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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00272
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 23, 1908
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00272
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text
I1


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D USTRIA


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A


RECORD


&fK6iY NAVAI.i ToRE&,
SIVAEK'ST GEiEKAbI
| DV8TiUA.WS FPAPI Als
( t431EW3PAPER9


A UNITED FIGHT,
In this issue of the Record is a strong
vigorous article relative to the manipulation
of the naval stores market by the American
Naval Stores Co. and its allies. It is up to the
factors and the producers to stand shoulder
to shoulder in fighting the unfair methods
of this "manipulator of markets." The Amer-
ican Naval Stores Company will continue its
nefarious game as log as the factors and pro-
ducers continue to aid them. Is it not time
to call a hall?


rE CORD


m


JACitWiLLC. FLA. SAVANNA", GA. m
****' - .. '- 1


(AL


sI .
MJS( 29 08





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TURPENTINE BARRELS ATLANTIC COOPERAOG CO.
MAWUACTIER$S IAND-MADE TURPEM11rC SARELS
We have been Man aiMstrin oown Staves for years and select th very best took for our barrls.
Skilled Coope employed. Jst beginning business in Jakwonville and we soliclt a thae of your pat-
ronag. end us a trial orer.
.1 a.. wnrr. h.-e. e.r W W--Up - wt ....alidl. .1me.ae w..wev Mo sd.e..


East Coast Lumber Co.
ROULM AND DRESSED LON LEAP

Yellow Pine Lumber
-]

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots
Stenmer Shipments a Speialty.

WATEKTOWN. FLORIDA


THE COMMERCIAL BANK
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. Braches: Ocla Le Cty
The largut leading State Bank i Jeksaonvife. Is e ieadt a In a M--
fashioed strictly conarative manr sad i subject to rgulr ...i .
by the Caomptllr.
SI.iTvlidual and Savine ALnsse O eldtsd.iL
.I ROBINSON, W. 3 OWEx, X. S '. AM
PrersMet. Vice-Prediame. .
515151511111111, %%%%*5%5%~%%%%w%%4-Imalil~lG


CONSOLIDATED NAVAL STORES COMPANY.

Home Office: JACKSONVILLE, FLA..
Branches: Savannah, Ga., and Pensacola, Fla.

OFFICERS.
WALTS Fa. OOAcMA, Preiant; D. H. MeMITT.A, H. L COVINGTON, JOHN H. POWELL R. B. POWELL and W. J. KELLY, Vis PreMdeMa.
J. a I TI, S etary ala Treasurer at Jasaville; J. Q. HODGES, Assitat Secretary at Savannah; J. ROZIER, Aaaiataat Seeetary at Pmals.
aaxrJLIIVJ COMMVITPD: W. W. Cmmer, .W. F. Coachman, W. J. Hiflmna, C. B. Bogers, sad A. 8. Hubbard.
DNg CTOBS: W. J. HIHma, .W. Onmmer, A H. Mnlle, W. coachman, W. C. Powel H. L. Oringtoa, C. B. Rogers, John H. Powll, A. S. H-
bard, I. A. Alrd, C. W. Deen, B Powell, W. J. Kelly.



NAVAL STORES FACTORS



Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
The'Cesaslldated" Is purely a co-operatlve Company. Its laterests are Identical witk these
of the Prodwcers. The patreoage of turpentine operators everywhere Invited.
Two Million acres of Land and Timber for sale on easy terms.
Prosiears rxe Invtod to "l or corrospod.


Bulletin No. 2.

PARTY FARES

Effective April 3, 1908.
For parties of ten (10) or mon havel na to-
Sether on one ticket two (2) cents per mile per
Mcapita, minme per capiteafareelftee( 15)cents.

THESE RATES
Are open to the public and apply between
any point on the

Atlantic Coast Lines
W. J. CRAIG. T.C. WHIT, A. W. FIUTOT,
Prs Tr l ssmmc GeI d Pameagr Aert. DtMia Paumnge Amret
WIL NGTON. N. C.
















WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL


RECORD.


PUBLSHMD EVERY SATURDAY. DEVOTED TO NAVAL STORES, LUMBER AND MANUFACTURING nirn wimi

WW.d S2L. 12. Oft1 is b COMNA d OW T..iS. Opd@W Amemele as Im llw Clid Oesinm md aslfd SqL 1. is Ame Coswa -m O- Oesm d of do GomId Ame Apbd Sit. 3I93m 6.
0" ie0si of Ter 0oweeOp v Asn Mag Ai pe 27. M an Cpd Gke doO w-SW Cmi Giwus Amiim id hGr Gumwia Smwu Amd6 OliOwsd w ."m 0eS Amm


Reflections on Present Naval Stores

Market,


In comparing last year's prices of rosin
and spirits turpentine with those quoted
at the present market, one will certainly
wobder what causes have brought about
Ste enormous change. it may be said, that
it it partly due to natural conditions; for
isthime, it is a recognized fact, that the
receipts during the past two months
have been considerably greater than those
of last year at the same period, owing to
this year's very early season. Further-
more it seems, that a general depression,
which is apparently expected for the pres-
ilestial year, is inluencing the naval
stores trade too, and all the other branches
of business which are more or less closely
united with it.
We learn, that the influence of this de-
presion is even far reaching enough to
still affect the foreign markets, although
the crisis of last fall might be considered
Seve by this time. It is stated, however,
that after an extraordinary boom the
building trade in Germany, for instance, is
practically at a standstill and that there
are reported more failures of builders and
contractors and forced sales of half fin-
ished buildings than ever before. This
mat have, naturally, some influence on
the demand for spirits turpentine, because,
if dealers in this article do not find an im-
mediate outlet for the product, with var-
aish and color manufacturers, etc., they
will only buy what they need for most
urgent requirements and will refrain from
laying in great stocks of turpentine.
Money is still very scarce and hard to get,
which makes buyers additionally careful
and circumspect in their operations.
These conditions may well prevail and
if they do, we understand, that they will
bear on the whole situation. What we
fal to see, however, is, why those circum-
atanees should have caused a falling off
In prices, since last year, of more than
d a barrel for common grades rosin and
from $5 to $10 per barrel for spirits tur-

Thee must be other reasons and those,
who have followed the market move-
marts only a little, will agree with us, that
te present conditions are to be attributed
to the schemes of the American Naval
Company and its allied interests.
the first place it is universally ad-
mitted that the American Naval Stores
Omapany has the power to manipulate the
market and, it has been charged that they
will use this power for their own advan-
tage. They are shipping today thousands
of barrels of rosin and spirits turpentine,
whish may have been contracted in Janu-
ary and February at a moment when the
market was forced up by them to a high-
er level, so that the present deliveries, at
a muek lower market basis, must neces-
sarily allow them big profits. It must not
be foqotten either, that the American
Noval stores Company has used and is
in the market as a weapon against fac-
t- ar poducers on account of the fact,


that there was an amount of spirits tur-
pentine tanked away from their reach.
That move, taken by the producing end
in self-protection, caused the war, a con-
test between honest working producers
and factors add those interests which, it
has beed alleged, are dot afraid to empAty
any possible trick aid scheme to win ouit
in the contest; The American could not
have found other meais to fight the pro-
ducers but a continued bear movement and
their fight is an easy one, when one con-
siders, that even the present state of the
markets allows the American to work
with profits, although the latter seem to
be gained with methods which no other
concern would think of employing, be-
cause they are unworthy of a concern,
built up on the principle of equity and
truth. Does not the indictment, which
now faces the American Naval Stores
Company, plainly state, that they are in
the habit of horning rosin and missgaug-
ing spirits turpentine-and what do the
enormous spreads between the grades "G"
and "H" "H" and "I" and "K" signity
The truth of the indictment, of course,
remains to be proven in court, and thus
anyone can understand, that the Ameri-
can Naval Stores Company can continue
the fight until the law actually steps in,
and further, that they do not care and do
not need to advance the present market,
for their own, immediate benefit.
If one stops to consider this feature
more closely, one must wonder why and
how it is, that factors and producers con-
tinue to deal with the American Naval
Stores Company and in fact aid them, in-
directly of course, in their nefarious prac-
tices. Do they still consider them invinci-
ble and is it fear which binds the ties be-
tween them? It certainly looks that way,
because one cannot well imagine that it is
a pleasure for either to see the products of
their toil fall into yon hands.
That the consumers praise the American
as a benefactor can be easily understood,
because they know that they have to
thank the A. N. St. Co. for the present low
prices; and the fact, that last year and the
year before they were caught mercilessly
in the traps of the American with sales
for forward delivery-a lot, which might
befall them again as soon as in pleases
Mr. Shotter to have it happen-cuts little
figure with the consumer now, while he
gets the products at so extraordinary low
prices.
It has always been an object of won-
der to us that the Consumers continue do-
ing business with the American Naval
Stores Company. They have all been warn-
ed of the practices of this concern and
the character of Mr. Shotter, himself, is
known to the greater part of them. A con-
sumer would boycott at nese, in his pri-
vate life, a dealer whose reputation was


(Continued on page 6.)


Basket Willow Growing.

Unique Experiment in Tree Growing in

Virginia.

One of the most unique experiments of proper planting distance for the Ameri-
the government in tree growing is the can green is 9 by 21 inches part, the
work in basket willow culture at an ex- highest yield in weight being produced by
perimental holt at Arlington, Virginia, this method.
just across the river from Washington. Careful counts were made to ascertain
The holt is located on an experiment farm the number of commercial rods produced
on rich Potomac bottom land on the slope on a square rod for different spacing. The
of the river bank about six feet above the following table shows the average figures:
water level. Twenty-eight contigu.Jus Spacing Number of rods
plats ranging from one to six square rods Inches per square rd.
each were planted several years ago with 0x18 782
four varieties of approved basket willows 9x20 517
to determine the best methods of man- 12x36 50
agement and its influence on the growth The number of rods on the plat where
and quality of the rods produced. the stools are set x18 inches apart ex-
Experiments show that the commercial ceed those on the plat where they ae
quality of the rods grown in this country planted 9x20 inches apart. The rods re-
under praper care and management is equal main considerably shorter, however, and
or superior to the finest of those imported a larger percentage of weight is lost in
from France or Germany. The manage- removing the bark from small rods than
ment ordinarily employed by American from larger one. The grower, therefore
growers does not yield rods with the profits by adapting the latter method.
proper requirements for high-grade wicker The average number of rods per stool,
work. The very gratifying results of the as well as the average weight per rod was
management devised by the United States found to vary considerably under the
Forest Service, which is conducting the several methods of spacing. Ain average
experiments, has awakened considerable in- figures from counts made are given be-
terest in this country and will unques- low:
tionably revolutionize the basket willow Spacing Number of rods Weight per rod
industry in this country. Inches per stool. Ibs
Perhaps the best evidence of how sig- 6x18 9.3 .106
nally the government has succeeded in 9x20 2.6 .24
its endeavors is shown by the fact that 12x36 4.4 .MR
a great many farmers as well as manu- It was founl that the average number
facturers of willow ware have been en- of rods per stool and average weight per
courage to plant bask',t willows for rod increased proportionately as the spae-
profit on lands hitherto considered entire ind distance increases.
ly useless. The enormous yield of rods per ae has
The experimental planting in the holt been carefully computed both in pounds
at Arlington has proved that close spac- and in money value under the different
in and between the rows is a matter ef systems of spacing.
paramount importance to basket willow Spacing Yield per acre
growers. The tests on close and wide Inches Ibs.
spacing made by setting the cuttings of 6x18 7,088 @.05 per lb. S6.40
all the varieties propagated at distances 9x20 7,904 @.05 per Ib. 305.90
of 6 inches apart in the row vy iz mnenes 12x36 6,192 .05 per Ib. 30.60
between the rows, 9 by 21 inches, and 12 An experiment relative to shading out
by 36 inches. The form and quality of weeds by close spacing has been satifae-
the rods produced under these different torily demonstrated. On plate where the
systems of spacing show decidedly the stools were set at distances of 8x1 inches
advantage of close planting. Considerable or 9x20 inches apart the weeds were all
pains were taken to arive at a satisfac- thoroughly suppressed after the second
tory solution of this important problem. year. The weeds continued to be ex-
The stock produced on these different ceedingly troublesome after the second
plats was carefully weighed and coin- year on plates where the stools were
pared both before and after peeling and spaced 12x36 inches apart. Uader the in-
drying The American green willow tensive system of managing a holt, the
(Salix amygdalina), so commonly planted grower not only secure a heavier yield
both in Europe and in this country yield- of high-grade rods, as shown In the tables
the following encouraging results: above, but, at the same time, saves eonsfr-
Weight of peeled rods erable labor in keeping the holt lean of
Spacing per square rod weeds. This is a demonstrate fact
Inches lbs which will prove to be of vital tipor-
6x18 44.3 tance to all growers.
9x20 49.4 There are at present four varieties of
12x36 38.7 approved basket willows employed in the
These figures, which represent the tests to determine the proportionate yield
weight of dry peeled rods per square rod for each kind according to close and wide
for different spacing indicate that the, spacing.










4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RKBORD.



WHITE OAK SPIRITS BARRELS

Guaranteed to conform to specifications Savannah and Jacksonville Board of Trade.

Write to Columbus Barrel Mff. Co., Columbus, Ga., or to HENRY ELSON, florida Mgr., Jaksmvie. rfa.


Many other very important considera-
tions were included in these experiments,
such as the effect of low cutting on the
yield and character of the rods and on the
vitality of the stools themselves. A care-
ful study was made of the proportion of
the wood to bark and of the comparative
weight of the peeled and drier rods for
each variety Special investigation was
made with reference to the utilization of
willow bark obtained from peeling the
rods. It has been shown that the bark
of most varieties contains sufficiently
large quantities of tannin to make them
useful to tanners, and it is hoped by
those concerned in making these investi-
gations that this enormous waste may be
turned to economic use whereby growers
may realize additional revenue from the
sale of bark.
The results of these and other experi-
ments will be published by the Forest
Service for the beneft of those interested
Sin basket willow culture. This publication
entitled "Recent Practical Results in
Basket Willow Culture," will be available
soon for free distribution and will be
mailed upon request to the Forester at
Washington.
The experimental holt at Arlington will
be considerably enlarged this year by
planting cutting* obtained from Europe.
Cuttings of a great many tested varieties
of European basket willows have been
bought from European growers in order
to increase the number suitable for culti-
vation in this country.

In the Court of the County Judge
for Duval County, Florida.
In Probate.
In the matter of the Estate of
John 0. Oram, deceased,
In the name of the State of Florida.
Whereas, Katie E. Oram, as Administra-
trix of the Estate of John C. Oram, de-
ceased, has filed in this Court her peti-
tion, praying that she be ordered to take
possession of the real estate described in
said petition, to-wit: Lots (1) One, (t)
Two, (3) Three and (4) Four, in Block
(11) Eleven, according to the map or plan
of Pablo Beach, North. in the County of
Duval and State of Florida, which said
map or plat was duly recorded in the
Clerk's Offlee of Duval County, Florida, in
Book I of Plate, pages 10 and 11, as the
assets of the Estate of said decedent, John
C. Oram; and that all persons in poses-
sion of said tract of land or any part
thereof, holding under said decedent, sur-
render possession of the same to said Ad-
ministratrix, and the Court will order the
sale of said land at private sale to pay
the debts of said Estate.
These are therefore, to ite and admon-
ish Mary B. Orm, of Barre, in the County
of Washington and State of Vermont,
Charles H. Oram, of Brandon, Rutland
County, State of Vermont, Elisabeth T.
Oram, Leaie J. Oram, Katherine M. Omm
and John 0. Oram, Jr., all of the said
town of Brandon, State of Vermont, the
last two being minors, heirs at law of
said decedent John C. Oram, Charles
Peeler, Esquire, as Guardian ad-litem for
said minor heirs at law, and all persona
interested to appear in this Court on the
30th day of May, A. D. 1908, and show
cause if any they have why the prayer
of said petition should not be granted.
Witness my name and seal as County
Judge of the County aforesaid this the
18th day of April, A. D. 190.
(Court Seal.) B. PHILIPS,
4-25-t Cbounty Judge.


Industrial Record's Buyers' Directory
i^1-l C:*-SS1836S115%T55%


ACCOUNTANTS.
T. o. Hutchimon, Jacksonville. FPa.
Walter Mcklow, Jacksonville, Fla.


J. D. Weed & CO, Savannah, Ga.
BArS,.
Comm-erl Bank, Jacksonville, Fi.
DZEE-WHOLESALE.
Chas. Blnm t OC., Jsackmevil, IMk.
.osep Zapt & O., Jacksoarilm ph.
BARREL STAVXL
East Ooast Lmber O., Watutown,
Florid.

OEm= AND CRATES
Cnmmer Lumber Co, Jaeksonvill, Fl.
CjOCnXKT1.
Knirgt okiera y and rmnitm O.
Jacksoville, Fa.
CLOTHING.
tandar Clothing Co., Jacksonvle, Fa.
Stuart-Bernstin o, Jackonvie, 1m.
COP11ER SWE B.
rWis Bethr 4, JadM.amvli, sawaM-

M A. Baer, Brunwiek, GL.
COOPERAG.
lords Cooperage to.,acksovill, Fa.
Atlanti Cooperage Oo., Jackhsville, ha.


Wa. D. Jone Jaeksonve, I.
DmUOS-WHOLESALE
Orea.--Ci-st Drtg O, Jacksonville,

softer DBg Mfg. OL, JaudLmavmi, km
ENGINEg.
eSobsed' Sam Co., J. 8, Maeon, Ga.
Lombard br Werks and Spy OC, An-

FURNITURK.
KdkW Oeckery ad -uiin, o.,
JaskenavIs, Jl.


Beam O Co. Wa. A., Jacksnville, P.

ShoeMrd' Sram CO., J. ., Maeon, Ga.
Lombard Isa Works & Supply C., An-

UWRAL DIRECTORS
The Chas. A. Clrk Jacksonvi, Fk.

GAL
Jacksonvill. (s Os., Jacksonville, Fl
gg10g" FURNISHER&Z
Strt-Bsrd tei Co., Jacksovifle,
GROCERS-WHOLESALE
Williams Co, J. P, Savannash. a
Young Ca, John B., Savannah, Ga.


HATS.
Stuart-Bernstein OI, JackMnville, FIl.
HARDWAREK
Tampa Hardware Ca. T a
Wed & CO. J. 11. BaL -k.
HAY AID GRAIW.
Bours & O0., Win. A., Jadmoenvflle, Fa.
ATS.
Standard Clothin O.. Jacksonville, F
HOOP IBO.
J. D. Weed & Oa. Savmmuh, Ga.
HOTLS,
Duval Hotel, Jacksoanville, FPh.

RON WORKS.
Schodeld Sam Jo, J. a, Mao, Ga


R J. UNs CO., Jeakeeavmfl k
Greenleaf & Crosby O., Jacksonvile, Jm
HMr & Siaer, JackisonvI, Mi
LUMDr
u cOeast Lmber OG. Waerewe,
Florida.

LIQUOR.
Blum a Co., Chas., Jasonvrille, Fla.
Altmayer & Flatau Liquor Oa., Mass,
Ga., sad JaeMonvill, la.
Joseph Zapt & Ca.. Jackorvlle, Fla.
meDIC IES
Spener Medicne Co., cOaaoos, Tams.
MACHINE WORK.
echoed's Sons Co., J. S., MaMon, G.
Lombard Irn WorLks AnMgta, Ga.

MATlRIALS FO luPsaUlams P10-

SOefeld' Sons o, J. S, MasM, Ga.
METAL WOZ RS,.
MoMaRl DiM Ce, Jadme 1, avan-.
ash and Mile.
Baker, A., ABrinewek, 4, end fAe-.


MILL S UffPLIL
Seholea s de Co., J. &a, Maso,
Weed & Co,o J. D, Bavannah, a.
Lombard Iron Wrks B& apply Co, An-
gust, Ga.
NAVAL STOBM.
Penin. ilat Naval Stores O., Jackonville
and 'amps, Fla.
Barnes & Jessmp Oa., Jackmeo e, Ji .
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., JadMom-
ville, Fl.
West-Flynn-Harris Co, Jaeksonvi'e, VPi
Williams Co, J. P., Savannah, Us.
Young Co, John B, Savaman. Oa.
other States Naval Store C., Saraw-
so,. Ga.
PLANING MILL.
Duval Planing Mill Co., Jacksonville, l.
PHOSPHATE MACHEIMNY.
TLmhard Iro Works & Supply Co, An-
gust%, G,


Sehod~es Bons O., J. a. Meas, Ga.

Atlantie Oast I.l

Loimrbd em Wefto & N-l O, An.


Born C O. W A. LA, Jeshome PL
HInI TAIMDS
nmmeLr Lumber Jabmerrf La.

Hutchiumon S 09., JMewwiNaf Jm.
Joe. Rosembelm Sh e O, Baisamh, On.
55Aff 3 0'AW
tiuut-Bsrmnf o, Jckl@oaWe, kIm.

. M. DISe & one, hLta, irM
ASeolrd. funs Ok, J. l, Ma., a
PRestn lfm Oa, COrat mry, him.A


Atl ntie oop 0., JacknviOe, M l J.
Florida opraer OS, *kerl, Im.


Bakw, M. hrsd. Ok G re


U I Yi anr a .Jol





uMer um% r r& .a


JZsAOmvllt IlURewOMEst Co, Jkso -
Au-AftAmir TOOLS.
Conidl Ted O0, JacksMonl, nF.
J. D. Wod & Ok. ann--h, Ga.
wATCIET

Hrm & Sler, JaEUOPle 71a.
a. J. Bles 0o. Jkoinmr, IK.
TELLOW PUI L93.K
Coumar imberf O., Jaskminer, Fl.
aest colot Ir O., Wtrtiown, Fla



WM. D. JONES
rnzsolkTIM ancumuff


FAMILY DRUQGIST
107 K. 1A1 GT.





ZAHN'S EUROPEAN HOTEL

UN=ER KME NANACEXNN?

Aeso me te *us P NW*a. net
A ll mer. te & Day Street.










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5



THE GROOVER-STEWART DW Go0.

FUAV 4e OIT-i1 OVIM 00.

Whal~ Druls. Olhem I Druggllsks #nrlee ad OeI.ay *.-
wmr mru.


The Conservation of Our National Resources

A STORY WITH A MORAL. years, and by and by these children began
The conservation of our natural re- to grow up. Then the point of view of
sources is a subject which ha received the man and hi wife han Tey want-
little attention in the past; but the facts ed to see their soa and daughters provid-
n the cae ae ipe, the p ed for and settled a this property of
Seleetary, and our duty so dear theirs, and they bea to see that what
that they might be fitly presented in a was enough and to spare for them would
story like one of the old fairy tale that not support all their children in the same
we all loved when we were bo and gir. comfort unless they themselves used it
Such a story would r e lia gthi rls, with better foresight. Through thinking
e stor tiue therlie this: of their children they were led to live
Oe upon a time there was young more in the future
man who had been given a great property more in the future
in wa dsthat region and who left home to They looked forward and said to them-
in a distant region and who left home to
take possession of it. When he reached 'elves: "Not only must meet our own
his property he first made himself ae- ned fromth property but we mus
quinted with it. As he explored it and see to it that our children come in for
studied its value he began to think how their fair share of it; so tht after a
he would make his ling out of it. The while the happiness we have had here may
p lem was not a hard one. He found be carried on to them." So the family
established itself. The man became re-
that his property was wonderfully rich, tblhe ielf.Te an me
and supplied his needs at the cost of speed, and his children grew up healthy
far lees exertion than he would have had and happy around him; ad when in the
to make at home, for it was a fair fullness of time he passed away his chil-
ell watered, well tbered, abounding dren took the place in which he had stood,
well watered, well timbered, abounding f e
in game and fruits, with broad meadows because of his foresight and care they en-
for cattle and horses and sheep ad with joyed the same kind of prosperity he had
for cattle and horses and sheep, and with
ao small store of rare and curious nier- enjoyed.
a m and an outcrop ofn excellent a It is a perfectly simple story; we all
ale and an outcrop of excellent eoal.
of us can name scores of men who have
Life was easy, and he lived lavishly and of us an name Tores of men who have
poyously, after the initial hard work of done this thing. The men ad the omen
ovin in and building hi ho and who do it are not famous, are not regard-
moving in and building his house and
raising his first crop was over. He had ed as remarkable in any way; they are
far more land than he could use, far more simply good, everyday, average citizens,
game, and what he lacked he was able to who are carrying out the duties of the
buy from home with furs, with timber, avrae citizen.
fifth minerals, and with the surplus of his t e H e Wth O t
crop. rce.
By and by he saw and liked a girl Once upon a time there was a young na-
an finally married he. Together they tion which left its home and moved on to
pspered on the property, which seemed a new continent. As soon as the people
too rich to nake it nessry for them who formed the first settlement began to
too rich to make it necessary for them
examine the value and condition of this
to trouble about the future. Game was e ne the value nd edition of th
still plenty, though less so than at first; new continent, they found it marvelously
Timber, tho growing les, was still rich in every possible resource. The for-
the timber, though growing less, was still st w vast tht th ly d I
abundant enough to last longer than they eats were ) vast that, in the early days,
could hope to live; by breaking new land they were not a bless, but hindrance.
they could always count on marvelous The soil was so rich and there was so
crope; the coal was a little harder to get much of it that they were able at first
at, but still close to the surface, and be- only to cultivate the edges of their great
side the man only dg out the easiest to property. It was quite plain to these
rech, and when the earth began to cavpeople in the early times that, however
in he merely started again at a new place. much land they might cover, however
His stock, grasag on the meadows, had much they might waste, there was always
trampled out some of the grass, but there going to be plenty left. As time went
tmeo smot gautron they discovered greater and greater
was still no lack. That some day strang- on the de d r g tr
Should possess their property whan resources. They found wonderfully rich
as would possess their property whan
they had done with it, and would find it deposits of metallic ore; ret oil and gas
somewhat run down, did not trouble thee fields and vast stretches of the richest
two good people at all. bituminous and anthracite coal lands; no-
But children came to them with the (Continued on page 7.)




T DUVAL Jacksonville,
THE DUVAL 'florida.

Thip Hotel has recently changed hands, and is under New Management
Throughly Renovated Throughout

Headquarters for Turpentine Operators


F. BAITOW STUBBS,

Pfr0i ks .


1. D. CRAWFORD.

Maraer.


JACKSONVILLE AND SAVANNAH

COMPARATIVE NAVAL STORES' MARKET

For week ending May 22.1908.
[With Last Yeas Prices for Refaers .]


ROSIN.


Grade.
WW ...
WG ....

M
N ......
M .....

K .....
H .....










M ...5.1
K .. 5
I ... 4
H ... 3
G ... 3
F ... 3
E ... 3
D ...2.9
CBA 12.7


Grade.l
WW .6.:
WG ..(
N ...5.1
M ....15.
K ..... 5.1
I .... 4.1
E ... 3.
G .... 13A
F ... 3.2
E ....3.1
D .... 2.
CBA ..12




Jax.
42


Jax.
42


6.01
5.95-
5.8
.5.61
.. .4
.4.2
.70-
3.,3
3.2(
3.1
.05-.
2.80-

1908.

00-6.056
10-6.05
0-6.00
00-5.75
.45-70
.20-70
1.75-80
.25-30
.20-25
.10-20
5-3.06
5-3.00


SATURDAY.


1907.


Jax. Sav.jJax.
0-15 6.15-205.70
6.05 6.10-155.60
0-85 6.00 5.45
5-75 5.90 5.30
)-70 5.75 5.25
0-70 4.80 4.90
3.80 3.85-904.85
5-30 3.30-354.771
-25 3.25-304.70
0-15 3.20 4.65
3.10 3.00 4.46
3.00 2.80 4.25

MONDAY.

Say. IJax.
6.10-35 5.75
6.06 5.65
5.90-6.005.60
5.90 5.45
5.75 5.40
4.75 5.15
3.85 4.85
3.30-40 4.80
3.25-40 4.70
3.15-30 4.65
3.00-05 4.45
2.80-85 4.25

TUESDAY.

sav. |Jax.
6.15 15.75
6.10 5.65
6.00 5.60
5.90 5.45-50
5.75 5.40
4.75 5.15
3.80 4.85-871
3.30-35 4.80-821
3.25 14.75 !
3.10 4.60-65
2.95 445
2.80 4.25-30 4


107.
Sav.
5.80
5.75
5.70
5.50
5.45
5.20
4.90
4.85
4.75
4.70
4.50-55
4.30-40

P.7-
Say.
5.80
5.70
5.65
5.50
5.45
5.20
4.921
1.871
4.80
4.75
1.50
1.30-40


WEDNESDAY.
1908.
Grade.J Jax. Sav. Jax.
WW ..16.10 6.10-305.75
WG ...6.00-05 6.10 5.65
N ... 5.90 6.065 .00
M ....15.821-86 5.90 5610
K ....15.70-80 5.75 SAO
I .... 4.75-80 4.80 5.15
H .....13.75-80 3.75-804.871
G ..... 3.27i-20 325-304.821
F .... .15-25 3.20-25 4.7
E .... 3.10-121 3.10 405
D ..... 2.5-3.00 2.90-3.004.45
CBA .2.75 2.75-804.25

THURSDAY.
1908.
Grade.[ Jax. Say. jJax.
WW .6.10 6.10-16 5.75
WG .. 6.00 6.10 5.70
N .....15.90 605 5.66
M .....85 5.90 5.55
K ... 5.80 5.75 5.50
I .....4.80 4.75 5.15
H ...... 3.7 3.75-80490
G .... 3.20 3.25-354.85
F .... 3.15 3.20 4.77
E .... 3.10 3.10 4.70
D.....2.95 2.95 4.50
CBA .2.75 240 4.25


190o.
Grade.I JaA.
WW .. 6.00-6.10
WG .... 5.90-6.00
N .... 5.80-65.90
M .... 5.70-85
K. ....5.70-80
I .... 4.20-80
H .... 3.75-80
G ... 3.20-25
F ...13.15-171
E ...3.10-121
D ... 3.00
CBA 12.75-3.00


Spirits Turpentine.
Saturday. Monday.
1908 1 1907 1908os 1907 (|
Say Jax. S0v.ax. Sv.IJax. Svlax.


1908 1907 1908
Sav.jJax. Say. IJax. Sav. Jax. Sav.||Jax.
421/4-%160 60y1142 42-%160 %1142


FRIDAY.

Say. |Jax.
6.15-205.75
6.10 5.70
&06 5.66
5.95 5.55
5.70 5.50
4.70 5.15
.70-754.90
3.20-2714.85
3.15-20 4.771
3.05-10 4.70
2.90-3.004.75
2.70-75 4.25


190o7.
Say.
!Srv.
6.80-85
5.70
6.566
5.55
5.45
6.0
4.8
4.871-90
4.80
4.721-75
4.50-65
4.3-45


1907.
Say.
5.80-85
.70-75
5.70
6.55
6.46-60
5.20
4.95
4.90
4.80-821
4.72J-75
4.521-55
4.30-40

xoo7.
Sayv.
5.85
5.75-80
5.70-74
5.60
5.55
5.20
4M
4.90
4.
4.831
4.75
4.75
4.30-35


Tuesday.
1908 1907
Sav.Jax. Sav
42-48y46o0 00%14

Friday.
19068 1907
Sav.|Jax. Sav
4214-%160 60%


NAVAL STORES RECEIPTS AND SHIPMENTS UERE AND

IN SAVANNAH.
rer week eaOlN May 22. O0.


ROSIN.
I Receipts.
Jlax. Sav. .lax.
Saturday ......... 876 3087 763
Monday ......... 3257 2183 877
Tuesday ......... 1072 47322920
Wednesday ...... 1118 2758 740
Thursday ........ 1356 36201444
Friday ........... 11300 3306 877


SPIRITS TURPENTINE.
Saturday ........... 300
Monday ......... 1054
Tuesday ......... 313
Wednesday ...... 412
Thursday ......... 468
Friday ............ 439


1025 94

1770 365
10591 416
15:41 433
1164 285


Sales. I Shipments. Stock.
Sav. Jax. Sav.Jax. Sav.
2738 2353 62837842 70646
19823500 963616 63493
3135 .... 22035922 60020
24761752 13036994 68648
25562300 1-24213630 71026
3264 8000 359135416 73973


1141 79
489 -
1207 -
809 345
1521 -
170


41 25906
3367 25677
1448 26731
195 27044
565 27111
77227579


34630
32108
32490
33354
34323
34715


I










6 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


INDUSTR AL IECORDl his life will soon appear in these col-
JAMS A. BHOMILOON. Editr-la-Chl I umns.) The Florida Audubon Society
A. 1. MARSEL .mme Mrar has been quietly doing its work for the
R T. ARNOLDM Adrwel "Ie r Ilast eight years, its headquarters being at
Pushlshed Ev w in e Aurt Maitland, Fla. From this little town
imr.non ~ r A"am thousands of leaflets telling of the habits
*Ttg e ru and l I du sJ.n and uses of birds, are constantly being
Al 11mu ,11es ins M bea ese sent to other towns and cities over the
The ldstatrii cord Coaapnty, State. Its officers and members are ever
Jacksonyil. Fla. on the watch to prevent unlawful killing
E tease of birds, either song, game, or plume.
savauarna-h. Ga. Notices containing at. epitome of the
assure at the Pastoi e at JakeonUville. Fla.. Florida laws have been pasted, particu-
n secomono as matter larly in places where destruction is com-
Adt tMby thUs Ez' uvi O ammitte of mon. Cards of laws, suitable for putting
lt T aipe ti Opsatms' Ahd fati" in hotel corridors have been, through the
W11 11I8, as it albasi o*- kindness of the managers of these hotels,
S 11 s & aJI o tinf gum- placed where tourists may read what
a'64t- game may and how many they may
Adpte A fril S1th, 19, as the oeWal shoot, so that violations may not occur
4d a tLhe etos to C QGrower As- through ignorance. But the branch of
=_ Adoptd lin i^ er 11, 19--.M a
thinly sl -mha -- do T. O S A. work nearest to the heart of the society
oe--m-Md to lumbew pspl by special is itE school work and no effort has been
eesolutioe adopted by the GeargS Sawmill spared to present to the children of tile
A-sati State in an attractive way, the immense
TM 1 OFCQ Q ICZ L value of bird life-their help to the farm-
T Lhe piat and the mai of- er and fruit grower, and the harm that
so" the iD treY sod COmrpaF follows bird destruction. To still further
are Imsted t thko it1set a of Iay d this interest, children are asked to be-
mwhmut of the ~t trpSmtim, d come pledged members of the society. No
J ,i w inag @ln t fee is asked, but they pledge to protect
The agavamsh, Ga. uSe- s i the Boud the birds and sign a card to that effect.
T TMi Bmlidin. asWM i' th*e le- The pledge buttons cost 10 cents-that is
M lr Y m, mttes h worm. all the society asks from the children.
OTECE TO PATRO&. The buttons are attractive and the chil-
Al y to *a *rait i t* e 'dren are proud to wear them. We con-
must~h~eIF aI j < tL S -T o asider the teachers of the State our most
Je riSs. A-tose an et awea to powerful allies; therefore no fee is asked
rmake MUstie as r atM ekrt-tirfla from any one engaged in educational
lf for Stiw ig =A -ri ~ -n a"! work. The signatures on cards to show
t1 .it te h me 11% 4- 4 they are in sympathy is all that is requi-
to thi em aw. site. All help in the way of educational
A' td IN* Pt-111lg CM. leaflets, charts, bird magazines, is fur-
nished those teachers who interest their
Roea to Atlantic Beach. pupils in bird life. There are many teach-
Announce meant was made this week by ers who help to interest the boys and
girls in the birds they see darting hither
County gineer Barnard that there was and thither through the trees, and whose
a (oree of seventy-five workmen now bus- sweet songs often fill the school room
ily engaged constructing the new road with melody, and have imparted to the
from South Jacksonville to Atlantic-Pablo children a love for the birds and a desire
Beach. Groups of this force of workmen to save rather than kill. It is through
the children we hope much for the future.
are busy at various points along the route. We feel sure the boys and girls of today
Some are filling low places in order to will grow up to apply the knowledge
bring the grade up to the desired stand- gained in school, and will fight for better
ard, others are handling the teams, while laws and for the enforcement of them.
Sa At present the obstacles in bird preserva-
sone are engaged in grading and con-
tion seem almost unsurmountable, but we
trusting crossings of branches, keep on with the hope that as the knowl-
The country through which the road will edge of birds as benefactors to man be-
pass is such as to cause difficulty in ef- comes more general, the destruction for
fesini grades and other nrenaratorv work. sport may become distasteful.


Laborers are being paid $1.25 per day, and
the foremen $1.50 and $2.
The road will be hard surfaced, and it
is promised that when completed it will
be one of the best public highways in the
State. The road connects Jacksonville
with the magnificent hard sand beach
skirting the Atlantic ocean, and affords
many advantages to the automobilist and
vehicle drivers.

The Florida Adlubon Society.
For the benefit of those readers who do
not know what the Florida Audubon So-
ciety is ever doing, a little talk about its
work may be of some interest to the
bird lovers of the State. Ali societies in-
terested in and working for the preserva-
tion of bird life are called Audubon so-
cieties, in honor of the great ornitholo-
gist of that name. (A short sketch of


NEW STEAMSHIP LINE.
Theo. G. Eger Heads New Line to Be
Established from New York to
Jacksonville.
Jacksonville is to have another steam-
ship line direct to New York, and Mr.
Theodore G. Eger is to be at the head
of the new company.
This announcement will give general
satisfaction to the people, for Mr. Edger
is well known to a large number of Flor-
idians and he has their confidence and
esteem. The announcement that he is to
be at the head of the new enterprise will
win for it hundreds of friends and pat-
rons.
For some little time it has been known
that negotiations were on foot with the
object in view of establishing a direct
steamship line between this port and New
York. The first public announcement,


Journal of Commerce of Tuesday, May
19, and was as follows:
"From statements made in usually wel
informed quarters, it appears that a new
steamship company is in the process of
formation to carry on a passenger and
freight service between New York and
various Southern ports. John W. Gates
and other capitalists of prominence are
said to be behind the venture. The new
company which, it is reported is to have
for its head Theodore G. Eger, former
general manager and vice president of
the Clyde Steamship Company, has been
so far advanced in its organization as to
have acquired several piers in the North
river and to have let the contracts ror
the construction of a number of its ves-
sels.
"According to a story told on Saturday,
the piers secured by the company are the
old piers No. 27 and No. 28 in the North
river, which are to be converted into a
single great pier fully seventy feet in
width.
"Those who claim to be familiar with
the facts in the case state that it is noe
intention of the company to have an
equipment of six modern vessels, three of
which will be operated direct to New Or-
leans, weekly, and the others semi-
weekly to Charleston, S. C., and Jackson-
ville, Fla. Mr. Eger, who is to be the
president of the company, is at present in
Europe, where he is said to be engaged in
perfecting further details in connection
with the organization of the company.
"According to the congressional stat-
utes, the six vessels will have to be built
in this country, to carry on a coastwise
service, and it is suggested that it will
probably be the better part of a year be-
fore they are completed and ready for op-
eration.
"Arrangements which have been per-
fected by the new company, it is reported,
also include the establishment of connec-
tions with practically all of the conti-
nental railroads, with the exception of
the Southern Pacific railroad.
"With the exception that the Clyde
Line, which has been dominated by Chas.
W. Morse financially, does not operate its
boats to New Orleans, the other points
reached by its service are practically iden-
tical with those that the new line will
serve. The Clyde company also operates
a direct water route line betwew- "'w
York city and Boston, and the main
points in the South to which its vessels
are operated include both Charleston, S.
(C, and Jacksonville, Fla., so that the two
companies will be brought into direct
competition."


(Continued from 1st page.)

not up to the standard, but here he seems
to overlook the fact rather willingly, that
Mr. Shotter has been condemned twice al-
ready on account of trespassing the laws
of this country-ten years ago, when he
was heavily fined on account of having
marked false gauges of turpentine on tank
ears. and only a year ago. because he and
some of the other leading men in the pres-
ent American Naval Stores companyny had
grossly disregarded the Sherman Anti-
Trust Law, for which offense the then ex-
isting combine was dissolved, un bigger
fines than before were imposed on Mr.
Shotter and his immediate associates.
Still the American Naval Stores Company
is considered the biggest firm dealing in
naval stores and all let them rule the mar-


however, was contained in the New York ket by the manipulations which have unit-


THE CLOTHIERS

14 ad II Wed IIIy S. jMk Pem Fi.


SO LEAENTS FOR

KOM ATS,
rUiLNEM
rmsmc
WA1T, 1C.NAW-



WE
AIM
TO



QUAUTY.
IS

OUR
SPECIALTY


THE STUART-BERSTEIN CO.

ed the market for so long time with Mr.
Shotter.
The consumers may continue their deal-
ings with the American, perhaps owing to
a certain negligence which prevets them
from divulging the true facts concerning
the American Naval Store wmpany, but
the producers and fators together should
find means to get rid of the iron ist upon
them. Not only are they the most inter-
ested in a definite defeat of the Ameri-
can, but, we might say, they themselves
must accept a part of the blame for the
condition of things, which would not be
what they are, had the producing end
opposed the American more vigorously
ever since they found themselves oppress-
ed. But if the producing end of the indus-
try continues to believe the American in-
vincible and bows down to them in silent
anger, conditions will not change, unless
perhaps, the government big stick shall do
for them what should have been done be-
fore by those most interested.
We understand, that it is a very seri-
ous undertaking to disregard the Ameri-
can Naval Stores Company as a factor in
the trade. A single man can hardly suc-
ceed, but with united efforts of every
man, who has the welfare of the industry
at heart, much, in fact, everything can be
accomplished. Let factors and producers
pull on one string only, let them not sell
their products to the American unless they
pay such prices, which will allow produc-
tion at least on a paying basis and the re-
sult will be attained. It will need
money and more money, but the united ef-
forts will be strong and powerful and if
every man does his duty, reduces expenses
of production to a minimum in order to
avoid any unnecessary expenses, and joins
the general uprising against the tyranny
of the American, success will finally come.


k










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. M



Have You a Jewelery Store in Your Home?

It's hardly possible, though if you have one of our splendidly illustrated catalogues you are just as
well fixed. The catalogue is free and gives you illustrations and prices of hundreds of rich designs ii' '"


Diamonds, Rings, Brooches, Silverware, Watches and other JewelIry v

Write us today and we will be glad to send you this art catalogue. Tell us what you want and we will quote you Special prices.

R J. J. Un COhOPANY ia W. BAY STREET JACCI ONVILLE. F'LA. .
meeeuemseesssaususuussssu


(Continued from 5th page.)


ble rivers flowing through broad expanses
of meadows; rich alluvial prairies; great
plains covered with countless herds of
buffalo and antelope; mountains filled
with minerals; and everywhere oppor-
tunities richer than any nation had ever
found elsewhere before.
They entered into this vast pomession
and began to use it. They did not neen
to think much about how they used their
coal, or oil, or timber, or water-they
would last-and they began to encroach
on the supply with freedom and in con-
tdense that there would always be plenty.
'Te only word with which they described
what they had, when they talked about it,
was the word "inexhaustible."
Let us see for a moment what the course
of development of this young nation was.
First of all they needed men and women
to settle on the land and bring up chil-
dren and have a stake in the country.
That was absolutely necessary before
they could develop the great nation which
some of them saw ahead. As the popula-
tion spread there arose a need that great
systems of transportation should be built
to knit the country together and provide
for the interhange of its products. These
rairads called for Iron, coal, and timber
ia great quantities. Then began an un-
preedented demand upon the forests
They could not build those transconti-
nental railroad lines without millions upon
millions of ties cut from the forests of the
country; and they could not mine the iron
and coal except as the forests gave them
the mans of timbering theih mines, trans.
porting the ore, and disposing of the fn-
Sished product. The whole civilization
which they built up was conditioned on


nothing like our wealth, nothing like the
average happiness of our people can be
found elsewhere; and the fundamental
reason for this is, on the one mue, cne
vast natural resources which we nad at
hand, and on the other side the character,
ability, and power of our people.
Now what have we done with these re-
sources which have made us great, and
what is the present condition in which
this marvelously vigorous nation of ours
finds itself? The keynote of our times is
"development." Every man from New
ork to San Francisco looks to the devel-
opment of the natural resources to pro-
duce the advantages and the opportuni-
ties he wants for his neighbors and his
friends. Anyone who questions the wis-
dom of any of the methods we are using
in bringing that development to pass, be-
cause he believes we are making mistakes
that will be expensive later on, is in dan-
ger of being considered an enemy to pros-
perity. He is in danger of having it
thought of him that he does not take
pride in our great achievements, that he
is not a very good American. But in
reality it is no sign that a man lacks
pride in the United States and the wonder-
ful things our people have done in devel-
oping this great country because he wants
to see the development go on indefinitely.
On the contrary, real patriotism and pride
in our country make it the first of all
duties to see that our nation shall con-
tinue to prosper. In sober truth, we
have brought ourselves into a condition in
which the vehy serious diminution of
some of our most necessary resources is
upon us.
What We Face.
Forest reseurces.-A third of the land
surface this countr 1 i ill1


iron, coal, and timber. As they developed u v uo VILI ** J -
their continent, iecher than any other, ered with what were, all in all, the most
from the east coast to the west, new re- magnificent forests of the globe-a million


sources became revealed to them, new in-
terests took possession of them, and they
used the old resources in new ways. In
East, the rivers meant to them only
means of transportation; in the West they
began to see that the river meant first of
all crops; that they must put the rivers
on the land by irrigation before they could
grow wheat, alfalfa, fruits, sugar beets,
and other crops that make the West rich.
They found that to feed the Vast popula-
tion which had grown up in the East they
must have the vast ranges of the West to
grow mest. They found that the resources
of soil and water which produced the
wheat, the cotton, and the meat-of iron
aad coal, and of timber, together made
up the working capital of a great nation,
and that the nation could not grow unless
it had all of these things. In taking po-
session of them our nation used them with


square miles of timberland. In the short
time, as time counts in the life of nations,
we have been here we have all but reached
the end of these forests. We thought it
unimportant until lately that we have
been destroying by fire as much timber as
we have used. But we have now reached
the point where the growth of our for-
ests is but one-third of the annual cut,
while we have in store timber enough for
only twenty or thirty years at our present
rate of use. This wonderful development,
which would have been impossible without
the cutting of the forests, has brought us
where we really face their exhaustion
within the present generation. And we
use five or six times as much timber per
capital as the European nations. A tim-
ber famine will touch every man, woman
and child in all the land; it will affect
the daily life of every one of us; and


greater effectiveness, greater energy and yet without consideration, without fore-
enterprise, than any other nation had ever cast, and without foresight, we have
shown before. Nothing like our growth, placed ourselves, not deliberately but


|O*****S**O|****** III*i |II m I$ | 0 I n0 I m n ,':

. JOS. ROSENHEIM SHOE CO.
- MA N lVrArpV1A ltVU-L AND JOi C O "
-f

'SHOES


SAVANNAH. GEORlGIA-
"B er SheM Mae f Cwminakry TrMela'
.....48 9


WANTED
AND

FOR SALE
Bats for thi colneh i S emit pec wed
for Arm inaertio ad 1 t per wart Ser
following isrtsem. no advrtiasem n
taken for iess than 40 ed musnt, mnd
tO emat for following iaMrtls. anh
must company orders nLe.e yn )n
an account with ua

WANTED-Position by competent Dis-
tiller; an furnish good reference. Ap-
ply to Box No. 21, Devon, Fla. 5-16-4t

WANTED-A turpentine place or loca-
tion. Parties answering furnish schedule,
price and where located. W. B. Young,
MeHenry, Miss. 5-2-08
Record. a

WANTED.-Good, reliable stiller wants
position. Ca furnish best references,
Address P. W. dride, Westville, Fla.
611-t

FOR SALB-Small turpentine plaee for
cash. Price sSA,0M. Good btcain. Ad-
dress Opeator, a IdtrW Record. tf

WANTED-Aln asmmmamrls o elma up
their bars of al kinds of aeed aaek aad
burlaps. We buy everything l the way
of seeks. Write a. Amerianl Fibre 0.,
Jacksonville. FI,

SALTBAIM -You receive $1000 cash
daily selling mehants our P00 Auto-
matic Soda Foutain. Grant IMIf. B,
Pittsburg, Pa. --t


Walter Mucklow,

CERTIIED PUBLIC ACCOT
Rams, 4 -44 MaNtal L Uft Eg

Jg a egF
Jlctarrrrnj Ptr


OUGHT SAW MILLS.

Lit Ml qSNL IKMm


Saws and Suppli


Steam and Gasine





Try


LOMB AR D:

AUGUSTA, OA.

Phosplate sibluueiy

CaUng aMI Dryers




WHISKIES

GINS AND RUMS


$1.50to$5.00 per Gallon

...... AGENCY FM......

Lewis 166 mai MIent VnMs
Pure Rye Whiies.
Controller Blamn Mnamr aad ayIam
Rye-Agate for Ja it (ia|H ..
Pabst Milwaukee ar ?r .
platioa.

CHAS. BLUM A C0.
5I1 and Sn WEST AY STBET
JACSSOMIIVIL. MA.











8 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


thoughtlesly, in a position whore a itm-
her famine is one of the inevitable events
of our near future.
Canada can not supply us, for sue wil
seed her timber herself. Siberia can not
' pply us, for the timber is too far from
water transportation. South America
a net supply us, because the timbers of
that vast continent are of a different
character from those we use and ill
adapted to our need. We must suffer be-
euse we have carelessly wasted the for-
et, this great fundamental condition of
seeses. It is impossible to repair the
damage in time to escape suffering, al-
though not too late to work hard to re-
duce it as much as we can.
Mineral, aei ,a natural gas.-But
forests only begin the story of our im-
paired capital Our anthracite coals are
ail to be in danger of exhaustion in fifty
years. and our bituminous coals in the
beginaltg of the next century; some of
our older oil Selds are already exanusz-
ed; the natural gas has been wasted, burn-
ing n~ht end day in many towns until
the supply has failed. Our iron aeposets
grew tes each year. Our rages in the
West, from which we first drove the buffa-
lo to cover them again with cattle and
shbp, are capable of supporting but one-
half what they could under intelligent
managemat, and the price of beef it
raised assordingly. Nearly every one of
our wonderful resources we have used
without reasonable foresight or reasonable
are, and as each becomes exhausted a
heavier burden of hardship will be laid
upon us as a people.
Now what is our remedy? The remedy
is the perfectly simple one of common
sense applied to national affairs as com-
man snsen is applied to personal affairs.
This i o abtruse or difficult question.
We have hitherto as a nation taken the
Ss e enorse as did at frst tph young man
who eams into possession of his new prop-
tty. It is time for a ebange.
It is tru that some natural resources
raVw t$haelves while others do not. Our
iuinm) resources e gone are gone for-
eer. It Xay appear, therefore, at first
tbhgt that eomervation does not apply
to them shes they can be used only once.
But this Is for from being me tact.
Methods of coal mining, for instance, have
beew permitted in this country which take
out a the average but half of the coal.
Then in a short tim the roof sinks in on
Athe other half, which thereafter can never
bl mined. Oil and natural gas also have
been a are being exploited with great
steo sad a though there never could be
sa ud to them. The forests we can re-
plies at get east and with an interval
of mdering.
11s Wute.-Th soil which is wasted
from the surface o our farms every year
to the amount of a billion tons, making,
with the future loss of fertilizing elements
arrived away in solution, the heaviest tax
the farmer has to pay, may in the course
of entries be replaced by the chemical
disinteration of the rock; but it is de-
eidedly wiser to keep what we have by
carefl methods of cultivation. We may
very proitably stop putting our farms
into streams, to be dug out at great ex-
pese through river and harbor appropri-
ations. Fertile soil is not wanted in the
bed of a stream, and it is wanted on the
Surface of the farms and the forest-cov-
ered slopes of the mountains. Yet we
spend millions upon millions of dollars
every year removing from our rivers what
ought never to have got into them.


Waste Through Piecemeal Planning.
Besides exhausting the unrenewable and
impairing the renewable resources, we
have left unused vast resources which are
capable of adding enormously to the
wealth of the country. Our streams have
been used in the West mainly for irriga-
tion and in the East mainly for naviga-
tion. It has not occurred to us that a
stream is valuable, not merely for one,
but for a considerable number of uses;
that these uses are not mutually exclu-
sive, and that to obtain the full benefit of
what the stream can do for us we should
plan to develop all its uses together. For
example, when the National Government
builds dams for navigation on streams, it
has often disregarded the possible use,
for power, of the water that flows over
those dams. Engineers say that many
hundred thousand horsepower are going
to waste over govern dams in this
way. Since a fair price for power, where
it is in demand, is from $20 to $80 per
horsepower annually, it will be seen that
the government has here, developed, yet
lying idle, a resource capable, under the
right conditions, of adding enormously to
the national wealth. So also in develop-
ing the western streams for irrigation, in
many places irrigation and power might
be made to go hand in hand.
Danger of Monopoly.
If the public does not see to it that
the control of water power is kept in
the hands of the public, we are certain in
the near future to find ourselves in the
grip of those who will be able to control,
with a monopoly absolutely without par-
allel in the past, the raily life of our
people. Let us suppose a man in a west-
ern town, in a region without coal, rising
on a cold morning, a few years hence,
when invention and enterprise have
brought to pass the things which we can
already foresee as coming in the applica-
tion of electricity. He turns on the elec-
tric light made from water power; his
breakfast is cooked on an electric stove
heated by the power of the streams; hi
morning newspaper is printed on a press
moved by electricity from the streams; he
goes to his office in a trolley car moved
by electricity from the same source. The
desk upon which he writes his letters, the
merchandise which he sells, the crops
which he raises, will have been brought
to him or will be taken to market from
him in a freight ear moved by electricity.
His wife will run her sewing machine or
her churn, and factories will turn their
shafts and wheels, by the same power.
In every activity of his life that man and
his family and his neighbors will have to
pay toll to those who have been able to
monopolize the great motive power of
electricity made from water power, if
that monopoly is allowed to become estab-
lished. Never before in the history of
this or any other free country has there
existed the possibility of such intimate
daily friction between a monopoly sno
the life of the average citizen.
It has not yet occurred to many of our
people that this great power should be
conserved for the use of'the public. We
have regarded it as a thing to ne given
away to any man who would take it. We
have carried over our point of view derived
from the early conditions when it was a
Godsend to have a man come into the
country to develop power and we are will-
ing to give him anything to induce him to
come. We have carried over that point of
view into a time when the dread of a
monopoly of this kind ought to be in the


mind of the average man everywhere, since we are still young." In truth we are
That is an instance of a resource neglect- at a critical point in that history. As
ed from the point of view of the public. President Roosevelt has said, we are at
A New Point of View. the turning of the ways. We may pass
But this is a time to consider not one on along the line we have been following,
resource but all resources together. Al- exhaust our natural resources, continue
ready here and there small associations to let the future take care of itself; or we
of citizens have become possessed of cer- mal de the simple, obvious, common-
tain facts, and have begun to work at sense thing in the interest of the nation,
one gr eatproblem. We have a drainage just as each of us does in his own per-
association, whose object is to make hab- sonal affairs.
table millions upon millions of acres, now On the way in which we decide to


lying waste in swamps all over the coun-
try, but capable of supporting in comfort
millions of people. We have forestry as-
sociations, waterway associations, irriga-
tion associations, associations of many
kinds touching this problem of conserva-
tion at different points, each endeavoring
to benefit the common weal along its own
line, but each interested only in its own
particular piece of the work and unaware
that it is attacking the outside, not the
heart of the problem. Now a greater
thing is opening out in the sight of the
people. This problem of the conserva-
tion of natural resources is a single ques-
tion. Each of these various bodies that
have been working at different phases of
it must come together on conservation
as a common platform. Bu the joining of
these units we shall have a mass of intel-
ligent, interested, public-spirited citizens
anxious to adopt a new point of view
about this country of ours.
That is the crux of the whole matter-
a new point of view about our country.
We have been so busy getting rich, devel-
oping and growing, so proud of our growth
that we have let things go on until some
intolerable abuse has driven us to imme-
diate action. It is time that we put an
end to this kind of opportunism, of mere
drifting. We must take the point of view
taken by the average prudent business
man, or man in any walk of life who has
property and is interested in it. What
the average man does in his own affairs is
to foresee trouble and avoid it if he can.
What this nation of ours is doing in this
fundamental matter of natural resources
is to run right into trouble head down
and eyes shut, and so make that trouble
inevitable before taking any step to pre-
vent it. But it should not take long to
reach the stage of national thought where
we shall deliberately plan to avoid the
difficulties which can be foreseen, if only
we can bring together all who have al-
ready begun to concern themselves with
one or another aspect of the conservation
problem.
The Problem Before Us.
This nation has, on the continent of
North America, three and a half million
square miles. What shall we do with it?
How can we make ourselves and our chil-
dren happiest, most vigorous and efficient,
and our civilization the highest ana
most influential, as we use that splendid
heritage? Ought not the nation to under-
take to answer that question in the spirit
of wisdom, prudence, and foresight ? There
is reason to think we are on the verge of
doing this very thing. We are on the
verge of saying to ourselves: "Let us do
the best we can with our natural re-
sources; let us find out what we have,
how they can best be used, how then can
best be conserved. Above all, let us have
clearly in mind that the great and funda-
mental fact that this nation will not end
in the year 1960, or a hundred years after
that, or five hundred years after than;
that we are just beginning a national his-
tory the end of which we can not see,


handle this great possession which has
been given us, on the turning which we
take now, hangs the welfare of those who
are to come after us. Whatever sueees
we may have in any other line of national
endeavor, whether we regulate truts prop-
erly, whether we control our great public


JOSEPH ZAPF CO


Wlbolesale Dealers o a t B r cf

ANHLUSEIL-BUSCH

St. Louis Lager Boor



ILlqWrai, NM Ei Wdlis
Writo for IPio



Cook Ifnot.
WrIH Why not








Cypress Tanks


er AU PMrpOS
BEST MADE
wroi Mr 1caleftna


Preston Miller Co.

Dept. B Crsesuut City, Fi






|CHAS. A. CMilk In.

hone l6. JaehAgvleI* %a.





Duval Planing Mill Co.
Seventh asd m lesaMe. Js MtmI Hs
Builders aun CerMtzset Wi Df WeO te
Have Us "ii e TMir Week


Phone 1740g








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

Capital $204000

HUTCHINSON SHOE COMPANY
VICTOR SHOES AND HATS
Wholesale O O -0 Jacksonville, Fla
Y--


service corporations as we should, whether
capital and labor adjust their relations
in the best manner or not-whatever we
may do with all these and other such
questions, behind and below them all is
this fundamental problem, Are we going
to protect our springs of prosperity, our
sources of well-being, our raw material
of industry and commerce, and employer
of capital and labor combined; or are we
going to dissipate them? According as
we accept or ignore our responsibility as
trustees of the nation's welfare, our chil-
dren and our children's children for un-
counted generations will call us blessed,
or will lay their sufferings at our doors.
We shall decide whether their lives, on
the average, are to be lived in a flourish-
ing country, full of all that helps to make
men comfortable, happy, strong, and ef-
fective, or whether their lives are to be
liven in a country like the miserable out-
worn regions of the earth which other na-
tions before us have posseessed without
foresight and turned into hopeless deserts.
We are no more exempt from the opera-
tion of natural laws than are the people
of any other part of the world. When
the facts are squarely before us, when the
magnitude of the interests at stage is
clearly before our people it will surely be
decided aright.
GUiord Piuehat,
Forester U. 8. Dept. Agriculture.

ANNUAL ME TING STOCKHOLDERS,

JACKSONVILLE DEVELOPMENT
COMPANY.
Notlce is hereby given that the Annual
Meeting of the Stockholders of the Jack-
sonville Development Company will be
held on the fourth Monday in May, (May
25th), at 8:00 P. M., in the Auditorium of
the Board of Trade, Jacksonville, Fla.,
for the purpose of electing a Board of
Directors and the transaction of such
other business as may come properly be-
fore the regular annual meeting.
W. IB OWEN,
J. A. HOLLOMON, President.
Secretary.
May 2, 4t.


The Feathered Tribe on the Florida Keys.
Prof. H. H. Kopman, of New Orleans,
a prominent and learned member and of-
ficial of the National Audubon Society,
an association with a world-wide reputa-
tion, organized for the preservation and
cultivation of birds, is a visitor to the
city.
Prof. Kopman has just completed a tour
of inspection of the West Coast. He
commenced his inspection at Pensacola
and cautiously picked his way down the
inlet and bayou dotted coast of Punts
Rassa, on the extreme lower end of the
State. He traveled mostly by boat, and
has many interesting experiences to re-
port.
He states that he found a half dozen
fine colonies of birds along the route he
traversed. The birds all seemed attached
to whatever island or section they had
adopted, and with but little attention
could be cultivated and multiplied with
surprising results.
He made thorough investigations of
these colonies of birds and states that it
is feasible for the government to estab-
lish and maintain reservations.
One of the finest reservations he says
he ever saw Is located upon what is called
Passage or Bird Key in Boga Ceiga bay.
This island has been blessed by nature in
the matter of formation, in fact it is a
most ideal place for birds. The birds that
make their homes on this island are 1mm-
erous, most of them being herons, sea
gulls and terns.
The reservation is in charge of Mr. A.
N. Pillsbury, Jr., a natural lover of the
feathered tribe. Mr. Pillsbury is giving
his time and attention to the reservation
gratis and takes a great interest in the
work he is accomplishing. Mr. Pillsbury
told Prof. Kopman that there were over
3,000 birds in the reservation, and the
outlook is good for the reservation becom-
ing the largest and most important in the
country.
Prof. Kopman will leave Jacksonville
today for New Orleans. Upon arrival
home he will begin a series of lectures
upon the subject of birds for educational
purposes. He will make a similar tour of
inspection next season.


HALF TONES-ZINC ETCHINGS

Illustrating rand Engr~ ving Department
or

THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION
Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc
Etchings made to order in the most improved and artistic
fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of Com-
mercial Work, Pamphlets, Etc,

A Speealty Is Made of Designnl.r Retouhing and
EmbellMhng Phtegraphs and Pietures.
In Writing or applying for Prices, Give the Most Explicit Description of What is
Wanted. Good Work and Prompt Deliveries Promised.

A FrQmgla Entterprise. Try It.


- Mc KOY PATENT

Turpe nlin Cup.

The best and simplest cup
on the market. Detachable
Greater Capacity, easier
dipped ,more eauly placed
on tree, stronger and proe-
tically indestruetible. Will
Snot rut. For eatalo and
price lit write


IT HEIIIII9II .
S1015 HiA isema uiess
New Oa4eams. ousua a.


INVENTOR AND TI
M. A. BAKER, MATHECTU OF
BAKER IMPROVED SEAMLESS TURPENTINE SKILLS.
















Wrte me for- jj. O. a peaMtnthempeslse het.
said ssr a jlnasamese.
WORK THROUGH THE COVXTLY PLOPTLY rATTDMS TO
The Largest and Oldest Copper Works IN the Soth.
My specialty Is large worms ar heavy Mbttem tlht doe t MI
BRUNSWICK, GA. and PENSACOLA, FLA.
DIRBTORS: J. C. Stanley, J. Harris, D. M. lynn, H. X. Pritehett, J. C.
Edwards, W. C. Powell, J. P. COmnal.
OFFICERS: .. C. Stanley, Pres.; J. Harris, VicePres.; K. B. Oneil, Shy.;
J. P. Council, Treasurer and Mansger.

THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.,
Home Office-Jacksonville, Fla.
Factory: WAWWAIrWl, C.
Manufacturers of ligh Grade Naval StIes Tels

Ii il 1111ll 11 llllll111 Siii 55555555$ll is
SJ. A.O. CABOn, President J DU. Tm YT, ViePmUdate1 t
ST.A. JRNA snd VlosePresident. H. L. KAYvmO. M Vi sss llt a am
H. P. E. ScasnuIm TIr..Sar.


J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

S 11 O SmI FIlBR Ia fl NM
- aMana ornes eAVAIIMas, OeomUam
S manes on. et JacOvee oViaL, m. 10ESIX

Naval Stores Producers awe Iftetd to CwraRep WI Vs,
as .saIiii : sls:ii s 5i5Ill5 lim iii







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RBBOOD.


Southern Drug Mfg. Company
WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS AND MANUFACTURERS OF
Flavoring Etracts Packed Drug., B. B. Bluing. Vinegar and Pyne's Popular ILeomdir
W handle everything in dte Dru. and Medcine Une. Write for prices. JACKSONVILLE. rLA.
[ -,^ -- -, i


ndard Clothing Company DIAMOND VALUES DON'T FAIL

When your money is Ineated in good Diamian, yeo mud er
O Pie oe Pri worry about the market. We have ne of the most mlperb ln of pm
Ss.nri n Pice Dia- ..monds in the South. Oim mad M for yourmlf.
11-13 339
FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AMD FIWIRsHIER, Main St. HESS & SLA R W.BGw.
,V ad I9 West bay St, - m JecseevUle, Fl ndt Jaekloammv we.
4i e i N awu i Ea. ipealal Ate atitrv t l Onrers.


------------------------------------ -------
_-'------_-] _-- _-_- _-_- .... ..... .... ..... ..... ....


J. W. Ma~e.



Joh


C. aB. Par
VieswPres.


Jen ePe1s.
Thoe.


W. W. Wmer,
Se. & Tre .


I


n R. Young Co.,


Commission


I Merchants.

Navl Stes factors. Wholesale Grocers.


Sm


,vmnah .a Brunswick. Ga.


-^-9W -- --~ ~~--_*****c***** ,
...... ....... .. t


I


o yam WW t a Tvpentlu Le a Uta?
SYou Wat a Sawm L eMin?
YM Wwt my Klad of ferMa Ladl?
Yeo Meaom malmaess?
c, .mtl or DWrite ft
J. H. Livingston & Sons,
' O* 4OCALA. rLORLDA.


The e tropols

4 'Mi Ite apad you want. It Is published
a .; d*ily and ii from 18 to 16 hours ahead of
S any other daily newspaper in Florida.

,Yi 5 a Year $2.50 Six Months
,'Fll TlF raphie and Stock report. If


you want to keep posted on the news, gt
the Metropolis.


CARR&. RUSSELL PUB. CO.


UL U


I.'
a
a
a


BEST TANKS
SON EARTH
Ar aindeB LaP rea, byG. M. D&ve 6
Son. T -rawmet ----A We*.
fle the atqu e
fW aMiew. wiVte Lw for- aIftms
h E W.YUlZt* yo buy aa Ptask.

4L JAI DAVL% 4& SUMN, FIatk C P11


IS






048




OLi
C
0
C
0

a
B

Cr
0


outhorn States Naval Stairs e.


Factors
lip to Savannah


Savannah, Ga.
and Commission Merchants
Get Competition Highest Primes Promptest Returs
Correpond With VW


J. Schiels Sos Copany,
J. S. SchflelM's Sons ompan,
)e~sselm"64pa.).l.- -7- .Le-n-


Distiller's Pumping
Outfit
No plant complete wiihot one.
*Hundreds of them in Ie in
BSouth to h rise ide-
ls am prioM. We ales ufatr
SfngiMne, eNles aid Nl
Grade MMdry,
u well a-!!y a full and plote
Mw Tusueuppi i

S Advice your wants.
Macon, - Georia.
. Al4 s... ..
; as masavmases ue*


prrwlwrwwuuugm.~uu3,mwewewesmw-eu~g~s


*'
C
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-- -_ ~- I I r


~-~-~-~-~----









WBORE MAKING YOUR PURCHASE
-leg The-

KNIGHT CROCKERY


FURNITURE COMPANY
JACKSONVILLE. FL..


DUCrIOUsi DIRECTORS:
S. L. c. ASHLEY. Prn B. w. nt
Q AL o. I3. BW. I JNT. tI Via. asni a. A. CNarr.
ON H. ews a"d G. raMm-r. T. G. Cureth,
P. L. Wek&. G. A. PETTWAY. Ld Vice P-e. A. S. Pandlmon.
L GL. Cma0d. 0 J. M ASHLEY. 3d Vie P SG. L e..
lS. Lt* a.BBE., sre. cT. se. a n e.
S. IL N. w. T. & 3mAg.on.

PENINSULAR NAVAL STORES CO.
Commission Merchants
and Wholesale Grocers
R srhg oaeIts-J-acksonsvile, Tanpa iand FemUandna,
ni Savannahh., G
rapit-i Stock, $1.000.000.
- lB^eKt&<%^%i!^~&<*&


. D. WED.


W. D. KRENSOI


J. D. WEED & CO.,

Savannah, Georgia

HEADQUARTERS FOR

Moop Iron, Turpentine Tools,

Batting, Etc.


McMillan Bros.


PLANTERS

"Old Time" Remedies
THE JOY OF THE MHOUiMlOL S.
Tom fe aMt resrndil, Nuh0 Te ,,6k BMWn
and Cubak 0a ih Joy 6 th ab.Witr so hh -e f.
amn reaed for ay rlm~. H hk a mf, renahi d yi s a
far wife, Hf. or HWith thu. are-dmad a m
doctor' ha -s at of yer poke8, ad yt hTv a h M y.
Beside, you a ere yow sto k a -y alIme that tat y tm.
NUBIAN TZA,-I LiUe i or war as aaF mi artth r
will s al far.. of uivw era Kidmy 6rM*im|. 4a10 e6 is ne
Fever. Crash tdh ommon alomms of eildres a as a alneate tele IM ti wtn o
an .moi --.me ndelsaue. uI the I uid, it a iezirs-y bheMlu-m .Ir
like Hit- it BREDY 13 U3-3.
nnImTA in a woie'n m-dieal It wffl e a dae- s me-- to
women, mad cmed ma Frmi Troubles. Is will brB youk ank thMe ad4 weoe.
who has oa m iA beai ame she though t wLon iOm It wi awe far the
ouU gil just matr wmauhood; mad plmre tO n yews a o ite amed
duties of wife and oths.
CUBAN ruIJP-The Instant Paiat Kiler, far elr man or homs. lRebe.
instantly, Colic, DCamM, Cholera Marb, Diarh Dd ni s a
for eolie In horse it a infallible remedy aid i r t ive sitfa i Ave
minut-.
CUBAN OIL-Th Best Bm sad Nrav I.I nimt J atbtlet r f
angled or toa esh, and will lastatly relieve the paim. O~ ImMt h is uad uat,
lds ad burn, bruises ad eore, res ped kand aMn fea, om mrd tender Oe
Relieves rheamaMte palam i, ame bak, t oants, a in etas k mue wine fnpe a6
swratehee, thrsd., epiat, eoar monM, -addle i, an --A d-seMd h.
Wuito w; tfo Plrim,
SPENCER MEDICINE CO.. Chattanooga. Ten


CUMMER LUMBER COMPANY
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

Rough an Droeod Luuaer
Leaos Leaf Yellow PAl.
"" ""AD rrlC


W. L. WILSON,
Press. d fress.


JNO. E. SARRIS.
Vce Pres.


6. J. scevu,
Uc'Y* a OWLuH.


Florida Cooperage Company
acarpor d) Capital Stook 0 0 0.@
AMANWCTAVrRRS OF


Turpentine,


Cotton Seed Oil. Dt


and Syrup Barres.
Offtie aI Frtwy Enterprie mMd Este StVtM
Telephone 1855 Jackseorllle, Fla


Southern Copper
Works

Manufacturers of TURPENTINE STILLS
Complete Outfits and Extra Kettles, Caps, Arms, Worms, Fur-
naee Doors and Grates always on hand
Old Stills t~,tP New Work "di~m'w''"
Heav C-e per- lt. Mteu Pip an Spe-"l C-Mpp Wta
Jacksonville, Fla.
A. Fayetteville, N. C. Savanah, (i. .MS1 Al


~-- ----1










Special


Watch Sale


4"-~-;


~rI-
n


UIlUTRATnN EXACT IZWL


15 JEWELED

WALTHAM

MOVEMENT
14 Kt. Sold Gold Ste


Greenleaf'& Crosby Company
41 West Bay St. : : : : Jacksonville, Fl.


I.m.. p H IILWI i t I t 1 1e1 I i 11 11 1 t .


f. f j. f f. r16 I ft rrf f f 16 to p f u


- M --- M,


Barlns Jessup Company
JackmsnvHf roIrId.
N.v4l r8e Fr.ctors and Comnmitsion
Merch.nts.
OlrCElS.
=" s -- M="M"
. U P .J. O A. swa. n V.-PrSIe'Rme.
sga~eTJrv mad Tvw enw. d



S* .L d AL 'm. I-
(NseC U E.N h J ; hu a. k



". .. oWI. a* rmt


:M l* rtu LI querT Company
S t. S i Jes olavI e4 ~IT


L V. WVT, L L LK L MM


WEST FLYNN HAIIS CO.
aumazOuvWj GnuJMM 89. M
WSW Ra
NAVAL STORES FIM
NAVAL ass NFW AsIL AsAAVMAW -ad aW *UK


WA A. =KAMM&I I |WI
Vhokale- Grocew r Daor s io M.rl -I H tya


; "VAUUU|,a JACUMOUNTM A TI M.H ^


WILL A. O. URS.

I m. r in Ftr% mn.

*e Ps6eY: Ifm Us m.w ss Bsee .r- P
a" FAST ,mr 51rAV


*


i ail lli| abl a i a i i a 11 a i
A'~ P'PI A LA -& 41--l &l al &I 4PI1 P ~ p'PIL"1 l l ~ ~ ~ l SIKI K I i ~


U.


Price $15 Complete Price $15 Complete
Price $15 Complete O Price $15 Complete a


.i I


25 YEAR

14 Kt. Gold
Filed Case
14 t. Soid Gold Bas