• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Title Page
 Doings of the alphabet
 Childhood's delight
 Mistress Mary
 Lady Queen Anne
 Poverty-Town
 The man in the wilderness
 Little white baby
 The milk-maid
 Dame Crump and her pig
 Hush-a-bye-baby
 Hush-a-bye-baby
 Little Charley
 Pussy and me
 Blow, wind, blow!
 Frank and Carlo
 The little lambs
 Back Cover
 Spine






Group Title: Aunt Louisa's golden gift : : comprising, Doings of the alphabet, Childhood's delight, Dame Crump and her pig, Hush-a-bye-baby
Title: Aunt Louisa's golden gift
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00048496/00001
 Material Information
Title: Aunt Louisa's golden gift comprising, Doings of the alphabet, Childhood's delight, Dame Crump and her pig, Hush-a-bye-baby
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. (some col.) ; 28 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Valentine, L ( Laura ), d. 1899
Howard, Justin H ( Illustrator )
Herrick, Henry Walker, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Donor: Egolf, Robert ( donor )
Publisher: McLoughlin Bros.
Place of Publication: New York
Publication Date: [1880?]
 Subjects
Subject: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1880   ( lcsh )
Alphabet rhymes -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Alphabet rhymes   ( rbgenr )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with twenty-four pages of illustrations printed in colors and gold ; original designs by Howard and Herrick.
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00048496
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002222565
notis - ALG2811
oclc - 62121047

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Title Page
        Page ii
    Doings of the alphabet
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Childhood's delight
        Page 14
    Mistress Mary
        Page 15
        Page 16
    Lady Queen Anne
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Poverty-Town
        Page 19
        Page 20
    The man in the wilderness
        Page 21
        Page 22
    Little white baby
        Page 23
        Page 24
    The milk-maid
        Page 25
        Page 26
    Dame Crump and her pig
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Hush-a-bye-baby
        Page 40
    Hush-a-bye-baby
        Page 41
        Page 42
    Little Charley
        Page 43
        Page 44
    Pussy and me
        Page 45
        Page 46
    Blow, wind, blow!
        Page 47
        Page 48
    Frank and Carlo
        Page 49
        Page 50
    The little lambs
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Back Cover
        Cover 3
        Cover 4
    Spine
        Spine
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AUNT LOUISA'S



GOLDEN GIFT:


COMPRISING


Doings of the Alphabet. Dame Crump and her Pig.
Childhood's Delight. Hush-a-bye- Baby.


WI T I

TWENTY-FOUR PAGES OF ILLUSTRATIONS
PRINTED IN COLORS AND GOLD.
ORIGINAL DESIGNS BY HOWARD AND HERRICK.




MLO UGHILIN 13 I 0 S., NEIV YORK.
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DOINGS OF THE ALPHABET.







DOINGS OF THE ALPHABET.



THE twenty-six letters, on pleasure intent,
At Alphabet House, a day's holiday spent;
Observe now, and see, in what order they went.

First came Captain A, with B C D and E;
F G H I J K, L M N, 0 and P:---
Then queer little Q, and then R, S and T.

Next, U V and W, went on their way;
X Y and Z stopped, with each other to play:
And now, all their names, little friend, can you say ?

S-H-O-U-T with delight gave a Shout,
As brimful of frolic, they scampered about;
And sought for amusement, within doors and out.
















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Doings of the Al/zabet.

A. in the garden, a large Apple found;
Ripe, red, and mellow, it lay on the ground.
He divided it first, and then handed it round.

B, watched the Bees, all the Summer-day long,
Busy, the sweet-scented flowers among;
Filling the air, with their soft, droning song.

C, stroked the Cat, as it slept in the sun;
Good boys never sleep, till their lessons are done;
But Puss, is but Puss, and so tasks she has none.

D, called the Dog; in his kennel he lay,
But readily came, at the summons to play;
Are we always willing, and quick to obey ?



























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Dozings of the Alp/ abet.

E, went for Eggs, and was highly pleased, when,
She spied out the nest of an old speckled Hen;
Who had filled it with Eggs, to the number of ten.

F, fed the Fowls, how delighted they came;
So greedy for food; it would fill me with shame,
If children, forgetting themselves, did the same.

G, heard a Goat bleat, and turning around;
Old Billy the Goat, in the garden he found;
But Billy kicked up, and was off with a bound.

H, saw the Horse, and he asked leave to ride.
Honest Hanks, with good humor, soon set him astride;
And through the green meadows, kept close to his side.





















































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Doihgs of the A4/ibhabct.

I, plucked the Ivy, which round the tree twined.
J with a jump, and a laugh, went to find
A Blue-jay, which sung in the thicket behind.

K, saw the Kine, (which are Cows,) and soon learned,
How curds from the milk, into cheese could be turned;
And cream, into butter, if properly churned.

L, loved the Lambs, soft and harmless were they;
How pretty they looked, at their innocent play!
As nimbly, they capered, through all the long day.

MI found a Mole, who though not very bright,
Worked far underground, where it always is night;
Much better than many, who work in the light.












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Doizgs of ite /Al/habet.

N and (, for dessert, Nuts and Oranges sought;
O, when asked to take more, had enough, as she thought;
And said NO, I thank you," as little folks ought.

P, heard the Parrot say, How do you do ?"
And then said, I'm wiser, Miss Polly than you;
For the words, and their meaning, right well I know, too."

Q looking, round saw some Quince in a jar,
R, prudently said, now, if honest we are,
Let us leave it alone, 'twill be better by far."

S, found the Scriptures, how happy was she,
To read the sweet words, from the book on her knee
"Suffer little children to come unto me."








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Dozugs of the Alpkiabet.

T, asked the Time, for soon home they must go;
Swiftly the pendulum, moves to and fro;
Time waits for no one, as wise people know.

U, who was Useful, to help and to learn,
Ran to the kitchen, and brought in the Urn;
Then served them to tea, and to plum-cake in turn.

V, from the Vine, gathered grapes for a treat;
W, walked on, the large Wagon to meet;---
And soon full of fun, ev'ry one took a seat.

X, Y and Z, were so sorry that they,
Had found little to see, to hear, or to say;
But hoped to do better, the next holiday.











CHILDHOOD'S DELIGHT.







CHILDHOOD'S DELIGHT.



MISTRESS MARY.


MISTRESS MARY, quite contrary,
How does your garden grow?"
With silver-bells, and cockle-shells,
And cowslips in a row."


Then deftly take, your little rake,
Among your roses go;
With pansies fair, and tulips rare,
Your garden-beds shall blow!"


















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LADY QUEEN ANNE.



Oh, Lady Queen Anne! you sit in the sun,

As white as a lily, and fragrant as one;

The breezes sing softly, the flowers are gay,

Come, pretty Queen Anne, let us welcome the May


Oh, Lady Queen Anne! we will frolic and sing,

Down in the green meadow, where violets spring;

Where the daisies are blooming in snowy array.

Come, pretty Queen Anne, let us hasten away!


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POVERTY-TOWN.



HERE is a poor woman from Poverty-town,

With three little children, and scarcely a gown;

They know how to brew, and they know how to bake,

They know how much flour to put in a cake!


They know how to sit in the garden, and spin,

And to make up a feather-bed fit for a King!

Oh, tell us dear Lady, oh, tell us we pray,

Can you give us some work in the kitchen to-day?


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THE MAN IN THE WILDERNESS.



THE Man in the Wilderness, asked of me;

How many Strawberries grew in the Sea?

I answered him, as I thought good---

" As many Red Herrings as grow in the Wood!"


Then I, with a giggle, asked him in my turn:

How many Fat Oysters he found in the Churn?

And the Man from the Wilderness, answered me--

" As many Wild Flowers as grow in the Sea! "



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LITTLE WHITE BABY.



Little white Baby, dancing so high!

Never mind, Baby, Mother is nigh;

Little white Baby, upward you go!

Crowing, and capering, high, and then low.


Up to the ceiling, and down to the ground,

Backward and forward, around and around;

Dance, little Baby, and Mother will sing,

And Baby and Mother will kiss in the ring!



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THE MILK-MAID.



"WHERE are you going, my pretty Maid?"

I'm going a-milking, Sir," she said.

"May I go with you, my pretty Maid?"

"You're kindly welcome, Sir," she said.


" What is your fortune, my pretty Maid ?"

"My face is my fortune, Sir," she said.

"Then I can't marry you, my pretty Maid."

"Nobody asked you, Sir!" she said.


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DAME CRUMP AND HER PIG.






DAME CRUMP AND HER PIG.


DEAR little Dame Crump, was a neat little dame,
With a neat little cottage, and neat little name;
One evening while sweeping, she saw with surprise,
A bright silver shilling, shine under her eyes.









"Oh, my!" said the Dame, with a dimple and smile,
" This is just what I've wanted, this very long while;
I'll hie me to market, as soon as itfs light,
And have a round fat little piggy by night."









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DAME CRUMP AND HER PIG.



She wore her blue bodice, and kirtle so fine;

Her little straw hat, with a riband did shine.

Sweet rosy-cheeked darling, so dainty and gay,

And fresh as the flowers that come with the May!




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Then over the meadows, and over the lea,

She tripped like a fairy, and warbled with glee;

Till she came to the market, when looking around,
A fine little piggy, she very soon found.


















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DAME CRUMP AND HER PIG.



Then pausing a moment, she happened to think,

That piggy was thirsty, and needed a drink;
She gave him some cider, then off and away,
And soon they were out, on the King's highway.











So they trotted along---a good trotter was he,

And the Dame was delighted, such manners to see;
Till they came to a brook, where HE came to a stand,
And the Dame with a stick, had to take him in hand.













































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DAME CRUMP AND HER PIG.



He squalled, and he grunted, he tried to lie down,
And wanted to trot again back to the town;
But pretty Dame Crump, was not anxious to roam,

And kept little piggy's head pointed for home.











Till they came to a hill, with a mill at the top,

And there once again, he decided to stop;
He squealed, and he capered, he laughed at the stick;
He frightened a hen, and ran after her chicks.













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Then rolled on the ground, with his feet in the air,
While the poor little Dame wrung her hands in despair;
For night was approaching, and waning the day,
And the Dame's little cottage, was still far away.











She paused for a moment, then ran up the hill---

Came back with a sack, which she bought at the mill;
Then tumbled in piggy, who thought it no joke,

To be slung in a bag, like a pig in a poke."











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DAME CR UMP AND HER PIG.



She had no more trouble---a little time more,

Brought her safely in sight, of her own cottage door;

And piggy, who seemed to be pale with affright,
Was littered, and fed, and made snug for the night.












Then her table she set, after changing her gown---
With a sigh of contentment, sat cosily down;
And after her tea, softly laughing with glee,
Went smiling to rest, with a kiss, as you see.











HUSH-A-BYE-BABY.








HUSH-A-BYE-BABY.

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HUSH-A-BYE-BABY.



S-IUSH-a-bye-Baby, Mother's a lady,
Father has gone to the mill,

And if you don't cry, he'll be back, by and by;

So, Hush-a-bye-Baby, be still.


Hush-a-bye-Baby, close up your eyes,

Molly is going to bake---

You shall have puddings, and you shall have pies,

With Caraway Cookies, and Cakes.


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LITTLE CHARLEY.



SEE little Charley---only look!

He's studied through his reading book!

And now he has, the live-long day,

With Hoop, and Hobby-horse to play!


Now Horsey gallops off again,

With flashing eyes, and flowing mane;

While Charley shouts, with whip in hand,

The dearest boy in all the land!



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PUSSY AND ME.



COME here, sweet little Pussy,

I'll dress you, I declare;

And you shall have the gold-chain,

While I, the heart will wear.


We'll dance, and play together,

Within the garden fair;

And you shall have a nosegay,

As soon as we get there.



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BLOW,- WIND,-BLOW!



BLOW, wind, blow !---and go, mill, go!

That the Miller may grind the corn;

The Baker shall take it, and into rolls make it,

And send us some, hot, in the morn.


Clutter, churn, clutter! that butter may come!

And cool in the brook until dawn;

Then up with the Sun, and let Baby have some,

To butter his roll in the morn.



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FRANK AND CARLO.



OH! what a lovely, Summer's day!

How soft the breezes blow;

See Frank and Carlo here at play,

Where sweet the Roses grow!


Good Carlo is an honest dog,

And full of fun and glee;

He's speaking now to little Frank,

As plainly you may see!


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THE LITTLE LAMBS.




DEAR little lambs! how innocent,

And pretty you do look!

You shake your pretty woolly heads,

And paddle in the brook!



Good-bye, good-bye, my little lambs,

I wish that I could stay;

But I must hasten home again,

To come another day!



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