• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Half Title
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Preface
 Table of Contents
 Reaping-time
 My lord red admiral
 Violets
 An old homestead
 Froggie's lesson
 The daisy
 Little content
 The kingfisher and the dragon-...
 Poppies
 The goat and the lamb
 A caged lark
 Our garden
 Little miss primrose
 The wood-pigeon, the partridge,...
 The little crab-apple
 My pets
 A summer song
 The longest day
 The key of gold
 Thistles
 Wild flowers
 Strange friends
 The hot-house lily
 Vanity
 The race for gold
 A choice
 The speedwell
 To little painters
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Group Title: The "little folks" nature painting book : : a series of outline engravings for water-colour painting
Title: The "little folks" nature painting book
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00048498/00001
 Material Information
Title: The "little folks" nature painting book a series of outline engravings for water-colour painting
Physical Description: 80, 8 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Weatherly, George
Greenaway, Kate, 1846-1901 ( Illustrator )
Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co
Publisher: Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co.
Place of Publication: London ;
Paris ;
New York
Publication Date: [1880?]
Edition: Twenty-fifth thousand.
 Subjects
Subject: Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Animals -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Flowers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1880   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1880   ( local )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre: Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations   ( local )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
France -- Paris
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with stories and verses by George Weatherly.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text.
General Note: Frontispiece printed in colors.
General Note: Illustrations by Kate Greenaway.
General Note: Baldwin Library copy illustrations are hand-colored: probably by young owner.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00048498
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002225228
notis - ALG5500
oclc - 14289159

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Half Title
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page iii
        Page iv
    Preface
        Page v
        Page vi
        Page vii
        Page viii
    Table of Contents
        Page ix
        Page x
    Reaping-time
        Page 11
    My lord red admiral
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Violets
        Page 14
        Page 15
    An old homestead
        Page 16
        Page 17
    Froggie's lesson
        Page 18
        Page 19
    The daisy
        Page 20
        Page 21
    Little content
        Page 22
        Page 23
    The kingfisher and the dragon-fly
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    Poppies
        Page 28
        Page 29
    The goat and the lamb
        Page 30
        Page 31
    A caged lark
        Page 32
        Page 33
    Our garden
        Page 34
        Page 35
    Little miss primrose
        Page 36
        Page 37
    The wood-pigeon, the partridge, and the sparrow
        Page 38
        Page 39
    The little crab-apple
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
    My pets
        Page 44
        Page 45
    A summer song
        Page 46
        Page 47
    The longest day
        Page 48
        Page 49
    The key of gold
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
    Thistles
        Page 64
        Page 65
    Wild flowers
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Strange friends
        Page 68
        Page 69
    The hot-house lily
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
    Vanity
        Page 74
        Page 75
    The race for gold
        Page 76
    A choice
        Page 76
        Page 77
    The speedwell
        Page 78
        Page 79
    To little painters
        Page 80
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Back Cover
        Cover 3
        Cover 4
Full Text






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THE "LITTLE FOLKS"

NATURE PAINTING BOOK.











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THE "LITTLE FOLKS"



NATURE PAINTING BOOK.



A SERIES OF

OUTLINE ENGRAVINGS FOR WATER-COLOUR PAINTING,

WITH STORIES AND VERSES


GEORGE WEATHERLY.











CASSELL, BETTER, GALPIN & CO.:
LONDON, PARIS 4 P NEW YORK.
[ALL RIGHTS RESERVED]






























PREFACE.


THE primary object of this book may be. ex-
pressed in a few words: it has been prepared
especially with a view to stimulate and en-
courage in young people a truer love for and
" a more correct knowledge of the common
objects of Nature. To this end it contains a
Z, series of outline illustrations of well-known
British flowers, ferns, birds, butterflies, and
animals, adapted for Water-Colour Painting.
It is suggested that, provided with these
outlines, the young artists shall go directly to Nature to
ascertain the true colours of the objects, and shall then colour
them to the best of their ability. By this means it is hoped
that-since Nature herself is the best teacher-artistic taste











vi PREFACE.

of no mean order, combined with a due appreciation of colour,
may be developed; while, at the same time, a closer examina-
tion of the flowers and other natural objects which enrich
and beautify our land cannot but inspire a deeper love for
the manifold wondrous works of the Creator.
To render the book of more enduring interest after the
illustrations have been coloured, and to some extent as expla-
natory of the designs, a collection of stories and verses has
been provided by the Author of the tales and rhymes in the
" LITTLE FOLKS Painting Book," &c.
As an inducement to all young people to colour this book
in the manner proposed, Prize Competitions for the best
coloured copies have been instituted in connection with
LITTLE FOLKS Magazine. The especial feature of these
competitions lies in the fact that all the coloured books and
other articles forwarded in competition for Prizes eventually
find their way into the hands of sick and suffering little
ones in the Children's Hospitals. How welcome the annual
LITTLE FOLKS Gift is to the Hospitals has been abundantly
testified in the past, and to readers of the Magazine must
have become almost a matter of history.
A reference to the pages of this book will show that, with
one or two exceptions, summer flowers only are included, and
the reason for this may readily be explained. The Prize
Competitions are open during the summer months only-from
May to the end of September-and it has therefore been
thought advisable not to include outlines of early spring or
late autumn flowers, specimens of which could not possibly
be obtained by Competitors. One or two exceptions have,












PREFACE. vii

however, been made in favour of old friends, such as the
primrose, the cowslip, and the violet, whose colours are
familiar to all, and whose absence would have been a loss to
the book.



The following Prizes and Medals are offered to readers of
LITTLE FOLKS Magazine who shall send to the Editor the
best coloured copies of this book:-

FIRST COMPETITION (For Complete Books Coloured).-A Prize of Y4 in
money and a Silver Medal of the LITTLE FOLKS Legion of Honour for the
best coloured copy of the "LITTLE FOLKS Nature Painting Book;" and a
Prize of 2 in money and a Bronze Medal for the second-best book. This
second prize will be awarded to a Competitor underfourteen years of age.
SECOND COMPETITION (For Books with Six Pages Coloured).-A prize of 3
in money and a Silver Medal of the Legion of Honour, and a Prize of 1 in
money, together with a Bronze Medal, for the best and second-best books
containing six pages coloured. The second of these Prizes will be awarded to
a Competitor under ten years of age.
FIRST AND SECOND COMPETITION.-PRIZES IN BOOKS-(at least Twenty in
number, but to be largely increased should the competitors be numerous)-
and Bronze Medals to all deserving Honourable Mention.

In the award of Prizes the ages of Competitors will be
carefully considered, so that all may have a reasonable chance
of success. The detailed regulations are as follow:-

I. Every Competitor must be under the age of eighteen years in the
First Competition, and under the age of fourteen in the case of
the Second Prize offered. In the Second Competition, Competitors
must be under the age of fourteen, and under the age of ten in the
case of the Second Prize offered.
II. In the First Competition all the illustrations in the book (the figure
initials, in addition to the flowers, birds, &c.) must be coloured.












viii PREFACE.

III. In the Second Competition, six pages only must be coloured, and
these must be the first six complete pages of illustrations in
the book, namely, pages 13, 15, 17, 19, 21, and 23.
IV. In both competitions the complete book must be forwarded; that is
to say, the six pages are not to be cut out and sent for com-
petition.
V. Each book or set of six pages must be certified by a magistrate,
minister of religion, teacher, or other person in a responsible
position, as the sender's own unaided work. (It should, however,
be understood that Competitors are at liberty to use any means at
their command to ascertain the correct colours of flowers, &c.) The
age of each Competitor must be similarly attested. Books which
are the joint production of two or more persons will be disqualified.
VI. Competitors for the "six-page prizes and medals may also compete
for the "complete book prizes, in which case the volume con-
taining the specified coloured pages, and a complete painted
volume, must both be forwarded. Only one book in, each com-
petition may, however, be forwarded by each person.
VII. The Competitions will close on Thursday, the 30th of September,
1880, after which date no books will be received.
VIII. All books must be plainly marked with the Competitor's name, age,
and address-(inscribed on the half-title-the page preceding the
frontispiece)-and should be sent, carriage paid, addressed to the
Editor of LITTLE FOLKS, La Belle Sauvage Yard, Ludgate Hill,
London.
IX. All books received for competition will be distributed among the
various CHILDREN'S HOSPITALS after the Prizes and Medals have
been awarded.





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y LORD RED ADMIRAL .12

VIOLETS ... ,. .. .. .. .-.... 14

AN OLD HOMESTEAD ... .. ... '... '..-. .. -' .. .1

.ROGGIE's LESSON .. ... ....18

THE DAISY l ..... . 20

LITTLE CONTENT CONTENTS.

THE KINGFISHER AND THE DAGN-FLY 24
POPPIES D 2


THE GOAT AND TE LA. A FALE 30

OA CAGED LESSON 183

OT E DAISY .204

LITTLE CONTENT P MROSE . .. .

THE OOD-FISHER AND THE PARTRIDGE, AND THE NARROW 38
POPPIES 28

THE GOAT AND THE LAMB. A FABLE 30

A CacED LARK 32

OuR GARDEN 34

LITTLE MISS PRIMROSE 36

THE WOOD-PIGEON, THE PARTRIDGE, AND THE SPARROW 38















X CONTENTS.

PAGE
THE LITTLE CRAB-APPLE 40

MY PETS 444

A SUMMER SONG 46

THE LONGEST DAY 48

THE KEY OF GOLD. THE STORY OF A SEARCH 50

THISTLES 64

WILD FLOWERS 66

STRANGE FRIENDS .. 68

THE HOT-HOUSE LILY .. 70

VANITY 74

THE RACE FOR GOLD 76

A CHOICE 76

THE SPEEDWELL 78

To LITTLE PAINTERS 80








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THE "LITTLE FOLKS"

NATURE PAINTING BOOK


REAPING-TIME.
SA WHISPER ran through the nodding wheat,
", And the seas of gold corn quivered;
SThe poppies that flared in the noon-day heat
f Grew cold with fear, and shivered;
SThe lark fluttered up from his grassy bed,
'... Scarce knowing the sun was shining;
""And the wild convolvulus drooped its head,
And for once forgot its twining:
For a joyous song was borne along,
And the voices rang through the hours:
Hurrah for the harvest! the reapers cried;
"Alas for us all! sighed the flowers.











12 THE "LITTLE FOLKS" NATURE PAINTING BOOK.

The reapers came with the morning sun,
And their sickles flashed full brightly,
Till at eventide, when work was done,
The wheat was lying lightly;
But the lark had lost its nest for aye,
The poppies flared no longer,
And the wild convolvulus faded away,
For man had been the stronger !
And a double song was borne along,
Merry and sad, through the hours;
For "Hurrah for the harvest the reapers cried,
But Alas for us all! sighed the flowers.





MY LORD RED ADMIRAL.
S "How common you are," said a butterfly
To a neighbour one sunny morn,
S As over a hedge of sweet wild rose
Both lazily were borne;
I'm sure, since I left my nettle-bed,
When the sun peeped up in the East,
I've seen your relations everywhere-
A score or so at least!
Such nasty lemon-coloured things
Cannot with me compare,
With bright vermilion on my wings,
An insect rich and rare !









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14 Ti. LITTLE FOLKS NATURE PAINTING BOOK.

Just then a little boy, well armed
With net of gauze, passed by,
And quick as thought the net had caught
Each flutt'ring butterfly.
"Poor little Brimstone said the boy,
"I'll let him fly away;
They are so common hereabout,
I'll catch one any day.
But as for this Red Admiral,
I'll take him home with me,
And, dead and pinned upon the wall,
Keep him for all to see "









VIOLETS.
THE violets hid in sheltered glade
A shy sweet scent are giving,
And all the place around is made
The brighter for their living:
So little lives, half hid from sight,
May yet be kind and tender,
Till other lives grow glad and bright
Through their sweet self-surrender.

































HEART'S EASE (Viola tricolor). SWEET VIOLET. (Viola, odorata).


























GREAT BINDWEED (Convolvulus seopium). COMMON HONEYSUCKLE (Lonicera
periclymenum).










16 THE "LITTLE FOLKS" NATURE PAINTING BOOK.


AN OLD HOMESTEAD.
p \f P WHEN wintry days are dark and drear,
S When winter fires burn bright and clear,
I watch the blaze, and see full plain
The dear old homestead once again.

See, there the old farm nestles still
SBeneath the shelter of the hill,
I Its thatched roof gleaming, as of old,
With lichens brown, and grey, and gold.

S. And there's the latticed window-pane
Of that dear room where I have lain
,So oft with brothers at my side-
Three tired boys at eventide.

I see the farmyard and the pens:
The very cows, and pigs, and hens
We knew long since the picture fill-
They surely can't be living still.

And there's the stile-the very same
On which I've often carved my name;
And there's the tree we liked the best,
And loved to climb, and called our nest.

And there's the copse, and there the mill:
All live, unchanged, in memory still,
Though Time, with hands that never stay,
Long since has swept them all away.










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18 THE "LITTLE FOLKS" NATURE PAINTING BOOK.

FROGGIE'S LESSON.
-: A FROG sat by a garden wall,
And watched the glinting sunbeams
fall
S. On creeping rose and lichens grey,
"" I And hardy wallflow'rs bright and gay,
And butterfly that sailing came,
SIts wings of tortoiseshell aflame;
And he cried Alas why should it be?
All things are very fair to see,
But me! but me!
If I might change but for an hour,
"With butterfly, or bird, or flower,
Flash through the air with glitt'ring wing,
No more a hideous ugly thing,
And fly about just where I would,
I could be happy as a king,
I know I could! "

An hour had scarcely passed away
Ere clouds had dulled the summer day;
The wind had changed, and hailstones fell
Upon those wings of tortoiseshell,
And crushed and bruised the insect lay,
The helpless sport of winds at play ;
While froggie, neathh the shelt'ring wall,
Laughed at the storm, nor cared at all.
But when he saw each broken flower,
The insect that scarce lived an hour,










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20 THE "LITTLE FOLKS" NATURE PAINTING BOOK.

He sighed, Alas, that it should be !
We all have trials and griefs, I see !
And beauty's trial is to be frail,
The sport of ev'ry passing gale.
And so, though flowers be bright and gay,
And sunbeams love on them to play,
Though butterflies flash in the sun,
I would not change with any one "



THE DAISY.*
EACH morning when the sun doth rise,
And o'er the hills comes peeping,
A little flower opes its eyes,
Nor careth to be sleeping;
With the first blush of dawn it wakes,
Its petals swift unfolding,
And all its little being stirs,
The glorious sun beholding.
But when, with splendour in the west,
The sun is slowly sinking,
The flower gently shuts its eyes
And very soon is blinking.
And so, because it loves the sun,
With it's awake or sleeping,
We call the little flow'r day's eye,
The day's length surely keeping.
"* A corruption of the old English name "day's-eye.
































COMMON DAISY (Bellis perennis) COMMON RED POPPY (Papaver Rhmas).

























COMMON BUTTERCUP (Ranunculus bulbosus). BLACKBERRY (Rubus fruticosus)










22 THE "LITTLE FOLKS" NATURE PAINTING BOOK.


LITTLE CONTENT. <
I MET a little maid one da y,,
In lonely country hid away,, "'
And, asking if she did not ghi
S: For merrier scenes, s Lv ddI '--
"Lonely? because w&QF., s, < '
F / rom where the -,.vi ictrie. \re
"i / Because no other hur.I s;r nea'\_ \,
Our farm so dear?
Lonely? Now, sir, how can we be?
SThere's father, mother, little Bee,
And baby (he can hardly crawl),
"And that's not all.

"For there's our pony Jack, you know-
He's getting rather old and slow,
But then we all must older get,
And he's a pet!

"And then there's Dash (Bee's very own)-
He's always happy with a bone;
And then there's Kitty-she's my cat-
Dear me! what's that?

"Hurrah! it's mother come to tell
We've five wee kittens, sir, as well!
At least I'm sure you will allow
We never can be lonely now?"





























































































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24 THE "LITTLE FOLKS" NATURE PAINTING BOOK.

THE KINGFISHER AND THE DRAGON-FLY.
THE kingfisher sat on a bough, and his eyes
"Were fixed on the stream below,
And he saw the minnows leap and rise,
But he let them come and go,
Till a dragon-fly skimmed the rippling brook,
With his armour all aglow-
Then the kingfisher gave one greedy look,
And said, "You are mine, I trow !
Hide and seek
For many a week,
A nice little game we've been playing;
But now, as a treat,
I'll have you to eat,
Before you again are straying.
It's no use to speak, or reason why;
I've made up my mind, and so you must die "
"Hard and tough,
Scaly and rough,
Quantum snff.
(Which means quite enough),
You'll find me, I think," said the dragon-fly.

The kingfisher smiled, and looked very wise
Puffed up in his own conceit,
He deemed he might well the warning despise-
He knew what was good to eat!
Moreover, he thought, wouldd be really absurd
To make any longer delay,















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TRAILING DOG-ROSE (]roSa a2belnsis). COMMON DEAD Vit IOLE (La num vulgartm).










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26 THE "LITTLE FOLKS" NATURE PAINTING BOOK.

So he answered the dragon-fly never a word,
But darted at once at his prey !
Slow to speak,
Yet swift of beak,
The morsel was very soon swallowed;
When, sad his fate !
He wished, too late,
The words of advice he had followed !
For the scaly repast
Stuck hard and fast
In a throat not over capacious,
And in jeering tone,
,That was half a moan,
The fly mocked the bird rapacious :
"' It's no use to speak,'or reason why;
I've made up my mind, and so you must die!
Hard and rough,
Scaly and tough,
Quantum slff.
And more than enough,
You've found to your cost is a dragon-fly "



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28 THE "LITTLE FOLKS" NATURE PAINTING BOOK.


POPPIES.

/ .- POPPIES red and white and yellow,
Gay as summer day,
-. l .'Each of you's a pretty fellow
In a certain way!
But your beauty's much too glaring
For a lengthened stay;
You'd be better not so flaring,
,.c So the people say.

Poppies glowing 'mid the mazy
"* Labyrinths of wheat;
YELLOW HORNED PoPPY Fairer far is any daisy
(Glautium luteum).
Growing at my feet!
For its wee face opens daily,
Free from all conceit,
And if it be clothed less gaily,
It is very sweet!

Poppies red and white and yellow,
Gay as summer day,
Each of you's a pretty fellow
In a certain way!
But though all be bright above you,
Sunbeams o'er you stray,
Try my best, I cannot love you,
Sad it is to say!














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LONG SMOOTH-HEADED POPPY (Papaver dubiumn). WHITE POPPY (Papaver somnifeuwn).









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30 THE "LITTLE FOLKS" NATURE PAINTING BOOK.

THE GOAT AND THE LAMB.
A FABLE.
'You poor creature said a pet lamb, in tones full of scorn,
to a goat which was busily employed one sunny afternoon in
drawing a little carriage containing one of its master's children.
"You are indeed a wretched creature, thus spending your days
in toil. See how much better is my lot: I am the pet of the
whole household, the farmer's children love to play with me
and caress me, and I have nothing to do all day long but to
amuse myself as I like best."
The goat turned its head to look at the speaker; there
was, however, no anger in its glance, but rather a strange
expression of pity which the lamb could not understand.
"Why do you look at me like that? it said, tossing its
head.
"I look thus, because I pity you," said the goat. Though
you do not guess it, your lot is far harder than mine, as I fear
you will find out ere long. The time is not far distant when
you will have grown too big for a pet, and then--"
"Oh, I can't stop to listen to such nonsense," cried the
lamb; and away it went leaving the goat to its work.

The months slipped by, and it was even as the goat had
said. The lamb grew into a sheep, and the children cared for
it no longer; then the farmer sent it out into the fields, and
in time it was driven with other sheep to the market, and then
its days were ended. But the goat still drew the children
round the yard and through the sweet old-fashioned garden.






















,\I .. '



1 aA










32 THE "LITTLE FOLKS" NATURE PAINTING BOOK.

Alas! how little ought we to boast of those apparent
advantages which we possess how rarely we guess that those
whose ways seem set in darker paths may, after all, be more
contented, and perhaps have more cause for content, than
ourselves.





A CAGED LARK.
S FAR up above a city's din,
S A little wooden cage within,
S A lark each morn sang loud and long,
SUntil the air seemed full of song.

i And passers-by looked up to see
i Whence came such wondrous melody,
^ And scarce believed the song they heard
Was carolled by a captive bird.

What ? Shut in cage just one foot square,
With not a breath of country air,
With nought to see save city street,
How could it sing a song so sweet?"

Poor wondering crowd! far from your thought
The lesson that the birdie taught-
To give God praise, whatever one's lob:
The lark but did what you forgot.



















,.







.-
& J w --'- ^ 4I rf























BROAD-LArED EVEaSASTIN, PEA HAWTH01N O .-,AY ("*a-- egus o!!acan \ a).
-j y -

(Lathyurs Zatifotis).




C











34 THE "LITTLE FOLKS NATURE PAINTING BOOK.

What though no more in sunny sky
With matin song it soared on high;
What though with loss of freedom's hours
Came loss of friends and trees and flowers;

What though no more 'mid summer heat
It soared above the rustling wheat;
What though the days were dark and long:
Yet life remained, and life was song.



OUR GARDEN.
THArT' not our garden, stretching far,
Where grand conservatories are,
Where plants from ev'ry land and clime
Live close companions for a time.

That's not our garden, sloping down
To woods that change from green to brown-
A garden rich in beds of flowers,
Lawns, roseries, and shady bowers.

That's not our garden, you must know;
And though of course we children go
Just where we will to look at it,
We do not love the place a bit.

For all is stiff, and such an air
Of stateliness reigns everywhere !












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36 THE "LITTLE FOLKS" NATURE PAINTING BOOK,

And flowers and things you mustn't touch
You really can't love very much.

But come with us, and you shall see
Just what a garden ought to be:
"A place where you can cull at will,
"A wealth of flowers around you still.

See here it is; not prim and neat,
But flower-bedecked, and very sweet;
Full as it is, we've always room
For ev'ry dear old-fashioned bloom.

It may be rather wild and rough;
We like it-isn't that enough?
And this would make it dear alone-
You see, it's just our very own.





LITTLE MISS PRIMROSE.
LITTLE Miss Prim, Little Miss Prim,
With her quaint little face With her bright little face!
By the water's brim, On the hedgerow's rim,
Where the whirligigs skim And where woods are dim-
With fairy grace, All shaded the place-
Lives little Miss Prim Dwells little Miss Prim,
With her quaint little face. With her bright little face.


































IVY-LEAVED CYCLAMEN, OR SOWBREAD COMMON PRIMROSE (Primulaces vulgaris).
(Cyclamen hederefolium).


























OXLIP (Primulacee elatior. COWSLIP (Primulaces veris).











38 THE "LITTLE FOLKS" NATURE PAINTING BOOK.


THE WOOD-PIGEON, THE PARTRIDGE, AND THE
SPARROW.
"You foolish thing said a wood-pigeon to a partridge which
was sitting on its nest of grass and leaves carefully constructed
in a hole in the ground. "Why build your nest so low
down, where all your enemies can get at you? Why not
follow my example, and choose the loftiest tree you can find
in which to build your home? I have only to collect a few
dead twigs and lay them together, and the nest is as secure
as possible !"
Nay, rather it is you who are foolish! said the partridge.
"Why build your nest in a tall tree where all can see it,*when
you might make a comfortable home on the ground out of
sight of every one ?"
"What does being in sight matter, if only you are out
of reach? asked the wood-pigeon, in a contemptuous tone.
The argument seemed likely to be a long and profitless
one; but at this moment a little brown sparrow, who had been
listening attentively, chimed in.
"You are both right in your own way," he chirped.
"You, Mr. Wood-pigeon, with your strong wings and
powers of flight, are best off high in the air and near the
open sky, so that you may easily escape if enemies approach;
while you, Mrs. Partridge, who cannot fly more than a few
yards, find your truest safety in concealment near the ground.
You are best off in your present positions, and a transfer of
habitations would probably bring trouble to both of you."































































-- ,
Ill7,1










--q -










40 THE "LITTLE FOLKS" NATURE PAINTING BOOK.


THE LITTLE CRAB-APPLE.
....-.--.-J, "LOOK!" said one little apple-tree to
another. "See how that cruel man is
;_-:-. .i ill-treating our brothers yonder. How
; -'i brightly the keen knife flashes in the
S-- sunlight, and what gaping wounds he
i '' il s making! Oh, I do hope he will not
j '*' come here and vent his spite upon you
S and me! Why can't he leave us alone
L '_ in our happiness, enjoying our lives in
our own way?
"Well, I don't know," said the other
little apple-tree, "but I am inclined to
think that what the man is doing may be all for the
best. I can't help remembering what attention he has given
me while I have been in his charge; and I was such a
weak little thing when I came to him first, but see how strong
and straight I am now, thanks to his loving care. So if he
does think it well to plunge that keen knife of his into me I
shall try not to cry out, trusting that all will be for my good."
You're a poor weak silly thing, then," said his neighbour.
" I'm sure I shan't allow him to touch me."
Just then the gardener came up to the last speaker, and
examined it closely. "I'm afraid you'll never be of much
use; he said: I shan't waste any more time over you. Here,
Johnny," calling to his little boy, you can take this tree and
plant it in your garden; it will just do for you to play with."











II


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BLCK-TON, O E (Prus spiosa). WILD CERRY (Cerasus avium).
BLACOK-THOBN, OB SLOE (Prunus spinosa.). WILD CHEEBBT (Oerasus aviutm).











42 THE "LITTLE FOLKS" NATURE PAINTING BOOK.

So speaking he passed on to the next tree, and smiled
approvingly. Then he took his knife and made a few skilful
slits in the bark of the tree, and inserted a little shoot, just
ready to burst forth into leaf. Next he bound up very care-
fully the wound he had made, bandaging it round with bast
and clay. And all the time he was at work the 'little apple-
tree uttered no sound, but tried to bear the pain patiently.
And when in a month's time the gardener came to look
at the tree, a little green shoot had sprung forth, and it felt
stronger and healthier than ever.
*
The years passed on, and the two little apple-trees had
grown up, and were covered with fruit. But the fruit of one
of them was large and sweet and mellow; while that of the
other was small and sharp and sour. And one day as the
gardener passed through the orchard, he stopped by the first
tree, and said to his son, This is one of the best trees in the
garden." But when he came to the other tree, he said,
"I'm sure, Johnny, you can't care about this wretched
crab-apple. It was never worth grafting, and it's not worth
keeping any longer; it only fills up the ground, and takes
away the light from its betters. You had better cut it down."
And so it happened that a few weeks afterwards the sound
of the axe was heard in the orchard, and the crab-apple fell to
the ground, and was cut up for fire-wood. But the tree which
had been grafted lived on long after the gardener himself had
passed away; and always remembered with gratitude the day
when it had borne a few hours' pain with patience that it might
become a stronger, nobler, and more perfect tree.














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44 THE "LITTLE FOLKS" NATURE PAINTING BOOK.


MY PETS.
So Dash is dead !-It may be weak
Over a dog to shed a tear:
It matters not, but this I know-
"He who is gone was very dear!

I'd had a dozen other pets
Before my little terrier came,
But when they all grew old and died
It didn't seem a bit the same.

There were the rabbits; and my bird,
Who sang his best for me alone;
The squirrel with his bright brown eyes;
The mice-the clev'rest ever known.

All these I loved, and as in turn
I buried each beneath a tree,
And carved their names upon the bark,
I know I missed them dreadfully.

And yet their loss was not like this :
They scarcely were my friends, you see!
But Dash, my playmate every day,
"Was more than any friend to me.

An I when he looked at me at times,
He almost seemed to talk and smile!
You must not wonder then at me,
Because I grieve for him awhile.











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46 THE LITTLE FOLKS NATURE PAINTING BOOK.




< '4 ,jtj






A SUMMER SONG.
SUMMER is nigh!
A gorgeous Peacock butterfly
Sails slowly on where wild woodbine,
Sweet peas, and passion-flower entwine
Above a fern-decked rockery.
Summer is nigh!

Summer has come!
The bees fly past with drowsy hum,
The thrush from trellised perch on high
Trills forth the good news to the sky,
The grasshopper no more is dumb,
For summer's come!

Summer is here !
The vaulted heaven is bright and clear-
A sky of wondrous azure hue,
With not a cloud to dim the blue-
The sun himself feels very near,
For summer's here!








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48 THE "LITTLE FOLKS NATURE PAINTING BOOK.

THE LONGEST DAY.
N tireless wings the year flies round,
The seasons come and pass away;
SSo winter dies and summer's crowned
"With glory of the longest day.

S The longest, when, as people say,
For sixteen hours the sun's in sight;
When twilight and the dawning day
"Leave scarcely time at all for night.

The longest day, when you may rise
Soon after three'and find it light, ''' T ''"
And go to bed at eight, your eyes
Still dazzled with the sun in sight.

But when the longest day is past,
Slowly but surely night grows strong;
With summer gone the sun sinks fast,
Nor cares to linger with us long.

When autumn leaves fall sere and dead,
The glad light hastes to die away,
Until, when holly glistens red,
Comes Christmas and the shortest day.

The shortest day, when from our eyes
In eight fleet hours the sun has fled,
And darkness reigneth when we rise
And when we all troop off to bed.


6'^



































IdLY of TIM VALItt (Convalaria mcajais). CLOVE PINK, OR CARNATION (Diantius
caryophyllus).







'` ii^ ~{T.

















SNAPDRAGON (Antirrhinum ma'us;. CoMMON EVENING PRIMROSE ((Enothera biennis).



1)











50 THE "LITTLE FOLKS" NATURE PAINTING BOOK.

What matters it ? for soon again
The glad sun lingers on its way;
The spring-tide cometh not in vain,
But ushers in the longest day.




THE KEY OF GOLD.
THE STORY OF A SEARCH.
I.
S" I CAN'T get that rhyme out of my head,"
Sr-- said Nibs meditatively, as he sat in his
.,-- high-backed chair. "I can't get that
"rhyme out of my head, and I don't think
I'm likely to, until I have traced the
rainbow to the very spot where it puts
its foot in the ground, and until I have
proved whether the key is really hidden
there !"
What are you muttering about ?"
said Dibs, who was seated on a stool in a distant corner of the
room.
"Why, I can't get that rhyme out of my head. You
know I told you about it the other day, just after I had
found it in that old book in the library. It ran something
like this:-
He who can trace the rainbow's arch
Far as the eye can see,
To where it hides within the ground,
"Will find a golden key-















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MICHAELMAS DAISY (Aster tripoliwm). SHRUBBY STOCK (MaatthiolC incana).










ra *. I
'' i "

-, ,-,










GIANT BELL-FLOWER (Campanula latifolia). CREEPING BELL-FLOWER (Campanula
ranpunculoides).











52 THE "LITTLE FOLKS" NATURE PAINTING BOOK.

A wondrous key that will unlock
The world's most precious mine,
"Where all the gems of ages past
In countless number shine.'

I keep humming it over to myself from the minute I wake
until I go to bed, and even then I do not lose it, for I dream
about it, and see the verses written all in letters of gold and
diamonds and rubies and pearls. I am quite sure I shall have
no rest until I have searched for the end of the arch, and
proved whether the lines are true."
But a rainbow stops with us such a little time," said
Dibs, who was of a more practical turn of mind than her
brother, "and you could not hope to get to the end of it
before it went away. Why, it would take you hours, if not
days! "
"I've thought of that myself," replied Nibs, "but I have
settled how to get over the difficulty. I shall be ready to
start the first day the rainbow makes its appearance, and I
shall then walk on towards the spot where it dips in the
ground. And when the rainbow hides from sight altogether
I shall stop until it chooses to show itself again. Yes, you are
quite right, Dibs! the search is sure to take hours and days;
most likely it will occupy months and years "
Dibs looked very solemn for a minute or two, and then
burst into tears. "And what am I to do all the time you are
away ? at last she blurted forth.
Nibs pondered a second or two, but his hesitation did not
last long. "I have it," he said; "you must come iith me, of
course." And so it was settled.























PLUMS (Prunus domestica.
















I V (Digitalis HARE L (a anla r difoia).

FOXGLOVE (Digitalis purpurea). HAREBELL (Ca~mPanulaC rotwnrdifolia).











54 THE "LITTLE FOLKS" NATURE PAINTING BOOK.


II.
It was a bright summer morning, and Nibs and Dibs were
busy in their little gardens. Stocks and campanulas, lilies and
roses, carnations and mignonette were rejoicing in the sun-
shine, when suddenly the sky was overcast, and the rain began
to fall.
"Look, look! said Nibs, "there's the rainbow! Run
and get ready and we'll be off."
In a very few minutes both were prepared to start. The
larder had been visited, and a little bag of provisions had
been made ready, and waterproof coat and cloak had been
donned. And just as they started the shower ended, although
the rainbow still gleamed merrily.
As they passed through the farmyard an old hen with a
family of young chicks looked at them knowingly, as much as
to say, I know where you're going, but yours is only a wild-
goose chase; you had better by far remain at home." And,
strange to say, as they passed the lake at the bottom of the
lane, a swan glanced at them with the same sort of expression,
and you could almost hear it saying-

"Oh, Nibs and Dibs,
Whither away ?
On fruitless quest
You start to-day."

But Nibs and Dibs didn't hear what the swan said, and so
away they tramped across the downs towards the spot where
the brilliant arch seemed to sink into the earth. On they
walked, but minute by minute the sun got brighter and






























I
-i II









/:


- K 3r<---










56 THE LITTLE FOLKS NATURE PAINTING BOOK.

brighter, and the rainbow grew fainter and fainter, until at
length no trace of it was to be seen.
By this time they had reached the edge of a shady coppice
on the down, and a halt seemed very desirable to both of them.
"It's of no use to go on," said Nibs, "for without the rainbow
to guide us, we might only walk to no purpose. So I think
we'll rest in the shade and have something to eat." And Dibs
was quite ready to agree, more especially to the last part of the
proposition.
A comfortable seat was soon chosen under the shade of an
old beech, and a carpet of moss made a capital table. The
provisions were quickly produced, a portion of them was set
aside as a reserve, and the remainder was divided with strict fair-
ness into two equal portions-one for Nibs and one for Dibs-
each consisting of two pieces of bread-and-butter and two tarts,
and it would be hard to say whose portion was consumed first.
"And now, Dibs," said Nibs, "having eaten all you are
likely to get at present, you can play about for an hour, and
leave me alone to think what we had better do next. But
don't go far away in case I should want you."
So Dibs wandered away in search of wood anemones and
other wild flowers, for which the coppice was noted, and left
her brother to work out the problem which was puzzling him.

III.
Nibs lay for some time with his back against the tree, a
puckering frown slowly making itself more plain on his fore-
head. Can we find our way without the rainbow to guide us,
that is the question ? at last he muttered aloud.
















r_

















WooD ANEMONE (Anemone nemorosa). ConN BLUEBOTTLE (Centaurea cyanus).










V1















PALE HAIRY COWFOOT (Ranunculus hrsuts). LESSR CLANDINE (Ranuc fi
PALE HErY CROWFO0T (RanuneuLUs hirsutus). LEsSEs CELANDINE (Ranunceuus ficara)











58 THE LITTLE FOLKS NATURE PAINTING BOOK.

Where do you want to go, my little man ?" said a sharp
little voice.
Nibs gazed round in alarm, but could see no one.
Can't you see me, little man? came in cracked tones
from the regions of Nibs' boots.
Nibs looked down, and there, to his astonishment, stood
a strange brown figure, about three or four inches high, the
colour of a dead twig, but in the shape of a little old man.
On his head he wore a red cap with a tassel on the top, and in
his hand he carried a pickaxe and a shovel.
"Can't you answer my question, little man?" said this
quaint figure. Where do you want to go ?"
"Where do I want to go?" said Nibs at length. "Well,
that's a difficult question to answer. But have you ever heard
the rhyme that runs-

He who can trace the rainbow's arch
Far as the eye can see,
To where it hides within the ground,
Will find a golden key-
A wondrous key that will unlock
The world's most precious mine,
Where all the gems of ages past
In countless number shine.'

You have? Well, then, now you know where I wish to go-
to the very foot of the rainbow to dig for the key."
Ha! ha! ha !" laughed the little man, "you've found the
right person to tell you the way. I'm the gnome of the mines:
come with me and I'll show you something." And as he
spoke he stuck his pickaxe into the ground, and Nibs found














,-. ..
"C M O "' "ALL ,- 't .C O'MMON 'MAR. M L W '

,, '- i -
41 : \r-- "I '

SHINING CRANE'S-BILL (Gerantum lucidum). HERB-ROBERT (Gelranium Robertianwm).





'7 ,, '- ;,*,,
-. .... .... .- ;. ,. .-


(7 .. .... .--------Jr
A >^ ..' .-. -,. 4 -"'



COMMON MALLOW (Malva sylvestris). COMMON MAbRSH MALLOW (A.thcea offclcsnoi).









60 THE "LITTLE FOLKS NATURE PAINTING BOOK.

himself sinking into the earth, with the gnome for his
companion.
Down they went, for a long time in darkness, but at last
the way seemed to grow lighter, until suddenly Nibs found
himself in the centre of a perfect blaze of light, and recognized
the fact that he was standing on firm ground once more. As
soon as his eyes became accustomed to the dazzling light, he
saw that he was in a most wonderful room, the walls and
floors and the ceilings of which were of gold, inlaid with dia-
monds and rubies and precious stones of every hue.
Is this the mine of the rhyme, do you think? laughed
the gnome. "Look again."
And as Nibs gazed all the gems seemed to glow with life,
and took the form of snakes and serpents, that writhed and
coiled in a sea of fire. He shrank back in affright.
Even so, little man," said the gnome, "is it with the
gold and the gems you expected to find. Too often do they
prove to be harmful as reptiles to their possessors. But I will
tell you the real meaning of the rhyme. The golden key is
the key of wisdom that will unlock the storehouse of know-
ledge, where all the gems of truest thought in bygone years
lie hid. And he who will watch patiently and with observant
eye all that is around him, from a rainbow to the humblest
creature that crawls on the earth, may find the golden key,
and may unlock day by day more of the chambers in the mine
of knowledge.
He who is wise will find the key,
Where'er his place in life may be.'

As for you, little man, know that your duty is to work hard at













1'U ''"
l, r ^ 1












C M' t r1as




iT / ]
















COMMON CREEPING CINQUEFOIL (Potentilla reptans)











62 THE LITTLE FOLKS NATURE PAINTING BOOK.

the studies that fall to you daily, and not to roam the world
seeking that which you can never find."
Nibs listened attentively, scarcely understanding all that
the gnome had said, but yet seeing clearly enough now that
he had indeed started on a wild-goose chase. He felt that he
ought to say something in reply, but the heat of the mine was
so intense that he did not seem able to speak, and he longed
for the fresh air. Just then he felt something very wet and
cold touch his neck; he gave a great start, and--

IV.
He awoke; awoke to find Dibs' fat little hand-cool with
the raindrops from the flowers she held-wandering over his
face. "Why, Nibs," she said, in a reproachful tone, "I
thought you were going to consider what we had better do
next, and you've only been sleeping! "
"I had to sleep to solve the problem, it seems," Nibs
answered. And now we'll go home again."
But how about the key of gold ? asked Dibs.
"'He who is wise will find the key,
Where'er his place in life may be.'"

answered Nibs, oracularly. "Our key is at home."
Dibs felt that she did not understand the matter, but as
long as she could remember she had placed implicit trust in
her brother, and she was not going to doubt him now.
Besides, she was tired, and wanted her tea. Dibs always was
hungry and thirsty, Nibs said.
And so home again the two little figures trudged, none the
worse, perhaps, for their wild-goose chase.

































NASTURTIUM, OR INDIAN
CRESS -
(Tropmeolwm majuis).

































GERANIUM, OR PELARBONIUI.










64 THE "LITTLE FOLKS" NATURE PAINTING BOOK.


THISTLES.
ONLY a cluster of thistles,
On the edge of a breezy down!
Only a cluster of thistles,
Purple and green and brown !

Only a cluster of thistles,
That bloom in the summer air,
And ripen their seeds so gaily,
And scatter them everywhere !

Only a cluster of thistles,
That spread, and spread, and sprca'l
SPEAR-PLUME THISTLE Till the down is one bed of thistles,
(Circium lanceotatum). And everything else is dead.

Only a little error,
Only a little sin,
That springs up all unnoticed,
A little heart within !

Only a little failing,
That grows while no one heeds,
Till the heart is full of evil,
As a garden full of weeds.

Only a cluster of thistles,
Only a little sin!
But who can tell the ending
If the growth but once begin ?
































CREEPING PLUME-THISTLE (Circium arvensis). MARSH PLUME-THISTLE (Ciciumn palustre).










pp- f
4 ,<1 .




A.A









COTTON THISTLE (Onopordum acanthium). MUSK TAISTLE (Carduus avtans).





E











66 THE LITTLE FOLKS" NATURE PAINTING BOOK.


WILD FLOWERS.
SING hey! sing ho!
For the flowers that blow
-In field and in wood wheresoever we go!
The bonny wild flowers
Of Nature's bowers,
Loved by the sunshine, kissed by the showers !
Sing hey sing ho !
For the bonny wild flowers!

You may boast of the blooms,
With their rich perfumes,
That live in the hot-house or gladden your rooms !
You may look with delight
On a garden that's bright
With each hue that the rainbow can bring to your sight !
All these may be fair,
And give proof of your care,
But they cannot with Nature's wild children compare!

S So sing hey sing ho!
"For the flowers that blow
In field and in wood wheresoever we go.
The bonny wild flowers
Of Nature's bowers,
Loved by the sunshine, kissed by the showers !
Sing hey sing ho!
For the bonny wild flowers!



























1 I






"LARKSPUR (Delphimzim consolida). MONK'S-HOOD (Aconitum napellus).


























LIVE-LONG (Sedum telephium). WILD TEASEL (Dipsacus sylvestris).
i







iri~i It
~i~i~a ~:./











68 THE LITTLE FOLKS" NATURE PAINTING BOOK.


STRANGE FRIENDS.
STRANGE friendships-strong as life itself-between
Creatures the most diverse are often seen.
Doubt not the truth, then, of the tale I tell,
And if it teach a lesson, it is well.


A cat, with one wee kitten-very dear,
Scarce left her young one's side, so great her fear
Lest, like the rest, it too should disappear.
But lo! one day, in quest of cunning mice
She vanished for a timeand in a trice
Kittie had strayed away. Then, sad to tell,
Into the farm-boy's hostile hands it fell!
No pity knew he for God's creatures, so
He cast it in the pond with one swift throw;
Then, whistling loudly,went upon his way.
Now mark what happened next. Most strange to say,
A duck, that paddled just where pussie sank,
Seized it at once and dragged it to the bank,
And for awhile at drying tried its best,
Till mother cat appeared and did the rest.
From that time forth, 'tis needless perhaps to say,
Cat, duck, and kitten in a special way
Were truest friends who loved to be together,
Though two were clad in fur and one in feather.









































7.,A
Sit
II




















70 THE "LITTLE FOLKS" NATURE PAINTING BOOK.


THE HOT-HOUSE LILY.

"OH dear, how wretched the glare of the glass is," sighed
a hot-house lily, one bright August day. "I don't see why
I should be cooped up in this place with all you other plants.
It isn't that I object so much to your companionship," it
added, condescendingly, "neither do I mind the heat, for in
my native land* it was much hotter than it is in here ; but I
do so dislike the glare of the glass. I wish I could get into
the open air for a change."
"But you couldn't live long out there," said an old plant,
that had been in the hot-house for years; you would die very
soon if a cold wind happened to pass by."
I don't see that I should," said the lily; a little change
of air would be more likely to benefit my health. At any rate,
I will try it if I get a chance; for nothing can be worse than
stopping here, with the sun peering through the glass at me
and frizzling me up."
The old plant looked up when it heard this, and perceived
a little flaw in one of the panes of glass, which had the effect
of bringing the rays of the sun together, something in the same
way that a burning-glass does. "I see what is the matter," it
said; it is only that there is a flaw in the glass above you,
and it will be all right when the sun moves on, or, most likely,
the gardener will find out the flaw, and have a new pane of
glass put in, and then you will be all right."
"You're very clever, no doubt," the lily replied; "but

"* Alstremeria plantayinea was first brought from Brazil.













-i \ .4.: ./l N,, ,r il.,
S.... .,lP- -~ .! .\
Il I 'I '

iri
.'",,, '' "; t
,,- ,:**- i;. q' !

-" '\ i / 'i
;I i i --.f'
SI''
A




S-\ ,' ./
'; \, i, ,
.\ :. 1, /, ,,, .' .,
\\ f,^ .,
S ( 7ii a p' i ne



ALSTh(EMERS LLmY (Alshrt nieri a jlantaginea).











72 THE "LITTLE FOLKS NATURE PAINTING BOOK.

other people have sense besides yourself; and if I get a
chance of going outside I shall go."
Just then a little boy of five or six years of age came into
the house, and his attention was at once fixed on the lily, with
its beautiful orange-yellow flower. Poor thing! he said,
"one of its leaves seems to be shrivelling up. I think it must
be too hot for it in here; I'll move it outside for a bit."
And greatly to the delight of the lily, forth it was carried
into the open air.
Good-bye," said the old plant, sorrowfully, as the lily
passed it; "I am afraid I shan't see very much more of you."
But the lily only laughed contemptuously.
*
Just at first all seemed to go well with it. It was put
down just outside the hot-house, and the hot rays of the
August sun fell full upon it. But the glare was gone, and the
hole that had been burnt in the leaf grew no larger.
But by-and-bye the sun went .down, and a cold east wind
came blowing past; and the gardener knew nothing of the
plant having been moved, and the small boy had forgotten all
about it, and no one came to fetch it.
And so the night went on, getting colder and colder; and
it struck a chill at the heart of the discontented lily, so that
when the morning came it was dying.
Then at last the gardener found it, and took it into the
hot-house again; but it was too late. And so it died.

































(L'i"Jta vulgaris).
,,,











SIt
11 -


-.' -' 'ni."- ..- -S A --"
S' c '










SWEET BRIAR (Rosa rubiginosa). IVY-LEAVED TOAD-FLAX (LinarL a cymbalaria).










74 THE LITTLE FOLKS NATURE PAINTING BOOK.


VANITY.
THE lily rears its stately head,
In proud disdain, toward the sky;
The hail beats down upon its face,
S And bruised and torn its petals lie.
The proverb's truth it proves to all-
Pride often comes before a fall.

SIn bold conceit a cock struts forth,
And crows defiance to the morn;
A passing fox creeps slily up,
Attracted by his notes of scorn;
And, as he drags him o'er the wall,
Cries, Pride, you see, has caused your fall!"

And as with flowers and birds, so too
With all of us who're proud and vain:
Conceit but brings us into view,
And makes our weaknesses more plain;
And friends no longer need be told,
That all that glitters is not gold.

Humility is truest strength,
And earns a happier, nobler place
Than Pride, that struts, self-satisfied,
With haughty overbearing face!
And this, at least, is plain to all,
Pride often presages a fall!





















IfI




















I ,.
'117











WRIITE LILY (Liliunm WalUchianum).











76 THE "LITTLE FOLKS" NATURE PAINTING BOOK.


THE RACE FOR GOLD.
SHE whose only goal is wealth,
Loving nought beside,
Sacrifices peace and health,
Never satisfied !
Round the world and round the world
Madly he may run,
But enough he'll never find
Underneath the sun!






A CHOICE.
"As grave as a raven,
As solemn and wise,
With never a smile
To light up your eyes;
As pert as a jackdaw,
As cunning and quick,
As good at contriving
Some mischievous trick:
Now which will you copy-
You have but to say-
The daw or the raven,
The grave or the gay? "











76 THE "LITTLE FOLKS" NATURE PAINTING BOOK.


THE RACE FOR GOLD.
SHE whose only goal is wealth,
Loving nought beside,
Sacrifices peace and health,
Never satisfied !
Round the world and round the world
Madly he may run,
But enough he'll never find
Underneath the sun!






A CHOICE.
"As grave as a raven,
As solemn and wise,
With never a smile
To light up your eyes;
As pert as a jackdaw,
As cunning and quick,
As good at contriving
Some mischievous trick:
Now which will you copy-
You have but to say-
The daw or the raven,
The grave or the gay? "











rt









I; '








lhl
1 I\,i
----
7-- -










78 THE "LITTLE FOLKS" NATURE PAINTING BOOK.

As bright as a sparrow,
With merry brown eye;
As thankful for good
As a lark in the sky;
As wise as a raven
In choosing my words;
As kind and as tender
As kindest of birds;
Such as these I would copy,
And so, I may say,
My moods would be many-
Grave, gentle, and gay."







THE SPEEDWELL.
IN field and fen, on hill and down,
The little speedwell's found,
And even near the smoky town
It runneth o'er the ground;
And ev'ry little blossom seems
A kindly wish to tell;
And so where'er its blue flow'r gleams,
We bid it, Speed you well."





















/i,,
[' ., i '





"L ,.'



COMMON SPEEDWELL (Veronica offcicnalis). GERMANDER SPEEDWELL (Veronica chamwcerys).














F E L n ,,I E ,-ic
.., ". ,. ,' y




,, ,- -



.3-

FIELD SPEEDWELL (Veronica agrestis). IVY-LEAVED SPEEDWELL (Veronica hederifoWca).











80 THE LITTLE FOLKS NATURE PAINTING BOOK.


TO LITTLE PAINTERS.
EENER-SIGHTED than a falcon
Must each little painter be,
Who would copy nature rightly,
Paint each colour truthfully;
For her hues are ever fleeting,
Changeful as an April day;
All the rainbow's colours meeting
In a wonderful array.

Yet if you would claim successes
In the noblest, truest way,
S You must go to nature daily,
Catch her hues whene'er you may;
Sparing neither time nor labour
In the early days df youth,
With this motto for your neighbour-
"Highest art is highest truth."











CASSELL PETTER, GALPIN & Co., BELLE SAVAGE WORKS, LONDON, E.C.
580









NOW READY.
EIGHTY-FIFTH THOUSAND, price Is. (post free, s1. 2d.);
or elegantly bound in cloth, price 2s. (post free, 2s. 2d.).

The "Little Folks" Painting Book.
A Series of Outline Drawings by KATE GREENAWAY, intended for Water-Colour
Painting, with amusing Letterpress Descriptive of the Pictures.
"The Little Folks' Painting Book is a charming series The 'Little Folks' Painting Book comprises a series
of outline engravings for water-colour drawings."-Court of outline engravings for water-colour paintings, which are
Journal. so fascinating in themselves that we quite grudge them to
This book is essentially what its title implies-a book the juvenile artists for whom they are intended."-John
of pictures to be painted by young pupils. But it is also a Bull.
mine of information for children. The myriads of readers It contains upwards of a hundred amusing and well
of LITTLE FOLKS Magazine will hail its publication with executed sketches in outline, all specially adapted for exer-
joy, and those who are not readers have good ground for cising the talents of young artists for painting in water-
regret. ing their loss."-The Civil Service Gazette, colours, &c., and four or five specimens are hand-coloured
"Published at a shilling (or two shillings in cloth), it is as a further guide to tyros. The illustrations are accom
a marvel of cheapness, and the young are to be congratu- panied by original stories and verses, which explain the
lated upon the issue of a volume which will be to them an characters and incidents portrayed, and give the volume ani
endless source of amusement."-Nonconformist. enduring interest."-Bristol Mercury.
Cassell, Petter, Galpin d Co., Ludgate Hill, London.


(UNIFORM WITH THE "LITTLE FOLKS". PAINTING BOOK.)
Price One Shilling (post free, Is. 2d.); or in cloth gilt, 2s. (post free, 2s. 2d.).

The "Little Folks"

Black and White Painting Book,

Consisting of a Series of Drawings in Black and Wnhite, with Blank Pages for Illustration,
and amusing Verses, by the Author of the 'Little Folks' Painting Book."
The Little Folks Black and White Painting Book-a volume for little children, is enriched
by lively verses and very numerous illustrations, printed in solid black, full of movement and
playfulness. It is a first-rate book for little folks, and there is not enough of it to tire the most
flighty among them; there is enough to please and amuse them for some time."-Athencunm.
It contains a curious and copious array of pictures in black and white, many of them both
amusing and comic. There are pictures on every page. We warmly commend it to the attention
of our readers. It is sure to be very popular."- -ueen.
Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co., Ludgate Hill, London.


FIFTH AND CHEAP EDITION, price is. 6d.; post free, Is. 9d.

The Little Folks' History of England.
By ISA CRAIG-KNOX. With Thirty Illustrations.
The author of this little History of England has evidently all the qualities for interesting young
minds. She obviously understands the way of addressing little folks and gaining their attention, while
she has avoided the opposite error of writing in a style too simple and childish to stimulate curiosity, or
to encourage exertion. The illustrations are excellent."-Educational Times.

CASSELL, BETTER, GALPIN & CO., Ludgate Hill, London.








A SELECTED LIST OF
Messrs. Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co.'s Publications.

ILLUSTRATED VOLUMES FOR ,CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE.
Decisive Events in History.
By THOMAS ARCHER. With Sixteen full-page Original Illustrations. Fourth
Thousand. Extra fcap. 4to, 176 pages, cloth gilt, 5s.
"Will be found exceedingly useful, and may serve to induce children to read more detailed accounts
of the several events of which it treats. It is very fully illustrated."- Examiner.
"These events, the turning points of history, are well told and admirably illustrated."-Educational
Times.
"Supreme events in the history of the world. A handsome book, bound with good taste, and gilt-
edged, and the plates are quite masterpieces of drawing and wood engraving."-School Board Chron cle.
Sixteen full-page illustrations, from drawings made specially for the work, tell the stories almost as
powerfully as the text, though that is admirably done."-Graphic.
The Little Folks' History of England.
By ISA CRAIG-KNOX. With Thirty Illustrations. New and Cheaper Edition.
Cloth, is. 6d.
The author of this little History of England has evidently all the qualities for interesting young minds.
She obviously understands the way of addressing little folks and gaining their attention, while she has
avoided the opposite error of writing in a style too simple and childish to stimulate curiosity, or to
encourage exertion. The illustrations are excellent."-Educational Times.
Odd Folks at Home.
By C. L. MATAAUX, Author of "Home Chat," &c. &c., with nearly 150 Illustrations.
192 pages, extra fcap. 4to, cloth gilt, gilt edges, 5s.
Field Friends and Forest Foes.
Profusely Illustrated. Extra fcap. 4to, cloth gilt, gilt edges, 5s.
Silver Wings and Golden Scales.
Illustrated throughout. Extra fcap. 4to, cloth gilt, gilt edges, 5s.
Stories of Girlhood; or, the Brook and the River.
A Book for Girls. By SARAH DOUDNEY. Illustrated. Cloth gilt, 5s.
Jungle, Peak, and Plain.
A Boy's Book of Adventure. By Dr. GORDON STABLES, R.N. Illustrated.
Extra fcap. 4to. 192 pages, cloth gilt, gilt edges, 5s.
Woodland Romances; or, Fables and Fancies.
By C. L. MATAAUX. Illustrated throughout. Cloth gilt, gilt edges, 5s.
The Chicken Market, and other Fairy Tales.
By Prof. HENRY MORLEY. With numerous Illustrations by C. H. BENNETT. Cloth, 6s
Tiny Houses and their Builders.
By the Author of "Poems Written for a Child." Profusely Illustrated. Cloth gilt, 5s.
Pussy Tip-Toes' Family.
SWith full-page Illustrations. Fcap. 4to, cloth, bevelled, gilt edges, Ss.

Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co.: Lnondon, Paris & New York.







Selections from Cassell, Petter, Galpin S Co.'s Publications. 3

ILLUSTRATED VOLUMES FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE.
Frisk and his Flock.
With full-page Illustrations. Fcap. 4to, cloth bevelled, gilt edges, 5s.
Around and About Old England.
By C. L. MATAAUX, Author of "Home Chat," &c. With numerous Illustrations.
240 pages, extra fcap. 4to, cloth gilt, gilt edges, 5s.
The Little Folks' Picture Album.
Uniform with the "Little Folks' Picture Gallery," containing 168 Large Pictures,
with accompanying text printed in bold type. Cloth elegant, gilt edges, 5s.
The Little Folks' Picture Gallery.
Containing about One Hundred and Fifty Pictures, with accompanying Rhymes,
by the Author of "Home Chat." Crown 4to, cloth gilt, gilt edges, 5s.
The Children's Album.
Containing nearly Two Hundred Engravings, with Short Stories by UNCLE JOHN.
Also several Pieces of Music. Cloth, gilt edges, 3s. 6d.
The Children's Sunday Album.
Bythe Author of "A Trap to Catch a Sunbeam." Containing upwards of I50
Engravings, with Simple Stories. Cloth, gilt edges, 3s. 6d.
Hymns and Poems for Little Folks.
Uniform with The Children's Album. Illustrated with 150 Full-page Pictures.
Super-royal i6mo, 320 pages, cloth gilt, gilt edges, 3s. 6d.
Stories about Animals.
By the Rev. T. JACKSON, M.A. Profusely Illustrated. 256 pages, extra fcap. 4to,
cloth, gilt edges, 5s.
Stories about Birds.
By M. and E. KIRBY. Profusely Illustrated. Extra fcap. 4to, cloth, gilt edges, 5s.
Paws and Claws.
Being True Stories of Clever Creatures, Tame and Wild. Profusely Illustrated,
cloth gilt, gilt edges, 5s.
Peeps Abroad for Folks at Home.
By C. L MATPAUX. 256 pages, fcap. 4to. Profusely Illustrated. Cloth, gilt
edges, 5s.
Home Chat with our Young Folks.
By C. L. MATIAUX. With 200 Engravings. Fcap. 4to, 260 pages. Cloth,
gilt edges, 5s.
Sunday Chats with our Young Folks.
By C. L. MATiAUX. Profusely Illustrated. Cloth, gilt edges, 5s.

Cassell, Petter, Galsin & Co.: London, Paris & New M, ork.







4 Selections from Cassell, Petter, Galpin l Co.'s Publications.

ILLUSTRATED VOLUMES FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE.
At the South Pole.
By W. H. G. KINGSTON. With Forty Engravings. Crown 8vo, cloth, gilt edges, 5s.
Notable Shipwrecks.
Being Tales of Disaster and Heroism at Sea. By "UNCLE HARDY." 320 pages,
cloth gilt, gilt edges, 5s.
Half-Hours with Early Explorers.
By T. FROST. Profusely Illustrated. Fcap. 4to, cloth gilt, gilt edges, 5s.
Captain Cook's Three Voyages Round the World.
With numerous Illustrations. Cloth gilt, gilt edges, 5s.
Cassell's Robinson Crusoe.
With 100 Illustrations. Extra crown 4to, cloth, 7s. 6d.; gilt edges, ios. 6d.
Cassell's Swiss Family Robinson.
With 140 Illustrations. Cloth, 5s.
Through Picture Land.
By C. L. MATAUX. With 200 Illustrations. Fcap. 4to, cloth, gilt edges, 3s. 6d.
Picture Teaching for Young and Old.
With 200oo Illustrations. Cloth, gilt edges, 3s. 6d.
Scraps of Knowledge for the Little Ones.
By JANET BYRNE. With Ioo Illustrations. Cloth, gilt edges, 3s. 6d.
Picture Natural History.
With upwards of 500 Illustrations. Fcap. 4to, cloth gilt, gilt edges, 3s. 6d.
Great Lessons from Little Things.
A Series of Practical Lessons on Bible Natural History. Illustrated throughout.
Extra fcap. 4to. Cloth gilt, gilt edges, 3s. 6d.
Peter Pengelly; or, True as the Clock.
By the Rev. J. JACKSON WRAY. Crown 8vo, with Illustrations, cloth, 2s.
Leslie's Songs for Little Folks.
With Twelve Pieces of Music by HENRY LESLIE, and Frontispiece by H. C. SELOUS.
Cloth gilt, gilt edges, 3s. 6d.
The Old Fairy Tales.
With numerous Original Illustrations. Cloth gilt, gilt edges, is. 6d.
Cassell, Petter, G dpiin & Co. : Loidon, l-aris, New York.








Selections from Cassell, Petter, Galfin S Co.'s Publications. 5

ILLUSTRATED VOLUMES FOR CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE.

The Story of Robin Hood.
With Plates printed in Colours. Cloth gilt, gilt edges, 3s. 6d.

Off to Sea.
By W. H. G. KINGSTON. With Illustrations printed in Colours. Cloth gilt, gilt
edges, 3s. 6d.

The Old Nursery Rhymes; or, The Merrie Heart.
With Eight Full-page Coloured Plates and ioo)'Illustrations. Cloth gilt, gilt
edges, 3s. 6d.

The Cosy Corner Series.
A Series of Story Books for Children. Each Book containing nearly ONE
HUNDRED PICTURES. Fcap. 8vo, cloth gilt, gilt edges, 2s. 6d. each.
Wee Willie Winkie. Bright Rays for Dull Days.
Bright Sundays. Chats for Small Chatterers.
Pet's Posy of Pictures and Stories. Pictures for Happy Hours.
Little Talks with Little People. Ups and Downs of a Donkey's Life.

The Vicar of Wakefield and other Works by
OLIVER GOLDSMITH. With upwards of 100 Illustrations. Super royal 8vo,
cloth, 5s.; cloth gilt, gilt edges, 6s. 6d.

Pictures of School Life and Boyhood.
Selected and Edited by PERCY FITZGERALD, M.A. Cloth, gilt edges, 3s. 6d.

The Child's Book of Song and Praise.
With 250 Illustrations and 33 Pieces of Music, and a charming Collection of
Hymns and Poetry. Cloth, 5s.

Cassell's Children's Treasuries.
A Series of Picture Books for Children. Uniform in size and price, each con-
taining Forty-three Full-page Pictures and accompanying Stories, Poetry, or*,Music.
Price is. each.
Simple Rhymes for Happy Times. The Picture Treasury.
Tuneful Lays for Merry Days. Tales for the Little Ones.
Cheerful Songs for Young Folks. My Sunday Book of Pictures.
Pretty Poems for Young People. Sunday Garland of Pictures and
The Children's Joy. Stories.
Pretty Pictures and Pleasant Stories. Sunday Pictures for Little Folks.

Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co.: London, Paris, CI New York.









Odd Folks at Home.

By C. L. MATEAUX, Author of "Home Chat," &c. &c.

Second Edition. Illustrated throughout. Cloth gilt, gilt edges, 5s.

In a way of charming simplicity and attrac- "A capital book for oldish children. Illus-
tiveness, the author tells stories and gives infor- treated with woodcuts of animals, mostly aquatic,
mation concerning birds and fishes, more especially and very good indeed. The book is full of anec-
the 'odd folks' among them. The book, which dotes and extremely readable."-Athenaum.
is profusely illustrated, conveys a great deal of "A capitally done book on natural history.
information, and is as interesting as a fairy tale."- Children will be taught as well as pleased by it.
British Quarterly Review. The text is bright and attractive, and the illustra-
Their habits are described in a simple yet tions are excellent."-Edinburgh Scotsman.
lively manner, well calculated to awaken the To children who have a taste for natural
interest of children in the teeming life of pond, history it will be the most acceptable present of
river, and sea-shore. The illustrations also are history it will be the most acceptable present of
river, and sea-shore. The illustrations also are the season. The Odd Folks turn out to be little
capital, and so numerous that nothing more can fish, sea anemones, medusae, urchins, tiny crabs,
be desired."-Academny. and all the wonders of the sea-shore, flying fish,
'Odd Folks at Home' is one of the most dolphins, tortoises, whales, seals, sharks, shells,
attractive volumes on natural history which we coral insects, pearls, sponges, sea-birds, and a
have had in our hands for some time past. Pro- variety of other natural marvels, about which the
fusely illustrated, in good type, it is a capital book author tells many anecdotes, and tells them well.
for young people, a present which is sure to be The illustrations are simply exquisite."-Bristol
appreciated by them."--ohn Bull. Mercury.



UNIFORM WITH THE ABOVE.


Woodland Romances;

or, Fables and Fancies.

By C. L. MATLAUX, Author of "Home Chat," &c. &c.

Illustrated throughout. Cloth gilt, gilt edges, 5s.

This is altogether a delightful book, both by Children of eight or ten years of age will read
virtue of its bright original verse, which is sure to or listen to these Woodland Romances' with
please old as well as young who have preserved a delight."-Queen.
simple natural taste, and its many excellent illus-
trations. These latter, indeed, are of such rare "Is a charming volume profusely illustrated in
merit that they almost entitle it to rank as an excellent style, and is made up of easy poetical
art-book rather than as a child's."-Acadezy. verse full of quaint and pleasing fancies concerning
beasts and birds, woods and flowers, and nature
"A collection of original fables and fancies in in all its varying aspects."-Christian World.
verse, which mothers and nurses will delight to
read to the little ones who look at the pictures, "Here are a hundred clever, pretty stories of
while older children will covet the book for birds and animals, done into amusing verse, and
themselves. We are glad, too, to see the whole illustrated profusely with admirable sketches. It
lighted up by mirth provoking sketches."- is a capital gift-book, and does not contain a dull
Edinburgh Daily Review. page."-Bradrj d Observer.
Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co.: London, Paris & New York.








Books suitable for School Libraries, &e.,
Selected from Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co.'s Publications.



The Magic Flower Pot, Truth will Out.
and otherStories. By EDWARD By JEANIE HERING. Cloth, gilt
GARRETT. Uniform with "Peggy edges, 3s. 6d.
and other Tales," 5s.
Flowers from the Garden How to Get On.
of God. A Book for Children. With I,ooo Precepts for Practice.
By the Rev. GORDON CALTHROP, Cloth bevelled, gilt edges, 3s. 6d.
M.A. Extra fcap. 8vo, cloth gilt,
2s. 6d. The Young Man in the
the Pott Battle of Life. By the Rev. Dr.
Palissy the Potter. LANDELS. Cloth bevelled, gilt
By Professor HENRY MORLEY. edges, 3s. 6d
New Library Edition. With four edges, s. 6d.
Full-page Illustrations. Crown The True Glory of Woman.
8vo, cloth, 5s.
8vo, cloth, 5s. Bythe Rev. Dr.LANDELS. Crown
The Three Homes. 8vo, cloth, gilt edges, 3s. 6d.
A Tale for Fathers and Sons.
By F. T. L. HOPE. Cloth, gilt Working to Win.
edges, 5s. A Story for Girls. By MAGGIE
Golden Days. SYMINGTON. Cloth,gilt edges, 5s.
A Work Illustrative of the Expe- Soldier and Patriot.
riences of an English Girl's School
Life in Germany. By JEAE The Storyof George Washington.
Life in Germany. By JEANIE .
HERING. With Frontispi. By F. M. Owen. Illustrated.
HERING. With Frontispiece.
Cloth, 3s. 6d.
Cloth, gilt edges, 5s. Cloth, 3s. 6d.

Peggy, and Other Tales. Esther West.
By FLORENCE MONTGOMERY. By ISA CRAIG-KNox. With
Library Edition, uniform with Twenty-four Engravings. Cloth,
"Misunderstood," 5s. gilt edges, 5s.
Cassell, Petter, Galpin Co.: London, Paris, & New York.


t COMPLETE CATALOGUES of Messrs. Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co.'s
PUBLICATIONS, containing a List of several hundred Volumes, including Bibles and Religious
Works, Fine Art Volumes, Children's Books, Dictionaries, Educational Works, History,
Natural History, Household and Domestic Treatises, Handbooks and Guides, Science,
Travel, &c., together with a Synopsis of their numerous Illustrated Serial Publications, sent fost free on
application to Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co., Ludgate Hill, London.










In MONTHLY PARTS, 6d.; and HALF-YEARLY VOLUMES at 3s. Od.



LITTLE FOLKS,

THE ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE FOR CHILDREN,

A, PART 67 forms the FIRST PART of a NEW VOLUME, and
contains a charming Coloured Plate, and the commencement of
Two New Serial Stories, one of which is by Florence Montgomery.
Author of Misunderstood,'" "LITTLE FOLKS is always a welcome arrival both in the nursery and the school-
room. It is among the very best of all the numerous children's magazines that are now
published. Many of the woodcuts are really quite charming little works of art."-
Academy.
"LITTLE FOLKS is out of sight the best children's magazine we know."-British
Quarterly Review.
"LITTLE FOLKS is one of the very best books for young children. There is an
attractive picture on almost every page, with easy, entertaining, and instructive stories,
interspersed with jingling nursery rhymes, bits of natural history, puzzles, riddles, and
games."-Graphic.
If any father of a family-of ages ranging from eight to fifteen years-knows how
to spend sixpence a month in literature to better purpose than in the purchase of
LITTLE FOLKS, we should be glad if he would enlighten us. Our verdict upon the
volume cannot, in short, be better expressed than in the hackneyed formula, No family
should be without it.' "-Literary World.
"LITTLE FOLKS disarms criticism. It is so admirably adapted to the purpose for
which it was designed, that nothing but praise can be accorded alike to the matter
which is provided for youthful readers, and the exquisite pictorial cuts by which it is
illustrated and enlivened."--Civil Service Review.
The praise of LITTLE FOLKS is among all the critics as the perfect ideal of a
Magazine for the young."-Glasgow Mail.
** Order PART 67, price 6d., forming the First Part of the New Volume.



The HALF-YEARLY VOLUME of LITTLE FOLKS
contains a Coloured Frontispiece and nearly 500 Illustrations.
Bound in coloured boards, 3s. 6d.; or cloth, gilt edges, 5s.
"In the volume of LITTLE FOLKS every kind of topic which can interest eyery
kind of juvenile appears to be dealt with, and we can perceive throughout tales of
adventure and merriment, a wealth of pleasantly-communicated knowledge, and many a
moral lesson presenting an unwonted aspect of cheerfulness. Pretty verses, comic
sketches, and graver pictures; hunting narratives for boys; gentle, genial idyls for
girls, with occasional larger type for the nursery, and music for the drawing-room,
are amongst its varied attractions."-Public Opinion.
Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Co.: London, Paris, & New Yrk.

11



















BOXES OF WATER-COLOURS
Suitable for use with

THE "LITTLE FOLKS'" PAINTING BOOKS.


No. DEscmIPTION CONTENTS

82. The Shilling MOIST Colour 12 Movable Pans of Co-
Box, in Japanned Tin, with Di- lours and 3 Brushes.
vided Lid to serve as Palette.

83. The Half- Crown MOIST 16 Movable Pans of
Colour Box, in Japanned Tin, superior Colours, with
with Divided Lid and Enamelled Tubes of Chinese
Flap to serve as Palettes. White and Sepia-
4 Brushes.

59. The Shilling FINE- ART 12 Cakes of Water-
Colour Box, in Polished Wood, Colours, with 3
with Hinged Lid and Hooks. Brushes & Saucers.


N.B.-The above Boxes contain the Colours and Brushes as recommended
by the Society of Arts and the Science and Art Department.


Supplied WHOLESALE by

EYRE & SPOTTISWOODE, Great New Street, London, E.C.
And RETAIL by all Booksellers.

--OVER.








TH- FOLLOWING

DRAWING MATERIALS
Are also supplied Wholesale by

EYRE & SPOTTISWOODE,
And may be obtained Retail through

ALLT E OOISSEJLLEj!S.


Indian Ink.
Camel Hair Brushes.
Drawing Pins.
Crayons (Assorted Colours).
Lead Pencils.
Pencil or Crayon Holders.
Hand Ruling Pens.
Geometrical Compasses.
Rules and Scales (Ivory and Boxwood).
Set Squares, T Squares, Curves, &c.
Student's Boxes of Mathematical In-
struments and Colours.


EYRE & SPOTTISWOODE,
Great New Street, London, E.C.
Edinburgh and New York.





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