Aunt Effie's rhymes for little children

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Material Information

Title:
Aunt Effie's rhymes for little children
Physical Description:
91, 4 p. : ill. (some col.), music ; 26 cm.
Language:
English
Creator:
Crampton, T
Effie ( Author )
Browne, Hablot Knight, 1815-1882 ( Illustrator )
George Routledge and Sons ( Publisher )
Dalziel Brothers ( Printer )
Camden Press ( Printer )
Publisher:
G. Routledge and Sons
Place of Publication:
London ;
New York
Manufacturer:
Dalziel Borthers ; Camden Press
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's songs   ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1879   ( lcsh )
Children's songs -- 1879   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1879
Genre:
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's songs   ( lcsh )
novel   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York

Notes

Statement of Responsibility:
set to music by T. Crampton ; with thirty-six illustrations by Hablot K. Browne.
General Note:
Date of publication from inscription.
General Note:
Piano music with intralinear words.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 002224622
notis - ALG4888
oclc - 61708302
System ID:
UF00048310:00001


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AUNT EFFIE'S RHYMES

SET TO MUSIC
BY

T. CRAMPTON.




















































AUNT EFFIE'S RHYMES.










AUNT EFFIE'S RHYMES


FOR



LITTLE CHILDREN


SET TO MUSIC BY T. CRAMPTON


WITH

THIRTY-SIX ILLUSTRATIONS BY HABLOT K. BROWNE

















GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONS
LONDON: BROADWAY, LUDGATE HILL
NEW YORK: 416 BROOME STREET

























Liam191






















CONTENTS.



-----<-<----

PAGE

DAME DUCK'S LECTURE TO HER DUCKLINGS . * .. 7

THE CARPENTER'S SHOP .. . I
I2
PUSSY-CAT .. 12

FREDDIE AND THE CHERRY-TREE .. .. 1 * 4 1

THE WATER-MILL .. 16

THE TURTLE-DOVE'S NEST .. * *. 20

THE ROBIN RED-BREASTS .. .. 22

THE LITTLE HARE .. .. .. . * 24

THE CUCKOO .. .. .. * .. 27

GERTRUDE AND HER ALPHABET 28

A COBWEB MADE TO ORDER .. .. 30

THE OLD KITCHEN CLOCK .. .. * * 32

THE MUFFIN-MAN'S BELL.. .. .. * * 34

THE MUFFIN-MAN'S POLKA .. . -35

THE CHORUS OF FROGS 36

THE FROGGIES' DANCE .. 37

THE LITTLE BOY AND THE STARS 38

THE MOONLIGHT WALTZ 41

THE CLOCKING-HEN 42

THE ROOKS . .. 44
46
THE SPIRIT OF THE WINE .. .

THE YOUNG LINNETS. 50

LITTLE RAIN-DROPS .. .. .. .. ..52










vi CONTENTS.
PAGE
THE WAVES ON THE SEA-SHORE .. .. .. 54

THE GLOW-WORMS ,. .. .. .. ... 56

THE GREAT BROWN OWL .. .. .. 58

THE CHINESE PIG .. . .. . 60

LOW SPRING TIDE. . . .. .. 64

THE HUMBLE BEE .. .. .. .... .. 66

THE FIFE AND DRUM BAND .. ... .. . 68

BORROWING WINGS .. .. .. . .. 70

UP IN THE GREAT BALLOON . .. .. .. .. 72

THREE LITTLE OWLETS .. ..... .. 74

MR. AND MRS. JACK-DAW. . . .. .. .. .. 76

THE TOP OF THE TREE .. .. . .. .. 78

LITTLE SALLICARIA .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 80

BEECH-NUTS .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. 82

TOMMY HOOD'S GOODS .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 84

A BRAMBLING .. . .. .. . .. .. 86

POLLY WEATHERCOCK .. .. . .... .. .. 90














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DAME DUCK'S LECTURE TO HER DUCKLINGS&

Lively. rnf

Vo,.c___ __j_ : __ __- -,-,,,. ,
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cal low: Their lit tie wings are short, their down Is mot tied grey and









yel low. There is a lit tle qui et stream That runs in to the
L ,---i- i-- -',--....----










8 DAME DUCK'S LECTURE TO HER DUCKLINGS.


=--- =- _--_---- --6-- _=__.: _=---

S moat, Where tall green sedg es spread their leaves, And wa ter li lies











float.







II.
Close by the margin of the brook
The old Duck made her nest,
Of straw, and leaves, and withered grass,
And down from her own breast.
And there she sat for four long weeks,
In rainy days and fine,
Until the Ducklings all came out-
Four, five, six, seven, eight, nine.

III.
One peeped out from beneath her wing,
One scrambled on her back;
"That's very rude," said old Dame Duck,
Get off! quack, quack, quack, quack!
'T is close," said Dame Duck, shoving out
The egg-shells with her bill;
"Besides, it never suits young ducks
To keep them sitting still."

IV.
So, rising from her nest, she said,
Now, children, look at me:
A well-bred duck should waddle so,
From side to side-d 'ye see ? "
"Yes," said the little ones, and then
She went on to explain:
"A well-bred duck turns in its toes
As I do :-try again."









DAME DUCK'S LECTURE TO HER DUCKLINGS. 9


V. VII.
"Yes," said the Ducklings, waddling on : "The hens will peck and fight, but mind,
"That 's better," said their mother; I hope that all of you
"But well-bred ducks walk in a row, Will gobble up the food as fast
Straight-one behind another." As well-bred ducks should do.
"Yes," said the little Ducks again, You'd better get into the.dish,
All waddling in a row. Unless it is too small;
"Now to the pond," said old Dame Duck: In that case, I should use my foot,
Splash, splash and in they go. And overturn it all."



VI. VIII.
"Let me swim first," said old Dame Duck, The Ducklings did as they were bid,
"To this side, now to that; And found the plan so good,
There, snap at those great brown-winged flies, That, from that day, the other fowls
They make young ducklings fat. Got hardly any food.
Now, when you reach the poultry-yard, Thus Old Dame Duck brought up her brood
The hen-wife, Molly Head, In such a genteel way,
Will feed you with the other fowls, That every little waddler kept
On bran and mashed-up bread. Improving every day.








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THE CARPENTER'S SHOP,

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do-
One morn-ing a spruce lit tie Gim let Look'd in to a car- pen-ter's
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I shop, . . And stand ing right up on its screw, It sur -
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vey'd it from bot-tom to top.. "Much com-pa ny, no con-ver sa tion," it

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THE CARPENTER'S SHOP. II





said, as it looked at the tools;. All stand-ing stock still in their pla ces! They



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must be a par cel of fools.




II. V.
"Are you well ?" said the spruce little Gimlet, I always was told," said the Mallet,
Addressing itself to the Plane. To look at my friends when I spoke;-
"Pretty well, when I'm well fed on shavings My head aches a good deal this morning,
That are not too coarse in the grain." It suffers from every stroke."
"And you, do you like your vocation ?" "There should be one wise head among you;
"'T is wearisome work," said the Saw, Pray, what has become of the Square ? "
"To gnaw all day long at hard timber; A Bit of Chalk-Pencil informed it
It gives one a pain in the jaw." That Ruler was not often there:
III. VI.
Do you sleep well up there in your hammock?" It was sent for, to make calculations,
It said to the Tenpenny Nails, And goes with the Carpenter's man,
Which, in the two ends of a wallet, Who consults it on every occasion
Hung down like a couple of scales. About the details of the plan.
The Gimlet awaited their answer, "Will you dance?" it inquired of the Pincers;
And seemed not a little amused I see you 're provided with legs,
When the Tenpennies frankly confessed Though I can't compliment you upon them-
That, as yet, they had never been used. A couple of queer-looking pegs."
IV. VII.
So then it inquired of the Hatchet, Notwithstanding, the Pincers were flattered,
That hung with its sharp-looking nose And straddling across a deal board,
Hooked over a peg in the wall, They slid from the top to the bottom,
If it liked dealing out heavy blows ?" Without ever speaking a word.
The Hatchet vouchsafing no answer, The Gimlet turned merrily round
The Gimlet turned round on its screw, On its sharp little screw of a leg,
And said to the great heavy Mallet, While the Pincers made many a bound
"That question's intended for you." And a pirouette, poised on one leg.
VIII.
The Plane and the Saw and the Mallet
Made music-each such as it could;
And the whole Joiner's shop rang with laughter,
That pealed from the unseasoned wood.
'Twas funny to see how they capered,
And whirled about on the floor;
And every one said that such figures
They never saw danced before.









PUSSY-CAT,

Moderato.

9I7. -- -- 4 --- L _ -
Pus sy Cat lives in the ser vants' hall,-She can set up her back and
/ ----- --- --.. --4-- -4-- -- *_--__--
,- ___ _-_. -_ r- -.____-- -_-_--- -
_-- _
3. "Squeak!" said the lit tle Mouse; "squeak, squeak, squeak!" Said all the young ones
4. "Squeak!" said the lit tle Mouse, "we'll creep out And eat some Che shire




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purr,. The lit tle Mice live in a crack in the wall, But they

.
too;.... "We ne -ver creep out when cats are a bout, Be cause
cheese;.. That sil ly old Cat is a sleep on the mat, And we



-@---- .-------- ----- _-- -_--h-- -_-_- ---- --- --- -----_-- ---


hard- ly dare ven- ture to stir; ... For when ev er they think of




we 're a fraid of You.".. So the cun-ning old Cat lay
may sup at our ease." So the lit tle Mice stole so


cres.-----


|-' V- I I W
tak ing the air, Or fill ing their lit tle maws, The Pus sy Cat says, "Come
_Ir_- __---_ ---=-z2 .-.- -_ _- -


down on a mat By the fire in the ser-vants' hall: "If the lit tle Mice peep, they'll
care ful ly out And scam-per'd a long the floor; And found out the cheese They









PUSSY-CAT. 13

------ _----- ------ _--- -- -- ---___ _

_J | I --- :.
out if you dare; I will catch you all with my claws."




think I'm a-sleep;" So she roll'd her self up like a ball.
wish -ed to seize Just be hind the scul-le ry door.

Allegro Agitato.


2. Scrab ble, scrab ble, scrab ble! went all the lit tle Mice, For they
5. Nib ble, nib ble, nib ble went all the lit tle Mice, And they





------------------------I-------


S smelt the Che shire cheese, The Pus sy Cat said, It
lick'd their lit tie paws; The cun ning old Cat then





I end of verse 2.1 end of verse 5.
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smells ve- ry nice, Now DO come out, if you please."
sprang from the mat, And caught them all with her claws, And







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Scaught them all with her claws.





































FREDDIE AND THE CHERRY-TREE,


Lively,


SI. Fred die saw some nice ripe cher ries Hang ing on a cher ry






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1 tree, And he said," You pret ty Cher ries, Will you not come down to


"--k









FREDDIE AND THE CHERRY-TREE. 15





me?" "Thank you, kind ly," said a Cher ry, "We would ra their stay up







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"here: If we en tur'd down this morn ing, You would eat us up









Little master, ifear."f you can."













III.






Freddie jumped, and tried to reach it,
One, the finest of the Cherry bobbcherries,d about,
Dangled from a slender twigckled Freddie's nose.;
"You are beautiful," said Freddie,
Red and ripe, and oh, how big!"
"Catch me," said the Cherry, catch me,
Little master, if you can."
"I would catch you soon," said Freddie,
"If I were a grown-up man."









I shall eat them w hen it's right;."
"I shall eat them all to-night."cld Fedie -








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THE WATER-MILL,

Allegretto.
' -a fr- '- s,- ,- '! -- ^ -^.^ ---s:-- m',,, "' ,!t'- ----r
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"A ny grist for the Mill ?" How mer ri ly it goes!
"i1'- "I"'l '-'" -- ^ ^ .-



,









THE WATER-MILL. 17



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1, -V -- -- --
i Flap, flap, flap, flap 1 While the wa ter flows. Round a bout and round a bout, The





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hea vy mill stones grind, And the dust flies all a bout the Mill, And
S- _. __. "--- ---_------- '_ = r_ _--









i makes the Mil ler blind.





II.
Any grist for the Mill ?"
The jolly Farmer packs
His waggon with a heavy load
Of very heavy sacks.
Noisily, oh, noisily,
The mill-stones turn about;
You cannot make the Miller hear
Unless you scream and shout.


III.
"Any grist for the Mill ?"
The Bakers come and go;
They bring their empty sacks to fill,
And leave them down below.
The dusty Miller and his men
Fill all the sacks they bring,
And while they go about their work
Right merrily they sing.
2









I8 THE WATER-MILL.

Allegretto.

J Y -- -- -, - - ---T -- - -

"4. "An y grist for the Mill?" How quick-ly it goes round!









Splash, splash, splash, splash! With a whirr-ing sound. Far-mers, bring your corn to day, And
,--- - -"- -z--- ---_-- -








Ba kers, buy your flour; And Dus ty Mil- lers, work a way, While






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it is in your power.





v. vI.
"Any grist for the Mill ? Living close beside the Mill,
Alas it will not go; The Miller's girls and boys
The river, too, is standing still, Always play at make believe,
The ground is white with snow. Because they have no toys.
And when the frosty weather comes, Any grist for our Mill ? "
And freezes up the streams, The elder brothers shout,
The Miller only hears the mill, While all the little petticoats
And grinds the corn in dreams. Go whirling round about.








THE WATER-MILL. 19
VII. VIII.
The Miller's little boys and girls Oh, heartily the Miller's wife
Rejoice to see the snow. Is laughing at the door;
" Gooo father, play with us to-day; She never saw the mill worked
You cannot work, you know. So merrily before.
We will be the mill-stones, Bravely done, my little lads,
And you shall be the wheel; Rouse up the lazy wheel,
We'll pelt each other with the snow, For money comes but slowly in
And it shall be the meal." When snow-flakes are the meal."






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H T TLE-S













2. Coo, Coo," said the Tur tl Dove, Coo," said
ry of yrs, Lt s t, bo -























Dove Made a pret ty lit tle nur se ry, To please her lit tie
she. Oh, I love thee," said the Tur te-Dove, "And I .. love
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n. Ve ry high they dear ly lov'd each o tree, Tho' they lov'itd their mo tie
3. The young Tur tie Doves Nev er quar rell'd in the
4. In this nur s'ry of yours, Lit tie sis ter, bro their

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Dove Made a pret ty lit tie nur se ry, To please her lit tie
she. Oh, I love thee," said the Tur tie-Dove, "And I .... love



nest; For they dear ly lov'd each o their, Tho' they lov'd their mo their
dear; Like the gen tie lit tie Tur tie-Doves, No quar rels should come











THE TURTLE-DOVE'S NEST. 21
-- --- ----- -- -- -- -



S love. She was gen tie, she was soft, And her large dark
"THEE." In the long .. sha dy boughs Of the dark pine
---- -_ ----_---
_

best. "Coo, Coo,".. said the Doves, "Coo, Coo," said
near. Be you ev er kind and gentle, Like the Doves in the




S- A

eye Oft en turned to her mate, Who was sit ting close
tree, Oh how hap py were the Doves, In their lit tie nur se -



she. And they played to ge their kind ly In their dark .. pine
tree; Then the hap -pi est of nests Is your lit tie nur se -




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by.
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tree.
ry.












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THE ROBIN RED-BREASTS,
Cheerfully.


I. Two Rob in Red breasts built their nest With in a hol low








tree, The Hen sat qui et ly at home, The Cock sang mer ri
t.. .. _-- _- ____----- -.. _j------- _





Iz-_- _-_-,__- --.--- -- --- ---. -_ _-_-_
0 leo
ly; And all the lit tle young ones said, "Wee,
I _ -n_ _ _-1 -:.









THE ROBIN-REDBREASTS. 23


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wee, wee, wee, wee, wee!"

- --------,: -- -- ----1,-=- -- ^ _jF -"



II.
One day (the sun was warm and bright,
And shining in the sky)
Cock-Robin said, My little dears,
'T is time you learn to fly."
And all the little young ones said,
"I '11 try, I'll try, I'll try."


III.
I know a child, and who she is
I '11 tell you by-and-bye,
When Mamma says, Do this," or "that,"
She says, What for ? and "Why ?"
She'd be a better child by far
If she would say, I'll try."














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A-6.
































THE LITTLE HARE,


Moderato.
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6 7. _ I









THE LITTLE HARE. 25



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warm. She slept un til the day light came, And all things were a -




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wake, And then the Hare with noise less steps, Crept soft ly from the







"-- ~- -=-.--- ~- -i-- --- 9--- ,--~ a--


brake.






II.
She stroked her whiskers with her paws,
Looked timidly around
With open eyes, and ears erect
That caught the smallest sound.
The Field-Mouse rustled in the grass,
The Squirrel in the trees,
But Puss was not at all afraid
Of common sounds like these.


III.
She frisked and gambolled with delight,
And cropped a leaf or two
Of clover and of tender grass,
That glistened in the dew.
What was it, then, that made her start,
And run away so fast ?
She heard the distant sound of hounds.
She heard the huntsman's blast.









26 THE LITTLE HARE.

IV.
Tally-ho !-hoy tally-ho !
The hounds are in full cry;
Ehew ehew !--in scarlet coats
The men are sweeping by.
So off she set with a spring and a bound,
Over the meadows and open ground,
Faster than hunter and faster than hound;
And on-and on-till she lost the sound,
And away went the little Hare.





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THE CUCKOOx

Allegretto. nmf

_- -- -_ _------ _--
I. And so you have come back a gain? And it was you I
-.. ----- _- --- -4-- --4-- -l-- ----

L 4











i
heard Pro claim ing it to all the world-You most con ceit ed









bird- You talked of no thing but your-self When you were here be fore, Un -
-_=j- -,_ _--- =_ __=___: _--= -- --- -= --


_---- __ __--


0


til your voice be came so hoarse That you could talk no more.







II. III.
And now you fly from bush to bush, The little bird that told me this
And say, Cuckoo, cuckoo." Suspected something worse,-
Have you no friends to care about ? That you neglect your little ones,
No useful work to do ? And put them out to nurse.
I hear you 're such a lazy bird, Oh, Cuckoo if this story 's true,
You cannot build a nest; I think you're much to blame.
Perhaps you could; if you would try,- Then talk no more about yourself;
We ought to do our best. Go, hide yourself, for shame !












.i d' i














You have not heard the sto ry et Of Ger true and her
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44










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