The youngster

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Material Information

Title:
The youngster
Physical Description:
96 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Daisy
Greenaway, Kate, 1846-1901 ( Illustrator )
J.B. Lippincott & Co ( Publisher )
Publisher:
J.B. Lippincott & Co.
Place of Publication:
Philadelphia
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Nursery rhymes   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1880   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1880   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by Cousin Daisy ; with illustrations by Kate Greenaway and others.
General Note:
Contains poetry and prose.
General Note:
Title page illustrated.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002223236
notis - ALG3485
oclc - 37701915
System ID:
UF00048436:00001

Full Text

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THE


YOUNGSTER,

COUSIN DAISY.

S T :r IL rlC c 4
BY KATE GREENAWAY i -


k-, IIIt



ea.





PHILADELPHIA:


B. LPPRNCOTT & CO.

S715 AND 717 MARKET STREET.







































Copyright, 1880, by J. B. LIPPINCOTT & CO.







THREE LITTLE SONGS.




One little girl, i
So pretty and sweet; ", -
Taking a walk
On two little feet.




Two little friends,
So timid and shy,
". i .'' Meet in the garden
*-a ,, .'1 i \i , j. ,,, "
.- A gay butterfly.

III., '__
Three little boys,
So chubby and neat,
Sat on a doorstep,
Out in the street.
3 - -






A LITTLE LAD.

A little lad in hat so flat,
". A-i little lass in green:
--- -'Jack Sprat, who ate no
.,.._ !fat,
His wife who ate no
Si lean.

Three children dancing
on the ice _
Upon a morn in May;
The ice fell in, they all
fell out,
The rest they ran away. -


A little lass with face so
'sad,
tl I A maiden all forlorn,
"1 Who milked, in Mother
S,- )i Goose's" rhyme,
"I ,'...", ' The cow with crumpled
:. horn.






TWO LITTLE OLD WOMEN.
": 1i' "
Two little old women sat.
working one day,
Knit! Knit! Knit!
And one was cross and ""
the other was gay,
Knit Knit Knitl -.


Tommy was blowing a
"u bubble one day,
Blow! Blow! Blow!
The bubble burst and
S __ went away,
Blow Blow! Blow!


This little boy told a sad
story, I fear !
Sad! Sad! Sad!
And his sister scolded l;
him well, I hear!
Sad! Sad! Sad! ,

5








MISS PRIDE.
"Little Miss Pride, who
J ^ Loved her own face,
Looked in the glass
*, ,/ To study its grace.


MISS SULK.
Little Miss Sulk, who
Loved her own way, .'
Always was cross -
And never would play.


"MISS AFRAID .
d" .' j, .^ ', ,;' i
i i Little Miss 'Fraid
1I 'I ,, 1?-'o; Went to a show,
S.- Ran crying home
: From her own shadow.

6
,P4








MISS PRIDE.
"Little Miss Pride, who
J ^ Loved her own face,
Looked in the glass
*, ,/ To study its grace.


MISS SULK.
Little Miss Sulk, who
Loved her own way, .'
Always was cross -
And never would play.


"MISS AFRAID .
d" .' j, .^ ', ,;' i
i i Little Miss 'Fraid
1I 'I ,, 1?-'o; Went to a show,
S.- Ran crying home
: From her own shadow.

6
,P4








MISS PRIDE.
"Little Miss Pride, who
J ^ Loved her own face,
Looked in the glass
*, ,/ To study its grace.


MISS SULK.
Little Miss Sulk, who
Loved her own way, .'
Always was cross -
And never would play.


"MISS AFRAID .
d" .' j, .^ ', ,;' i
i i Little Miss 'Fraid
1I 'I ,, 1?-'o; Went to a show,
S.- Ran crying home
: From her own shadow.

6
,P4







DANCING MARY.
Mary was so fond of a
dance that even in mar-
ket she asked the old
woman who sold eggs to ,';./ I/
stop her work and give L. 'L. .
her a turn.


S-KIND TOM.

/ See, Annie is holding up
a flower for dear brother Tom
to smell. He is a good, kind

) -' I

boy, and never says a cross .Ii'.
word to his little sisters, but '
tries to make them happy. r.,
I wish all boys were as kind
as Tom.

7







DANCING MARY.
Mary was so fond of a
dance that even in mar-
ket she asked the old
woman who sold eggs to ,';./ I/
stop her work and give L. 'L. .
her a turn.


S-KIND TOM.

/ See, Annie is holding up
a flower for dear brother Tom
to smell. He is a good, kind

) -' I

boy, and never says a cross .Ii'.
word to his little sisters, but '
tries to make them happy. r.,
I wish all boys were as kind
as Tom.

7







JACK AND JILL.

This, I think,
Is Jack and Jill,
Who came to grief
j Upon a hill.


Right, left! Right, left!
Point your toes merrily! I ,.9
Right, left! Right, left! -
Keeping time cheerily! '' -




SPretty little lambkin,
Si 'i, Skipping 'mid flowers,
'- Are you very happy
,, Thro' the sunny hours ?


8







THE LITTLE ARTISTS.


T. /s "
I.~~ --....-^
One little artist, ,--I
Finished for the day, -I
Will wash her brushes nicely
And put them all away.


-- P ~-\ -- '- ^ -


f- _-., Two little artists,
'< Busy as can be;
.', I' Mary scrawls a farm-house,
S While Harry paints a tree.



.. ,' c ..
Three little artists .--
Showing brother Ned
Where his pretty picture I-'',
Needs a touch of red. ---

9








S'a MY LADDIE.
-.S. '- Oh, here's my little laddie,
With heart so true and kind;
A better, sweeter laddie
S. 1 It would be hard to find.



And I've a little lassie,
With sunshine in her hair;
If you look out in the garden, ,
I think you'll find her there. ,

""" /"_


... Pretty Poll! Pretty Poll!
-.2- Take an apple, do !
-._2 .- I found the very nicest one
", On purpose, Poll, for you.

10







How do you do?"
said the Flower-pot to -/. .
John and Susy.
"We are very well,"
said they. Where are .
you running so fast ?" ..
"I am going away to -
Fairyland, and when I -


come back I will bring
""- you some golden seeds."
'.-'. -- ? \' '_ "Let us tell mother,"
said Susy; but when
-,--.\: they got into the house
mother and nurse were


so busy washing baby'
that they would not lis-
ten to their story, so
they just started off to ' .-
hunt the Flower-pot and
ask him to tell them .'' '
more about Fairyland. -
"11








Si TO MARKET.
"4 Trot, trot, to market,
I' ''' To buy a plum bun;
S, Home again, home again,
l s- Market is done.



FAR AWAY. .. -
Far away, far away, .7, ;-rn,
Birdie still sings; -
But I can't fly away: "
Have no wings.


"" -OVER THE SEA.

F-ar away, far away,
-_ .. Over the sea;
Oh, when will somebody
-^^'^S. :Come and fetch me?

r 12








Si TO MARKET.
"4 Trot, trot, to market,
I' ''' To buy a plum bun;
S, Home again, home again,
l s- Market is done.



FAR AWAY. .. -
Far away, far away, .7, ;-rn,
Birdie still sings; -
But I can't fly away: "
Have no wings.


"" -OVER THE SEA.

F-ar away, far away,
-_ .. Over the sea;
Oh, when will somebody
-^^'^S. :Come and fetch me?

r 12








Si TO MARKET.
"4 Trot, trot, to market,
I' ''' To buy a plum bun;
S, Home again, home again,
l s- Market is done.



FAR AWAY. .. -
Far away, far away, .7, ;-rn,
Birdie still sings; -
But I can't fly away: "
Have no wings.


"" -OVER THE SEA.

F-ar away, far away,
-_ .. Over the sea;
Oh, when will somebody
-^^'^S. :Come and fetch me?

r 12







HAPPY WILLIE. ., ,r -,-

Play, Willie, play! -
You've nothing to do;
You can play, if you like,
The whole day through.
I a.




Brother, come, the cakes are
done,
S/ The oven's nice and hot;
.We'll bake them quickly in
"A I the sun
Upon a flower-pot.

If there is bread enough
for you,'
There's a piece for a poor _.
child too; -
And when you breakfast,
don't forget
The little birds the crumbs "
can eat. .
13







AP. r THE ROBIN'S NEST.
I Mary, Mary, quite con-
trary, are you thinking
f about the nest the mother-
V robin has built in the old
,,o oak-tree ? If you wait a
S while you will see four
a l-t eggs in the little home.

Well, little miller will
you grind me some corn
to make into bread ? I
will pay you in kisses, and
sister Alice shall share .
the profits.

SLittle Boy Blue, I am
Sglad you have waked up
S! at last. I hope the cows
\ ( did not do much harm in
the corn, or that the sheep
l' .,' i' did not trample the mca-
S.... "how so the wheat would
"nogrow.
14 \








We can read, : ,
And we can spell;
We can laugh




SDavy Donothing,
S Truant from his task,
Loitered through the long
day,
S"'" Till play-time all was
past.


SILLY LILLY.
Little Miss Lilly, i
You look very silly,
Asleep on a chair
In the open air. '. ..


: 2; ... ,L







MY LITTLE PONY.


Hop, hop, hop, nimble as a top,
Over hill and valley bounding,
With your clinking hoofs resounding:
Hop, hop, hop, nimble as a top.

Whoa! whoa! whoa! how like fun you go!
Stop, you nag, I tell you, tell you;
If you don't, I'll surely sell you.
Whoa! whoa! whoa! how like fun you go!

Spare, spare, spare; sure enough, we're there;
Very well, my little pony;
Safe's our jaunt, thojigh rough and stony:
Spare, spare, spare; sure enough, we're there.

Here, here, here; yes, my pony dear:
Now with hay and oats I'll treat you,
And with smiles will ever greet you,
Pony dear, yes, my pony dear.
16







PUSSY-CAT.


Pussy-cat lives in the servants' hall,
She can set up her back and purr;
The little mice live in a crack in the wall,
But they hardly dare venture to stir:

For, whenever they think of taking the air,
Or filling their little maws,
The pussy-cat says, "Come out, if you dare;
I will catch you all with my claws."

Scrabble, scrabble, scrabble! went all the
little mice,
For they smelt the Cheshire cheese;
The pussy-cat said, "It smells very nice;
Now do come out, if you please."

" Squeak !" said the little mouse. "Squeak,
squeak, squeak!"
Said all the young ones too;
"We never creep out when cats are about,
Because we're afraid of you."
2 17







A HORSE THAT COULD PUMP.

S. See these girls drawing
-.cool water from the pump.
S- Well, it is common to hear
S' of a girl pumping, but I

'..'_ a horse doing it. A friend
-of mine had one that, when
.- the trough was not full,
"!"" ------- U. would take the handle of
"the pump between his teeth

_. .-_ till there wa a as much water
S- "-- as he would like to drink.

LITTLE FRANKIE.

"How is little Frankie? -
Where is he going to- -- -'
day ?". '
"Oh, quite well, thankye, '--
thankye, -- t
I'm going away, away, -
Over the hills and away." t ?

"But what's to become of '
me, poor Polly, t I ,
Who will care for me?" '' 'i
"Oh, you'll stop at home '
and look after dolly,
And make some tea-
For Fan, Susy, and me." ._
18







A HORSE THAT COULD PUMP.

S. See these girls drawing
-.cool water from the pump.
S- Well, it is common to hear
S' of a girl pumping, but I

'..'_ a horse doing it. A friend
-of mine had one that, when
.- the trough was not full,
"!"" ------- U. would take the handle of
"the pump between his teeth

_. .-_ till there wa a as much water
S- "-- as he would like to drink.

LITTLE FRANKIE.

"How is little Frankie? -
Where is he going to- -- -'
day ?". '
"Oh, quite well, thankye, '--
thankye, -- t
I'm going away, away, -
Over the hills and away." t ?

"But what's to become of '
me, poor Polly, t I ,
Who will care for me?" '' 'i
"Oh, you'll stop at home '
and look after dolly,
And make some tea-
For Fan, Susy, and me." ._
18








SULKY BROTHER.



Brother is sulky,
And must go to bed;
Come let us pull ^ (.
His hat off his head. '

Let us kiss his big ears,
And make a loud sound: --
Brother, dear brother, -
Won't you turn around? -




COFFEE OR TEA.
i -c ",. ..i **-- -- ** ." -- _- -
-4 .-C4

S-. .Will you take coffee,
_. Or will you take tea?
-D o you love toffee,
S,,"; ,Or do you love me?

':" : TDo you like plum-cake ?
S- I like it too;
-- Eat some for my sake,
While it is new.



19








SULKY BROTHER.



Brother is sulky,
And must go to bed;
Come let us pull ^ (.
His hat off his head. '

Let us kiss his big ears,
And make a loud sound: --
Brother, dear brother, -
Won't you turn around? -




COFFEE OR TEA.
i -c ",. ..i **-- -- ** ." -- _- -
-4 .-C4

S-. .Will you take coffee,
_. Or will you take tea?
-D o you love toffee,
S,,"; ,Or do you love me?

':" : TDo you like plum-cake ?
S- I like it too;
-- Eat some for my sake,
While it is new.



19








A WONDERFUL PIE.




--,-. ..I. I Sing a song of sixpence,
A pocket full of rye,
Four and twenty snowballs
,Baked in a pie;
I' When the pie was opened,
i' The snow had gone away;
SWasn't that a pretty dish
S To eat on Christmas day?




THE POT AND THE KETTLE.


Said Jack to the Kettle,-
"Your blackened old metal
Should be kept clean and I'
bright; 1
Pray get out of my sight "' a 1 ,

Said the Kettle to Jack, .
"Which of us is most black, .
You the pot, I the kettle, ----
Would be a hard thing to -

20settle."
20








A WONDERFUL PIE.




--,-. ..I. I Sing a song of sixpence,
A pocket full of rye,
Four and twenty snowballs
,Baked in a pie;
I' When the pie was opened,
i' The snow had gone away;
SWasn't that a pretty dish
S To eat on Christmas day?




THE POT AND THE KETTLE.


Said Jack to the Kettle,-
"Your blackened old metal
Should be kept clean and I'
bright; 1
Pray get out of my sight "' a 1 ,

Said the Kettle to Jack, .
"Which of us is most black, .
You the pot, I the kettle, ----
Would be a hard thing to -

20settle."
20







THE CAT AND THE CARROT.


"How would you like it
yourself?" said Carrot.
"Like what?" asked Ger- /
tie, in open-eyed wonder.
"Why, to have a nasty, '.
cruel fork thrust into your
sides. How would you like
it?" repeated Carrot. f -
"I didn't know you could r i
feel it," said Gertie.
"Other people, besides I '- .
yourself, have feeling," said '
Carrot. .

-A -- j { "~~ 9 i i\ -~

"--_- You've eaten all, and
S___ not left me a bit," said Puss.
"- .' "So I have," said Gertie.
"" But I didn't know you
S"' ',:'- were hungry."
S' But you ought to have
,,, '' known it," replied Puss.
"You forget other people,
Besides yourself, have feel-

0 dear !" thought Ger-
.' = tie, "both Puss and Carrot
think me selfish; and I try
S- so hard not to be."
21







GETTING UP.


S ___ "'Tis seven o'clock!" says
S,.I nurse at the door:
I) 1 Kate lifts not her drowsy
S'" / head;
\' '' "'Tis eight o'clock !" says
S'., nurse once more,
S. But Katie is still in bed;
"'Tis nine o'clock !" says
K .L. -* *nurse, with a frown:
L; "/i Kate opens one sleepy
eye;
"" ' Ten o'clock, and Katie
/. | ( comes down,
S W, fishing she'd been
".'I i--- more spry.


THE SETTING SUN,.

The sun had set beyond the hills
In a flood of red and yellow.
Said Maud, with a smile, "He'll be
back in a while:
He never rests, poor fellow! i
The birds are sleeping in their '
nests, '' J
The flowers their buds are closing, i
But the poor old Sun-hlie never .
rests; Er h.1 -
You never find him dozing."
22







GETTING UP.


S ___ "'Tis seven o'clock!" says
S,.I nurse at the door:
I) 1 Kate lifts not her drowsy
S'" / head;
\' '' "'Tis eight o'clock !" says
S'., nurse once more,
S. But Katie is still in bed;
"'Tis nine o'clock !" says
K .L. -* *nurse, with a frown:
L; "/i Kate opens one sleepy
eye;
"" ' Ten o'clock, and Katie
/. | ( comes down,
S W, fishing she'd been
".'I i--- more spry.


THE SETTING SUN,.

The sun had set beyond the hills
In a flood of red and yellow.
Said Maud, with a smile, "He'll be
back in a while:
He never rests, poor fellow! i
The birds are sleeping in their '
nests, '' J
The flowers their buds are closing, i
But the poor old Sun-hlie never .
rests; Er h.1 -
You never find him dozing."
22







A STORY THAT KNOWS NO END.
When it's wet, it is not
dry;
When there's wind, your
kite will fly; ,,
When it's hot, it is not
cold; -
When it's full, no more .
'twill hold; '.
When it's night, it is not -
(lay ;
When you work, you -
must not play; 'i,;
When it rains, it does '
not snow; \ I ;
When I learn more, you I
shall know.
TOM TAYLOR



SLittle Tom Taylor
Sat on a rail, or
A beam which ran out
from the shore,
S-- When past flew a bird:
A loud splash was
heard,
"- -" -- And Tommy was seen
S. there no more.

^Y -<- --- ; : 8 ; ^
;Bt ~Aitf t







A STORY THAT KNOWS NO END.
When it's wet, it is not
dry;
When there's wind, your
kite will fly; ,,
When it's hot, it is not
cold; -
When it's full, no more .
'twill hold; '.
When it's night, it is not -
(lay ;
When you work, you -
must not play; 'i,;
When it rains, it does '
not snow; \ I ;
When I learn more, you I
shall know.
TOM TAYLOR



SLittle Tom Taylor
Sat on a rail, or
A beam which ran out
from the shore,
S-- When past flew a bird:
A loud splash was
heard,
"- -" -- And Tommy was seen
S. there no more.

^Y -<- --- ; : 8 ; ^
;Bt ~Aitf t







THE GNOMES.

,,, "So you don't believe in
i gnomes ?" said a queer voice.
'l Alice shrank against the old
'oak, and looked at the strange
._ .. figure before her.
1 2 i i "So you don't believe in
Sgnomes ?" he repeated. "Then
S..come with me."
H e stamped on the ground,
and they sank into the earth.
Presently they stopped, and
S "-Alice saw they were in a beau-
S tiful cavern, where hundreds of
little figures were at work.
"All this is being done for you mortals," said the gnome to Alice, in
a reproachful tone, "and yet you say you don't believe in us, and
laugh at the idea of there, r
being such people."
I am very sorry," said '
Alice; "I will never say '
so again." I'
"Very well," said the '
gnome. "I suppose you I i .
would like to go home i
again ?" ., .I .
He gave Alice into the
charge of one of the work-
ers, who waved his arms, '
and hey, presto! they were
standing before the door
of Alice's house.
24







NAUGHTY BOB.

Bob was fond of all "" .
manner of naughty tricks;
he teased his sisters, and .
thought it great fun. One ."
day, when his sisters were.
playing at croquet, Mas- -
ter Bob came with a face
full of great alarm and -
said,
"Oh, Mary, your kitten I
is burnt up !" r-
Poor Mary was very /
frightened, and ran into /7
the house, only to find it -
another of Bob's tricks. > -- .

CLOUDLAND.
Whither away, my little
maiden, over the house-
Si tops, up among the birds
'^ and stars? Please tell us
"t, what they do in Cloud-
S land when you come back,
S \ and bring us some little
S\ cloud-cakes and candies;
,_ we would like to know if
S... they are as good as ours.
-- e hardly think so, for
,, clouds don't look as if they
-%:; '- had much taste to them,
I '', and everything up there
'-.. ... must be the same.







NAUGHTY BOB.

Bob was fond of all "" .
manner of naughty tricks;
he teased his sisters, and .
thought it great fun. One ."
day, when his sisters were.
playing at croquet, Mas- -
ter Bob came with a face
full of great alarm and -
said,
"Oh, Mary, your kitten I
is burnt up !" r-
Poor Mary was very /
frightened, and ran into /7
the house, only to find it -
another of Bob's tricks. > -- .

CLOUDLAND.
Whither away, my little
maiden, over the house-
Si tops, up among the birds
'^ and stars? Please tell us
"t, what they do in Cloud-
S land when you come back,
S \ and bring us some little
S\ cloud-cakes and candies;
,_ we would like to know if
S... they are as good as ours.
-- e hardly think so, for
,, clouds don't look as if they
-%:; '- had much taste to them,
I '', and everything up there
'-.. ... must be the same.







MISCHIEVOUS DICK.



Oh, a terrible boy
I Was mischievous Dick,
"Al s Ripe for all manner
i Of meddlesome trick.

Teasing his sisters
y t Or breaking their toys,
Creating disturbance
Or making a noise.



THE YOUNG BIRDS.

Oh, my dear children, do -.I ,
not touch the pretty little '
birds in their warm nest.
The mother-bird has gone ,
for some food, and will soon
return. See! she is flying
as fast as she can back to
the nest, and now she is
giving the little birdies a
worm which she found in the
field and has brought to them
in her bill. The birdies are
as careful of their young as
your father and mother are
of you. I ll,
26







MISCHIEVOUS DICK.



Oh, a terrible boy
I Was mischievous Dick,
"Al s Ripe for all manner
i Of meddlesome trick.

Teasing his sisters
y t Or breaking their toys,
Creating disturbance
Or making a noise.



THE YOUNG BIRDS.

Oh, my dear children, do -.I ,
not touch the pretty little '
birds in their warm nest.
The mother-bird has gone ,
for some food, and will soon
return. See! she is flying
as fast as she can back to
the nest, and now she is
giving the little birdies a
worm which she found in the
field and has brought to them
in her bill. The birdies are
as careful of their young as
your father and mother are
of you. I ll,
26







FLOWERS.



Little blue forget-me-not,
With its yellow eye,
Always smiles and gives a nod
As I pass it by.

Violets play at hide-and-seek,
But I find them out;
Underneath their leaves they keep,
And watch what I'm about.




THE NORTH WIND.

I -

SThe north wind doth
blow,
i. And we shall have snow,
} And where will the children
go?
I Oh, with fur and muff,
SIt is easy enough
S / I I To laugh at snow and wind-
puff.



"27







FLOWERS.



Little blue forget-me-not,
With its yellow eye,
Always smiles and gives a nod
As I pass it by.

Violets play at hide-and-seek,
But I find them out;
Underneath their leaves they keep,
And watch what I'm about.




THE NORTH WIND.

I -

SThe north wind doth
blow,
i. And we shall have snow,
} And where will the children
go?
I Oh, with fur and muff,
SIt is easy enough
S / I I To laugh at snow and wind-
puff.



"27







TAG.
See this little maiden
i of long-ago in mob-cap
S'.'lJ.- 1 and long dress, and this
,I -- little lad with his queer
I i -- coat and a bow on his
"i K --, hair. They played tag
I just the same as the lit-
S. l tle ones of to-day, and I
I ' I '- expect they said "Inty
".( I minnty cuty corn" just the
S t i same way. Look out, lit-
: I tle man, or you will be
--- caught! Sister can run
--ast, if she is a girl, and
has her hand almost on
Your coat-tail; and if
she should happen to catch you it would not be so much fun for you.
Here we have another ''I'
queer couple. They also II I I
belong to the same old is
time, only this little boy
has no coat on, and the .
little girl looks very
sober. I hope the boy
has not been naughty.
I think not; his little
face looks too sweet and
happy for that. It may
be that some one is sick
and she is telling him not --
to make too much noise
in his play. .. -
28








TOBY AND THE RAVEN.

"I can't make it out at
all," said Toby as he stood,
deep in thought, with his-. '"-
fat little thumb in his mouth.
"Why don't you say what
you mean ?" said the raven,
at his feet. I don't know
what you are talking about.
Can't make out what?"
"It is just this," said .
Toby: "Why do some peo- -
ple have nice things to eat
and Tot and I have nothing
every day but porridge ? I
am getting tired of it."
You are a naughty boy, Toby," said the raven. "I know a little
girl who does not even have porridge to eat, and no kind mamma to
wash and dress her in the morning, but has to run around from house
to house asking for something to eat; and even then she does not get
S_ enough, and very often
i-- goes to bed hungry. You
__ __ should be thankful for what
you have, and not envy
.. .' others."
.. .. Toby thought over what
S- the raven had said, and
S- .. r after that was satisfied with
.- i- the good things he had and
did not wish for those of
"-- others. Envy is a sin, and
""- I hope children who read
this will keep from it.
29








THE FIVE LITTLE MAIDENS.
"<" i Do you see these five
little girls in sugar-loaf
T'C-, hats? Look at their down-
," 3I,. cast eyes and grave faces.
', .j Only a week ago they were
"- i the merriest of the merry,
-' and laughed and sang all
-' d;ay long; but study they
ii neglected and spent their
r !... r- time in play, and so were
rt- .- sent to a place where they
would learn to be solemn
Sin season. It is to be
S/ hoped they will be wiser
S- -- when they come back.
"Dear me!" said Tommy, Sammy, and Johnny, looking after them;
"I think we had better stop laughing so much and study a little more;
for if we don't, we will ,,
have to wear those dread- r 'i- .
ful hats and look cross all
the time." -'
So they scampered off
across the fields to school, \
and were splendid children --
all day. What they have
done since I do not know;
but if that is them I hear -- I -
laughing under the win- :/ '
dow, I am tliiiili, they
will soon have to wear .
those dreadful liats and "
be sent to join the girls. -._--- ---
30








THE BRIDGE OF DEE,
Upon the bridge, upon the .
bridge,
That crossed the river
Dee, -.
A little lass, a little lass,
Stood weeping silently. '--

A little laddie crossed the
bridge,- ,
The bridge above the
Dee,-
And the little lassie dried
her eyes
And smiled right mer-
rily.

IN THE HAY.

--.-:
S' Now, little people, up, up
S- and away,
To toss and tumble the
"k new-mown hay;
"-- \ Come with a whoop and
: come with a call,
-' Come with a good will or
else not at all,
S' 'A For the jolly old farmer
says you may
L j ...... J- Do just as you please in
". . .... ,the new-mown hay.

31








THE BRIDGE OF DEE,
Upon the bridge, upon the .
bridge,
That crossed the river
Dee, -.
A little lass, a little lass,
Stood weeping silently. '--

A little laddie crossed the
bridge,- ,
The bridge above the
Dee,-
And the little lassie dried
her eyes
And smiled right mer-
rily.

IN THE HAY.

--.-:
S' Now, little people, up, up
S- and away,
To toss and tumble the
"k new-mown hay;
"-- \ Come with a whoop and
: come with a call,
-' Come with a good will or
else not at all,
S' 'A For the jolly old farmer
says you may
L j ...... J- Do just as you please in
". . .... ,the new-mown hay.

31








SPRING-TIME.


"* !':- '1 I, .The sweet birds are sing-

".- .The young lambs are
l '..' springing,
S/ / The bells are all ringing


S,^ iIThen let us go Maying,
S'i. A e For all things are playing,
*I~ -! In-doors there's no stay-
S I ing,
Si ~i In happy spring-time.


THE APPLE-TREE.
"Why do you come to -"
my apple-tree,
Little bird so gray?"
"Twit-twit, twit-twit, twit-
twee !"
That was all he would (;:r. l
say. .

"Why do you lock your
rosy feet (. i
So closely round the .'
spray ?" '
"Twit-twit, twit-twit, twit- '
tweet!"- -
"That was all he would .
say. 32








SPRING-TIME.


"* !':- '1 I, .The sweet birds are sing-

".- .The young lambs are
l '..' springing,
S/ / The bells are all ringing


S,^ iIThen let us go Maying,
S'i. A e For all things are playing,
*I~ -! In-doors there's no stay-
S I ing,
Si ~i In happy spring-time.


THE APPLE-TREE.
"Why do you come to -"
my apple-tree,
Little bird so gray?"
"Twit-twit, twit-twit, twit-
twee !"
That was all he would (;:r. l
say. .

"Why do you lock your
rosy feet (. i
So closely round the .'
spray ?" '
"Twit-twit, twit-twit, twit- '
tweet!"- -
"That was all he would .
say. 32






COCK-A-DOODLE-DOO.

A little boy got out of bed,-
'Twas only six o'clock,-
And out of window poked his head,
And spied a crowing cock.

The little boy said, Mr. Bird,
Pray tell me, who are you ?"
And all the answer that he heard
Was, Cock-a-doodle-doo!"

"What would you think if you were me',
He.said, and I were you ?"
But still that bird provokingly
Cried, Cock-a-doodle-doo !"

"How many times, you stupid head,
Goes three in twenty-two ?"
That old bird winked one eye, and said
Just Cock-a-doodle-doo!"

He slammed the window down again,
When up that old bird flew,
And, pecking at the window-pane,
Cried, Cock-a-doodle-doo!"
3 33

















- .. .. -"-- -' -- ' ,' 1









NURSERY-SONG.
"As I walked over the hill one day,
'' I , -. I I



NURSERY-SONG.



As I walked over the hill one day,
I listened, and heard a mother-sheep say,
In all the green world there is nothing so sweet
As my little lamb, with his nimble feet;
With his eye so bright,
And his wool so white,
Oh! he is my darling, my heart's delight."
And the mother-sheep and her little one
Side by side lay down in the sun;
And they went to sleep on the hill-side warm,
While my little lamb lies here on my arm.
34











-: _.-- ,_ >. i' :-, .-i ,; ,



If se entered the yard, I

------- --- -- _- "-,,C -- --_. --_ --- -


-4







TROUBLESOME MAY.

There once was a lassie,
I've heard grandma say,
Who went by the nickname
Of Troublesome May.

If she entered the yard,
Then a flutter and gobble
Would show the poor girl
She had got in a hobble.

Or the gander would hiss,
And endeavor to bite
Just a dainty piece out
Of her apron so white.
35









III

- 1 -I, M

















THE DEAD BIRD.
ear little b e wish you well









Why can't you grow a bit stronger ?
Then we'll open the door and away you shall sail,









A captive bird no longer!"

But the poor little bird in its cage of gold
Was never to grow and strengthen;
1- OPP. ,"11





















And it cared not at all its days to hold,
It cared not the time to lengthen.
When the children came one sad, sad day,




The bird lay still and quiet;
"And grave were the faces that late were gay,
And hushed were the games and riot.
36



















"" ":.... ." .






















Now into my work-box,
II







BUSY LITTLE FINGERS.

Busy little fingers,
Everywhere they go;
Rosy little fingers,
The sweetest that I know.

Now into my work-box,
All the buttons finding,
Tangling up the knitting,
Every spool unwinding.
37









;-7





: - _. _. '_, .-^ ^.S









WADING IN THE BROOK.

Splashing, dashing little rogues
In the water cool they play;
Little does their mother know
Of the way they spend the day.

Bright the sun shines in the sky,
Green the young leaves on the trees,
Fresh the water in the brook,
Fragrant smells are on the breeze.

Rich the world in pleasant gifts,
Full of joys the summer time,
Hours-golden hours-that pass,
Graced with halo all divine.
38
. : -- -- --"





















38


































CAUGHT BY THE TIDE.

It was very naughty of Willie to go down to the beach alone, without
telling mother or sister where he was going. He might have been
drowned. He had been amusing himself, looking for shells, and did
not notice that the tide was coming in. All at once he saw that the sea
had got between him and the shore. Immediately he hastened to the
rock, thinking he would be safe there; but if mamma and Dora had
not come in search of him, as they did, they would have been too late
to save him. Willie was foolish as well as naughty.
39
























THREE PET FROGS.

Three pet frogs! Three pet frogs!
See how they stand.
They all stand up in a queer little ring,
And they dance and they croak, and try hard
to sing;
Did ever you see such a wonderful thing
As three pet frogs!

40
"1 si' "" ;
,,, ,, e u ,e ,,, ; ,od r u ,h




See ho theystund




















IIf
-N -I - '--7j









BARBARA AND DICK.

Barbara and Dick were to go to school,-a real school, kept by a
schoolmaster; they thought it would be grand. When the day came
for them to go, they started off over the meadows and cornfield, Barbara
carrying the satchel with the books and luncheon in one hand and lead-
ing little Dick by the other. Barbara got along very well, and answered
all the questions that were asked her in school, but poor little Dick sat
on a low bench, with a book in his hand, and could not make out one
word, for he was not a very smart boy, and could not read yet. But
Barbara helped him all she could, and he soon got along nicely.



41


















IF
.- ,^ a.: -- ,-


a ....J - - ,

























I-J
.. :':;'' -^-.': ,, ^^ ,-., ..-=.,. /'-






























PLAYING AT MAIL COACH.

To an old box we tied a horse
That had no head nor tail;
I was the guard and sat behind,
zn -
















And Bertie drove the mail.
42



AL











1-4 "Kill ,i, i !-. 'i I






9'.'








QUEER TOM.

Tom Flossofer was the queerest boy I ever knew. I don't think he
ever cried. If Fleda found her tulips all rooted up by her pet puppy,
and cried, as little girls will, Tom was sure to come around the corner
whistling, and say,-" What makes you cry ? Can you cry tulip? Do
you think every sob makes a root or a blossom? Here, let's try
to right them."
So he would pick up the poor flowers, put their roots into the ground
again, whistling all the time, make the bed look smooth and fresh, and
take Fleda off to hunt hens' nests in the barn.
One day, when his big sister was worried for fear it would rain and
she could not go out, Tom came up to her with a mug full of fresh
berries, and said, in his queer way,-" Never mind, Mary; if it does
rain, I have brought you some berries to comfort you."
43
to righ the43


















~-








TO A FISH.


Sparkle, sparkle, little fish;
Would we had you on a dish
Nicely cooked; you then would lie
Like a pigeon in a pie.

Flash and sparkle, little fish!
To be cooked is not your wish;
So, beneath the waves so deep,
Happy freedom you may keep.


44












"3il __' r .,"-7, -, a -





















WONDERLAND.


Would you like to go to Wonderland,
To Wonderland, to Wonderland ?
Then sit by me, and, book in hand,
We'll read and read,
And be, indeed,
With dwellers in Wonderland.


45.
















,r- f: ".


, ,., -- --_-_ -.-- ,. .


*, ' , s .; - _






THREE LITTLE FISHES.


Three little fishes leaped in the sun,
Just as the joyous June day had begun,-
Leaped in the sunshine and frolicked with glee,
Poor little three!

Three little fishes leaped in the sun,
A little lass hooked them one by one;
The bait was too tempting for them, you see,
Poor little three!


46












TI








1W A



A NUTTING SONG.

Oh, but the nuts are so brown in the wood,-
Out in the.wood, the glad autumn wood,-
And the children have trooped forth in rollicking mood;
Some clad in round hat and some clad in hood,
After the nuts so brown in the wood,
After the nuts so brown.

Oh, but the nuts were brown in the wood,-
Out in the wood, the glad autumn wood,-
And the children have trooped home in quieter mood;
Some of them fretful, and some of them good,
All of them laden with nuts from the wood,
Laden with nuts so brown.

47

























SUNBEAM,. TWINKLE, AND HILARY.

They were brother and sisters, and when they were asleep they were
wonderfully like one another,-the same eyes and nose and mouth, the
same fat, ruddy cheeks. But when they were awake you would not have
guessed that they were brother and sisters at all. The truth was, that
Hilary and Sunbeam were always laughing, while their brother Twinkle
was always crying. And that is the reason of their changed faces
asleep and awake; for it's not very easy to laugh or to cry when you're
asleep, I can assure you.
Now it happened that one day, when Sunbeam, Twinkle, and Hilary
were sitting on the garden wall, they all three fell asleep. And Twinkle
dreamed about a little boy that was always cross, and cried from morn-
ing until night, until he wore great gutters in his cheeks, and they never
went away, even when he was a man.
But, strange to say, from that time he grew more like Sunbeam and
Hilary, and folks said they were "as like as three peas."
48















BABY AND DOGGY.




We have a little baby at home, you know,
Who loves to paddle in the water so;
When he takes his bath it is splash, splash, splash,
And the water dances over with a dash, dash, dash,
Till nurse will cry, "Oh, fie! fie! fie!
It will take a week to get the floor dry, dry, dry;
I must rub, rub, rub, rub, rub, rub, rub,
And all through that baby in the tub, tub, tub."


We have a little doggy at home, you know,
Who loves to paddle in the water so;
When he comes from a walk through the door, door, door,
The marks that he leaves upon the floor, floor, floor,
Make the housemaid shout, shout, shout, shout, shout,
"How ever shall I get the stains out, out, out?
I must scrub, scrub, scrub, scrub, scrub, scrub, scrub,
And all through that horrid little cub, cub, cub."






4 49








A RAINY DAY.


Oh, where do you come from,
You horrid little drops?
Pitter patter, pitter patter,
I declare it never stops.

I know the rain won't hurt me,
Although they say it will;
I hate to keep in-doors like this.
And be so very still.

And I've got an umbrella,
Though not a handsome one;
I think that I shall go outside,
And have a little run.

Tell me, little raindrops,
Is that the way you play-
Pitter patter, pitter patter,
All the rainy day?

Oh pretty little raindrops,.
As I've nothing else to do,
I will be good, indeed I will,
If I may play with you.

The little raindrops answer--
Pitter patter, pin,
We only out of doors can play,
But you must play within.
50









)- OF



-- --
_ -I d
S- - .- -, '








ei 'li, i.\ \ ,,

I .....II


I' ', .. ,I.

-", I i' I, IIi'
'" I, II I II I-








r -- i

__,__ .












ROBIN REDBREAST.



Very high on a branch,
The warm nest above,
Robin Redbreast sang
To please his little love.

She was gentle, she was soft,
And her large dark eye
Often turned to her mate,
Who was sitting close by.

Chirp," said the mother,-
"Chirp," said he;
Oh, I love thee," said robin;
"And I love thee."

In the long shady branches
Of the dear old tree,
How happy are the robins
In their little nursery!

The young baby-robins
Never quarrelled in their nest,
For they dearly loved each other,
Though they loved their mother best.



52










,~_ - If f:,
l S1 i'


j i ,
,o'v' ,,i .. ..
-"".',
,7q' ,
... ,,\ ...
,'., ~ ,;, ;,....
I ,, '"'










THE CAT AND THE CHICKEN.


Here is a picture of a cat my old nurse, Mrs. Holden, had, and I will
tell you a very pretty story about her.
Mrs. Holden had an old hen which had only one chicken. This
little chicken was very feeble, and went peeping about in quite a pitiful
way. When Mrs. Holden was in the kitchen one day, and saw the old
hen clucking around the door-step with one chicken, she said to her girl
Ann, "I don't think it is of any use to raise that one chicken. I will
give it to the cat."
There was a great gray cat under the table, lying in a basket with
her three kittens. So Mrs. Holden picked up the poor little chicken
and tossed it into the cat's basket, looking to see it eaten up; but
instead of hurting it, the old cat began to lick its little downy feathers
as she did her soft little kittens, and the chicken cuddled down close to
the cat and kept warm.
Mrs. Holden said, "Old Pussy isn't hungry just now." But old
Pussy had no idea of eating up the chicken, even if she was hungry;
and when food was given to the cat and kittens, the chicken ate some
too, and it lived with the cats, and began to grow and thrive.
When Mrs. Puss left her basket, the chicken would jump out and
follow her out of doors and in again.
At last, one day, when the chicken got as large as a pigeon, the
old cat started out to go hunting. She had got nearly round the house,
when she looked round and saw the chicken following her. Then
she turned back and took it by the neck.
"There!" said Mrs. Holden, "the chicken's gone now; the old cat
has killed it." But she had not. She carried it back to the basket and
dropped it in; then she went away.

54





















Ilk


a IS.












ca I -J,.JL/


I. A

m~

! "r~i~~ AW
1 1 jl









WINTER SPORTS.


Jim and Joe, away they go
To build a castle of the snow;
Snow so white the castle walls,
Snow so hard the cannon-balls;
And peeping out above the hold,
A giant's head of snow so cold.
" Hallo!" said Jim, "when all is ready,
And tower and turret made quite steady,
We'll hoist a flag of colors bright,
And then we'll have a jolly fight;
We'll call the castle Giant's Fort,
And get our friends to join the sport.
Hugh, Nigel, Tom, my soldiers three,
To keep the Giant's Fort with me;
Whilst Ambrose, Nugent, little Ben,
Walter, and Charles shall be your men.
A battle fought without a blow,
Our only weapons balls of snow,
To take'the giant's head your aim;
Whilst to prevent it is our game.
To work! for well on either side
The troops with balls must be supplied."
Said Joe, "It is a glorious plan,
I'll work as hard as e'er I can;
And when the battle's fought and won,
We in the house will have some fun."


56





























It 4V
c, I.ll -I I' i, -



,I ,i i',",,
,' ,IIi ,, I
,r lh il I 1 '' !
IiiI 12 "

i LiY i UP'11'l'l~_l ' "~ .P~~,hah~~~~iP
|jl~


-I












MY PETS.


I am a little girl, and my name is Polly. I have three pets.
First, my dog Toby. He has long white hair, which I comb out
every day, to make him look like a gentleman.
Then comes my doll Topsy. She is rather shabby now, and has no
paint on her face; but she is clean, I am sure, for I wash her in the
water-butt every Saturday, and scrub her well with the sponge.
Last of all comes my newest pet, my kitten, which I am going to call
Dick.
About a month ago my aunt brought me this kitten in a basket, and
I sat ever so long wondering what to call it.
I thought of all the stories I had read in my pretty picture books,
and of all the stories I had heard, but I could not think of one about
a kitten or a cat. So I went and asked my mother if she knew one.
I know one about a cat," she said, "and your kitten will be a cat
some time."
"Please tell me it," I said.
"Dick Whittington and his Cat," she replied.
"Oh, yes!" I said, for I had forgotten all about it.
Then, when I thought about it, I remembered that his cat had no
name; and so I called it after him.
Now you see what fine times we four can have together; for we play
at all sorts of games, both in-doors and out.
My pets never quarrel; for I teach my cat and dog to be kind to
each other, and I am kind to both of them.



58





















L4-















till























; -_ --wM E








MARY AND THE CHERRIES.

Mary saw some fine ripe cherries
Hanging on a cherry-tree,
And she said, You pretty cherries,
Will you not come down to me ?"

"Thank you kindly," said a cherry,
"We would rather stay up here;
If we ventured down this morning,
You would -eat us up, I fear."

Mary jumped, and soon she reached them,
Standing high upon her toes;
And the cherries bobbed about,
And laughed, and tickled Mary's nose.

Soon a basket of the finest
Mary gathered from a twig;
"You are beautiful," said Mary,
"Red and ripe, and oh, how big!"

60











I '








i'



___ \ V \ "'i










THE STRANGE LITTLE GIRL.


Here is a little girl,
Look at her well;
Think if you know her,
If you do, tell.
I will describe her,
That you may see
If she's a stranger
To you and to me.

She has two feet
That can run up and down,
Over the country
And all about town;
She has two little eyes,
Always busy and bright,
And looking at something
From morning till night.


62




























I- . -. I.I I.






Sj ff




I k 111 1111'.. . "


PA -








\- -
-,t!.














SUGAR-STICKS.


Three little sun-bonnets all in a row,
Six little cheeks beneath all of a glow,
Six little pouting lips-pouting out so!
Three little women, so small, plump, and round,
Whose toddling feet slowly move o'er the ground,
All silent except for a small smacking sound.
Such an air of importance, though words they speak not;
Eyes staring, blue and round, onward they trot,
Now what are they doing, this queer little lot ?
After all 'tis a mystery easily guessed,
For these three little women, in sun-bonnets dressed,
Are doing of all things that they love best.
For so round, and so white, and so red, and so thick-
Or as they would have surely expressed themselves, "fick"-
In each little mouth is a sweet sugar-stick.
A few copper coins will buy sweeties to please
A hundred such plump little women as these,
O think of this, all ye people who live at your ease.
To the wishes of others let's never be blind,
If we'll keep our eyes open we daily shall find
How little it costs to be thoughtful and kind.





64










ELLEN AND THE FAIRIES.


Ellen often wished to see the fairies. She had read about them in a
book of fairy tales which her grandmamma gave her on Christmas day,
but she had never seen them. So one fine summer's night she deter-
mined to see them for herself. She stole away to the orchard, and
seated herself comfortably under an old apple-tree. She sat there a
long time, until the moon peeped at her over the hedge. Then she
thought the soft evening breezes wafted the sound of merry voices to
her. She listened, and looked, and lo! a band of wee fairies spread
themselves about the orchard. The prince held up his hand and said,
"Listen, fairies, you must all remember this, work before play; you all
know your tasks, go and perform them." Ellen watched one little elf,
and saw him produce several tiny cans of paint. He climbed up the
apple-tree, and tinged each blossom with delicate pink. Another painted
the buttercups with gorgeous yellow; another the daisy's yellow eye,
and wiped each stain from its white petals, whose edges lie tinted with
pink. Each took a flower, and cleansed and painted it. Others busied
themselves with tiny phials of perfume, putting a drop of one into the
violet, and of another into the primrose, and of another into the cowslip.
When their work was done, they ate their supper of honey and dew.
They went away after bidding good-by to Ellen. When she saw the
fairies going away, she opened her mouth to shout "Good-by," but
instead she found herself waking from a sleep in her little crib at home.
Her mamma was standing by her crib, looking anxious, and saying to
papa, "I hope she has not caught cold." "Why, Ellen," said papa,
when lie saw she was awake, "we had lost you, and found you fast
asleep in the orchard."


5 65










THE PET LAMB.


Oh, mother! mother! mother!" and here Tiny stopped for breath.
Well! well! well!" said mother, what has happened now?"
"Can we keep it, mother? May and Lillie and I found it almost dead
in the woods, and have carried it home all the way, and may we keep it?"
What, dear?"
This little lamb."
What to do with, my dear ?"
"Oh, to take care of, and to feed."
Her mother looked with a smile at the little girl.
"Very well, the lamb shall be yours. Run and tell your father at
once, then he won't give it to any one else."
Into the next field ran Tiny, where she found her father at work.
"It's mine, father!" she shouted, long before she reached him.
"What's yours, my girl?" he asked.
"The little lamb," she replied.
How do you make that out?"
Mother says so."
"And what are you going to do with it ?"
I am going to feed it, father."
"Can I have it?" she continued. Please, father, say yes."
You said it was yours."
"So it is, for mother said so; but you won't give it to any one else,
will you ?"
Not while you want it," he replied. A kiss sealed the bargain, and
away went Tiny to feed the lamb.
It soon got well, and Tiny had the pleasure of seeing it grow up to be
the finest sheep on her father's farm.


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JANE AND ELIZA.


There were two little girls, neither handsome
nor plain;
One's name was Eliza, the other was Jane;
They were near the same height, as I've heard
people say,
And both of one age, I believe, to a day.
'Twas thought by most people, who slightly
had seen them,
There was not a pin to be chosen between
them;
They played all the day 'mid the daisies so
bright,
And slept on the same little pillow at night.
They were always as happy as birds on the
tree,
And never a scowl or a frown could you see:
These two little girls, neither handsome nor
plain,
SOne named Eliza, the other named Jane.

68






































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POOR LITTLE BIRDIE.


Oh, Harry! how could you ? The poor little
bird !"
The speaker was a little girl, who ;was kneeling
on the grass, with her tears dropping upon a
poor bird which was lying on the ground almost
dead.
Near by was a trap, and all the poor birdie's
tail-feathers were left in it.
"Oh, Harry! you do not know how much the
poor bird has suffered; and perhaps it has a mate,
who is waiting for it to come back to the nest;"
and May's tears fell faster.
Well, little sister, it is a shame, and I will
promise never to set a trap again," said Harry
" so kiss me, and we will bury the little bird, and
put a board over its grave ; and whenever I see
it I shall think of my promise."



70













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HOW JACK SAVED JOE'S LIFE.


I want to tell you a story about a dear old dog
we have.
His name is Jack, and we love him very much.
Joe-that is his little master-was left alone in
the carriage one day, and the horse took fright.
Jack was near by, and saw the danger. He
jumped up and caught the bridle. He held on
tight and was dragged a long ways, but at last
the old horse got tired and stopped. Jack would
not let go his hold until a man who was near
caught the horse. When the danger was over,
it was found that poor Jack was injured very
severely.
Jack was taken home, and the children took
good care of him, and gave him all sorts of good
things to eat: but sometimes he had to take
medicine, and he did not like that any more than
little children do.


72




















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I'LL TAKE THE SHORTEST.


One day a lady went into a toy-shop with her
little son and daughter.
Buy us each a lead-pencil, mamma," said
Willie.
Yes, do, mamma," said May.
"I'll get one and. divide it between you," said
mamma, taking some money from her purse.
When the pencil was cut, one piece was smaller
than the other.
What shall I do ?" said mamma.
Willie, the younger, looked up, with a smile on
his rosy face : I'll take the little piece, mamma;
for I am a man, and ladies should always have
the best of everything, you know ; so sister shall
have the larger piece."



74












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THE BIRTHDAY PRESENT.


The day Bertha was five years old her father came back from grand-
mother's with a basket in his hand. "Now, what has he in it ?" said
Bertha to herself.
"Your kind grandmother," said he, "has sent you a birthday present,
and I doubt whether you can guess what it is."
So he set the basket on the table and lifted the lid, when, lo! a plump
Maltese kitten put up its head, and with wondering eyes looked around,
as much as to say, Where am I ?"
Now, although Bertha was very thankful to grandmother for so lively
and lasting a present, yet one thing troubled her. She had another pet,
her faithful playmate Dog Tray; how would Tray and Malty-so she
called the kitten-agree?
"The only way to find out," said papa, is to try them." So Bertha,
with much anxiety, set down a dish of nice bread and milk for their
supper.
"Tray, this is Malty," said she, bringing them together. "Be kind
to her, for this is now her home. She is both small and a stranger, and
it becomes you to act gently toward her. Now see how nicely you can
eat together."
Tray and Malty got along very nicely, and gave Bertha many a
happy hour.
Bertha loved to sit as you see her in the picture, with Malty on her
lap, waiting for papa to come home.




76










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PAWS AND CLAWS.


Mother," said little Nanny, "sometimes pussy has paws, and some-
times she has claws. Isn't that funny? She pats with her paws, and
plays prettily; but she scratches with her claws, and then I don't love
her. I wish she had no claws, but only soft little paws, then she would
never scratch, but would be always nice."
"Well, Nanny, dear," said her mother, "remember that you are very
much like pussy. These little hands, so soft and delicate, when well
employed, are like pussy's paws, very pleasant to feel. But when they
pinch, or scratch, or strike in anger, then they are like pussy's claws."
"Well, that's funny enough, mother. I never thought I was so much
like pussy."
"You love pussy much," said her mother, "and you may learn a good
lesson from her. When you think kind thoughts, and speak gentle,
loving words, then you are like pussy with her nice, soft paws, and
everybody will love you. But when you think bad thoughts, or give
way to ugly tempers, and speak cross and angry words, then you are like
piiy with her sharp, scratching claws, and no one can love you."
Nice, soft paws are much pleasanter than sharp, tearing claws. And
so gentleness is much pleasanter than anger or wrath, and this is a good
reason why we should try to learn this lesson.






78


















( --








A BUTTERCUP.

A little yellow buttercup
Stood laughing in the sun;
The grass all green around it,
The summer just begun;
Its saucy little head abrim
With happiness and fun.
Near by, grown old and gone to seed,
A dandelion grew;
To right and left with every breeze
His snowy tresses flew.
He shook his hoary head, and said,
"I've some advice for you.
"Don't think, because you're yellow now,
That golden days will last;
I was as gay as you are, once,
But now my youth is past.
This day will be my last to bloom;
The hours are going fast.
"Perhaps your fun may last a week,
But then you'll have to die."
The dandelion ceased to speak,-
A breeze that capered by
Snatched all the white hairs from his head,
And wafted them on high.
His yellow neighbor first looked sad,
Then, cheering up, he said,
"If one's to live in fear of death,
One might as well be dead."
The little buttercup laughed on,
And waved his golden head.
80







THE LOST BIRD.

Why, dear child, thus weep and mourn,
Because your little bird is gone ?
And why with longing eyes do you
Thus watch the trees to which it flew?
The bird, you know, was newly caught,
And with his cage by you was bought;
But do you really think that he
Would in that cage live happily ?
A bird who once, while he is young,
Has wandered free the trees among,
Will pine and grieve, and try each day
To break his bonds and flee away.
But if a bird his whole life long
Within a cage has chirped his song,
That bird will have no wish to roam,
Because his prison is his home.
Therefore, dear child, no longer grieve,
For truly you may now believe
Your little bird is happier far,
For now he's escapedd from prison bar.
6 81








THE WRECK.


What a nice place this is to sail our little ship in !" exclaimed Louis.
"It may be we had better wait for George, Louis. Remember what
mother said about the danger of the ships being carried away over the
rocks."
"Oh, I'll take care; we are not quite so silly as mother thinks we
are; and I don't believe George will come at all this afternoon."
"Well, it will not do to go home without seeing our ship sail. So you
get ready to catch it. Shall I push it right off here, or over there ?"
"Push it from where you stand, Alice; that is the best place."
The little vessel glided gracefully into the water on a mimic wave, to
the great delight of the children, who clapped their hands and almost
screamed for joy. Louis caught it as it sailed up to the rock, which he
called a wharf, and launched it back to Alice. Thus they played a good
while, sending it back and forward to each other. It kept a straight
course, and did not seem in any danger until the last time, when Louis
pushed it a little too far out. It drifted into the current, and soon trem-
bled on the brink of the waterfall. A second wave carried it over the
falls into the foaming stream below, where it became a total wreck.
Alice burst into tears, and Louis almost forgot his own loss in trying
to console her.
They went round to the stream below the falls, and looked long and
anxiously for even some fragments of the wreck of their "dear little
ship," but it was all in vain.
Just as they were mournfully turning from the scene of shipwreck,
they saw George Thompson coming toward them. He heard their
sad tale, and, to comfort them, promised that if he could find time to
spare, and some suitable wood, he would make another boat. But they
did not soon forget the lesson they learned in obedience.

82












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