<%BANNER%>
Weekly industrial record
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00276
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: June 20, 1908
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00276
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text






SSTRIA









-Y -1YAVAls ToREg,

12aVP1REKR' GrE4MERA
Nl1OV\TRIAl1o FAidMIAhl

G EWSPAPER 9




Consumers Are Interested.
Since the publication of an article addressed to the
Naval Stores Onsumers in the lht issue of The Record,
we have received may letters from consumrs commend-
ing our course and making suggestions. We are publish-
ing a very streag letter in this issue from one of the largest
domestic consumers. Other letters now in hand will be
published in later issues. The TInd-iai Record is a pro-
ducers' paper. It always has been and always will be.
At the same time it recognizes the necessity for a clear,
V PW W clean, business-like iader l-diig between the producing
Sand the csmm~ ng interests. This can be mint~ied only
Sin equity and fairness on the part of both interest.


)


5-t
10-


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


V -


b


SAVANNAH, GA.


IC==
a


-- -- --- -- - - -r YLLIILi


- r 1 ,- r


*-~


s.


I iC~-lr~









TURPENTINE BARRELS ATLANTIC COOPERAGE CO.
MANUFACTURERS AND-MADE TURPENIINE BARRELS
We have been Manufacturing our own Staves for years and select the very bet stock for our barrels.
Skilled Coopers employed. Just beginning business in Jacksonville and we solicit a share of your pat-
ronage. Send us a trial order.
J. 4MeN. WRIGOHT, ammua*er -O DyrloUpehureh Buildlig JamcaMonvtlU, Frib4d


Bulletin No. 2.

PARTY FARES

Effective April 3, 1908.
For parties of ten (10) or more traveling to-
gether on one ticket two (2) cents per mile per
capital; ,.inina. per capital farefifteen( 1 5)cents.

THESE RATES
Are open to the public and apply between
anp point on the

Atlantic Coast Lines


W. i. C3.AG.
Peum-Tmerc Mmge.


T. C. WIITE,
Geonrl Frener AgemtL
WILMINGTON, N. C.


A. W. FRMrOT.
Divmiou Pasesacer Agea


East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED LONO LEAF

Yellow Pine Lumber


Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload


Lots


Steamer Sipments a Specialty.

WATERTOWN. FLORIDA


THE COMMERCIAL BANK
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. Bramces: Ocra Lake Cty
The largest leading State Bank i Jacksonville. Ia edmd i am -
fashioned strictly comrvatirv master and is subject to regular exa- ti-
by the Comptroller.
Wluavidual and Savings Aem na soliited.
H. ROBISON, W. OWnS, H. CATrr T aq
Prmiat. Vie-Ps aml CaMr.
^^6X'WLiNai^-L tCubb^


CONSOLIDATED


Home Office:
Branches: Sav


NAVAL STORES COMPANY.


JACKSONVILLE,


FLA.


annah, Ga., and Pensacola, Fla.


OFFICERS.
WALTE F. (XACHMAN, Presidet; D. H. McMILLAN, H. L. COVINGTON, JOHN H. POWELL, R. B. POWELL sad W. J. KELLY, Vice President
J. ( ITLE, Seretary sad Treasurr at Jacksonville; J. Q. HODGE, Assistant Secretary at Savannah; J. K. ROZIER, Assistant Secretary at Pinmmla.
iJuAVllVE COMMI'rTE: W. W. Oummer, W. F. Coachman, W. J. Hillman, C. B. Rogers, and A. S. Hubbard.
DIRCTO1RS: W. J. Hillmn, W. W. Cummer, D. H. MeMilIaa, W. F. Coachman, W. C. Powell, H L C. Covington B. Rogers, John H. Powel, A. Hb-
bard, S. A Alford, C. Deen, R. B. Powell, W. J. Kelly.



NAVAL STORES FACTORS


Paid in Capital


Stock, $2,500,000


Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
The "Consolidated" is purely a co-operative Company. Its interests are identical with those
of the Producers. The patronage of turpentine operators everywhere Invited.
Two Million acres of Land and Timber for sale on easy terms.
SProducers re Invited to call or correspond.


- -------- ------~~;,-~YI~:~,'*;,~i'ii~:~i~;~;Cl~i
















WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL


RECORD.


PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. DEVOTED TO NAVAL STORES, LUMBER AND MANUFACTURING ImltUali.

4.1600s41 Se 302. b1 M L tEmuEinw Coameile of b.- Twme.eim Opa .A ..s Am is d ;i mi. OC i. pl d adapd SeqL .L A. Arud Cw a* a C i Or m o d e Gena u iAm~ Adqiem d Sep. U 1 03 a the
l0.1 oae Orp Toi Twpmm ..cin Amo:ei.iT Adepw AS 27.. 03. a O8.. i or. ... I s. iw.&is C_ G. .,.m A.m.. EI. .bm. b y e.. m Swn m s Ams e.. i rnil dSto *i-o- sa m ri Anmis...



Some Striking Features of the Naval Stores Market As


Viewed By a Large Western Consumer.



The Record's Reply Which Deals Directly With the Situation-Of Keen Interest Both to

the Producing and the Consuming Interests.


The following letter front a large West-
ern naval stores consumer has just been
received by The Record:
June llth, 11n8.
Industrial Record Publishing Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.:
Gentlemen-We have your esteemed fa-
vor of the 8th and we wish to thank you
for the attention given our inquiry anti
also for the names submitted to us of
firms who can be trusted of being outside
of the so-called "Naval Stores Trust.
While we admit that it is a hard propo-
sition for some of the Naval Stores coni-
panies to compete with the American Na-
val Stores Company, we think the proper
move to make would be to have the gov-
enment look after the grading and brand-
ing of the rosin packages as here is the
very weak point.
Some naval stores company will take
advantages of this weakness, more than
any other firm and will take and regrade
and rebrand shipments to suit price and
conditions. Now. if such laws were enacted I
that would make it a felony for anybody
to change or remove the inspector's mark.
or, which would be more necessary that the
government appoint an inspector who
would brand each and every Iarrel as to
the grade of rosin it contains, and have
this brand attached to the package in such
a way that it could not be removed unless
it would he cut out, and show very plainly
that it had been tampered with.
Take it right now. for instance, where
there is a difference of $1 per barrel be-
tween "K," "I" and "H" gades. There is
nothing easier for an unscrupulous firm to
Substitute one grade for another.
We have already received from a certain
naval stores company a shipment of rosin
where each and every mark had been
scraped over, that would indicate very
plainly that another grade had been select-
ed. We honestly believe that as far as the
rosin market is concerned that this very
feature of it is giving the unscrupulous
and dishonest dealer the advantage over
his competitor in not only getting their or-
ders by offering his goods for 10 or 15c a
barrel less; but he would invariably make
a profit of 75e to 80e a barrel over and
above his legitimate profit by re-grading
the packages. Otherwise we cannot see
why some naval stores companies should
be so much more successful than other
eople.


We hope that you will nuake an effort
through your representative to have a law
enacted that will protect the consumer
and the honest dealer and at the same time
have the government to brand and inspect
to such an extent that their marks cannot
be removed without being detected and
the interference with these marks would
have as a consequence imprisonment for
the guilty party.
We believe that this would be a better
solution of the matter than any other
move you could make and we further be-
lieve that you would be striking a heavier
blow at the American Naval Stores Corm-
pany by this one act than any other move
you could make_
Thanking you very kindly for the inter-
est shown in this matter, and.A'ping that
some good may result out of our corre-
spondence, we beg to remain, etc.


WHAT CONSUMERS SHOULD KNOW
CONCERNING THE NAVAL STORES
TRADE. THE TRUE RELATIONS BE-
TWEEN PRODUCERS AND CONSUM-
ERS. SOME VIEWS RELATIVE TO
THE FUTURE MARKET IN ROSIN
AND SPIRITS.
Following up what we called "A Frank
Word to Consumers" in our last issue, we
herewith beg to submit to our readers a
new letter from our friends in the West,
a letter, which we deem of world-wide im-
portance, because not only does it point out
the greatest evil under which producers
and consumers labor, but it shows a way
by which matters can be remedied.
It reads as follows:
That is plain talk for you, dear read-
ers, and it would be superfluous for us to
add a single comment to the force of the
arguments contained in that letter. What
we wish to express however, is a request
to all our readers, producers and con-
sumers, to aid the common cause with
similar information. We want every-
body's suggestions as to how the present
evil can be remedied, and we want, furth-
ermore, everybody to come out frankly
with whatever experience he may have
had in his dealings with the American
Naval Stores Company. There is only one
concern in the naval stores trade who
ever had to defend its business methods
before the courts and was found guilty.
That firm is the American Naval Stores
Company, who again stands under indict-
meat on infamous charges. From our


former letters you must have understood. TION OF THE MARKET, WHICH, ON


that nothing else but the machinations of
the American Naval Stores Company have
brought about the present conditions.
Therefore then, we all must see how we
can eliminate the bad influence of the
American Naval Stores Company from the
market, and as the final success of such
undertaking concerns both producers and
consumers, we hope that all will assist us
in our fight. You need not fear, that any
help you might give the common cause.
would harm you in the end. The indict-
ment is there, as a basis, and if you can
give further proof, that the American
Naval Stores Company has disregarded
the laws of this country in any manner,
the case against them will be so aggravat-
ed, that one can hopefully expect such
measures on the part of the government
that will effectually disable the American
from continuing their nefarious practices.
Remember, readers, the Naval Stores
Trade can be made profitable for produc-
ers and consumers only if the market
manipulations and other such tactics are
entirely eliminated, and this ultimate end
can only be reached by the breaking up of
manipulations. Therefore do not hestitate
to give your aid; it means thousands of
dollars for every one of you, whether
next year's market will again be ruled by
the American Naval Stores Company or
whether the question of supply and de-
mand will make the prices. Where so
much is at stake for each producer or
consumer, individually, we hope we have
not asked their help in vain!
We mentioned in our last issue, that
producers and consumers are mutual
friends. This statement has been received
with some doubt apparently, and it was
mpinted out to us, that the high pieces
which ruled during the existence of the
okl Naval Stores Export Company rather
proved the contrary. Some readers of
the Industrial Record refer us back to
this producers concern, accusing us of the
responsibility for the enormous prices
which consumers had to pay for rosin as
well as spirits turpentine. This, it is
claimed, cannot be taken as a sign of con-
sideration from the producers and fear is
expressed that similar conditions may be
brought about, should the producers unite
again now into a big selling company.
It is fortunate that this question has
come up at this time, because we see from
the communication of our friend consumer,
that he did not understand the market
three years ago, and that thus he blames
the producers' company for a MANIPULA-


THE CONTRARY, MUST BE PLACED
AT MR. SHOTTER'S IKX)R! It was Mr.
Shotter who forced the abnormally high
prices on the Naval Stores Export Com-
pany as well as on the consumers, by buy-
ing the Savannah receipts daily at con-
stantly advancing prices. The Naval
Stores Export Company tried to resist the
abnormal advances by keeping out of the
Savannah market, but it had to take in
the receipts elsewhere at Savannah prices,
according to contracts made. Thus their
best endeavors were in vain-Shotter had
mapped out the plan too well, his intention
was to stock the Naval Stores Export
Company up on highest prices, then drop
the market rapidly in order to break
them. If the Naval Stores 'Export Com-
pany had survived, it would have brought
you then a stable market, ruled solely by
the question of demand and supply. Mr.
Shotter was too powerful, however, and
with an enormous financial backing he suc-
ceeded in remaining the dictator of the
market, exercising his power more and
more from one season to the other. You
all have felt the iron hand of Mr. Shotter
upon you, the question is, whether you
will continue suffering under the yoke lie
imposed upon you or whether you will aid
in breaking loose from him for ever. We
have told you, consumers, on a previous
occasion, that the producers desire only a
legitimate profit on the product of their
toil. This you should gladly pay, if you
have the assurance that you need not fear
further such practices described in the in-
dictment which would mean payment of
triple the legitimate profits out of your
pocket, considering, that you might pay
for "I" rosin for instance, when "H" rosin
is delivered to you, etc. Whether the mar-
ket is low or high, the American Naval
Stores Company can always make the bus-
iness profitable to themselves, and by
using their own methods, they force you
to pay profits into their pockets against
which, what the producers ask, looks like
charity. Have you ever before seen the
different grades of rosin at prices from
$2.75 to 6.55, a spread of almost $4.00?
Producers will tell you, that the intrinsic
value of the grades from B C to G differs
by about 5 to 10 cents, from H K by 10
to 20 cents, and above that by about 25
cents. Now look at the difference in
prices existing at present, fro B C to D
is a spread of 35 cents. G to H 50 cents, H
to 1 80 cents, I to K $1.00, etc. What does
that suggest to your mind? Our opIla
is entirely settled on that subject, r











4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL R RECD.



WHITE OAK SPIRITS BARRELS

Guaranteed to conform to specifications Savannah and Jacksonville Board of Trade.

Write te Columbus Barrel Mfg. Co., Columbus, Ga., or to HENRY EL SON. florida Mgr., Jacksonville. Fla.


since we read the indictment against tihe -jS6S6
American Naval Stores (onplany. This
concern being largely interested in theal
production of naval stores, will, of course. Industrial Record's


suffer losses in that department. It keep
the demand back, in order to avoid any
serious advance in prices, which would al-
low a legitimate profit to all-then there
is nothing left for it to do but use its owl
peculiar means for making its business
profitable. Read the letter again printed
at the beginning of this article and you
will see, how profits are arrived at and in
what measure they come to the American
Naval Stores Company.
From the foregoing you will understand,
that the American Naval Stores companyy
is not so very much interested in higher
prices, nor does it need to le, since big
profits are gained anyhow. Thus one may
do well to expect a continuance of the
present prices, although or rather because
they are entirely ruinous to the prodlucing
end! Prices are so very low, indeed, that
consumers could well afford to pay a little
more, and still purchase at a great advan-
tage to themselves. The present market,
it is true, is rather strong both for spirits
turpentine and rosin, but we are inform-
ed that there are indications, which point
to further bear pressure. We are rather at
a loss to see, why Mr. Shotter should wish
to further bear the market and it strikes
us, that perhaps all these hear tactics are
preparatory to the trial which he will have
to fact in November. Supposing, that Mr.
Shotter would base his defense Iulm the
idea, that it was impossible to get better
prices for the naval stores in domestic or
foreign markets and that the lower prices
were nothing but a consequence of over-
production and lack of demand ? He would.
of course, need to sustain any claims made
in that direction by facts, and it may
well be possible, that this reason leads
him to continue the bear movement, al-
though it may be little trouble for the
government to disprove such contentions
of the defendants. On the other hand Mr.
Shotter may fear the realization of plans
concerning a new producers company and
he may hope to frustrate them in the be-
ginning by pauperizing the producing end
of naval stores so that it will be unable to
make any move in that direction for want
of funds
Whatever the reasons may be. which
prevent higher prices for naval stores, one
thing is certain, that Mr. Shotter is the
immediate cause for the continuous bear
pressure as well as he has brought about
higher prices before, when he saw fit
and all the explanations in a re
cent issue of the Naval Stores Review, re-
garding the low prices cannot convince us
that such enormous drop in prices wai
necessary. Those reasons, surely would
have influenced the market to some extent
but they would not have brought price.
down dollars, had not Mr. Shotter desired
it.
What can the producers suggest to rem
edy matters, and what, we ask, will con
sumers do in order to win for them a sta
ble market, a market without manipula
tion and manipulators? Let us heal
from you.


ACCOUNTANTS.
T. G. Hutehinson, Jaeksonville. FL
Walter Mucklow, Jacksomville, Fa.
AXZS.
J. D. Weed & Co, Savannah, Ga.
BANKS.
Commercial Bank, Jacksoavrils Fla.
BEKR-WHOLESALE.
Chas. Blum & Co, JaMkaovil, Jm.
oseph Zapf & Co., Jaeksom la. 1.
BARREL STAVES.
uat Coat umber 0., Watertown
FloridB

BOXS AND CRATMS.
Cummer Lamber Co, Jacksovilfl FIL
CROCKKRY.
Knight Crockery mat F Ltanim O,4
Jacksonville, FV
CLOTHING.
Standard Clothing Co., Jaeksoville. Fla.
Stuart-Bernstein CO., Jaeksonville, i.
COPPER SMITHS.
MeMflan Brttea JacMsvMe, SoUm-
nab arn Mobre.
M. A. Baker, Brnswick, Ga.
COOPZRAG.
lorida Cooperage toJekamfrr nsFla.
Atlantic Cooperage Co., JacknavOfl, Fma.

DRUGS
Wm. D. Jones. Jacksonvill, Fla
DRUGS-WHOLESALE.
Grover-Stewart Drugy Co. Jakmvill,

Southern Drug P C. 0., Jadmmk Mil, Fl.


Sehofeld' S on Co, J. 8. Masm, Ga.
Lombard Iroa Works and opply C0., Am-



Knight Crockery and Fmniatua Co,
Jackseovifll, Fla.

FBRTILr RS.
Rours & Co.. Wa. A., Jeakoville, Fla.
- 7Ouzsum dn
hobeld's SoM C.. J. 8, Maso, Ga.
SLombard Iron Works BSupply CL. An-
Sgta, a.
FUNERAL DIRECTOR.
The Cha A. AClark Co Jekaomvile, lFl
I GAS
Jacksouvill. Gas Co, JacksonvMme. Fla.
AGENTS' FURWIsrwwa
- standard Clothigi Ca., Jackorville. la
- Stuart-Berstein Cao, Jacksaville, lF.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
r Williams C., J. P Svamals. a.
Young C., John R., Savame, Ga.


Buyers' Directory
^*^w^-k&'k&*Ua ^KeWrCm ^^r ^^'C*ktakak &


HATS.
Stuart-Bernstein Oa., Jackdsrville, Fr.
HARDWARE
Tampa Hardware Co, Tampo, la.
Weed & Co. J. D.. Savmma. Ga.
HAY AND GRAIM.
Bown & Ca.. Wn. A., Jeemonvile, La
HATS
Standard Clothing Co. -Jackeaille, F
HOOP IROI.
J. D. Weed & Cao Savamah, Ga
HOTLS.
Duval Hotel, Jaekeswile, Fla

IROM WORKS
Scholeld'a Sor Ao, J. ., Mams, Ga.
JEWXLX.R&
T. J. Riles C01, Jaskl-ielEl, NIL
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jae kmvie, lh



Heot ClIer.mbor Oak, V06060010


LIQUORS.
Blum & Co, Clow, JaskoMville, Fm.
Altmayer & Flatan Liquor 0O, Mabe
Ga., ad Jackonville, M ia.
Joseph Zapf & Co.. Ja comie, ib.

-SEDICIM.

MACHINE WORKS.
Schofied's Sas Co, J. S, Mam. a.-
Lombard Iron Works. Auguta, Gh

MATERIALS FOR luxKPmsxamss 1P0-

Sehofeld's 8oas Co, J. 8., Mesas, O.
METAL WORKERS.
Mexifem Drea Ce., JacksemwiW. a iue-
as al Mobie.
Baker, M. A, uniawieI, Ga., am POM-
cola, Fla.

MULL SUPPLIS&


Lombard Iron Works A Supply Co., Au-
gurta, Ga.
NAVAL STORES.
Penin-lar Naval Stres Ca., Jaeksorille
and 'amps, Fla.
Barnes & JMesup Co, Jaeksonwe. FM.
Comlidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
vine, Fl.
West-Flynn-Harris Co, Jaekomvi''e Vis
Williams Co., J. Savannah. iae.
Young Co., John R., Bavanma* Ga.
Southern States Naval Sita 0r C, S m-

PLANING MILL.
Dural Planing Mill Co., JaeksoMvifle, Fla
PHOSPHATE MACHINERY.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Ca., A
gsts, Ga.


rums.
ehoad's Boe Co., J. ., msr., Oa.
WAIMI.OAI
Atlantie Coast IAW
SAMWEIA&
Lombard Iro Works &t 8fmpp O., As


Bors O&a, Wm. A., Jaee ItIL
SIP YTAW.
Comer Iamber 0 admeva
5gSO--WUOIZ3ALL



SHOS-..XTAWL
Stuart-Bernstein Cl., Juacukaaevi,
TANII
.C M. Davis & Sm, Phlktta, F.
SchoiMs Sorn 0O., J. a., Mes. Oa.
Prewten Mwm, O mn at city, Phi

aU-aram asms BARWr&
Atlatie Cboperage C., Jaemmrvml, 1g.
Florida Cooperage JaenBdmvmi Ik.
SUr l zmu= ST1LLS
Baker, M. A. BrMawek a,. aml
e00e, AL
McM1ikm SthesS .06, .JaoonemeM
Savanmah man Meta.


Jaeksonville Development Ok, J1smn-.
vine, Fl

TXU iramAia TOOLS.
Comune Tool Co, Jakmrvle, r.s
J. D. Weed & 0&. svmnb, GO
WATCHES.
Greeniesf & Crsby C., Jacksnville, Pl
Hea & 8oager, Jackasbmy Va.
J. Rilso JaeksoavfB, Pk.
YELLOW PIIE LUEMR.
Cummer Iumber Co., Jamaawvle, Flo.
Feat Coat Iambr CO.. Waartows, V e.



WM. D. JONES

PRScrmIPn SPECUAuST
...oj.
FAMILY DRUGG)ST
107 E. BAY ST.
a n Orders 81




ZAHN'S EUROPEA HOTEL

UNDER NXW 3*NAW 3UT

Reems. s to Uote Pir Md. Nefl M
AR NOr. wa X. I L Awtna
JAuCKUO.LU, ILA.


a~IlTt\\\ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ u ~ ~ ~ -c-----~cc-


__- -----,,,,-,,,-----~u~rrr~rr~r~r~rm~i-









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. S



THE GROOVER-STEWART omUa c..

FORmEmrY ar oAmraRST-owIOVE R aue 00.
Whel sale DrUsg, Chemaials, DrIf, gisis Susries ad memi mry 8tmes
-609N- &VIL FLXOMMS


Jacksonville and Savannah Comparative Naval Stores Market For Week Ending June 19, 1908.
WITH LAST YEAR'S PRICES FOR REFERENCE.
ROSINP


GRADE
WW_.
WG
N
M
K
I
H
G
F
E
D
CBA ........ ........


SATURDAY
Jax. 1908 Sav.
6.45-6.50 6.45
6.40 6.40)
6.20-6.05 6.25
6.00-6.05 6.00
5.60-5.75 5.65
4.60-4.75 4.60
3.75 3.75
3.25 3.30
3.221-/3.25 3.25
3.121/.-3.15 3.15
3.00 3.05
2.70 2.70


Jax.
5.70
5.60
5.:30
5.20
5.10
4.95
4.85
4.75
4.70
4.55
4.30
4.00


1907 Say.
5.95-6.05
5.90
5.75-5.90
5.50-5.70
5.50
4.90-5.00
4.85
4.80
4.70-4.75
4.55-4.60
4.25
4.05-4.10


GRADE Jax.
WW_.. .. t6.45-6.50
WG .__........ 6.40
N 6.25-6.30
M 6.00-6.05
K 5.65
I 4.60-4.70
II 3.75
G 3.30-3.321/
F 3.25-3.30
E 3.15-3.171/:
1) 3.05
CBA *> 70-2.75


WEDN ESDAY
1908 Sav.
6.45
6.40
6.25
6.00
5.65
4.60
3.80
3.35
3.30
3.20
3.10
2.75


Jax. 1907 Say.


5.85
5.80
5.40
5.15
5.10
5.05
5.00
4.85
4.80
4.65
4.40
3.85


5.90
5.85
5.85
5.50
5.25
4.95-5.00
4.85-4.90
4.75-4.90
4.75-4.85
4.60
4.20-4.40
4.00-4.10


THURSDAY


GRADE
WW ....
W G ............-- __... .
N
M
K
T
H
G
F

D
CBA ........... .....


Jax.
6.45
6.40
6.25
6.00
5.65
4.60
3.75
3.30
3.25
3.15
3.05
2.70


1908 Say.
6.45-6.50
6.40
6.25
6.00
5.60-5.65
4.60
3.75-3.80
3.30-3.321/
3.25-3.30
3.15-3.171/2
3.05
2.70-2.75


Jax. 1907. Sav.
5.70-5.7; 5.95-6.05
5.50-5.70 5.90
5.30-5.54) 5.75-5.90
5.15-5.30 5.70
5.10-5.15 5.50
4.90-5.00) 4.90
4.80 4.85
4.70 4.80
4.65 4.70-4.75
4.50 4.60
4.20-4.25 4.25
4.00 4.05-4.10


GRADE
WW ............
WG .........
N
M
K
I
II
G
F
E
D
CBA ............


Jax. 1908. Sav.
6.45 6.45
(i.40 6.40
6.20-6.25 6.25
4i.4) 6.00
5.60-5.65 5.65-5.70
4.60 4.60-4.65
3.70-3.75 3.75-3.80
3.30-3.35 3.35
3.25-3.35 3.35
3.15-3.20 3.20-3.25
3.00-3.05 3.10
2.70-2.721'. 2.70-2.75


Jax.
5.70
5.50
5.30
5.25
5.20
5.15
5.00
4.95
4.90
4.60
4.30
3.85


1907. Say.
5.95-6.00
5.80-5.90
5.30-5.85
5.25-5.55
5.20-5.25
5.00-5.15
4.80-5.10
4.75-4.95
4.70-4.90
4.55-4.75
4.30-4.35
3.85-4.10


TUESDAY


Say. GRADE
5.95-6.05 WW..... ..
5.90 WO ........-- .......
5.75-5.90 N.....................
5.50 M .......... .........
5.25 K ....................
4.90-.495 I ......... .......
4.85-4.90 II.............. _-
4.80-4.85 Or
4.70-4.80 F
4.60 E
4.25-4.40 D
3.90-4.10 CBA .............


Jax.
6.45
6.40
6.25
;i.l')
(i. )
5.65
4.60
:1.80
3.35
3.30
3.20
3.10)
2.75


1908. Say.
6.45
6.40
6.25
6.00
5.65
4.60
3.80
3.35
3.35
3.20
3.10
2.75


Jax.
5.70
5.60
5.30
5.20
5.15
5.15
5.10
4.95
4.90
4.60
4.20-4.25
3.85


1907 Say.
5.90-6.05
5.85-5.95
5.85
5.50-5.60
5.25
5.00-5.15
4.85-5.10
4.80-4.95
4.75-4.90
4.55-4.75
4.30-4.371/2
3.85-4.10


SATURDAY.
Jax. 1908 Sav. Jax. 1907 Sav.
40 40 57 57
WEDNESDAY.
Jax 1908 Say I Jax 1907 Say
40/ 40-401'/157 57-571/


SPIRITS TURPENiTIlNE
MONDAY.
Jax. 1908 Sav. Jax. 1907
[O 40-401/4 5
THURSDAY.


Jax
57


1908 Sav Jax
57/4-57/> j57


Sav.
57


1907 Say
57/ .-57 />


TUESDAY.
Jax. 1908 Sav. i Jax. 1907 Say.
40 401l 57 57
FRIDAY.
Jax 1908 Say Jax 1907 Say


39-A


40 157


Naval Stores

ROSIN Receipts.
Jax.
Saturday--.._..__.- 1196
Monday 2467
Tuesday 1822
Wednesday.............. 1094
Thursday..--- 1153
Friday 1268

SPIRITS TURPENTINE
Saturday--.. .-..... 419
Monday 905
Tuesday 440
Wednesday ........... 381
Thursday --..- ... 382
Friday 345


Receipts and Shipments Here and in
For Week Ending June 19, 1908.
[ Sales. Shipments.
Say. I Jax. Sav. Jax.
4fl .1 3


3468
4719
3362
3980
3639

1641
1024
1372
1752
1316
1566


1884
2484
757
1623
1103


3357
2763
3887
2521
3580
3179

486
1316
935
1527
782
1543


1915
-

1100K



35

50


Savannah


Sav.
4348
2887
25
2690
82001
2680

2359
2112
128
383
622
617


Jax.
36652
37848
38400
40222
409(66
41019

30965
29236
29655
30525
31296
31678


MONDAY


1908.


1907.


GRADE
WW..----
WG......-....----....
N
M
K
I
H
G
F
E
D
CMBA ............


Jax.
6.45
6.40
6.25
6.00
5.65
4.60
3.75
3.30
3.25
3.15
3.05
2.70


Sav.
6.45-6.50
6.40
6.25
6.00
5.65
4.60
3.75-3.80
3.30
3.25-3.271/.
3.15
3.00-3.05
2.70-2.75


FRIDAY


Jax.
6.10
5.80
5.40
5.10
5.00
4.95
4.90
4.85
4.80
4.60
4.40
3.90


Stock.


Sav
91296
91877
96571
97243
93023
93982

37,649
36124
35036
36280
38343
39292


____.__~ ._, ,,,,.,, '


FRIDAY


571/.,-57l/"..


57V.-57V.









THE WEeKuLY IND~JSThTAT.. flP~fltU


The present season has proved a pecu-
liar one in many respects. While few big
orders have been placed by retailers, they
have ordered more frequently and kept the
trade up almost to normal. Another feat-
ure that is pleasing to the jobbers is that
collections have been unusually good in all
parts of the South. Hardware dealers
have operated ulmon a very conservative
plan and have bought only enough to keep


Branch EdIMeoral aed esines Offloe ia their stocks compllete. but they have been
SavannaGh. fG. ready to pay regularly as bills are sent in.
Entered at the Postoeffie at Jacksonville. Fla.. For the most part retailers are carrying
aseeond-clas matter small stocks this summer, much smaller
Adopted by the Exeutive Committee f I than usual, but this necessitates frequent
the Turpentine Operatorb' Asoeiatinm orders and in many respects the year has
lSepteber 12, 190, a-e it exelmre ff- lwen as satisfactory as could be expected.
del orn. Adopted i anal en tio th b ing hardware line business
September 11 as the org Jao of the In the builin hardware line business
eral a-eiatioL i May and the first part of June was
Adopted April 27th, 1903, a the official equally as gool as last year. Tennessee.
ors of the Int tetote tGrowe' As- .\lalaima. Mississippi and Texas merchants
tion. Adopted t mb 11, a have I)vin very ilwral buyers of building
oythe onldy od akw the T. 0A. ha0. lien vry lisl.rI y f I"<"?
Commeaded to lumber people by pedal hardware. and other sections have held up
resolution adopted by the Georgia Sa mi well.
Aoieiation*. Inquiries from all sections of the South

THE R ICOI YS O IC&, indicate that the general trade for the fall
The -~bahia- phat ad the moir of- will be entirely satisfactory. however few
amee of tho altr*l Record Company large orders are being placed. Buyers are
are located at the intersection of Bay and conservative and are holding back their
Newan Streett, Jadekoville, Fla, i the fall orders as long as possible in order to
ry heart of the greet trpentie ad astertain just what they will need. In see-
yellow industries.
The Savanah, Ga_ oHf is in the Board tions where gorsl crop reports are made
of Trade Building. Satvnmimh i the lead- buying is fairly gsoil now. but in others
ing open p ma stores market in the world, merchants are holding their fall orders as
long as possible.
NOTICE TO PATiROS. I Stove Trade Very Dull
All ymIent for advertiai ian the In-


Justril Record and subecriti thereto
mst be mae direct to the heme e in
Jackso.vie. Agent ae net aowev to
auke coectios ader ay cireu tance
Bine for advertiag and leariptim are
seat eat frm the heme eoce, when de,
aad al rmittaacea mat be made direct
to thi c n .m
therhI b Recend Pubehin CO.

GILCHRIST AND FLETCHER.
The Record has no apologies to offer for
expressing its gratification at the nomina-
tion of General Albert Gilchrist for Gov-
ernor of Florida, and Hon. Duncan U.
Fletcher for United States Senate This
paper is not a political publication in any
sense of the word. but it is interested in


In the past three weeks the stove trade
in the Souti has fallen off fully 100 per
cent and most of the Southern stove
makers have closed their foundries tem-
pararily. Trade held up well through the
early spring and some orders for fall de-
livery were received. In the past few
weeks, more especially since June 1, buyers
have almost entirely left the field. This is
accounted for in the fact that the stove
trade is almost entirely in car load lots.
aml merchants feeling a slight uneasiness
about the future, are holding off as long as
possible. The stove boundaries will be
ready to handle the fall demand on short
notice. The outlook for the fall and win-
ter is fairly good, but order books at the


So e h founclariesn are almost blank. This has
those policies that tend toward the up- caused no special uneasiness in the trade,
building of the vast business interests of oee as e siu is fy de
e < -. ~however, as the situation is fully under-
the State. This is a day of extreme con- ,
se tism. It Is needed now more than stood, as all manufacturers anticipate an
servatism. It is needed now more than average business by August 1.
ever before. Radical political policies ef-
feet business. With all due respect to HE SOUTH WILL DIVIDE ARKETS.
Mr. Stockton, who is a worthy and most
estimable citizen, we do not believe that For a period that dates from the founda-
his political views are in keeping with the tion of this nation until the Civil War the
best business interests at this time. We manufacturing portion of the United
can say the same about Governor Broward. States was very largely confined to the
We believe the voters of Florida have de- Northern and Eastern sections while the
cided the issue well. South was principally agricultural.
It is said that necessity is the mother of
HARDWARE JOBBERS OF THE SOUTH invention and it may be claimed that the
EXPECT A AI AVEAGE Y necessities of the Southern States during
the period when war shut them out from
OF TRADE. the world's markets first started then on
The arrival of June brought an extreme- the path of general manufacturing and
ly quiet period in the hardware trade of which has since had a steady and persist-
the South, and for two weeks business has et growth until at the present time the
ieen extremely dull. Notwithstanding a two sections are rapidly approaching an
material decrease in business since the lat- equality in that field of which neither
ter iart of May. the hardware jobbers are seem to le fully apprised.
not complaining and many are of the opin- This may be due to the fact that the
ion that the year will average up pretty South has pursued its course with so little
well with last year. of open rivalry that really little has been
oWhile business is dull just at present, experienced by its Northern competitors,
jobbers and manufacturers anticipated it save in a few exceptional instances, hut
and are not annoyed. They are in splen- a clever knowledge of its real strength.
did lcsition to meet the decrease in orders this young southern industrial giant is
and as the prospects are bright for a gonil destined to assert itself more strenuously
fall business few complaints are heard. 'in future than in the last and will more


INDUSTRIAL RECORD
JAMES A. HOLLOMON. Editor-4e-Chief
A.H. IL ARSH. Bnune Mamaer
I. T. ARNOLD. Advertising Maner
Pusblihed EV r, S-tuiday.
tu (Ie c)- -.03.00 Per AnnAm
8s wanamn-on !(Foreign) .... 50
"The Pine and Its Produot%.-
AR cemmufatlam alel be addremds
The Industrial Record Company,
Jilackunvillem Fli


evenly divide all markets, both domestic
and foreign, with its northern competitors
This is not said from any sectional
standpoint but rather from a knowledge of
those changing conditions in this direc-
tion that are constantly coming to our
attention.
When originally established there were
only a few Southern enterprises that even
dreamed of more than sharing local mar-
kets, and they were satisfied to divide that
trade with their old friends in those lines
across the northern borders; but there
has been such a steady growth with con-
stantly widening markets that Southern
products are ever now largely distrubited
throughout all portions of the United
States and foreign countries.
We have long believed, however, that
the time would come when many northern
enterprises which seemed to think their
IMosition impregnable to southern conme-
tition would Iw treated to a rather rude
awakening are right now at last.
With the recent financial depression
many of these old plants in the North and
East adopted a waiting and inactive policy
with a withdrawal of their advertising
contracts in this territory; while on the
other hand Southern enterprises made only
a temporary halt, that was followed by
greater activity in advertising than ever
Iwfore in their history, and the result is
going to be like the fabled race between
the hare and the tortoise, tile former slow
competitor will reach the goal while its
most complacent rival is sleeping by tile
wayside.
With a foothold in other markets
southern manufacturers will hold these
markets with a tenacity born of the en-
vironments through which they have won
their present position and the South will
prove as strong in all manufacturing lines
as it ever was in agriculture.-The
Tradesman (Chattanooga).

MUST LOOK TO THE SOUTH.
From various sources the startling in-
formation is being given to the world that
exhaustion of those resources on which
mankind must depend for a livelihood is
rapidly taking place and within a few
years, at most, present sources of supply
in many fields will have come to an end.
It is estimated that the timlsir supply
will not last fifty years longer, while
coal will be exhausted within the century.
It is claimed that the increase in pop-
ulation is in far greater ratio than the
acreage of production in food supplies
and it is to this special point that we
would direct the attention of the people
of the South.
There is no subject that bears so di-
rectly on the future of this section as
the one of improving our farming meth-
ods and rendering the South entirely self-
sustaining. We have repeatedly made the
statement that when the people of the
South learn to feed and clothe themselves
from their own resources they will le in
position to practically feed and clothe thit
world besides, and this statement we be-
lieve to be literally correct.
There is no other portion of the known
world where climate and soil have conm-
bined to render production of all fool
supplies so easy and so ailndant as here
in the South. Without the addlition of a


THE STUART-BERNSTEIN CO.


singlle acre to spare of cultivable lands,
those now in use caln be so improved by
intelligent methods of cultivation, as to
more than meet all demands that ean be
made upon them. We have repeatedly
used corn as one strong and plain exam-
ple of the correctness of this position.
Through slip-shod cultivation, or rather
want of cultivation, the average yield of
corn per acre for the States of the South
is only thirteen bushels, and yet that crop
was worth last year nearly $500,0000,000.
Suppose the yield was made to average
twenty-six bushels per acre only, and that
is an easy matter to accomplish, the
wealth of this section would added to by
half a billion dollars annually. But it
should not be reganled as difficult, much
less impossible, to increase that yield to
thirty-five or forty basheds,for nowhere
else will there le found such ready re-
sponse to intelligent cultivation and res-
toration of fertility as here in the South
We have seen this fact demonstrated
over andt over again, hence we are not
writing from any other standpoint save
that which comes within the sphere of our
own knowledge ani observation. There
were portions of the South that were con-
sidered "worn out" for farming purposes
forty years ago. but which were subse-
quietly treated to methods of restoration
and these now present as fertile as in the
days of their earilier cultivation.
By apply ing similar methods to all other
portions w' .-an add more to the wealth of
the South in the next five years than has
lieen accoimlplished within any period of
double tliat extent in its history. Is this
not worth working for? It will require a
determined. persistent campaign by press
;Ind lN4pple to do this. hut surely with such
a goal to strive for there should not Ie
found a single laggard in the ranks of
those who would seek its accomplish-
nlent.--lhe Tradesman ((hattanooga)-


6


THE CLOTHIERS

14 ad 16lWesBaty Jakmuiag, Fh.


TH WEirmY EDUSTIALRIRIirl


SOLE AGENTS FOR

KNOX HATS.
FLORSHIEM
SHOES,

nART. S n FF-
NME AND MARX
CLOTHES.

WE
AIM
TO
PLEASE


QUALITY
IS
OUR
SPECIALTY








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. I



rHave You a Jewelery Store in Your Home?

It's hardly possible, though if you have one of our splendidly illustrated catalogues you are just as
well fixed. The catalogue is free and gives you illustrations and prices of hundreds of rich designs in

Diamonds, Rings, Brooches, Silverware, Watches and other Jewelry

Write us today and we will be glad to send you this art catalogue. Tell us what you want and we will quote you Special prices.

~ Ia. J. RILES COMPANY IS W. BAY STREETl JACCSONVILL.Er. FILA.
L


CONDITION OF CUT-OVER LONGLEAF and that immigration has not been fast
PINE LANDS IN MISSISSIPPL enough to put the cleared land under cul-
(By Mr. J. S. Holmes and J. H. Foster, of tivation.
the Foest Service.) Agricultural and Forest Land.
This circular is based on a study of the Of course much of the land which has
forest conditions of Mississippi recently been cleared of trees is more valuable as
made by the United States Forest Service agricultural than as forest land, and
in co-operation with the Mississippi State where this is the case the passing of the
Geological Survey. It is supplementary ldmber industry will work no hardship.
to a preliminary report on the condition of The decline of the lumber industry makes
cut-over lands in the longleaf pine re- little difference to communities where
gions of the State, and corrects and modi- farming is the chief industry, although
fies a number of the statements made in every farmer is more or less dependent
that report. upon a cheap and convenient wood supply
The Longleaf Pine Industry. for fuel and fencing, and should perma-
Originally all of the southern part of mently maintain his own woodlot as a
the State, except where hard woods held ready source of timber for all farm needs
their own in the river bottoms, was cov- And while the raising of field crops is
ered by pure forests of longleaf pine, and more important than tile raising of tim-
for a long time it was practically untouch- ber crops, each has its place in the econo-
ed. The first settlement of the region mic development of the State. and the
took place chiefly along the fertile river lumber industry furnishes, indirectly, an
bottoms. Even with the advent of the excellent home market for farm produce.
railroads lumbering did not for many Some land is better fitted for tree growth
years, receive any great impetus, and all than for agricultural crops, because it
cutting was along and close to the main will yield a higher permanent net revenue
lines and streams. But under the recent to its owners, and to the State as forest
great development of the lumber industry, land; it should therefore he held as forest
the longleaf pine has been exploited on a land. Other land gives better returns front
gigantic scale. A few lumber companies, farm products, which makes it strictly af-
seeing the end of their resources already in ricultural; it should therefore be cleared
sight, are reaching even into the most re- and held as farm land. A comparatively


mote and inaccessible localities after a
fast diminishing supply; the industry will
not last a great many years longer, and
even now it is centering in a comparative-
ly few companies that have secured con-
trol of large holdings. Within a quarter
of a century most of the companies now
operating will have exhausted the mate-
rial that must keep their mills running;
some concerns, in fact, look forward to but
a few years of operation, and only two
companies, which have bought up all the
standing timber they can get. claim that
they have enough to last forty years.
When these companies are forced to leave,
it will mean severe loss to them and a
hard blow to what is now the foremost
industry of the region. Today Mississippi
ranks fifth among all of the States in
lumber production, and third in yellow
*pine cut. In 9l! it produced 13 per cent of
all the yellow pine in all of the States or
more than I /, billions of board feet.
Wasteful Lumbering.
The situation would be critical even if
it meant the exhaustion of a great natural
resource through close utilization and by
good methods of cutting. But inasmuch
as cutting has been unusually severe and
wasteful, and since fire almost invariably
follows lumbering, more than half the
longleaf pine land of the State has been
converted into a blackened and barren
waste. This means that over the larger
part of the area there is little or no pro-
duction of the timber, which, when once
gone, will not be replaced by a new
growth which should now be coming on;


1S111til 3l3 too$iii Ii I I IIIi*siti*ISOiSSU IiiiItI

SJOS. ROSENHEIM SHOE CO.
SMAMNVACTUtERS AND JOBBERS OF


SHOES

SAVANNAH. GEORGIA
"Best Shoes Made for Cemnrissary Trade."
sIell lose$ some@ also asl l $&stoogel t ooi


Plank's Chill Tonic is guaranteed to
cure chills, fever, colds, la grippe. 25e.*


WANTED
AND

FOR SALE
Rate for thi column is 2 eats pr word
ior rst insertion and 1 et per word for
following isertion. No advertisemet
taken for le than 40 eeto for firt, aad
20 cents for following inertion. Cash
must accompany orders unles you a~ve
an account with a.


small though annually increasing proper-by o t
tion of the cut-over pine land is being WANTED-Position by competent Dis
used for agriculture, and it will be man tiller; an furnish good reference. Ap-
years before all of it is needed. Until it ply to Box No. 21, Devon, Fla. 5-16-4t
is so needed it should not 1w allowed to WANTED-A turpentine place or loa-
become an unproductive waste through tion. Parties answering furnish schedule,
periodic fires that run over it after log- price a where located. W. B. Young,
going, but should be a good investment to McHenry, Mie 5-2-0a
its owners and a source of profit to the RaeordL
State by growing a taxable product. With
a stand of pine seedlings, promising a fu- WANTED.-Good, reliable stiller wants
ture stand of timber, there would be a position. Ca furnish best references.
definite potential value, promising a con- Address P. W. Eldridge Westville, Fla.
stant increase. The better land would. in 6-11-9t
all probability, yield a crop of poles in -
from twenty to thirty years, or good saw FOR ALE--Small turpentine place for
eash Price $84M0.O0. Good backing. Ad-
timber in forty years. It is quite likely oPrce $,ator, 5e IGod ia Record. tf
that a considerable proportion of the land
will not be needed for field crops until WANTED-AI eomiesris to ~ led up
after a timber crop has had a chance to their brns of aU kids of seed aeks ad
mature, so that the latter should be grow- burlap." We buy everything in the way
ing until the ground it occupies is needltd of ameks. Write mu. A im Fil ., C
for the more profitable use. At present aeksonille. Fa.
the cut-over lamis have no timlwr value, SALESMEN-You receive $100 cash
and will remain valueless for lumblring daily selling merchants our $20.00 Auto-
until they are protected by their owner matie Sods Fountain. Grant Mfg. Co,
and by the State. Pittsburg, Pa. 4-11-t
Public Opinion. TIMBER LANDS for sale, 12,500 acres
The movement for proper management Long Leaf Pine timber with good ship-
of forest lands is seklom in advanee of ping facilities at a sacrifice if can sell
public opinion. It is, therefore. necessary quick. Geo. Dozier, President, Dawson,
that the people of the Stale awaken to a N. S. and Lbr. Co., Dawson, Ga 5-30-3t
realization of the potential timler value of WANTED-position as Turpentine man-
the cut-over lands. What aplpars to be a ager or woodsman. Can control labor
widespread indifference to the future of and furnish bet references. D. L. Gay,
the lumber industry. which seems all the Collins, Miss. 5-0-2t
more strange in the light of the great im-
iortance of tile industry to the State, is WANTED-Position by competent dis-


tiller. Can furnish good reference. Ap-
ply to Box 21, Devon, Fla. 5-30-S2



OUGHT SAW MILLS

Lath and Skiigl iackies


Saws and 5atppieos

Steam and Gasoline

Engines




LOMBARD

AUGUSTA, GA.

Phosphate Machinery

Casting and Dryers



WHISKIES
GINS AND RUMS
FROM

$1.50 to$5.00 per Gallon

......AGENCY FOR......

Lewis 1866 and Meunt Vernm
Pure Rye Wl1*skis.
Controllers Blum's Monogram and Sylan
Rye-Agents for Jungst nCinreia ad
Pabst Milwaukee Beer Priaes e a
pliation.

CHAS. BLUM & CO.
517 and l19 WEST BAY STREET
JACKSONVILLE FLA.











9 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


not so much indifference as it is a fixed be-
lief, based on general observation. The ap-
parent absence of reproduction, however,
is due not to the nature of the tree but
mainly to repeated fires.
The passing of the lumber business-
for it surely will pass if the present atti-
tude toward the cut -over lands persists-
will mean the loss of millions in every
country not alone to the lumber men, but
to the counties themselves, for their reve-
nues largely depend on the maintenance of
the values, either by cultivation or refor-
estation, of the cut-over areas. The farm-
er himself, the man on the ground, is the
real loser from the lack of growing tim-
ber, and he seems generally apathetic.
When he allows his timber land to revert
to waste he deprives himself of material
he needs; he loses the income from cross-
ties and poles which he should be able to
cut from his own land; he deprives his
children of a heritage of great value, for it
is a foregone conclusion that lumber prices
will constantly increase. It would he far
better if these lands could be considered
as a forest resource permanently, or until
they are actually needed for agriculture.
Then they would be at least increasing in-
stead of deteriorating in value.
Fires.
In Mississippi, as everywhere, fire is
the scourge of the forest, and is the chief
cause of the waste condition of cut-over
lands. Its prevention is the chief problem
to be met, for unless it is prevented there
can be no hope for timber production.
Other agencies have some influence on
the lack of reproduction, though they are
by no means as destructive as the constant
burning. Where hogs roam the woods in


large numbers they do great damage, be- stump-land region. Counts of seedlings


cause they not only destroy a great deal of
the pine seed, but also dig out many of
the seedings to eat the roots. Another de-
terrent of pine reproduction is a growth of
scrub oak that comes in so thick after log-
ging that it retards new pine growth or,
on limited areas, even prevents it.
But fire remains the most powerful ene-
my to reproduction. As soon as the logs
are cut and the lops and tops strewed on
the ground, sparks from the logging en-
gines set fire to the brush and the whole
logged area is burned. This is only the be-
ginning, for the first fire is followed by
others of annual recurrence. These may
be started through carelessness, or to clear
up the ground or improve grazing. or wan-
tonly, merely to see the fire burn. While
a slight fire may not kill outright the
young pine that is 6 or 4 years old, the
new growth that has but recently started
from the ground is invariably killed; and
the fires that come again and again, year
after year, finally cause all the reproduc-
tion to succumb, and every effort of nat-
ure to restock the ground with pine is pre-
vented by the fires that are set in the-
spring.
Reproduction When Fire Is Kept out.
Where fire is kept out, reproduction of
the pine forest is a comparatively simple
process. Investigation has shown many
restricted areas, in various counties, that
are well stocked with pine today because
the areas have not Ib burned over In
some of the western counties longleaf pine
I :s borne seed abundantly during the past
year. During the warm days of November
and December the seed from these
trees has germinated throughout tihe


made where seed trees were present
showed from 12.00 to 15.000 settlings
per acre. Should this one crop alone
mature, the future stand of these lands
would be assured. Iltt his spring the
ground will prolalbly be burned over
again and very few people will ever real-
ize that a future pine forest, has been de-
stroyed. One small area was found in
one county where fire did not run last
year. It was an excellent example of
what reproduction would Iw if fire pro-
tection were assured; one-year-old seed-
lings covered the ground so closely that
there was at least one to every square
foot.

RAILROADS AND WOOD PRESERVA-
TION.
The recent action by the Board of Direc-
tors of the American IRailway Engineering
and Maintenance of Way Association in
appointing a committee of seventeen to
investigate and report ulum the subject of
woul preservation has shown that the
practical railroad men of the country rec-
ognize the importance of taking steps to
conserve the rapidly diminishing timber
supply of the United States.
Timler is one of the principal materials
purchased by the railroads and its econo-
miical use is a subject of far reaching im-
portance. More than 100.000.000 cross ties
are used annually ly thli different railroad
companies, and their average life in this
country is not more than six or seven
years. From a study of European meth-
ods. and the knowledge of woodl preserva-
tion under conditions in this country. tim-
lwr testing engineers say it is reasonably


certain that an average life of from 15 to
20 years may be secured by treating the tie
with a good prevention of mechanical abra-
sion, thus to a large degree diminish the
drain upon the timber supply.
While the quantity of timber used for
ties is very great and the problem of a fut-
ure supply is a serious one, yet this class
of timber is not the only one which should
receive consideration. A greater length of
service from timber now used by railroads
for bridges, trestles, piles, fences, and
transmission poles is greatly to be desired.
A. IL Kuehn. engineer of tract and road-
way. (leveland, Cincinnati, (hicago & St.
louis Railway, is chairman of this spe-
cial wood preservation committee and C.
. (Crawford, specialist in wood preserva-
tion, United States Forest Service, is
its vice chairman. The first meeting was
held in Chicago in the early part of last
month for the purpose of organizing and
deciding upon a plan of work. The com-
mittee was divided into four sub-com-
mittees to take up the following lines of
work:
Statistics and Economics, O. Chaunme,
Consulting Engineer, Chicago, Illinois,
chairman.
Preservatives and Specifications. H. von
Schrenk, Consulting Timber Engineer, St.
Louis, Missouri, chairman.
Adaptability of Woods and their Prepar-
ation. W. K. latt. Civil Engineer. Forest
Service, Lafayette, Indiana, chairman.
Treating Processes, C. (. Crawford, Spe-
cialist in Wood Preservation, Forest Ser-
vice, Washington. I). (.. chairman.
This American Railway Engineering and
Maintenance of Way Association now con-
sists of about !00 members representing


at~ a 1-a-a--a -va9--a -a--a---Ei a + I 1 i--~%l~c-1-~-~a 3-%k i-~gi-H-! 14' i--%-I- 11-4' 1-1 1 1 a -i 14 a a I a i


Consumers, Attention!


Are you a subscriber to THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD? If not, send in your subscription at

once. You cannot afford tc be without this paper. The RECORD is the official organ of the Turpen-

tine Operators' Association. It is the champion of the interests of the Producer. It is the bitter foe of

the Trust, which is antagonistic to the Producer at one end and the Consumer at the other end. Above

all things, it is fair and certainly keeps its readers in touch with actual conditions. The subscription

rates are $3.00 per year, payable in advance. Foreign subscriptions $3.50 per year. Fill in inclosed

blank with your remittance.


CU "rOUT HEE



INDUSTRIAL RECORD COMPANY,

Jacksonvlle, Fla., U. S. A.
GENTLEMEN:


Please find inclosed S _

for one year beginning with the current issue.


for which please send the INDUSTRIAL RECORD


a


--


Name

Address-


&itl I I ItP- t-l+ I'++++*44'1 III t-I-I-%i I a aaa ut


S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
S






S
S
S





I.


I








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9

Capital $204000
HUTCHINSON SHOE COMPANY
VICTOR SHOES AND HATS
Wholesale -, o o Jacksonville, Fla


200,000 miles of railroad track and includ- JOSEPH ZAPF CO
ing among its membership the leading rail-
road engineers of the country. The object
of the association is the advancement of
knowledge pertaining to the scientific and
economical construction, operation and
maintenance of railroads. The method em- I
played to obtain this information is
through standing committees appointed by
a board of directors Each committee is
appointed to investigate a special subject Wholesale Dealers in and Bottl, I
and to report at each annual meeting, pre- AN H EUS ER- B USC H
sending the results of its investigation, fol-
lowed by recommendations which are pub- St. Louis Lager Beer
lished in "The Manual of Recommended
Practice," after they have been adopted by Wholealo
the association. Liprs, Wies, Mim al W trs
PUSHING THE ROAD TOWARD PERRY. Write for Prices
D. M. Lutz, manufacturer of lunlldr
staves and laths, Jonesboro, Tenn., who
has been cutting bridge and trestle timber, C O O k If not.
for the A. C. L Jacksonville and S. \\W. Whv riot?
extension from Jacksonville to Perry, Ela., WITH
has finished his contract with same, and G a s s AcKS VIL
all bridge and trestle timbers are now iAS COMPANY


placed and the iron is laid to a point with-
in 10 miles of Perry. This road has been
under construction for four years, having Cypress
had considerable trouble in getting the
draw in on the Suwanee river, which took


4\


Mc KOY PATENT

Turpentine Cup.

The best and simplest cup
on the market. Detachable
Greater Capacity, easier
dipped ,more easily placed
on tree, stronger and prac-
tically indestructible. Will
SJ not rust. For eataloc and
S, / price list write


IIOT PiluEITRP em CO.
1015 Hibenia Buildi g,
New Orleans. ITsivas-


M A AKERVENTOR AND T
M* A. DBA, MANUFACTURER OF
BAKER IMPROVED SEAMLESS TURPENTINE SIILtS.


Tanks


about 18 months, together with the low
country in which the road passes being un-
der water for long periods has delayed the
progress which is now being pushed to its
utmost by Eason & Casteel, under the di-
rection of Robert Strange, engineer in
charge, and his two assistants, Walker
Bros. The road passes through a portion
of Florida's finest timber lands and fills the
requirements of the many naval store op-
erators for transportation.


IN CIRCUIT OOURT, Fourth Judicial Cir-
cult of Florida, in and for Duval Coun-
ty. In Chancery.
Leslie J. Wootten vs Cleveland L Woot-
ten.-Notice to Non-Resident:
To Cleveland L. Wootten, Clarksville,
State of Virginia:
You are hereby required to appear to
the Bill of Complaint filed herein against
you in the above entitled cause on or be-
fore the fth day of July, A. D. imu.
The Industrial Record is hereby desig-
nated as the newspaper in which this or-
der shall be published once a week for
four consecutive weeks.
Witness my hand and seal of office this
2Oth day of May, A. D. 190&
(SEAL) P. D. Casidey,
Clerk.
By H. J. Cassidey, Deputy Clerk.
James M. Peeler, Solicitor for complain-
ant. 5-30-4t.


For AN Purposes
BEST MADE
Write for Cateloe

Preston Miller Co.


Dept. B


Crescent City, Fla


CHAS. A. CLARK, In.
hmro 16. Jaclonv, ol.
hone 186. Jacsonville. Fla.


Duval Planing Mill


Co.


Sewutb a d RablrdAve. lJacksea.s F:a
Builders and Contractors Wi De Well t
Have Us Bid es Their Work
in our Lie.
Pheoe 1749

Walter Mucklow,
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT,
Rooms, 46-47-48 Mutual Life BMx
Telephee a27T
JACISOL VILLM. LA.


THE DUVAL alorida.
Thi Hotel has recently changed hands, and is under New Management
Throughly Renovated Throughout
g=gCdquarters for Turpentiie Operators
F. BARTOW STUBBS, 1. D. CRAWFORD,


Manager.


Write me a fIeoor I. 0. anr nWtatetae rentimne l.
sljts sold aundr .a *g** .
WORK TmrOVGn THE COVLTILY PRLOnPTLY AT IrDD TO
The Largest and Oldest Copper Works i the South
My specialty is large worm a d heavy bottois that do .t eak
BRUNSWICK, GA. and PENSACOLA, FLA.
DIREBTORS: J. C. Stanley, J. E. Haris, D. M. Flynn, H. E. Pritehett, J. C.
Edwards, W. C. Powell, J. P. CouneiL
OFFICERS: J. C. Stanley, Pres.; J. E. Harris, VicePre.; K. B. Council, Secy.;
J. P. Coundl, Treasurer and Manager.

THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.,
Home Office- Jacksonville, Fla.
Factory: WArnWAWIT- W. C.
Manufacturers of Hith Grade Naval Stores Tools

4 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I l It I1 I I t i ii i I I I iill t .-(-r-r
SJ. A. G. CAmo,. President J- P. Durunzra. iet Vice-Preldest
T.A. JumNIxa. 2nd VIoe-Presidet. H. L KATrol. 3d Vice-Presldet asd Sec.
H. F. E. Sckairan. Treasrer.

J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

111 1 FlEsB a UIIOLESIE Rl[ M .
SMaiM Ofrn" SAVA NI.Mm, OORNGIA --
resf orm.. JCKMONVILL.. .LA. anf" reerytl '.m. :
Naval Stores Prodcers are Isvited to Correspose With Us. -
-*t-'-' -- tt~I t: I: llI l lllll ll l l l i lllIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlOIi


Proprietor.







19 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


SSouthern Drug Mfg. Company
WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS AND MANUFACTURERS OF
Flavoring Extracts, Packed Drugs, B. B. Bluing. Vinegar and Pyne's Popular Remedies.
We handle everything in the Drug and Medicine line. Write for prices. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


SStandard Clothing Company I


One Price


a
S


One Price


FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
s7 and 39 West Bay Street, Jacksorvalle, Florda
StetsM anad Hawes Hats. Special Attentlem Giren to Mal Order. I

0t* 81 16888 I @I.llel so go am 1.11...... I I a I I ll l


J. W. Motte,
President.


C. BL Prke,
Viee-Pres.


James McNatt.
Vice-Pr.


W. W. Wilder,
See. A Treas.


John R. Young Co.,


Commission
Merchants.


Naval Stores factors. Wholesale Grocers.


Savxavmih 4k Brunswic]. Ge.


You Want a Turpentine Location?
You Want a Sawmill Location?
You Want amy Kind of Florida Land?
You Mean Business?
S* Cal on r Write t
J. H. Livingston & Sons,
* OCALA. FrLO IDA.
^06W^%

The


Mi etropolis


Is the Paper you want. It is published
daily and is from 12 to 16 hours ahead of
any other daily newspaper in Florida.

$500 a Year $2.5o Six Months
Full Telegraphic and Stock reports. If
you want to keep posted on the news, get
the Metropolis.

CARTER & RUSSELL PUB. CO.


JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


DIAMOND VALUES DON'T FAIL
When your money is invested to good Diamond, you need never
worry about the market. We have one of the most superb lines of pure
Diamonds in the South. COw and ee for yourelU.


11-13
Main St.


HESS & SLAGER
JmckcouvlUe, Fim.


339


q BEST TANKS
ON EARTH


r durailit. Write thm for peMs aad it
irmatio beare yo bo a tak.
0. M. DAVIS & SON, Palatka, Fla. .






Southern States Naval Stores Co.
Savannah, Ga.
Factors and Comamission Merchants
ship to Savannah Get Competition Highest Prices Promptest Returns <
SCorrepond With Us

.v u&^3sasXikManaM6n& \^X seCssm3asca


*eeeeeseseeeeeooe**ogeseee**e***eeeoe**OSbeeO-ee
SJ. S. Schofield's Sons Company, ;

Headfuarters for
; Distiller's Pumping
. :Outfit
SNo plant complete without one.
S1 Hundredsofthem in use in Georgia,
Florid Alaama Missisippi and
oath Carolina.Write for pri
S..laer and prices We also manufacture

SGradf MamNiy,
4 as well as ca! afllsdlie I
0 0
+- W SuCUSu, Poe,
4 Boi"er Tules Ef.
Advise your wants.
Macon, - Georgia.
; a sL.m ',Iner r n..
So K af Tfaek waft for To oe t atii r-es
********** *******As*****&** **** *.*.*e6.* 666 ****et










BEFORE MAKING YOUR PURCHASE!


-See The-


PLANTERS

"Old Time" Remedies


THE JOY Of THE HOUSEHOLD.


KNIGHT CROCKERY


-And--


FURNITURE COMPANY
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


DIGRECTOxRs:
D. C- Ambe7.
G. A. Peisimy.
m 111. me.%1
P. LW eeks.
J.G. Cwrord.
H. Weibeft
S&HL ewir


D. C. ASHLEY. Prfideat
B. W. BLOUNT. let Vice Preident
and Geaene Mamer.
G. A. PETTEWAY. 2nd Vice P-es.
J. M. ASHLEY. 3d Vice Pres.
S. H. BERG. Sec. mad Tres.


DIRECTORS:
B. W. Movt.
B. A. Crer.
T. G. CAlbreth,
A. S. Pendletoa
B. G. Imaiser.
J. M. Aamey.
W. T. B. Hasrria.


I PENINSULAR NAVAL STORES CO.
Commission Merchants
and Wholesale Grocers
Receive Points--Jacksonvmle, Tanpa and Fernandina,
Fla., Savannah, Ga

'Capital Stock. $1.000.000.
zesysgagXmss't aSsassmarammarammaevs WWW<%.v^^^^i


T.a foerw ea remedies, .ul Tea, assi- c
and Cae O, are the j'oy the houeho. With thm near at band, a
man is rady for ay eergey. HB ha a safe, reliable aalt sty relief ei.
for wife, cdrea, lf or slck. Wit theme remedies keep the
doctor's hads out of your pokedt, d yet healthy, a=y ftamny. -
Beides, you ea ere your stek of say aihmnt tht ma y la t m
NmUBI TZA--a liql er Powar a -Fer the guet famy mnie. a
will cre all forms of Liver and Kidny Ceriampai, Prswa b Ma ad Mal- L
Fewer. Cures the comme almmnr of ebilre; and a a lmative teie a is witlha
a eqal--rfe a reliable. In the iquid, it k ext.rely paltar-h ~. tem
like it-and it is READY FOR UBSK
BENaDICTA is a womma's mediie. It wfll eam an the diammeei ommnn s
women, and eased as Female TroRbes. It will bring youth beek t the zuded worm,
who ha gam o offering beame rhe thought it womuAn lt. It wil ear. for th
young girl just entering womahood; and prepare the young woma r the seae
duties of wife and mother.
CUBAN RLIEF-The instant Paint Killer, for either ma or beast Relie
nstantly, Colic, Cramps, Cholera Morba, Diarrhoc, Dytetery and iek Beade
for olic in bhoMe it i a e an iaib and is gara d to give ree in am
miaute.
CUBAN OIL-The Best Bme atn Nmrve ialsest is antisepti for eae,
na gged or torn flesh, and will istantly relieve the pai. Cre meet m te.a" d st
mealds and burs, bruise and sore, chapped hads and face, are and tender fae
Relieve rheumatic pains, lame badc, sti joits, and in stok ar wire fmee t
ertehes, thru, splint, collar mres, saddle galk, and dimmed hbes.
Wite fr Pdri.
SPENCER MEDICINE CO.. Chattanooga. Teo



SUMMER LUMBER COMPANY
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. KRENSON


Rough DAressed Lmnbre

Long Leaf Yeslow Pine.
BOXES AM ORAT


W. L. WILSON,
Pres. & Treas.


JNO. E. NAIIIS.
Vice Pres.


6. J. SCOVIL,
Sec'y & GeUL Xgr.


Savannah, Georgia

HEADQUARTERS FOR


Hoop Iron, Turpentine Tools,

Batting, Etc.


Florida Cooperage Company
(I eorponaed Capital Etock *00.000
MAN A CICTJRERS OF
Turpentine, Cotton Seed Oil, Dip

and Syrup Barrels.
Office and Factry Enterprise ad Estele Streets.


Telephone 1855


9 'The Actual WVorth


McMillan Bros.


Of a TURPENTINE STILL Is in what it does,
how it does it, and how long it will do It.
The McMILLAN STILL will produce the greatest amount of Pure Spirite
of Turpentine and the highest grade of Rosin from any grade of Crude Tur-
pentine, that it is possible to make, and will last longer under any kind of
use, besides requiring less Wood and consequently less Water than any STILL
ever offered the TURPENTINE PRODUCERS.
THERE IS A REASON, they are built on HONOR, sold on their MERITS,
and fully GUARANTEED, therefore Mr. Turpentine Producer, KNOW THE
STILL YOU PURCHASE, do not experiment, order from the house of EX-


PERIENCE.
Jacks-vlle, Fla. Also Fayettevlle, N. C.


Savamah, Ga.


MbUt AML


J. D. WEED & CO.,


Jacksonville Fla.








I~ff'E U~- EEU EEEE 3 - -3 - - - - - - - -


-c.
















d


Sterling Silverware


~W~f
sawa


: i
*
U
U

Ic


















a oF Pl@a


t a

i.


JACKSONVILLE,
Eotablthoed 186


Street


FLORIDA.
IuScoapwNm-d 1 .


.~L., ,,,,


144


We have on exhibition a magenicent display of Sterling Siver.
Complete Table Servicesfitted up in various Patterns. The various
articles are so classifed that they can be shown without confusion
or loss of time. Each individual piece is clearly displayed. You can
ramsack showcases half a day and not bring to light half as many
varied and attractive pieces as ypo will see in five minutes time
running through our complete stock.
0. .a


tloan1;;UI l- t I 3Iu1 to -lu Tu13TII 1tI 9 9 1I uruU+-#11-4 I11?u!5uIuUI i I I 1 9lI,


3 3 0 I ~ ~ '- = ru"'~'


L V.


Barnes & Jessup Company


Jak~ouonvif. Florida.

Narvl Stores Fgictors and Comnmaison3
Meacchanta.
merhe'nts.

C ML Morass. P.~~t J. A. Ew~ing. Vico-Presidoi
F- i -Vled-C Seeretwry wad Treasurer
mEEMTOKLS* C. K. Ekrons. J. A. wn, R.IL S. Hmal.n
j. .- psm. 3L C. Loag, W. ELCuminor. E. *.#Iells. W S. F
Jeal&i6a C. W. Tmnlor


_A - - .- _
mTE OLDl8T WHIStY eHOUws s
THE SOUTH. (EtiWaaHid i xSL.)
OLD SHARP WILLIAMS-Pure Fme
Old Rye. By the gallon, $.S; four full
q qurt, expr. prepai.
SGEO J. (X)LEMAN-Pere Rye; Rih
sad Mellow. By the gallon $75; for
full quarts, 3.00, exprem prepaid.
ANVIL RYE--Pure Siabetstial Finy
Whiskey. By the gallon J.8; four full
qurt. 53., express preped
CLIFFO D BYE-By the gallr 532;
four full qusrta 5L8S, exprea ureaild
lOw K= DTUBY T O0N-De- ftrom
Bonded- Wehowe; tue sat old. By the
goall $3.0; four full quart 340, expre3
prepa id.
OLD POINTER CLUB OORN-miet sad
Mumew. s t g am S.S fr fuRlquarta 91W, expr pe d
-- Hi pa i s and catalogue. Mailed free upon appia
The Altanyer Flatau Li-a Ta7, 723, 14. 7JA W. Bay Serot JacksLwAvl, l.
P. O. oBe assL Phem 3.


rmFe


MMW IL HARM
V. i. IMMz.
Vhatuiawl


ILL 11121
Soft W To"
EL L YEArn
Antgo'mdTiew


i WEST FLYN HARRIS CO.
; IOEST KIIM. a L3- Stm h a.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS
SATAL S~~1OS -..4.mrw AT VANNA, GA, JA., Wan.




W ^~f IT 1P Ar/ for the Cebltebad Union Ture.--e AMe,
S* IL.x, DWAU WA1 VIA.

: Wholrsale Grocers also Dealers in Hay. CGuin and Heavy


SOLE AGENTS the Cebr1a, UkiChi Tw-h Asms,
MRCHANIS VAREHOUSES.
SAVAMnA, eA. JACKBOrNVa, wa 7" TMA, Ms


WILLIAM A. BOURS Jam4 <


WILUAMA. BOJRS& ICO
Te OLaEST eruiu amm ua Ime Wm ai K Wa .


I. PArS


ANY


lny, Gra Fe, & wdm
6eeft i emy su p" f lew,


Grib, A"md I frtIi
0MROO: ft. 1 -e
206 [AlT *BV ST., Xj


(I



Ur
a
a
a


a


rreenleaf & Crosby Company


I


~~~~~~~~~~~-~rrr~rrrrrrr~~r-------------


11?


-----i


~i~ir
441
.
, ^A^ ,ac3~fe=a.Sig


41 West Bay


I