The pet lamb picture book

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Material Information

Title:
The pet lamb picture book containing The pet lamb, The toy primer, Jack the Giant Killer, The Fair One with the Golden Locks
Uncontrolled:
Pet lamb
Toy primer
Jack the Giant-Killer
Fair One with the Golden Locks
Physical Description:
1 v. (various pagings) : ill. ; 28 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
George Routledge and Sons ( Publisher )
Kronheim & Co ( Printer )
Publisher:
G. Routledge and Sons
Place of Publication:
London ;
New York
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1879   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1879
Genre:
Children's stories   ( lcsh )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
with twenty-four pages of illustrations, printed in colours by Kronheim & Co.
General Note:
Date of publication from incription.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002224458
notis - ALG4722
oclc - 61708292
System ID:
UF00048319:00001

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THE



PET LAMB PICTURE BOOK

CONTAINING

THE PET LAMB.
THE TOY PRIMER.

7ACK THE GIANT KILLER.
THE FAIR ONE WITH THE GOLDEN LOCKS.

WITH

TWENTY-FOUR PAGES OF ILLUSTRATIONS
PRINTED IN COLOURS BY KRONHEIM & CO.












LONDON
GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONS
THE BROADWAY, LUDGATE
NEW YORK: 416, BROOME STREET



















LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



THE PET LAMB:-
"THE LAMB, WHILE FROM HER HAND HE THUS HIS SUPPER TOOK."
"WHAT AILS THEE, YOUNG ONE? WHAT ? WHY PULL SO AT THY CORD "
"WHEN MY FATHER FOUND THEE FIRST IN PLACES FAR AWAY."
"THEN I'LL YOKE THEE TO MY CART LIKE A PONY IN THE PLOUGH."
"SLEEP-AND AT BREAK OF DAY I WILL COME TO THEE AGAIN."
"HERE THOU NEED'ST NOT DREAD THE RAVEN IN THE SKY."

THE TOY PRIMER:-
THE GARDEN.
THE TOY-SHOP.
THE FARM-YARD. (Large Picture.),
THE NURSERY.
THE SEA-SIDE.

JACK THE GIANT KILLER:-

GIANT CORMORAN -STEALING CATTLE.
GIANT CORMORAN FALLS INTO THE PIT.
JACK AND GIANT THUNDEL. (Large Picture.)
JACK AND THE TWO-HEADED GIANT AT BREAKFAST.
JACK KILLS THE LAST GIANT.

THE FAIR ONE WITH THE GOLDEN LOCKS:-
THE KING LISTENING TO AVENANT IN THE TOWER.
THE CARP GIVES AVENANT THE FAIR ONE'S RING.
AVENANT PRESENTED TO THE FAIR ONE WITH THE GOLDEN LOCKS. (Large Picture.)
AVENANT KILLS GIANT GALIFRON.
THE FAIR ONE WITH THE GOLDEN LOCKS RELEASES AVENANT.





















THE PET LAMB.













THE PET LAMB.





The dew was falling fast, the stars began to blink;
I heard a voice: it said, Drink, pretty creature,
drink !"
And, looking o'er the hedge, before me I espied
A snow-white mountain-lamb, with a Maiden at its
side.

No other sheep were near, the lamb was all alone,
And by a slender cord was tethered to a stone;
With one knee on the grass did the little Maiden
kneel,
While to that mountain-lamb, she gave its evening
meal.













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2 The Pet Lamb.

The lamb, while from her hand he thus his supper
took,
Seemed to feast with head and ears; and his tail
with pleasure shook.
"Drink, pretty creature, drink," she said in such a
tone,
That I almost received her heart into my own.

'Twas little Barbara Lewthwaite, a child of beauty
rare!
I watched them with delight; they were a lovely pair.
Now with her empty can the Maiden turned away;
But ere ten yards were gone her footsteps did she
stay.

"Towards the lamb she looked ; and from that shady
place
I unobserved could see the workings of her face;
If Nature to her tongue could measured numbers
bring,
Thus, thought I, to her lamb that little Maid might
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3 The Pet Lamb.

"What ails thee, young One? What? Why pull so
at thy cord ?
Is it not well with thee? Well both for bed and board?
Thy plot of grass is soft, and green as grass can be;
Rest, little young One, rest; what is't that aileth thee?

"What is it thou wouldst seek? What is wanting to
thy heart?
Thy limbs are they not strong? And beautiful thou
art:
This grass is tender grass; those flowers they have
no peers;
And that green corn all day is rustling in thy ears!

"If the sun be shining hot, do but stretch thy
woollen chain,
This beech is standing by, its covert thou canst gain;
For rain and mountain storms, the like thou need'st
not fear,-
The rain and storm are things which scarcely can
come here.




























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The Pet Lamb. 4

" Rest, little young One, rest; thou hast forgot the day
When my father found thee first in places far away:
Many flocks were on the hills, but thou wert owned
by none,
And thy mother from thy side for evermore was gone.

"He took thee in his arms, and in pity brought
thee home:
A blessed day for thee! then whither wouldst thou
roam ?
A faithful nurse thou hast; the dam that did thee
yean
Upon the mountain tops no kinder could have been.

"Thou know'st that twice a day I have brought
thee in this can
Fresh water from the brook, as clear as ever ran;
And twice in the day, when the ground is wet with
dew,
I bring thee draughts of milk, warm milk it is and
new.

























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The Pet Lamb. 5

"Thy limbs will shortly be twice as stout as they
are now,
Then I'll yoke thee to my cart like a pony in the
plough;
My playmate thou shalt be; and when the wind is
cold
Our hearth shall be thy bed, our house shall be
thy fold.

"It will not, will not rest !-poor creature, can it be
That 'tis thy mother's heart which is working so in
thee ?
Things that I know not of belike to thee are dear,
And dreams of things which thou canst neither see
nor hear.

"Alas, the mountain-tops that look so green and fair!
I've heard of fearful winds and darkness that come
there;
The little brooks that seem all pastime and all play,
When they are angry, foar like lions for their prey










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The Pet Lamb. 6

"Here thou need'st not dread the raven in the sky;
Night and day thou art safe,-our cottage is hard by.
Why bleat so after me? Why pull so at thy chain?
Sleep-and at break of day I will come to thee again!"

As homeward through the lane I went with lazy feet,
This song to myself did I oftentimes repeat;
And it seemed, as I retraced the ballad line by line,
That but half of it was theirs, and one half of it
was mine.

Again, and once again, did I repeat the song;
" Nay," said I, "more than half to the damsel must
belong,
For she looked with such a look, and she spake
with such a tone,
That I almost received her heart into my own."






















THE TOY PRIMER.







THE GARDEN.
lawn grass tree branch path rose
bank leaf stalk pluck bough bunch
seat shade bush hedge root game
IT is a fine day. The sun is out, and all is
bright. Let us run on the path. We must
not run on the bank. Can you catch me?
Here is the dog; he will run too, but he must
not go on the beds, or he will spoil them.
Let us run to the bush. I will get there first.
Do not run too close to the hedge. How
green the trees are! Yes, it is June: they are
now in full leaf, and their branch-es make a
nice, cool shade. Let me pluck a rose. Do
not break the stalk. How sweet it smells!
Here is a bunch of flow-ers. What a nice
po-sy! The grass is soft. Let us play a game
of cro-quet on the lawn. Here are the balls
and the hoops. There is a nice seat in the
ar-bour. I will read to you. Here is a book
a-bout trees. A tree has roots that strike deep
down in-to the ground. The roots are like legs;
the tree could not stand with-out them. Then,
it has a great trunk, which is its bo-dy.
Then the tree has branch-es, which are like
arms. They spread out a long way. Then
there are the boughs. The leaves and buds
grow on the boughs.
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THE NURSERY.

ball cart nurse rain face silk
room doll chair floor horse book
home- house dress door wall shelf

IT is a wet day. We must not go out in the
rain. We must stay at home and play in
our room. Let us get the toys. Which do you
like best? I will have the cart; I like to fill it
with toys and draw it along the floor. Here
is an ark. It has a dog, a horse, a cow, and
a pig in it. My doll is on that chair. How
nice she looks! What a smart dress she has.
Yes, I made it of some silk that Mam-ma gave
me. My doll's face is made of wax. Let us
put her house- straight. What a nice house!
Yes, it has a door, and walls, and floors, like a
real house. One room has a bed in it; and
here are the chairs. See! Nurse takes Ba-by
in her arms. How pleased he is! Throw the
ball. It is on the floor. So is the ark. Can
you read? See, there is a nice book on the
ta-ble. Let us put the toys a-way now. Nurse,
please put the toys on the shelf.
2







THE FARM-YARD.

farm lane yard load stack barn
field ground trough strap flail scythe
wheat straw corn chaff grain flour

H ERE is a Farm-yard. A cart with a load
of hay comes down the lane by the
house. There are two stacks of hay in the
yard. A man is on one of the stacks, by the
tree. Hay is long grass, cut down and dried
in the sun. It is cut with a scythe. When
the sun shines, folks go out in-to the fields and
toss the hay with forks. Horses eat hay. Here
are two horses. That horse has a boy on
his back. This horse by the trough turns
his head round to look at the man. What
is the man do-ing? He is fix-ing the strap at
the horse's side. What is this on the ground ?
It is straw. Straw is the stalk of corn. When
the corn is ripe, it is cut down and taken to
the barn. Then they thresh it witl a flail to
beat out the grain, and then they part the
grain from the husk. The grain is sent to the
mill to be ground in-to flour. Bread and cakes
are made of flour. The husk of corn is called
chaff. When the corn is all cut, the poor folks
go into the fields to glean what is left..
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THE FARM-YARD.
hand fork milk shed maid pump
cock duck geese bird dove cote
food chicl fowl gate roof ride
DO you see the Far-mer ? He stands by the
cow. He has a hay-fork in his hand.
The cow gives us milk. Here is the maid with
a pail full of new milk. Her name is Jane.
Jane, will you give me a cup of milk ? Yes,
here is a cup: it is nice and fresh. That cow
is in the shed. Here are cocks and hens, and
ducks and geese. And here is a tur-key What
a large bird! How he spreads his tail and
struts a-long! The cock stands on the low
wall by the pimp. The ducks swim in the
pond, Do you see the doves ? Yes, they are
in the dove-cote. But I can see some more.
Where? On the roof of the shed. Oh, yes,
there are three. How the pigs grunt. They
want their food. Do you see the young ones?
Yes, there are four or five of them. What a
large brood of chicks the hen has! Yes; I
like to feed the fowls. The ass stands by the
trough. Poor ass! he is very pa-tient. What
long ears he has! will he take me for a ride!
Yes, if you are good. Where shall we go ?
Oh, up the lane and round by the hill. Let us
-go home, now. Open the gate, please.
4
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THE TOY-SHOP.

drum mill spade pail hoop boat
pond horn girl goat whip lamb
wool oats walk trot tail mane

W ILL you buy me a new toy? Yes, for
you have been a good boy. What toy
will'you have? Here is a horse, here is a drum,
and here is a mill. Here are spades, and pails,
and hoops. Would you like a top or a ball ?
or a nice boat to sail in the pond ? or a kite to
fly in the fields ? or would you like a horn to
blow? Ann has a doll. Dolls are for girls, not
for boys. I will have a gun or a whip. No,
I will have this dog. May I not have both ?
Yes, you may. Let me see; here is a goat.
Do look at his face! How like it is And here
is a lamb with wool on it, just like our pet
lamb at home. But I like the horse best. I
like his mane and his nice long tail. Come,
sir! let us see how you can walk and trot!
I will rub you down and give you oats and
hay. I will be good to you, and not whip you,
nor spur you, nor ride you too hard. That is
right; I hope you will be good and kind to all
things. May I take the goat for Tom ? Yes,
you may. Thank you, Mam-ma: how pleased
he will be!
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THE SEA-SIDE.

beach wave ship shore crab pier
show tray sand cliff shell claw
tide bathe mound song Punch stick

(COME to the beach. What a gay scene!
Here are girls and boys at play on the
sand. Here is a show. Why, it is Punch with
his stick and his strange squeak! And here
are some men with black faces and odd
clothes, to sing droll songs! How queer they
look, to be sure! How they make the folks
laugh! Here is a poor girl with shells in a
tray. Let us buy some. They are very pret-ty.
Now take your spade. Let us make a high.
mound' with the sand. See, Tom has caught
a crab. How it spreads out its claws! Do
not hurt it. It will not harm you, if you let it
be. The cliff is a long way off. So is the pier;
but it is not so far off as the cliff. I can see
a ship. So can I; it is close to the shore. Do
you like to bathe in the sea? It will make
you strong. The tide flows in fast. It will
soon come up to where our mound is, and
wash it away. Will it come up so far? Oh,
yes. What shall we do then ? Oh, it will then
be time to go home.
6























JACK., THE GIANT KILLER.











JACK THE GIANT KILLER.


IN ancient times the good people of Cornwall were sadly
frightened at many wicked giants, who came from differ-
ent places, robbing and killing all that fell in their way.
Amongst them was the giant Cormoran, who had a great
castle on a rock which stood in the sea. He often waded
through the water and came over to the coast, when all the
people would flee before him. After he had feasted himself
upon their cattle, he would carry off with him a number of
sheep and oxen, slung across his back.
Now, there was a very little fellow, named JACK, who was
not like other boys, but was as bold and as strong as a man;
and when he was told the shocking things that had been done
by Cormoran, he would say to his father quite bravely,
"Shouldn't I like to kill that giant!" One night, having
heard from his father more sad tales of Cormoran's doings,
Jack felt more than ever a wish to kill him; so by-and-by he
slipped out, and got together a dark lantern, a pickaxe, a
shovel, and a horn, and with these he left the house quietly,
and came near the giant's castle, which stood on a hill.























































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2 Jack the Giant Killer.
Jack then dug a huge pit, just at the foot of the hill, over
which he strewed sticks and turf, so that it looked like the rest
of the ground. At daylight he went to the castle-gate, and
blew his horn so loudly that he aroused the giant, who
roared out, "You little villain! you shall pay clearly for
this!" Down the hill he rushed after Jack, until he came
to the bottom, and in a moment tumbled head over heels
into the pit. There he stuck fast, Jack all the while crowing
over him, and asking him why he did. not come out and
meet him like a man. Jack then laid hold of his pickaxe,
and taking a good aim, struck Cormoran a terrible blow on
the crown of his head, which killed him outright.
One day, when Jack was strolling about, a giant pounced
upon him, carried him home in his pocket, and threw him
into a room full of bones, telling him to keep quiet while
he sharpened a knife to kill him with, for he meant to cook
him for dinner, if he could get another giant who lived
close by to come and dine with him. Jack looked about
the room, and found two strong ropes; he made loops at,
one end of each, got up to the window, and waited
till the two giants came to the door. Directly they
were under the window, he dropped a loop over each head,
and quickly threw the ends over a beam, and hoisted them
from the ground, kicking and struggling. Jack then glided








































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3 7ack the Giant Killer.
down the ropes, and put an end to the giants with his new
sharp sword, and let all the prisoners loose.
Jack next came to a great house, and a giant with two
heads asked him to walk in; after supper, he put him in
the best bed, but Jack, fearing mischief, kept wide awake.
Presently the giant crept softly up to the bed, and banged
away upon it with his club, but Jack had put a sack of
bran there, that was lying in the room. At breakfast next
morning, the giant said, Pray how did you sleep?"
Pretty well, but for the rats," said Jack. The giant then
Filled two bowls with porridge; Jack ladled his into a
leather bag inside his waistcoat, and then said, Look here;
see what I can do!" and cutting the bag, the porridge fell
on the floor. "I can do that too !" roared the giant, and with
his knife ripped his own stomach up, and died on the spot.
Soon after this, Jack was invited to King Arthur's
Court, and while he was there the King's son asked
him to go with him to attack a huge giant, who was the
terror of one part of the country. When the Prince and
his little friend arrived at the giant's castle, the former
concealed himself behind a tree, while Jack boldly knocked
at the 'astle-gate. "Who is there?" growled a voice of-
thunder. "Only a weary traveller," said Jack. "Well,
then, what news do you bring ?" "Oh, very bad! King



















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7ack the Giant Killer. 4
Arthurs son is coming here, with a powerful army, to burn
your castle and to put you to death!" "Pray come in,
take my keys, and hide me in the deep stone cellar till
they are gone." As soon as the giant was safe under lock
and key, Jack let the Prince and his followers into the
castle, and they set to work to brick up the entrance to the
stone cellar, so that the giant was soon starved to death.
The Prince rewarded Jack with many precious gifts, and
amongst these was his own sword, which he begged his little
companion to wear for his sake, and to use it in destroying
wicked giants wherever he should encounter them. After
parting from the Prince, Jack went through a vast forest, and
fancied he heard groans coming from a tree. On drawing
near to it, he found a knight and a lady were prisoners in the
hollow trunk, where they had been just placed by an enormous
giant who lived in the forest. Jack quickly released the
captives, and on their way through the wood they saw the
giant lying on the ground, sound asleep. Jack had now a fair
chance for making use of the sword the Prince had given him,
and having quietly climbed up to the giant's breast, he dealt
him so well aimed a blow at the heart that he left him for
dead.
Jack learned that the giant just killed by him had a
brother -with a hideous great head on a small body, who was














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Jack the Giant Killer. 5
so savage that the very sight of him, with his frightful club
covered with iron spikes, was enough to terrify people to
death. Although this monster was almost more than his
match, Jack was not daunted, and he watched at the mouth of
the cave where the giant lived, until he should come out.
And he did come out by-and-by, with a horrid roar, rolling his
great eyes, and grinding his teeth; Jack then, by a thrust
through his right arm, disabled him, and after this he soon
found an opportunity to finish him.
After this the Knight and his lady invited Jack to their
castle, where they gave a grand' feast in his honour. But
while they were all enjoying themselves a servant, who could
scarcely speak for fright, came to say that a fierce giant with
two heads, named Thundel, was coming, and that he was
now very close. At this even the bravest of the knights
present shook with fear; but Jack told them to take courage,
and he would show them how to deal with the giant. He then
ordered the drawbridge, which crossed the moat that ran
round the Knight's castle, to be nearly sawn through. By this
time the giant had arrived, and Jack went out to meet him.
After leading him a dance round the castle, so that all the lords
and ladies might see him, Jack ran lightly over the drawbridge.
The giant attempted to follow him, but the bridge, being
sawn in the middle, gave way beneath his immense weight,












































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'7ack the Giant Killer. 6
and he fell plump into the water, where Jack soon made an
end of him.
There now remained only one giant to be got rid of, who
held a Duke's daughter among his captives. Jack was
determined to rescue this fair lady, although it was a task of
very great danger, for the giant's gate was guarded by two
fiery dragons, at the sight of which hideous monsters he, for
the first time, felt a little afraid. But this did not last long;
he soon took courage again, and coming close up to the
gate, found there was a huge horn, under which these
words were written-
Whoever can this trumpet blow
Will cause the giant's overthrow.
Jack now took a long breath, and manfully blew the horn;
the gates flew open, and in a moment the giant, his
castle, and the dragons turned into a blue mist, and were
no more to be seen. Nothing remained but the captives:
amongst these was the Duke's beautiful daughter, who soon
after was given by her father in marriage to our brave
little hero, JACK,-a reward he fully deserved, for being so
famous a GIANT-KILLER!



















THE FAIR ONE WITH THE

GOLDEN LOCKS.









THE

FAIR ONE WITH THE GOLDEN LOCKS.


O NCE upon a time there was a king's daughter, who was very
% handsome. She was called the Fair One with the Golden
Locks, because her hair was like the finest gold. There was a
young king amongst her neighbours, very handsome and very
rich, who fell so deeply in love with her that he sent an ambassador
to ask her hand in niarriage. The ambassador arrived at the
Fair One's court and delivered his message; but she answered
him that she thanked the king, but had no inclination to marry.
When he came back, everybody was afflicted that he did not
bring with him the Fair One with the Golden Locks, especially
the king, whom they tried to console, but without the least success.
Now, there was a youth at court, named Avenant. Every-
body loved him, except the envious, who were vexed that the king
conferred favours upon him and trusted him.
S Avenant was in company with some persons who were talking
of the return of the ambassador. If the king had sent me to
the Fair One with the Golden Locks," said he to them carelessly,
" I am certain she would have returned with me." These mis-
chief-makers went to his Majesty and told him this, adding that
Avenant thought himself better than the king, upon which he"
flew into a great rage, and caused Avenant to be cast into a high
tower, to starve to death.
But one day his Majesty was passing by chance close to the
tower, and hearing the voice of Avenant, complaining of his treat-
ment, he stopped to listen, and having spoken with him, he saw
clearly that he was innocent. He cast an angry look upon the




































































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2 The Fair One with the Golden Locks.
traducers of his favourite, and brought him away. After supper he
called him into his cabinet, and said to him, "Avenant, I still love
the Fair One with the Golden Locks. I am tempted to send thee to
her to see if thou couldst succeed." Avenant replied that he was
ready to set out the next day. "Hold," said the king; I would
give thee a splendid equipage." No!" said Avenant; I need
only a good horse, and letters of credence from your Majesty."
He took leave of the king and of his friends, and went forth
alone. He thought only of the best means to induce the Fair One
with the Golden Locks to marry the king. He had a writing-case
in his pocket, and would alight from his steed to make a note of
any happy idea that occurred to him. One morning, in passing
through a meadow, a charming idea came into his head: he dis-
mounted, and seated himself on the bank of a little river.
After he had made his note, he saw on the grass a large gold carp,
gasping and nearly dead. Avenant picked it up and put it gently
back into the river. As soon as the carp recovered herself,
" Avenant," said she, I thank you for the kindness you have
done me. You have saved me; I will do as much for you."
Another day, he saw a large eagle pursuing a crow. Seizing
his bow and arrow, he killed the eagle. "Avenant," cried the
crow, I will not be ungrateful; I will do as much for you."
Avenant resumed his journey. Entering a great wood, he
heard an owl screeching, as if in despair. He searched on all
sides, and at last found the owl in a large net, which had been
spread by fowlers during the night. He drew his knife and cut
the cords. "Avenant," the owl cried, "but for you I should have
been killed. I have a grateful heart; I will do as much for you."
Avenant now hastened to the palace of the Fair One with
the Golden Locks. Everything about it was costly and beautiful.
He dressed himself in his finest clothes, and took'with him a little
basket, and in it a beautiful little dog, which he had bought as
he came along. When he presented himself at the palace gate,
the guards saluted him most respectfully, and ran to inform the


















































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3 The Fair One with the Golden Locks.
Fair One with the Golden Locks that Avenant, ambassador from
the king, her nearest neighbour, requested to be presented to her.
At the name of Avenant, the princess said, That betokens
something agreeable to me. I would wager he is a handsome
young man, and pleases everybody."
Avenant was ushered into the hall of audience. He was so
struck with admiration that he could scarcely speak, but, taking
courage, he delivered his oration to perfection. He beseeched
the princess that he might not have the mortification of returning
without her. Gentle Avenant," she replied, I assure you I
should be very happy to favour you more than another, but you
must know that about a month ago I was walking by the
river side, and in pulling off my glove, I drew from my finger a
ring, which fell into the stream. I have made a vow never to
listen to any offer of marriage, if the ambassador who proposes
the husband does not restore to me my ring."
Avenant was much surprised at this answer. He made the
princess a low bow, and begged her to accept the little dog; but
she replied that she would receive no presents. When he returned
to his lodgings he went to bed, and his little dog, whose name was
Cabriolle, went and laid down beside his master. All night long
Avenant never ceased sighing. i "Where can I hope to find a
ring that fell a month ago into a great river ? said he. Cabriolle,
who heard him, said, My dear master, pray do not despair. Let
us go down to the river-side as soon as it is daylight."
At daybreak Avenant arose, and strolled by the river, think-
ing only of taking his departure, when suddenly he heard himself
called by his name. He looked all around him, but could see
nobody. "Who calls me ?" he asked. Immediately the golden
carp appeared and said to Avenant, "You saved my life. .I pro-
mised to do as much for you. Here is the ring of'the Fair One
with the Golden Locks." Avenant stooped and took the ring out
of the carp's mouth, and thanked her a thousand times. He went
at once to the palace. When the princess saw her ring she was




















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The Fair One with the Golden Locks. 4
very much astonished. Really," said she, "courteous Avenant,
you must be favoured by a fairy." Madam," he answered, I
am not acquainted with any fairy, but I was very anxious to obey
you." As you are so obliging," continued she, you must do me
another service, without which I never will be married. There
is a prince not far from here, named Galifron, who wants to make
me his wife. He is a giant, taller than a high tower. I sent word
to him that I did not wish to marry, but he has never ceased to
persecute me. He kills all my subjects; and before anything can
be done you must fight him and bring me his head."
Avenant was a little astounded at this proposition; but
answered, "Well, madam, I will fight Galifron. I believe I shall
be conquered, but I will die as becomes a brave man." The
princess was much surprised, and said a thousand things to prevent
him. It was of no use. When he had made his preparations, he rode
into the dominions of Galifron. He soon saw the monster, coming
through a wood: his head was visible above the highest trees.
He was in a dreadful rage, and, snatching up an iron mace,
he would have crushed Avenant at one blow, had not a crow
alighted on his head, and picked out both his eyes. Avenant
avoided his blows, and gave him such thrusts with his sword, that
at last he fell bleeding from a thousand wounds. Avenant quickly
cut off his head, and the crow, who had perched itself on the
nearest tree, said to him, I promised I would return the service
you rendered me. I trust I have done so to-day."
Avenant thanked the crow, and forthwith mounted his horse,
laden with the horrible head of Galifron. When he reached the
city, all the people followed him, crying, Behold the brave
Avenant, who has slain the monster!" Madam," said Avenant
to the princess, "your enemy is dead; I trust you will no longer
refuse the king, my master." "Ah! pardon me," said the Fair
One with the Golden Locks; "but, indeed, I must refuse him,
unless you can bring me some water from the Gloomy Grotto.
Hard by there is a deep cavern. At the mouth of it are two






























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The Fair One with the Golden Locks. 5
dragons. Inside the cavern is a deep pit, into which you must
descend; it is full of toads, adders, and serpents. At the bottom
of this pit there is a small cavity, through which flows the fountain
of health and beauty. Some of that water I must absolutely
obtain." The princess was immovable, and Avenant set out to
seek in the Gloomy Grotto the water of beauty.
Having nearly got to the top of a mountain, he sat down to
rest. He knew that the Gloomy Grotto was not far off. He saw
a horrible rock, out of which issued a thick smoke, and the next
minute one of the dragons, casting out fire from his mouth and
eyes. Avenant, prepared to die, drew his sword, and descended
towards the cavern, with a phial which the princess had given him
to fill with the water of beauty. It is all over with me," thought
he. Just then he heard a voice calling, "Avenant! Avenant "
and, looking up, he saw an owl in an old tree, who said to him,
" You saved my life. I promised I would do you as good a turn.
Give me your phial. I will fetch you some of the water of beauty."
Avenant quickly handed the phial to the owl, and saw it enter the
grotto without the least difficulty. The bird soon returned with
the phial full of water. Avenant thanked the owl heartily, and
joyfully took his way back to the city.
He went straight to the palace and presented the phial to
the princess, who had no longer an excuse to make. She thanked
him, gave orders for everything to be got ready for her departure,
and finally set out with him on their journey.
At length they arrived at the king's capital city, and his
Majesty, hearing the Fair One with the Golden Locks was
approaching, went to meet her, with the most superb presents.
The marriage was celebrated with such great rejoicings that folks
could talk of nothing else. Now, the Fair One with the Golden
Locks would often talk to the king about Avenant, praising him
for what he had done. This did not please the king, who again
threw Avenant, bound hand and foot, into the tower. When the
Fair One with the Golden Locks heard of this, she implored the


















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The Fair One with the Golden Locks. 6
king to release Avenant from prison. But the more she entreated,
the more angry the king became, for thought he to himself, It
is because she loves him ;" so he refused to stir in the matter.
The king took it into his head that perhaps she did not think
him handsome enough. He longed to wash his face with the
water of beauty, in hopes that the queen would then feel more
affection for him. The phial full of .this water stood on the
chimney-piece in the queen's chamber: but one of her chamber-
maids had broken the phial, and all the water was lost. Not
knowing what to do, she remembered that she had seen in the
king's cabinet a phial very much like it, full of water; so, without
a word to any one, she slyly took it and placed it on the queen's
chimney-piece.
The water which was in the king's phial had the fatal pro-
perty of throwing people into a deep sleep, from which they never
awakened. So, when the king took down this phial and rubbed -
his face with the water, he fell into a profound sluiiber d
expired. Cabriolle was the first to hear the news tl: kl
death, and said to the queen, Madam, do not forget t
Avenant." She left the palace without speaking to any one, and
went directly to the tower, where with her own hands she took off
his irons, and, putting a crown of gold upori hit head, and a royal
mantle over his shoulders, she said, Come, charming Avenant,
I make you king, and take you for my husband."









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