• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 To the Children
 January
 February
 March
 April
 May
 June
 July
 August
 September
 October
 November
 December
 Advertising
 Back Cover






Title: The children's almanac for 1879--80--81--82--83
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00048331/00001
 Material Information
Title: The children's almanac for 1879--80--81--82--83
Physical Description: 1 v. (unpaged) : ill. ; 13.6 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Pratt, Ella Farman, 1837-1907
D. Lothrop & Company ( Publisher )
Publisher: D. Lothrop and Company
Place of Publication: Boston (Franklin St. Corner Hawley)
Publication Date: [1878]
 Subjects
Subject: Juvenile literature -- 1878   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1878
Genre: Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Massachusetts -- Boston
 Notes
Citation/Reference: BAL
Statement of Responsibility: edited by Ella Farman.
General Note: Bound in brown cloth ; stamped in gold and black ; light gray endpapers.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00048331
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 001102783
oclc - 05383136
notis - AFJ8864

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Frontispiece
        Plate
    Title Page
        Page i
        Page ii
        Page iii
    To the Children
        Page 1
    January
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
    February
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    March
        Page 14
        Page 16
        Page 15
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
    April
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
    May
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
    June
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    July
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
    August
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    September
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
    October
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
    November
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
    December
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
    Advertising
        Page 78
        Page 79
    Back Cover
        Cover 3
        Cover 4
Full Text






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The Children's Almanac.

FOR
1879-80-81-82-83. ^


EDITED BY

ELLA FARMAN.











BOSTON:
D. LOTHROP AND COMPANY,
FRANKLIN ST., CORNER OF HAWLEY.































COPYRIGHT,

D. LOTHROP & CO.,

1878.
















thrkioElt anv blurcrill, Printers,
BOSTON.











ORIGINAL POEMS,

BY

HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW.

MRS. A. D. T. WHITVNEY.

WILL CARLETON.

ELIZABETH STUART PHELPS.

EDGAR FAWCETT.

MRS. L. C. WHITON.

JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER.

CELIA THAXTER.

MRS. SALLIE M. B. PIATT.

JOHN JAMES PIA TT.

J. T. TROWBRIDGE.

THOMAS BAILEY ALDRICH.















TO THE CHILDREN.



IN Old Times knights and brave men frequently chose a
Motto which they honored and held as a Rule and a
Reminder in daily life. This Conduct-Motto was often painted
on the shield, engraved upon the seal ring, or embroidered upon
the banner or the scarf; and thus it was constantly in sight and
in use.
In this little Almanac, this little everyday book designed for
a handy pocket reference and school-desk companion, there is a
Birthday Line from the poets for each of you, which you may
adopt as a Conduct-Motto, and if you say it over and over and
keep it in mind it will surely help you in becoming as strong
and as true as the grandest men and women you have ever read
about.
But, though your own Birthday-Motto is specially your very
own, you can have a Daily Conduct-Motto also. There is a
fresh one for each morning. Read it, hold it up high in your
thoughts, and honor it in your deeds. E. F.













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JANUARY.



ANUS am I; oldest of potentates !
Forward I look and backward, and below

I count, as god of avenues and gates,
The years that through my portals come and go.

I block the roads and drift the fields with snow;
I chase the wild-fowl from the frozen fen;
My frosts congeal the rivers in their flow,
My fires light up the hearths and hearts of men.



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LITTLE FOLKS' MEMORANDA FOR JANUARY.



"Wish you Happy New Year "- First Monday



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after New Year's School re-opens -Jan. 20, WIDE AWAKE and BABYLAND day Prime Coastings
and Skatings throughout the month-Glorious Saturdays-Jolly Sleighrides.



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CONDUCT MOTTOES FOR JANUARY BIRTHDAYS.

i. Better not be at all, than not be noble. Tennyson.
2. 0' guid advisement comes nae ill. Burns.
3. What kind word to thy playmate spoken ? Willis.
4. Hard work is wholesome past all doubt. -- Lowell.
5. Love is sunshine, hate is shadow. -Longfellow.
6. Truth is the highest thing that man may keep. Chaucer.
7. Love thyself last. Shakespeare.
8. Nothing's so hard but search will find it out. fHerrick.
9. He nothing common did, nor mean. Marvell.
o1. Be sure of your facts, your measures, and your weights. -Lowell.
ii. My heart is true as steel. Shakespeare.
12. Feet that run on willing errands. Longfellow.
13. Whose yesterdays look backward with a smile. Young.
14. Be strong-backed, brown-handed -Lowell.
15. What shall I do to be forever known ? Cowley.
16. Mistress of herself though china fall. Pope.
17. Blessings ever wait on virtuous deeds. Congrevze.
x8. A white lily in the midst of noxious weeds. --Longfellow.
19. Shine in use! Tennyson.
20. O, while you live, tell truth and shame the devil! Shakesfeare.
2t. 'Tis always morning somewhere! -Longfellow.
22. I dare do all that may become a man. Shakespeare.
23. Wishing, of all employment, is the worst. Young.
24. Be good, sweet maid, and let who will be clever. Canon Kingsley.
25. Make each day a critic on the last. Pole.
26. Hang sorrow Care will kill a cat. Geo. Wither.
27. The flower of sweetest smell is shy and lowly. Wordswor!h.
28. There's a gude time coming! Sir Walter Scott.
29. Old friends are best. Yokn Selden.
30. Be plain in dress and sober in your diet. -Lady lMontague.
31. If all the year were holidays
To sport would be as tedious as to work. Shakespeare.











STUDIES OR HE SCHOOL YEAR.
STUDIES FOR THE SCHOOL YEAK.
























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FEBRUARY.



W ILL winter never be over ?
Will the dark days never go ?
Must the buttercup and the clover
Be always hid under the snow ?
Ah, lean me your little ear, love, -
Hark to a beautiful thing:
The weariest month of the year, love,
Is shortest, and nearest the spring!


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LITTLE FOLKS' MEMORANDA FOR FEBRUARY.- Hurrah for the shortest month in the year!-
St. Valentine gets up his team and loads his gift-sleigh -Feb. 14, St. Valentine arrives.-Feb. 20,

WIDE AWAKE and BABYLAND day Feb. 22, Washington's Birthday Holiday.











CONDUCT MOTTOES FOR FEBRUARY BIRTHDAYS.

x. Folks that's afeared to fail are sure of failure. Lowell.
2. Do noble deeds, not dream them, all day long. -Kingsley.
3. Have a good hat Be shy of breastpins! O. IV. Holmes.
4. Learn to labor and to wait. -Longfellow.
5. With smiles for the joyful, with tears for the weeper. Whittier.
6. I knew the Right and did it. Tennyson.
7. Folks need not be unkind, austere. --Mary Howitt.
8. If you're mistaken, own up and don't fight. Lowell.
9. I'll find a way, or make it! 7ohn G. Saxe.
zo. He had a hearty hatred of oppression. -Holland.
ix. Gentle words are always gain. Tennyson.
12. Each heart is told the poor to aid. IVillis.
13. Neat was the kitchen, and tidy was she. Dr. Holmes.
14. Walk with the Beautiful.- Burrington.
15. To worship rightly is to love each other. Whittier.
x6. Follow, follow, thou shalt win! Tennyson.
17. Here's a fellow who can both write and fight! -Longfellow.
x8. Gatherye rosebuds while ye may! Robert Herrick.
x9. Make the truth thine own for truth's own sake.- Whittier.
2o. Stand by your ship till you all go down. -Dr. Holmes.
21. With patient manliness he kept his rank.-Stedman.
22. Dare to be true! Nothing can need a lie George Herbert
23. Pathways are steep that reach the mountain height. Mrs. Whiton.
24. Whom hast thou pitied? And whom forgiven? Willis.
25.. Rule by patience. -Longfellow.
26. Fit to do as well as to plan. Stedman.
27. Sweet it is to have done the thing one ought. Tennyson.
a8. Noisiest fountains run soonest dry. Whittier.
29. I will be free as the rushing air,
And sing of sunshine everywhere. -L. Maria Child.

















RECITATION HOURS.




















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MARCH.



A LTHOUGH I now stand Number Three,
Yet they in history versed
Say, in the days that used to be,
Of months I was the first.

They put me back, one of those years
When classes new were forming;
And maybe that's the reason, dears,
Why I am always storming.


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LITTLE FOLKS' MEMORANDA FOR MARCH. Skates hung up for the season -Cold toes and
-nipped noses still in order-Mar. 2othb, WIDE AWAE and BABYLAN day-Spring vacation
-Maple Sugar and Good Times in the Country-The last of the sn all
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LITTLE FOLKS' MEMORANDA FOR MARCH. Skates hung up for the season-Cold toes and
nipped noses still in order- Mar. zoth, WIDa AWAKE and BABYLAND day-Spring vacation
- Maple Sugar and Good Times in the Country The last of the snowballs.












CONDUCT MOTTOES FOR MARCH BIRTHDAYS.

I. True worth is in being, not seeming. -Alice Cary.
2. And all may do what has by man been done.- Shakespeare.
3. Strong in the strength which only truth can give.- Trovbridge.
4. Here's a heart for every fate.- Byron.
5. Like a gentleman and like a man.- Tennyson.
6. I'm an off ox at bein' druv.- Lowell.
7. All things come round to him who will but wait.- Longfellow.
8. Who has less than you a Little Brother is. E. F.
9. Always doing his very best 7. G. Saxe.
to. So ready to be pleasant, and so kind.- Siary Howitt.
ii Live so good and true Honor willbe but worthy due.- Will Carleton.
12. Peace-cry for war-cry! Longfellow.
13. Excelsior.- Longfellow.
14. Make thy life one brave endeavor, one grand, sweet song.-Kingsley.
15. He wouldn't injure even a bird.- Pho6e Cary.
16. The first virtue is to temper well thy tongue. Chaucer.
17. The worst I know I would do good to.- Whittier.
18. Keep thine honor sweet and clear Longfellow.
19. Cherrily then, my little man !- Whittier.
20. Leave what you've done for what you have to do.- Holmes.
21. Nothing useless is, or low.- Longfellow.
22. Never fail thy cheerfulness.- IVlittier.
23. Don't be haughty and put on airs.- Saxe.
24. Good can't never come too late.- Lowell.
25. Always busy and always merry.- Saxe.
26. There's life alone in duty done.- Whittier.
27. Let us be what we are, and speak what we think.- Longfellow.
28. Now's the only bird lays eggs of gold.- Lowell.
29. Sweet thoughts, good thoughts, like angels clothed in white.-E. A. B.
30. The brain is like the hand and grows with using.- Tennyson.
31. All who joy would win,
Must share it,-Happiness was born a twin.-Byron.

















I DESIRABLE BOOKS TO READ.
DESIRABLE BOOKS TO READ.





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WAKE AND SLEEP WHILE BONNIE SPRING I
BUSY IS WITH BLOSSOMING. F



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APRIL.

F the apples bloomed to-day,

It would be pink, and would be May;

If great gold roses opened soon,

Then it would be yellow June;

If it snowed O, I remember !

It would be white, and be December.

Just because it's grey and blue,

April! April that means you.



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LITTLE FOLKS' MEMORANDA FOR APRIL. April i, Jokers' Day: "I'll do my sporting gently"-
School Re-opens Easter, with Easter eggs and Easter gifts April o2, WIDE AWAKE and
BABYLAND day Hoops and marbles and stilts make their appearance.



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CONDUCT MOTTOES FOR APRIL BIRTHDAYS.

x. All good and no badness.-- ohn Skewton.
2. From labor there shall come forth rest.-Longfellow.
3. Each good thought moves the dark world nearer to the sun.-Whittier.
4. If it rains, let it rain we shall not drown.- A lice Cary.
5. His boyhood was of manliest hue.- Bryant.
6. Now know, that to crow, often brings one to woe.- S. C. Foster.
.7 Work they find, they do with their might.-A. D. T. Whitney.
8. With happy youth and work content --ean Ingelow.
9. Words of friendship, comfort and assistance.- Longfellow.
So. All thy spirit braced to noble ends.- W. I. Story.
xx. And their souls were sweet as the day new-born.-Dr. Holland.
1?. I hold it sinful to despond. -Celia Thaxter.
13. Be then thy conscience as the eternal rock.--Trowbridge.
14. Lifting Better up to Best.-Emerson.
15. Obeying Duty's every-day behest.- Stedman.
x6. They fail, and they alone, who have not striven.-Aldrick.
17. His words are bonds.- Shakespeare.
18. Know thy joy ere it passes, barefoot boy --Whittier.
19. I'll be as patient as a gentle stream.- Shakespeare.
20. In the field of Destiny, we reap as we have sown.- Whittier.
21. Hasty climbers soonest fall.- William Byrd.
22. I grow in a straight line, upwards.- George Herbert.
23. In a false quarrel there is no true valour.- Shakespeare.
24. He speaks best who hath the skill to hold his .peace.- Vaux.
25. Scorning to revenge an injury.-Lady Carew.
26. One thing is found good, that one thing is success.- Emerson.
27. It would ill become me to be vain.- Shakespeare.
28 A simple, loyal nature, pure as snow.-Aldrich.
29. The law of love prevails.- Longfellow.
30. Whether the prize be a ribbon or throne,
The victor is he who can go it alone.- J. G. Saxe.








LIBRARY REFERENCES.

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MAY.



N yonder broad meadows that May loves to
sprinkle
With bloom and sweet fragrance besides,
I watch how the long breezes tenderly wrinkle
The stream that with melody glides,
And fancy the bells of the buttercups tinkle
A wedding peal from their green tides,
For when the fresh trees in such balminess twinkle,
The birds are all bridegrooms and brides.


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LITTLE FOLKS' MEMORANDA FOR MAY.- May Day, and May baskets -Trailing Arbutus in
bloom-May 2, W AWAKE and A AD day May 3o Decoration day- roquet-grouds








in order -Flower-bed work or little spades and little rakes.
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LITTLE FOLKS' MEMORANDA FOR MAY.-May Day, and May baskets Trailing Arbutus in
bloom- May 20, WIDE AWAKE and BARYLAND day May 3o, Decoration day- Croquet-grounds
in order -Flower-bed work for little spades and little rakes.











CONDUCT MOTTOES FOR MAY BIRTHDAYS.

x. Labor is life -'tis the still water faileth -Frances Osgood
2. Be strong! be good! be pure !- Longfellow.
3. Kindness to the wronged is never without its reward.- Whittier.
4. If you've wronged him, speak him fair.-Holmes.
5. Smiling the brighter the darker the day.- Alice Cary.
6. In evil days he faltered never.- IVilliam Cullen Bryant.
7. The right only shall endure.-Longfellow.
8. Take the open air the more you take the better.--A non.
9. Unspoiled by praise or blame.- T. B. A ldrick.
io. Take what passes in good part.- aohn Byram.
zt. Tolose with high endeavor is to win.- Trowbridge.
12. A perfect woman nobly planned.-lt ordsworth.
13. To work in my place through shower and shine.- E. F.
14. Useful hands and honest hearts.-Elliott.
15. She was made for happy thoughts -Mary Howitt.
"16. Gi'e me your hand -we're brethren a'!- Nicoll.
17. Friends never be ashamed when they hear thee named.-Will Carleton.
18. The best is yet to be.-Browning.
19. Little at the first, but mighty at the last.-Browning.
20. Stout muscles and a sinewy heart.-Massey.
21. Deserve the best.- Channing.
22. Right the day must win.- Faber.
23. Scorn of miserable aims that end with self.- George Eliot.
24. Be strong, and trust high instincts.-Lord Lytton.
25. Who laughs at crooked men need walk very straight.-G. IV. T.
26. What happiness to look upon the sun.- William Mnorris.
27. Be men stand up! draw in a mighty breath Ellsvorth.
28. Though boats go down, men build again.- Hiram Rich.
29. Even wrong-doors are our brother-men.-An on.
30. He won the day the battle of something-or-other.- Longfellow.
31. Don't be proud and turn up your nose
At poorer people in plainer clothes.-Saxe.















SHORT QUOTATIONS, &C., &C.






















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JUNE.



G REEN sloping fields o'er which cloud-shadoi
pass;

A quivering splendor tangled in the grass;

Sunrise-hued roses throbbing in the air;

The starry blackberry blossoms here and there;

And on divinest skies white clouds that lay

As air of Heaven in drifts had dropped away;

Rapture of birds at dawn a hush at noon -

Ah by my heart's wild beating it is rune !


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LITTLE FOLKS' MEMORANDA POR JUNE. The longest play hours of the whole year-Roses
and strawberries and straw hats and red faces and hard study- June 20, WIDE AWAKE and
BABYLAND day-Examination looms in the near distance (also Midsummer holidays).











CONDUCT MOTTOES FOR JUNE BIRTHDAYS.

i. Never the little seed stops in its growing.-Mrs. Osgood.
p 2. Impulsive, earnest, prompt to act.--Vhittier.
3. There's nothing so kingly as kindness.-Alice Cary.
4. Owning all thy wrongs, atone for all.--Trowbridge.
5. All that's chivalous and all that's daring.--Saxe.
6. If you wish a thing well done, you must do it yourself.-Longfellow.
7. Carry learning to its height.-Emerson.
8. Home i we love it, and all that are there.-Nicoll.
9. Use your manners discreetly in all kinds of companies.- Shakespeare.
Jo. In base revenge there is no honor won.-Lady Carew.
xI. Look where you step, or you'll stumble.-7. G. Holland.
12. Though he he merry, yet withal he's honest.-Shakesfeare.
13. Great of heart, magnanimous, courtly and courageous.-Longfellow.
14. Whose smiles are pleasant, and whose words are peace.-Anon.
15. Reserve in utterance and resolve in act.-Punch.
16. I love a friendship free and frank.-- ohn Byratm.
17. Boldly to my task again !-Adelaide Proctor.
18. She dealt no upbraidings and no blame.-Dr. Holland.
19. I've been laughing at work while others sigh.-Mary N. Prescott.
o2. In harvest time it is too late to sow.-E. A. B.
21. Shamed be the hands that idly fold! Wlhittier.
22. Get out of your dumps, and up and at it again !-Holland.
23. Helper of the poor and suffering.-Adelaide Proctor.
24. Often baffled, he ever prevailed.-Owen Meredith.
25. Plenty to do, and an incentive for doing it, too.-A-non.
26. Not to be laughed at and scorned because little of stature.-Longfellow.
27. Life's great results are something slow.-Howells.
28. Ever blithe, ever bold.-Owen Meredith.
29. 'Tis not by endless hoping, fortune you can win.-C. Dunn.
30. Hischaracter'ssuch
As to make his friends love him too much. Lowell.










THINGS TO BE DONE IN VACATION.












































NEVER BE IDLE NEVER BE SAD
GO IN THESUNSHINE AND C-ROW D'
















































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JULY.



SHE summer harvest day begun
With cloudless dawn and flaming sun;

Ripe grain the sickle flashes through;

The sweep of scythes in morning dew;

The nooning underneath the trees

Made cool by sea or mountain breeze;

The thunder shower, the clearing sky,

And sunset splendor of July.

















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4883. 1882. 1881. 4880. 1879.


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LITTLE FOLKS' MEMORANDA FOR JULY. Examination Day- I.ong Vacation begins-- Inde-
pendence Day and Fourth" fun July no, WIre AWAKE and BAnYLAND day -All aboard for
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CONDUCT MOTTOES FOR JULY BIRTHDAYS.



x. Always doing his very best.--ohn Godfrey Saxe.
2. In all things keep ourselves loyal to the truth.-Longfellow.
3. Of yesterday's sunshine the grateful heart sings.-WVhittier.
4. We cannot do wrong and feel right.-Alice Cary.
5. Discarding praise as motive of my labor.- Dr. Holland.
6. We are no tell-tales, madame l Shakespeare.
7. 'Mid the bravest, braver than them all.-Adelaide Proctor.
8. He who seeks one thing may hope to achieve it.- Meredith.
9. Work for some good, be it ever so slowly.- Mrs. Osgood.
io. See thou be worthy to be known.- Owen Meredith.
Ix. Dare to have a purpose firm! Dare to make it known.-Anon.
12. Whatever you are, be brave, boys! -Downton.
3. I am a pattern for housewives.- Longfellow.
4. Tolove all things set above me- all of good, all of fair.- E. B.
5. As a man may, he fought his fight.- G. H. Boker.
16. God means everyone to be happy, be sure.--, Oven Meredih.
7. Believe in the red on the rose! -Mrs. S. M. B. Pialt.
8. Still cleave to the right, be lovers of light.- A non.
9. He takes to heart the grief of every stranger.- Mrs. Browning.
o. Be quiet, Take things as they come.- Owen Meredith.
z. Simple duty hath no place for fear.- iWhittier.
2. Down with your crown, man Be humble -7. G. Holland.
23. Our duty down hee is to do, not know.- Owen MAeredith.
24. She had sympathies rapid, open.-- lrs. Browning.
25. Leave to others the shamming.- A non.
26. How good to live and learn Browning.
27. His words are noble, good, and wise.-Adelaide Anne Proctor.
28. He had the genius to be loved.-Elizabeth Barrett Browning.
29. King of two hands, he does his part.-Lowell.
30. Toiling upward in the night.- Longfellow.
3I. Keep thou the one true way,
In work or play.-Keble.


















POST OFFICE ADDRESSES.







































,'F'








AUGU ST.


B UTTERCUP nodded and said, "good-bye!
Clover and daisy went off together,
But the fragrant water-lilies lie
Yet moored in the golden August weather.
The swallows chatter about their flight,
The cricket chirps like a rare good fellow,
The asters twinkle in clusters bright,
While the corn grows ripe and the apples mellow


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LITTLE FOLKS' MEMORANDA FOU AUGUST. Long Vacation continues- Good Times; ber-
rying, boating, base ball, croquet, hammocks, pic-nics, camping out and gypsying generally--
August 20, WIDE AWAKE and BABYLAND day Long Vacation comes to an end.



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CONDUCT MOTTOES FOR AUGUST BIRTHDAYS.

x. Help them who cannot help again.-Emerson.
2. Firm in the strong purposes which build the world.--7. 7. Piatt.
3. God make thee beautiful within! Whittier.
4. Forget your bumps, get out of your dumps!- G.Holland.
5. He was so noble, and so gay. -Adelaide Anne Proctor.
6. Live as though life were earnest, and life will be so. Meredith.
7. His bearing bold, though by courtesy controlled.- Scott.
8. If you are mistaken, own up, an' don't fight.- Lowell.
9. Wake up and be doing, Life's heroic ends pursuing.- Mrs.Browning
1o. Patient to the last! Elizabeth Stuart Phelfs.
ox. Mercy to the weak!- Longfellow.
12. Be open, above board, and frank, boys -H. Downtown.
13. In thy spirit's power, steadier than rock! -Anon.
14. He who is honest is noble.-Alice Cary.
15. Gentle in mien, words and temper.-Anon.
16. Proved his truth by his endeavor.- G. H. Boker
17. Even trouble may be made a little sweet.- Mrs. Pinat.
18. Wrong to root out, good to strengthen.- Owuen Meredith.
19. Yes, be thyself, thyself,-only thyself! Anon.
20. I still see something to be done.-Mrs. Browning.
21. When it is raining, let it rain! Longfellow.
22. We build the ladder by which we rise.-Holland.
23. So very slow to blame.-M ary Howitt.
24. Rich in a glorious Future of bright deeds.- Adelaide Proctor
25. Go cheerful as yon humming-bees to labor, as to play.- Whittier.
26. Rules are well.-Lord Lytton.
27. Whose triumph's due to patience, pluck, and tact.-Punch.
28. I go my own way-onward, upward! -Owen Meredith.
29 Nothing evil having done, nothing can encumber.-Mrs. Browning
30. It is only work that you want, indeed! Mrs. Piatt.
31. Laugh at those who grumble,
And be jolly as you can.-- ohn Godfrey Saxe.










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SEPTEMBER.



S END back these lonesome lights to Fairyland,
Whose winged glimmer of gold lured childish

feet,

Borrowed (with flower and bird), you understand,

To keep while moons were warm and dews were

sweet.


Hush! -we may have them for a little yet,

Before the weird leaf-gathering frost creeps on.

Ah, loveliest time !- wherein we may regret

The fair things going, not the sweet things gone.

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LITTLE FOLKS' MEMORANDA FOR SEPTEMBER. Back to town Fall Term of School opens
- School-rooms filled with bright eyes, brown faces and brown hands--September 20, WIDE
AWAKE and BABYLAND day Best study-days of the whole school year.











CONDUCT MOTTOES FOR SEPTEMBER BIRTHDAYS.

i. Child-simple, undefiled, frank, obedient.- Af's. lBowning.
2. Be thou in rebuking evil, conscious of thine own.- Whittier.
3. Prison thy soul from malice, bar out pride.- Channing.
4. Honest work for the day, honest hope for the morrow.- Meredit'i.
5. So long as you are innocent, fear nothing.-Long'fell/o
6. One get surelier onward by walking than leaping.-Lowell.
7. Whose looks have power to make dissensions cease.-Anon.
8. Come-here is work-begin! -E. Ellsworth.
9. What seems coarse is often good and fine.-A bbey.
to. A noble deed is a step toward God.-- G. Holland.
Ir. Modest answer and graceful air.- Whittier.
12. True heart and strongwill.-Adelaide Proctor.
13. The least flower may share its dew-drop with another.-E. B. B.
14. Act, act in the living present! -Longfellow.
15. Be visible through and through, boys! H. Downtown.
16. True treasure is not lightly won.--Ars. S. M. B. Piatt.
17. Learn to right the injured cause. -Sir Wlalter Scott.
1i. High heartedness doth sometimes teach to bow.-Lady Carew.
19. To make the best of all things is the best Owen Mere.l .'z.
20. We are too ready with complaint.- Mrs. Browning.
21. Her hearth is swept clean.-- R. Lowell.
22. No endeavor is in vain.- Longfellow.
23. Sweet promptings unto kind deeds. IVhittier.
"24. I never dodge."- 7ohn Byram.
25. Our place is kept ready for us to fill it.- A. A. Proctor.
26. Lofty thoughts and lovely deeds! Owen Meredith.
27. Speak out plainly! be precise with facts and dates.- Mrs. Broaunin.,
28. Both the Sweet and the True.- Elizabeth Stuart Phe4ls.
29. We can act to a purpose-we spring up erect.-Mrs. Browning.
30. Happy, and careless and blest,
Full of the song-sparrow's spirit.-C/lia Tha tt r.
















LECTURE AND CONCERT DATES, &C. &C.


















































wrFTr DAYS IN YOUR GOLDEN FLIGHT.
m RRlIN MALL THAr'S SWEET AND BRIGHT






















rT~II









OCTOBER.



O CTOBER Morning! -how the sun
Glitters on glowing shock and sheaf,

On apple crisp with mellow gold,

On wonder-painted leaf !

October Evening -look, the moon,

Like one in Fairyland benighted !

Out-doors Jack Frost bites sharp; within,

Good, our first fire is lighted!



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LITTLE FOLKS' MEMORANDA FOR OCTOBER. Fine Saturdays for nutting and autumn-leaf
excursions -The best nights of the whole year for delicious rosy sleep Splendid days for hard
work on the school-books- OCTOBER 20, WIDE AWAKE and BABYLAND day.











CONDUCT MOTTOES FOR OCTOBER BIRTHDAYS.

I. I shall be glad to learn of noble men. Shakespeare.
2 Duties well performed and days well spent.- Longfellow.
3. And each shall care for other.-Emerson.
4. To act to-morrow what he learns to-day.- Browning.
5. A hardy frame, a hardier spirit.-Lowell.
6. We always may be what we might have been.- A. A. Proctor.
7. I love all who love truth.--Elizabeth Barrett Browning.
8. Nature fits all her children with something to do.-Lowell.
9. In fun, and in earnest, be true, boys! H. Downtown.
xo. Hold thy lot as great as any.-E. C. Stedman.
ii. Courage to endure and to obey.- Tennyson.
12. He is sweet as sweet can be.- Mrs. S. M. B. Piatt.
13. The strength to do, the power to will.-E. Stuart Phelps.
14. There's life alone in duty done.- Whlittier.
15. Thro' actions pure and good grew to perfect ladyhood.- Stedman.
x6. Warmed with sunny goodness, warming all.-- Y. Platt.
17. Shout for the Helper and Doer -Mrs. Browning.
18. Scorn to bear an injury in mind.- Lady Carew.
g9. For those that overcome, the crowns are ready.- Meredith.
o2. Win or lose exulting-we are strong.-- Piatl.
x2. Ever in the New rejoicing.- Whittier.
22. He sought to know twixtt Right and Wrong.- Lowell.
23. Be modest in your dress.- Lady Mary Wortley Montague.
24. Great gifts can be given by little hands.-A. A. Proctor.
25. What I seek, I am impatient to gain.- Owen Meredith.
26. Beauty, Good, and Knowledge.- Tennyson.
27. Steadfast and tender in the hour of need.- A non.
28. What she suffered she shook off in the sunshine.- Browning.
29. Her gentleness was equal with her youth.- Stedman.
30. If no better, let us do but this-endeavor! Mrs. Browning.
31. "Whom God's creatures love," the angel fair
Murmured, "God doth bless with angel's care."- T. Westwood.









CALLS; STREETS AND NUMBERS.
V4 CALLS TEET AND NUMBERS.

















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NOVEMBER.



THE flowers have with the swallows fled,
And silent is the cricket;
The red leaf rustles overhead,
The brown leaves fill the thicket.

The mild October days are gone,
Sweet nutting-time, and kite-time;
With frost and storm comes slowly on
The year's long wintry night-time.

But while the mellow light departs,
The household draws together,
And ever warmer grow our hearts
As colder grows the weather.


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1883. 1882. 1881. 1880. 1879. Z
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LITTLE FOLKS' MEMORANDA FOR NOV"IBER. Thanksgiving plans--NOVSmBR 20, WIDE

snow-flakes and cold noses of the season- Roasted chestnuts and pop-corn.
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LIrTLE FOLKS' MEMORANDA FOR NOVEMBER. Thanksgiving plans- NOVEMBER 20, WIDE
AWAKE and BANYLAND day Thanksgiving Day, with jolly gatherings at Grandpa's bouse- First
snow-flakes and cold noses of the season-Roasted chestnuts and pop-corn.











CONDUCT MOTTOES FOR NOVEMBER BIRTHDAYS.

i. Much mirth and no madness. okhn Skewton.
2. 'Tis only noble to be good. Tennyson.
3. What avails a life of fretting?-- Whittier.
4. Keep happy, sweetheart, and grow wise.--Adelaide Proctor.
5. The heart that loveth is willing. Ldngfellow.
6. Yours is the charm of calm good sense. -Meredith.
7. I grudge not at another's gain. William Byrd.
8. A good child on the whole, meek, manageable. Mrs. Browning.
9. Pleased with what he gets. Shakeseare.
1o. Whatever you are, be kind, boys. -Anon.
Ix. The sense of lofty courtesy. -Elizabeth Stuart Phel.s.
12. Sow the seed and reap the harvest. Tennyson.
13. Give me purpose, steadfast purpose. Tennyson.
14. Look thou not down, but up Browning.
15. He does not tease and storm and pout I --Mrs. Piatt.
16. The land has need of one whose will will find a way. --. 7. Pia't.
17. A heart that in his labor sings. Lowell.
18. Her wisdom in her goodness found its mate. Stedman.
s9. Bold to leap a height! strong to climb -Mrs. Browning.
20. Laugh away each late defeat. 7. Pialt.
2r. Whatsoever is willed is done. Whittier.
22. To the poor a noble brother. Emerson.
23. Courage, if sorrow comes, to bear it. Lowell.
24. Some work of noble note may yet be done. Tennyson.
25. The working hand to help the will. Owen Meredith.
26. Scorn to owe a duty overlong. -Lady Carew.
27. Gentle in thought, benevolent in deed.- A non.
28. Something attempted, something done. Longfellow.
29. I too have my vocation work to do! Mrs. Browning.
30. When she begins to turn up her nose
No longer she'll be as sweet as a rose. E. F.















HOLIDAY GIFTS TO PURCHASE.


































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DECEMBER.


W HEN every stocking was stuffed with dolls, and
balls, and rings,
Whistles, and tops, and dogs (of all conceivable
things !),
Old Kriss Kringle looked round, and saw on the elm-
tree bough,
High-hung, an oriole's nest, lonely and empty now.
"Quite like a stocking," he laughed, "pinned up
there on the tree !
I didn't suppose the birds expected a present from
me!"
Then old Kriss Kringle, who loves a joke as well as
the best,
Dropped a handful of flakes in the oriole's empty
nest.














































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LIrTLE FOLKS' MEMORANDA FOR DECEMBER. Christmas Plans and Anticipations-- DECEM-
"BER 20, WIDE AWAKE and ABYLA- day Snowballs and skates and sleds (perhaps)--Decem-
her 25, "Wish you Merry CHRISTMAS School closes for the Holidays.










CONDUCT MOTTOES FOR DECEMBER BIRTHDAYS.

i. Brave, not romantic, frolic, not frantic. -Fielding.
2. All the glorious deeds of man make golden riot in my heart. A non.
3. Work like a man, but don't be worked to death. Holwmns.
4. Know well thy friends. Owen Meredith.
5. Behind the clouds is the sun still shining. Longfellow.
6. Large charity doth never soil white hands. Lowell.
7. A larger work! a loftier aim! Owen Meredith.
8. Hope and pray, trust always! Whittier.
9. I am rather made for giving than taking. IMrs. Browning.
xo. What I aspired to be comforts me. Browning.
II. You wouldn't catch this boy lopping his wing! Dr. Holland.
12. Be gentle in manners and mind, boys! -H. Downtown.
13. That she was sweet is all I care. Mrs. Piatt.
14. The tolerant, high-bred patience. E. S. Phells.
x5. Wise and good as she is fair. Wiittier.
16. Girls fain would know the end of everything. --Mrs. Browning.
17. He set his hands to every noble task. Stedman.
18. Sworn to be Champion of Right. y. y. Piatt.
x9. He earned their trust who first withheld it him. -Stedman.
20. She had winning ways. Mrs. Browning.
21. To all that sow, the time of harvest shall be given. Whittier.
22. Well I know my duty to my elders. -Shakesfeare.
23. Nor seek; be sought! -Owen Meredth.
24. I like to be sincere at once. Elizabeth/ Barrett Browning.
25. Unto an evil counsellor close heart and ear and eye. Mary Howitt.
26. He may be great by doing rightly and kindly. -- Mrs. Browning.
27. What is dark below is light in heaven. Wiittier.
28. Who seeks the Right, to him all good things flow. Stedman.
29. He leaves clean work behind him. Mrs. Browning.
30. Homekeeping hearts are happiest.- Longfellow.
3x. Press on! if once and twice thy feet
Slip back and stumble, harder try! -Park Benjamin.















BOOKS READ DURING THE YEAR.

























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Childhood is the prelude to a noble Manhood and Womanhood.

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ELLA FARMAN, Editor.

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