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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00284
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: August 15, 1908
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00284
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text





pUST RIATJ


PfsY NfAVAI ZToRES,
VIM1rER GErEtElAI
f ND\~TRIJA6@o FIAlMGIAh
CG'5 EWSPAPEk


Naval Stores Conditions


in Mexico.


Attention is called to an article in this
issue about Naval Stores Conditions in
Mexico. It is written by Carey B. Town-
send, whom every operator in the pine
belt knows and admires. This article
will open the eyes of those of our read-
ers who are not familiar with the condi-
tions in that neighboring country.


I i- J







S% I-- ___- --Mm


ATLAN TIC


COPFJRAGJCE CXO..


H44AND)-14AUDE


SIRIT 3AMRI 4Q,


T.1.if 3444-764.


Our customers may "It pays to use Atlantic Bhrrels."
J. MeN. Wright, Manaer. Jack.oville. riF


Ofm.. Coaeoudtt" dIUiinj


Atlantic Coast Line R. R.
GOES VERYWIIHRE

North, South, East and West
Consult the Purple Folder."
For detailed information, rates, schedules, reser-
vations, see your nearest ticket agent. Call on or
write to
A. W. F'RITOT,
DivisieM Passenger Agent,
FRANK C. SOYLS1ON, Trav. Pass. Agent.
ATLANTIC COAST LINE. Jacksonville. Fla.


East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUOI AND DIRFIP- L4ONQ LAF

Yellow Pine Lumber

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots
Steamer Shipmtets a Specialty.

WATERTOWN. FLORIDA


I


THE COMMERCIAL BANK
JACKSONVILLE. FLA. Braclb Ocala n Lake City
The largest leading State Bank a Jackaomrille. Is coadted ia am ei-
fashioned strictly consrvative maner and is subject to regular ezarint
by the Comptroller.
t-lL..avidual and Savings Aeeoe solicited.
H. ROBISON, V. a OWVU, H. GAcL.LAr
Presilet. Vaic-Pfmeiat. g


CONSOLIDATED


Home Office:


NAVAL STORES COMPANY.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Branches: Savannah, Ga., and Pensacola, Pla.

OFFICERS.
WALTER P. COACHMAN, Premidt; D. H. MMILLANA, L. L COVINOTON, JOHN H. POWEL L B. PO WRL sad W. J. KELLY, Vies Preside.
J. C LITTLE, Secretary ad Treasurer at Jacksonville; J. '. HODGM, Assista Seetary at Savamba; J. K. ROIER, Asistaat Secretary at PiRal
EXECUTIVE COMMLTEE: W. W. Cummer, W. F. CoTama, W. J. BDlma, B. Logers, sad A. urd.
DIRECTORS: W. J. Hillman, W. W. Cammner, D. H. MaMi., W. P. O*mcuM, W. C. Powell, H. L. Orit C. B. Eoger, Joh H. Powell. A. BHb-
bard, B. A. Alford, C. W. Deam, B. B. P l, W. J. KCIly.



NAVAL STORES FACTORS


Paid in Capital


Stock, $2,500,000


Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
The "Consolidated'" is purely a co-operative Company. Its Interests are Identical with those
of the Producers. The patronage of turpentine operators everywhere Invited.
Two Million acres of Land and Timber for sale on easy terms.
Producers are invited to call or correspond.


6


_ __ __


L


r


Lmr


I


I

















WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL


RECORD.


PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. DEVOTED TO NAVAL STORES, LUMBER AND MANUFACTURING IN i K lsb.


w S.L .Ba02 m r. r by o r. ie Cuminae d the Trpeiw Operk s' Asoal a as Euosie ca O.Oc aman d adeptd SeL .1902. n Amin l Conveansm. a w O^cal Crmm aims f the General AdssiAio ed Sept. L 103. the
O id Oc aem f Torpeaime Operrs' Amssocior Adeped April 27. 1901 as Olicil Orge d the liter-Stae Cas Grwrcen A action. Endorsed by Georgi Sawmill Alssocitio OfciPIlr d fSuha Stock Growers AmIDmian.




Naval Stores Conditions in Mexico.


Interesting Facts About Uncle Sam's Great Neighbor in the South. Movement of American Capital and Ameri-
cans to the Republic, Ancient History, Sentiment and Poetry, Combined Witf

0 the Prosaics of Every Day Life.


N Vaklosta, Georgia, for many of tile Interior, and an active memler of
years, a bright-hearted, hos- thie Cabinet. In this resls.et. Mexico sets
pitable old fellow, named tlhe I'nitel States a gtns example. as our
Prescott, kept a popular V'ie-'President are more ornamental titan
hotel, his principal custom- useful, except when congresss is in session.
ers being drummers and tur- There are seven Departments, all presided
pentine men. Whenever a over by strong and patriotic officials con-
stranger stopped there and stituting a Government of much ability
returned to the hotel after and strength. The Secretary of Finance.


a walk around the city,
our friend Prescott invariably accosted
him with this salutation: Brother, h-w'd
ye like the town, what you've seed of it?"
So, having been in Mexico for several
months, on the eve of my return to the
States, I thought I would send you an
article for the Record, giving my impres-
sions of this wonderful country, and thus
answering the question which a number of
your readers will naturally put to me, viz:
how do I like Mexico, what I have seen of
itT
Facts About Mexico.
Much ignorance prevails in the United
States as to Mexico and Mexican condi-
tions, and I confess to a liberal share my-
self, until I came here and learned many
things, which have been something of a
revelation to me.
To begin with, this country possesses
an area of 767,000 square miles, with a
population of 15,000.000 people.
It has an immense coast line along the
Pacific Ocean, and an extensive border on
the Gulf of Mexico. Its frontiers touch the
United States for a stretch of over 1,000
miles, while on another side it looks out
upon the Carribean Sea, and also touches
Gautamala and British Honduras, away
down in Central America. Following the
plan of the United States, Mexico has
twenty-seven States, two Territories, and
one Federal District, (like our own Dist-
rict of Columbia). In this Federal Dist-
rict is situated their superb Capital, the
city of Mexico. from which I am now
writing. They have a Congress like ours,
and each State has a Governor and a
Legislature.
The President of the Republic, as every
school boy knows, is General Porfirio Diaz,
and he has been Executive here for twenty-
seven years. Undoubtedly, he is one of the
greatest statesmen and grandest charac-
ters in the history of the American Con-
tinent. President Diaz is 78 years old, but
strong and vigorous yet, and it is the wish
and prayer of all Mexicans as well as
foreigners in the Republic that he may
be spared for many more years, to guide
the Ship of State to its goal of even
greater national strength and prosperity.
The Vice-President, Hon. Ranumo Corral,
a man of great ability, is also Secretary


lion. .lose Yves limantour is known all
over the world as one of the greatest liv-
ing financiers.
Mexico has at present Is'tween 19.000
and 20.000 miles of splendid railways, with
several important lines building, the prin-
cipal of which are the Ilarriman Southern
Pacific extensions, and thet Stillwell line,
known as the Kansas City, Mexico and
Orient Railway. These lines are helped
substantially by the GCovernment. which
hands over to them a cash Im lsus, upon the
completion of every twenty or twenty-five
kilometers. A kilometer is equal to five-
eighths of a mile.
It is estimated that $.00.000.000 (in
gold) of U'nited States capital is invested
in Mexico. in mines. railroads, lands, tim-
Iwr, and other enterprises. There are
fully 75.000 foreigners residing in the lie-
public, divided almut as follows: 40,000
Americans or "Yankees," 20,000 Spaniards,
5.000 English, 5.000 (ermans, and 5,000
French.


estimate the pine timber area of Mexico at
about 20O.EM),0(X) acres, of which mflly two-
thirds are short-leaf. lololly, spruce, and
scrub or "bastard" pine. not suitable for
Turpentine, leaving I.f000.000 to 7,000.000
acres of good pine. in every way adapted
to Naval Stores production.
A most peculiar and interesting feature
of the Mexican situation is, that the pines
producing Naval Stores, or suitable for
same. are only met with in the mountain-
ous districts, at comparatively high alti-
tudes, say from 5.000 to 9#.(JK) feet above
sea-level. No pines gpsl for either tur-
lentine or lumelr can Iw found below the
above elevations.
The Forestry Bureau of the United
States, in their investigations of the Tim-
Iwr Pines of the Southern States, report-
and report correctly-that no pines suit-
able for the extraction of turpentine and
rosin are found in the pine belt from Vir-
ginia to Arkansas and Texas, at a higher
altitude than 2,0)0 feet and very little
alsbve 1.i,50 feet. Therefore, it was puz-
zling to ime to find conditions exactly re-
versed in Mexico. Nature which does all
things well, has provided a thicker bark,
closely set together, for these trees, and
thus the cool night atmosphere of the
high altitudes does not chill or injure the
pines. While there is little or no flow of
sap at night, the first rays of the morning


Naval Stores Conditions. sun striking the trees starts th<
So much for geography, statistics, and ning" freely, and they only 1i
generalities, I will now say something darkness fals. 1 have never
alout Naval Stores and conditions sur- running pines titan these in ntm
rounding the industry-so dear to readers servation, which lias extended
of the Record. I came to Mexico in March, ("pe Fear to the Sabine River
under a contract with a companyy of Rhode (Owing solely to the (col nI
Island capitalists, to re-organize a turpen- prolpr to estimate the yield
tine business which they had opened up pines at twenty-five IT'r cent. le
in tite State of Michoacan, and which was best output of our southern
not doing as well as they expected or other words, it is safe to court
wishlet. I was glad of an opportunity to 35 barrels of spirits to the cr
see for myself the pine timber of Mexico, in Mexico. with rosin in pIrop
to make a test of the ipon labor, to look The Ml-xican turpentine pine
into the tratisioortation problem, and to different apltaranee from n
olserve climatic conditions. States trees. The bark as I
I have had exceptional advantages in -is different. Ising thicker a
acluainting myself (practically) with the and the needles are shorter a
Mexican proposition, and will give you as also the pine-burrs or seed
briefly as Iiossible an outline of same. All smaller Isoth in diameter aid le
sorts of reports have reached the States not get these pines "sized up"i
alout Naval Storets conditions out here. I assure you. as they present
some of theli true, part of them false. interesting study.
I came with grave doubts in my own mind The higher the altitude, the i
on the subject, inocu-latedl-so to speak-- hearing are the pines those
with the idea tlh:lt our own Soutlhen 9.tN) feet presenting a slarp
States were the *nly 1-oitiaiatt producing those at 54.M)0 tto 6;.0 ) feet.
centers of turl'nt;tne and ri.sin. and that vetstigatiton however, with Ip
the industry could not su -*eed elsewhere. convilncel Ile to t yt ll surprise
While no statistics .ir reliable information is no difference in the yield or
are available on the subject, it is safe to of the gunm, which is after all


em to "run-
et-up when
seen better
entire ob-
I from the
s.
rights, it is
of Mexican
ss than the
trees. In
it on :0 to
op per year
portion.
s present a
ur U'nited
have stated
nd tougher
ind coarser,
-cones are
ngth. I did
in a hurry.
ted a most

different ap-
at 8.900 to
contrast to
A close in-
roler tests.
that there
tile quality
to the pro-


8


fessional naval stores operator the only
thing of interest. In Mlichoacan, where I
spent most of nmy time, the altitude of
the camp is 6.000 feet. The days are warm'
but the nights invariably cool. I kept a
thermometer record, and the lowest the
mercury went was '50 and the highest 88.
The average was about 66 degrees. Tur-
pentine runs all right in Mexico when the
temperature is W0 and albove. We all slept
every night under blankets, and I saw not
a single mosquito, which only a New Or-
leans man can fully appreciate.
I found an entire absence of the black
bugs and beetles which kill so many of
our So uthern pines annually, and I was
gratifite to observe that no "dry" or
"dead" faces developed on the trees. The
pure and dry mountain air of these alti-
tudes acts as a natural preservative to
meats an vegetable matter. We could
hang up dead squirrels or game birds or
meat of any kind for four to six days,
without same tainting or spoiling. Evi-
dently the atmosphere affected the quality
of the crude guun also, as I noticed that
the rosin turned out from the old or high
Ismxes was of an unusually fine quality,
grading from I to M instead of D to G, as
customary. As to the relative yield of
Spirits front a given quantity of crude,'it
is about the sane as we get in the United
States, or from twenty to twenty-two per
per cent.
While most of the timber is on the hills
and mountains, a great deal is found in
the marrancas and valleys, and on easy
slopes, affording convenient workmg.
Mexican Peons and Labor.
The lalsrers out here are called "poens"
generally. but in some sections, they are
styled "mozos." The eomns are native
Mexicans, of Indian blood and origin, but
not at all like our United States Indians.
A great many of them are as white as
we are. lnt the majority are dark-skinned,
similar to our itiulattoes. but at a glance
you can see that they are a different prop-
sition front the African. They are peace-
able. humble and polite, and make ex-
cellent laliorers. They live on little and
therefore work for small wages. The
general Lpay for lield work and common
labor is forty to lifty cents per day, Mexi-
can money, e. vqlual to twenty to twenty-five
cents in gold. For turrl-ntine work, we
paid at the rate of sixty-two cents per day
(Melxican) or thirty-one cents in gold.
Isxes are cut by the day, and chipping
likewise, the only piece-work Iwing dip-
ping, for which the pay is ten cents per
live gallons, costing about fifty cents gold
Ipr Ibarrel of fifty gallons.
The dippers out here use a five-gallon











4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



WHITE OAKS SPIRITS BARRELS

Guaranteed to conform to specifications Savannah and Jacksonville Board of Trade.

Write to Columbus Barrel Mfg. Co., Columbus, Ga., or to HENRY ELSON, florida Mgr., Jacksonville, fla.


tiln canl which is ealei a "lbotiej" and fmew
of them get more than ten full onies in a
day. The guml is Ibrought to the still from l
the wood\l, on bIrros, which carry at a loadi
four intties.
The I ,ons live principally on tortillass."
frijoles (or Iwans). and chiles, with meat
occasionally. The tortillas are made from
corn, and resemble flap-jacks or latter-
cakes. They ido not iput any salt in tlhem,.
and they are really the --"ulleavened reall"
of the Scriltures. A Iweon famiily. ca1n exist
oni fifteen or twenty cents lur day. Some
of their huts or cabins are( worse than any-
thing ;you ever saw a laior crackerr" or
a sorry negro living in. They have no
furniture to speak of. I have not seen a
In~lstead or a chair or table, in a peon cablin
yet. They dress in thin white cotton
clothes, with no underclothes, but all peIns
have blankets, which they wrap around
them when they get cld. anmi sleep in
same at night. Their foot-gear is a kind
of sandal, or niaim asins. .Al thle lrpeon
wear the big sombnreros. made of straw.
They are a picturesque lot. I was glad to
find that they make good turpentine hands.
They soon learned the standard regulation
A.lmerit-an work. and they get iup and down
the hills with surprising agility. I tested
them thoroughly and they are all right. I
fact I would rather have tle Mexican lpeon
than the negro. IBesides, lhe is cheaper.
Thlie mien are limnihlered at the camp. and
never known by name. These names they
have somee of them) wouIl give you lock-
jaw. Pay days are weekly, and each man
is required to hand in his axe or hack or


ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION OF (has. E. Ilias. Jacksonville. 60 shares.
CENTRAL SPRINGFIELD COMPANY. In witii,.n wheliretf we have hereunto
The nideirsigned Ipersolls hereby asso- -i .l"-ril i or Iiaiies anili alied oumir seals
-iath themseln es together for thle pur- this 13th day ,i f .\l gulst A. I). I!KmS.
li., of form iinh a morporrationl under the Geo. E. Swisher, (Seal.)
law-, of tlie State of Florida and d4o adopt John H. Williams, (Seal)
the following Articles of Incorporation: Chas. E. Haas, (Ieal)


1.
The niaime of this corporation shall lse
S-:NTI.ALI SPll.Nt''IELD (OIMPANVY,
ail iti pincil place oif business snall
lie in the ( ity of .lacksoniville. Florida. It
slall have tile right to transact btiustness
inl a nyv other city town or nmunicipality in
this Stmilte or alny other State in the
I llited States.
2-
The general Inature of t'he business to lbe
transacted I,,y -aid corporation shall lie to
lowi. lbuiiv iiil sell real estate, lboth ilm-
prov(l anild uiniprovel, l, oth for itself
and ai s agent-, ts for others; to collect rents:
to Iiorro-w ain lend moneyV for it-'elf aind
for ,iothrs to hilild houses for itself and
for otlher-, asn tol sell t, the same either for
cash or oni credit, and generally to do all
things usually done by a real estate cotn-
paly..
3.
The almoililt of capital stock ot said
ciorporat ioni shall I.e Ten Thousand Do)l-
ars to, I, divided into one hlnuilnred shares
of tlie par value of (hie Hundred Dollars
each. Pavnint for said capital stock
1mia.v IN. maiide ili eanh or in real estate or in
service-' renderlel 'at a just valuation to lse
tlixte by t LIi lioard of )Directors. No
i tockliolhler shall sell oir transfer his stock


dilp iaddle Wmfore getting his money. Mou- in this i( orlmration without the consent
lday morning, the tiols are re-issuedl to if all thie other stockholders.
the lpmns, when they go to thie w'mds. 4.
The laborers have to le workedd in smlulds iThe t,.,rmim for whichh said corporation
of ten to sixteen. The:y cannot Im sent i snt -hal exist shalll I foir ninety -line years.
out singly. like our Soulthern negroes. W\\'e
had a "t-aptain" over each squad, but the 'Th.fiI bsirn.-s of tihe corlporation shall
plan did not work well, las the captain got I., c-llionduced bly ti, following oflicers: a
very little more pay and was not much president. Vice-Presnident and a zl:re-
Iwtter than the men under him,l and there t:ary and Treasulrer. and a Toard of not
was more or less loialing, when nIone of the I.,s than three inor more than five 1i-
wotods-riders were around. I think ibst rectors. Tier Sectretary and Treasurer
results can I'e olbtain4e by dis miwnsing with mIlia In, onie anll the samne person.
wamlos-riders and "captains" laoth. and em- .
ployiing young white .Americtans, preferably I' til tlhn olicei-s ehl-ted at the first
ex-convict guards. whio have had charge of ;Ininiial elet,- ionl are qualifitl, tie business
ctmnvic-t* ohi turlpntine farms. They can be ,f th,, c-rloration, l shall be ucimducted by
nmountedl, and stay with their squad all thi, following-lname omllicers: Johin 11.
day. N-o guns will l-' required. and no \illiams. 'President: (Leo. E-'. Swisher,
harsh menasulres rlmetssary. simply keep Vice-Presideiit. ( hlas. :. Hlaas. Secretary
then moving along and at work. Tur- mnd 'Treasuirer. nd .liohn II. Williamis.
Ipn-tine in IMexico is marketed in cases I:e.. F. Swislier and ( has. E. Ilaas, Direc-
(of two 5-gallon cllns). iiosin is put up tors.
in bags and Iboxes holding about 100 'I'he first mlinnal meeting of the stock-
Indllnls each. Harrels don't go out here. IIolih,-rs shall I-, hIel oni the first lMonday
.A burro or a mule camln carry 200 pounds in Smptemllir. 1I!ii. alid the first annual
at a load, and they are good for twenty- uiiting ,if ihe D ire)tors shall Ii held iam-
five to, thirty miles a day over the moun- nlediately after the st uokholders' ilmeting.
tain roads. Burros are cheap. costing 'The r-egulallr annual meetings of the stock
frmn $20.00 to $25.00 (Mexi-an) andi good holder, anid DIirectors shall Iws hield there-
imule-s -an hle Iouglt for $.75.00 and $ 80.(00 a;ftr ,, i tihe first Monliday ill Steptemller in
(Mexican). A first class horse can be had ,;each liuil ev\,r. yar.
for $30O.00 to .$i0.00 goldl. 7.
Market and Future Outlook Here. The names anl reidences of the sub-
The market in Mexico for naval stores seril.ers :anl tlihe aimoiunt of the capital
is a gootl one, and favorable to the pro- ,t.,-k sutlsc-ibed bIy each arem as follows:
ducer. Turlentine commands from fifteen .,ohln If. Williams. .acksonville. 20


to twenty cents per gallon (gold) more shares.
(Continued on Page 6.) t;eo. E. Swisher, Jacksonville, 20 shares.


State of Florida,
I)Du\al ( Counlt y.
Iet'fore nme. aii oillicver dulv authorized to
take aekm;lll i ledgelients. iwerslonally ap-
i.-eai-e d .ohn II. m Williamis, ;ieo. F. Swisher
and ('has. E. llmias, known to lme anll
known by ml toIo bie the pIersons whio silh-
-criliel to the foregoilng Articles ot ineor-
iiltratiloni of the, ( central Springfiel ( inl-
l aym. wiho. i|iliI lingiig sworn. each for hinm-
self. says that lie siginedl the loregoing
article e of incorporation for the purposes
iientionlle i therein.l.
Swornll to land subscrilwed Iwfore mn this
l:til day of .ilgilmt _\. I). IKti9.
Elwyn N. Moses,
Notary lPublie State of Florida at Large.
My ('onllmissiion expires March :1. 1910.
lli-4t.

THIS MAIL-ORDER BUSINESS.
The business of trading in lumber andi
kindred pranluct-s by catalogue, has atf-
fordnhal occasionl for a gImul deal of sacri-
lice a:s well as ainomyance in legitimate
trade circles. It is a curious ract that
l'ers ins kllowing ino li'tter are easily I1-
gililed into taking the chance of trading
with strangers at long range as against
doing so with merchants of known re-
sl onsibilityv it lhonie. In this there is a
sort of settle convll\iction that home trad-
ers iupo wlllhomn recourse in cases of error
e-all he readily -nfoircedl, andt properly oh-
jetts of distrust tio lw avoided, and that
entire s-traingelrs remotely hloated and who
witl tlhe pay for gnnols of unknown char-

acter in hliand are proof against possible
rt.helamaitions. are worthy of unquestion-
ing confidence aind patronage. Such inci-
dents mniist be aecouintell for as acts of
perversityv pure and simple, but like other
weaknesses of a similar sort. t hey are of
frm'-mient 'occurrenceil. Another phase of tlhe
sublje.ct is that derangement of the nat-
ural or legitimate channels of trade is ob-
structive of the, forces that sustain pros-
pwrity and bring thrift not alone to the
individuals immniiediately interested, but
tiie entire I)wlyv IXiitic at tlhet sa lle timle..
The trade of a given locality Ibelongs there
anll til th e extent that it is diverted there-
from., the eonmmiinity in\olvedl suffers. To
illustrate tils principles supllise the mer-
ca:ntile interests of anyl given town to have
lele absorlab byl trade folk at a distance.
what. in that event, would lumenle of the
town lwhom-e earnings or profits had thus
iheen diverted-? Tlhe same principle applies
with equal relevante-y to amny given coim-
ilunillity. ;i state or nation. (Conlme-tition
that destroys profits by undermining prices
is of necessity or corresliniulingly destruct-
ive of thrift or thlioe volnditions wherelmy
individuals. cotiimminit is. states and na-
tions illae rtlre ar mit nd mmlade iproslerous.
Mianulfaiturer, aind wholesalers who sell
to concern-'ll thus engaged in undermining
the natural lprlps of legitimate forces, are


t!lerebl coniit rillutingm to ithat lend; are, in
ifaut. actcssories Ibefore t lie fact, and if con-
'.cill ly i may rightfully le bIlanmed ac-
c>triliingly. It is inciloneivable that these
s-called ceatalogue-houses caan sell the
samer giNmods at pritcs so greatly below
those of legitimate dealers and thrive as
they are known to do. There is "a nigger
in the wootm pile" somewhere. So-called
wreckillng cmnpalnies are naturally bad4
enough as ilistsirl hrs of necessary profits;
thlev are in a defensebls position when
I.akinig nomiiinal wrecking business an en-
gine with which to wreck legitimate inter-
ests. It cannot be justified upon any
conceivable hYlpotlhesis of either fairness or
soiuin public policy. It is distinctly and
irredeemably ani defenselessly harmful to
the conimmnity at large and while not a
matter to Ie regulated lby law, it can and
oighlt to lie dliscountenancel and made im-
ijossille as a matter of ethics. No whole-
.,aler of lumlner call claim any right to sell
anylinul whose business is to disorganize
andl cripple the regular process of trade
anil ciminerce. It is front these processes
and their fruits that individuals and com-
imuniitie. derive the energizing force of
thrift. It is by and uIlpo the same token
that ipubllic works are fosterel. progress be-
co-,les lnossilde and all tranquility and hap-
piness de'lnllMtI. The business world is
gradually alsormhing a fitting sense of
tlese, vital facts and. it may be hoped, will
-ooner or later profit iby it. -Lumber Trade
JIournal (New Orleans.)

Too Obvious.
It wa1 v the first vaudeville performance
the old colorel lady had ever seen, and
she was particularly excitedl over the mar-
velhus feats of thei magician. But when
lie covered a newspalpr with a heavy
Ilannel cloth and read the i-'tnt throufih
it. shell grew a little nervous. He then
doubled the cloth and again read the let-
ters accurately.
This was more than she could stand.
and rising in her seat, sheik said:
"1'mn goill' homne! This ain't no place
for a lady in a thin calico diress!"-Ev-
erylutld's.





WM. D. JONES

PRISCIPTIOI SPECIALIST

...4Rd

FAMILY DRUGGIST
107 E. BAY ST.

Mau Ordeaa 8ieite&




ZAHM'S EUROPEAN HOTEL

UMDEIR IEW AKAAG3NT

Reman, 50C to .oo Per Night. Mlsm at
An Houm. is L. Bay Street.
JAcragOwIM FLA


I










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


THE GROOVER-STEWART OI1 co.,

FORMErLY rTE OaHRSTIE-aOAOVER DM0 00.
Whelele Drumgs Chemicals, Dru mgsts Sundries and Cmmissary oeeds
J.MMWLLLLE, FLOAI.


the Editorial Version.
There cannot IX much sati ftlt iton in
"goin' around and lickin' the leito:'" w'l-n
the latter not only makes copy wr.t fo
the encounter, but pictures himself as the
hero as well. The following vivid pen-pi-t-
rure is taken from the editorial colmmns
of an Iowa journal:
"There was a blow. Somebody fell. We
got up. Turning upon our antagonist, we
succeeded in winding his arms almut our
Waist, and by a quick maneuver threw him
on top of us. bringing our back, at the
same time, in contact with the solid bed
of the printing press. Then, inserting our
nose between his teeth and cleverly en-
tangling his hands in our hair, we had
him!"-EvNerybody's Magazine.

OLD

G
E
0
R
G
I

A



O
R

N



H


S
K
E


A very rare article now, and seldom
found. Having purchased a large
quantity in bonded warehouses before
pdohibition went into effect in the
State of Georgia, and gauging same,
we will offer to the public a pure old
Corn Whiskey which we guarantee
under the pure food laws of the na-
tional as well as the State govern-
ment. No one can offer for sale any
goods under penalty of the law unless
same is bona fide nor can they be
misbranded; hence, you are not tak-
ing any chances on the above, being
strictly as represented.
Four quarts .......... $3.75
One gallon jug ....... 3.25
All express charges prepaid.
We handle all of the best brands of
Rye and Bourbon Whiskies, Gins,
Apple and Peach Brandies. Send for
our price list and catalogue. Mailed
free upon application.
The Atmayer & Flatau Liquor Co.
720-722-724-7e6 West Bay Street,
Jacksonville, Fla.


Jacksonville and Savannah Comparative Naval Stores Market For Week

Ending Aug. 14, 1908.


ROSIN


SATURDAY
GRADE. Jax. Sav.
WW.-__ ..6.25
W G ---..... .... 6.15
N 5.65-5.75
M i.10
K 4.40
I .3.60-3.65
H 3.50
G 3.10
F 3.05
E 2.70-2.75
D 2.60-2.65
CBA .......... 2.50


RAD. WEINFSDA
TRADE. Jax.
W W ......... .2
WG ...... 6(.05
N 5.55
M 5.(X)
K 4.30
I 3.60
H 3.45
G 3.00)
F 2.70
E 2.60
D...-...... .... 2.55
C(HA ................ 2.45 2


Y.
Say.
6.35
6.15
5.65
5.10)
4.40
3.65
1.40-3.50
1.05-3.10
2.95-3.00
2.65
2.60
.40-2.55


Jax.
6.25
6.15
5.75
5.15
4.40)
3.60
3.45
3.00(
3.00
2.75
2.65
2.5,
eso


Sav.
6.35
6.15

5.10
4.45
3.65
3.50
3.15
3.05
2.70
2.60
2.55


' I RSDAY.
JJax. Say.


6.25
6.05
5.40
4.90
4.30)
3.60)
3.45
2.95
2.85
2.60)
2.55
2.30


6.35
6.15
5.65
5.00)
4.441
3.65-3.70
3.45-3.54)
3.00-3.05
2.90-2.95
2.60-2.65
2.55-2.60
2.40-2.45


TUESDAY
Jax. Sav.
6;.20-6.25 6.35
(i.015-6i.10 b.>
5.55-5.60 5.65
5.00 5.10
4.30 4.40-4.42 1,
3.60 3.65
3.45-3.5)0 :3.45-3.50
3.05-3.10 3.10-3.15
2.95-3.05 3.00)-3.05
2.60-2.70 2.6;>-z.t;i
2.55-2.60 2.60-2.65
2.45-2.50 2.50-2.55

FRIDAY
Jax. Say.
6.15-6.25 6.35
6.(00-6.)05 6.15
5.40 5.50-5.55
4.8O-4.85 4.90
4.20-4.35 4.30
3.55-3.60 3.65-3.70
..40-:3.45 3.45
2.90 2.95-3.00
2.S,3 2.90
2.60-2.65 2.60-2.65
2.50 -2.55 2.5( 0-2.55
2.30 2.40


SPIRITS TURPENTINE

SATURDAY. M()ONDAY. TUi 'I'ESDAY.
Jax. Sav. Jaix. Say. Jax. Sav.
33:1, 35% :{, ;5i-3:>. 35:%-3:l;' 1 351. 36-36' .
WEF)NESDAY. T1 ll ISDAY. FRIDAY.
Jax. Say. Jax. a. Jax. Sav.
:{5;,,_. 35'-35=<4 *. yX-351/t 35',4 :{1 35/t-3:5: :{5:;


Naval Stores Receipts and Shipments Here and in Savannah
For Week Ending August 14.1908.

SPIRITS TURPENTINE
Receipts. Sales. Shipments. Stock.
Jax. Sav. Jax. Sav. Ja.x. Say. Jax. Sav.
Saturday......... 296 882 144 262 -529)0 :39107
Monday 581 774 802 1075 5(M) 20S 39403
Tuesday 304 1380 248 935 414 340 39484
Wednesday ..... 6(24 87 490 128I 1457 39374
Thursday .................- 593 1305 6o)5 107 50 42 399S
Friday 361 879 463 945 5 0 358 41541


ROSIN
Saturday ............ .... 976
Monday 196()
Tuesday ..........------ 90
Wednesday .......... 1875
Thursday...-..... 14 S6
Friday 1567


3184
2736
464:1
2217
4113
3289


1424
2363
936
1627
1591


26)02
2571
3679
2469

3931


(;::4
1904)
71
26400)


2411
12.673

2171
320
2721


754S7
77447
77S07
777S82
79197


152,962
143,025
138,993
138,839
143.0425
143.593











6 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL RECORD
JAMES A. HOLLOMON. Editor-in-Chief
A. H. MARSH. Busine Mnmer
R. T. ARNOLD. Advertisin Manuer
PublaUhed Ever, Sturdu'y.
Rt (D omsie)...83.00 Per Annum
RunaceavTxou !(Foreian) .... 83-0 "


- Tha Plino &a Its Prod'wta.


All c 1unalcAUM a ahould be address
The Industrial Record Company.
JaLcksonville. Fla.
eranoh Edltorial and Bualnes Offices a
Savannr~h Ga.
Entered at the Postoffice at Jacksonville. Fla.
as second-cla matter

Adopted by the Executive Committee of
the Turpentine Operators' Association
September 12, 1!02, as its exclu-ive ofli-
cial organ. Adopted in annual convention
Septenmlwl r 11 as the organ also of the
general association.
Adoptedl .pril 27th. 1903, as the official
organ of the Interstate (ane Growers' As-
sociation. Adopted September 11, 1903, as
the only official organ of the T. u. A.
(onmended to lumber people by special
resolution adopted by the Georgia Sawmill
Association.

THE RECORD'S OFFICES.
The publishing plant and the main of-
fiees of the Industrial Record Company
are located at the intersection of Bay and
Newnan Streets, Jacksonville, Fla., in the
very heart of the great turpentine and
yellow pine industries.

NOTICE TO PATRONS.
All payments for advertising in the In-
dustrial Record and subscriptions thereto
must be made direct to the home office in
Jacksonville. Agents are not allowed to
make collections under any circumstances.
Bills for advertising and subscriptions are
sent out from the home office, when due,
and all remittances must be made direct
to this company.
Industrial Record Publishing Co.




J. R. Saunders Dead


The Record is pained to record the
death of J. R. Saunders, of Pensacola.
As a large and extensive factor and
operator he was a power in the naval
stores world. J. R. Saunders was
always a friend of the man in the
woods; he was always a foe to the
interests that manipulated the mar-
ket against the producers for per-
sonal gains. He was honest, sincere,
nervy, industrious, able. The indus-
try loses a giant in his death.



TRIBUTE TO A SISTER.
(By the Editor.)
In every home, however beautiful and
happy and promising and hopeful, there
cones a day when the shadows exclude
the sunshine, when darkness and gloom
fall heavy; in every life, however bright
anl cheerful, there comes a day when de-
spair sw..-eps every ray of light before it
and engulfs it with a gloom that is almost
impenetrable; in every heart, however free
from care, there comes a day of trouble
anil Suil|e ring.
I have just returned to my desk from a
family re-union in North Carolina. From
Florida we went. From .Aillainia gath
ern'd other nmemlers. Froml the imountains


NAVAL STORES CONDITIONS IN MEX-
ICO.


of the Sapplhire LaInd anl from the red
clay fields of the southern section of the
State gathered other nmenm rs.
Reunion' Wh\\at a joyous ring has the
word? What a suggestion of happiness
lanId hve! Yes. there was love. the deep-
est. the purest. tthe most sublime love.
lit there could be no happiness. it, the
despair, the misery, tile heartahehs in
that reunion!
,Would you call the roll?
There were mother and father and Orah
and .Jolnnie. and Frank and Minnie and
India and Annie and, Edythe-yes. Edyithe
but ah! around her we stood with heav-
ing hearts and tear stained eyes. for God
lad taken her prectious soul to Heaven;
the angel of death had added her name to
their starry scroll of the immortals.
Fdythe Kerner Ihe, the youngest daugh-
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Il. P. Kerner, of Kern-
ersville. N. ('.. died at her home in
l.aurenlurg. NC.. just as the shadows of
night were falling Thursday. August 6th.
Shei had been ill less than a week. (heer-
ful to the very last site passel away just
as iwsace'.fily as a child falls to sleep:
with a smile on her lips, while surrounded
by heartbroken mother and brother and
hlusland. sihe sank into tihe sweetest of
all slumnlbers.
Edythe was the sister of the one who is
nearest :and learcest to ame-th(en sihe wa.
any sister, too. I loved her as such.
I.right. cheerful, always happy. with a
noble (1iristian character and a kind anid
loving liei:rt. sihe was a favorite, not only
of her brothers and sisters, but of all who
knew her. Her pathway was one of sun-
shine. Her very life. in its purity and in
its naturalness antl simplicity, was one'
that none could tail to admire. She coIn-
1iquered and held the affections of all who
knew her.
Edlythe was young, less than twenty-
three' years of age. I.ife's I'wanitifull morn-
ing had not yet touched the noon. (Only
a few months ago andl she was a bride.
What a happy s'ca.nsion last Novemlbwr
when .JIoeph IA', of lanurenlburg. worthy
young man, full of promise and ambition.
led her from the marriage altar. lHow
happy they were! Tlheir ambitions were
linked. They planned together in a true
and Ieautiful love. Their home life was
ideal. The Ibreaved and sorrowing his-
lanld (od comfort! lie has lost the
jewel so dear to himi. a jewel that time
and cirtcumstanees can never replace in
this world.
Yes, it was a reunion, the last reunion
in at family unbroken by death for a
,luarter of a century, that can lIe held this
side of eternity. May the next one be
held in Heaven. Those of us who are left,
husband, m, mother, father, brothers, sisters,
will go onel through tie journey, with the
nlmemory of lher whom we loved fresh in
our hearts, an in<-entive o o ineet her where
there are no shadows, where there is
lio ldeatl.
We laid Edythe away in the little
church yard. Her friends were there from
every walk of life. There was mourning
among them. deeply. sincere, heartfelt, for
everyone loved lher. And as the grave
closed nuon her and tihe tributes ot her
friends were plane upon her hier, tlhe dear.
ldepartel child sle'pt I'lneath a wilderness
of Lowers. BIyTrHER.


(Continued from Page 5.)

than in Mr. Shotter's pet town, Savannah.
(Ga.. while rosin is worth from $2.00 to
-I4.00 i'er Iarrel more. This is largely
owiiir to lMe\ice's protective tariff. (hir
lexic'ai friends have evidently bI.en at-
tending I'nerl Sam's celebrated protective
school. as thei "touch" they impose on
nearly everything coming in through the
cllst onm-houilse is severe. On cotton, for
instance, tihe import duty is 321 cents
ier kilo. which reduce to Ipunds and in
goli aiimnounts to just albut 7 1-3 cents
per Isilond. Now Mexico has 150 cotton
mills, and i- developing cotton growing
fast. but at present has to import fully
one-fourth of the cotton used in the re-
public. (f course tle grower gets the
line'tit of the tarit.f it is proper that he
-dhoil. and there are' no calamity-howlers
among the cotton growers in Mexico. On
turlentine, tlhe tariff is sixteen cents per
gallon in gold. and on rosin. $3.17 per 280
ipunds, which is all right for the pro-
ducer of naval stores and helps to keep the
wolf from the door.
Tlhere are only seven or eight stills at
present ill Mexico. and the average cap-
acnity of each is small. The home con-
sumption easily takes up the local pro-
dlution. and sonil turlintine and rosin
hans to Is, inlpirted each year.
The Waiters- 'ieree (il Co. are the prin-
eipal buyers and distributors of turpentine
in Mexico, but they do not handle rosin.
This is Imnghlt ull by a number of strong
and active brokerage firms, who then sell
it to the soap. paewr. and match factories,
which are nlnuerious and constantly in-
creasing.
To conclude tihe naval stores section of
my letter, any failures or unsatisfactory
results on this business in Mexico have
Ie'cn ilue to improper work and methods,
and ignorance. and not observing the sea-
onas right. 1 was in the State of Oaxaca
a few days ago. and visited a small tur-
I'nitine pIlatee run by a native Mexican.
lie had (cut his boxes rather "holes in the
trees." with ordinary club axes. and was
using tlie' sale tools for chipping. The
lailirers skin oft several inches of the face
of tliet tree eacli week. and for a space
ldoilule tihe width of a Imx. and all the
gum which runs down on either side of the
Ibix goes on to the ground and is wasted.
After hloking at the work a while, I re-
marked to my interpreter that the man
wa;s simply "ceomillmitting rape on those
pines." The interpreter, however, could
not put it in shape to tell our Mexican
friend. as the Spanish language is not
equal to a lot of our American expres-
sions.
IhDrango. Michoacan. Oaxaca, Jalisco,
and Guerrero States are probably the
Imost attractive sections in Mexico for the'
naval stores prolpisition.
Trusts Not Wanted In Mexico.
I have lween sorry to see the low prices
and unsatisfactory conditions under which
thle naval stores business has been suffer-
ing this year in th(e United States. The
trust has Iten, successful in its baleful
work. it apl,).ars, with the usual assistance
of Bay Street. Savannah. the idea being
to tight Jacksonville all the time. I hope
the recent movement will materialize
vic-torieousl v in a short time. and a check
Is' put on further operations of the con-
spirators. I cannot see how any turpen-
tinle Iprsiueer can make a dollar on forty
centss spirits and $:l.(0 common rosin.


THE STUART-BERNSTEIN CO.


Trusts do not thrive on Mexican soil, I
will state. While in the States "raging
lions going about seeking whom they will
devour." out here, they are mild as a
purring kitten, and tame enough to eat
oat of your hand.
President liaz, statesman that he is,
saw years ago how the miserable trust
business worked in the United States, so
he determined to clip their wings and file
their teeth, as far as Mexico was concern-
e.I. His success has been phenomenal, and
everybody gets a square deal in this coun-
try.
Within the past year a gigante re-
organization scheme has been successfully
pnt through by the Government, by which
the entire system of Mexican Railways
have teen practically taken over by the
Nation, and control wrested from the New
York financiers, who had no doubt planned
to "skin the hides" from the Mexicans in
course of time. and to "eat without salt"
every commercial and producing class in
the republic. No confiscation of capital
was involved in the plan, all stock-holders
and lnmd-holders being fully protected,
but all hole of "stock-watering" and
gouging the Ieople has "gone glimmering."
Talking almut railroads, I notice that all
the engineers and most of the conductors
are Americans. and they handle their
trains in magnificent shape, as a matter4
of course. gradually however, they are
introducing native Mexicans In those
Imsitions, and it is likely in five years'
time. the American conductors and en-
gineers will Is- in a minority. I met and
talked with several of the conductors.
They are fine fellows, and glad to switch-
,of from Spanish and talk United States
to an; American passenger. Many of these
men are here bweause they lost out on
some railroad in the States, and while
they hlon't tell you so, you can see that
they aret homesick to get back to the
I(nitedl States, but owing to the oper-
ation of the deadly "black-list" all hope
of re employment on Morgan and Harri-
man & tCo.'s railway lines is a vain dream,


SIlEMEET ME





11111WT. $=UA"-
-111 AM SA MA



WE
AIM

PLSE


QUA""Y
Is
'J.
spCALTY


THE CMOTHUERS

14 ad 16 VW In St. JamUFb.










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. T



Put Your Money In Diamonds Where the Market Don't Drop
A really first-class diamond is such a safe investment and so sure to increase
in value that every man should own one. See ours, they are first-class

EVERY flAN NEEDS A GOOD WATCH .'
Everyone realizes this, but everyone don't realize how cheaply one can be
lmught unless he sees our stock or catalogue. 4
IF YOU CAN'T COrIE TO US LET OUR FREE CATALOGUE COME TO YOU
R J. RILES COMPANY S1 W. BAY STREET JACICSOVWILLEr a..LA.
Lt


so they have to stay in a foreign country.
This black-list idea of the American rail-
road magnates would not Iwe tolerated for
a moment in Mexico, or fl'rolw, yet we
boast that we are not the "land of the
Free and the home of the Brave."
Mexico, Historic, Scenic and Picturesque.
I am glad to leave geopraphy, statistics,
naval stores, the trusts and the railroads
now, and to conclude my letter with some-
thing more romantic and interesting, per-
haps, in a literary way.
The visitor to Mexico never has a dull
moment, as the scenery is so beautiful,
and the appearance of everything so dif-
ferent from our own country, the atten-
tion is attracted and the mind interested
all the time.
Those of your readers who have perused
Prescott's "Conquest of Mexico" and
Noll's "Empire to Republic" realize that
lots and lots; of history has been made in
these lovely valleys, on these fine old
mountains, and in these ancient towns
and cities. Yet, one of the chief charms
of the country is that you see so much
that is antiquated, handed down to the
simple people from a line of ancestors
dating back hundreds of years, but all
undisturbed by the rush and turmoil of
modern progress. All over Mexico, the
same old plows are used in the fields which
Egyptians and other Asiatics used 2.500
to 3,000 years ago. These plows are made
of a strong piece of wood, pointed, and
the handle is single, and the plowman
holds the same with one hand, while he
plies the oxen with the goad held in the
other hand. American plow manufactur-
ers have been trying for years to introduce
our modern double-handled, steel-pointed
plows, but the peons do not care for them.
The patient hard-working little "burros"
are seen everywhere, and they are neces-
sary to mountain transportation. I have
been reminded of the lines from Macau-
lay's Lays of Ancient Rome. where in the
"Prophecy of ('apy's" descriptive of a
scene at the period when Romulus founded
Rome, occurs this verse:
"The ox toils through the furrow,
Obedient to the goad;
The patient ass up flinty paths
Plods with his heavy load."
You see solid old aqueducts 150 to 300
years in use, still suplying water to some
of the cities. At (Colula near Puebla,
stands a wonderful Pyramid, broader at
the base than those of Egypt, and the
theory was advanced a number of years
ago by Ignatius Donnelly that this Cho-
lula Pyramid is the original Tower of
Babel. Old Popocatepetl. which every
school child has studied about, still stands
sentinel over Mexico. Its summit is covered
with perpetual snow, and there is no more
beautiful or entrancing sight than this
covered with perpetual snow, and there is
(Continued on Page 10.)


WANTED
AND

FOR SALE
Rate for this column is 2 eats per word
for first insertion and et per word ISr
following insertiom. No advertismen
taken for less than 40 ants for lit, a-I
20 cents for following inertioms. ONh
must accompany orders less yoe 'aw
an account with us-

Plank's Chill Tonic is guaranteed to
cure chills, fever, colds, la grippe. 25e.*

WANTED-A turpentine place or loca-
tion. Parties answering furnish schedule,
price and where located. W. B. Young,
McHenry, Miss. 5-2-08
Record.

WANTED.-Good, reliable stiller wants
position. Oan furnish best references.
Address P. W. Eldridge, Westville, Fla.
5-11-9t

FOR SAL-Small turpentine place for
cash. Price $800.00. Good backing. Ad-
dress Operator, care Industrial Record. tf

WANTED-An eomnimrim to d n up
their bars of all kinds of seed ameks ad
burlap. We buy everything in the way
of sacks. Write us. American Fbre Cl.,
Jacksonville, Fla.


JOS. ROSENHEIM SHOE CO.
N MAMVrACTVAO E AMD JOIUS1 Or


SHOE

SAVANNAH. GEORGIA
Best Slus Made for Coummia Trnade.f"
1U sei4 e 11511s s s s el sgal 8 o11goggm I m..


WANTED-A Florida grove. Am ready
to buy the best bargain offered. What
have you? Describe fully what property
consists of, location and lowest price. Also
last season's yield. Vandeventer, 552 W.
182 St., New York City. 7-18-3t

WANTED-IPosition as manager turpen-
tine location. Five years' experience
as manager. Now employed. Want
change on account of health. Address
".\. B. C." care Record. 8-8-4t.

TURPENTINE WOODSMAN wants posi-
tion. lest reference and experience.
Don't carry and hands to you. Neither
from you when leaving. Address. S. M.
Donaldson, Groveland, Ga. 8-8-3t.

WANTED-A turpentine place or loca-
tion. Parties answering give full de-
scription, location and lowest price.
P.. 0. Box 87, Wilmington, N. C. 8-8-2t


i Standard Clothing-Company I


One Price


I


One Price i


_ FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
17 and 19 West Bay Street, JacksoRvilll, Fl
Stetson and Hawes Hats. Special Attente Given to Mall Orders.
----- --. --------------gcszz uumsmsus 010



You Want a Turpentine Location?
You Want a Sawmill Location?
SYou Want any ind of florida Land?



SJ. H. Livingston & Sons,
OCALA. FLORIDA.
5 5%1 M k11% %%XX%%%V^^$^^^^^^1' SkkkBB^^ BBVC15&^


OUGHT SAW MILLS

LaNl aWd SUlimgle iWMaW


Saws and Supl;es,

Steam and Gasoline

Engines


Try


LOMBARD


AUGUSTA, GA.


Plhosphate Machinery

Casting and Dryers





WHISKIES
GINS AND RUMS
FROM

$1.50 to$5.00 per Gallon

...... AGNCY POR......

Lewis 166 amn Moiet Ver*o-
Pure Rye Widiskles

Controllers Blum's Memogra adOilis
Rye-Agents for Junt Ori ndl
Pabst Mihwak Brs. Ptiss e- ap
plieaUo.

CHAS. BLUM & CO.
SIT.17 s 5 WEST BAY lTWA
JACKSO VIIUfZ A.


- ---










STIM WEEKLY MDUSTRiAL RECORD.


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
LETTERS PATENT.
Notice i' hereby given that the under-
signed will apply to the Honorable Na-
poleon B. Broward, Governor of the State
of Florida, on the 31st day of August, A.
D. 1908, for letters patent incorporating
the Cleaveland Improvement Company un-
der the following proposed charter, origi-
nal of which is now on file in the office of
the Secretary of State of the State of
Florida.
J. A. Cranzora,
D. M. Flynn,
W. W. Cleaveland,
W. C. Powell,
John H. Powell,
James hoyal.
The undersigned hereby associate them-
selves together for the purpose of becom-
ing incorporated and forming a corpora-
tion under and by virtue of the laws of
the State of Florida, with and under the
following proposed charter:
L
The name of this corporation shall be
the Cleaveland Improvement Company,
and its business shall be conducted in the
State of Florida, in other States of the
United States of America, and in foreign
countries wherever necessary or conven-
ient. The principal office of said corpor-
ation shall be in the city of Jacksonville,
County of Duval, State of Florida.
IL
The general nature of the business to
be conducted by said corporation shall be
to acquire, own, use, improve, sell, mort-
gage, pledge and lease lands and real es-
tate, and to sub-divide and plat the same
into lots, plots, or tracts, for building,
farming, agricultural or trucking pur-
poses, or for the purpose of a cemetery
or burial ground, and to sell, lease or
otherwise dispose of said lots, plots or
tracts, and to generally deal in real es-
tate on its own account, including the
erection of dwellings and other houses or
buildings on the lands owned, leased or
controlled by said corporation, and selling,
leasing, renting, mortgaging and other-
wise dealing in the same, and to act as
broker, factor or agent for others in the
purchase, sale, management, control and
disposition of real estate and in the loan-
ing of money on the security of mort-
gages and other pledges on real estate; to
engage in the business of mining phos-
phate, coal, iron, stone, or other minerals
or ores, and to extract or otherwise re-
move from any lands owned or controlled
by said corporation oil and gas and to
those ends to own, maintain and operate
mills, smelteries and refineries, wells,
stills, tanks, storage facilities, and other
devices or facilities needful for the manu-
facture and traffic in said materials; to
cut, dip, scrape, box, or otherwise work or
use for the purpose of extracting crude
turpentine and rosin the timber on any
lands owned or controlled by the said cor-
poration, and manufacture said crude
material into spirits and other naval
stores, and to sell or otherwise deal in said
crude material or naval stores, and to cut.
work or otherwise use for the purpose of
manufacturing lumber the timber on any
of the lands owned or controlled by said
corporation, and to manufacture the same
into lumber and to sell or otherwise deal
in the said timber, lumber, and products
thereof, and to those ends to own, main-
tain and operate stills, refineries, saw
mills and other manufacturing devices and
facilities; to develop, cultivate, or other-
wise use for agricultural, trucking or hor:


ticultural pnrlpses any of the lands owned
or controlled by said corporation, and
generally deal in fruits, nuts, agricul-
tural or horticultural prouu~-?; to buy
and sell both at wholesale and retail, and
otherwise deal and traffic in groceries, dry-
goods, hardware, all kinds of merchan-
dise, fertilizers, brick, lime, stone, and
building and plumbing materials of all
kinds; to do any acts or things which may
be necessary or convenient in the conduct
of any of the businesses hereing named,
including the erection of buildings, own-
ership of live stock, building, buying, sell-
ing. leasing, managing, owning, hiring and
operating vessels, tramways, railways,
dredges, lighters, engines, cars, or other
vehicles or means of transportation, for
the carriage and transportation of all
property or products held, controlled,
owned or manufactured by the said cor-
poration in connection with the business
of the said corporation, but not to use
the same for the purpose of doing the
busir-es of a common carrier; to sub-
scribe for, purchase, receive, own, hold for
investment or sell, dispose of and make
advances upon, stocks, shares, bonds, se-
curities or obligations of other corpora-
tions wherever located or organized, en-
gaged in or pursuing any one or more of
the kinds of business, purposes, objects, or
corporations indicated herein, or of any
corporation holding or owning stocks or
obligations of any such corporation, and
while the holder or owner of any such
stock, bond,- or obligations, to exercise
all the rights, powers and privileges of
ownership thereof, and to exercise all and
any voting flowers thereof; to advance
and lend money upon securities of lands,
crops, personal property or commercial
paper; to invest any funds which may
come into the treasury of the corporation
and which may be owned by the corpora-
tion at pleasure and in such manner as
may be provided by the By-Laws; to bor-
row money and secure the same, and
moneys otherwise owing by the said cor-
poration, by mortgages, deeds, bonds,
notes, or other obligations thereof; to re-
ceive payment for capital stock subscribed
for in money or in property, labor or ser-
vices, at a just valuation thereof, in the
discretion or judgment of the Board of
Directors; to make contracts of any kind
whatsoever for the furtherance of its pur-
poses or business to have a lien upon all
the shares of any stockholder who may
become indebted to this corporation, either
individually or as co-partner, surety or
otherwise, with the right to sell or dis-
pose of said stock, or such portion thereof
as may Ies necessary to pay off said in-
debtedness at either public or private sale,
and upon such notice and terms as the
Board of Directors may prescribe, and with
the further right to refuse to transfer
such stock until full payment of such in-
debtedness has been made; to make such
by-laws in furtherance hereof as may be
necessary; and, generally, to have, exer-
cise and enjoy all the rights, powers anil
privileges incident to corpora ions for
profit organized under and by virtue of
Sthe laws of the State of Florida.

III.
SThe amount of the capital stock of this
Corporation shall he Fifty Thousand ])ol-
lars ($50,000.00). to ie divided into five
Shundredl shares of the par value of One
Hundred Dollars ($100.00) each, to be
paid for in lawful money of the United
SStates of America, cash, or in property,
labor Board of Directors. Ten per cent. of said


capital stock shall IxH subscribed for and
paid in eIfore sail corporation shall
transact any business.
IV.
The term for which said corporation
shall exist shall be ninety-nine years.
V.
The business of said corporation shall
Io' co.,ndluctedl by the following officers: a
president, a vice-president, a secretary, a
trea-urer, and a board of not less than
three nor more than thirteen directors.
The offices of secretary and treasurer may
Iw held by the same person. The Board
of Directors may appoint subordinate of-
ficers of said corporation having such pow-
ers, duties and terms of office as may be
provided by the By-Laws. The directors
shall ib elected by the stockholders at
each annual meeting; all other officers of
the corporation shall be elected annually
li t he directors. The date of the annual
meeting of the corporation shall be held
on the first Tuesday of September of each
year. The stockholders shall meet on
Wednesday the second day of September,
1908. being the first annual meeting, at
the offices of the corporation in the city
of Jacksonville. Florida, at ten o'clock A.
MF., for the purpose of adopting by-laws,
holding first election of otlicers and com-

pleting the organization of the corpora-
tion. Intil the officers elected at the
first election shall be qualified, the bu-i-
ness of this corporation shall be conducted
,by the following officers: J. A. Cran-
ford. President; 1). M. Flynn, Vice-Pres-
ident; \\. \\. (leaveland, Secretary and
Treasurer. and .1. _\. Cranford, D. M.
l lvnn. W. WV. (leaveland. W. C. Powell,
Jolihn C. Powell, .John II. Powell, and
-lanes loyall. Directors.
VI.
The highest amount of indebtedness or
liability to which this corporation shall
at any time subject itself shall be twice
the amount of the authorized capital
stock.
VII.
The names and residences of the sub-
scribing stockholders of this corporation,
together with the amount of capital stock
subscriled for by each. are as follows: J.
A. Cranfordl, Jacksonville, Florida, twen-
ty-five (25) shares. 1. 1. Flynn, Jack-
sonville, Florida, forty (40) shares; W.
\V. 'leaveland, Jacksi nville, Florida.
forty (40) -hartls: W. PC. wcll, Jackson-
ville. Florida. fifty (50) shares; John C.
I'Powel. .acksonville, Florida, twenty-five
,2-5) shares; John II. Powell, Jacksonville,
HI,ridia. ten (10) shares; .lames Royall,
a.Icksonville. Florida, ten (10) shares.
.T. A. Cranford,
D. M. Flynn,
W. W. Cleaveland,
John II. Powell,
W. C. Powell,
James Royall.
State of Florida,
County of Duval.-SS.
Personally appeared before me J. A.
(ranford. 1). A Fvlyn, W. W. Cleveland,
Joh1n If. Powell, W. C. Powell, and James
Itoyall. each of whom are well known to
me to be the individuals described in and
who siubscrilkxd and executed the foregoing
liharter. and severally acknowledged that
.li cx\<-ciltiled tlhe same for the purpose
1 h .;',.ill .I'\ r-ssedl.
In \\itne, \\I hereof I have hereunto set
nmy hand aln olilicial seal. in the city of
.n-ksiii\ille. ( iunty of Duval, State of
Florila. this 21-t day of July. A. I). 1400.
1da I.. Morris.
Nolary 'lPuli- for lthe State of Florida at
l-arge. Mvy CI mi-siion expires May
191th. 19011. July 25-6t.


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR LET-
TERS PATENT.
Notice is hereby given, pursuant to the
Statutes of the State of Florida, that we.
the undersignedl intend to apply to the
Honorable Napoleon II. Broward, Governor
of the State of Florida, for Letters Patent
to be issued to the Iuval Distilling Com-
pany. in accordance with the Articles of
associationon hereinafter set forth and
adopted as a proposed (Charter.
R. P. Sewers,
W. M Troutman,
T. H. Simpson.
Jacksonville. Fla., August lith, 1908.

Articles of Association of Duval Distiling
Company.
We, the undersigned, have associated to-
gether for the purlose of forming a cor-
poration for profit, under the laws of the
State of Florida, and adopt the following
as the Charter of said corporation.
ARTICLE I.
The name of this corporation is the
I)DVAL DISTIIJIN.t COMPANY, and its
principal place of business is in Jackson-
ville, Duval County, Florida, with such
branches and agencies as may be estab-
lished by the Board of Directors.
ARTICLE 11.
The general nature of the business to be
transac'ted by this corporation shall be to
carry on the general Iusiness of distilling
and malting, including the manufacture,
dlislilling. re-distilling of alcohol, wines,
spirits and liquors of all kinds, and the
manufacture of nalt liquors and bever-
ages. and the dealing in and sale of the
same together with the by-products there-
of. To buy, own. handle and s.ll live stock,
grain. meal and provisions; To buy, lease,
own. mortgage, sell and convey all kinds
of property, and to erect distilleries, ma-
chinery. warehouses and other buildings
on its real estate; To establish agencies
and branches of the business in the State
of Florida and elsewhere as needed; To
buy. own. handle and sell the stock, bonds,
notes and other eviddenees of indebtedness
of other corporations and of individuals,
and to have and exercise such other powers
as imay I l necessary or convenient to the
several businesses aloove specified. under
the laws of Florida.
ARTICLE III.
The capital stock of this corporation is
T'en Thousand ($10.000) Dollars to be di-
vibeld into one hundred shares oil rne par
value of tOne lHundred ($100.00) Dollars
each. to lw paid in cash.
ARTICLE IV.
The term for which this corporation is
to exist is ninety-nine years from and
after tle late of Letters Patent.
ARTICLE V.
The business of this corporation shall be
conducted by a President, Vice-President.
Secretary and Treasurer and a Board of
Directors, consisting of three stockholders.
The offices of Secretary and Treasurer
may wb held by the same person. The
numilr of directors may be changed from
time to time by the stockholders at a
St meeting called for that purpose, bming at
no time less than three or more than
thirteen. The Directors shall be elected
by the stockholders at each annual meet-
Sing from those stockholders then qualified
to vote. All other officers and agents of
this corlsration shall be chosen or ap-
pointed at the time and in the manner
Spre.srilwdl by the Ity-liaws. but the Presi-
dent must be chosen from the Directors.










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9

Capital $200,000

HUTCHINSON SHOE COMPANY
VICTOR SHOES AND HATS
Wholesale Jacksonville, Fla*


The annual meeting of the stockholders
shall Iwe held on the first Monday of lanu-
ary of each year beginning in tne year
1!MN). Until the officers elected at the
first annual meeting of sto-klholders shall
be qualified, the business of this cor-
poration shall le conducted by the follow-
ing officers: R. P. owners President; W.
M. Troutman, Vice-President; T. IH. Simp-
son, Secretary-Treasurer, and said persons
shall constitute the Ioard of Directors.
ARTICLE V.
The highest amount of indebtedness to
which this corporation (-an at any time
subject itself is Five Thousand ($5,000.00)
Dollars.
ARTICLE VIl.
The names and residences of the incor-
pIrators, and the amount of capital stock
suliscrihed by each are:
R. P. Sowers, Jacksonville, Fla., 33
shares, $:,300.00.
WV. M. Troutman. Jacksonville, Fla.. 33
shares, $3,3000.0
T. If. Simpson, Jacksnmville, Fla., 34
shares, $3.400.00.
In witness whereof, the subscribing in-
corporators have hereunto set their hands
and seals,


R. P. Sowers,
W. M. Troutman,
T. H. Simpson.


State of Florida,
countyy of lDuval.
Before me this day personally aplwared
R. P. Sowers, W. M. Troutman and T. H.
Simpson, who are well known to me and
known to me to be the lwrsons desertiwed
in and who executed the foregoing Char-
ter and Articles of Incorporation, and sev-
erally acknowledged before me that they
executed the same for the purpose therein
expressed andt set forth.
Witness my hand and ollicial seal this
lith day of August A. D.. 1908. at Jack-
sonville, Duval county Florida.
(Neal.) Chas. S. Adams,
Notary Public State of Florida.
My commissionn Expires October 30,
H190.


NEW LUMBER CONCERN HAS BEEN
ORGANIZED.
Consolidated Lumber Company's .Main
Office Here.
The latest big enterprise founded in the
city of .acksonville is the ('onsolidatedl
Lumls-r Company.
Tle incorporators of the new concern ar-
C. .1. Mc:ehee. E. S. Iawls, C. B. Stillwell
and William leFils. who are among lcir-
ida anl (:eorgia's most substantial Ibnui-
ness men. The company will 1I incorpor-
ated with a capital of $2.5Y0~N. which hlas
Iben divided into 2-,0 shares of the par
value of $100 each. All or any part of the


a llpitalI stsx-k (if the coirlilold ion may l it,
lbay.ablel inl or is..aiie it- usedi~ for tite jlim-
e *a, 4i proi uxrl y. ailsior or serivices :i! ;I
just -ad nation Iternvol'. to I, fixed It .% #]w
Iioardl (of dlir-vtor- iof tl iieorp1oaiii;ito ;t*
a ilt-l Ine ing toie eaCdi lii ii ia it )1
I*ntil tie(- tir,.t kIlti1llid V1 44-t -l-il 1II 11 I l ,i-
ites,. of th liew heol(lit-i--lI% ll lit. ciiiiihitv~l
Ib.% lite following oflicers:
C. .1. iAle( lics. piresident; E. S-'. Rawlsh.
v ile i-preient C. Il. St illwell. Secret I.1 ii i
.ait liI tr-asurer. andl thle o llicers will voitlioi I
like iblardl of direct' ins.
ItI'lle purjiie of t ie IIe ne w c vo-!1a isi 0( con
ducmt :a generally l -nilier businiess. aln-I
doi aviiv andi aill tIuiiinga aililroplrizit. for ,I ".I

i,-rmi' welfare aiw l i-tri--t-,.
Thei Inialiill ofive of tike 4confially "Iill lbe
Ii Maiti-i in .1aek -aonvil ie.


C"43k[ If not.
WITH Why not?
JACKSONVILLE
Cias GAS COMPANY


(Seal)
Cypress Tanks
(Seal)


for All Purposes
BEST MADE
Write for Cateloege

Preston Miller Co.


Dept. B


Crescent City, Fla


I CHAS. A. CLARK, Inc.
FuanlD IIrc W s,. ea,.
P hone 186. Jacksonville. Fla. I


Duval Planing Mill Co.
Seve si aid RaiiresdAte. Jacks.ville Fla
Builders and Contractors Will Do Well t
Have Us Bid on Their Work


in our Line.
Phone 1749.


Walter Mucklow,
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT,
Rooms, 46-47-48 Mutual Life Bldg
Telephone 278a
JACKSONVILLE. kLA.


THE DUVAL iorida.
This Hotel has recently changed hands, and is under New Management
Throughly Renovated Throughout
Headquarters for Turpentine Operators
F. BARTOW STUBBS, 1. D. CRAWFORD,
Proprietor. Manager.


ZAPF CO


Faultless Chip Skimmer
llic beist skiiimnier made, improving
ev>\ry charge, making better rosin and
wliter spirits. Now ready for delivery at
.':;.00 each. Order at once through your
lfacti-. (;iauranteel to pay for itself on the
first charge you use it.
FAULTLESS SKIMMER COMPANY,
Columbus, Ga.


Wholesale Dealers In and Bottlrs r
AN H EUSER.-BUSCH
St. Louis Lager Beer
Wholemie

Lipors, Wims, MIrwl Water
Write for Prices


M. A. BAKER & COMPANY
PENSACOLA, FLA. AND BRUNSWICK. GA-


Your Profit!


Depends upon the quality and
workmanship of your Still. If you
have a leaky Still or one that is
easily Burned out, you will LOSB
MONEY. To be on the safe side,
you must operate a


Baker Improved Still
I'or it is the only still that has stood the test and been on the Market for over
Fifty Years and today has more users than ever. Our Stills with their
IIE.AVY Bottoms and thick sides, with our LARGE Worms, made from the
v'ryv beIst grade of copper have no equal. Write or wire us for anything that
lyoul need in the Still line. and you will get the BEST at a reasonable Price.
When in need of any repair work, REMEMBER we have the Best still repair-
cr. in the country.

"If You Don't Buy a Baker Still We Both Lose."



We are asking 3on
Dippers, to write the Jobber
about our goods. be-
Scrapers, cause our facilities
for meeting the de-
Special Tools mands of the trade
are better than ever.


The COUNCIL TOOL COMlP4ANY,
WVANANISH. N. C.


-J. A. (G. CA soN. President J. F. DUSENmBRY. st Vice-Prmtadent
-T.A. JKNNING.u. 2nd Vice-President H. L KAYTON. 3d Vice-Presdent and Sec
H. F. E. SCHURTraa, Treasurer.

J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

NIRVL STORES VICTORS lN i IflILE GROERS.
I Main Office AVYANNXH ORCGoIA
Br....h Office. i JACKSONYVILL1E, FLA-L. O Banh GsoeeJ y Hns. t

Naval Stores Producers are Invited to Correspoad With VIs.
i 11 l t11 11 1.1 I 1 11 IIIA.4--441 111 Il I I I 1 11.


- I- a









10 THE WEKBLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Southern Drug Mfg. Company

WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS AND MANUFACTURERS OF
Flavoring Extracts, Packed Drugs, B. B. Bluing. Vinegar end Pyne's Popular Remedies.
We handle everything in the Drug and Medicine line. Write for prices. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


NAVAL STORES CONDITIONS IN MEX-
ICO.
(Continued from Page 7.)
no more beautiful or entrancing sight than
this fine old mountain at a long distance,
on a clear day. The volcano is extinct now.
The Spanards in the time of Cortez, made
gunpowder with sulphur brought from the
crater of Popocateptl. The mountain is
17,852 feet high, about 4,000 feet loftier
than Pike's Peak in the United States.
Near Oaxaca, at a small village called
Tule, I saw the biggest tree in the world,
158 feet in circumference. You have seen
the pictures of the big trees in California,
with a team driving through a tunnel cut
in the tree. Well, they can put a double-
track through this big tree near Oaxaca,
and still have lots of room. The monster
is over a thousand years old, but is still
green and vigorous.
The Cathedrals of Mexico are one of
the chief attractions. Most of them were
built by the Spaniards during the 400
years of their iron rule over Mexico. The
church of Santo Domingo at Oaxaca is
magnificent. The ceiling is papered with
pure golf leaf, and is of course a beauti-
ful sight. A cathedral at Puebla has an
altar railing made of solid silver, weigh-
ing 26 tons. Mexico is of course a
Catholic country, but the dominion of the
priesthood is not so absolute as it was a
few years ago.
The National Museum here is a most
interesting place, containing thousands of
Aztec idols and sculpture, relics of the
Spanish era, and the period when the ill-
fated Maximilian tried to foist the Em-
pire on the Mexicans, and wound up be-
fore a firing-squad at Queratero.
The huge Calendar Stone of the Aztees
is worth looking at. With this wonder-
ful stone, they were able to accurately re-
cord hours, days, weeks, months and
years. Near it is the famous Sacrificial
Stone, on which they offered up to their
fierce gods thousands of human lives
every year. Over a million of unfortunate
creatures are estimated to have been put
to death on this huge stone which is cut
from lava rock, and weighs about 25,000
pounds. Six priests officiated at the hor-
rible ceremonies, one holding each leg and
arm, and the fifth the head of the victim,
while the sixth priest armed with a sharp
knife cut open the breast and tore out
the heart, and cast it-still palpitating-
before the proper idol, near by, whom it
was desired to propitiate. It makes one
shudder to think of the misery and suffer-
ing endured on that cold block of dark
stone. You think of the unfortunates,
dragged there to die, taking a last look at
sun and sky, trembling at their dreadful
-appreaching fate.
For who to dumb forgetfulness a prey,
This pleasing anxious being e'er resigned;
Left the warm precincts of the cheerful
day,
Nor cast one longing, lingering look be-
hind.
The city of Mexico is the pride of all
Mexicans, and the admiration of every
foreigner who visits it. Within the last


twelve years, the Capital city has been
thoroughly modernized, until now its
streets, boulevards, public parks, and
governmentall buildings, also numerous
business and private houses compare
favorably with the finest in the United
States. The population is about 400,000.
Thousands of the wealthiest families in


the republic reside here, and the display of
wealth and fashion is quite impressive.
Every Sunday afternoon from 1:00 to
2:30, the "Parade of the Carriages" on the
Alemada and up and down Avenue San
Francisco is a sight long to be remember-
ed. You never saw as many fine turnouts,
beautiful horses, splendid automobiles,
and pretty women pass and repass a
given point anywhere in the same space of
time.
The Mexicans surpass us in the musical
line. Every Mexican, no matter how poor
or humble, is fond of music, and in every
town and city, the Government provides
handsome public parks, with plenty of
seats scattered around, and a modern
stand from which a fine military band dis-
penses music three or four times a week.
Finally, in politeness-rapidly becoming
a "lost art" in our United States-our
Mexican friends surpass us exceedingly.
I never saw such courteous and polite
people. Every poor peon you meet on
the roads takes off his hat, in passing with
the salutation "Adios, Senor." I called the
attention of an American acquaintance to
this universal and pleasant quality of the
Mexicans. He replied, "Nothing to it!
Don't amount to anything." I told him
I had onre hear politeness compared "to
the pneumatic tire on an automobile or
bicycle, nothing n it, it is true, yet it
helps to make easier and pleasanter the
journey of life, and smooths out many a
rough place on the road."
This is a long letter, but I couid write a
lsok on Mexico, and not tell half of the
interesting and wonderful things to be seen
in this country. 1 holp to be able to at-
tend the convention of the Turpentine Op-
erator's Association, next month, and meet
many of my.good naval stores friends in
your always attractive city of .acksonville.
CARY B. TOWNSEND.
Mexico (ity, Mexico, August 19, 1908.

SHERIFF'S SALE.
Under and by virtue of an execution is-
sued oet of and under the seal of The
County courtt of l)uval county, -:orida.
upnm a certain judgment rendered in ssaid
court on the 7th day of Septemler A. I).
190 in that certain suit where C'uuimer
lAmlwr C'ompany, a corporati. ., etc., is
plaintiff and A. ('. Shannon is defendant, I
have levied upon and will offer for sale
and will sell to the highest bidder for cash,
before the court house of Duval County,
Florida, on Monday the 3rd day of Au-
gust A. 1). 1!W., during the legal hours of
sale, the following described property, to-
wit: Lots one (1), two (2), three (3),
five (3), six (6), seven (7), and eight (8) in
Block Forty-eight (48), Edgewodl. IDuval
County. Florida, according to plat of same
recorded in Plat Isook 42 at page 37 of the
public records of said Duval County, Flor-
ida, said lots alsve descrilwd being all of
said Blok Forty-eight (48) except lot
four (4) therein, and said property wing
sold to satisfy said execution.
I. F. Bowden,
8-1-5t Sheriff Duval County, Florida.


BEST TANKS

ON EARTH (

Are made i Paktf*, h. . Davis &
Son. mTy e-lacted r wod. Wort-
S- h .aw to the Qi of the material.
and a- nombi- ian Matsely aquaaled
r drability. Write them for price and fall
lsImeation before you buy a tank.

AM. DAVI & SON, Palatka, Fla.


ISouthern States Naval Stores Co.

Savannah. Ga.
Factors and Commission Merchants
Ship to Savannah Get Competition Highest Prices Promptest Returns
Correspond With Us





****IS*S*o*s*eos***********So*******so***asn ****Z**

I J. S. Schofield's Sons Company,
* *


4
4
4
4
4

i
4
4
4

4
4
4


*V'V WuV--VwVY-wV *V*V*V*V*V*V-


Headquarters for

Distiller's Pumping

Outfit.
No plant complete without one.
SHundreds of them in use in Georgia
Florida, Alabama, Missimsippi and
South Carolina. Write us for particu-
lars and prices. We also manufacture
Engines, Boilers aid Higk
Grade Machiery,
Sas well as carry a full and nmplete
--stockof--
; Mill Supplies, Pipe,
D Boiler Tubes, Etc.
Advise your wants.

Macon, - Georgia. f
A LTM*e saM sTga aga I
Kima r fntoWrt fIr Tl lto g-pLag I


DIAMOND VALUES DON'T FAIL

When your money is invested in good Diamonds, you need never
worry about the markets. We have one of the most superb lines of pur
Diamonds in the South. Come and wee for yourself.


11-13 HESS & SLAGER 339
Main St. J W.BaySt.
Jackreonvalle. Fla.


-- -


******************


40 *go 00 a a -0 0 0 00 i so 0 so 0 04 C50 6 40 00fr







ii I, _irlr, ----7


BEFORE MAKING YOUR PURCHASE!

-See The-


KNIGHT CROCKERY

--And--

FURNITURE COMPANY
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

rD. ^^N^ %C. AS3akeY^. .
DVRECTOS: DIRECTORS; -
D. C. As D. C. ASHLEY. Presit. W. Bw om.
G. A. i s. BW. BLOUNT. It Vice Prldert B. A. Crer
CL. 11 'r. and Geaeral Mlman r. T. G. Cmibreth.
P. L. Weeks. G. A. PETTEWAY. 2ad Vice P-eA.A. S. Pedler .
Ji. G-C...mri. J. a. ASHLEY. 34 Vice Pre. B. G. La*taer.
I. We.bet S. HI BERG. Sec. and Tres. J. M, Aa b r
Il.lM W. T.e B. 1.

I PENINSULAR NAVAL STORES CO.
Commission Merchants
and Wholesale Grocers
Receiving Points-Jacksonkvile, Tampaand Fri0andin.a,
Fla., Savannah, Ga.

-Capital Stock, $1,000.000.
L fC^Khfc

H. D. WEED.


W. D. KRENSO-


J. D. WEED r CO.,


Savannah, Georgia

HEADQUARTERS FOR


Hoop Iron, Turpentine Tools,

Batting, Etc.


McMillan Bros.


PLANTERS

"Old Time" Remedies
THE JOY OF THE HOUSEHOLD. t
These lowr went remmuma. Nabin Tea, Dmaslab, Cuban not"
sad Cub 0i8 are n joy of the household. With th- ma -ar at haud, a
m s ready for y emrgeey. He ba a safe, reliable al spedy reief h
for wife, children, aef or st k. With theme remedies yeo ean keep the
doetor's bamd out of your pocket, ad yet ave a healthy, happy family.
Besides, you eaa ce your etoek d ay ailet that my beal the.
mUBIAN TA-In Liuid or Powder F -I the grat family medrea it
wMl mre aln form of Livr ald Kidney Colir ta, Prme ta C(il ard Mamhl
Feve. Crs the common ailments of ehildrm; nl a s a laxative tea t i wMhras
a eqal-afe and reable. In the liquid, it i extremely palsatae-eve ddhBg
like it-ad it is READY FOR UH8.
BEnEDICTA i a womma's medieie. It will ea all the diammeas- eei-
woma, sad eased as Female Troublea. It will bring youth bak to the mide wom
who has gon oe suffering beau she thought it woemam hIt. It will eae for the
young gir just entering womanhood; and prepare the young woman ser the ama
duties of wife and mother.
CUBAN RELIEF-The intant Paint Killer, for either an or beast. Relieve
; uantly, Colie, Cramps, Cholera Mormse Diarrhoea, Dyatetery and iek Bfeadme.
for eolic in hones it is an infallible remedy and is guaranteed to give re in *m
minutes.
CUBAN OIL-The Beat BeM and Nerve iuni et. la ataseptie for euts.
magged or tora flesh, and will instantly relieve the pain. Cura s irset bites and Mtalse.
ealds and burns, bruises and sorea, chapped hands and face. ore and tender t- t
Relieves rheumatic pains, lame back, stif joint. and in stock eures wire femae reui,
eratehes, thrash, splint, collar sores, addle ga, and diseased bofs.
Writ us for Pf ie.
SPENCER MEDICINE CO.. Chattanooga. Ton


CUMMER LUMBER COMPANY
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

Rough - Dressed Lumber

Long Leaf Yellow Pine.
BOXES AM ORATES


W. L. WILSON,
Pres. a Treas.


JNO. E. MARRIS,
Vice Pres.


6. SC@VIL,
Secy & 6.A wor.


Florida Cooperage Company
(lacorposed) CapHll wteocrk Sa1000
MANWUrACTUtERS OF


Turpentine, Cotton


Seed Oil, Dp


and Syrup Barrels.
Offce an Factery .Eterpris anM Estee St s.
Telephone 1855 Jacksonville. Fla.


To be Imitated is to be Flattered
We are leaders in our line of business. the cut herewith displayed is the repro-
duction of an actual photograph taken of one of our standard 30-bbl. Turpentime
Stills connected up in our yard, showing the Kettle, Cap, Arm and Worm, also the
Gate, location of seams and rivets. It is not a seamless still, but has the,ft~west
seams in it of any Still on the market. .
This cut represents our actual production and is not made by a cast-off cut of
any other concern.
If your profit depends on the quality and workmanship of your Still it is evi-
dent that you must get a MeMillan Still. All improvements that have been made
on Turpentine Stills that have been worthy of the consideration of the Producers
for the last decade are summed up in the McMILLAN TURPENTINE STILL of which
there are more in operation today than all other makes put-together, and that they
are giving perfect satisfaction is shown by the ever increasing demand; because they
are built right. Possibly a little higher than any other at first cost, but your repairs
and the risk from fire is much less hazardous.
These goods are in your reach from Fayetteville, N. C., Savannah, Ga., Jacksoa-
ville, Fla., and Mobile, Ala.
ALL WORK GUARANTEED.


Jackhsonvlle, FIa.


Also Fayetteville. N. C. Savamah, Ga. M le, Ala.


nop I





































SBarnes & Jessup Company
SJacksonville. Florida.
NivalI Stores Factors and Commission'
Merchant.

ornICERS.
C. E. arnas. Pr l nt. J. A. Ewin, Vice-Pre.dent.
E. B. Wells. Secretary and Treasurer.
DC1TOILS C. H. Bame1. J. A. Ewaig, R. S. Hall.
JL .l E. C.Long, W. K.E. Cummer, E. B. Well. W 5.
Jenmir S. W. Taylor

..Ma...i.... ..........ma..Iag...o..l.************** i


J. W. uMe.
P94066"L


C. I Parka
Vem-pre.


lam ieNan.
vleeP-e.


W. W. Wlder.
See. & Tres.


John R. Young Co.,

Commission
Merchants.

Nara Stores factors. Wholesale grocers.
Savlmmala - - - - --


..ggImmpuIIu::::..'" u..uuuu.uulw...-.uuuals **er~


.4


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11
9
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.9
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mr..w#.~~~4~....t~S*' ******------


L V. WEST.
Pkdeu


D. K LTN.
PLOW. HAN
V. L. UELT.


D. L TMAJm
AS'eyamd Tun.


WEST FLYNN HARRIS CO.
GENERAL O FNI1A WE. S .h.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
NAVAL STOmeS rXCV A AT uVA.AR, A., JAemws vA
FLA, AMD wMAUlom ,. nA.


Wholesale Grocers also Dealers in Hay. Grain and Heavy
Hwneh&~


SOLE ArGENTS ia *. ^C Tw,--i- Am.
Ion.CHAItS WAREHOUSE
SAVANXZA, GA. JAC IUULK A TMUSA, L-.
.4


*


WILLIAM A. OURS JAMUS 0. DanM

WILLIAM A. BOURS &COMPANY
THt SeT CSTAJhE I S8US A *1t1 In I N STA1t.
Hay, Grain, fet4. Gardea
Sacs, POulry soles, Iur,.
Gris, Meal amd Frulirs.
OUI MOST: Prempit sAY StiAe -... c1. rVt.
206 EAST BAY ST., JACKSONVICl. fA.


DIAMONDS


Direct From the Importer

Our stock of Diamonds and Precious Stones is purchased abroad
by a member of the firm and imported direct, thereby saving our
patrons the middle man's profit. Inspect our stock, it comprises
the careful selections of a buyer of forty years' experience.
Color, quality, and freedom from flaws must have careful consid-
eration in the selection of a diamond. A selection package will
be sent to responsible parties on request. Write for catalogue.





41 West Bay Street Jacksonville, Fla.


U ii_


I


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