One day in our long vacation

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Material Information

Title:
One day in our long vacation
Series Title:
Books for bright eyes
Physical Description:
64 p., 4 leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 12 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Miller, M. E ( Mary Esther ), 1826-1896
American Tract Society ( Publisher )
Publisher:
American Tract Society
Place of Publication:
New York ( 150 Nassau Street )
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Cousins -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Country life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Bookplates (Provenance) -- 1878   ( rbprov )
Juvenile literature -- 1878   ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1878
Genre:
Bookplates (Provenance)   ( rbprov )
Juvenile literature   ( rbgenr )
fiction   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
Mrs. M.E. Miller.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 001572740
oclc - 22866749
notis - AHJ6568
System ID:
UF00048330:00001

Full Text















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ONE DAY

IN

OUR LONG VACATION.



MRS. M. E. MILLER.






AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY,
I50 NASSAU STREET, NEW YORK.






















COPYRIGHT, 1878,
BY AMERICAN TRACT SOCIETY.










ONE DAY
IN

Our Long Vacation.

CHAPTER I.
"A-MY! KINGS-LEYI" This
musical call we heard, as I
dropped the lines over my pet
Draxy, and lifted Ernie out of






6 ONE DA Y IN
the phaeton at a friendly farm-
house gate.
Draxy was glad enough, af-
ter all the long hills we had
climbed, to promise me with
her mild eyes that she would
stand still, while we followed
the voice that rang out over
the valley,
"A-my! Kings-ley!"
Soon we found the mother
of Amy and Kingsley Martin,
standing on the terrace calling






OUR LONG VACATION. 7
to her darlings to come home,
to the notes of the pretty song
_amie.
She turned with a hearty
welcome, and caught Ernie up
in her arms, saying,
"Ernie shall play with the
echo-listen now!"
If you have not heard the
song, you cannot know how
charming was the call. But if
you too have played with the
echoes, you may fancy how






8 ONE DA Y IN
this echo caught the names,
and sent them back to us, as
we called or sang, listened and
laughed, until at last the chil-
dren came up out of the win-
tergreen woods below.
Draxy and Aunt Mary!"
we heard Kingsley exclaim, as
he saw pony at the gate before
he spied his little guest.
"Aunt Mary and Draxy, I
should say!" said prim little
Amy, hurrying by his side.






OUR LONG VACATION; 9
"Hurrah There's Ernie
too!" the boy shouted as he
saw us, and came running with
a tin cup full of the pretty red
berries, which he poured freely
into Ernie's fat hands, and of-
fered to me with his good-
morning kiss.
Amy picked up her pretty
Maltese kitten as she came!
Ernie was so impatient to
get the kitten in his arms, that
he emptied the berries from
2






Io ONE DAY IN
one hand between his smiling
lips, and accepted the lively
plaything with Amy's hugs
and kisses.
The three were sitting down
on the grass when mamma
Martin said, Kingsley, papa
has gone to the river; do you
think you and I can lead Draxy
to the stable ?"
"Let me do it all alone,
mamma; papa has trusted me
a good many times."






OUR LONG VACATION. I
Away went the eight-year
old boy, so well used to help-
ing his father harness and un-
harness his horses, that in a
moment he led Draxy carefully
away from the phaeton, to the
old barn, where she had eaten
many a measure of oats before.
This Martin's nest is on the
tiptop of one of the high hills of
Greene county, facing the Cat-
skills. Southwest of us, those
grand old mountains stretched





12 ONE DAY IN
away, bluer than baby's eyes,
higher than some of the clouds,
their peaks clear cut against
the sky.
Little Round-top nestled low
in the shadows.
"Is that a' baby-mountain?"
Ernie asked; will it never be
any higher ?"
The old Mountain House
shone dazzling white.
Really and truly," Kingsley
explained to Ernie, "Little






OUR LONG VACATION. 13
Round-top is a pretty big
mountain to the folks in Cairo.
And really and truly that is
not a white pigeon, resting half-
way up the mountain, but a big
hotel, holding a hundred peo-
ple this minute; arid they know
they are on top of one of the
mountains. But you see, Er-
nie, bigger peaks are behind it,
and that make's it look half
way down to us."
We turned to the east. Right






14 ONE DAY IN
below, the country tumbled
away from our feet, broken into
smaller hills, mounds and cush-
ions, till all the roughness
seemed smoothed out and for-
gotten on the flats that lay in
the sunshine above the river
banks.
Then there was the river-
our darling Hudson, and Amy
counted "three sails and one
steamboat, in sight, Aunt
Mary !"






OUR LONG VACATION. 15
And Kingsley spied, "Two
trains on the Hudson, and one
on the Berkshire road!"
We did not try to count the
villages, there were so many
in sight, almost every one
marked by a church-steeple.
Amy wondered if it were for
us, so many miles away, to see,
that all the country churches
were painted white.
How do you think you would
like to live up so high, where





16 ONE DAY IN
you could not help but think
of that mountain in Bibleland,
where One looking down saw
all the kingdoms of the earth
while naughty Satan tempted
even Him ? So in the prettiest
Places, the loveliest homes,
now-a-days, he tempts us-on
mountain-tops, in city streets-
no one so lofty, or so lowly,
that Satan will not trouble
him.
The only next-door neigh-






OUR LONG VACATION. 17
bors to Martin's nest are the
robins and the crows, foxes
that steal chickens, and red
squirrels that help themselves
to the children's nuts, and chat-
ter saucily over their heads, safe
in the branches of the trees.
Amy and Kingsley walk a
mile to school, all the way
down hill, happily; then, after
school, it is easy to climb the
hills to such a home and such
loving parents.
3






18 ONE DAY IN
No visitor would have cho-
sen to go into the snug brown
house in such far-seeing weath-
er. No shelter need be more
pleasant than the shade of
the balsam-tree near the door,
where an old wagon-seat invi-
ted mamma and Aunt Mary to
sit. No carpet could be pret-
tier than the grassy green.
Nobody's paintings so perfect
as the panorama unfolding
all around us.






OUR LONG VACATION. 19
So we spent the morning
out of doors; the children wan-
dering off, a half-hour at a
time, to see the pets of the
farm.
How many of you would
have rushed after these little
folks, when Kingsley said,
Lady Fisher is standing
under the apple-trees, by the
bars, with her coltie; such a
cunning colt, dressed just like
its mother, with her white






20 ONE DAY IN
stripe on its face. Aunty, may
Ernie go to see it?"
When the children came
back and were resting-no,
rolling-on the grass, Ernie
told them about a colt he
owns.
Papa gave me a coltie last
summer. Its mother was sick,
and the baby-the coltie, I
mean-was sick. Papa kept
the mother in a big stable
alone, so she could be still. I






OUR LONG VACATION. 21
went to see the sick horsey-ba-
by one day with papa. I asked
him if the coltie would die, and
he said he guessed so. Then
I said, 'Why don't you put
him by his mother ? If I were
going to die I would want to
be with my mamma.' Pretty
soon the mother left her coltie,
and it got well; and papa put it
in the little meadow, below the
garden, so we could see it play
all day. He named it Tom-






22 ONE DAY NV
all-alone. It has not one white
hair on its body. Oh, let's
play horse !"
Kingsley ran to his play-
room for horse-lines. When
he came back Ernie was ready
to be harnessed, standing in
one stocking and shoe, and one
bare foot.
"Why, Ernie, you can't run
over the gravel without a shoe,"
he said.
"Why, I must, if I'm Joe






OUR LONG VACATION. 23
Joe has one white foot; and oh
how I like to ride behind Joe!
you can get everywhere with
him! Come, Kingsley, put the
bit in my mouth."
But girls do not care much
for playing horse; they would
have turned away from bare-
footed Joe's harnessing, to see
Amy sewing for her dolls.
There are twins in her doll-
family. Pink suits the com-
plexion of one, as well as blue






24 ONE DA Y IN
suits the other. Such dainty
dresses Amy makes in pairs, of
the two colors! Such tiny
stitches she takes! You girls
would like to engage her for
your doll dress-making, if you
could see the twins' wardrobes.
After the boys came back,
"Joe" was shod with Ernie's
shoe and stocking, and subsi-
ded, with heavy eyes and rosy
cheeks, into a sleepy boy in my
arms.






OUR LONG VACATION, 25
Then Kingsley brought me
some of his sketches; and "re-
ally and truly," I hope you will
see larger pictures from his
hand some day, or hear of
him as a great architect or en-
gineer.
Can you read those long
nouns without spelling them?
They are too long for the boy
to-day; but a shorter one he
has fairly earned-he is a boy-
artist.
4






26 ONE DA Y IN
Who wonders, after all, when
we think of his home so near
the clouds! How could he help
drawing the twisted boughs of
the old apple-tree, that drops
its early harvest-apples about
the kitchen-door! And the
flock of sheep and frisky lambs
he has drawn so well.
When Ernie woke from a
little nap, we went to see Kings-
ley feed the fowls. Chickens,
did you ask ? Not over eighty !






OUR LONG VACATION. 27
And ducks? Oh, yes; big,
mother-ducks, waddling about
important; little yellow ducks,
that came tumbling over each
other, in their haste to catch the
food as Kingsley scattered it.
What did he give them?
Pot-cheese and Indian meal
for the little, wee ones; buck-
wheat for the middle-sized
broods; and shelled corn for
the grown-up members of the
barnyard troop.






28 ONE DAY IN
O dear; how many good
dinners in store! twenty dow-
ny ducklings, and old ones
enough, I should think--to
hear them quacking all at
once.
One little duck Kingsley car-
ried into the house to his moth-
er. He said he knew it was
sick, because it was so yellow
about the gills."
Such wide-awake country-
boys learn earlier, easier, and






OUR LONG VACATION. 29
more of the habits of animals
and birds and creeping things,
by living among them out-
doors, than city boys learn
from books in school.






30 ONE DAY IN


CHAPTER II.
IT was so very warm at noon,
that we were glad when Mam-
ma Martin called us into her
cool diningroom to a cold-
chicken dinner, with good
brown bread, and bowls of
huckleberries and milk.
After dinner, Amy and
Kingsley sang together, which
was delightful to see and hear;















? 1










I~..






I' -
%- -
"30






OUR LONG VACATION. 31
for not every brother and sis-
ter are so happy together, and
live and sing in harmony.
Is it not harder than a rid-
dle to guess why little people
of one family should tire of
each other, and be selfish or
quarrelsome ?
While I was thinking so, a
horse and wagon stopped at
the gate, and the driver, a
young man, came to the door
to ask for Papa Martin, then






32 ONE DAY IN
went away. This young man
had yellow hair, and a mus-
tache of the same delicate color.
I guess that man is sick,
Kingsley!" said Ernie, as the
two boys watched him drive
down the hill. He is so yel-
low around the gills."
Ernie was thinking of the
sick duck which he was petting
in a small basket.
Just then a little girl came
up the winding road between






OUR LONG VACATION. 33
the sugar-maples. Her long
light hair was flying, and the
leaves of a bright-covered book
were fluttering in her hand.
It was Eva, Amy's cousin,
who lived in the first house
down the hill.
Her how-do-you-dos were
soon said, and then,
Aunty Martin, mamma
thinks she has found a name
that fits me, and she sent me
to show you this story in my
5






34 ONE DA Y IN
new Wide-Awake. It's all
about a little girl, how she was
all dressed up for a party, in
blue, and before the company
came she fell into a tub o' wa-
ter and had to be dressed all
over. See! There she is,
a-dripping and a-crying, and
her name is Nippiny-Fidget!
All day mamma has called me
so. Now come, Amy, let's
play with the twins."
Such a fluttering, fly-away






OUR LONG VACA.77ON. 35
child you hardly ever saw.
After the twins, she found a
dozen other playthings. The
longest time she kept still was
while she knelt upon a chair
and looked out of the east win-
dow.
Aunty Martin thought aloud:
"Grandpa says if his Flutter-
budget is still a minute, she is
in mischief." And going to
the window, she found Eva
playing with spectacles, peek-






36 ONE DA Y IN
ing above, below, and through
them.
"Grandpa has gone to see
Walter, and has forgotten his
glasses; Eva, we will lay them
in a safe place for him."
But they dropped on the
floor in spite of Aunty's out-
stretched hand. Eva slipped
down from the chair and hip-
pity-hopped out of the door,
laughing.
"Blame it on me-everybody


























I.:







I,. K






OUR LONG VACATIONz 37
does at our house-all the
mischief !" and away she went,
Miss Nippiny-Fidget-O. "
"And now, Aunt Mary, will
you please tell us a story?"
Kingsley asked.
Do, do !" coaxed Amy, while
mamma sat down with her
knitting, and Ernie cuddled
down, with the kitten which he
had named Malty-maow-cat."
So ready a circle of listeners
deserved something, surely.






38 ONE DA Y IN
Can't you make up a fairy
story ?" Amy asked timidly.
No-o !" implored her broth-
er. Two boys to one girl.
Boys do n't like fairies; give
us a bear!"
Have you heard of the pet
bear in Cairo ?"
No, they never had.
Well, once upon a time, last
summer, I was introduced to a
live bear in a gentleman's yard,
between his garden and his






OUR LONG VACA1Y7ON 39
barn-yard. The workmen go-
ing back and forth from the
barn to the house at meal-
times, passed the bear, and as
he hears quickly, he must have
known the sound of the bell
inviting them three times a
day. When the tables were
cleared, he was fed like a dog.
In the middle of the little
bear-yard, there was a high
pole firmly set in the ground.
Over the top of the pole a stout






40 ONE DA Y IN
iron ring had been thrown, and
to this ring was attached an
iron chain, and at the other
end of the chain was the bear,
walking-always walking, ex-
cept when he ate or slept-
round and round and round, as
the ring slipped easily around
the pole.
You never saw a bear walk ?
Then you do not know how
soberly he went, as if he had
heard newspaper stories of






OUR LONG VACATION. 41
walking for a wager. Often
his feet criss-crossed over the
chain; he never tripped nor
cared; he raised one clumsy
paw over it, then another, and
round he went.
Back of us in the garden by
the house, a dear little baby-
girl was playing, and the gate
between the two pets was open !
If it had been my baby and
my bear, I think the gate would
have latched in a hurry.
6






42 ONE DA Y IN
Late in the winter, I heard
from the bear: I did not get a
letter from him, but his master
told us something that sur-
prised me. Remember, this
bear had been caught very
young, over on Round-top, and
had been treated like a dog
each summer of his life; yet
when cold weather set in he
was bear enough to go into
winter quarters under the barn.
I knew very well that all his fore-






OUR LONG VACATION. 43
fathers had slept through the
long mountain-winters, but I
expected this fellow would for-
get he was a bear, and choose
regular meals like dog and man.
But, no; three times a day
cook rang the bell, and the lazy
fellow must have smelled many
a savory soup and roast, as the
men passed by, but he did no
more than blink his sleepy eyes
at them if they stopped to look
into his dark hiding-place."






44 ONE DA Y IN
"Is that all? Oh tell us
more," said Kingsley.
"Is it true?" asked truth-
loving Amy.
"Just as true as some queer
stories I might tell you about
Ernie's favorite Joe. He knows
so much he seems half human;
and he can be very good, but
he can be very naughty too.
He cannot be trusted in any
pasture;. no matter how good
the grass is, nor how sweet the






OUR LONG VACATION. 45
clover, nor how pretty the dai-
sies among which the other
horses feed, content; for he
has a trick of jumping fences.
A few times in every summer,
Uncle Charley feels so sorry
for him that he turns him loose
with the others. For a few
hours he crops the grass, and
rolls and runs about and seems
satisfied; but at last he feels
his liberty and he takes it.
He leaps over the fence, trots






46 ONE DA Y IN
across a field, jumps a stone
wall, then another, and another.
Sometimes, when some one
has gone to catch him, he has
met him coming home after
clearing half-a-dozen fences.
Then he is marched into his
stable, to stand there alone, to
fight flies and consider if he
has been wise or silly.
I know a little boy who runs
away and is shut up a day
or two after; and then he is






OUR LONG VACATION. 47
sorry as Joe; but like Joe, he
forgets again and again. Joe
is petted every day; the chil-
dren and I feed him, apples, a
handful of clover, or burdock
leaves; until he expects some-
thing, and neighs and paws
the ground, when one of us
comes in sight. Papa says he
would eat shavings from our
hands, if we put green specta-
cles over his eyes. His man-
ners at meal-times are not the






48 ONE DAY IN
best. When four or five other
hard-working horses stand in
the stable, who have earned
their oats first, Joe carries on
wildly till he is waited upon.
But I think I have seen chil-
dren who expected to be helped
first at table.
One day his master had to
go several miles in search of a
workman, who lived a long
way from any road. He drove
Joe as far as he was told a horse






OUR LONG VACATION. 49
could go; there he got out of the
wagon and tied the horse to a
stake by a stone wall. Then
Uncle Charley walked on; but
he had not gone far, before he
heard Joe neighing so loudly,
he thought other horses were
running near, or something had
scared the pet. He walked
back, in sight of Joe, spoke to
him, and seeing nothing wrong,
he turned away. Then he
walked till he came to the edge
7






56 ONE DA Y IN
of some woods. As he was
passing in among the trees, he
heard a clatter, and ran back
to see Joe trying to get over
the stone wall to follow him.
He backed the unruly creature
down; made sure that the wag-
on was not broken; laid down
part of the wall and led horse
and wagon over. Then he
drove on till he reached the
house. He tied Joe there, and
he stood content while he knew






OUR LONG VACATION. 51
his master was in the house or
walking about it."
Was such a big horse afraid
to stay alone ?" ask Amy.
It was a strange place and
lonely; and he knew his mas-
ter was leaving him; and he
likes company as well as we
do."
Now tell us something
about Roland !" said Kingsley.
"Roland and Joe were in-
vited to come to the fair last






52 ONE DAY IN
year, and as guests, invited for
their beauty, horse parlors were
given them. The two had
never before been driven side by
side. Roland enjoyed the drive,
and was happy enough till he
was shut up in his fine stable;
then he told as plainly as he
could, that he wanted to get
out and go home. I hope you
do not know what it is to be
homesick! When morning
came, he was still unhappy;






OUR LONG VACATION. 53
but Joe, who cares for nothing
if he can only get his oats, was
all right. When they were
taken out for exercise, and Ro-
land met Joe, he was so plainly
pleased, that his master guessed
he had been fretting for his
friend in harness. When the
horses were put back in their
parlors again, a board was ta-
ken out between, so that Roland
could see Joe, and he stood an-
other day, quiet, as if at home.






54 ONE DAY IN
I think sometimes it is too
bad they cannot speak, to tell
what frightens them, or when
they are sick. But they find
ways of showing thanks and
love and dislike. That they
know us who love them, and
that they love their own homes,
there is no doubt. Each horse
has its tricks of temper, and
must be handled differently;
but Joe and Roland are the
most intelligent. Sometimes.






OUR LONG VACATION. 55
I think they are more pleasing
in God's sight than some men
are. They are all that He
wishes them to be-noble ani-
mals; while many people fall
far, far below what He requires
of them.
And now Kingsley, it is four
o'clock, and I will thank you
to bring Draxy from the barn."






56 ONE DA Y IN



CHAPTER III.

WHILE Mrs. Martin and I
looked on to see pony securely
hitched to the phaeton, her lit-
tle folks were begging her to
promise to return our visit at
an early day.
Ernie clung to his favorite
playfellow, till I took up the
lines and talked about leaving






OUR LONG VACATION. 57
him; you do n't suppose I
would, do you?
I disliked to turn my back
upon the wonderful view, and
jog down the hills so early;
but grandma and Willie would
be looking for us; so we
said our good-bys, and Draxy
brought us safely home.
Ernie slept half the way, so
he was refreshed and ready for
fun when we found we had
company at home.
8






58 ONE DA Y IN
No need to ask grandma if
she had passed a lonely day;
for there in our cheery sitting-
room were the guests she liked
best-though that she does not
tell-Cousin Jessie and Char-
ley Fisk.
As usual, Charley had a-book
in his hand, and was reading
aloud, something that pleased
him, to grandma, who sat fa-
cing the window full of plants.
Jessie, at her elbow, was chat-






















~~ -'






OUR LONG VACATION 59
tering softly to Willie, who lay
on the floor playing with a new
puzzle.
Jessie is a next-door cousin,
who flies in at one door and out
at another, on butterfly sort of
visits. But Charley had come
three miles; and "Come to
stay," Willie whispered.
"See my wild button-hole
bouquet, Jessie," says Ernie.
Did you pick that on the
mountain ?" asks lively Jessie.






60 ONE DA Y IN
Yes, I did; there were tame
flowers all 'round the house,
but I liked these the best. O
mamma, can I go with the boys
to the three-cornered lot, to ride
back on a load of hay ?"
Yes; there will be just time
for one ride after tea," I was
glad to promise, as Augusta
rang the tea-bell.
I say, mamma," says Wil-
lie, "grandma made apple-pies
this morning, and she gave me






OUR LONG VACATION. 61
three corner-lots of one for din-
ner! and there was a tin-ped-
ler here, and a tramp! Oh,
and I lost my best ball!"
"Augusta, close the dining-
room, to keep out the flies."
Grandma said that, shutting
you other little folks outside,
to imagine the chatter over our
raspberry-shortcake.
When the three boys came
out from tea, they met, at the
kitchen-door, a picture of grand-






62 ONE DAY IN
motherly care and motherly
love.
Ma-ow mia-ow !" wailed a
great gray cat on the doorstep.
Charley was running out,
when Willie caught his sleeve,
saying, "Wait, wait! it is
Grandmother Graycat, with a
mouse, calling the kittens."
First, a gray kitty came
bounding along; and then,
Black-and-white, which was
Ernie's long name for the pret-






OUR LONG VACATION. 63
tiest kitten. And then their
mother came. She looked as
if she would have liked a fresh
mouse, but she did not say so;
she lay down by the gray cat,
and together they watched the
kittens scrabble for the mouse,
which old Gray had all that
time held under one paw.
Little Gray snatched it and
ran behind the currant-bushes.
Selfish thing!" cried Ernie.
Black-and-white" ran after






64 ONE DAY IN VACATION.
her greedy sister, but so soon
came back, to drink the milk
Ernie poured in her saucer,
that we think she had no taste
of the game-supper.
And that was the last ever
seen of Gray! Nobody knows
what became of her, unless it
is Prince. We ask him; he
winks his blind eye, and looks
as if he could, if he would, say
a great many things.





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