Willie and Lucy at the home

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Material Information

Title:
Willie and Lucy at the home
Physical Description:
104 p., 4 leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 19 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Giberne, Agnes, 1845-1939
Religious Tract Society (Great Britain) ( Publisher )
William Clowes and Sons ( Printer )
Publisher:
Religious Tract Society
Place of Publication:
London ;
Brighton ;
Manchester
Manufacturer:
W. Clowes and Sons
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Brothers and sisters -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Temper -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Dogs -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Animal welfare -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Obedience -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Uncles -- Juvenile fiction   ( lcsh )
Family stories -- 1879   ( local )
Bldn -- 1879
Genre:
Family stories.   ( local )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
England -- Brighton
England -- Manchester

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
by the author of "Willie and Lucy at the sea-side," "Hungering and thirsting," "Eve and Bertie," etc.
General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002230276
notis - ALH0624
oclc - 61656797
System ID:
UF00048314:00001

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WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.







BY THE AUTHOR OF
"WILLIE AND LUCY AT THE SEASIDEE" "HUNGERING AND THIRSTING,"
"EVA AND BERTIE," ETC.

















LONDON:
THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY;
56, PATERNOSTER ROW; 65, ST. PAUL'S CHURCHYARD;
AND 164, PICCADILLY.
BRIGHTON: 31, WESTERN ROAD.
MANCHESTER: 100. CORPORATION STREET.







fl-------------------------------------

















tLOOTON :
PRINTED BY WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS,
STAMFORD STREET AND CHARTRB CROSS.












I4










WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.

-----o- ow ----

CHAPTER I.
THE LITTLE DOG PEPPER.
ONE very bright summer's day Willie
Gray stood looking at his garden-bed.
He had a spade in his hand, and a
rake lay behind him on the grass.
And a whole row of new little plants,
which the gardener had given to
"Willie, were spread out upon the
gravel-path.
"I think I will put one in each
corner, and two in the front, and two
at the back," said Willie, speaking half-
aloud, with a very grave face. "I







4 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
wish that rose-tree did not stick out
so here in front, but papa says I should
hurt it if I were to move it. Oh dear!
I wish plants did not die so quickly."
Willie began to dig as he spoke.
He had often been shown how to put
plants in the ground, but Willie, like
many other little boys, was not fond
of taking trouble, and liked to do
things his own way. So he dug holes
that were not quite deep enough, and
squeezed the roots with his hands to
make them go in, and mashed down
the earth all round with his toes.
Some of the roots peeped up out of
the soil, so Willie sprinkled some earth
over them to hide them. And then
he stepped back, and thought his
garden very grand indeed.
"It is ever so much better than







THE LITTLE DOG PEPPER. 5
Lucy's," he said. "I think I have
twice as many plants as Lucy has.
I wonder if Roberts will give her any
to-day. I don't think he would have
given these to me if I had not seen
that he was going to throw them
away, and asked for them. Well, I
don't think Lucy wants any more in
her garden."
This was to answer a little voice in
Willie's mind, which said in a soft
whisper, "Why did you not ask for
some for Lucy as well, or give her
some of yours ?"
"She does not want them," said
Willie quite aloud. "She cannot put
them in the ground nicely, and they
would all die. Come, Pepper, Pepper."
A queer little rough black and grey
dog, with long hair drooping over his
. L ______________







6 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
bright, sparkling eyes, came bounding
up. He sprang upon Willie, and
danced round him, and rushed away,
and rushed back to spring upon him
again.
Pepper was Willie's own dog. Pep-
per was very fond of Willie, and Willie
was very fond of Pepper.
Willie was always ready for a game
of play with Pepper. He took a piece
of stick and flung it away, crying,
"Fetch it, Pepper." Then Pepper
dashed away, and came back with
the stick in his mouth. Only he
never would drop it at Willie's feet,
as Willie wished him to do, but
danced about and lay down with the
stick between his two little black
paws to bite it, and when Willie came
near he ran away with it again. The







THE LITTLE DOG PEPPER. 7
more Willie scolded, the more he
ran.
Then Willie tried to catch him, and
Pepper trotted away before him, with
the stick in his mouth, keeping just in
front of Willie, and only just out of
reach of his hand, but never troubling
himself to go faster than need be.
Whether Willie went fast or slow, it
was all the same. And Willie, instead
of laughing, grew quite angry to see
Pepper trotting in front of him, and
looking back in such a quiet way,
with the stick in his mouth. He
cried out, "Pepper, you are a horrid
naughty dog!" And then he picked
up a stone, and threw it at Pepper
with all his might.
It was not a large stone, but Pepper
gave a sharp yelp of pain, and then







8 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
dropping the stick, he crouched down
at Willie's feet. Willie was a kind-
hearted little boy, and he loved
Pepper very much, and the stone had
hardly left his hand before he was
sorry for his anger. He threw himself
down on the grass, and hugged and
kissed Pepper, and Pepper wagged
his tail and licked Willie's face, for
dogs are much more ready to forgive
than little boys and girls are.
But when Willie stood up, and
told Pepper to "Come along," Pepper
tried to limp on three legs, and then
whined and lay down, as if it hurt
him to move. Willie could not bear
to see this, and to know it was all his
own doing. He went down on the
grass again by Pepper's side, and burst
into tears over him, and hugged him







THE LITTLE DOG PEPPER. 9
again-as if that could do the leg any
good. And then a voice by his side
said,-
"Why, Willie, what is the matter ?"
"Oh, papa-Pepper's leg," sobbed
Willie.
What is the matter with Pepper's
leg, my boy ?" asked his papa, while
Pepper wriggled in Willie's arms, and
tried to lick Mr. Gray's hand, and
whined again.
Willie's head sank lower with
shame. "Papa- I did-I did it. I
was angry because he would not drop
the stick-and-and I threw a stone
at him."
Willie !" said Mr. Gray, and Willie
began to sob again.
Mr. Gray was quite silent for a
moment, and then he took Pepper







10 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
from Willie's arms, and felt his leg.
Pepper cried out, but licked his hand
all the time, and looked at Willie
with his bright eyes, as if he felt
sure his little master would help
him.
Oh, papa, is he hurt?" asked Willie
in a mournful tone.
He would not whine so if he were
not hurt. I hope it may not be much.
But, Willie, what am I to say to this ?
How can I let you have Pepper for
your own if I cannot trust you to be
kind to him ?"
"I'll never hurt him again," said
Willie in a whisper.
"No, so you think now. But is
this the first time you have acted in
such a way ?"
"No," said Willie faintly.







THE LITTLE DOG PEPPER. 11
"Or the second ?"
"No,-but, papa, I didn't ever hurt
him before like this."
"No, but once I saw you throw a
stone which, if it had not missed him,
would have hurt him more than this.
And once you struck him with a
heavy stick. Willie, I warned you
each time, and I cannot let this go on.
I will not have God's creatures ill-
used in my house."
"Oh, papa, please!" sobbed Willie.
"Yes, you know what I told you-
that unless you could treat your little
dog as he ought to be treated, I could
not allow you to keep him."
Papa--oh, papa !" and Willie
clung to his father in distress. "Oh,
don't take Pepper away. I love him
so."







12 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
"Love him, Willie! and hurt him
like this !"
"Oh, I won't again-I won't ever
again-Pepper, darling Pepper!" and
Willie went down flat on the grass in
a passion of crying. "Oh, papa, what
shall I do ?"
There was no answer to this ques-
tion. And Willie, lying there with
his face hidden, could not see how
hard it was for his father to keep from
speaking. He could not see Mr.
Gray's look of tender pity over his
little boy. He only knew that he felt
very, very wretched, and that when
he looked up his father and Pepper
were gone.
Pepper gone! Willie sat up, and
looked round him. Pepper gone!-
his own dear little Pepper-and all







THE LITTLE DOG PEPPER. 13
because he could not be trusted to
take care of him. Even tears stopped
at that moment. Willie knew that
what his father had said was true.
It was not the first or the second time
that he had given way to such
anger. Down in Willie's heart, he
knew it was not even the third, or
fourth, or fifth, for many a time his
temper had failed, when no one had
seen him. No one !-ah, Willie knew
that One always sees.
And now Pepper was to go. Was
that what his father meant? Pepper
was to be sent away-quite away-
where Willie would never see him
again. Willie's heart swelled and
swelled at the thought, till it felt
almost like breaking. What would he
care for the garden, and the fields, and







14 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
the green grass, and the bright sun-
shine, if he had not Pepper to play
with?
And oh, how poor little Pepper
would grieve! That was the worst
thought of all. How he would whine
for his little master, and miss the long
games and races they had each day,
and pine among strangers. And all
because Willie could not be trusted
with him.
Willie could not bear his own
thoughts, and he started up, and
rushed down the garden-path. But
all the time his thoughts went with
him, and he wanted Pepper more than
ever. He crouched down at last
under a lilac-tree, as Pepper had
crouched at his feet, and cried till he
was tired.







WILLIE IN TROUBLE. 15




CHAPTER II.
WILLIE IN TROUBLE.
IT seemed a long time to Willie that
he stayed under the lilac-tree, but at
last the wish to know what had be-
come of Pepper grew so strong that
he could not bear it. He rose slowly,
and made his way to the house.
Should he find Pepper quite gone
away, or would he see him again?
He walked faster and slower by turns,
and at length went into the parlour.
Mrs. Gray was sitting there with
some work, and she looked up to say
kindly, "Why, Willie dear, we could
not think where you had gone to."







16 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
But Willie could not answer at
that moment. For there on the
rug was a basket, lined with some-
thing soft to make it like a bed.
And out of the basket peeped Pep-
per's bright eyes. Willie went across
the room with a rush, and knelt
down by Pepper, crying more sadly
than ever, for now that he saw him
again it did not seem as if he could
bear to lose him.
Mrs. Gray said nothing at first, but
soon Willie felt her hand against his
cheek. And when he looked up there
was his father standing by his side as
well.
Come here, Willie," said Mr. Gray;
and sitting down in an arm-chair, he
lifted Willie on to his knee. Come, I
think you have cried enough for one








WILLIE IN TROUBLE. 17

day. Try to leave off, and listen to
me."
"Oh, papa,--Pepper," sobbed Willie,
squeezing his mother's hand.










L








hurting Pepper. Yes, I see you are,
so you need not cry any more. Tell
C







18 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
me what made you so angry with him,
Willie."
"He would not bring me the stick
when I told him. Papa, when dogs
fetch, don't they put down the thing
before their master ?" asked Willie,
looking up.
Yes, when they are trained. And
when little boys are trained they al-
ways do just what they are told. But
suppose that, when you do a lesson
badly, or do not obey in a moment,
mamma or I were to throw a stone at
you, Willie !"
Willie could hardly help laughing.
" Oh, papa, you would not do that."
Why not ?"
"Why, you couldn't," said Willie.
"Why not ?" asked Mr. Gray again.
"Why, papa, would it be right ?"







WILLIE IN TROUBLE. 19
No, it would be wrong. And is it
right of you to throw stones at Pepper
when he does not obey you ?"
"No, papa," sighed Willie.
"And besides being wrong, mamma
and I love you too much to do what
might injure you for the rest of your
life."
"I love Pepper," said Willie.
"Yes, Willie, but what kind of love
is it that can let you treat him in such
a way ?"
Papa, I didn't mean to hurt him.
I'll never throw a stone again," said
Willie, looking up in his father's face.
"You think not now."
"I know I shan't. I'll promise."
But Mr. Gray's hand came over
Willie's mouth. "Stay, Willie; you
cannot promise that. I think I should
_________________j-- - --







20 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
feel more hopeful about you if I saw
you less ready to trust yourself. When
you threw the stone were you in a
good temper or a bad temper ?"
"A bad one, papa. I was in a pas-
sion," said Willie, hanging his head.
And when you are in a passion,
do you think about doing what is
right, and what pleases me ?"
"No, I think I forget all sorts of
things, except that I am angry," said
Willie; and he added, sadly, "Papa,
you mean that I should forget my
promise."
"Indeed, I am afraid you would.
Think how often I have spoken
and warned-you before now. And,
Willie," added Mr. Gray, drawing his
arm closer round his little boy, "it
is not only for Pepper's sake that I am







WILLIE IN TROUBLE. 21
grieved and anxious to-day. Think
what it might have been if Lucy
instead of Pepper had made you
angry."
Oh, papa, I couldn't throw a stone
at Lucy," said Willie.
"Because you love her ? But then
you love Pepper too."
"Oh, papa, I couldn't. She's ever
so much smaller than I am."
"And brave boys never hurt any-
thing smaller or weaker than them-
selves. Brave boys never hurt little
girls. Is that what you mean, Willie ?"
Willie nodded. "But you forget one
thing, Willie. A boy in a passion is
not brave. He is not himself for the
time. He is a slave to his temper.
He does not care whom he hurts."
"Willie, have you never hurt Lucy







22 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
in a passion ?" asked his mother's voice
by his side.
Willie thought for a moment, and
his face grew very red.
"I did once, mamma, when she was
sitting on my kite, and would not get
up. I threw my ball right in her face,
and made her cry."
"And if the ball had been a
stone," said his father, do you think
you would have stopped at that mo-
ment, to think whether it was too
hard ?"
Willie shook his head.
No, Willie. It will not do to trust
to your love for Lucy, or to your being
a brave boy. There is only one thing
in which you can safely trust. Do you
know what I mean-what strength I
am speaking of?"







WILLIE IN TROUBLE 23
"I must pray to God to help me,"
said Willie in a whisper.
"Yes, you must ask for His grace,
that you may be able to conquer your
hasty temper. The Lord Jesus says,
' My strength is made perfect in weak-
ness.' If you seek His strength,
then you will succeed;" and Willie
felt his father's arm pressing closer
again,-"I would give more than I
could tell to see you one of Christ's
little soldiers, warring against sin."
"Papa, I will try," said Willie softly.
"How does a man become a soldi,.ir,
Willie ?"
Why, he enlists," said Willie,
"Nurse's nephew did, papa, because
she told me. He went to the sergeant
who had the bright ribbons in his cap,
and the sergeant gave him a shilling,







24 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
and then he could not draw back,
even if he wished. But nurse said he
did not wish, because he wanted to
be a soldier, and fight for the Queen."
And how is a little boy to become
a soldier in the army of the Great
King, Willie ?"
"He is to enlist too," said Willie
softly. He is to go-Papa, he is to
go to the Lord Jesus. But he does not
have a shilling."
"No, but he has something better.
He has the pardon of all his sins,-
" a pardon sealed by love Divine.'"
"And then he has to fight," said
Willie.
"Yes, against the world, and sin,
and Satan; against temper, and pride,
and selfish ways. And he must not
draw back, Willie."







WILLIE IN TROUBLE. 25
"No," said Willie, it would not be
brave,-he would be a coward."
And, Willie, God says of such
soldiers as that, 'If any man draw
back, my soul shall have no pleasure
in him.'"
"I think that would be very dread-
ful," said Willie in a low voice. And
then he sat silent some minutes, look-
ing down and thinking very hard.
But all at once he glanced towards
the rug, and tears came into his eyes.
"Papa," he said, "may I-?"
May you what ?"
"Pepper," said Willie. "Oh, papa,
must he be sent away ?"
And Willie was going to throw
himself down on the rug beside Pep-
per, but his papa held him fast.
No, I do not want any more crying








26 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
to-day. Would you mind it very
much if I sent him away ?"
Willie's voice choked as he tried to
say, Oh, papa, please, please do not."
"Well, I will give you one more
trial. For the next month I shall
watch you closely, and if I see that
you cannot be trusted to treat the
poor little dog kindly, I will send him
away; but I hope you will take warn-
ing by to-day, Willie. Only do not
forget that the very first time you
treat him in such a manner again,
Pepper will no longer be yours. And
at present you are not to make him
fetch or carry sticks."
"Papa, I would not be cross about
it," said Willie humbly.
I hope not, but I .cannot be sure.
Do as you are told, my boy, and keep







WILLIE IN TROUBLE. 27
watch over yourself. Seek for strength
where it may be found, and you will
not fail."
Mr. Gray put Willie down with a
kiss, and Willie slipped away to
Pepper. He felt very grave all that
evening. For though Pepper's eyes
looked bright, and he sometimes tried
to jump up and play, he could not
move without crying out, and Willie
knew that this pain of his dear little
dog was all his own doing.




-7 '*'-

~~I







28 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.




CHAPTER III.
UNCLE ARTHUR.
"OH, Willie," cried Ldicy, next morning,
when he ran into the garden, after
his lessons, "nurse says your new
plants are going to die."
"They are not," said Willie. "I
planted them myself all right."
"No, but nurse says they are going
to die."
"I tell you they are not," said Willie
again, speaking louder, for he did not
like to believe that he had made a
mistake. And he ran off to his garden
so fast that little Lucy was quite left
behind. When she came up, she







UNCLE ARTHUR. 29
found him standing and looking with
a very grave face indeed.
"They are quite dying," said little
Lucy again, very sadly. "Cannot
you give them some water, Willie ?"
"Ah, Master Willie," said nurse, "I
don't think you could have put in
those plants as your papa has shown
you how to do."
"I do not care," said Willie, in
rather a sulky tone; but the next
moment he looked up, and said
brightly, No, I did not, nurse. I put
them into holes too small for their
roots, and jammed the earth tight
all round them, because I was in such
a hurry."
"'More haste, worse speed,'" said
nurse, shaking her head. "You had
better have taken a little more pains
i -- ---i







30 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
while you were about it, Master
Willie."
Willie sighed, and went off for his
little spade. Without a word he dug
up all the eight plants, and began
planting them again with great care.
Two or three looked so bad that he
almost threw them away, but, after
all, he thought he would give them
one more trial. At the eighth plant
he stopped. He looked at Lucy, and
then at his bed, and then at her bed,
and then at Lucy again.
"Well, Master Willie, what is the
matter now?" asked nurse.
"Lucy, would you like to have this
for your very own ?" asked Willie.
Lucy's cheeks grew quite pink all
in a moment. "Oh, Willie, may I?
Oh, nurse, is it not nice ?"







UNCLE ARTHUR. 31
"Master Willie is a kind little boy,"
said nurse; and Willie felt very happy
as he dug a hole in Lucy's bed, and
put in the plant. Then he fetched
the watering-pot, and gave each of
the plants a nice cold shower. The
sun did not shine yet on this part of
the garden, or Willie would not have
done it, for he knew that it is bad to
water flowers in hot sunshine.
And now it was all done, and Willie
stood idle, with the watering-pot in his
hand, and the spade lying at his feet.
"I think my garden is getting very
full of flowers," he said. "Oh, nurse,
do you know mamma says my birth-
day is quite early next week, and I
shall be seven years old?"
"Yes, I know that, Master Willie."
"And Lucy will be six in three







82 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
months, mamma says. Three months
is a very long time. But I don't think
a week is long. Nurse, do you think
Pepper will be quite well on my
birthday ?"
"I don't know, Master Willie, but I
hope so. He seems better this morn-
ing, only he cries out if one touches
his leg."
"Yes, it hurts him very much still.
I do hope it will not hurt him long.
I want so much to have him to run
about with me again."
"Well, Master Willie, you have no
one but yourself to thank that he can't
do so," said nurse, gravely but kindly,
for nurse was always kind.
"I know that, nurse," said Willie,
rather vexed. You need not tell me
So."







UNCLE ARTHUR. 33
"You are not likely to forget it yet,
are you?" said nurse. What are you
going to do on your birthday, Master
Willie ?"
"I don't know. It is sure to be
nice," said Willie. Oh, nurse, could
you not take us a long lovely walk in
the fields, and have some biscuits
with us to eat? Would you like
that, Lucy?"
We will think about it," said nurse,
smiling. "And now, Master Willie, we
must start for this morning's walk, or
we shall have no time."
Willie thought he would much
rather have stayed in the garden. But
he put away his tools, and, after all, it
was a very happy walk,-even though
Pepper was not with him. He ran
about with Lucy, and climbed green
D







34 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
banks to pick daisies that she could
not reach. Then he helped her to
gather a great bunch of dandelions,
and nurse sat down on a fallen trunk,
and made a dandelion chain. It was
not nearly so pretty as a daisy chain.
Nurse broke off the yellow flowers,
and then stuck the smaller end of one
stalk into the larger end of a second,
until a great many were joined. And
then she had only to fasten the two
ends' in the same way, and there was
the chain complete.
Nurse made one necklace for Lucy,
and one for Willie, and then two brace-
lets for each of them. Lucy thought
hers very fine, and danced about on
the grass. And Willie liked his too,
and danced with her, until there came
a sudden clatter of horse's feet, and a








































































J-Z







UNCLE ARTHUR. 35
gentleman rode up. And then Willie
all at once thought it was not like a
boy to wear chain and bracelets, and
he pulled them off in a great hurry,
and broke them.
The gentleman laughed at this,
which made Willie turn quite red in
the face. He stopped short, and
smiled down at little Lucy, who was
looking up shyly at the great black
horse. And then he said-
What is your name, my little
man ?"
My name is William Henry Gray,"
said Willie, rather in surprise at being
asked, and still more at nurse's smiling
face. And this is Lucy Mary Gray."
And then the gentleman came.down
off his horse, and gave them each a
kiss. Lucy was half afraid, and ran







36 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
back to nurse's side. Willie was
rather vexed, and thought the stranger
must fancy him a baby. He rubbed
his cheek, and tried to make himself
look tall, while the gentleman gave
him a pat on the head, and said-
"I was sure it must be them. How
do you do, nurse ? I thought I knew
your face. How is your mistress "
"Thank you, sir, quite well," said
nurse, looking very much pleased.
"She did not expect you to come
to-day, sir."
"No; I am taking you all by sur-
prise. Well, Willie, do you know who
I am?"
"No," said Willie. "I have never
seen you before."
"But I have seen you before,
Willie."







UNCLE ARTHUR. 37
No, you haven't," said Willie, for
lhe felt cross about the kiss.
"Master Willie!" said nurse gravely,
while the gentleman laughed, caught
up Willie, and placed him on the
horse's back.
There, how do you like that ?" he
asked. Don't be afraid. I will take
care you do not fall off."
I'm not afraid. Only girls are
afraid," said Willie, though he did
think the ground looked a very long
way off. He had never seen such a
tall strong gentleman, and such a
great black horse, before.
Only girls ? I do not know about
that," said the gentleman. "I am
afraid of some things myself, Willie,
and yet I am not a girl." Willie's eyes
grew wide open at this. Come, do







38 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
you not know who I am? Did you
never hear of Uncle Arthur Tracy ?"
"Uncle Arthur! Oh yes," said
Willie, with still wider open eyes.
"He is out in India."
"No, he is not in India now. He is
here by your side, Willie."
Willie was so pleased at this, that
lie would have jumped for joy if he
had not been on horseback.
"Did you not know I was coming
home ?" asked the gentleman.
"Mamma said Uncle Arthur was
coming, but I did not know it was
yet," said Willie. "And did you come
in a ship over the sea ?"
"Yes-such a great ship. Have you
ever seen the sea, Willie ?"
"Oh yes," cried Willie. Mamma
and papa, and nurse, and Lucy and I,







UNCLE ARTHUR. 39
all went to the sea once-ever so long
ago.
Why, Master Willie," said nurse,
laughing, "it is just a month to-day
since we came back."
"A month; that is nothing," said
Mr. Tracy. "Do you call that long,
Willie ?"
"It seems very long," said Willie.
"But we saw the great waves one
day, and we went out in a boat when
it was smooth. And there were the
rocks, and the sands, and the
crabs, and the star-fish, and the sea-
anemone. Papa taught me that
name. And we had spades, and we
used to dig."
"And Willie fell into the sea one
day, and had to go to bed," said Lucy.
"You need not tell that, Lucy," said








40 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
Willie, growing red again. "I do not
tell about you when you are naughty.
And, uncle, will you tell me all about
the tigers, and snakes, and bears, and
monkeys in India ?"
"I will see," said Uncle Arthur. "I
dare say I shall find some stories that
you will like to hear."



CHAPTER IV.
A TALK IN THE EVENING.
So here is the little boy that told
me I had never seen him before," said
Mr. Tracy.
It was the evening of the same day,
and Willie and Lucy had just come
into the parlour, as they always did
I ________ _______ _ _____ I







A TALK IN THE EVENING. 41
after their papa and mamma had dined.
Willie brought Pepper in, and put him
down on a soft cushion. Mr. Tracy
took up Lucy in his arms, and though
she was shy, he looked so kind that
she was not afraid to sit on his knee.
Then Willie came and stood in front
of him.
"Did you ever see me before, uncle?"
he asked.
Why, you told me I did not,
Willie," said Mr. Tracy.
But please, uncle, did you really ?"
To be sure I did."
"And Lucy too ?"
"No, not little Lucy. And I do not
wonder that Willie should forget me,
for he was only six months old when
I saw him last.- He was lying in a
cradle, with pink and white muslin all







42 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
about him, and he looked a very fat
little baby indeed."
"But I am not a baby now," said
Willie; "I shall be seven years old
next week."
Then Mr. and Mrs. Gray talked with
Mr. Tracy, and Willie had to be silent.
He sat on the rug, and stroked Pepper's
head, and played with his long hair,
and thought about a great many things.
After a time there came a little silence,
and Willie said, half under his breath,
"I wish I might ask a question."
"Ask any question you like, Willie,"
said Mr. Tracy.
"He wants to ask about his plants,"
said little Lucy. "He planted them
all wrong, and they were dying; and
then he planted them right, and gave
me one.







A TALK IN THE EVENING. 43
No, I do not. I do not want to
ask about that at all, Lucy. Uncle
Arthur, you said-"
"Said what, my boy?" for Willie
came to a stop.
"I said only girls were afraid. And
you said, Uncle Arthur,-you said you
were afraid of some things."
"And I am not a girl, am I ?" said
Uncle Arthur.
"Oh no," said Willie and Lucy at
once.
And you want to know what I am
afraid of. Is that it ?"
Willie nodded his head in answer,
and Lucy nodded hers, for she always
liked to do what Willie did.
"See if you can find out," said Mr.
Tracy. "I am not afraid of horses,
Willie."
---------







41 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
Oh no, it is such a great big black
horse," said Willie.
"And Willie rode on him," said
Lucy.
"Ah, but Uncle Arthur held me,"
said Willie. When I am a man I
will ride a horse just like that."
If it please God that you live to
be a man, Willie," said his papa; and
Willie looked grave for a moment.
"I am not afraid of tigers either,
with a good gun to defend myself,"
Mr. Tracy went on. "I will tell you
about them some day soon."
"On my birthday ?" asked Willie.
"Very well, so do not ask me before
then. Well, Willie, can you tell me
what it is that I am afraid of?"
"No, I do not know," said Willie.
And Mr. Tracy told him.







A TALK IN TIHE EVENING. 45
"I am afraid of doing wrong, Willie."
Willie sighed.
"And I hope you are afraid of the
same thing, Willie."
"I do wrong sometimes," said Willie
-" I mean very often. I threw a stone,
and hurt Pepper's leg."
"That was wrong, Willie. And I
am afraid we all do wrong, not only
sometimes, but very often, and all day
long. We cannot even do a right
thing without mixing up sin with it."
But I thought-I thought men
ought to be afraid of nothing at all,"
said Willie.
"Not even of doing wrong ?"
"I thought they ought to be sorry,"
said Willie.
Ay, so they ought when they
have done wrong. But there is a







46 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
good deal about fear in God's Word,
Willie. I wonder if you can bring
me that great Bible off the side-table.
Is it too heavy ?"
Oh no," said Willie; and he was
quite proud to carry it to his uncle.
Mr. Tracy turned over the pages, and
said, Read me that verse, Willie."
And Willie read slowly aloud:
"' Serve the Lord with fear, and rejoice
with trembling.'"
"And now read this," said Mr. Tracy,
finding a second place, and pointing
to the verse:
"'Let all the earth fear the Lord;
let all the inhabitants of the world
stand in awe of Him. "
"And here again," said Mr. Tracy.
And Willie read:
"' God is greatly to be feared in the







A TALK IN THE EVENINGr. 47
assembly of the saints, and to be had
in reverence of all them that are about
Him.'"
Willie had to spell the longer














words, but he soon made them out,
and Mr. Tracy again turned over the
leaves.







48 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
Here again, Willie, the first few
words of the verse."
"' Be not high-minded, but fear,'"
read Willie.
"Yes, and one more-here."
"' Work out your own salvation
with fear and trembling.'"
Now, Willie, what do you think ?
Are men--brave men-never to fear ?"
"Uncle, they are to fear God," ktiid
Willie.
"Ay, and that means that we are
to fear to do what would displease
Him. Men who fear in this way need
fear nothing else in all the world.
Look here, Willie, read this."
"'He shall not be afraid of evil
tidings; his heart is fixed, trusting in
the Lord,'" read Willie. "Uncle, I
know what that means--mamma told







A TALK IN THE EVENING. 49
me once. It means that if he trusts
God, he will not think any bad thing
is going to happen to him."
"Yes, Willie, because no bad thing
ever does happen to those who love
God. All that happens is for their
good. One more verse, and you will
have done."
And Willie read: "'There is no fear
in love, but perfect love casteth out
fear; because fear hath torment. He
that feareth is not made perfect in
love.'"
Willie looked up in his uncle's face.
"Then we need not fear, after all,
uncle ?"
"If you love God, Willie, you need
not be afraid of Him. But still you
must be afraid to displease Him by
doing wrong."
E







50 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
Willie looked thoughtful, and his
papa took up Lucy in his arms, and
gave her a kiss.
"Look, Willie, is Lucy afraid of me?"
Oh no, papa."
"But is not Lucy afraid of doing
what I have told her not to do ?"
"Yes, papa," said Willie; "Lucy was
very, verymuch afraid one day, because
she took one of those berries which
you told her she must not touch."
Lucy hid her face on her papa's
shoulder, and he kissed her again.
"Yes, she was afraid, Willie, and
yet she came and told me, and she
had no fear of coming close to me.
She knew that I should only punish
her as much as was for her good, and
that it would pain me as much as it
would her."







SEVEN YEARS OLD. 51
"Yes, papa," said Willie. And Mr.
Tracy added softly-
"Willie, that is just how God's
children feel. The more they love
Him, the more they fear to grieve
Him. And yet when they do wrong,
their first wish is to confess to Him,
and to seek for pardon and peace
through Jesus Christ our Lord."



CHAPTER- V.
SEVEN YEARS OLD.
"IT is my birthday. Oh, nurse!" cried
Willie, jumping up in his bed; "it is
my birthday, and I am seven years
old."
Willie slept alone in a little tiny








52 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
room close to the nursery, and the
door was open into the next room,
where nurse and Lucy slept. When
Willie called out, nurse came in, and
gave him a kiss.
Yes, it is your birthday, Master
Willie, and I wish you many happy
returns. And here is something for
you."
Willie threw his arms round nurse,
and gave her a hug. Then he sat
down on his pillow, and pulled open
the paper in a great hurry. And there
was a nice little india-rubber ball in-
side. Willie was very much pleased.
He threw it down, and it bounded
against the wall, and back towards the
bed. Willie caught it in his hand,
and laughed aloud with glee.
Then nurse told him it was time to







SEVEN YEARS OLD. 53
dress, and Willie made great haste,
for he was eager to go downstairs.
As soon as he was ready he ran into
the next room, and cried :
"Lucy, Lucy, look what nurse has
given me."
"And I've got something for you
too," said Lucy. "Oh, Willie, I hope
you will like it, because, you know, I
couldn't get much."
Willie had to untwist a great many
pieces of paper, and at last he came to
a little red pencil. He kissed Lucy,
and thanked her, and told her he liked
it ever so much," and then he began
trying to write with it on a piece of
paper. Lucy looked very happy and
pleased. And then the breakfast bell
rang, and they went downstairs.
"Why, Willie, you were asleep when







54 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
I came in to see you this morning,"
said his mamma. Willie guessed
what she had been in for, and wished
very much that he had been awake.
But now he had to wait a little
longer, while they had prayers. And
then the servants went away, and
Willie took his papa's great Bible to
the side-table.
When he came back to breakfast,
there were three parcels on his plate.
Willie could not think how they came
there, and he was quite sure they had
not been there at prayer-time, or he
must have seen them. But no one
would explain. Mr. Gray laughed,
and Mrs. Gray told him to open them,
and Lucy clapped her hands, and Mr.
Tracy said quite gravely, "Do you
not think they walked there, Willie?"







SEVEN YEARS OLD. 55
Oh, uncle, parcels do not walk," said
Willie, pulling at the string. Oh dear,
this will not come undone."
"Let me help you," said Mr. Gray,
and he took a knife and cut the twine.
Then Willie pulled off the paper, and
came to a large box, filled quite full
with tin soldiers on tin horses, and tin
soldiers with tin muskets, and two
little guns, which would shoot peas.
"That is from Uncle Arthur," said
Mrs. Gray, and Willie thanked him,
and jumped about the room with de-
light. He thought it was the very
best toy he had had in all his life.
Then he went to the next parcel,
and found in it a nice little wooden
desk, very small, and neat, and pretty.
Inside there was paper, besides pens,
and envelopes, and a glass inkstand,
L_______________







56 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
and a stick of sealing-wax, and a piece
of india-rubber. Willie was learning
to write nicely, and that was why his
his mamma had chosen a desk for
him.
"And now for papa's," said Mrs.
Gray, when Willie had done looking
through the box, and had cried, How
pretty! Oh, Lucy, see here," at each
fresh thing in it.
Then Willie began to open the
third parcel. He thought it felt like a
box, and so he found it was-a square
rough wooden box. Willie could not
think what was inside. His papa
helped him to open it. And there
lay a neat little hammer, and a gimlet,
and a screw-driver, and one or two
other tools, and a pocket-knife with
one large blade, and a number of nails.







SEVEN YEARS OLD. 57
Willie grew quite red with joy, and
looked up at the others, and said:
"Oh, mamma! Oh, papa! is it for
me ?"
"Really for you, Willie," said his
mamma, smiling. We think you are
old enough now to hammer nails a
little. And I hope you are careful
enough."
"Mamma, I will be careful."
"Well, Willie, you have two things
to keep in mind," said his papa, laying
a hand on Willie's head. One is, that
you are never to touch these tools
when Lucy is near you; the other is,
that you are never to use them unless
nurse or mamma is within call."
"May I use them in the little lumber-
room ?" asked Willie.
Yes, if nurse is in the next room.







58 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
I hope we shall find we may trust you,
Willie."
"I will be sure to do as you tell me,
papa," said Willie gravely. But he
was too happy to look grave more
than a moment. Mrs. Gray told him
to roll up the pieces of paper and
string, and put them on a side-table.
Then they all sat down to breakfast.
Willie could hardly help laughing aloud
all the time, at the thought of his tin
soldiers, and his desk, and his tools.
He hardly knew what he was eating,
and he kept smiling across the table
at Lucy, till Mr. Tracy said:
"Take care, Willie. Do you think
you will ever get your mouth to its
proper shape again if you keep on
grinning like that ?"
"I don't grin, I am sure, Uncle







SEVEN YEARS OLD. 59
Arthur; only monkeys grin," said
Willie. "And, oh, uncle, did you not
say you would tell me about tigers
and monkeys on my birthday ?"
What, have you not had pleasures
enough yet for one day? Well, we
will see by-and-by."
When breakfast was over, Willie
went back to his presents. He put
them all out on the table, and Lucy
stood by his side, looking at all that
he did.
First he went through his desk.
He pulled out the paper, and put it
back. He made marks with the two
pens, and said the black one wrote
better than the brown one. He tried
to draw a little picture with the pencil
Lucy had given him, and rubbed out
mistakes with his new india-rubber.







60 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
Then he opened his tool-box again.
He felt the hammer all over, and
counted the nails. He wanted very
much-oh, very much-to try how he
could use the hammer. His mamma
had gone out of the room for a minute,
and Lucy was by his side, and a little bit
of wood lay on the table, which looked
just fit to have a nail driven into it.
It was very hard to keep from doing
so. But Willie thought of what his
papa had said, and all at once he put
the hammer into the box, and shut
down the lid, and pushed it quite away
across the table.
Then he took out the tin soldiers to
play with. He felt very happy, be-
cause he had done what was right.
When his mamma came back he was
glad and pleased to see her, instead of















4;: '1

Pi

j'



r



Ilr
1







I






























..i




I


.A
.i .
I ..







SEVEN YEARS OLD. 61
sorry, as he must have been if he had
used the hammer.
Some of the tin soldiers had red
coats, and some had blue. Willie took
all the red coats himself, and called
them English, and he gave the blue
coats to Lucy, and called them French.
Then he gave her one gun, and kept
the other himself, and said they would
have a battle.
It was a very quiet battle. All that
the soldiers did was to stand in stiff
rows, and stare at each other. Some
of the horses looked as if they had
begun to gallop, but they never moved
from their place. But Willie and Lucy
did all the work of fighting with their
two guns. First, Willie shot a pea at
Lucy's soldiers, and tried to knock
some of them over, and then Lucy did







62 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
the same to Willie's soldiers. Lucy's
pea almost always missed, but Willie
knew better how to aim, and soon a
great many of Lucy's blue-coated sol-
diers lay flat on the table. Willie
clapped his hands, and cried, Hurrah !
Hurrah! It is just like the Battle of
Waterloo."
I do not know about battles," said
Lucy, "but I wish I could knock your
soldiers down, Willie."
But you cannot, Lucy, because you
are French," said Willie.
Then I wish you would be
French, and let me be English," said
Lucy.
"But that will not do, Lucy, because
you cannot knock them down, and the
English always used to beat the
French," said Willie, who had begun







SEVEN YEARS OLD. 63
to hear a little history at lessons, and
liked it very much.
"But the French fought bravely,
and gave the English hard work some-
times, Willie," said Mrs. Gray, coming
up with a smile. "So I think I will
help Lucy a little in her shooting."
Lucy was very glad of this, and
many more of Willie's red soldiers
were knocked down. But all Lucy's
blue ones lay flat at last, while he
had still some standing. And Willie
clapped his hands again, and shouted
" Hurrah!" three times: he was so
proud of having gained the battle.


:ihh_ ij/








64 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.




CHAPTER VI.
WALKING.
"NURSE, what are we going to
do?" asked Willie, as nurse put on
Lucy's hat and jacket after early
dinner.
"You are going for a walk, Master
Willie."
"Yes, but you are not dressed. Are
you going to take us out ?"
Nurse shook her head.
"Then who is ? Oh, nurse, do tell
me. Are we going with mamma ?"
"You will soon know, Master
"Willie," said nurse. "Let me brush
your hair for you. There. now you







WALKING. 65
will do, and you may go downstairs
with Miss Lucy."
Willie ran down before her, very
anxious to know what was going to
be done. In the hall stood his
mamma in her bonnet and shawl, and
his papa and uncle, both with hats in
their hands. And Pepper was frisk-
ing round them, looking very lively,
and very ready for a ramble. His
leg was almost well again now,
though he had not yet been for any
very long walks or races with his
little master.
"Oh, mamma! Oh, papa! Oh, uncle!"
was all Willie could say at first.
"Don't, Pepper,"-for Pepper had
seized Willie's glove in his teeth,
and was shaking it, and growling in
play. "Pepper, give it to me this
F








66 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
minute. Look, mamma, he is learning
to do as I tell him."
"Like a certain little boy," said Mr.
Gray.
"Oh, papa, are we really going to
walk with you ?" asked Willie.
"Yes, we are all going for a nice
stroll in the fields. Come, are you
ready ?"
Willie pulled open the door, and
held it while his mamma and papa,
and uncle and Lucy, all passed out.
Then he shut it, and ran after them,
with Pepper at his heels. They
turned down the road which led away
from the village, and were soon
walking in a narrow lane, with high
hedges and trees on each side.
"Willie had not had such a merry
walk for a long time. First he ran







WALKING. 67
some races with Pepper, but Pepper
soon began to limp, and to walk on
three legs, so Willie was afraid to go
on with them. Then Mr. Tracy said
he would chase Willie, and he let him
have a good start. Willie raced along
the road, and then scrambled under a
stile, and rushed down a field. Mr.
Tracy jumped over the stile, and went
after him, and Mr. and Mrs. Gray and
Lucy stood and looked on, and laughed
very much.
At last Mr. Tracy came up to Willie,
and lifted him up in his arms, and
took him back to the others. Willie
struggled to get free, but could not do
it until Mr. Tracy put him down. By
that time they were all very hot and
rather tired. So they found a nice
little corner in the field, with some







68 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
felled trunks of trees upon the ground,
and shady branches over their heads.
There they all sat down, and Lucy
was quite happy to keep quiet by her
mamma's side. But Willie could not
rest. He made believe to ride on a
trunk, and ran races round it, and
jumped over it, and chased a dragon-
fly. And then a sudden thought came
into his head, and he rushed back,
crying, "Uncle, oh, Uncle Arthur, do
please tell me a story about tigers and
monkeys."
Corhe and sit down here then,"
said Mr. Tracy, and Willie became
quite grave in a moment. He sat
down on the grass, and crossed his
legs, and gazed up in Mr. Tracy's face,
and Lucy slipped off her seat, and
came to sit down by him.







WALKING. 69
"So I am to tell you a story
about a tiger," said Mr. Tracy slowly.
" What is a tiger, Willie ?"
"A great big wild beast that eats
up men," said Willie.
"When he can get them, which I
hope is not often, Willie. He kills
more animals than men."
"It is very naughty of the tiger to
eat men," said Lucy.
"Yes, I should like to beat him,"
added Willie.
Beating would not do much good,
Willie," said Mr. Tracy. "Did you
ever see a spider catch a fly ?"
"Oh yes, uncle. The poor fly gets
into the web, and sticks there, and
then 'out jumps the cruel spider,' like
in the song, and eats him up."
"Not a cruel spider at all, Willie.







70 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
The fly is the spider's proper
food."
Willie and Lucy both looked up in
much surprise. "Is not the spider
cruel ?" they both asked.
"Are Willie and Lucy cruel to eat
sheep and oxen ?"
"No,-I do not know," said Willie.
"Are we, uncle?"
"No, not cruel at all. God gave
us sheep and oxen to eat. It
would be wrong and cruel to tor-
ment them, or to kill more of them
than we need, but not to eat as
much as we want. And God has
made flies the food of spiders, Willie,
so it is not wrong of spiders to eat
them. And God has made tigers
and lions to feed upon other weaker
animals-"







WALKING. 71
"And upon men, and women, and
children ?" said Willie.
"Yes, if they can catch them. It is
not wrong of the lions and tigers, for
they do not know any better. They
cannot tell right from wrong. But, of
course, we do not like to be eaten, and
so we defend ourselves."
"Yes, with a great gun," said Willie.
"Uncle, were you ever eaten?" asked
little Lucy, quite gravely, and Mr.
Tracy could not help smiling. Lucy's
papa and mamma smiled too, and
Willie laughed out loud. Then Lucy
grew red with shame at her funny
mistake, and hid her face in Mrs.
Gray's dress. Mrs. Gray kissed her,
and told her not to mind, and Mr.
Tracy said-
Now I am going to tell my story."







72. WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
So then Lucy sat up, and she and
Willie both looked very hard at their
uncle, and waited for his story.



CHAPTER VII.
UNCLE ARTHUR'S STORIES.
"ONE day I went for my evening
ride towards the jungle," said Mr.
Tracy. "I used to go out for a ride
on horseback every evening in India.
What I am going to tell you about
took place many years ago. What is
a jungle, Willie ?"
"I do not know, uncle."
"A jungle is a kind of forest. There
are hundreds and thousands of miles
of jungle in India -lonely forest,







UNCLE ARTHUR'S STORIES. 73
where the trees grow thickly, and
wild beasts prowl about at night in
search of prey. On the evening that
I am speaking about, it was growing
dusk, and I was not wise to ride alone
near the jungle so late in the evening,
but I did not think about it. The trees
where I was grew thinly, but soon I
came to a very thick part of the forest,
and then I turned back, meaning to
go home. But just then I saw an
animal coming towards me. It looked
like a bullock in the dim light, and I
thought it odd to see a bullock in
such a place, so I turned my horse
round again, and rode towards it."
"And was it a bullock, uncle ?"
asked Willie.
"I thought so, and I rode nearer,
and the creature came nearer to me.







74 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
And then all at once I saw-what do
you think I saw, Willie ?"
"What, uncle? oh, what?" cried
Willie.
"I saw the stripes upon its sides."
Lucy looked puzzled, and Willie
said, Oh, oh, uncle! then it was not
a bullock ?"
"No; those stripes showed me at
once that I was riding up to a large
tiger. And I was all alone-out in
the dusk-two miles away from the
nearest village, and I had no gun
with me."
No gun!" said Willie. Then you
could not shoot him ?"
No, I had no weapon of any kind,
except my riding whip. And if once
my horse saw the tiger, I knew it
would be all over with me, for he







UNCLE ARTHUR'S STORIES. 75
would be in such dreadful fear, that
he would tremble and shake too much
to gallop away."
Willie gave a deep sigh, and Lucy





4.
--".. ..,,











went away to her mamma's side,
and said she "did not like tiger-
stories."







76 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
"But I do, and I want to hear the
end," cried Willie. "What did you
do, uncle ?"
Why, I turned my horse round as
quickly as I could, Willie, before he
saw the tiger. I was just in time. If
he had caught a glimpse of those
striped sides, you would have no
Uncle Arthur talking to you at this
minute."
"I am so glad he did not," said
Willie. "And did you gallop off,
uncle ?"
Yes, I put spurs to my horse,
and went off at full speed. And when
I looked back, there was the great
tiger coming at full speed after
me. But my horse went the fastest,
and before long I lost sight of
him."







UNCLE ARTHUR'S STORIES. 77
"And you were safe," said Willie,
with a sigh of relief.
"Safe, Willie, thanks to God's care
of me. I never had a more narrow
escape. But, you know, there are no
tigers in England, Lucy."
"Except in cages," added Willie.
"Oh, do tell us some other story now,
uncle. Something about- about -
snakes."
"A story about snakes. Well, I
know one very short one. Did you
ever hear of a cobra-di-capello ?"
No," said Willie. "What a funny
name!"
It is not a large snake, but a bite
from one is almost certain death
within two or three hours."
"I have seen snakes," said Willie.
"They were in cages, with glass in







78 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
front, and they moved their nasty
tongues all about the glass, and
wanted to sting me through it."
"Snakes do not sting, Willie."
"Oh yes, uncle. Nurse told me it
would sting me with its tongue if the
glass were broken."
"Oh no, Willie," said Mr. Tracy,
smiling. "You may tell nurse of her
mistake, if you like. Nurse has not
been to India, and many English
people think that, but it is quite
wrong. Snakes can do no harm with
their tongues. The poison is in their
teeth, or their fangs, as we call them.
There is a bag of poison at the bottom
of each fang, and when the snake
gives a bite, a tiny drop of this poison
is squeezed into the wound. The
poison spreads in the blood, and







UNCLE ARTHUR'S STORIES. 79
very often ends in death. The bite
of some snakes kills in half-an-hour.
The cobra is one of the most deadly."
"And did one of them ever bite
you, uncle ?" asked Willie.
"Not quite so bad as Lucy asking
me if I had been eaten by a tiger, but
not far short of it," said Mr. Tracy.
"No, a cobra never bit me, Willie.
But once I was staying with a friend,
and the lady of the house was sitting
on a sofa, talking to a visitor who had
come to see her. The visitor went
away after a time, and the lady went
into the next room. Just then the
dogs became very restless, and began
to bark and make a great noise about
something under one of the sofas. I
think it was the one the lady had
been sitting on, though I cannot be







80 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
quite certain that it was not the other.
And what do you think we found
there ?"
Oh, was it a snake ?" cried Willie.
"Yes, one of those dreadful cobras,
darting about his head at the dogs,
who were barking at him. Think
what it would have been if he had
bitten the lady!"
Willie looked grave, and thought it
much nicer to be in England than in
India. And then he said-
Please tell me one more story,-a
monkey story, uncle."
"More still? I think this must be
the last. The husband of this same
lady, Willie, had a monkey who was
very fond of making faces. He was
very much afraid of his master; but if
he was out of the way, the monkey







UNCLE ARTHUR'S STORIES. 81
used to slide down the pole where he
was chained, and make a dreadful grin
at the lady. She did not like it at all,
but he would not stop, and he always
took care not to be caught at his
tricks by her husband-except once."
When, uncle, and how ?"
"Why, Mr. Monkey slid down his
pole as usual, and peeped into the
sitting-room. He saw his mistress,
and thought she was alone, but the
gentleman was there too, only sitting
so far back as to be out of sight.
Then the monkey made one of his
ugly grins at his mistress, and she
told her husband. Out came the
gentleman, and Mr. Monkey was in a
dreadful fright, and rushed up his
pole, making his teeth chatter, and
pulling up his chain after him. But
G







82 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
the gentleman soon made him come
down again, and then he had to per-
form cross-armed drill."
"Do what, uncle ?" asked Willie in
a puzzled tone.
"Why, the gentleman was an offi-
cer, Willie, and sometimes when he
had to punish a soldier he made him
walk up and down, and carry his
musket across his shoulders. That is
called cross-armed drill. And the
monkey had to do the same, only he
had a stick instead of a musket; and
he did not like it at all."
"He was a funny monkey," said
Willie.
"And a cross one, too, Willie.
Long after, when his master had
gone away to some other place, he
had a letter from the native to whom







PEPPER'S TRICKS. 83
he had given the monkey. And the
man said they had had to put the
monkey to death, for he had 'killed
one little child.'"
"Oh, what a bad naughty monkey,
uncle! But it has been such a nice
birthday walk !" added Willie. "Thank
you for the stories, uncle."



CHAPTER VIII.
PEPPER'S TRICKS.
WILLIE'S papa had told him that for
a month he could not be quite sure
whether he could keep Pepper or not.
It must depend upon whether he could
always be kind to him, and never grow
angry or hurt him.







84 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
Willie loved Pepper so much that
he would have been sorry indeed to
lose him. And this made him try
hard to be a kind little master to
Pepper. He kept a watch over him-
self, and tried not to be vexed, even
when Pepper would not obey him,
and would not fetch sticks to him in
the right way. Willie knew he had
a quick temper, and he was very much
afraid that some day he might forget.
So each morning and evening, when
he knelt down, and said the words
that came in his prayer,-" Please,
God, make me a kind little boy, and
conquer my evil temper, for Jesus
Christ's sake,"-he tried really to feel
what he was saying, and to pray for
it in his heart. So it was no wonder
that Willie began to grow more kind







PEPPER'S TRICKS. 85
and gentle, and was no longer cross
to his little dog.
There was reason enough for
Willie's fondness for Pepper. Pepper
was so clever, and so funny, and knew
how to do so many things. Willie
and Lucy always liked a game with
Pepper better than any other game.
One thing Pepper could do was to
beg. He used to sit up on his hind-
legs, and hang one fore-paw over the
other, and put his head on one side,
and look so wistful, that no one could
help giving him something to eat.
He would walk a little way on his
hind-legs too, if some one walked in
front of him holding up a piece of
bread or biscuit. Pepper did not
much like doing this--most likely
because it tired his little legs.







86 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
Sometimes when Pepper was beg-
ging, Willie would put the piece of
bread or meat on his nose, and count,
slowly,-" One two three -four-
five-six-seven- eight- nine- ten."
And at the word "ten," Pepper would
throw it down, and eat it. Willie
wanted to make him throw it up in
the air, and catch it in his mouth. But
Pepper either could not or would not
do this, so Willie had to give it up.
He would hold it on his nose, or on
one of his paws, or on the top of his
head, or even in his mouth, and never
eat it till he heard the word "ten."
But he would never throw it up in
the air and catch it.
Pepper could do something else.
He could play at hide-and-seek. Willie
and Lucy were very fond of playing







PEPPER'S TRICKS. 87
this with Pepper. Was it not a funny
game for a dog? Lucy used to sit
down on the ground, and put her little
hands over Pepper's eyes. Then
Willie, after making Pepper smell the
ball, would hide it somewhere quite
safely. Sometimes he put it under
the rug, or behind the curtain, or
beneath a chair-cushion. Then Lucy
took her hands off Pepper's eyes, and
Willie and Lucy both cried, "Seek,
Pepper, seek it out."
And then Pepper began his search.
First he went to the rug, and sniffed
all along the edge, making such queer
long snorts, that Willie and Lucy
laughed till they could hardly stand.
Then he went to the curtains, and
poked about among them. Then he
peered behind the coal-scuttle, and







88 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
under the chairs and tables. Then
he would jump on his hind-legs, and
poke his little black nose beneath the
cushion of each chair, giving a long
sniff as he did so.
And he always found the ball in the
end. He used to drag it out, and rush
away with it in his mouth, and Willie
and Lucy rushed after him. But they
never found it easy to catch him. His
four little legs took him along so fast.
Pepper did very funny things some-
times. Once there came a strange
cat into the kitchen, and Pepper did
not like her at all. She kept spitting
and snarling at Pepper, and Pepper
jumped about round her, and barked,
but was afraid to come too near, for
fear of a scratch on his nose or in his
eyes. It was so droll to see him, that







PEPPER'S TRICKS. 89
nurse called Willie down into the
kitchen to look. And all at once
Pepper thought of a very clever plan.
What do you think it was ? Why,
he rushed up against the cat all in a
moment, and knocked her back into
the round hole under the copper. And
then he slipped in backwards after
her, and stood, with his face looking
out towards Willie, quite quiet and
grave, and the cat in the hole behind
him. I do not know whether pussy
scratched his legs, but his hair was
so thick that he did not mind that.
Willie was quite proud of Pepper
for thinking of such a clever plan.
Pepper did not like strange cats, though
he never really wanted to hurt them,
and only cared to race after them, and
drive them away. But he was very







90 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
fond indeed of Lucy's little kitten, and
used to play all kinds of games with
her. If Willie called, "Cat, Pepper-
cat!" Pepper used to rush to the win-
dow, and whine and bark. If he said,
"Pussy, Pepper-where's pussy?" Pep-
per wagged his tail, and looked about
to try and find her.
Sometimes Pepper made pussy mew
when he played too roughly with her,
but he never hurt her on purpose.
Once when she had a saucer of milk on
the high window-seat, where he could
not reach her, Willie found him sitting
up on his hind-legs, and begging. Was
not that a clever way of asking pussy
to give him some of her milk? But
pussy was not so clever as Pepper,
and did not know what he meant. I
do not know how she would have













4 Yl1













ctell







PEPPER'S TRICKS. 91
given him any if she had known, but
she never minded his going to drink
with her out of her saucer. Pepper
was not quite so kind to pussy, for he
always growled at her if she came
near his plate when he was eating
dinner. Willie wanted to cure him
of this, but it was not easy.
One thing that Pepper did not like
at all was having a bath. Once a week
he was always washed. He was fond
of water, and liked a swim in the pond,
but he did not like being soaped and
scrubbed. When Willie said, "Pepper,
you want washing," or, "Pepper, you
must have a bath," or, Pepper, where's
the tub?" Pepper knew what he
meant, and used to put his tail down
and creep away into a dark corner.
One day when Pepper was going to

' .







92 WILLIE AND LUCY AT HOME.
be washed, he could not be found.
Willie had told him it was time for
his bath, and I suppose Pepper made
up his mind to escape it if he could.
The bath was ready, and the water
was poured in, and the soap and brush
stood at hand, but Pepper was gone.
Willie hunted and called, and the
servants hunted and called, but it was.
of no use. Nurse went about, saying,
"Pepper, Pepper-poor little Pepper
-come along, Pepper."
But Pepper was much too cunning
to "come along," even in answer to
nurse's kind tones. And at last where
do you think they found him? Why
just behind the door of a tiny room,
which had swung nearly to after him
when he walked in. The door was
just ajar, and there stood Pepper look-







DIGGING A POND. 93
ing through the crack at them all with
his bright eyes, but not choosing to
come and be washed. Poor Pepper!
was it not too bad that he had to bear
soaping and scrubbing after all?
You see how clever Pepper was,
and you cannot wonder that Willie
and Lucy were so fond of him.



CHAPTER IX.
DIGGING A POND.
" I THINK I'll make a pond in my gar-
den, Lucy," said Willie one day.
And may I help you ?"
"( Why, you can't dig," said Willie;
"but when I have made the pond, you
may help me carry the water to fill it."