• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Front Matter
 Frontispiece
 Title Page
 Content
 Back Cover






Title: Kate Greenaway's birthday book for children
CITATION PAGE TURNER PAGE IMAGE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00048298/00001
 Material Information
Title: Kate Greenaway's birthday book for children
Physical Description: 126, 4 p., 12 leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 10 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Greenaway, Kate 1846-1901 ( Author, Primary )
Barker, Sale Mrs. 1841- ( Author, Secondary )
Evans, Edmund, 1826-1905 ( Engraver )
George Routledge and Sons ( Publisher )
Publisher: George Routledge and Sons
Place of Publication: London
New York
Publication Date: c1880
 Subjects
Subject: Birthday books   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1880   ( lcsh )
Bldn -- 1880
Genre: Children's poetry   ( lcsh )
poetry   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: with 382 illustrations drawn by Kate Greenaway ; printed by Edmund Evans ; verses by Mrs. Sale Barker.
General Note: Date of publication from inscription.
General Note: Interleaved with blank pages for notes. Presentation copy.
General Note: Baldwin Library copy contains names and birth years hand written next to birthdays.
Funding: Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00048298
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved, Board of Trustees of the University of Florida.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002221900
notis - ALG2130
oclc - 05079426
lccn - 12032656

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Cover 1
        Cover 2
    Front Matter
        Page i
    Frontispiece
        Page 1
    Title Page
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Content
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 6a
        Page 6b
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 8a
        Page 8b
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 10a
        Page 10b
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 12a
        Page 12b
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 14a
        Page 14b
        Plate
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 16a
        Page 16b
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 18a
        Page 18b
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 20a
        Page 20b
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 22a
        Page 22b
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 24a
        Page 24b
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 26a
        Page 26b
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 28a
        Page 28b
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 30a
        Page 30b
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 32a
        Page 32b
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 34a
        Page 34b
        Plate
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 36a
        Page 36b
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 38a
        Page 38b
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 40a
        Page 40b
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 42a
        Page 42b
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 44a
        Page 44b
        Plate
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 46a
        Page 46b
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 48a
        Page 48b
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 50a
        Page 50b
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 52a
        Page 52b
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 54a
        Page 54b
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Plate
        Page 56a
        Page 56b
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 58a
        Page 58b
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 60a
        Page 60b
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 62a
        Page 62b
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 64a
        Page 64b
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Plate
        Page 66a
        Page 66b
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 68a
        Page 68b
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 70a
        Page 70b
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 72a
        Page 72b
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 74a
        Page 74b
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 76a
        Page 76b
        Plate
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 78a
        Page 78b
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 80a
        Page 80b
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Plate
        Page 82b
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 84a
        Page 84b
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Plate
        Page 86a
        Page 86b
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 88a
        Page 88b
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 90a
        Page 90b
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 92a
        Page 92b
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 94a
        Page 94b
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 96a
        Page 96b
        Plate
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 98a
        Page 98b
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 100a
        Plate
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Plate
        Page 102b
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 104a
        Page 104b
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 106a
        Page 106b
        Plate
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 108a
        Page 108b
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 110a
        Page 110b
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 112a
        Page 112b
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 114a
        Page 114b
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 116a
        Page 116b
        Plate
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 118a
        Page 118b
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 120a
        Page 120b
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 122a
        Page 122b
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 124a
        Page 124b
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 126a
        Plate
        Page 127
        Page 128
    Back Cover
        Cover 3
        Cover 4
Full Text
















The Baldwin Library
RmfB Uuf r










^upsnittb to^ e i'" ^"--i-: -



- .....- i.. .....- -... (... .- ..--.- ....-....-

S/ -- r ./,--
........... .-^ C ?./**1"* *



___ _I__ _I_




































































C;d



3



-i---
I-












"BIRITHDAY:'BooK,

for Children

WITH 382 ILLUSTRATIONS,
DRAWN BY KATE GREENAWAY,
PRINTED BY EDMUND EVANS.

VERSES BY MRS. SALE BARKER.

I.ONDON:
GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONS,
BROADWAY, LUDGATE HILL.
NEW YORK: 416 BROOME STREET.

fAL, RIGnBT R IEaRS D.1
















_ _Il_^__ls^ ____ ____1_1 _I














fB r CHDAYil.'OO

for Childrlen



JANUARY IsT.
WHAT are the bells about? what do they say?
Ringing so sweetly for glad New-Year's Day:
Telling us all that Time never will wait.
Bidding us use it well. ere it's too late.

JANUARY 2ND.
A large brown muff, for cold, cold hands,
So dainty, too, trimmed up with bows:
Of all comforts the best, when you have
to go out,
On a day when it freezes or blows. "
5



.
^lp
\if i



F.












i



JANUARY 3RI.

There was an old woman who ,hook,
The wind her umbrella it took;
She cried, "The wind's strong,
I can't hold it long;"
And that's why she trembled and shook.


JAN UARY 4TlI.

A great big muff and feathered hat,
Poor little legs look bare;
A curious little figure this,
Enough to make you stare.


JANUARY 5TIt.

The joys of the tea-pot who will not sing?
The warmest and cosiest comforting thing
Who does not enjoy a good cup of tea?
SWithout taste or reason I 'm sure they must be.



--







. .----------------------------------





-.... ..... <^ '/.. ........ ^........... <''^ '^ ... ..... ...
u...... .........
C'~C





....I...... .. .. . .. .. .. .















.... .... .. .. ..... ..-- .....
"/ I...-. ........... ......


-----------------.......





. .








JANUARY 6TIr.

So bright, so fresh, so delightfully nice.
To skim along on the hard smooth ice!
What fun to fly on your skates away,
Skating so gaily the whole of the day'


JANUARY 7TH.

Old Mrs. Big-bonnet, little Miss Wee,
Out for an airing, as you may see;
Chatter and chatter, and pleasantly talk.
Enjoying together their nice winter's walk.


JANUARY 8TH.

Who wouldn't go to a Fancy Ball?
High-heeled shoes to make us tall;
Ribbons, and laces, and powdered head.
And then to dance a minuet led.



4Z








JANUARY 9TI.



ls --@_.





LA


4- L4-2-


Z^
//^




1-------



I've seen many Quakers, and Guys a few,
And I think this a frightful Guy-don't you?
Just look at her bonnet, and look at her back !
To dress herself well she hasn't the knack.


JANUARY IoTHr.

A Turk with a hookah, I declare!
I think this will make you little ones stare.
Perhaps he's the Sultan, come over to see
- If he in this Birthday Book will be.


JANUARY IITI.

Dear little Baby he's wrapped up so warm,
And just beginning to run;
Out in the frosty day, roses to win,
Fresh air, and plenty of fun.
8











.. .. . .. . . .




























.. . . . . . . . . .. r










. I .., -"-

.. .. .. ... .;. .. ...... ( -..; t . .
4.-i"



































L__........... ............ ..........___







JANUARY i2Tlr .
A jug and a basin-for what, do you think?
With water to wash little fingers from ink;
For some little children, alas are so
Fond of touching such things, you know.

JANUARY 13t1.
Roly-Poly with a snowba ll.
throwing g it at nothing t aall;
Roly-Poly round about,
It seems to me he's very stout .



JANUARY 14TIl.
So wearied with her heavy load!
So ragged, sad, and cold !
Dear children, always pity show
"To those who 're poor and old.
9



J6 0


r-ss~t









JANUARY 15111.
A clown, or a jester, I fancy thi- man.
But really I can't be sure, think as I can;
His hairptands on end, and his waist's very long,
And he looks just as if he was singing a song.

JANUARY 16TH.
A cottage so rustic, and pretty, and
. warm :
y ''8 Would you like to live in it, pray?
SLittle children, I dare say, are living
there now,
And, though poor, are happy all
"day.

JANUARY 17TrH.
l\ly dear little lady. now why turn your back?
I ami sure that your face is fair;
Yet we see but your dress, aid the round of youth
cap,
Not even a vestige of hai
TO






6 ......







. .. .. ... .. .



./ (I 4/
..(^^^^,,.^<,,
7





AA 4 K1



,,^,t :- ,^



S...... .. .... .... . .



................ ..... ..............---------'-
. . . . . . . . .



..l ........



......... ... I


......... / t.7..








JANUARY 18TIH.
If you have cows, here's something
to feed them,
Something most juicy and sweet ;
A fine mangold-wurzel is i at cows J
delight in,
To them 'tis a wonderful treat.
JANUARY 19rHi.
Small black-haired child, with a chubby
round face,
Two little round eyes, and round nose;
Little fat arms, and little white frock,
And out peep the dear little toes '
JANUARY 20TH.
There was an old woman, whose hat
Was all peaked, and not at all flat;
On her back was a hump,
That stuck out in a lump,-
'Twas a trouble to her when she sat.
ITI



~R;3 1,1'
r-" ..' C





7?~








JANUARY 21st.
Of an empty chair, uhen it's ugly, too.
Why. what can we say, between me and youn
We only can fancy some lady fair
Is coming to sit in the empty chair.


JANUARY 22NI.

A very grand lady, come out for a walk,
What a feather, and large-brimmed hat
So very important, yet only a child,-
We all very well can see that.


JANUARY 23RD.

Just see what a pace he is rushing along:
Just look at his nose and his chin!
His hat, and his pig-tail, his curious legs.
And his arms, too, so awkward and thin
I



R








.. .';L~~:~,~~,!...- ^).t.;,. ........








-- -- ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. . .. . .



.. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . . .







































.-: J .., ... .. '-,


- ........ -. .......i...



_








JANUARY 24TH1. -

Pray, young lady, where are you going?-
Out for a winter's walk;
To breath fresh air, and come home fair,
And then some tea and talk?

JANUARY 25Tit.

Useful and ornamental too,
Handsome in colour and form
Cream-jugs may peaceful and pleasant be,
Though tea-pots sometimes have a storm.

JANUARY 26TI".

Sitting by the fireside, thinking of the past,
Of the time, long faded now, far too bright to
last;
Waiting patiently and still, for the end to come,
Looking-with what wistful eyes !-for the last
long home.














..



JANUARY 297n.

Footstool, or hassock, whichever you call it,
Is useful enough in its way;
But it helps little people sometimes to a tumble,
And big people, too, I may say.

14



JANUARY 27TH,

This woman is going to market,
With a basket full of eggs;
She has many a weary mile to walk,
I pity her tired legs.


JANUARY 28TH.

Goosey, goosey, gander !
With a night-cap on his head;
He turns himself, and twists himself.
And then he goes to bed.












--- --- --- -- ..... .............- .- .






































- ft I *I
.. .. -
.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... .. .. .. .. .. -













I







JANUARY 30TH.
What is he doing, this little Jack Horner:
There on his three-legged stool?
Is he doing his lessons, or eating his dinner;
Or merely just playing the fool?

JANUARY 31sr.
Baby is looking for father,
He's been such a long time away,
Father is coming to baby,
Has thought of her all through the day.

FEBRUARY IST.
Is this Queen Elizabeth, may I ask,
With her ruff, and her cushioned head?
No, for this lady still proudly walks,
And Queen Elizabeth's dead.
15 5





O
\9'








FEBRUARY 2ND.

i Cabbages red, and cabbages green,
This is a fine one as ever was seen;
- j : Cabbages grow in the garden near,
Cabbages grow the whole of the year.


FEBRUARY 3RD.

This is Master Baby, paying a morning call,
"Sitting so good upon his chair, but speaking not at all;
Listening to every word, the funny little man !
Wondering at the news he hears, thinking all he can.


FEBRUARY 4TH.

Hush-a-bye, Dolly! go to your rest;
Mother wants to be busy, you know.
Dolly, be quiet, I won't have you cry;
To sleep, child, you really must go.






. ..-4 ....








........ .u .c
. .... .... .............. ... ................................/ .I






SJ,-- -- -- -- - -- -- --------- .. .. .. ... .. .. .. .. ..





































.......... .................................. .................................... .............
















.................................................. .............. ..........................
















......... ....... ............................................................... .... ..................



























.................................. ....................................... .................
















----------- ------ --------- -----------------------
















---------- --------------------------------- ----------------------------



























---------- ........ .............................. ........... ....... ..................
















---------------------------- ..................... -------------- .......... ................
















............ ............. .................................... ----------








FEBRUARY 5'rt.

A nice new broom, to sweep away.
And keep the floor so clean: -
The crumbs and dust all disappear,
There's not one to be seen,



FEBRUARY 6TIl.

The wind, determined to have some fun,
Blew an old woman to make her run;
The old woman trotted along with a will,
But stopped at last, when she got to a hill.


FEBRUARY 7TH.

A kite, one day, flew up in the sky,
To try and reach the sun;
He failed, and he fell with a broken string,
And sighed, It can't be done!"



.---









FEBRUARY STH.

There was an old person too fat,
Who wore a remarkable hat
( He said, Let the world talk,
1'11 take a good walk,
And try to get rid of this fat."


FEBRUARY 9TH.

A shuttlecock was sent so high,
He very nearly reached the sky;
When he came down he was so vain,
They never sent him up again.


FEBRUARY IOTI.

i"2- Little maid, little maid, whither away,
Running so fast on this early-spring day?
Perhaps it's Mamma you are going to meet,
S And Love lends his wings to your little feet.






































1 -C
) : ii .



---

















.~~.~.... ..~~.......................







................ *'- I ........ ...... ..........
/--, ,



























........... ... .........










.. . .. .. . .. . .. . .. . . .








FEBRUARY IITH.,

Turnips and carrots are all very fine,
If on boiled mutton you 're going to
dine:
But, as that is a dish that I really
can't bear,
I 'II willingly give up to you all my
share.

FEBRUARY I2TH.

A pot of spring flowers before me stands,
Primroses fresh and fair;
Telling of days that are coming soon,
When their sweetness fills the air.

FEBRUARY R3rT.

Carrying home the washing,
Snowy-white and clean;
Merry maidens bring it home,
As can well be seen.




















K*,'




A^



FEBRUARY 14TH.
Pray, little lady, why do you come out,
When it's raining in this way?
Perhaps an important letter to post ?-
I remember, it's Valentine's Day!

FEBRUARY 15TH.
Johnnie has got a new peg-top,
That spins with wonderful grace;
The boy is surprised and delighted,
Just look in his eager face.

FEBRUARY 16t-H.
Polly, the milkmaid, comes over the plain,
Fills up her milk-pails, and then back again;
Milk for our breakfast, milk for our tea,
Thank the good moo-cows for you and for me.
"01
























..... ..... ...... ..... ........... ............................. .



















S .............. .. .................................................. ................





















S. . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .
.. .. .. .. .. -- -- -










































.. . .. -- - -- . .
.. . . ....... .... .... ....... ..............---- --- --... .................................. .













S.......................................... . ............... ............. .. .. .. ... .. .... ..









S. ............ .... ......... .......................................................................... ... .



_







7., /..1 L > 1 ," / t
+/^3 .. ,
U2 II~ Cr



I_ _








FEBRUARY 17TH.
The old pump stands in the meadow,
Where all the cows are fed, 0!
To give them a drink is but fair, I think,
So the old pump stands in the meadow.

FEBRUARY I8TH.
Little Laura Lazy lies against the wall;
If she spends her time so, she'll do no work
at all.
Softly we will touch her, give a little shake,
Then, perhaps, this idle maid may think it
time to wake.



FEBRUARY 19TH.
Little Tom Thumbkin blows bubbles so light,
Up they go-higher yet-colours so bright;
Little Tom Thumbkin looks quite forlorn,
Why, do you think, it is?-bubbles are gone.
2 T



1?



D









FEBRUARY 20TH.

An empty chair an empty chair !
Come and sit down on it, any who dare :
It looks so firm, but give it a shake,
And into pieces it soon will break.


"FEBRUARY 2IST.

"Little friend, little friend, why stare you so?"
"I'm looking, I'm looking, to see the wind blow."
Little friend, little friend, have you a mind
" To become a small pig? They alone see the wind."


FEBRUARY 22ND.

A good-sized bonnet, a very small dog,
As you can plainly see;
The bonnet would do for a kennel too,
It really seems to me.
rU1 122



I_


























7 : 37
(re / ';


.......I......... .................... ...



















.... ... .... ... ... ... .... .. ... ... ..

















. . . . . . . . _











.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .
















------------------- ....................











. . . . . . . . . . . . .








..... .... .... .... ..... .... ..... ... .... ..... ....











.......... ........... ........... ..........



II







FEBRUARY 23RD.
" Baker, what have you got in your basket
Something good, I trust." K
" Cakes and buns, jam tarts and biscuits,
Pastry with nice thin crust."

FEBRUARY 24TH.



"A Japanese tea-pot! let's have some tea,
"A cup of the most delicious bohea i
Then plenty of sugar, and plenty of cream,
And with smiles of contentment our faces
will beam.

FEBRUARY 25TH.
"Dolly, Dolly, tell me, dear,
Do you like your ride ?
The go-cart's small, but so are you,
There's room for more beside,"
23



a










j45



S FEBRUARY 26TH.
Do, pray, look at this lazy loon,
Smoking his pipe before it's noon!
" Leaning his back against a rail,
While the little black dog is wagging his tail.

FEBRUARY 27TH.

Selina Amelia called out to her cat,-
Oh, Pussy, dear Pussy, I wish you'd
grow fat;
Here's a saucer of milk, mixed with
oil from the cod,
SI hope you won't think that the mix-
ture is odd."

FEBRUARY 28TH.
Shall 1 sing to my baby about the bright flowers?
Shall I sing about the glad sun ?
Shall I sing to my baby of long summer hours ?
Shall I sing to my sweet little one?
24
































----------- ............ ------------ ..............................













........... ...........................................................................................













.......... .... ............................................................. ...............






















---------------------- ....................... ........................................................













........................................ ................ ........... ....................













............... .................... .............................






















---------- ..................... ............ .....













........... ......... ........ ............................. ........... .....................













................................ I.- ........... ---------- ................... ..........












1























































.. .. .. .. .. -- -- .. .. -- -









......................... ............... -- -- -- --





----- ---- .... .... ....







FEBRUARY 29TH.
A green, green tree, that stands by itself,
A tree without very much shade;
For its branches are cropped quite small at top,
Until to a point it is made.

MARCH IST.
Not much to be seen but a feather!
Can it be on account of the weather?
We '11 suppose a fine face,
And a great deal of grace,
So hidden because of the weather.

MARCH 2ND.
Upright as a dart, but without much grace,
And her grandmother's bonnet quite hides her face.
I can't say much for her-now, can you ?
And I shouldn't care to say, How do you do?
25



I









MARCH 3RD.
Now, this I call a feat of skill,
Though I should think it made him ill,-
To catch a ball, and stand like that,
Above all, when one's rather fat.


MARCH 4TH.

SMiss Roundabout's dressed to go to a ball.
You'd think her so stout that she can't dance at all
But she is so light, she's just like a balloon,
' And thinks that each dance is over too soon.


MARCH 5TH.

Little Kitty. how I love you!
I like to squeeze you to my cheek:
S Always purring, never scratching,
Always gentle, always meek.

26



__










S .
.. . .
.... ". .









... ................. .. ..... ..... ...................... .......... ..... ..--------
<~



IV.
.
i, t I
,
.,1-: -.---- ---------

















.. .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. .


















































.. . . .. .I . . .. . . .









MARCH 6TH.

I was walking in the country,
It was a little sad;
This was the only creature near,
The only friend I had.


MARCH 7TIH.

Vain young person, who may you be,
Turning your head to look at me?
I will give you a penny, or give you a bun;
But compliments from me, you will have none.


MARCH 8TH.

What is she looking at, up in the sky,
Is it the moon or the sun ?
She will be dazzled, or moonstruck, perhaps,
And then, what is to be done?
27



:1.






' 0


-^








MARCH 9TH.
Here is a round ball, give it to me,
And I will toss it up high;
Forty times as high as the house.
Then will it reach the sky ?

MARCH IOTH.
Alack alas! and well-a-day!
S Here's never a child come out to play !
)\ ;t I '1 tell Belinda, Clarissa, and Jane,
I never will promise to meet them again.

"MARCH IITH.
In this little wee house an old woman
Swells,
"- She makes gingerbread figures, and
Si' -lollipops sells;
---The children all cheer her wherever she
Goes,
But she has a great trouble-which is a
S red nose
28









_ _II



-------------------- .............. ... ..I.- .......... ...... ..... .....




............. .......... ................... ..........................




...... ............... .. ........



. .. . .. . . .





















. .. .. .



... ^ ...i .. .^..... ......... ....... ..// ..................- ....












;r '.
-:-" ~,.;.......... ...............






.. . . . . .. . . . . .


.. . .. . .. . .











.. . - -- . . .. . . .








MARCH 12TH.
"Polly, what are you looking at?
What do you see out there?"
I see a ship sailing far, far off:
And where is it going ?"-Ah, where !



MARCH 13TH.
A little Marionnette man,
Throwing up a ball;
I really cannot understand
How he can catch at all.

MARCH 14THI.
Dear little maid !-Is she sleeping,
Or crying her woes to the ground ?
Grief, and rest, and a little joy,-
It is thus the world goes round.
29



I, a j 2 4



FrP~~~









MARCH 15TH.

Baby, baby, in the bowl,
Have you caught an eel?
Only cotton for a line,
To fish for Mother's reel.


MARCH 16TH.

"Little Miss Sarsenet looks very glum;
"Do you think that she's cross and sulky ?-Hum!
It may be so, or it may not be;
Miss Sarsenet's slightly ruffled, I see.


MARCH I7TH.

' '.- Sweet are the hedges close to the stile,
: Laden with blossoms of May;
Sweet sings the river that murmurs below,
= The whole of the happy spring day.
30












. .. ..-...,.





..... .. -...:..... . ..... -. -..


. .......... ....
A''LL

























MARCH i8TH.

Poor little wandering gipsy child,
In rags, with feet all bare!
Come, bring some meat, and bread, and cake,
And let her have a share.


MARCH I9TH.

This is the woman who is so fat,
There's no door she can get in at:
She has a child, so very small.
"That it can scarce be seen at all.


MARCH 20TH.

Strike away strike away!
Make the hoop run:
The faster it rolls,
The greater the fun












*II



i i
r



MARCH 21ST,

Two loving little sisters, going for a walk,
Chatter, chatter gaily, pleasantly they talk;
What do they talk of? Dolls, politics, and bees;
Both have the same views-that one plainly sees.


MARCH 22ND.

Benevolent and happy man,.
Who takes his walks abroad;
He gives away his pence and pounds,
And all he can afford.


MARCH 23RD.

Who is coming to Margery?
Who is coming, I say?
Some dearly loved one, who brings a plum bun,-
That's who is coming, I say.

32











t















......... ......... .... ...... ........







.---- --





















.... ..... ---------- .. .. .. .. .. ...... ...... ................



~. ~..........









MARCH 24TH.

The wind blew hard, the wind blew strong,
And blew Lucinda fast along;
At last it blew her up in the air,
Now, has she come down, or is she still there'


MARCH 25THt.

Ah! sweet primrose, you are come,
To tell us of the Spring;
The hedge-rows bloom, the woods are green,
And now the birdies sing.


MARCH 26Th.

Little Patty is delighted,
What, do you think, about?
All the flowers are shooting up,
And the buds are out.

33



__
















*s *'

I',9 .



*'



MARCH 27TH.

Poor Miss Baby, in the wind,
Finds herself unsteady
And she has to trot alone.
Until Nurse is ready.


MARCH 28TH.

Lily of the Valley, very fair to see,
Sweet and dear to all I've loved, ever dear to me.
Flower, pure and fragrant, when you begin your reign,
Visions of a glad lost time will ever come again.


MARCH 29TH.

Small Billy is a coachman,
But where-oh! where 's his team ?
I think they're gone to Fairyland.
Or vanished in a dream.

34



_ I


















__ I_



...........





























...........























.............. ............













.......... ---------------------------- ...............













...............


















__ I_



...........





























...........























.............. ............













.......... ---------------------------- ...............













...............























3'








MARCH 30TH.

The sails go round with a hearty swing,
As the wild wind plays on the hill:
And the corn is crushed, and the flour ground,
Right merrily at the mill.


MARCH 31ST.

What does the child see?-is it the moon?
Or does she look at an air balloon ?
Up yet higher, ever so far,
Out there peeps the evening star.


APRII, isT.

Look at this boy as you pass by;
Look, how he's laughing I'll tell you why:
He made an old woman an April fool;
With vulgar boys that is the rule.























-j



APRIL 2ND.

A pot of flowers, if you are able.
Always have upon the table;
And a bird who'll sweetly sing:
These things tell you of the spring.


APRIL 3RD.

Baby dear, with eyes so bright,
Staring up with all your might!
What is the sight, or what the sound,
That makes your eyes so big and round ?


APRIL 4TH.

I am walking out so early,
To see my great-aunt Jane;
I'll walk a mile, and talk a while,
And then come home again.

36



_ _








.. ............ ..... ............ ........ I ..



............L ^ ... ..--...--/--.:.....
~7ec~ai~~'I



zci.



- -- -- ---







/[Ail



.......rh~.- ..!..:t..^........... ..L ........ .. i A .......

?? ^ *.* ~.. ; -*'......


________/_l $i ,



__1 I



III I



I *








APRIl. 5'rn.

Tilly Toddles knocked her head
A very hard, hard blow;
She loudly cried, and sadly sighed
"Odear! it hurts me so!"



APRIL 6'tH.

Running along with his flag in his hand,
To frighten the crows away;
We see but his back, and the crown of his hat,
His face, perhaps, some other day.

APRIL 7TH.

A Normandy peasant, come out fur a walk :
Could you understand if you heard her talk ?
" Bon jour, joli enfant," she would say,
Which means, Pretty child. I wish you good day."

37



ii,



, '"



F









APRIL 8TH.
Rushes by the river-side,
Growing proud and tall;
The wind comes by, and makes them bow,
Then they look quite small.

APRIL 9TH.
-x
Baby, with the tea-cup,
What have you got in it ?
If it is tea, give it to me;
Come, share it, miss, this minute.

APRIL IOTH.
Up the rope, up the rope,
Ever so high!
Will you come down again ?
"Yes, by-and-by."



. 1,



.____



RSL-







T------------- --------------.........
- --: ': /- ... .... ....









/ 'I :'



-.......... --.--.- --..-- .- ....

................. ............. ..........
~L~kF$3







































.............................................................. .. .. ........... ............. .










S.. .. .................. ... ............... ................ .

















S .................. ...... .............














































-- - - --- -----------
-- - - ....... ........... .................... . . . . . . . . .









S............................................ . . ........ .....--- -- -- -..................... .










,.. ................. ...... ...... ...... ....... ...... ...... ...... ..................... .. .









APRIL IITH.

Birdie, dear birdie, oh, whence do you come
Now say, do you bring any news?
Has mother come back from London town,
And has she not brought me new shoes?


APRIL 12TH.

What 's in the basket, the basket?
What is there, great or small ?
Perhaps plum buns and gingerbread.
Perhaps there's none at all


APRIL 13TH.

Cowslips, cowslips, fresh and sweet.
And very, very dear !
I look at you, and then go back-
Oh, many a long, long year!



_












APRIL 14TH.

Mermaid, or child in a sea-shell!
S Pray, little mermaid, is that where you dwell?
_- Blown by the wind, riding over the sea,
"I'd rather it you, little mermaid, than me.


APRIL 15TH.

Little hands behind you!
And why do you hide them, then ?
Have you a ball, or nothing at all,
But fat little fingers ten ?


APRIL 16TH.

Would you like to know why I walk so fast?
A sight I'm going to see;
It may be a ship, or it may be a shark,-
It may, or it may not be.
40















-i-..- L .... ... .. .............. ..
. .. ..- ........ ... . .1 3
.. ............... .... ...., ,.. ^ ........ .




















S .......... .-.........



_







1



APRIL 17TH.
Upon the grass, beneath the bright spring
sunshine,
There sat a gentle, pensive little maid;
The soft spring air just breathed a per-
fume near her,
"I bring the kisses of the flowers,"
it said.

APRIL 18TH.
Who went in the fields to-day,
To gather marigolds, I say?
Was it Belinda Abiathar Ann?
Tell me, I pray you, if you can.

APRIL 19TH.
Dear me! this is very odd,
Upon the stairs to sit;
I think she's got her night-gown on,
And doesn't care a bit.











I

''
' *



y ;''S



APRIL 20TH.
I want to see the world, you know;
I'm going to be a sailor:
This is my sailor suit, you see,
Just come home from the tailor.

APRIL 21ST.
Come and look at this round plate,
Hanging alone in pomp and state.
Do you like it empty, or covered with cake?
I hope it's not always like this, for your sake.

APRIL 22ND.
"Little girl, where do you come from?
Little girl, where do you go ?"
"I come from the school in the hollow,
Where they teach us to read and to sew.




























-.... ... L .... -: .: ......... .;..... -.. ................. . ........ ........ ^ : ..:-

















- . . . .







S.,7- -* .



"-I---I- -----. ....... -........




- L .i -- -








APRIL 23RD.



Yes, I am fond of them; I
Now, are not you?-
Fond of potatoes,
When they are new?

APRIL 24TH.

There was an old woman whose mind
Was fixed on a race with the wind;
Her friends said, "You'll find
You'll be soon left behind;"
But she smiled, and set off with the wind.

APRIL 25TIH.

Have you got a cabbage there,
Little funny maiden fair?
" Yes, I have, I'm going to boil it,
Though the cook says I shall spoil it."
43



'44



u.c
bl









APRIL 26TH.

See, 0 children! now I bring
Glad sweet flowers of the spring:
May your paths with flowers be spread!
May you on them lightly tread!


APRIL 27TH.

Just an entrance, nothing more;
Whither, whither does it go ?-
Where glad hearts are gay and light,
Or where they ache in silent woe?


APRIL 28TH.

Ivy, stealthily you creep,
Killing where you cling.
Strange so graceful, fair a plant,
Should be a cruel thing.

44



__ __










*r', : -

p lalp =-e f-,~ r
'lid
S 7..... ... ....
-------- ...... ....... .. ..............



..&(^^k ^ tt^.^.^.^..iM /^.L-t-^-.------- .1^



___













































................. .........
IL C------




r----- -






'i {, ~ -^\!w r





^*., ^ y& "~*"^- "
,_7

If1& I .-
~ Li








APRIL, 29"rH.
Blowing airy bubbles light,
Watching changing colours bright:
Tommy, happy as a king,
Joyful at so small a thing.

APRIL 30TI.
Yes, they did squabble, scratfched in their spite:
Now they are friends again -friends again quite.
Look, how they lovingly each give a kiss;
Now we are sure that there's not much amiss.

MAY s'r.
A strange-looking creature as ever was seen,
Dancing and grinning round Jack-in-the-green:
This is an old fashion, that comes in with May,
And sad for the sweeps if the First's a wet day.



6,


W^!^"




<^^


r?


< j1



fc?









MAY 2 I).

"' Here's a nest," said a bird,
"With my eggs in it, three;
All spotted and handsome,
As eggs can well be."


MAY 3RD.

Tulips in the garden grow,
Don't they make it gay?
1 'm very fond of tulips,
I'11 pick one if I may.


MAY 4'rl.

Little airy, fairy sprite,
Flying in the air;
Dropping blossoms to the earth.
Scattering flowerets fair.

46



c,

$


























d



; ____










MA Y 5 TH.

Is she sad, little maid.
Or is she but sleeping ?
I'd rather she dozed,
Than made red eyes by weeping.



M A

When I was ou
I met an ol
What he said,
Now, gues


M A \

Come, jump off t
If you can do it
Yes, you have do
Out to the fields,



" t V



"6TH.

t a-walking, ,'
d, old man: \ I
and what I said, '1
it if you can. _


7TH.

he tub-just let me see
; now-one, two, three
ne it; let's merrily run
and we'll have fine ftn.
47









MAY 8Tir.

S This girl is dressed all spick-and-span,
"i. And neatly as can be;
S\Her sash well tied, her mittens straight.
SShe's going out to tea.


MAY 9TII.

Wild ro-.s grow in hedges,
"In the merry sunmmer-time;
I 've talked of them, and sung of them,
-\nd put them into rhyme.


S^IAMAY rorII.

S\Watching how the daisies grow,
In the early morning;
S ~ At night their yellow eyes are c!noed.
But open in the dawning.

48





































~~~--------------- --










f '

I



:1~I








M A Y i I TH.
" Paddy, oh Paddy, now where do you go,
Stepping an Irish jig, dancing just so "
" Oh, shure 1'm off, then, to Dublin town,
To buy wife and children aich a new gown."

-)MAY I21Ti i.

Blossoms pink, and blossoms white,
Flowering in May;
Sweet and bright, they bloom so fair.
And all the world is gay.

MAY r13 'l.

Such a big bonnet, a basket as big !
Is she going to market to buy a small pig?
"When she comes back, it will be a fine joke,
A pig in a basket, a child in a poke.



D










J



MA V 14TH.



Up, up flies the shuttlecock, up with a jump
Down on the battledore now, with a thump !
Fly away, shuttlecock, higher yet fly,
Up to the clouds that pass over the sky.


MA I5TH.

A spirit floating through the night.
Where the stars now shed their light.
Tell us, tell us what you are ?-
The Spirit of the Evening Star.


MAY 16Ti1.

Tulips in a pot, you see;
Phillis brought them in to me :
I thought Phillis very kind,
To pick her one I'd half a mind.



*f





University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs