say, 'If you fellows make
game in the play-ground, and now are going such a noise we shall get into a scrape.'


80




























al
lilt






i/ ,






























GOING TO ST. PAUL'S.


EVERY year there is a great gathering of quaint dresses which were the fashion in the
Charity-school children in St. Paul's Cathedral. days when the good people lived who gave
Here is a picture of some of them, in the their money for the support of these schools.


81






























































A RAINY DAY.


THIS brave girl is going to Sunday school. It little voice within, which we call'Conscience,'told
was very comfortable by the fire, and she did her she had better go. So here she is, and I am
not wish to go out in the wind and rain; but that sure her teacher will be very pleased to see her.

82





























































MARY AND HER LAMB.


HERE is a Scotch girl holding a lamb. See the that Mary is their friend, and they do not run
mother -sheep looking up at her little one! away from her as they do from any one else.
' B-a-a b-a-a!' she says. All the sheep know They know that Mary is their friend and guide,


83






















IhI
I '1 "' I I \ j', \

R 0 211

-I I, A j'


































look at. It is not a striking likeness, Bob, by again
,
























S--








































MAT GOING ALOFT.


THIS is Mat. He has been told to climb the he might become giddy and tumble. Mat has
rigging and look ahead. See how wisely he a good face: if he lives to be a man he will be
looks up at the sky! If he were to look down a sensible, upright, brave sailor, I am sure.


85 I





















-








































HUNGRY AND COLD.

WHAT a sad picture! Inside the house, happy Ah, well! if nobody does so our Heavenly
children are dancing round a Christmas-tree; Father will open the door of His House, and
outside, a boy is dying of hunger and cold. call His tired, cold, hungry child into that Home.
Don't you wish that somebody would open the There he will be even happier than the children
door of the house, and call the poor boy in ? who are dancing round the Christmas-tree!


86



































,; ",




















LITTLE OWLS.

THESE little owls lived in an old church given to Arthur Craddock for pets. But he
tower. Some men went up it to repair it, and did not keep them long. One morning when
found them looking very curious, and much he went to look at them and feed them, he
alarmed by the strange noises the workmen found that some one had opened their cage
were making. They were brought down and door, and that they had. all flown away.

87































































-_ _


LOTTIE'S CHICKENS.

HERE are some children looking at their which ran about quite tamely. But the poor
chickens. Lottie is holding one in her hand. little things were killed by the cat. So now
She thinks he does not seem quite well. The these chickens are kept carefully in a cage, and
children have had chickens of their own before, covered over with a net.


88.

















W-














































A CLEVER MONKEY.

HE is such a clever little monkey. You see with the monkey's funny tricks, that she is
he is dressed as a soldier, and he has been going to give him the nice sponge-cake which
letting off his little pop-gun, to the great the nurse has just given to her, instead of
delight of the children. Daisy is so pleased eating it herself.


89 12










































































JOHN IN THOUGHT.


WHAT are you thinking about, John ? Is it leave off dreaming, and say something to your
that long lesson which must be learned before poor little sister, who wishes you to look at the
the holidays ? or is it the grand cricket-match fine house she has been building with her new
that is to be played to-morrow afternoon ? Do bricks.


90
!: .. ..7 --








-g ~/--












( SRI


x~

~ ~/#/$# ~t~. \\X1.,













thZoias ri ttegrn rce-ac iehue h a enbidnrwt
that~~~~~~~\ is tbepaetomroafrNooDrcs













,1------------------



















































DORA AND LION.

'DEAR old doggie! I do so love you!' That her constant companion, and lets her pull him
is what this little girl is saying. And Lion is about as much as ever she likes. Dora has no
a dear old dog; there is no mistake about that. brothers and sisters, and she would be very
He saved little Dora's life once. Now he is lonely without her four-footed friend.

91















































THE PRINCESS OF WALES AND HER BOYS.

THis is the portrait of the Princess of other, Prince George, eleven years old. They
Wales and her two sons, Prince Albert Victor have grown taller since then, and have learned
and Prince George. When this portrait was a great deal and been to sea. We are very
taken the eldest Prince was twelve, and the proud of our brave young sailor-princes.

92
=-~~ -----
-- -- _ ---- .. - ---- -
THE PRINCES F~ WAEADHrBOS
T I is th potrat f te in ess o tePic ere lvnyasod hy


Wae ndh rt o os P ic lb r ito ae r w ale icet e, n ae ere
and~~~~ ~ ~~- :Pic ere hnti otatws a ra eladbe osa eaevr
aen h edet ricewa weve ad heprud ofou rae oug aiorprncs
"92I)



























1111011 I MO IIIIUAU un i
































FRAU FROHSINN AND HER CHILDREN.

GRETCHEN and her mother are peeling pota- in her children. They are healthy and strong;,.
toes for dinner. See what a basketful Rein- batter still, they are obedient and helpful, and
rich and Emile have just dragged in! Frau they wisely think it no hardship, but fine fun,
Frohsinn has not much money, but she.is rich to have to work hard.

93
)