• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Chapter I
 Chapter II
 Chapter III
 Chapter IV
 Chapter V
 Chapter VI
 Chapter VII
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Group Title: Sisters, or, 'Tis best to think before we act
Title: The sisters, or, 'Tis best to think before we act
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00048444/00001
 Material Information
Title: The sisters, or, 'Tis best to think before we act a tale of interest
Alternate Title: Tis best to think before we act
Physical Description: 40, 8 p., 1 leaf of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 18 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Sargeant, Anne Maria, 1809 or 1810-1852
Dean & Son ( Publisher )
Publisher: Dean & Son
Place of Publication: London
Publication Date: [1880?]
 Subjects
Subject: Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Stepmothers -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Nannies -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children and death -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Selfishness -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Pride and vanity -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Youth -- Death -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Runaway children -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1880   ( rbgenr )
Family stories -- 1880   ( local )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre: Publishers' catalogues   ( rbgenr )
Family stories.   ( local )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by Anna Maria Sargeant.
General Note: Publisher's catalogue follows text and on endpapers.
General Note: Frontispiece printed in colors and text is in a single ruled border.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00048444
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002237066
notis - ALH7547
oclc - 61852286

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Chapter I
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Chapter II
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Chapter III
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Chapter IV
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Chapter V
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
    Chapter VI
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Chapter VII
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Advertising
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Back Cover
        Cover 3
        Cover 4
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OR,


'TIS BEST TO THINK BEFORE WE ACT.








Tale of Interest,

BY ANNA MARIA SERGEANT.





FRONTISPIECE IN CHROMO LITHOGRAPHY.





LONDON; DEAN & SON, 160A. FLEET STREET. E.C.
PUBLISHERS AND WHOLESALE STATIONERS,
CnRISTMAS CARD AND FANCY STATIONERY MANUFACTURERS.
^J~---- ---------.-__-.____---------------.--------^~





















TIE8 SISTER= S.

CHAPTER I.


ANNETTE and JULIA BERESFORD lived in a pretty,
cottage-like house, in the reighbourhood of London.
It had a tasteful verandan before it, covered with
jessamine, and a green-house at the back, and it
was hid from the high road by tall trees and bushy
shrubs.
But the outside of Jessamine Cottage-for that
was the name the house was called by-was the
least attractive part of it. It was the inmates which
made it a pleasant and happy home.
These two little girls had a dear, good, kind
mamma, who made every one about her happy,-
at least if they were not happy, it was not her fault.
They had a dear papa, too, but he was not so much
at home; he had business to attend to, which took
him from home in the day time. Then, when
Annette was about six years old, and Julie-as she
was usually called-nearly four, there was an addition
to the family by the birth of a little brother. Oh,
what rejoicing there was on the occasion! The
girls thought it the most delightful thing that could



3










THE BERESFORD FAMILY.

have happened, and they were so fond of the sweet
pet," as his nurse called him. There was a grand
consultation-and Annette and Julie were at the
head of it-to decide what the little fellow should
be called. One said one name, and one said another;
but, after a great many had been thought of,
mamma's choice was fixed on at last; and what
do you think chat was? Why, it was the name of
heir dear papa, Charles.
Well, Master Charles-or Charlie-was, I assure
you, an important person. He is mentioned last,
because he came last, not because he was thought
least of. Now, we will describe the young folks.
Annette was a tall, pale, delicate-looking girl.
Most persons thought her plain, but she was so
sweet-tempered and affectionate that they cared
very little about whether she was plain or pretty.
Her health was not good; and as she was thought-
ful for her age, you would have guessed her to be
two or three years older than she really was.
Julie, on the contrary, was a very pretty child,
and some people had been foolish enough to tell her
so, and she was proud of her beauty. But she was
not admired like her sister, for she had a haughty
spirit, and did not like to be controlled. She thought
every one ought to consult her pleasure, and study
her comfort above other people's; that not only the
servants, and her sister, but even her papa and
mamma, ought to do just what she wished. Now
this was not only very foolish, but very wrong. It
is right that young people should be under the




4











THE BERESFORD FAMILY.

direction of their elders, and they are happier when
they are, than when they are suffered to have their
own way; but Julia was not wise enough to know
this.
I am sorry to say that Master Charlie was more
like his sister Julie than he was like Annette.
Though such a little fellow, he liked to have his
own way too. His good mamma tried to teach him
better; but when he was little more than two years
old, she was taken very ill, and after lying ill for a
long while, she died.
Oh, what a sad loss that was to the poor children!
Annette and Julie cried a great deal, and thought
they should never be happy any more, for Julie
loved her mamma very much, though she often did
things to grieve her. Now she thought of some of
the naughty things she had said and done, and she
would have given anything not to have done them,
but it was too late to tell her so, and ask her for-
giveness.
Mrs. Beresford knew she was going to die a good
while before, for the doctor told her she could never
get well again; but she was not afraid. When she
was strong enough to speak she often called her
little girls to her bed-side, and gave them good
advice, and begged them to remember all she had
said to them when she was well. She talked to
them mostly about religion, and she told them that
it was religion that made her not afraid to die. She
even talked to little Charlie, and she told him that
he must he a good boy, and then when he died he




5











THE BERESFORD FAMILY.

would go to heaven, where she was going. Annette
thought a good deal about what her dear mamma
said; and she thought the best way she could shew
how much she loved her, was by doing what she
had told her to do. So she tried to be very obedient
to her papa, and kinder than ever to her sister and
brother, and to do everything else that she thought
was right.
An elderly woman, who had lived in the family
a great many years, now had the management of
the house and the care of the children. Nurse
Benson was a trustworthy servant, and, on the
whole, a kind-hearted woman, but she was not a
proper person to take such a charge. She wasl
often heard to say that she loved the little darlings
too well to put any restraint upon them; and now
that they had lost their dear mamma it would be
cruel to give them any more pain. This was just
the sort of treatment that Julie and Charles liked,
though it was a very bad thing for them, for the
more self-willed children are suffered to have their
own way, the more they will want to have it.














6












THE BERESFORD FAMILY.






CHAPTER II.



ABoUT two years passed away, when one morning
whilst the children were together in the nursery,
Nurse Benson came into the room in a great bustle,
and looking very angry. "So your papa is going to
bring you a new mamma," she said, in a voice so
loud that it might have been heard all over the
house.
A new mamma !" cried Annette, looking up from
her needle-work.
A new mamma !" almost screamed Julie.
"A new mamma !" echoed little Charles, clapping
his hands with delight.
Yes, my sweet pet. But you would not be glad
if you knew what a sad thing it will be for you,"
she said. Oh, my poor dear children and then
she burst into a flood of tears.
We won't have her-she shan't come !" cried
Julia, throwing her beautiful wax doll, which she
had just dressed, upon the floor.
"No, that we won't, Julie, if nurse don't like
her," chimed in little Charlie.
It is no use talking so, my dears !" cried Mrs.
Benson, still sobbing, as she took the child up in



7











THE BERESFORD FAMILY.

her arms. It is no use talking so, your papa will
bring her here very soon, and then we shall all be
under her."
I'll never call her my mamma, that I never will!"
cried Julia, stamping her little foot on the ground.
I'll shut the door in her face," added Charles,
and suiting the action to the words, he ran to the
door which his nurse had left open, and slammed it
with violence.
Annette now rose from her seat: "Dear nurse,"
she gently said, it may not be so bad as you think.
Surely papa would not bring us a mamma who
would not be kind to us."
Oh, you don't know people so well as I do, my
poor child," she answered.
Now Annette was, as I have told you, a thought-
ful girl, for her age, and she had the good sense to
see that her nurse was doing very foolishly, as well
as very wrong, by trying to set them against the lady
their father thought proper to make his second wife.
She could not herself help feeling a little unwilling to
call any one mamma" but the dear one they had
lost, but she resolved to try to overcome this feeling.
I would leave the house the very day she comes
into it if it were not for your sakes, my poor children,"
Mrs. Benson said. I, who nursed your precious
mother, would never stay here to see another person
take her place; no, that I would not."
Oh, you won't leave us to that cruel woman, will
you. nurse ? cried Charlie.
"No, my sweet pet; nurse won't leave you to be




8











THE BERESFORD FAMILY.

ill-used, she will stay and take care of you," she
answered.
If she ill-treat me, I'll run away," cried Julie.
The next morning, Mr. Beresford called the little
girls into the library, where he generally breakfasted
alone; taking each by the hand, he said he had some-
thing pleasant to tell them.
Julie's face brightened, for she could not think it
possible that her father could call their having a step-
mother something pleasant; but when he smiled, and
added, I am going to bring you a sweet lady, who
will be a mamma to you, in the place of the dear
mother you have lost," she burst into tears, and poor
Annette wept too.
Why do you cry, my dear children ?" Mr. Beres-
ford asked, tenderly throwing his arms round them.
" I have thought of your happiness as well as my
own, in this matter, and 1 am sure you will love her
-almost as wellas you loved your own sweetmother."
"That I never shall," cried Julie.
"Oh, yes, we will try to do it, dear papa," said
Annette.
That is like my own Annette," said Mr. Beres-
ford, kissing her cheek. "That isjust what I expected
from you."
Oh, and Julie will try to love her, too; I am sure
she will, when she sees it will make you happy, dear,
dear papa."
"No. I can't love a step-mother-a cruel step-
mother," cried Julia, sobbing.
Julie, this is very naughty," said her father, and




9











THE BERESFORD FAMILY.

if you act in this manner I must punish you, by
sending you away from home."
"Ah, nurse Benson said you would not love us
now," Julia sobbed out.
"Nurse Benson! did she say so?" and Mr.
Beresford looked at Annette for an answer.
Annette was sorry to bring her nurse into disgrace,
but she thought it but justice to her sister to tell her
papa what she had said.
"I respect Benson for her long and faithful services,"
said Mr. Beresford, and I love her for her affection
for your dear mamma, and for you, but I feel very
much displeased with her about this matter. I must
talk to her about it myself. But I hope, Julia, that
I shall never hear any more such naughty speeches
from you," he added, as he rose to leave the room.
"When Annette and Julie were alone, Annette said
all she could to persuade her sister to do as their papa
wished. Why should you think this lady will not
be kind to us ?" she asked; I am sure dear papa
would not put us under the care of any one that he
did not think would be. Come, Julie, let us try to
love her."
But Julie would scarcely hear her, and she pouted,
and frowned, and stamped on the floor, and said a
great many naughty things which perhaps it would
be better not to repeat.









10











THE BERESFORD FAMILY.





CHAPTER III.


THE next day, Mr. Beresford told the little girls
that he was going to leave home for a week, and
that when he came back he should bring the lady
with him, who was to be their mamma.
I am sure you will love her when you know
her," he said, looking at Annette.
Oh, yes, papa, I think we shall," she replied,
smiling, and throwing her arms round his neck.
Julie did not speak, but when her father bade
her "good bye," he whispered, "I forgive you what
has passed, my dear, but never let me hear anything
of the sort again."
Annette thought the time seemed very long that
her dear papa was away, but he was as good as his
word, for on the morning of that very day week he
came back.
The children were looking out at the nursery
window at the time, and when they saw a carriage
stop at the garden gate, they guessed who was in
it, and they guessed quite right. Mr. Beresford
leaped out, and then he helped a lady out, and led
her down the garden walk. She looked up at the
window, and when she saw the children she smiled.
Their father looked up too, and nodded to them.




11











THE BERESFORD FAMILY.

In a few minutes Nurse Benson came in, not
looking very well pleased, and she told them that
their papa wished them to go down directly into the
dining-room to be introduced to Mrs. Beresford.
"I won't go," said Charles, catching hold of a
chair, as much as to say, and nobody shall make
me."
"Oh, yes, you will, dear!" cried Annette, coax-
ingly. You will go with me, won't you? Don't
you want to see papa again ?"
"No, I don't; and I don't want to have a new
mamma," was his answer.
You must coax him to come, nurse," she said,
turning to Mrs. Benson; then giving her hand to
Julie they tripped together down the stairs.
"I thought she looked very sweet and pretty
when she smiled at us," said Annette. "Almost
as pretty as our own dear mamma, but not quite.
Did not you ?"
No, I did not," Julie answered, sulkily.
The dining-room door was open, and the little
girls went in together.
So this is my gentle Annette ?" said the lady,
holding out a hand to her. Then pressing her to
her bosom with a long warm embrace, she added
with deep feeling, God bless you, my child."
Annette returned her embrace, and then ran into
the open arms of her father.
Mrs. Beresford next turned to Julie. And this
is the lively Julie," she said, attempting to draw her
to her side. But Julie held back. "You see I




12











THE BERESFORD FAMILY.

know your names, and something of your characters,"
she gaily said, without seeming to notice the little
girl's rudeness.
Julie now ran to embrace her father, but he did
not smile on her as he did on Annette, for he began
to feel angry with her.
"You will love me, my dear children, will you
not?" the lady asked once more, taking each of
them by the hand.
I don't know," Julie answered.
"You don't know? Well, perhaps you don't
know, my dear, till you have seen a little more of
me. But I hope you will. I very much wish that
you should love me, for I love you dearly."
They were here interrupted by the entrance of
Master Charles, whom Nurse Benson was by turns
trying to coax and drag into the room. "I don't
want a new mamma! I won't have a new mamma!"
he called out over and over again.
Oh, this is Nurse Benson's sweet pet," said
Mrs. Beresford; and he shall be my sweet pet,
too, if he will come and kiss me," she added, look-
ing up at the unruly boy.
"I won't kiss you," was his answer.
Oh, you don't mean what you say, I am sure.
You will kiss me, and love me too."
"I won't love you !" he cried.
The lady looked greatly distressed. "Dear
4nnette, coax him to come to me," she said.
But Master Charles was not disposed to be coaxed;
he would not let his eldest sister come near him,




13








I---


THE BERESFORD FAMILY.

but throwing his arms around Julie, he sobbed out,
"We won't have her for a mamma, will we, Julie ?"
"Take him away, he is a naughty boy, and he
shall not have the pretty things we have brought
for him," said his father.
I don't want pretty things-I won't have them,"
Charlie bawled out; and the sweet pet was now led
from the room.
"Oh, we shall be good friends when we meet
next time, I hope," said Mrs. Beresford.
I have a box full of books and toys for you, my
dear children," she added. We will open it in
the afternoon. But now you must tell me all about
what you do and what you learn, and shew me the
garden and the green-house. I love flowers, and
will help you to take care of them."
You are very kind, ma'am," said Annette,
timidly, but Julie stood by in sullen silence.
"You will call me mamma-your dear mamma,
will you not, my sweet children?"
Oh, yes, yes," replied Annette.
Don't you say yes, too, my pretty Julie," the
lady asked, with one hand patting Julie on the
cheek, and with the other parting the clustering
curls from off her frowning brow.
"No."
"No?"
"No. I can't call you mamma," she answered,
bursting into tears.
"Well, well, my love, don't cry; perhaps it is
hard to call a stranger by that dear, dear word. I'll




14











THE BERESFORD FAMILY.

not be angry with you, but you will love me soon,
and then you will like to call me your dear mamma."
No, that I never shall," Julie thought, but she
was afraid of her father's anger, and she did not
say it.
Will you shew me the green-house, my dears ?"
Mrs. Beresford asked, rising as she spoke, and
offering a hand to each of the little girls.
Annette tripped lightly towards the glass door,
which opened upon a lawn.
"You have a very pretty house here," she added,
looking round. "I hope we shall all be very happy
together."
"I hope so," Annette responded; then turning
to some moss-roses which were growing near, she
said, Shall I pick you one of these beautiful buds,
ma'am, mamma ?"
"Do, my love," Mrs. Beresford answered; and
as Annette raised her head to offer her the flower,
she saw that her eyes were full of tears. What
makes you cry, my dear child," she tenderly asked.
Annette blushed and hesitated.
These were dear mamma's flowers," she replied.
"She put the slips in herself, the summer before
she died."
And you love them for her sake ?"
"Indeed I do."
"And I will love them for her sake, too. Don't
be afraid to speak of her to me, my dear children.
I shall always listen with pleasure, and I shall not love
you the less because you speak of her very often."




15











THE BERESFORD FAMILY.

Here Mrs. Beresford took the bud Annette had
gathered, and placed it in her bosom.
"You have some very nice flowers here," she
said, as she entered the green-house. "Your dear
mamma was fond of flowers, I think ?"
Oh, yes, she was very fond of them; and she
was just going to give us lessons in Botany when
she was taken ill."
"Botany is a beautiful study. Should you like
to have some lessons in it?"
Yes, very much, indeed."
Then we will study it together."
"Together ? Oh, I think that you know a great
deal about it already," returned Annette, smiling.
I know something of it, my dear, but I consider
myself a learner yet. Will you join us ?" she asked,
turning to Julie.
Oh, I don't like the hard words. I should never
remember them."
"Nay, my love, don't say so. I think you could
remember them if you would try. We must meet
with something hard in everything. Well, tell me
what you like to do best. I should be pleased to
find something that we can like together."
"Julie is very fond of music," Annette said, as
her sister did not reply.
"Is she? Then we will study music together.
I am very fond of music too. We will play together
to amuse dear papa, after dinner. Shall we ?"
Julie murmured out something like Yes, ma'am."
"If you and your papa like, I will teach you my-




16










THE BERESFORD FAMILY.

self," the lady added. "Your own dear mamma
used to teach you, I think."
"Yes," answered Annette, "and I am afraid that
we have not learned much of late."
"I think my plan of teaching will make study
pleasant," Mrs. Beresford added. You shall have
no long, dry tasks. I will teach you as we ramble
about in search of objects, and as we sit by our
parlour fireside. I have taught four little nieces in
that manner. They will come to see us some day,
and then they will tell you how pleasant it is to
learn in that way."
It is very good of you," said Annette.
I am only doing as I would wish to be done by.
Now if I were a little girl like you or Julie, and you
were a tall woman like me-If I were the daughter
and you the mamma, how would you act towards
me, and how would you like me to act towards you?
"Would you not be very kind to me, and try to please
me? And would you not like me to love you in
return ?"
Oh, yes, that we should."
"Well, we must all try to make our Saviour's
golden rule the rule of our actions; and then we
shall not only be happy ourselves, but make every-
body about us so."
The ringing of the first dinner-bell here put a
stop to the conversation. The little girls ran up to
the nursery-not to change their dress, for that was
not necessary-but to put on their pinafores. And
Mrs. Beresford joined their papa in the parlour.




17










THE BERESFORD FAMILY.

After dinner the box of presents was produced,
and Charlie was at length coaxed into making his
appearance; though not without some difficulty.
Perhaps it was being told that there was a wooden
horse, large enough for him to mount, which settled
the matter. It is certain that the sight of the toy
made him look a little more pleasantly on the ugly
step-mother, as he had been suffered by Nurse
Benson to call Mrs. Beresford.
How far has Master Charles proceeded on the
road to learning?" the lady asked, as she at last drew
the little boy to her side.
Charles looked up, at a loss to understand her.
"Oh, he has not made much progress," replied
Annette, but then he is not five years old yet."
Don't you like learning, my little fellow ?"
"No, I don't. I like play better."
"Well, that is candid, and perhaps it is natural;
but when I teach you, I think I shall make it so
pleasant to you to learn, that you.will like learning
as well or better than playing."
"I won't learn if I don't like it," he answered.
"But you would not like to be a dunce, would
you ?"
Oh, I'll learn when I'm a man."
"But you can't learn so well when you are a
man, you must begin whilst you are a little boy;
however, I won't frighten you, by shewing you the
top of the hill we have to go up, for we shall find
it easy when we take a step at a time, and we shall
get up at last without knowing it."




18











THE DERESFORD FAMILY.

"Now, let me help you to mount on your horse,
and then Julia and I will sit down to the piano
together, and play a tune to amuse papa-shall we?"
Mr. Beresford smiled his consent. Julie really
had a tste for music, but her wish to)excel did not
arise from a right motive. She was fond of being
admired; and when she had been out on a visit,
she came home disappointed and out of temper, if
she had not been asked to play, or if her performance
had not been praised. Mrs. Beresford knew nothing
of this vanity, and she commended her diligence-
saying, however, at the same time, that though
music was a very pretty accomplishment, it was not
so useful as many other things, and ought not there-
fore to take up too much of our time.
This amiable lady soon contrived to bring smiles
to the faces of both Julie and her little brother,
though they had before determined not to be pleased
with anything she did or said; and Mr. Beresford
sat a delighted and attentive, though almost silent
spectator of what passed.















19











THE BERESFORD FAMILY.






CHAPTER IV.


A FEW weeks after Mrs. Beresford came to
Jessamine Cottage, Julie's ninth birth-day came
round. The children had always been allowed to
keep their birth-days, and their kind step-mother,
willing to afford them every pleasure in her power,
cheerfully consented to the practice being continued.
Grand preparations were accordingly made for the
occasion. The drawing-room was decked with
flowers-the pastry-cook was ordered to send a
plentiful supply of tarts and sweetmeats; and cards
of invitation were sent to as many young folks as
Miss Julie Beresford thought proper to receive.
It may be supposed that the young lady herself was
very happy. Most little girls would have been, but
poor Julie spoiled her own pleasure, and made every
body else uncomfortable, because she was put out of
temper.
Though it was early in the autumn, the weather
had for some days been very wet and cold; so, as
Julie was not quite well just then, and Annette was
always ailing, Mrs. Beresford went up into the little
girls' bed-room, whilst they were dressing, to see
what they were going to wear. On entering the




20











THE BERESFORD FAMILY.

room, she found Nurse Benson just putting a thin
white muslin frock over Julie's shoulders.
Oh, that will never do, my dear," said the lady.
"That is not a proper dress for this weather; and
you have had a bad cold for the last week."
But I should like this dress better than any
other," the little girl answered, adding,"Papa always
lets me wear just what I like."
Your papa thought that your nurse would use
her judgment in such matters, and he would not, of
course, interfere ; but now h1e expects that I shall
take care of his little girls."
The muslin dresses had been worn once before, and
were much admired.-Annette had got out hers also,
but when she found that her mamma did not approve
of her wearing it, she folded it up carefully, and put it
into the drawer again.
It would have been well had Julie done the same.
Little folks cannot know what is best for them; so
they ought to take the advice of their elders, and
those who have the care of them. Miss Julie Beres-
ford thought, however, that she was old enough to
take care of herself, and she was determined to have
her own way. So she put the dress on.
"You mean to wear it, then ?" said Mrs. Beresford.
It is my birthday, and it is hard if I cannot wear
what I like on my birthday," she replied, and she
pouted, and tossed her head with anything but a
becoming air.
Well, Julie, I will only advise-I will not com-
mand you," Mrs. Beresford said, as she quietly walked
out of the room.



21











THE BERESFORD FAMILY.

Pray don't persist in wearing the dress, my dear
sister," pleaded Annette, as soon as she was gone.
Indeed I shall wear what I like," she answered.
Annette looked at Mrs. Benson. A word from
her would have done good; but Nurse Benson was
not likely to further Mrs. Beresford's wishes. She
thought, too-foolish woman that she was-that a
little girl ought to do just as she liked on her birth-
day-that it was cruel to put any restraint upon a
child on that day, above all days in the year. We
shall shortly see who was in the right.
Julie was dressed in the muslin frock, and to match
it she wore thin silk stockings and satin shoes. When
her toilet was finished, she went into the drawing-
room to be admired-she thought everybody must
admire her-but she was mistaken; for there was
such a frown upon her brow, that instead of thinking,
" How nicely Miss Julia is dressed, and how very
pretty she looks," -they only said to themselves,
" How cross she is on her birthnight-I wonder what
has put her so out of temper !"
"How pale you look, my dear," Mrs. Beresford
said, as Julie sat down at the breakfast-table, the
next morning. "Are you ill?" she kindly added,
taking her affectionately by the hand.
Julie had been really very ill all the night; she
had not been able to sleep, between feverish heats and
shivering fits ; but having a notion that she had taken
a violent cold, and some pricks of conscience, because
she had despised her mamma's advice, she did not
like to own it.
She tried to laugh it off but before the morning



22











THE BERESFORD FAMILY.

was over, she was so much worse that she could now
hold up herhead. She was therefore carried byNurse
Benson up to her bed, and the family physician was
immediately sent for.
At night the little girl was in a high fever. She
had a violent cough, too; which caused her much
pain, and she was obliged to take a great many disa-
greeable draughts.
Now, nobody said to her this is the effect of your
own folly and self will-This is a just punishment for
your disobedience; but a little voice whispered it
in her ear, though she would gladly have been deaf,
rather than have heard it.
Conscience will accuse us and make us miserable
when we do wrong.
She was now fretful and peevish-people who are
ill-tempered when they are well, are more so than
ever when ill-and it was no pleasant task to wait
on her.
Even Nurse Benson was angry with her, and An
nette could not always bear her pettishness; but Mrs,
Beresford never gave her an unkind word, though
she tried her patience very much.
It was many weeks before Julie was able to leave
her bed, and when she did, she was so weak that she
could not go out, and run about in the garden, as she
used to do. She had still a bad cough, and the doctor
advised that she should be kept in doors all the winter.
This was a sad trial to her; she had heard of the
merry Christmas parties, and could not join them;
and when the snow was on the ground, she saw




23











THE BERESFORD FAMILY.

pharles throwing snow-balls with his young com-
panions, and she longed to be with them, and she
thought that she was paying very dear for the plea-
sure of having her own way on her birth-day.
This was not all. When the spring came Julie
grew worse again ; and it was thought that she would
go into a decline. Her graceful form lost its round-
ness, and she became even paler than her sister An-
nette. Change of air was ordered for her, and when
the summer commenced, Mrs. Beresford took her and
Annette to a watering place.
If Julia had been well, she would have enjoyed
running about on the sandy beach, seeking shells
and sea-weed; and then making all sorts of pretty
things as presents for her friends, from what she
had herself collected. This she was not, however,
able to do. She was so weak and languid, that she
was obliged to lean on her mamma and her sister as
she walked, and even then, to stop every now and
then to take rest.
Mrs. Beresford was as kind to her, and attentive to
all her wants, as if she had been her own mother;
but Julie shewed no affection in return. Annette
sometimes reasoned with her on the subject, which,
however, only made her angry. She could not, she
said, love any one who had taken the place of her
dear mamma, and she attempted to justify her con-
duct, saying it was not likely she could do so.
This visit to the sea side happily restored Julie to
health, and she came home again quite well.





24











THE BEzESFORD FAMILY






CHAPTER V.


IN the opening of the year, a fresh event happened
in the family at the cottage. This was nothing less
than the arrival of a little stranger. Annette was
quite delighted, and she thought it a great pleasure
to be allowed to nurse him sometimes. But Julie
and Charles were jealous and angry, and they called
him an interloper, and a cross pet, and many other
such names. As he grew older he would have been
quite a plaything for his brother and sisters, but
Charles would not play with him, and Julie used to
put a stop to his childish caresses by saying, Oh,
you are not our own brother: you have no business
here, you are a spoiled boy:" and so on.
This sort of treatment made the little fellow cross
sometimes, though he was, on the whole, a good-
tempered child, and very gentle and affectionate.
Being the youngest he was, of course, indulged
rather more than the others, and Charles was jealous
of that, and he was constantly saying that he had
taken all his papa's love from him.
Charles was one day playing in the front garden
with his bat and ball, when Mrs. Beresford called
to him from one of the parlour windows, and very




25











TIHE BERESFORD FAMILY.

gently bade him go to the back of the house in case
he should do any mischief. He did not choose,
however, to obey her, for he thought she had no
right to dictate to him, and he was determined to
do as he pleased; so he went on playing as before.
Little Henry was present, and without having any
idea of making his brother angry, but only from a
childish frolic, he watched for an opportunity when
Charles's head was turned another way, and snatched
up his ball and hid it. The arch smile on his rosy
face told what he had done, upon which Charles,
in a very angry tone, ordered him to tell him where
he had put it. The little boy, however, only laughed,
being amused at the joke.
Charles ought to have remembered that when he
was Henry's age he used to play off such tricks on
his companions. But instead of that, he fell into a
violent passion, and threatened to strike Henry if he
did not tell him instantly where he had hid his ball.
If you beat me I'll tell my mamma, and she will
make papa beat you again!" cried the child; and he
could not have made a more unlucky speech, or one
so likely to make his brother more angry still.
"Yes, your mamma makes papa hate me," he
answered, in a very fierce voice; and as he spoke
he raised the bat he held in his hand and struck the
child on the head.
Henry gave a loud cry and fell upon the ground;
and Mrs. Beresford, who being still at the window,
saw what passed, now ran terrified to the spot. The
olood gushed out of the wound, and she carried him




26












THE BERESFORD FAMILY.

shrieking into the house. Charles was really very
much frightened, and very sorry, but he was too
proud and too obstinate to go in after her and say so;
so he went on playing as if nothing had happened.
The wound was found to be very serious, and
Mrs. Beresford sent instantly for a surgeon. She
also sent into town for Mr. Beresford, for she was
very much alarmed.
Annette came with tears in her eyes to tell her
brother the state in which poor little Henry lay.
She begged of him to come and ask pardon, but he
refused, and tried to justify himself by saying Henry
had provoked him to strike him.
Mr. Beresford came home in great haste, and
after running up into the room where his poor little
boy was, he came into the garden to search for
Charles. Had he found him in trouble about the
mischief he had done, and willing to own himself in
the wrong, he would have forgiven him, but, as this
was not the case, he was very angry, and ordered
him to go up into his bed-room, where he told him
he should be kept on bread and water for a week.
The whole family were now in the deepest distress,
for Henry's wound brought on a fever, which affected
his brain. He did not know any one, but lay in
bed moaning with pain, with his cheeks burning
with the fever, and his beautiful auburn curls dyed
in blood. Even Julie sat by his side and cried
bitterly, and she began to think what a dreadful
thing passion must be, to lead people to do such
wicked acts.




27











THE BERESFORD FAMILY.

You may be sure Annette was as much grieved
as any to see little Henry's sufferings; but she was
even more distressed to think of rharles's sin; so
she begged her father to give her leave to go to him
in his room, to see if he were yet penitent. On
opening the door, she started back with surprise
and concern at the scene of confusion before her;
for, enraged at being made a prisoner, Charles had
vented his passion upon everything he could put
his hands upon, and books, papers, combs, brushes,
and the dressing-glass shattered in pieces, lay scat-
tered on the floor. He was walking up and down
the room, and he would not listen to a word his
sister had to say, though she did not reproach him,
but spoke to him in the most gentle and affectionate
manner.
Finding all to no purpose, she went back, with a
very sorrowful heart, to little Henry's sick chamber.
The next morning, when a servant was sent up
with Charles's breakfast of bread and water-for
Annette could not bear to take such a breakfast to
him-she came back saying, that Master Charles
was not in his room.
"Not there!" exclaimed Mr. Beresford, rising, in
surprise; why, what can have become of him ?"
The young woman then said that she thought he
must have got out at the window, and let himself
down by the verandah, for the window was left open.
Annette and Julie ran terrified up stairs, followed
by their father. Mrs. Beresford being in little
Henry's chamber, as yet knew nothing of the matter.




28
A'-











THE BERESPORD FAMILY.

It was evident, from the appearance of Charles's
bed, that he had only thrown himself upon it in his
clothes for a few hours. They guessed, therefore,
that he had made his escape out at the window at
the dawn of day, before any one was about.
Mrs. Beresford had sat up all night with her poor
little boy; and when told of what had occurred, she
said she had heard a slight noise very early in the
morning, but that she had not thought anything
of it.
The family were now in deeper distress than ever.
They sent people all round the neighbourhood to
inquire after the runaway, but to no purpose. Still
they hoped that he would return home when night
came on; but, to their great grief, he-did not.
Oh, what dreadful trouble that one fit of anger
has brought us all into !" thought Julie, as she
went to her own bed-chamber. "Perhaps it will
cause poor little Henry's death: and my poor
brother Charles-oh where are you ? You have
perhaps no bed to lie on. You have perhaps nothing
to eat."-She sobbed bitterly as she thought of all
this, and she could not sleep.
Annette begged leave to sit up with a servant to
help nurse the sick child, that Mrs. Beresford might
take a little rest. Her thoughts were also on her
unhappy brother, and she could not help weeping
for both, as she sat by the bedside of the little
sufferer.
We have not spoken of Nurse Benson lately; but
she still remained in the house, for Mr. Beresford




29












THE EnRESFORD FAMILY.

was too kind to send her away, when she was getting
old, after she had spent her best days in the service
of his family. She was as sorry as any one about
Charles, and she could not help feeling that she had
encouraged his bad passions, and helped to bring
on this trouble, by setting him against his step-
mother. Indeed, she took it so to heart, that she
did not live long after.
































10
L .











THE BERESFORD FAMILY.






CHAPTER VJ.


ONE gloomy evening in autumn, a little more than
three years after the events related in the last chap-
ter took place, a dirty, sickly-looking youth, between
fourteen and fifteen years of age, in the dress of a
common sailor, was seen lingering about Jessamine
Cottage. No one knew who he was, and he was
looked at rather suspiciously. More than once he
was told by the police to go about his business ; still
he loitered near the house, and seemed as if he
wished, but had not the courage, to ring the gate
bell.
Perhaps the young reader will guess it was Charles
Beresford. It was so.
Poor fellow he had gone through a great many
hardships in those three years, and most heartily
had he repented ever having run away from home.
Gladly would he have come back again long before,
but he had been to sea, and the captain he had
engaged himself to had taken care that he should not
leave the ship, and thus have an opportunity of
getting off. At last, however, he was attacked with
a serious illness, which left him so weak that hli
was unfit for doing hard work, and then he let him




31











THE LERESFORD FAMILY.

go. And now he had begged his way from one of
the seaport towns. Yes, his proud spirit which
would not at one time humble to acknowledge himself
in fault, and could not bear the mild control of his
affectionate father and kind step-mother-that proud
spirit had been obliged to submit to all sorts of hum-
bling things, and he was now without a penny to buy
a bit of bread or to find a lodging with.
"You had better take yourself off, young fellow, I
can tell you that ; or I'll take you off to the station-
house!" cried one of the policemen who had before
spoken to him. Just at this moment a servant came
to the cottage gate to answer another person's ring,
and Charles made up to it as fast as he could, and
asked if Mr. Beresford lived there still.
"Mr. Beresford!" repeated the young woman.
"No, there is no Mr. Beresford. Mrs. Beresford
lives here."
What, is my father dead ?"
"Your father I don't know who you mean, my
boy."
Mr. Beresford is my father," Charles gasped out
in great agitation.
Surely !" cried the young woman, looking very
earnestly in his face,-" Surely you are not the boy
that I've heard ran away three or four years ago."
"Yes, I am; I am Charles Beresford. Oh, do
tell me if my father is alive."
The woman did not answer, but looked very much
distressed.
"Don't keep me in this dreadful suspense !" he




32











THE BERESFORD FAMILY.

cried, and he caught hold of the gate-post for sup-
port.
Well, my poor boy, Mr. Beresford is dead; he
died more than two years ago," was her answer.
Charles burst into tears. This was a blow he had
not expected. He had thought a great deal about his
little brother Henry, and was afraid he might find
that he had died of the blow he had in his passion
given him, but he never once thought of not finding
his dear papa alive. He had made up his mind to
beg his forgiveness on his knees-he had determined
to ask Mrs. Beresford's pardon too, and to tell them
that he was very sorry for all his past misconduct, and
that he was resolved on behaving better for the future,
if they would but receive him once more. Think then,
dear young reader, what a dreadful shock it must
have been to him to hear that it was too late-that
he could never see his ill-treated parent any more.
Charles did not often shed tears ; he used to think it
shewed a want of spirit to shed a tear, but now he
cried like a little child.
What shall I do, my poor boy ?" asked the kind-
hearted woman. Shall I go and tell Mrs. Beres-
ford, or Miss Annette, that you are here ?"
Oh, let me see my sister Annette," he answered.
" But stop," he added, catching her by the arm, do
tell me before you go, if-if-if---" he could not get
out the words he wanted to say.
If what? Miss Annette, and Miss Julia, and
Master Henry, are all alive and well; if that is what
you want to know."




33











THE BERESFORD FAMILY.

Oh, then he is alive, I have not killed him ?" he
gasped out.
"Suppose she added, you come round into the
kitchen, and then I'll tell Miss Annette. It would
frighten her so to see you, if she did not know before-
hand of your being here."
Charles thankfully accepted her offer, and went
with her round to the side door, into the kitchen.
Here he sank wearied and faint into a chair, and hid
his face with his hands.
In a few minutes, a light step was heard in the
passage, the door was thrown open, and the brother
and sister were once again clasped in each other's
arms.
"Dear Annette," "Dear Charlie," was all that
they could say to each other for some time : at length
Annette said: You are greatly altered, my dear
brother. I should scarcely have known you, you are
grown so tall; but you look very pale and ill."
"And you are altered, too, my dear sister," he
added. "You are grown quite a woman. Oh, what
changes have taken place since we last saw each other.
But if dear papa were but alive"-Here Charles burst
into a fresh flood of tears.
Great changes had indeed taken place since the
'anderer had left his home, besides the death of Mr.
Beresford. That gentleman had been a partner in a
large banking house in the city, and he was generally
thought to be a rich man. However, when he died
(and his death took place very suddenly), it was found
that he had nothing to leave his widow and children,




34











THE BERESFORD FAMILY.

for the bank was not in that flourishing state which
he had even himself supposed it to be in. Mrs. Be-
resford had enough property of her own for herself
and Henry to live upon comfortably; but she did not
think of herself only, her principal care was for the
two poor girls, who had been brought up with the
expectation of having fortunes. As soon as Annette
heard of the btate of affairs, she proposed taking a
situation as governess in a family-she had had an
education which would fit her for it, but Mrs. Beres-
ford could not bear the thought of parting with her,
for she loved her as if she were her own child.
So she proposed that they opened a school for young
ladies. Julia was now old enough to assist with the
younger pupils, and then she said they could all re-
main together. This proposal quite met with Julia's
approval; for among the changes which had taken
place, there was a very happy change in her temper
and general conduct. Her brother Charles's flight,
poor little Henry's long illness, and her father's death,
had led her to think very seriously of her own faults :
and she had tried very hard, and prayed very earnestly
to God, for strength to get the better of them.
Annette told her brother all this in a few words,
and then she begged he would let her go and tell Mrs.
Beresford and Julia that he was there, for they did
not yet know it, the servant having called Annette
out to tell her first.
Charles did not much like to see Mrs. Beresford.
He looked down at his dirty, shabby clothes, and
then said, Oh, what a disgrace I am to you all!"



35











THE BERESFORD FAMILY.

but his sister assured him that he would be made as
welcome by her as by any, and that she had grieved
as much as any one at his going away as he had done.
"Where is poor little Henry ?" asked Charles;
"surely he must hate me after what I did to him."
He does no such thing," cried Annette. He
has been taught to forgive you, and to pity you, and
to pray to God that you might be brought back to us
some day. We have all prayed for that," she added,
"and now God has answered our prayers. Oh, we
shall be happy yet." As she said this, she went out of
the room and back to the parlour.
Mrs. Beresford and Julia were not long ere they
clasped the poor returned wanderer to their hearts.
Little Henry, too, seemed as pleased to see him as any,
and to have quite forgotten that he had ever done him
an injury.
Charles went to bed that night happier than he had
done for years. It was indeed a happy thing to be at
home once more, and to be spoken kindly to-for he
had met with very rough treatment since he had been
away; but the thought of his dear papa's death
threw a damp over everything. If he could but have
asked his forgiveness, he thought he could have borne
it better. Many rebellious and disobedient children
have thought so, when they have lost their kind and
tender parents.









36











THE BERESFORD FAMILY.





CHAPTER VII.


THE next morning Charles was not able to rise from
his bed. The fatigue of walking so far, when he had
scarcely got over his illness, added to the want of
proper food, had been too much for him, and he
was very ill again.
Mrs.Beresford sent directly for the family physician,
but when he came he said he was afraid Charles's
constitution was so broken that he would never get
over it.
This was a sad trouble to them all. They hoped,
however, that the doctor was mistaken, and that their
kind care would yet restore him to health. But when,
instead of getting better, he grew worse and worse,
and became paler and thinner than ever, and a dread-
ful cough came on, they began to fear that what Dr.
Morris had said was too true.
Mrs. Beresford now talked to him very solemnly
about death. She felt it to be right to let him know
his danger, but she was very happy to find his mind
was prepared to hear it. He knew, he said, that all
he had suffered was but just punishment for his sins;
and he thanked God for having mercifully let him
come home to die, instead of cutting him off when he
was amongst strangers, and far away from those who




37











THE BERESFORD FAMILY.

loved him. But above all, he said, he thanked God
for having led him to see the errors of his past life,
and to seek for pardon through the death of our Lord
Jesus Christ.
He then confessed to Mrs. Beresford, that even
when he was most rebellious and wicked, he had often
thought of the good advice which she and his dear
papa, and his sister Annette had given him. Such
thoughts would come across his mind, he said, without
his wishing it; but he had always tried to forget
them, and that was the reason why they did
not alter his conduct. One day when he and
his brother Henry were alone, he begged him,
with tears in his eyes, always to mind what his
dear mamma said to him, and never to grieve her,
adding, "If I had minded what she and my dear
papa said to me, when I was a little boy like you, I
should not be lying here sick."
Charles lived through the winter, but he was not
able to leave his bed, excepting to sit up for a few
hours sometimes in an easy chair by the fire. And
when the spring came, and the trees and the flowers
began to bud, and the birds sang in the hedges, and
the sun shone brightly and beautifully, then he was
laid in his grave. His kind step-mother, and his af-
fectionate sisters and little brother, you may be sure,
grieved very much at his loss; but they did not grieve
so much as they would have done if they had heard
that he died at sea; for now they knew he was
penitent, and they hoped that God had forgiven him
his sins, and had taken his soul to heaven.




38








I.


THE BERESFORD FAMILY.

Dear young reader, perhaps you will think this a
sad finish to our story; but where there is sin, there
willbe sadness. People always make themselves and
others unhappy when they do what is wrong. How-
ever, we are glad to tell you that Mrs. Beresford,
Annette, Julia, and Henry (for he is not little Henry
now) live very happily together still. Jessamine
Cottage is as pretty as it was fifteen or sixteen years
ago, when we first described it. Indeed the shrubs
and the trees in the front garden look more beautiful
than ever, and the green-house is still full of sweet
flowers. But the best thing of all I have to tell you
is, that Julia has quite given up her bad temper and
pride, and is now as amiable as her sister Annette.
























39




















BENEVOLENCE.

Hail, source of pleasures ever new!
While thy kind dictates I pursue,
I taste a joy sincere;
Too high for little minds to know,
Who on themselves alone bestow
Their wishes and their care.

By thee inspired, the generous breast,
In blessing others only blest,
With kindness large and free,
Delights the widow's tears to stay,
To teach the blind their smoothest way,
And aid the feeble knee.

0 God! with sympathetic care,
in other's joys and griefs to share,
Do Thou my heart incline;
Each low, each selfish wish control,
Warm with Benevolence my soul.
And make me wholly Thine.












40








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people at different periods, and all that is most useful and entertaining with regard to
their customs, manners, laws, and government.

kG Miss Corner ventures to assure her readers that they will find the
history of a country and its people quite as amusing as any fictitious tale,
and far more interesting, because it is true.

CORNER'S HISTORY OF SCOTLAND, from the Earliest Period to
the Present Time. By Miss CORNER. With CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE,
INDEX, and modern MAP. Three full-page Engravings on steel, from
paintings by Sir John Gilbert, R.A. Cloth lettered. 2s. 6d.
The same Book with Questions for Examination. 3s.
"We have perused this history with much interest, delighted with the ease and
perspicuity of the style and with the clearness and force of the narrative."-Edinburgh
Chronicle.
DEAN & SON, PUBLISHERS AND FACTORS, 160A, FLEET STREET, E.C.


1







CORNER'S HISTORiES.


CORNER'S HISTORY OF ENGLAND AND WALES, from the
Earliest Period to the Present Time. Adapted to Youth, Schools, and
Families. By Miss CORNER. New Edition, revised and greatly ex
tended, by the late Editor of the "English Journal of Education.'
Strongly and handsomely bound in cloth, lettered, and contains-
(i) Steel Engravings from designs by eminent artists, and a Map of
England and Wales (size 18in. by 14in.,) also
(ii) A Pictorial GENEALOGY of the Monarchs of England, from the
Conquest to the year 1857, with graphic illustrations of Remarkable
Events (size 32in. by 24in.,) also
(iii) Map of the Costumes, Ships, and Furniture of the various Ages
in England, a!so
(iv.) Chronological Table and Index from B.C. 55, also
(v.) Table of English Sovereigns, their relationship and progeny,
and Lineal descent of Queen Victoria from Egbert, first King of
England.
Strongly bound, cloth gilt. 3s. 6d.
The same Book with Questions for Examination. 4s.
Over ninety thousand copies of this work have been sold. The press generally has
spoken highly of it, recommending it strongly for school and home use; and the tes-
timony of experienced teachers proves that it is a work which merits the praise bestowed
on it.

CORNER'S HISTORY OF IRELAND, from the Earliest Period to
the Present Time. By Miss CORNER. New Edition, enlarged and im-
proved, with CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE, modern MAP and Engravings on
steel, from painting by Sir John Gilbert, R.A. Cloth lettered. 2s. 6d.
The same Book with Questions for Examination. 3s.
The historical facts, always correct, are detailed in plain and concise language. This
is one of the best class-books on Ireland for young people."-Limerick Standard.

CORNER'S HISTORY OF FRANCE, from the Earliest Period to the
Present Time. By Miss CORNER. New edition, enlarged and improved,
with CHRONOLOOIcAL TABLE, INDEX, and MAP, and scale of British
miles and French leagues. Two steel Engravings, finely executed by
Davenport, from drawings by J. Franklin. Cloth lettered. 2s. 6d.
The same Book with Questions for Examination. 3s.
For eight centuries the history of England has been incidentally connected with that of
Fiance and the history of France is in no small degree the history of modern civilization.
A sale of nearly thirty thousand has been realized of this history.

CORNER'S HISTORY OF GERMANY, from the Earliest Period to
the Present Time. By Miss CORNER. A new Edition, revised and
enlarged, with CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE, INDEX, and QUESTIONs for Ex-
amination, to which reference is made by figures in the text. An
accurate MAP, and finely-executed steel Engravings by Davenport,
from paintings by Sir John Gilbert, R.A. Cloth lettered. 3s.
"We do not know of a more agreeable or instructive present for Youth."-Times.

DEAN & SON, PUBLISHERS AND FACTORS, 160A, FLEET STREET, E.C.
Manufacturers of 'a.sntines, Christmas, Birthday, and Easter Cards.









CORNER'S HISTORIES.


CORNER'S HISTORY OF GREECE, from the Earliest Period to the
Roman Conquest, with a sketch of its Modern History to the Present
Time. By Miss CORNER. New Edition, with Questions to each Chapter.
MAP by Becker, CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE and INDEX. Cloth lettered. 3s.
"This work is ably written. An immense amount of information is given perspicuously
and interestingly, the best authorities have been consulted, and the results of their
labours have been judiciously employed by Miss CosRNE."-Spectator.

CORNER'S HISTORY OF ITALY, from the Earliest Period to the
Present Time. By Miss CORNER. New Edition. Cloth gilt, steel-plate
Engravings, from designs by Sir John Gilbert, R.A., and MAP. 2s. 6d.
Italy is now, in an historical point of view, one of the most interesting kingdoms
in existence.
Written with great care and ability."-Joohn Bull.

CORNER'S HISTORY OF HOLLAND AND BELGIUM, from
the Earliest Period to the Present Time. By Miss CORNER. With a
MAP and Steel-plate Engravings, from designs by Sir John Gilbert, R.A.
Cloth gilt. 2s. 6d.
"A condensed mass of knowledge, well put together, and well illustrated."-Church
and State Gazette.

CORNER'S HISTORY OF ROME, from the Earliest Period to the
Close of the Empire. Adapted to Youth, Schools, and Families. By
Miss CORNER. With MAP of the Empire, CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE, and
INDEX. Questions subjoined to each Chapter. Constant Reference to
Authorities. Cloth lettered. 3s. 6d.
Miss CORNBR's History of Rome is well written, and the historical facts elicited by
"the learned labours of Niebuhr, Arnold, &c., are made to take the place of the fabulous
accounts which have hitherto passsd current as authentic history; at the same time the
popular early legends are not omitted, but their doubtful nature is pointed out."-
Westminster Review.

CORNER'S HISTORY OF SPAIN AND PORTUGAL, from the
Earliest Period to the Present Time. By Miss CORNER. MAP of Spain
and Portugal. Fine steel Engravings, from drawings by J. Franklin.
New Edition, enlarged and improved. Cloth lettered. 2s. 6d.
The same Book with Questions for Examination. 3s.
"The advantage of publishing these two histories in one volume will be apparent to
every teacher. Miss CORNER has been singularly fortunate in making this volume one of
the most pleasing of her historical library. There are but few school histories of Spain
and Portugal. and it is not too much to say that there is not one written in so interestii g
and accurate a manner as this."-Daily News.
So concise and plain as to be at once adapted to the capacities and volatility of young
people, while they are useful compendiums for adults."-Times.

CORNER AND KITTO'S SCRIPTURAL HISTORY SIM-
PLIFIED; in Questions and Answers, for the use of Schools and
Families. By Miss CORNER. Revised by JOHN KITTO, D.D., F.S.A.
New Edition, with CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE, INDEX, and two MAPS, one to
illustrate the early part of Scripture History. Cloth boards. 3s. 6d.
Dr. KITTO co-operated with Miss CoRNER in writing this work, and the testimony
which he bore to her ability is most satisfactory. He wrote: "The authoress has shown
great skill and judgment in the condensation of large statements and seizing the salient
points of the subject before her."
DEAN & SON, PUBLISHERS AND FACTORS, 160A, FLEET, STREET, E.C.
Manufacturers of Valentines, Christmas, Birthday, ana guasetr Cards.








Corner's Juvenile Historical Library.
Thtse little Histories are rendered pleasing to young children, and are adapted to
their capacities, so that the principal facts may be known without their mirls
being burdened with unimportant details.

CORNER'S EVERY CHILD'S HISTORY OF ENGLAND, from
the Earliest Period to the Present Time. By Miss CORNER. New
Edition, stiffcover, uncoloured Map. Is.
Same Book bound in cloth, coloured Map; Portraits of the Monarchs,
and Events to be Remembered. Is. 6d.
History for children ought to be told in their own simple language, or it fails to interest
them; while all that is unfitted for childish ears, or unsuited to a childish understanding,
should be carefully omitted. I have allotted a distinct period for the subject of every
chapter, and have arranged a Series of Questions at the end of each, to render my History
useful as a School-book for the junior classes.-JULIA CoRNER.
CORNER AND FARR'S EVERY CHILD'S HISTORY OF
FRANCE, from the Earliest Period to the Present Time. Examination
Questions are subjoined to each chapter. With MAP of France.
Stiff covers. Is.
The same Book, with Portraits of upwards of Seventy of the
Sovereigns of France. Cloth. Is. 6d.
CORNER AND FARR'S EVERY CHILD'S HISTORY OF
GREECE. With MAP of Greece, and Questions for Examination to
each chapter, Stiff covers. Is.
The same Book, cloth bound. Is. 6d.
"So cleverly has Miss CORNER used the excellent materials at her disposal, that her
History is at once a stepping-stone for the young pupil, a summary for the general
reader, and a compendium for the student. To write an abridgment of such a book is a
task in the art of precis writing. Dr. FARR undertook the task, and it is but justice to
him to say that he has performed it most creditably."-English Journal of Education.
CORNER AND FARR'S EVERY CHILD'S HISTORY OF
ROME, from the Earliest Period to the Decline of the Roman Empire.
With MAP. Stiff covers. Is.
The same Book, cloth, Is. 6d.
This Book has been described by the Press as the best stepping-stone to the best
School History of Rome." From the testimony of teachers and parents, the publishers
believe that this description conveys a well deserved compliment to Miss CORNER and
to Dr. FARR.
CORNER AND KITTO'S EVERY CHILD'S SCRIPTURE
HISTORY. Two MAPS; viz., Wanderings of the Children of Israel
from Egypt to the Promised Land, and Palestine in the Time of our
Saviour. Stiff covers. Is.
The same Bool, cloth, is. 6d.
This Book, like that from which it was adapted, has been highly commended in most of
the religious newspapers and magazines. It is not compiled in the catechetical form, but
Examination Questions are appended to each section.
CORNER, RODWELL AND FARR'S CHILD'S FIRST STEP
TO THE HISTORY OF E'GLAND, by RoDWELL. New Edition, re-
vised and corrected. Illustrated with Portraits of the Sovereigns and
Map of England. Chronological Table and Principal Events to be
Remembered in each page. Cloth gilt. 2s. 6d.
DEAN & SON, PUBLISHERS AND FACTORS, 160A, FLEET STREET, E.C.








JUVENILE EDUCATIONAL BOOKS.
The Books in this series, generally, are stepping-stones from the nursery to the
school-room, being written in a pleasant manner, and are sure to amuse whihl
they instruct; the greater number are well illustrated.








this will show you, eaCtl', how meC' greater is the proportion of water than land.]
"Quotation. showing the simple man er in which Geography is explained by Miss
IFl ', '" I I P'lll i'l '






or, the s even dark squarements out of Geography in water th e other r three, white, the land
this will show you, exactly, how much greater is the proportion of water than land.3
Quotation. showing the simple manner in which Geography is explained by Miss
SARGEANT, in

PAPA AND MAMMA'S EASY LESSONS IN GEOGRAPHY;
or, the Elements of Geography in a new and attractive form. By ANNA
MARIA SARGEANT. Fully Illustrated. Price Is. in stiff covers; or,
Is. 6d. bound in cloth, gilt.
The object of Miss SARGEANT'S little book is not only to induce children to like Geo.
graphy, but also to impart in a simple and attractive manner, elementary knowledge of
the subject: in other words, a good and complete groundwork. The book is written in an
amusing dialogue form and is illustrated with numerous explanatory engravings, and is
intended as a companion book to Miss CORNER's Play Grammar."

CHARLES BUTLER'S YOUNG PUPIL'S EASY GUIDE TO
GEOGRAPHY. For the use of Schools and Private Instructors. New
Edition, enlarged, modernized and re-arranged by Dr. R. H. MAIR.
Strongly bound in cloth. Is. 6d.
This adaptation of a school book which has for so many years been a favourite amongst
teachers and pupils, will, it is hoped, give general satisfaction. Dr. R. H. MAIR has
carefully revised the book. To each chapter is appended a series of Questions. A copious
Index, with reference to upwards of eleven hundred places, is also appended.
"This is truly what it professes to be, an Easy Guide. We recommend it without
hesitation."-Athenaum.

CHARLES BUTLER'S GUIDE TO GEOGRAPHY, WITH THE
USE OF THE GLOBES. By CHARLES BUTLER, re-arranged by Dr. R.
H. MAIR. Price 2s. strongly bound in red cloth, gilt.
This work is comprised of the Young Pupil's Guide to Geography, BUTLER'S Use of
the Globes," and seven Glyphographic Maps.

CHARLES BUTLER'S GUIDE TO USEFUL KNOWLEDGE.
Containing, in the form of a familiar Catechism a variety of infor-
mation connected with the Arts, Sciences, and Phenomena of INature.
For the use of Schools and Private Instructors. By CHARLES BUTLER.
New Edition, revised and corrected throughout by G. MARTIN. Cloth,
embossed, price Is. 6d.
This work is in itself a simple yet comprehensive cyclopaedia of general information. It
describes Articles of consumption used chiefly as food and drinks; articles used for
flavouring food, as spices, &c. Vegetable and animal productions used in the arts, and
their applications: Earths, stones, &c. as applied to the arts; Materials from which are
obtained colours and dyes; Chemistry; Miscellaneous inventions; Electricity, galvanism,
electric telegraph, &c. &c.
There is an index to about 1000 different items.

DEAN & SON, PUBLISHERS AND FACTORS, 160A, FLEET STREET. E.C.










eedfainJr abra


PEOPLE of every age, taste, and class, take delight in reading
of feats of heroism, dangers bravely encountered, and perils nobly
overcome. MESSRS. DEAN & SON, therefore, are now publishing
a series of such narratives in a cheap and popular form, under
the title of



BT

LIEUT.-COLONEL KNOLLYS, F.R.G.S.,
AND OTHERS.
A Complete Book is issued at intervals, each with a Frontispiece in
Colours and numerous full-page Wood Engravings; price One Shilling and
Sixpence, handsomely bound in cloth gilt, for prizes and presents. Also
bound in fancy wrappers in colours, at One Shilling each.

Among the Series are the following:-
1-SHAW, THE LIFE GUARDSMAN. Ready.
2-THE EXPLOITS OF LORD COCHRANE. Ready.
3-THE VICTORIA CROSS IN THE CRIME. Ready.
4- ,, ,, INDIA. Ready.
5- ,, ,, THE COLONIES, &e. In the Press.
11-BRAVE DEEDS AND HEROIC ACTIONS. Series I.-MILITARY.
By CAPTAIN CLAYTON. Ready.
12-BRAVE DEEDS AND HEROIC ACTIONS. Series II.-NAVAL AND
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13-PAUL JONES, THE NAVAL HERO OF AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE.
By JAMES WARD. Ready.
Thefollowing, by Lieut.-Major Knollys, are in active preparation:
6-UNDECORATED MILITARY AND NAVAL HEROES.
7-GALLANT SEPOYS AND SOWARS.
8-DARING DEEDS AFLOAT-ROYAL NAVY.
9- ,, ,, ,, MERCHANT NAVY AND PRIVATEERS.
10-FEMALE HEROISM IN WAR.

DEAN RON, PUBLISHERS, 160A, FLEET STREET, E.C.









DEAN'S L.' S l1arvels of cheapness d- beauty!
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11-Cat's Party 9-House that Jack Built
12-Little Pig's Tale 10-Nursery Rhymes
13-Jack and his Brothers 11-Nursery Jingles
14-Dove's Party 12-Mother Hubbard
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LONDON: DEAN & SON, PUBLISHERS, 160A, FLEET STREET, E.C.








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1-Mattie and Lilian. 9-Careless James.
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