Chatterbox album of animals

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Chatterbox album of animals
Physical Description:
280 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Vandegrift, Margaret, 1845-1913.--
Gardner, W. W ( Publisher )
Strangeways, John ( Printer )
Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
Publisher:
W.W. Gardner
Place of Publication:
London
Manufacturer:
John Strangeways
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Animals -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Pets -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Natural history -- Juvenile literature   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1880   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1880   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by the author of "Holidays at home", and "Little three-year-old".
General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
General Note:
Title page and frontispiece printed in colors; other Illustrations by Weir.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002223086
notis - ALG3334
oclc - 62121049
System ID:
UF00048497:00001


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PAGE PAGE PAGE
ASLEEP AND AWAKE iii BEAVERS 67 FAITHFUL BRONZE' 108
A ROBIN'S NEST IN A SHOE. iv I BROWN BOB' 151 FALLOW DEER AND LYN 202
A WONDERFUL CAT 11 BIRDS OF PASSAGE 158 'FERDINAND' 268
A LARK IN A CRICKET-GROUND 13 BESS AND THE KITTEN 176
A WISE DONKEY 44 BLACKBIRD AND CAT 214 'GYP' 1
A GREEDY JACKDAW 52 BOLDNESS OF A VIXEN FOX . 226 GOAT AND KIDS 15
A SEA-FARING DOG 70 'BEN' SINGING 245 GREYFRIARS' BOBBY 113
-A SWIMMING-MATCH 71 GOLDEN-BILL AT HOME 133
A FAMILY OF CHICKENS 75 CALVES 18 GRIMALKIN 234
A CLEVER FOX. .84 'CHARLES'BRINGING HISI ASTER'S GOOD FOR EVIL. .77
A SAGACIOUS DOG 90, 270 SLIPPERS 26
ANIMAL AFFECTION 106 CALF 45 HUNTING MARE 19
A DOG'S PITY 130 CAPRIOLEE DRAGGING HIS COL- HOME FROM THE SHOW 29
AUROCHS 139 LEAGUE TO THE COOK 57 HORSE PROTECTING A DOG . 150
A FOUR-FOOTED THIEF 140 COWS IN THE BROO 60 HYENA FRIGHTENED BY A TRUM-
A WONDERFUL SPARROW 141 CAT AND STARLING 124 PETER 221
A JEWISH CEMETERY 161 CAT AND KITTEN . 137 HORSE OPENING A DOOR 248
AN UNWELCOME VISITOR. 162 'CRIB' 155
A NOVEL BOOT-JACK 167 COUNCIL OF HORSES 179 ITALIAN GREYHOUNDS AND PUP-
APE IN A TREE 177 CAT MINDING CHICKENS 189 PIES 233
A SOCIABLE DONE 184 CAT AND D 199
A SCHOLASTIC JACKDA .186 CHARLIE AND TOPSY 224 JACK/ FROM LIFE 3
A FOX IN THE FURROW 87 CIRCUS HORSE AT ASTLEY'S. 262 'JACOB' AND SQUATTIE' 21
A GLOUCESTERSHIRE NEDDY WITH CHAMOIS 276 JENNY WRE 46
HIS BURDEN 192 JACKKO' WITH PUSSY'S BONE 173
A KNOWING Fox 205 DOT 6 JEWEL 244
A BRAVE DOG 207 DORMICE 38
A GENTLE GUIDE 212 DENIS DONOVAN'S DONKEY .87 KANGAROO AND YOUNG 10
A CLEVER GANDER 215 DOG WITH BROKEN LEG .107 'KATEY' .83
AN EXPENSIVE MOUSE-NEST 216 DINNER-TIME 109 'KURRA' AT THE WINDOW 119
A SOCIABLE ROOK 20 DOG AND PUPPIES 148
A MOTHER WATER-RAT 230 DOG WAITING ON CAT 178 LEVERETS 16
A BIRD'S NEST 238 DOGS HUNTING THE WILD BOAR 206 LITTLE PIGS. 33
A HEROIC DOG 246 DOG SAVING A SHIP 219 LEFT BEHIND 64
A FAITHFUL DOG. 247 'DoCTOR'RUNNINGTO HIS MASTER LITTLE TOMTIT 103
A SENSIBLE DOG. 250 FOR SUGAR 227 LOVE-BIRDS 118
ANGOLA TOM NURSING CHICKENS 251 DOG AND DUCK 240 LEFT ALONE 153
ANGOLA CAT 252 DEAD SHELDRAKE 260 LINNET SINGING IN THE GORSB 211
ARCTIC Fox, 255 DONKEYS 264
A DOG'S INSTINCT .263 DOG PROTECTING HIS MASTER 272 'MERRY' 25
AN INTELLIGENT DOG . 267 MONKEY AND CHILD 47
AN EXTRAORDINARY FAMILY 271 EXPECTATION 78 MAGPIE AND KNIFE .55
A DOG HIGHWAY ROBBER 274 EIDER DUCKS 204 MOTHER-LOVE IN A RAT 69
MOUSE CLIMBING UP ALOE PLANT 105
BIRDIE ROBIN 8 FEEDING THE DONKEY. 32 'MASTER MAGRATH' 172
BRAHMIN CATTLE .12 'FAIRY,' AN ALDERNEY COW 42 MY DOG FRIEND 197
BULL'S HEAD 36 FIGHT BETWEEN A DOG AND. A MONKEYS 232
BABY SEA-GULLS 40 SWAN 74 'MUMBO 265


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CONTENTS.

PAGE PAGE PAGE
'NESTOR 97 THE MOTHER-HEN 14 THE RAT AND SPOON 154
NIGHTINGALE AND LINNET. 149 THE SWAN AND THE DRAKE. 20 THE RIDERLESS HORSE 157
NORWICH CANARY 156 THE BLACK EWE AND HER LAMB THE COWHERD'S DOG 159
NIGHTINGALES BUILDING THEIR RETURNING HOME 23 THE BLESSBOCK AND YOUNG 160
NEST .249 TOM' AND THE TOAD . 24 THE SPARROWS' PETITION . 164
THE SWAN AND THE CROWS. .28 THE DOG AND THE DONKEY. 165
OLD JACK AND HIS MASTER. 126 THE BULL-DOG 30 THE CONFABULATION .. 166
OUTSIDE THEPUBLIC' .142 THE CRIMINAL DOG 35 THE WILD CAT .170
' OLD BALACLAVA JACK' 201 THE WOLF 37 THE ARCTIC, OR WHITE BEAR 171
THE DOG AND HIS SHADOW . 48 THE DOG THAT CROSSED THE
PEACE 4 THE EGG COLLECTOR 50 ATLANTIC IN THE 'CITY OF
PUSSY ASLEEP 34 THE WOUNDED COCK 51 RAGUSA' : 174
PUSSY IN THE HAY-LOFT 65 THE POUTER AND THE HORSE 53 THE HORSE AND THE BOAR. .. 180
PUSSY AT PLAY .73 THE MONKEY AND THE NUTS .54 THE BROWN BEAR .. 181
PUSSY ON SUNDAY 99 THE STUDENT'S BEAR . 56 THE ROBBER MAGPIE 182
POOR ROBIN REDBREAST 121 TOM DRIVING PUSSY FROM HER THE SICK MONKEY 183
PARIS DOGS DURING THE SIEGE 163 FOOD .. 62 THE THRUSH IN ITS NEST 185
SPO L L Y 1 6 9 T H E Y O U N G M O N K E Y . 6 6 T H E S L Y F o x . 1 9 0
PUSS AND THE LINNETS 188 THE LYNX 68 THE SWALLOW AND THE THRUSH. 191
PUSSY AT THE CRYSTAL PALACE 193 THE LOP-EARED RABBIT 72 THE RED FOX 194
PUSS LOOKING AT THE CREAM 208 THE HEN AND HER DUCKLINGS .76 TURKEY 195
PUSSY'S STRANGE FAMILY . 261 THE STAG IN TROUBLE 77 THE FAITHFUL FRIEND 196
THE GARDENER'S FRIEND .79 THE FIRST SWALLOW 198
QUARREL OF THE ROOKS 253 TRAY' AND GROWLER . 81 THE TAILOR-BIRD 200
' QUIz' AT THE PIANO . 273 THE KIND HORSE 82 THE STOCK-DOVES 203
THE OTTER. .88 THE CUCKOO'EGG IN THE HEDGE-
RICH AND POOR 27 THE DEAD CHAFFINCH 89 SPARROW'S NEST 209
ROBIN ON THE APPLES 31 THE SCAPE-GOAT 91 THE ESCAPE 210
RATS CARRYING AN EGG 39 THE FALLOW-DEER 92 THE BLOODHOUND 213
RABBITS 43 THE NIGHTINGALE 94 THE FLY AND THE BULL 225
'ROYAL TOM' 49 THE DAY OF REST 95 THE KINGFISHER. 228
'ROVER'AND THE CHICKS 120 THE SPARROW ON THE HOUSE-TOP 98 THE CRANE AND THE TROUT 231
RHINOCEROS PLAYING WITH BALL 132 THE WOLF AND THE STORK 100 THE DOG AND THE BREECHES 235
RATS . 218 THE BEAR AND THE TEA-KETTLE 101 THE DOG'S FUNERAL 236
'ROOKEY, A TAME HOODED CROW 223 THE SLY OLD Fox 102 THE ROBIN 237
THE PIGS SWIMMING ACROSS THE THE BLIND MAN'S DOG 241
SAVED 17 RIVER 104 THE DISCONTENTED SQUIRREL 242
SEA-GULLS .22 THE SWAN .110 THE FROG AND THE EEL 243
ST. KILDA SHEEP, FROM LIFE 41 THE SYRIAN BEAR .111 THE WHITE SPARROW 254
SOW AND HER YOUNG 59 THE DONKEY AND BOY 112 THE PELICAN 256
SSQUIB' AND THE FEATHER. 1 THE STORK 114 THE SHEPHERD'S DOG . 258
SHEEP OF THE BRITISH ISLES 3 THE BITTERN 116 THE JACKDAW 259
SHETLAND PONY 80 THE OLD HORSE RINGING THE THE KESTREL 269
'SHOCK' CARRYING UMBRELLAS 85 BELL 123 THE POITOU DONKEY 275
SYMPATHY 6 THE THRUSH AND PINCUSHION 125 THE ERNE, OR SEA-EAGLE . 278
SHEEP AND LAMBS. 3 TIMOTHY, OUR PET HEDGEHOG 127 'TIFF' FRIGHTENING THE PIGS 279
SHEEP FOLLOWING THE SHEPHERD 115 THE IBEX 128 THE RUDE RAVEN 280
SAGACITY OF A SPARROW 117 THE SHEPHERD'S DOG AND THE
SCOTCH DEER-HOUND .. 122 LOST BY 134 AR 5
SHUT OUT 29 THE TOAD 15 WILD BOAR. 06
SHEEP AND DUCKLINGS 131 THE SWALLOW'S NEST 136 'WALLY'S' FOUNDLING 222
'SNOB' SAVING HIS MASTER 220 THE RAT'S NEST 18 WORN OUT 257
SHORTHORN Cow. 239 TURKEY-COCK AND DUCKLINGS 143
SAGACITY OF A CAT 26 THE END OF A DOG'S QUARREL 144 YOUNG RAT SAVING ITS PARENT 58
THE TAME CROW 145 YOUNG CUCKOO IN TITLARK'S
THE DEAD LAMB 2 THE BEE AND THE TOMTIT 146 NEST 175
'TOLLY-BOY' 7 THE MASTIFF 147, 168 YOUNG RABBITS IN THE SCARE-
THE LAMB AND THE LINNET 9 THE SICK THRUSH 152 CROW 217

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CHATTERBOX ALBUM.

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ASLEEP AND AWAKE.
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A ROBIN'S NEST IN A SHOE. BY HARRISON WEIR.

THIS is a Robin that built its nest, and hatched crowd forward to receive the food provided for
its eggs, in an old shoe which had been thrown them, and after they had eaten return out of
away. It was curious to see the young birds sight into the toe of the shoe.


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GYP," BY F. W. KEYL.

WHEN 'Gyp' had his portrait taken he was a made the best of his lot, was a good dog in the
lively puppy, although he looks so solemn, water, a first-rate watch-dog and companion in
But in after-life the distemper left the poor the house, learned a good many tricks, and died
little dog afflicted with palsy. However, he 'universally regretted and much respected.'

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THE DEAD LAMB. BY HARRISON WEIR.

BUT yesterday, no happier dam It was a new-born thing ;-the rain
Ranged o'er those pastures wide Poured down all night-its bed
Than she, fond creature when the lamb Was drenched and cold. Morn came again,
Was sporting by her side. But the poor lamb was dead.


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"JACK," FROM LIFE. BY HARRISON WEIR.

HERE we have a Bear on the top of a pole. sometimes show his teeth when he is teased.
The Bear's name is 'Jack,' and he lives at the If any one gives him a lump of sugar he is
Crystal Palace. He is very playful, but will quite delighted.


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PEACE. BY HARRISON WEIR.

PEACE.
PONTO lies by Lapears, Save for sport and pastime,
Lapears lies by him, Would be most absurd:
That these should chase each other, Cruel-nay, we might say,
Save for play or whim, Wicked was the word.


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PEACE. BY HARRISON WEIR. I'l;
PEACE
Po~molles y LaparsSave or sprt aia atie
Laparslie byI hii Wol be. mot srd
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"5. BY I-IAI RISONL2
1%M chse Cock al; Iei ~ogadcul
il, Scmpr liIl one Yo ar ekan id
It his passol athyu ee dadpte
All you spr --Is doe ieamchlv cid
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"DOT." BY F. W. KEYL.

THIS clever dog, whose name is 'Dot,' fetches train's arrival, Dot scampers off and posts
his master's newspaper every day. The paper himself on the bank.
is brought from London about nine every The train rattles past, the paper is flung
morning, by the guard of a passing train, out, Dot seizes the paper with a bark of de-
Regularly as the time draws near for the light, and scampers home again.

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"TOLLY-BOYS." BY F. W. KEYL.

THE old pony in the picture has just given its The little boy knows that it is the right
rider the pleasure of a good gallop, as you can and kind thing to do, so he gets off for a few
see by the panting of the little terrier, and minutes to let his old favourite get rested.
Tolly-boys' (that is the pony's name) distended A true gentleman is always careful of his
nostrils. horse, and kind to it.

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BIRDIE ROBIN. BY F. W. KEYL.

BIRDIE ROBIN sits all alone
On a leafless hawthorn stem;
Lark and swallow away have flown-
Why didn't he fly with them P

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THE LAMB AND THE LINNET. BY HARRISON WEIR.

"A LAMB, who from a wolf had fled, Nay,' said the Linnet, 'envy not
"A Linnet saw, and to her said: My state, if thou must mourn thy lot;
'How gay and happy thou must be! If as a bird thou'dst seen the light,
No wolf can ever injure thee! Thou would'st have feared a hungry kite!'
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KANGAROO AND YOUNG. BY F. W. KEYL.

THIS picture was drawn from a gentle How pleasant it must be for the young
animal at the Zoological Gardens while it Kangaroo to be carried about in a warm, soft
was munching biscuits which the children hammock, out of which it can peep into the
gave it. world as out of a coach-window!


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A WONDERFUL CAT. BY HARRISON WEIR.

THIS affectionate Puss is head-nurse to her take medicine or food; and at night, if the
sick mistress. She has learned to know the attendant is asleep, she will call her, or gently
different hours at which the patient ought to nibble her nose until she wakes.


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BRAHMIN CATTLE. BY F. W. KEYL.

THESE cattle came from India, and are now in some Indian grandee. They were very valu-
the Zoological Gardens. They belonged to a able, and celebrated for their speed in harness,
small herd sent to the Queen as a present from for the Indians use them as we do horses.


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A LARK IN A CRICKET.GROUND. BY HARRISON WEIR.

A CRICKET GROUND seems rather an unsafe to hurt them. They are kind boys, and the
place for a Lark's nest. But these little birds mother-lark knows this, and comes and goes
are all right. The boys take good care not without showing the least sign of fear.

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THE MOTHER-HEN. BY F. W. KEYL.



THIS is the portrait of a good, kind, and only have risked her life in defence of her chicks; she

too-anxious mother-hen, which would willingly lived in a farm-yard at Carshalton, in Surrey.
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GOAT AND KIDS. BY F. W KEYL.

THE Goat is a self-satisfied, cheerful, and some- France and Germany form the live stock of
what whimsical creature. It is chiefly found the poorest class of villagers.
in hilly countries; such as Wales and Scot- Kids will get very tame, and follow their
land, Switzerland, Italy, Spain. Goats in masters like dogs.

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GOjADKIS F.WK'L
THE oat s a elfsatified cherfu, adsm- Fac n emn er h iesoko
what whimsical creature~~-. I scifyfud tepors ls fvlaes





inhil cunres sc a Wls n Sct Kidswl e ey madflo hi

land, S~tzerland, Ialy, Spain. Goats i masters like dogs

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LEVERETS. BY F. W. KEYL.

LEVERETS are often found by mowers in the selves at once like guinea-pigs. They have
meadows. They are not born blind like the always a pretty white star on their fore-
rabbit, but able to see and take care of them- heads


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SAVED. BY F. W. KEYL

Is not this Newfoundland Dog a noble fellow ? drowned. He teaches us that nothing is im-
He has just saved a little girl from being possible to the brave and the faithful.



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CALVES. BY HARRRISON WEIR.

WE Calves are related to Count Bison, in the time of Julius Casar. There, now!
Russia; to Citizen Buffalo, in America; don't you think that we are members of
and to Sahib Zebu, that elegant, deer-like a very large, useful, and highly genteel
animal, whom Indian folk worship. People family, and that I am a very learned
say that we had forefathers in England in calf?

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HUNTING MARE. BY HARRISON WEIR.

THIS hunting Mare was sold by a farmer at owner found her standing at the gate of her
Malton to a gentleman, who took her with him old field. In her cross-country gallop of nearly
to Whitby. On Wednesday morning the Mare sixty miles she must have had to cross two
was missed from the field in which she had rivers and a railway.
been put, and on the same evening her former

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THE SWAN AND THE DRAKE. BY HARRISON WEIR.

AN impertinent Drake said to a Swan,-' How noisy quacking, Sir Drake, I often think you
is it that I never hear you talking ? Are you must be deaf!'
really dumb, Mr. Swan?' It is better to be silent, like the Swan, than
The Swan answered, -' When I hear your to be for ever rating, like the Drake.
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"JACOB" AND "SQUATTIE," FROM LIFE. BY F. W. KEYL.

THIS is a picture of 'Jacob' and 'Squattie.' sideway bounds, 'Jacob' jumps at it and paws
'Jacob' has just been hiding, and aiming out of it; but 'Squattie' takes no notice, though we
his ambush, as if it were a mouse, at the tip of may be sure she would rather be without the
'Squattie's' wagging tail, while she enjoys a few intrusion just now.
bones. Then, with a succession of very funny

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SEA-GULLS. BY F. W. KEYL.

SEA-GULLS often follow in the wake of a 'All is fish that comes to the beak;' for
steamer, for the sake of the scraps and waste nothing comes amiss to them.
which are thrown overboard during the Sea-gulls are sometimes spoken of as natural
voyage. If gulls have proverbs, like human fog-signals-telling the sailors that land is
beings, they must certainly have a saying, near.


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THE BLACK EWE AND HER LAMB RETURNING HOME. BY F. W. KEYL.

SHEEP do not at all like leaving their native Lyon to the farm of Harelupe in Tweed-dale,
pastures. The Ewe in the picture loved her and made the journey in nine days. After
old home so much, that when she was taken that she was allowed to remain on her native
away from it, she returned to it with her lamb. farm, till she died of old age in her seventh
She travelled from a farm in the head of Glen year.

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TH TtC W N ERLA./ RTrRIG OE B .".KY

SH P- dono a allie eaig her aiv Lontote ar o arlue nTweddae
pastres Th Ew inthepicurelovd hr an mae te jurny i nie dys.Aftr=
old~~~~~~ hoe omuh ta we sewas tae that~B~Uj shDrr~E~jL~ : wa allwe to reano hrnt

awayfromit, he return toit wth hr lab. frm, ill he ded o oldagein he eet
She raveled rom farln te hed ofGlen year

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himself. But he caught toads and frogs seem- piteously, but as Tom never hurt them, they
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.in a toad or a frog, and lay it at her feet, his nimbly as if nothing had happened..
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"24"TOM" AND THE TOAD. BY PERCY MACU








eyes round and glaring, and his tail as stiff as


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"MERRY." BY F. W. KEYL.

' MERRY' is a common name for Pomeranian sharp features. The French call them 'chiens-
dogs, both in this country and in Germany. loups,' or 'dog-wolves,' because they are so
They are also called 'Spitz' (which means much like wolves.
'pointed') on account of their pointed nose and


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"CHARLES" BRINGING HIS MASTER'S SLIPPERS.

THIS wonderful Parrot was named 'Charles,' would bring him his slippers or his night-cap,
and belonged to a merchant of Amsterdam. and call the servant whenever she was wanted.
He made himself very useful to his master- 'Charles' lived to be seventy-six years old.


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RICH AND POOR. BY PERCY MACQUOID.

WHEN these two horses meet abroad, one bears cart. But when they meet at meal-times
proudly on his shining back a beautiful young they forget the difference of their stations, and
girl, while the other is harnessed to a farm- chat together in the most friendly way.


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THE SWAN AND THE CROWS. BY HARRISON WEIR.

THE black Crows hated the white Swan, and Meekly the insulted Swan dived beneath the
determined to spoil her beauty. So they water, and rose fairer than before.
spattered mud all over her beautiful plumage.
Human crows, with slander's mud,
Vainly smear your reputation:
Truth will prove the cleansing flood
To undo the operation.

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HOME FROM THE SHOW. BY HARRISON WEIR.
Oxi,: morning I was hardly drest, I s-at-T swore-I struggled hard;
They snatched me from my happy home, My mistress gave the lid a kiss,
And squeezed me in a wooden chest, And wrote, with tears, upon the card,
As dark as any cat-a-comb. The Cat Show-the Metropolis.'
I saw a crowd of cats and men,
I heard the sound of drum and horns;
And here I am at home again,




















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THE BULL-DOG. BY HARRISON WEIR.

AND have I indeed such a villainous leer?
Do you do a dog justice now, Harrison Weir?
What a savage expression! how frightful a frown!
No wonder I'm shunnedl as I walk through the town.


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TH BL-DG B HRISNWER
AN aeIidedsc ilanu er
II/ yoti do a doo- justice n~IB ~ \ Vi'W, Harrison Weir?7,r,
Wha asaag eprsson owfrghfu afrwn
No wnderI'm butied a I wlk troug thetown


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ROBIN ON THE APPLES. BY HARRISON WEIR,

O str Robin-redbreast 0 fie, robbing Robin!
I hardly can look at you there without sobbing.
In winter I feed you, beguiled by your graces,
And in summer you rob me, you bird of two faces !

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FEEDING THE DONKEY. BY F. W. KEYL.

POO little foal of an oppressed race!
I love the languid patience of thy face:
And oft with gentle hand I give thee bread,
And clap thy ragged coat, and pat thy head.'
COLERIDGE.

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LITTLE PIGS. BY F. W. KEYL.

Do you know old Philip Spudbury, that works at Pixham Mill :
He has thirteen little baby-pigs that are hardly ever still;
They scamper, scamper, scamper-all round the sty they run,
And jump, and dive, and tumble, they so enjoy the fun.
One day the gate stood open, there was not a soul in sight,
So off they scampered up the road in wonderful delight.

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A momnt, and a sudden dash All her catching, scratching whirling,
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gain, her four fe etc in hes She springs, and daitily alights.
Just with one eye she peers aou Then, this merriest sprites
Gravely she begins to wash- All her tumbling, jumping, twirling

A moment, and a sudden dash All her catching, scratching, whirling,
Sends the ball out here-out there: Repeats again-each frolic play-
Again, her four feet in the air, That and sleep fill up her day!


34





















~---5====--- 14





































THE CRIMINAL DOG. BY HARRISON WEIR.

"WHAT has this dog done? Why,
He ate a pretty little lamb,
And when he'd done that, slew her dam,
And then attacked the shepherd, too.
And so from crime to crime he went,
Until he met with punishment.
w------- L=---






























































BULL'S HEAD. BY F. W. KEYL.

THis is the picture of the head of the animal its horns and bones make buttons, knife han-
to which we owe the 'Roast Beef of Old dies, and other useful articles. Nearly every-
England.' And not only does it supply us thing in life is for our use, and we should
with food, but its skin makes leather, and 'Waste not.'


36





























































THE WOLF. BY F. W. KEYL.

SOH, the horrible wolves methinks I hear Down from their caves they come by day,
The sound of their barking drawing near; Savage as mad dogs for their prey;
Down on the tracks where the hunters roam,
Down to the peasant's hut they come.'-IMVARY HOWITT.

7 E





























































DORMICE. BY F. W. KEYL.

THE Dormouse is very small, and lives in often takes its food between its fore-paws
a pretty round nest of grass, with a lining and sits upright to eat it. When the cold
of moss and lichens. It feeds upon nuts, weather comes it rolls itself into a ball and
acorns, and grain, and, like the squirrel, it falls fast asleep.

38


























































RATS CARRYING AN EGG. BY F. W. KEYL.

SEE lhow these four clever rats manage to get to him. No doubt the experienced rogue will
the egg they have just stolen from the hen- carry it safely down the steep descent into
house into their hole. One old rat goes in their secret storehouse.
backwards, and the others push the egg down


39

























































BABY SEA-GULLS. BY F. W. KEYL.

PRETTY baby sea-gulls! What a shame it is was ever so much better than shooting at the
to shoot the parents, and leave the little ones poor birds.
to die of hunger If people must be always popping off powder
A boy once made a little boat with sails, to and shot, let them do so at something which
serve him for a target amid the waves. That is not hurt thereby.

40

























M


































ST. KILDA SHEEP, FROM LIFE. BY F. W. KEYL.

THESE quaint little animals, looking like a birds, and of these little sheep. I fear that
compound of goat, gazelle, and sheep, are there are not many of these animals to be
St. Kilda sheep. St. Kilda is a rocky island seen now, as larger breeds of sheep are found
far out at sea, off the west coast of Scotland; to be more profitable.
the home alike of the eagle, of countless sea-


41 s 2










i .... _


















































"FAIRY," AN ALDERNEY COW. BY HARRISON WEIR.

THIS is the portrait of 'Fairy,' an Alderney gate of the field having been left open on
Cow. Fairy always comes of her own accord purpose. She is docile and obedient, and
to be milked, both morning and evening, therefore is much esteemed by those who
and returns when the milking is over, the know her.

42
































































RABBITS BY F. W. KEYLL.

THIS picture reminds us of the old rhyme of Rabbits are comfortable-looking creatures.
Father's gone a hunting- If they were not, people would not so readily
He'll bring home a rabbit-skin have changed a 'Welsh rare-bit' into a 'Welsh
To wrap our baby bunting in.' rabbit.'


43
44 Vl




'IN"A

I ~P


~~ :V







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A WISE DONKEY. BY F W KEYL.

THIS wise donkey once said a rather good thing. fits my back. My mother used to say that half
Some one was pitying him because he had of our wants are created; half of our miseries
such a cruel master, and such a heavy load. imaginary; and half, and more than half, of
He answered, 'If my burden be heavy, yet it our blessings lost, for want of seeing them.'

^ ---- "n . ----- I ---- ---------- -- --------------------------------------------------------------| -- --- .. * , ., ,, ,*.1., -. | ,, ,



























































CALF. BY F. W. KEYL.

ARE not calves pretty little creatures? those of butchers' shops. In Ireland they are some-
the Alderney cow look so fawn-like, as to remind times nicknamed 'Staggering Bobs.' It is
one of the young of the red-deer; those of the amusing to watch their first steps, which give
short-horned cattle remind us more of veal and the reason for that name.

45













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felt uncommonly tired, and very much in- and looked around, then he saw the enemy
"f--f1 /----
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r-- .. -- ---- -- --..


















_____ _J!




JENNY WREN. BY HARRISON WEIR.
JUST before the battle of the ]3oyne, on the Iwoke the drummer-boy, who, like the rest of
1st of July, 1690, King William's soldiers his comrades, was fast asleep. He started up
felt uncommonly tired, and very much in- and looked around, then he saw the enemy
lined to take a nap. While they slept, a approaching, and instantly gave the alarm.
little Wren spied some crumbs on a drum- Had it not been for Jenny Wren, James might
head, and hopped upon it to pick them up. have won the day.
The noise of her little feet on the parchment

46























































MONKEY AND CHILD. BY HARRISON WEIR.
A MONKEY on board a ship ran away with a by leaping from one mast to another. At
baby belonging to one of the passengers, and last the captain ordered every man to hide
took it to the very top of the mainmast, himself below, and took a seat where he could
Every one was frightened. The captain was see without being seen. To his great relief,
at his wits' end. He would not let the sailors the monkey, on finding that the coast was
climb after the monkey, for he feared that if clear, came down, and placed the baby unhurt
they did so, it would drop the child, and escape upon the sofa from which it had been taken.

47








































--2 :

























THE DOG AND HIS SHADOW. BY HARRISON WEIR.

A DOG, who from a butcher's shop He springs upon it to obtain
Has carried off a mutton-chop, The booty; but he springs in vain:
Its shadow in the river spies, Not only does he gain no more,
And thinks, 'Here is another prize!' But loses what he had before.


a4
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THE OG ND IS HADW. Y HRRION EIR

A OG wo ro abuchr' so H srigsupn t o bti

Ha crredof amuto-cop Te ooy;bu h srigsinvan
It sad winth rvr speNo ny osheg i n oe



And hins, 'ereis nothr pize! Bu loes wat e ha beore

'ii 4R





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II





























"ROYAL TOM." BY HARRISON WEIR.
. I"















































ROYAL TOM' was a splendid Tom-cat, which H. R. H. the Duke of Edinburgh took special
was for many years a well-known sight, as he notice of him; and in 1870 he was exhibited
sunned himself in the shop-window of Messrs. to the Princess of Wales and her children.
Sturrock, hairdressers, of Princes Street, Edin- Tom did not long survive this great honour, for
burgh. He was called 'Royal Tom' because he died in 1871, aged fifteen and a half years.


"49
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i i I :II I
= SI ; i IiIi'I1i \






"ROYA T0I. BYHRRSN ER
'~ ROA ot wa peddTmc hih t.R T h ueo Eibrh o pca
was; Io man yer a welknw siht ash oieo i;adi 80h axiie
sne imsl in th shpwno Nsr. t h rneso ae e hlrn
=~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~~~~~'\1 Sturock hardeses o PicsSre, dn o i o ogsrieti ra oor o
burgh,~ ~ ~~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~~~~~~i ti was cald'RylTm'bcueh idin17,ae ien n a yas

4 ,-
























































THE EGG-COLLECTOR. BY HARRISON WETR.
Tins wonderful colley dog, who lived at a watch until they had laid their eggs, and these
farmhouse in Scotland, not only used to tend he would gently take in his mouth and carry
the sheep, but would bring the cows home to indoors.
be milked, and was also useful in many other He was never known to break one, although
ways. One of his favourite occupations was to he was the chief egg-collector of the house for
find out the nests of the hens. He would several years.

50































THE WOUNDED COCK. BY HA'RISON WEIR
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One day the two cocks fell out, and fought for means in her power, tried to show how sorry
II Ah T'1












































some time : at last one was thoroughly beaten, she was for him. And so for days she attended
and was left by the other sorely wounded and to him, until he got well.
crest-fallen. The victor walked off, and all One faithful friend is worth a host of
the hens accompanied him but one, who came flatterers.

51
lAll








51-it






























MA----070



























A GREEDY JACKDAW. BY HARRISON WEIR.

A JACKDAW was standing on the roof of a ing the larger piece. Another sparrow, who
house, eating a bit of bread. Whilst pecking was watching his chance, pounced down on
the bread to pieces, a few crumbs slid down the bread and flew away with it. So the
the roof, when a poor hungry sparrow tried to jackdaw was justly punished for his being
get them. The jackdaw dashed at him, leav- greedy.


52



































__ ~-------------* --- - - -- i





























THE POUTER AND THE HORSE. BY HARRISON WEIR.

SOME Pigeons were feeding on the grain that do so. Whereupon a pigeon flew up and
fell from a horse's nose-bag. Every time the pecked at the horse's. head, which made him
horse tossed his head to reach his food, he jerk it up, and so more grain was spilt. This
sprinkled some on the ground. Presently, as was repeated until the pigeons had all had as
his appetite became more satisfied, he ceased to much grain as they wished.


53 2
55 .?












'*

4!--- -- __ _---_ _____ ____-











































THE MONKEY AND THE NUTS. BY HARRISON WEIR.

A MONKEY had a sack of fresh, sweet nuts. possessor of the nuts in a great fury. He now
Dozens of other monkeys flocked around him, pelted them with nuts, and soon they all ran
hoping to get some. But the greedy creature away. But his precious nuts were gone, too.
flung them only the empty shells of those he He had used them all in driving off his foes.
had cracked and eaten. This made the other Thus oft we see a triumph cost
monkeys very angry, and they attacked the As much as if the day were lost.'

54

























/ I

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. .......













S ----= --- ------







MAGPIE AND KNIFE. BY HARRISON WEIR.

THIS magpie was a most amusing bird. He be less and less in number. At last Master
would watch the servant *clean the knives, Mag was caught stealing one, and in an old
sitting on the knife-box, then suddenly jump shed in the garden, where he had hidden them,
down, peck her heels, then on to the knife-box were found six knives, a thimble, a reel of
again. After awhile the knives were found to cotton, and other things besides.


55


























































THE STUDENT'S BEAR. BY HARRISON WEIR.

THIS Bear was sent in a hamper from Mount gown were made, arrayed in which (to the great
Lebanon, in Syria, to a gentleman at Oxford, scandal of the dous) he accompanied his master
who was very fond of natural history. He to breakfasts and wine-parties, where he made
soon became a great favourite at the University. himself very amusing, and partook of many
He was named 'Tiglath-Pileser.' A cap and good things.

56























i





wished to fasten apriole' on to the pit, al to say, Here is the right one, fasten him on



























57
CAPRIOLE was a clever dog, who belonged though it was not his day; 'Capriole' did not
_- ~~iii >_--i: ....-< ...
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"CAPRIOLE"~~~~~;ieiili DRGGN HI OLEGETOTECOK Y ARSO ER
~~~~ ~ I iAIL 'i wa a clvrdg h eogd tog twsnthsdy;'Ciol'di i
toth hushodofa ic camelan t he aprveothsbt anof t ind\ the the
Frenc cout, te an anoher og trnedthe ogwose urn t wa, sezed im y h er
spit on alternate days. Oneli dayi the head.-eook1111 an draggdhmt tecoa i ewse
wihe t asen'Caril' n o h sit l- tosy,' ee s hergh oe fstnhi o.








7 _____.____ ________________

















































YOUNG RAT SAVING ITS PARENT. BY F. W. KEYL.

ONCE, in a vessel sailing from New York to on his back another rat, which was quite grey
Lisbon, the rats were found to increase so very with old age, and also blind. The men sup-
fast that the captain ordered sulphur to be posing the old rat to be the father of the young
kindled in the hold. The rats left their holes, one, could not kill an animal which showed
and were killed in great numbers by the sailors, such tenderness, but allowed it to carry its
At length, one appeared on the deck bearing aged parent in safety to some other home.

58




















































IFi



SOW AND HER YOUNG. BY F. W. KEYL.

HERE is the picture of a sow with her young removed from the flames, heard the cries of
ones. In general, the old pig is a kind and her young ones, which had been left behind,
tender mother, ready to brave any danger in and at once broke away and jumped into the
defence of her young. There was once a fire fire, where she perished with those she could
at a large farm; an old sow, which had been not save.

59



























































COWS IN THE BROOK. BY W. H. J. BOOT.

IT is Sunday morning. The people are going But the cows might cross the brook and get
across the fields to church. The boy who is into another man's field, so he must stay be-
left to look after the cows looks after the hind this morning. Perhaps to-night he will
folk, as fi he would like to be with them. be free to go to evening service.


60

























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-,-- -7:r



















"SQUIB" AND THE FEATHER. BY HARRISON WEIR.

WHEN Swans are pluming themselves, a good will be very much pleased with it, for she has
many of their feathers drop out. 'Squib' has long been wishing for one of these pretty
just fetched one for his young mistress, by white feathers to put in her favourite dolly's
whom he was sent into the water, and who hat.


61















N














































TOM DRIVING PUSSY FROM HER FOOD. BY HARRISON WEIR.

' ToM' was a tame Pigeon which used to de- and finding Pussy asleep on the bed he would
light in teasing the cats. In the picture we send her quickly down with a box on the ear
see him driving poor Pussy from her food. from his flapping wing. Puss was quite a
Sometimes he would go up into the bedroom, match for Tom' when she was really angry.


62





























































SHEEP OF THE BRITISH ISLES. BY F. W. KEYL.

HERE are some sheep, natives of the British the right top corner. The speckled-faced
Isles. The Leicester ewe is at the left top Scotch has its place in the centre of the
corner of our picture. The South Down is picture; and the St. Kilda ewe and Welsh
by the side of it. The Dorset ewe fills up ewe are seen below.


63
633














- -- --
____,._ - -'

























































LEFT BEHIND. BY F. \V. KEYL.

TIns picture tells its own story. The grand 'Lion' is very unhappy at being left behind.
Hound has a master of whom he is very Let us hope that faithful 'Lion' will find
fond. But the master has to go across the some one to care for him and be kind to him
sea, and cannot take his dog with him. Poor while his master is away.


A4
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--, --- ----------- V-1
















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PUSSY IN THE HAY-LOFT. BY F. W. KEYL.
Pussy wished to get up to the hay-loft, but Pussy with a grateful purr. Puss is a regular
the ladder was in the wrong place. Some one attendant at meals, and if she finds any door
saw what she wished to do, and kindly moved shut, she jumps upon the handle so as to try
the steps to their proper position. Up went and move the latch.

















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THE YOUNG MONKEY. BY HARRISON WEIR.

A LITTLE monkey chanced to find A monkey, by experience taught,
A walnut in its outward rind; The falling prize with pleasure caught,
He snatched the prize with eager haste, The kernel peeled, and liked it well.
And bit it, but its bitter taste Walnuts,' said he, are good and sweet,
Soon made him throw the fruit away. But must be opened ere you eat.'


G66











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BEAVERS. BY HARRISON WEIR.
A PAIR of young beavers having been put in all kinds of things, such as boots, slippers,
a tub of water, and thinking, doubtless, that and so on, with which they tried to make a
their 'lake' should have a creek, proceeded dam. As it did not answer, they were very
to gnaw the sides till they had made a hole in much cast down, crying and rolling themselves
one of the staves; then they gathered together about, like children in a pet.

67
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their 'lake' should have a creek, proceeded dam. As it did not answer, they were very






























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THE LYNX. BY F. W. KEYL.

THE Lynx is a sort of cat with short tail, tufted therefore not many are to be met with close
ears, and bright eyes. Its colour is a reddish to each other. The Lynx is quick-sighted,
yellow, with dark spots of the same colour and sees its prey a long way off. It is very
here and there. The under-parts are white. active and fierce, and attacks animals much
The Lynx likes best to roam about alone, and larger than itself.

68
















& I









































MOTHER-LOVE IN A RAT. BY HARRISON ,W ..
ONE evening a man set a rat-trap in his kitchen. mangled mother lying upon her side, and
In the morning he found a full-grown female suckling two of her young that had not been
rat, caught by the fore-legs in the trap. As frightened away. The heart of the rat-catcher
he came near her, several young rats scampered was softened, and mother and family were
off, and on looking closer, he saw the poor allowed to run off.

69
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A SEA-FARING DOG. BY HARRISON WEIR.

'FAN's' master sold her to the owner of one of house; there she taps at the door and barks,
the far-famed Yarmouth smaks. But 'Fan' as much as to say, 'Here I am, safe and sound
does not forget her old friend. She goes to once more; let me in:' and if it happens to
sea in the smack, but the moment its prow be early in the morning, she always tries to go
again touches the landing-stage, Fan' quickly up into the bedroom to see her friend, who is
gets on shore, and trots off to her late owner's always ready to welcome her.


70
























































A SWIMMING-MATCH. BY HARRISON WEIR.
-i















































NOT long ago a swimming-match was arranged head under his chin. Knight, being a good
at Eastbourne, between a man named Knight swimmer, and not needing any such help, tried
and a dog. When man and dog took to the to strike out, but the dog would not let him.
water, the dog thought it his duty to save the It was not possible to have the race, and so
man from drowning. He swam towards him, Knight was taken into the boat and the dog
and tried to keep him afloat by placing his swam ashore.


71
---'. b --:
























ROI






















THE LOP-EAED RABBIT. BY F. KEYL.


















THIS lop-eared Rabbit is named 'Clara' (which enough to keep up from the toe, except when
means 'clear'), from her gentle ways and clear, she is very excited. It is the result of damp
bright eye. Poor 'Clara' is what they call 'pen- pens and litter-on many generations.
jointed;' that is, her forelegs have not strength 'Clara' is a very good mother.


72
Iii i

































THE LOP-EARED RABBIT. By Fr.W. WIEYL.

THIS lop-eared Rabbit is named 'Clara' (which enough to keep up from the toe, except when
means C lear'), from her gentle ways and clear, she is very excited. It is the result of damp
bright eye. Poor 'Clara' is what they call 'pen- pens and litter-on many generations.
jointed;' that is, her forelegs have not streng'th 'Clara' is a very good mother.


72











































S \1



















PUSSY AT PLAY, BY HARRISON WEIR.

WHIRLING, twirling, tumbling, jumping,
Catching, scratching, springing, bumping-
Was there ever such a creature ?
Who such heaps of tricks could teach her ?


73























f _~~~~-- --., -:., ----






































dog wished to drink, and the swan tried to neck, squeezed him, and trampled on him so
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beat him off. The dog grew angry, and dashed much that, had not a spectator come to the
//k/ ,




















FIGHT BETWEEN A DOG AND A SWAN. BY HARRISON WEIR.

IN one of the public gardens in Paris a fight strong wings the swan rolled him over in the
took place between a swan and a dog. The shallow water, encircled him with his long
dog" wished to drink, and the swan tried to neck, squeezed him, and trampled on him so
beat him off. The dog grew angry, and dashed much that, had not a spectator come to the
into the water. With two blows from his rescue, the dog would certainly have been killed.

74



























































A FAMILY OF CHICKENS. BY F. W. KEYL.

CHICKENS they are that we see; but what foreign ? To be sure; you have guessed it
sort ? Not game, to be sure, though like them, now. The cock is an Indian jungle-cock.
but too small. Bantams-game ones, perhaps: The group was sketched at the Zoological
but then they are too big. A Cock-a-doodle- Gardens, where many of them range at will
doo it is, and no mistake. Perhaps they are among the shrubs.

75
75




































Z7-






















THE HEN AND HER DUCKLINGS. BY HARRISON WEIR.

SOME ducks' eggs were hatched by a hen. lot of eggs 'Biddy' hatched were some of her
When the little ducks first took to swimming own laying. The silly hen thought that her
'Biddy' was dreadfully frightened, but after a second brood ought to do the same thing as
time, when she saw that they got no harm, the first had done, so she drove her poor little
she stopped her cries, and said to herself, chicks into the pond, where they were all
'After all, they were wiser than I.' The next drowned.

76
























































THE STAG IN TROUBLE. BY HARRISON WEIR.I
THE picture shows us a poor Stag in great in the branch, and increasing his difficulties.
trouble. His horns, or antlers, are entangled The same sort of thing happens sometimes
with the branch of a tree, and he struggles to those who should be wiser than the stag.
forward without knowing that he is only How frequently one trouble brings on
making matters worse. His efforts to get another; and so it is one falsehood leads +-
free are only fixing the horns more tightly many.

77 H 2














































































And that before the set of sun,
A righteous execution
78
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Some robin may hop down quite near,
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- --.- .
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TIIE GARDENER'S FRIEND. EY HARRISON WEIR.

TIlE gardener hopes when he digs,
Some robin may hop down quite near,
To feast on the worms he turns up;
And truly no robin need fear,
For a gardener welcomes the bird as his friend,
IHis pretty redbreast ever prompt to defend.

79
































I M



.*~~ ___ ^- ____ _- ~ -.^ ^^ ^ -^ II *' I --_---- -= -- ^ 9 - ____ __ ___ __


























SHETLAND PONY. BY HARRISON WEIR.

THE Shetland Pony is a native of the rocky tainous districts. But in many a home in
Shetland Islands, off the north-eastern coast of southern England, where there are no moun-
Scotland. This little creature is strong and tains, the little Sheltie, with its shaggy mane,
sure-footed. It is especially valuable in moun- is the useful favourite of the boys and girls.

80




























































OLD Tray' and rough Growler' are having a fight,
So let us get out of their way;
They snarl, and they growl, and they bark and they bite-
Oh dear, what a terrible fray !
81


















81





















L,














































THE KIND HORSE. BY HARRISON WEIR.

HERE is a good kind Horse in the stable. The cocks and hens roost upon our friend's back.
old fowl-house has been pulled down, so the He looks quite leased over it-does he not ?



82


























































"KATEY. BY F. W. KEYL.


' KATEY' was a blithe little terrier belonging letters and parcels for her master, and always
to a flyman at Eastbourne. She used to carry proved a trusty messenger.

































































A CLEVER FOX. BY HARRISON WEIR.


THIS cunning fox is throwing fir-branches into way, he will take a larger branch than usual,
the stream. He does so because he wishes the and crouching himself down upon it, will drift
ducks to get used to the sight of them, and down the stream into their midst. Poor ducks!
then, when they have ceased to fear, and little do you know of the danger so near
scarcely trouble themselves to flutter out of the at hand !
819
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-~-~















































ducks to get -used to the sight of them, and cown the stream into their midst. Poor ducks!
____ I












I \ '













































"SHOCK" CARRYING THE UMBRELLAS. BY HARRISON WEIR.

THIS wise Dog will often carry a bundle of halfpenny he carries to the nearest shop, lays
umbrellas to the station, and deliver them it on the counter, and gets a biscuit in return.
safely to their owners, and then, with many a Need we say that this dog has a kind and
wag of his brown tail, he silently asks for a sensible master?
halfpenny to pay him for his trouble. This

85 ii
8 I












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but could not make it stir. In a rage he left his own -ock.
,- '

















4-
















SYMPATHY. BY HAIIRISON WEIR.

A F LocEC of sheep was being driven along. One the new-comers gathered round t!he panting
poor creature was so tired that it lay down on sheep, and, after sundry rubbingis of noses and
the ground. The drover beat it with his stick, bleatings, he rose, and scampered off to join
but could not make it stir. In a rage he left his own flock.
it, and went after the other sheep. In a few Surely we may learn a lesson of kindness
moments another flock came up, and several of from this little story.

86






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DENIS DONOVAN'S DONKEY. BY HARRISON WEIR.

DENIS DONOVAN was a merry, witty, sharp treated his donkey kindly, so that it grew
Irish boy, whose father was dead; but Denis fat and strong, and did its work well, and
didn't mean that his mother should work for everybody praised Denis Donovan and his
him, so he found friends to help him to buy a donkey.
donkey and a truck, and some vegetables, and Kindness is a virtue which will not lose
soon he was driving quite a brisk trade. Denis its reward.

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THE OTTER. BY HARRISON WEIR.

THE Otter is a sort of water-ferret, or water- carries it to the bank and makes a meal. But
weasel. God gave him a long, flat, and broad the Otter is like naughty Jack, who leaves a
tail for a rudder, broad feet for oars, and saucy plate-he spoils much more fish than
wonderfully sharp teeth to hold fast his slip- he eats.
pery food. When the fish is caught, the Otter

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birds in the guard n. And what do yo. think buried it, and th-n the live chaffinch -ew away.
-8 1
.E D. AD .. . W...








bird..s in the--...-- AChf ..
-- _---- __.





















l e







0 NE nrornlinm there was a great chattering of "et III). Po1o little thini3g, I toolk it up and
birds in the garden. And what do you think buried it, and thent the live chaffinch flow away.
was the matter ? A little chaffinch lay dead Let us hope that it found some kind friend to
on the grQuncd, and its mate was talking to it console and comfort it, and that it did not die
and hovering about it, and trying to make it of sorrow.

..- =_W
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A SAGACIOUS DOG. BY HARRISON WEIR.

THIS good dog's master lost a parcel out of his faithful dog carefully guarding it. Many
carriage, and did not miss it until he reached tales are told of dogs which have lost their
home. Going back to make search for the lives in protecting their masters' property.
parcel, he found it lying in the road, and his

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s Im























THE SCAPE-GOAT. BY HARRISON WEIR.

BY the Scape-goat is meant the goat which over it the sins of the people. This was a
the high priest of the children of Israel was pi( ure of Jesus Christ our Saviour, who has
obliged by the Law of Moses to send away by ca: ried away all our sins : for 'The Lord hath
itself into the wilderness, after he had confessed laid on Him the iniquity of us all.'


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THE FALLOW-DEER. BY HARRISON WEIl.


THE haunt of the fallow deer Where the fox bnrks from the hill,
By the moorland spreading wide, And the owl hoots through the night,
Amid whose herbage sere And the glossy blackcock crowcth shrill,
The red grouse loves to hide ; To hail the morning light.
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