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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00271
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 16, 1908
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00271
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text

BI
ytCEV


ST RI




CORD


afEnY AVAIL eToRES, I
aVMEK'S GrEREIAh

|ODVSTTRIAlh o FIAwAlsA

| < AEWSPAPEI9


Mere Complete Market Reports.
blthmint with the next imeu The Reaord will have
a mo complete naval store market report, review nd
srtaal department. We have already se ed the
seri of an expert, who will devote his time to getting
and prising facts regarding the production, the aon-
samptioa, the shipments, the stocks, the comparison ;
the canes for the prevailing prices% and o on. He will
ind out and place the responsibility for the market where
it belogs. He will make the market page of The Record
fall, aerate and interesting.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


SAVANNAH, GA.


ILIM1I


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URPlENTINE BAR.RLS ATLANTIC COOPER.AO CO.
MAIWHfACTURtRS AND-MAbC TURPENIMNE BARMLS
We have bes muI uiang our own Staves for years mad sleot the vr best sook for our barrels.
Sked Coopers mply. Just beginning bsinaes in Jaeksoville and wb solicit a share of your pat-
romg. Sd Br tr a onei-r.
ls#w. wa90e5". Wans'ew urn DvIU.rbin... UUI 4- 11asse la..


Bulletin No. 2.

PARTY FARES

Effective April 3, 1908.
Fbr paru of ten (10) ormore trmweUn to-
etmhr m an twceat two (2) etsa pr mrle per
caitsm*imum Pr capta fMartem( 15)cents.
THESE RATES
Are open to the pubc and apply between
ty point on the

Atlantic Coast Lines


W. S. MAW.
r Tramhc Maow


Tr. Q. WWffm
eGeMsed r AwmL
W3NGTrom. 1N. C.


I. W. Farro'r.
Divid P Agwrk


- w~


East Coast Lumber Co.
tOUMH AND DRESSED IAIO LBAP

Yellow Pine Lumber

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carldkd Lots
Stemer SbIpmmet a Swape y.

WATERTOWN, rLOIDoA
----- -- -----


THE COMMERCIAL BANK
JACSonV RA. A FA. Drinel e f *Lain OW
The lrgsest saniag Stase Bak in Jaoivis. U somo h is eM-
fashhmed striaLy conservatve imw and is subji bet to wuhn wasMn
by the Comqrse.
Arlsoniual and avib MAssasinld
a. WoDO, W. a 3. e5&A
1PuhL Vi"-"Wr.


CONSOLIDATED NAVAL STORES COY.
CONSOLIDATED NAVAL STORES COMPANY. ,


Home Office:
Branches: Say


JACKSONVILLE,


FLA.


aanah. Ga., and Pensacola, Pla.


OFFICERS.
WAIrMi J. CDAIWAU Pridert; H. IMalrItAN, H. L COVINGTON, JOHN H. POWEIU 34 B. POWELL and W. J. KELLY, Vie Presidsdn.
J. 0, IJITI nn Setary am Tasurer at Jaeksaville; J. Q. HO)GES AMsistant Becretary at avaaruh; J. L BOZIK, Assistant cometary at PmssMa.
LnaJUlUxVr COX rrr : W. W. Oammer, W. F. Coameman, W. J. HUman, C. Roges, Ud A. & Hubbad.
DWaTOB: W. J. Umh-, W. W. COmmer, X H. Mafill W. F. CoaDhman, W.. C.Poll, H. L O ovigtoa, B. gers, John H. Powll, A. ub-
ard, A. AUafr, C D an, a Powel, W. J. Kely.



NAVAL STORES FACTORS



Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned amd Controlled by Practical Operators.
The Cossolldated" Is purely a co-operative Company. Its Interests are Identical with these
of the Producers. The patronage of turpentine operators everywhere lavited.
Two Wfllion acres of Land and Timber for sale on easy terns.
Prsodsers .re invited to cJll or correspond.
Sim -mg-s


















WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL


RECORD.


PUEZSHED) VEIRY SATURDAY. DEVOTED TO NAVAL STORI, LUIdER AND MANUFACTURING nwimc l b.

60d Sao U. Oft br dw Nn ls da Twpew 0opr d a& A ysMid Orp.m aad akil SoL L. DU02. n Ainmad Glen. i a O&d Ovms dw o feo d 'Aio AAISIl.L L 9i a 6a
Gk Q Ovm Onp of Tu pondas Ouwdmoo Amasio lmq 27 dpr2 a e o Cm Gvw Aamnem& liadw by Gusvs Sswima Awnedm... dOwnm of %adi esese Amd


The Ups and Downs of Spirits Dur-

ing Past Week.


Exports of Forest Products,

Not Including Naval Stores.


Slw Advance in Low Grade Rosins Pales
Command Higher Price.
This week's trading was enlivened by
the fact that Spirits Turpentine reached
46 cents on Tuesday in Savannah; there
was no support to the market at that
price, however, and in consequence it went
back, being quoted today (Friday) at
42% cents Jacksonville receipts in tur-
pentie were taken in at 43 cents on
'Tuesday in accordance with the advance
in the Savannah market and for a little
while it looked as if prices should con-
tinue the advance. Cheap offers of the
hig interests abroad as well as in this
country, however, checked the demand at
ame and prices naturally declined again.
It is more than ever evident that the
market is governed by interests which,
for some reason or the other wish to pre-
vent prices to rule higher for the present.
The best proof for this statement is the
fact, that there is actually a big demand
springing up for turpentine every time
the primary market is quoted a little
higher. Of course, when the big inter-
ests counteract an advance in Savannah
by putting out lower offers than the mar-
ket actually warrants, even though the
parcels offered are very small, it is nat-
ural that the eagerness on the part of
dealers as well as consumers subsides, in
the expectation of still lower prices.
Rosin has shown a little advance during
this week. "E" Rosin which was quoted
on last Saturday's market at $3.15, is to-
day (Friday) worth $3.15-$.20 and F G,
which was quoted then $3.25 and $3.30,
stand now at $3.30 and $3.30-3.35.
The bulk of the advance, however, fell
on the pales and it is worth remarking
that between B C and WW there exists
now a spread of $3.50, the greatest dif-
ferences lying between G and H and H and
I.
It strikes us as singular that pales
should demand such high prices at the
very time when they are most abundant-
ly produced. It is surely not the custo-
mary policy of the great interests to run
up a long stock on high priced pales and
) as sympathy with the producers and fac-
ters has hardly anything to do with it
ee may not be wrong in surmising that
the great spread between the grades is
of especial significance.
Business in rosin continues to be dull.
Oaly stray lots of small importance can
be sold. We are sure that this is not
due, however, to an entire lack of de-
maud, it is amply the outgrowth of the
wer planned policy of the great interests,
who deserve the credit for this extraordi-
amy depression in the Naval Stores trade
That these interests desired the decline
in its full measure is evident by the fact
that they sent their agents abroad-Mr.
Treodale for instance-who did nothing
ele but preach lower prices. Buyers
wre advised that if they could wait
m lMh Mki-t hi ra.tr----t.dl the mr-


ket would surely go lower. Buyers, con-
sumers especially, are always lending
willing ears to bearish talk and the ad-
vice coming from quarters which are rec-
ognized to manipulate the market at will
and random, was universally believed.
The first consequence was the depression,
but a consequence, that the buyers did
not see at once, is the fact, that they
allowed themselves to get caught by the
great interests, at their own loss, but at
the advantage of the great interests.
These, it will be remembered, caused the
market to advance at different times very
suddenly, and the buyers, getting scared
into the belief of a big bull movement,
were easily led to place orders for for-
ward deliveries, which of course had to be
lower than the then prevailing market,
but which allowed a good profit to the
great interests as soon as they succeeded
in bearing the market subsequently, when
the time of shipment had come. In this
way the great interests are about the
only ones which could draw advantage
out of the present, unnecessarily great de-
cline, whereas they made producers as
well as buyers suffer the brunt of the sit-
uation, although the former will be by
far the greater losers.
We say that the present decline is un-
necessarily great and we can prove it by
the fact that bigger orders to buy come
in at once, whenever the market shows
a little more strength. It is a waste of
time, however, to look fo the demand un-
less it is made by the great interests,
which would only need to advance prices
to cause buyers to come forward.
They desire, perhaps, more than any-
thing else, to crush competition, but after
all they are in the business for the pur-
pose of making money and although
there may be means and ways known to
them to win profits, which are not, can-
not and will not be practised by other
concerns, we should think that a strong
back movement would be entirely to their
advantage now when all has been said,
we again impress upon the readers the
fact, that the market is at the mercy of
the great interests, the question remains.
will they use their power to bring fur-
ther ruin to the industry or will they
help it along.
It is always believed that the plans for
the manipulation of the market on the
part of the great interests are hatched
out months and months ahead of time. If
it is still true, then we might consider
the present low market simply the begin-
ning of the execution of such plans. They
may wish to acquire all these big stocks
at lowest possible prices in order to be
able to advance the market at a given
time very suddenly and strongly when
they shall try to load up the competition
at high prices, then cause the market to
decline just as suddenly, by aid of their
cheap stocks in the hope to ruin their ad-
versaries.


Uncle Sam's exports of forest products
have shown higher and higher values dur-
ing the last five or six years. This has
been the case although reports show that
there has not been a corresponding in,
crease in volume. For instance, the quan-
tity of sawed timber exported from this
country has increased less than 12 per cent
in the last four yeas, while the price has


what they were twelve years ago sad
were larger than those of any previous
year. The shipments to Australia and
the Orient especially have been inreasing
steadily during this period. The ship-
ments to South America of redwood, as
well as a number of other forest prod-
nets, has increased greatly in the past two
years.


increased over 50 per cent. Again, the
amount of rosin exported has increased Good-Bye Dogwood and Persalun.
but little, while the price has more than The supply of dogwood and persim-
doubled. mon shuttles in the Southern States s'
From 1903 to 1906 the value of staves nearly exhausted. This statement will
showed very little increase, but in the not appear significant to the average man
year 1907 there was a decrease in the when he first hears it. But when he is
number exported of about 10 per cent, to- told that the entire supply of shuttles,
gether with an increase in the price of bobbins, and spindles used in the cotton
about 20 per cent. This last would seem and woolen mills in all parts of the eonm-
to indicate a recognition of the fact that try is furnished by the dogwoed and per-
the supply of the highest grades of white simmon growing in the Southern States,
oak is rapidly diminishing. The staves the seriousness of the situation is ap-
exported are almost exclusively of the parent. The textile mills of the country
highest grades of white oak and form represent a capitalization of uarly a bil-
about a fifth of the annual production lion dollars and bobbins, shuttles, aad
of white oak staves in the United States. spindles are just as necessary parts of
As might be supposed, a large part-80 these mills as the throttle is to the Io-
per cent-of the staves went to Europe, comotive.
forty per cent to France. The export Fortunately the shuttle I -mufehwn


trade makes a heavy drain on the sup-
ply of white oak.
Boards, deals, planks, and sawed tim-
ber made up 50 per cent of the total value
of forest product exports. Rosin ranks
next, with nearly 10 per cent of the to-
tal value of these exports. Spirits of tur-
pentine follows with about 10 per cent.
Four-fifths of the rosin and turpentine go
to Europe.
The number of shingles exported has de-
creased fairly regularly since 1903. In
1907 there were shipped less than half
the number that were exported four years
before. More than 50 per cent of these
shingles go to Mexico, while less than 10
per cent were shipped to ports outside of
North America. This shows how few shin-
gles are in demand abroad. The total ex-
ports of shingles represent less than one-
fifth of one per cent of the production of
this class of material in the United
States.
The amount of wood exported in the
form of hewn or sawed timber and lum-
ber was about 7 per cent of the total
lumber cut in the United States in 1907.
More yellow pine is exported than any
other kind of timber. The order is yellow
pine. Douglas fir. and redwood. Although
there are no figures which bear directly on
the amount of yellow pine lumber annu-
ally exported, it is estimated that at
least 13 per cent of the yellow pine cut
finds its way to other countries. Proba-
bly a third of the Douglas fir exported
went to South America.
The redwood exported forms an impor-
tant item. Australia and the Orient to-
gether took 40 per cent of the total and
South America 32 per cent. The exports
of redwood in 1907 were about five timeal


have found another source of supply in
the dogwood stands in the far northwest
part of the country. Two large compa-
nies manufacturing spindles, shuttles aad
bobbins have erected plants in the Cas-
cade in Oregon, whose dogwood forests
are the greatest in the world, the tree of-
ten attaining a height of 75 feet sad a
diameter of one to two feet. The south-
ern dogwood is rarely more than 6 lines
in diameter. Extensive stands of dogwood
are also found in California and Washing-
ton. Up to the present time, lumber
users in the Pacific northwest have found
dogwood valueless except for fuel, and
its utilization for the manufacture of
shuttles will bring about a considerable
increase in stumpage values of this tree.
These companies, at their Oregon plants
will not only manufacture the articles
named but will utilize every part of the
tree turning to account the waste wood
and producing such by-products as pyro-
ligenous acid, acetic aid, protaestate of
iron, acetate of lime, methylated spirits,
solvent naphtha, wood tar, wood pitch,
and various forms of charcoal. Dogwood
is indispensable in the manufacture of
shuttles, bobbins, and spindles because it
is the only wood which takes a high pol-
ish and wears perfectly smooth by fric-
tion under water.
The discovery of the adaptability of
the Pacific dogwood, however, has not
aided the eastern manufactures, and
they have been obliged to look for nub-
stitutes nearer home. The most promis-
ing of these are mesquite and tupelo gnm.
The wood of the mesquite is heavy and
very hard, close grained and has a com-
pact structure. It is probable that it
would be aminatlv adam at for the m n-












4 TH WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



VVIHITE OAK SPIRITS BARRELS

Guaranteed to conform to specifications Savannah and Jacksonville Board of Trade.

Write to Columbus Barrel Mfr..., Columbus, Ga., or to HENRY ELSON, Flerida Mgr., Jacks-vile, Ila.


ufacture of shuttle blocks, as it appears
to have all the requisite qualities of
weight, hardness, and susceptibllity to a
high smooth polish. Already it has proven
well ftted for the manufacture of spools
and bobbins for which white birch is now
so largely used. The tupelo gum is me-
dium hard and heavy, and has a compact
fibrous structure. It has not yet been
utilized to much extent in the textile in-
dustries, though it is quite probable it
will play an important part in the future,
since it combines with several necessary
qualities the exacting property of wear-
ing smooth with friction.

TO THE NAVAL STORS MEN OF
FLOIDA.
I would Inte your attention to some
of the various legislation which was itro-
dueed in the Florida House of Represen-
tatives during the slm of 1903. A bill
was introduced with a view of securing
reveno out of the naval stores business.
The argm t was preeed that by fur-


alihing certain tag or labels, as is done
in the inspection of fetilir, a revenue
to the State could be made out of this
busalne. The naval stores people would
not pay it; that it would come out oe
the purchasers of these supplies. This bill
was killed. I made a speech in opponaitim
to t. My recolletio is that I am the
oaly oe who made suk a speech Ther
may have been thers.
There was a committee of engaged
in the naval stores bu e, at Tllahas-
s during the session of the legislature
Owing to my record, being friendly to
their interests, I was requested to intro-
due and take charge of the following
bill: "House Bill No. 47, a II1 to be
entitled an Act to Prevent and Proibit
the Adulteration of Spirits of Turpentine
and Naval tores, etc.
I do not take any redt for simply
doing my duty. I think, however, it
might be well 'r soan of you gentlemen
to know who has been your friendly n the
legislature. As you know, I am a can-
didate for Governor erlda. Any as-
sistance you am give m wl be highly
appreciate. I hav the hbaor of being
Very repectfully yaoe,
ATiaRT W. GnCarr10 ,


ACCOUNTANTS.
T. G. Hutohisom, JadaoMville, Fla.
Walter Maudlw, Jackaoville, Fa.


J. D. Wesd & o., SO annah, Ga.
BA K&
oomnul Bank, Jaekmaonvill Fla.


B3KI-WHOL3SALE
Cbus. Ehu & Ja ouriB, Fr.
.osph Zapi & Jar ill, F.
DARREL 8TAVE .
East Cont Lnmbr o, Watertow,
Florida.

1DOX= AND CRATIE
Cummer Lumber eo., Jacksorvillie FI.


Knight eehky and Prste O0,
Jaeksouvll, FbL.
CLOTHING.


HATS.
Stuart-Bernstein Co., Jaeksonville, Fla.
HARDWARK.


HATY AND ORAI.
Bours & O. Wm. A., Jasnmravilla, Fa.
HATS.


Standard nothing OC.. Jaekamonvil, Fak.
HOOP II s.
J. D. Woed & 0a. savannah, a.
HOTELS
Duval Hotel, Jasavle, Fla.

IRON WORKS
Seofeldha seen .o J. 8., Maonu, Ga.


& J. Ruie 'n., Jaeksrmvin L
Greealeaf & Crosby Co., Jaeksoville, M
Hss Slager. Jaeksomafll. Fl
LUMME


Standard Clothing O., Jackso nolle., Fl.
Stuart-Bernstein C., Jacksovlle, Fla. An" eL mber Ga, Waerewn,


COMM SIsULS.
Mcmil. 3reths11 Jas keemo&ll Savm -
ash and MEaM
M. A. Baker, Bruaswiek, Oa.
COOPERAGE.
blorida Cooprage Lo.,Jaksonville, Fla.
Atlantic Cooperage CO., Jacksonville, Fla.

DRUGS.
Wm. D. Joas. Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS-WHOLzSALE.
Groover-aStwart Drug O, Jacksonille,
lb.
Tamp aI r 1amp, a.
Soutbhme Drig OC., Jashammvlsl Fa.


Swholebd Seae COk, J. &., MaeIo, Ga.
Lmbard Ir WedtW and qaply O, Au-


KrSW Cloekery and Frdtam OC,
Jackenesm FV
Namv, Jaedomevi, FLa.


Bours & CO. Wa. A., JaksoEvflle, Fla.

aofSddr. Same O., J. 1. Ma a., Ga.
Lombard Ire Works a Bupply Ce. Au-
g.s, ot
FUNERAL DINECTOR
The Chas. A. Clark O, Jaeksoville, Fl.

GAL
J*sekaeomvl Gam OB, Jacksonville, Fia.
QKNTV FURENISHBE
8tdarud Clothi y O., Jacksonville Fla.
Stuart-Bernoai o., Jaeoksnve, Fa.
0ous--WHOLESALE.
Williams O, J. P, Savannah, Oa.


LIQUOR
Blum & Co. Cha.., Jacksovill, Fa.
Altmayer & Flatan Liquor CO., Maeo,
Ga., and Jackenville, Fla
Joseph Zapf & Co.. Jacksonville, a.


8peneer Medieme Co, CatsMaoos, Tea.
MACHINK WORKS.
lhoflldd's Some Co. J. 8, Maon, Ga.
Lumbard Irme Workas August, ".

MATERIALS FMOR An PrmaLs PaO-

Sehoseled's Soe o.. J. J. Mauo, Oa.
MXTAL WORS.u

nabh and MeMbi
Baker, M A, BuawiW Ga. O ad a P M.
cola, Fla.

MILL SRPPLEL
SehoAed' 8om O J. S Maseo, Ga.
Weed A ClO, J. D., Savannah, Ga.
Lombard Ireo Works & 8pPly C, An-
gusta Ga.
NAVAL STOREa
Penis-,la, Naval Stores O., Jaeksovifle
and 'amps, Fla.
Barnes a Jaemp Oa., Jasksaovl Fa.
Cons atd Naval Storea O, Jasoa-
vll, Fla.
West-Flynn-Harri Co, Jaeksonvi'e, pla
Williams Co., J. P., savannah, Ga.
Young Co. John R., Savanah. Ga.
Bslthn States Naval Store 0, Iava-
as Ga.
PLANINO MILL.
Duval Planing Mill O, Jacksonville. Fla.


.UM
SehoeM'a Bome Co., J. 8. Mase, Oa.

Atlante COast Ies.
SAWiELL
oImarN khe Wefts &ft | Ce., Aim


Bow s a O. wi. A, J*ammvnM
SNp yTAR.
Cummer mber C., ia*knemvil1

Hutchinso S Oa a, J"&m=W N&
Jos. Rabasmbie en Che, Saems, Ga.

Stuart- rt Ct, Jiel, l.

0. M. Ikvis & Bme, Ithsea, n.
eors a Ow o. Jo., mem, a.
Prtms Meir Oes Oamne CaIr, I

Atlantic Cbeerais CO, Jaefnville, Ph.
Florida Cooperg* C0., JeSkemnUh6 lh.
I Uirjmeaa S2ULL.
Baker, M. A., B answ k, Ga a -
ok, Fla.
MN isft Brothers .O6, .JadsmeamM
StramBath and EMa.
TI-^Mr LAMDM

JakBsevill Development CrO, J asor.
vinl, l.a

Iur-amasms TOOL.&
Coun l Tool oI., Jack.sevii, Fi.
J. D. Wesd & OG. avaash, Ga.
WATZCN.
Grelenaf & kemby 0., JauenMvie, NF.
Hems & Sla.ger, Jaaskmsv1il F
R J. R.es Oa. JaMeenvl 9i.
FELLOW MPIE LUM D
Summer Lumber Co., JasehmsN,, Fl.
Ert aOmt Lumber C., Watertown, NI



WM. D. JONES,




FAMILY DRUGGIST
107 Ik. BAY IT.
MSG Ordi goadb@L




ZAHN'S EUROPEAN HOTEL


UNDR W KM NA Ialnl


eaPms, ,e to eLe. Per 00 nu be at
PHOSPHATE MACHINIEYT. AM & nd Z. ,F a,
Lombard Iron Works a Supply Ok, A- .
Ga, urmr L


Industrial Record's Buyers' Directory
i- - - - - -








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 6


THE GROOVER-STEWART omm c"o.



Wherml. D"rs, esOhIeab, Ir uema.-led aN d OmmWs y *
OnA FLNW


Arbor Day was observed in North Caro-
lina on May 10, and it is interesting to
know just what lesson could be drawn
from that day in a State so well supplied
with forests. This is explained in a bul-
letin which was issued by State Geolog-
ical Survey, from which the following ex-
tracts are taken:
While the same sentiment which is at-
tached to the observance of Arbor day
in the scantily forested western States
cannot be applied in a well-wooded State
like North Carolina, yet the observance
of such a day has its significance. Arbor
day in North Carolina could be set aside
for the school children to learn of the
great natural gift which we have in the
forests, and the relation of the forests
to the well-being and wealth of our peo-
ple.
The right way to plant a tree, how the
:roots and crown should be, the manner of
pressing the earth firmly about the roots,
and how to prune the branches-this is a
manual exercise but one which it is well
for every one to be able to perform.
The life of the tree is closely associ-
ated with the smallest roots which absorb
moisture and the need for preserving
these when transplanted should be em-
phasized. The moisture the tree must
have, its use of manure (leaf, mold and
humus), how it grows and bears its fruit
are elementary to the fundamental truths
.of the relation of the forests to the hap-
piness and progress of our people.
Relation Farm and Field.
Next to the very soil itself, which in
:North Carolina was originally nearly all
forest covered, the forest has been the
.chief source of livelihood for our people
If it at one time temporarily barred the
progress of the farm, it yielded at the
same time a revenue in furnishing both
warmth and shelter. When the farming
lad became worn and thin or gullied, the
thickets of pine again covered the soil,
restoring its fertility and making it pro-
ductive. The relation of the forest to the
farm is paramount. It is so intimate as
to be almost inseparable. On the farm the
ues of wood are manifold, for fuel, fenc-
ing, building tools and barrels and crates
for shipping.
Within itself, moreover, the forest sus-
tains a vast industry, employing more
than 20,000 of our men in handling and
sawing and reconverting its lumber and
other products. The lumber is used for
building our towns and then it keeps the
factories of many of them busy, changing
the rough lumber into furniture, as is the
ease at High Point and Lexington, or
turning wood into pulp for paper, as is
done in the mountains at Canton; or
making tanning materials from wood,
which is done at Old Fort.
But even this is not the limit of the
direct usefulness of the forest. The value


of the many rivers of North Carolina for
manufacturing depends largely upon the
period of low water, and upon how small
uniformity of this flow, upon the absence
of great floods, and the shortness of the
a quantity of sand and earth is washed
from the soil of our hills and mountains.
Great unevenness in the flow of 'the
streams makes it difficult to use the pow-
er. Large amounts of earth in the water
fill up the ponds and reservoirs and pre-
vent the water being stored. The forest
is very important in adding to the use-
fulness of the rivers. The more forest
there is on the streams and the thicker
the sponge of leaves and litter on the
ground beneath the trees the more uni-
form is the stream flow and the freer the
water from sand and earth. And this Is
true not only of the big rivers but the
small streams as well. The bottoms along
many of them, at one time cultivated in
corn, are now washed into deep gullies
by the floods as the influence of the for-
est has been lessened by burning and de-
stroying its humus in addition to clear-
ing the land.
Arbor Day's Session.
It is from these thoughts that the real
lesson of Arbor day can be drawn. The
forest is one of our greatest and most
valuable natural gifts and one which
when destroyed, lessens our prosperity,
reduces our sources of wealth, and brings
great damage to other industries; while
it is not possible to replace it when once
destroyed on steep and poor land, ex-
cept after a great many years and at
great expense. As such a resource, it
should be wisely used and in such a way
that young trees may always come up
in the forest land to take the place of
those that are cut. It is important to
the owner that every acre of land should
be producing something of value, and
since in many parts of the State we can-
not grow grass on lands which has become
washed or worn, or which is very steep,
such land should be planted in trees that
it may be growing something of use and
value, for idle lands like idle hands are a
reproach to both owner and State. And
since the forest is one of our primary
sources of wealth, like our waterways
and our fisheries, the State should seek
by wise laws to perpetuate them, and
we should try to retain their ownership
and use so far as possible among the peo-
ple who live in the State, and have their
homes here, in order that the wealth that
the forests create as they rise in value
may remain at home; and we should look
forward with the hope that eventually the
greater portion of our hardwoods will be
manufactured into finished products with-
in the State, keeping skilled men busy,
and building cities where only towns
stand today; and that the wood will not
go out as mere rough lumber to supply
the factories of other states.
These are profitable suggestions for Ar-
bor day, and will serve to show that the
true significance of the day should be:
the relation of our forests to our wealth
and prosperity.


Duval Planing Mill Co.
Sevestb asd I ls dAve. Jckses. Fla
Builers and Contractors Wll D Well t
Have Us Bid ea Their Work
in ear Line
Phone 1749.


Monday .................. 1,106 1,743 68
Tuesday .................. 1,930 3 -
Wednesday ............... 1,276 2,891,895
Thursday .............. 1,016 2,501,200
Friday ................... 673 2,702 -


DO YOU WANT FtuuaaV'MUa

For it will pay yo to me te sa Pa
nature at-


Ramils' s


Main Street.


I Standard Clothing Company i


One Price


a One Price

440000P


FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FMRNISHcERS,
17 ead 19 West Bay Street, Jmacksoev PFlarJ
Stetson a&ad Hawes Hats. Spe al Attenton Gives to Mal Ordwra




COMPARATIVE MARKET k YUkl b.

SPIRITS OF TURPEzTINE FOR THE WEEK HERE AND At AVYAnAIL
Prite. Sales. shionn.. 11ssiepI. t
SJa. Sa. Ja. s. Jax. JAB J aT. Ja ai.
Monday ........ 142% 42% 888 14171 201 430 61 714 24
Tuesday ......43 45 470 72 2 44 14 77
Wednesday .... 43 44 284 113 21 32 900221
Thursday ...... 42 42% 347 00 200 17 30 1288 250
Friday ........ 42 42% 226 944 40 196 ,71
ROSIN F0O THE WEKK HBERK AND AT SAVAI AH.
Monday. Tuesday. Wednlday. ThJuray. r Jia. l
Jax. 8. Ja. Sax. Jar. 8ay. Ja. av. JaM. Sa.


W W ................. 5.85
WG ................. 5.80
N ................... 5.75
MA ................... 5.65
K ................... 5.55
1 .................... 4.665
i ................... 3.75
G ................... 3.30
F .................... 3.20
E ........... ....... 3.10
D .)- ........... ..... 3.95
('BA ................ 2.85


6.005.85
5.955.80
5.805.75
5.755.65
5.705.55
4.804.65
3.803.75
3.303.30
3.253.20
3.153.10
3.002.965
2.852.85


6.105.96
5.955.85
5.855.75
5.755.70
5.655.60
4.804.66
3.803.75
3.303.30
3.253.20
3.053.10
3.062.95
2.902.86


6.90
6.05
5.95
5.85
5.75
4.85
3.85
3.35
3.30
3.20
3.10
2.A5


3,153 1,700 1,973135,185 61,918
1371,395 3,49336,826 665,174
989 984 2,27638,221 66,461
3,1 938 3,0993710 65,970
S938 3,00937,08 68,0~


111111 DUVAL Jacksonville,,
THE DUVALFlorida

This Hotel has recently changed hands, and is under New Management
Throughly Renovated Throughout
Headquarters for Turpentine Operators


F. BAITOW STUBBS,

Propietor.


1. D. CRAWFOIR

Mmger.


Arbor Day in North Carolina.


Jaskamvia


REPORT OF ROdbI MOVEMENT HIE AMD AT SAVAMLA

Jar. sav. Ja. ov. Jax &w. J. rv.










6 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL RECORD
JAN33 A. HOLOSION. Ediew--Ch
A. aL 31AA.S N-guts
L T. ARNOUL. AdvardM essri


w y
awmmm~6a 40 ar Annom

"The Pine and If Profducts.-
All a- mmo rem--s -iM be a
The Industrll RLecord Company,
Jacksonvilli. Fla.
amnah Emstal and e"usinme OffBo a
Savannma.h Ga.
Mature at the Postofoe at JacekaoviBe. Fla..
us eooma-oa mater
tby the xsutive Committee of
m a nme Operater' Associatioa
rtember 12, 10B, a its exulive ofil-
aOlsn. Adopted annual convention
Septeb 11 a the rgan alo of the -

Adatii AWil 27th, 1l, a the offiBsi
A In%
=mn of teIntertate Onue Gxwro As-
e ain. Adopted SAeptember 11, 1908, as
the only o sl u of the T. 0. A.
C---oi to lumber people by speca
reuthr adopted by the Georgis Swam

THK sscwiva Omaon
Tun 113COMMM OWIUCEL
T pbil plant ad the mar of-
Me of te Idustrial Beor Ompany
mre located at the intesectiob of By and
newnan Streets, JaeFwavle, FI& a th,

Th nvanamm, Ga, oamils i the Bo rd
f Tnad Bwildi Savanm I the led-
iaf Mope w ml tema market in the world.


NOTE TO PATRONS.
Payments far atirlain the In-
Jt2tWIl eMrd an s-.minlm thereto
mat be mue dlet to the .m rte i
JachaviBe. Apgmts ar not aMedv to
makb cetin.s ludr an y
Eigs fer atiog sao bausriptier ae
~t out ham taw INM 6 vis ago,
aid a remittamee ant be ma& direst
to thi= camf CO


RECORD ENTERPRISE.
We are pleased to announce that in
the future, beginning with the next issue,
we shall have a more complete naval
stores market, review and statistical de-
partment than ever before attempted by
any publication in the United States.
The Record has already secured the
services of an expert who will devote his
time to gathering and printing facts re-
garding the production, the consumption,
the shipments, the stocks, the compari-
sons; the causes for the prevailing prices,
and so on. He will point out and place
the responsibility for the market where it
belongs. He will gather and publish facts
heretofore left under cover. He will call
a spade a spade.
The Record will give closer attention
to naval stores affairs than it ever has
before.
The industry is growing-it is getting
more important rather than diminishing
in importance. On its success to a great-
er or less extent depends the success of
half the other industries in Florida.
As in the past, The Record will al.
ways be found working in the interests
of the producers. It knows no other doc-
trine. It will continue on the firing line,
and every operator knows and always
will know where to find his trade paper.

The Booster vs. the Boomer.
There is no more effective way of
boosting the South than in boosting its
towns and cities, each vicing with the
other and all working eanestly to ad-
vance their respective localities.


The best remedy for dull times is to get
busy and turn up something by mere
force of energy and effort and this gen-
erally succeeds. As the most successful
merchants are those who advertise most
in dull season so it is with regard to
general conditions; they can best be rem-
edied when adverse through additional
work and increased activities among all
classes and in every line of enterprise.
It is one of the most significant and
auspicious signs of a brighter era ahead
when we see so many of our towns and
cities taking up a boosting campaign.
This is being done in a regular, syste-
matic manner by many leading cities and
while in most instances the sole object*
had in view are merely to stimulate trade
with the adjacent territory, the result"L
are such as will tend to aid the entire
South.
No stronger card could be played for
every interest in this section than to
present to the world a scene of busy ac-
tivity that embraced all our leading
cities, each at work in boosting its own
local resources and advantages. Dull
times would have no show whatever be-
fore such general activities as this would
indicate and there would be progress and
prosperity here while stagnation ruled
elsewhere.
This would be far different from
"booming," as it was known in a former
era of the South, and which The Trades-
man has always condemned, for a "boom-
er" was one who sought for "suckers" to
be caught in a purely speculative game
and who were generally left high and
dry holding the empty bag while the oth-
er fellow had the swag. The South was
very seriously hurt by this class of boom-
ers, some of whom are still active in cer-
tain localities, exploiting purely "hot air"
schemes or speculative enterprises, and
which can prove of no lasting benefit to
any one, much less to this section gener-
ally.
But a "booster" is an entirely differ-
ent character and his energies are exert-
ed in an altogether separate direction. A
booster is an optimist and he is laboring
to dissipate pessimism which exerts a
blightening influence on all material ad-
vancement. A booster aims to build up
on existing foundations which he knows
to be solid and substantial and his ef-
forts are a distinct asset of highest value
for the community in which he lives and
labors.
The Tradesman has always considered
itself a booster for the South and never
a boomer, hence it has been a strong ad-
vocate for a general boosting campaign
that would embrace the commercial or-
ganizations, the press and the business
men of this section, first in a getting-
together movement so that when the
building up process and agencies as would
prove irresistable in a march of progress.
We have always realized that it was
chiefly on its own people that the South
must rely for its advancement, that every
one was an important factor in the work
of development and restoration in which
it was engaged, and so we have felt that
if there was only a spirit of self reliance
made manifest and a sentiment for united
effort created to build on what we already
had there would never be heard the voice
of pessimism anywhere in this fair land
much less any question either at home or
abroad as to its future greatness. Let's
all be boosters of the South by becoming
boosters of our own home towns and
cities!-The Tradesman (Chattanooga).


A NORTHERN WRITER ON
SOUTHERN MILLS.
An article in the Boston Transcript by
P. H. Goldsmith, D. D., describes con-
ditions in the cotton mills*of the South
in a manner quite different from the usual
attitude of Northern writers, giving facts
as they exist, and not mere theories.
Commenting on the article, the Colum-
bia (S. C.) State says editorially:
So much of what is palpable nonsense,
so much of downright misrepresentation,
so much of misconception and misstate-
nient, so much of outright lying, has been
written about Southern cotton mills that
the -incerity. the justice and the truthful-
ness of Doctor Goldsmith's article make
it unique. For it he deserves the grati-
tude of a people who have almost become
accustomed to being traduced and ma-
ligned.
We commend Doctor Goldsmith's article
in whole to the careful perusal of those
interested. Here we would direct atten-
tion only to a few of the salient points
evolved by the writer.
To those who would hold the mills re-
sponsible for the generally unhealthful
and undeveloped physical and mental
characteristics of the mill workers as a
class, Doctor Goldsmith points to the
fact that this condition must be "congeni-
tal, as it could hardly be acquired in the
brief period in which these people have
been in the factories." He harks back to
the hard conditions under which these peo-
p!e lived for generations before the mills
came into existence, conditions of poverty
and illiteracy, when body and mind alike
were scantily nourished, and he arrives at
most wholesome conditions surrounding
them in the mill communities the opera-
tives have steadily improved and will
continue to do so.
As to the charge that the mill em-
ployes are "poorly paid," Doctor Gold-
smith finds that, comparatively, they are
as well paid as the New England oper-
atives-when the difference in the cost of
living, clothing, and fuel is taken into
consideration. It is the difference, he
says. between "simplicity" and "complex-
ity," but "of so much I am sure; a com-
petent and thrifty New England opera-
tive, with fixed habits of steadiness and
good management, with the pay he could
get in South Carolina, and spending no
more than he would find necessary, in
view of his surroundings there, would
have more money at the end of a year's
work in that State, than he would living
here" (in New England).
"As to the alleged abuses in connec-
tion with the company stores," Doctor
Goldsmith "found no evidence of them at
the present time" and can "hardly under-
stand how it would be otherwise at pres-
ent, in view of the State law. and of the
scarcity and independence of labor, not
to mention the growing intelligence of the
laborers, who are quite ready to assert
their rights, of which they seem to be
pretty generally aware."
As to "white slavery," Doctor Gold-
smith is convinced that nothing that could
be described by that term is to be found
in South Carolina at the present time."
Of "peonage"-thank heaven at last
for the truth-the writer reports that he
is "unable to discover evidence of the ex-
istence in South Carolina of any condi-
tion which by the broadest interpretation
of the term could be called peonage.-


Sm.EOL MQ TS R

KUM EATS.
rUMimKM
6IINMhIff

HART, KeM rr-
ICR AMl MARX
CLOTHS.

WE
AIM
'0



QUALITY

OrU
SPECIALTY


THE STUART-BERNSTEIN CO.


Cotton Oil ill Statistics.
Taking as a basis some of the statis-
tics recently acquired by the association,
Major Robert Gibson of the Interstate
Cotton Seed Cliurshers' Association says:
"In the cotton seed industries there
are various branches, all with kindred
interests. There are 848 mills in the cot-
ton belt which are engaged in pressing
cotton seed for its products. In these
mills there are 2,008 presses and in con-
nection with them 2,752 ginstands and
3,126 winters. Allied lines are ice making
plants and the making of fertilizer of
several kinds.
"It is estimated that in the manufac-
ture of cotton seed oil and by products
more than $8,000,000 is invested. The
total valuation of the products of cotton
seed will likely run to $30,000,000 more.
This is an increase of about fifteen fold
in twenty-five years.
"Other estimates show that out of the
crop of 1906 there was used by the mills
about 4,000,000 tons of cotton seed, cost-
ing about $60,000,000. When made into
oil cake, hulls and winters and other prod-
ducts, there was a valuation of $00,00.-
000. These figures are for those mills
which do a crushing business strictly.
The crop is potential for an increase of
at least $40,000,00 which would go very
largely into the hands of cotton plant-
ers.
"At present but little more than half
of the total seed production of the coun-
try is crushed. Tennessee and Mississip-
pi crush about 85 per cent. South Caro-
lina uses less than half. Texas produces
more than a fourth of the cotton and
seed
"Consumption of cotton seed oil in our
own country has increased wonderfully of
late years. Less than half as much oil is
exported now as was sent away eight
years age. It is now about 25,000,000 gal-
lons. Less than a third of the value of


THE CLOTHIIE.

14 And 1 Wd1 Ill. JMakMit4, Fh.


U _.....-.








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7



Have You a Jewelery Store in Your Home?

It's hardly possible, though if you have one of our splendidly illustrated catalogues you are just as
well fixed. The catalogue is free and gives you illustrations and prices of hundreds of rich designs in


Diamonds, Rings, Brooches, Silverware, Watches and other Jewelry

Write us today and we will be glad to send you this art catalogue. Tell us what you want and we will quote you Special prices.

s. .s. UIL .S COMsPAY is w. BAY STREET J.ACsONVILLEc. PLA.
r-4


the cotton seed exported in 1900 was
aent out in 1907 for making into oil in for-
eign lands. It was less than 9,000 tons
last year. More than 500,000 tons of seed
have been sent out every year for a
number of seasons past. About one-
fourth of the total crush of oil and some-
thing like 40 per cent of the meal is now
exported.
"In a recent issue of a trade journal
it is stated that, assuming that all of the
cotton seed could be used on the farms for
fertilizer or other purposes, their value
would not be greater than $7.50. In the
black land belt of the South the seed was
not a fertilizer. The crushing, therefore,
has given to the farmer more than 100
per cent increase in the income from this
source, as the seed nowhere was lower
than $15 a ton this season. If the pro-
ducer, the manufacturer, the consumer,
the newspapers and the general public
would act sensibly in co-operation there
would soon be a value of not less than
15 a ton for the seed, and the total
products would have a value of not less
than $200,000,000 a year."


build on the part of those who have been
deterred by high prices of materials and
supplies. It is not out of reason to ex-
pect that this spring and summer will see
the high tide of building activity in the
South.

Possibilities for Turpentine in Northwest.
Washington, May 13.--L W. Hawley,
expert on wood distillation for the For-
est Service has just left Washington for
Oregon, Washington, Montana and Idaho,
to investigate the possibilities of a future
turpentine industry in the northwestern
portion of the United States.
Mr. Hawley has taken with him a small
distillation apparatus, which he will set
up at various places in these States, dis-
tilling the different woods to determine
their value in the production of turpen-
tine. In this manner an accurate idea
of the yield of extracts from the various
woods can be obtained, and samples of the
material will be sent to Washington for
analysis and estimation of its value for
use in paints, varnishes, and other naval
stores.
There are at the present time in the


High Tide in Building. Northwest, several wood distilling plants
Reports to the Southern Building Rec- which are producing various grades of tur-
ord from every city of importance in the pentine, wood preserving oils, and materi-
mSouth have a uniformly encouraging als of a similar "nature. It is believed
utor. We have not yet reached the point that a careful study of existing condi-
where personal expenses are recklessly as- tiona in this section will yield results
eumed, as they were a year ago, or where which will give an accurate idea of the
manufacturers can afford to give all of possibility of utilizing the enormous quan-
their time to producing an increased out- tity of saw mill refuse now going to
put, disregarding the uncomfortably high waste.
cost of production because the volume of
business gave compensation for increased B ac Paper, White Ink.
expenses, but we have reached the point If a proposition put forth by Wiscon-
where business men and capitalists are sin print paper manufacturers is taken as
reaching out for real estate and building seriously by Eastern manufacturers and
investments and are spending their money publishers as it is in Appleton, Wis.,
with confidence in the permanency and Americans in the near future will be read-
proit to be derived from the expenditures. ing black newspapers printed with white
From every quarter our reports tell of ink.
lumber mills and of cotton mills increas- The chief points advanced for the plan
ing their pay rolls to the number of thou-
ands, car builders are again returning to W A
work, building companies are letting con-
tracts that have been held in abeyance W I I
for six months or more, and capitalists AND
are going ahead with large building pro-
eets, which they are able to carry to a FOR S A LE
sueessful termination, a fact that has S
surprised many, on account of the restric- Rate for this eluma t s e ats per wod
tion of inances that has existed, for Ar irms ltle 1 eIt per word
There is without a doubt a material t following ins Ne40 aer t, sla
taken for less than0 eig f Samt, and
saving to be effected by contracting now 20 eent for following rtiam. C(h
for prospective building. All building ma- must accompany eders uless yOa av
trials may be purchased on a more satis- an account with a
factory basis now than they could have
been a year ago. In a number of Southern WANTED-Poition by competent Dis-
cities it is stated that the saving on all tiller; an furnish good reference. Ap-
materials ranges from ten to fifteen per ply to Box No. 21, Devon, Fla. 5-16-4t
cent. In one case certain materials are
said to be thirty-three and one-third per
cent cheaper than last year. These con- WANTED-A turpentine place or loca-
ditions naturally stimulate the desire to tion. Parties answering furnish schedule,


* 0'
0W
JOS. ROSENHEIM SHOE CO.
RANVFAGTVdE3S AD A"5331 OW


SHOES


: SAVANNAH. GEORGIA
"Bst Shes Made for Cm..srwy Trade."
suea0aum11ueM Iahu 11usrnau1nses1a8ssas.1eeeee&4108e8* *11,I


price and where located. W. B. Young,
MeHenry, Mis. -2-08
Record. a

WANTED.-Good, reliable stiller wants
position. Can furnish best references.
Address P. W. Eldridge, Westville, Fla.
5-11-9t


FOR SALE-Small turpentine place for
cash. Price WSAOW 0. Good backing. Ad-
dres Operator, ear Industrial Record. tf
-_
WANTED-Al emmimarls to ean ap
their barm of all kinds of eed maedk ald
burlapa We buy everything i the way
of macks. Write as. Amerim PFibre o.,
Jacksonville FLa

WANTED.-Position. Bookkeeper and
commissary man preferred. Will ride
woods. Healthy locality wanted. Six in
family. Sober. successful controller of la-
bor. Can bring few hands (good). Satis-
faction guaranteed. Addras Box 306,
Devon, Fla. 4-18-4t

POSITION WANTED-For turpentine
woodsman. Can give good reference. Sat-
isfaction guaranteed. Box 37, Devon, Fla.
4-18-4t
SALE MEN-You receive $1000 eash
daily selling merchants our $20.00 Auto-
matie Soda Fountain. Grant Mfg. Co,
Pittsburg, Pa. 4-11-4
POSITION WANTED-By experienced
turpentine man as manager of turpentine
place. Will buy an interest. Good refer-
ences. Address A. M C., 611 Ashley St.,
Valdosta, Ga. 3-28-4t

WANTED-A partner with $500 to go
into the naval stores business. Business
now open with good prospects. A perma-
nent business undertaking. D. D., care
Record. 4-4-St

TURPENTINE-MEXICO.-We control
absolutely 500,000 acres turpentine pine.
Guaranteed cost of transportation not to
exceed six cents per gallon from still to
seaport. Will sell outright or entertain
proposition to develop under valuable gov-
ernment concessions. If in earnest, write
for details. No agents need apply. Con-
ness Realty o., Conness Building, San
Antonio, Texas. 4-25-2


LIGHT SAW MILLS

Lam aW N s NMNims


Saws and Su lies,


Steam and Gaoline


Enines


Try


LOMB AR D

AUGUSTA. GA.

PMMsptW MMnwgry

Ctastf amid Dryrs




WHISKIES

GINS AND RIUM


$1.50to$5.00 per Gallo

...... AQS CY F O ......

Lewis 168 19I Meuu1t VeRne

strollers Blam's me ~m Vsm
Rye-Ag-ts for Ju~t (lrn and
Pabst Milwaukee erom. P less a ap.
pliUatio.

CHASE. BLUM A CO.
SIT AInd Si9 WEST SAY STET
JACMSOWVI.LU MEA.






a -M WarTE Y LNbU jrulAL k &coUXD.
-m m ... ..


Shriners' Oriental Feast at the Masonic


I
UJOSEPH


ZAPF CO


Temple Last Night.


Wholesaem Deslema inad tole cf
AN HIUSEIL-BUSC H
St. Louis Lager Blee


A splendid banquet served under the auspices of the banquet committee composed of Nobles
C I Streer and George White.


Wrns hr Prim


Cook I ot.
Why not
JAAMSNVLLE
Gas ,Am cm



Cypress Tanks
for AU PWpmM
BEST MADE
Wri fr causes

Preston Miller Co.
' DepL. 8 Ce~mt tty, Fla



P EC AN
P nam" ae hef w



EcUtOOf am
Sertasty d results
Amal crops
M"perslue product
Sperlorto a lots


STHEL OPPORTUNITY OF TODAY,
The first to paimt a pm groev
wMl be tai firt to rapa


Great her6t.
are the preservation of the forests, the 25th), at 8:00 P. M., in the Auditorium of Continental Hotel at the same place sn&d
saving of millions annually in pulp wood. the Board of Trade, Jacksonville, Fla., the most successful convention in thse for f ll ln r-- W a9e to
Black paper can be made of old and for the purpose of electing a Board of history of this association was held. T71e
used newspapers-almost any fibrous Directors and the transaction of such members who attended were delighted and; THE RIFFIH6 MOIS e.
stock. White paper requires spruce or other business as may come properly be- when the committee met for final adisi-j I
hemlock. The proposition will be brought fore the regular annual meeting. ion, although Toxaway Warm Springs,. La
to the attention of the Eastern print W. B. OWEN, Whiite Sulphur Springs and Asheville made-I
manufacturers and publishers. J. A. HOLLOMON, President. overtures for the meeting only -Atlantie
Secretary. Beach was considered.
ANNUAL METING STOCKHOLDERS, May 2, 4t. "Between 200 and 225 members ef tie
association, besides their families, will at- Walter MJulaU w,
JACK8O0 VILLI DEVELOPMENT Convention of Georgia Crushers. tend.
COMPANY. A special from Atlanta says: "During the last ten months the mem- i CERTmID PUlNUC ACCOWITAR
Notice is hereby given that the Annual "The Cotton-Seed Crushers Association bership of the association has increased 2 1 46-" Mtual ife ao
Meeting of the Stockholders of the Jack- of Georgia will meet at Atlantic Beach, fifty per cent and now includes every
sonville Development Company will be Fla., Monday and Tuesday, June 8 and 9. large oil mill in the State and represents 2 6
held o the fourth Monday in May, (May "Last year the association met at the a capital of several million dollars." X JACK TIU L. I"


11 111 1 a








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9
Capital $200S ,
HUTCHINSON SHOE COMPANY
VICTOR SHOES AND HATS
Wholesale 0 1 O Jacsonville, Fla'


HALF TONES-ZINC ETCHINGS
Illustrating and Engraving Department
F O


THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION
Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc
Etchings made to order in the most improved and artistic
fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of Com-
mercial Work, Pamphlets, Etc,
A Speela' Is Made of Deslgning, Reteling and
Embeathing Phetegraps and Pistures.
In Writing or applying for Prices, Give the Most Explicit Description of What is
Wanted. Good Work and Prompt Deliveries Promised.
A Florida Enterprlae. Try It.
*r g t


e Im etropolls
Is the Paper you want. It is published
daily and is from 12 to 16 hours ahead of
any other daily newspaper in Florida.

$500 a Year $2.50 Six Months
Full Telegraphic and Stock reports. If
you want to keep posted on the news, get
the Metropolis.

CARTER & RUSSELL PUB. CO.
JACKSONVILLE. FLODA.
-^l~l--w^^a-^^-^v- il^^^^


Want a TuVentine Location?
Want i Saw iln LeeAt and?
Wast ay Kimd of Fride Lad?


Meoa Bushless?
C 1 o e r Write t
Livingston &
OCALA. FLOR.0A.


Sons,


You
You

IFYo
J. H.


m hu-------------uu u------------- @188118 1


J. w Lt.


C.. P.smto
Vto4Pre.


JaSEM Melasit,
04'em


W. W. Wlder,
So. & Tress.


John R. Young Co.,


Commission
Merchants.


Naval Stores factors. Wholesale Grocers.
Savya,-,h ai Brunswick. Ga.*
1~~~~~~~~~1--- a~aaUlSUSSIIUUIUII iamu:


Mc KOY PATENT

STurpentine Cup.


The best and simplest cup
on the market. Detachable
Greater Capacity, easier
dipped ,more easily placed
on tree, stronger and prae-
tically indestructible. Will
not rust. For eataloa and
price list write


110o PIIEP T liiE OP 10.
1015 Hibmena ruilda
New Orleans. Louisana.


M. A. BAKER,


INVENTOR AND THE
MANUrACTUERU OF


BAKER IMPROVED SEAMLESS TURPENTINE SIILLS.











;Writ me f rlor O. u.za lp* itetkre trI-u belt.
wiur* *OM s un4 ar an an-ja -
WORK THROUGH THE COVNTIY PROMPLTLYATT iDED TO
The Largest and Oldest Copper Works is the, South.
| My specialty Is large worms a* d heavy bottoms that de sot leak
BRUNSWICK. GA. and PENSACOLA, FLA.
DIREBTORS: J. C. Stanley, J. E. Harris, D. M. Flynn, H. E. Prithett, J. C.
Edwards, W. C. Powell, J. P. Council.
OFFICERS: J. C. Stanley, Pres.; .1. E. Harris, VicePres.; K. B. Counndl, Seey.;
J. P. Council, Treasurer and Manager.

THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.,
Home Office -Jacksonville, Fla.
Factory: WAWrAWInS, C.
Manufacturers of Hith Grade Naval Stores Tools
IlII 8II lli llll I ll lllI ll ll I lllllllllllll lil i I iiii8i
J. A. G. CABsao, President J. F. DUs5NraY. lt Vice.Pisdeat
T T.A. Jam las. iad Vioe-Presldent. H. L KATTOM, 3d Vice-Presdeat sad wc.
H. F. E. ScsWr.a, Tresarer.

SJ. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,
S IIlll S1 FKMIIS i IlHESIlE ABOB .
-Main Office ALVAIN OROMa -R l
r.aeb Offleeo JACKSONVILL., PLA. msum.h miOr N.-, :
Naval Stores Producers are Invlted to Corweapeo With L/s.
. ...i .^............ ..i_. . .. ..... m J E . 1


llisaats **M i l l I l l T


p











10 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL R3EORD.




Southern Drug Mfg. Company
WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS AND MANUFACTURERS OF
flavoring Extracts, Packed Drugs, B. B. Bluing. Vinegar end Pyns's Popular Remedies.
We handle everything in the Drug and Medicine In*. Writ for prices. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


In the Court of the Oounty Ji
for Duval onmty, Florida.
In Pro
In the matter of the Estate of
John ( Oram, deceased,
In the ame of the State of Flork
Whereas, Katie E. Oram, as Adminn
trix of the Estate of John C. Orm,
eased, ha filed in this Court her ]
tiof, praying that she be ordered to 1
possession of the real estate describe
said petit to-wit: Lot. (1) One,
Two, () Three and (4) Four, in B
(11) Eleven, according to the map or
of IPblo Beach, North, in the Count:
Duval and State of Florida, which
map or t was duly recorded in
er ee of Duval County, Florii
Book 1 of Plate, pages 10 and 11, as
assets of the Estate of said decedent, J
a Oram; and that al persons in pao
sim of aid trat of lad or any
thereof, holding under said decedent,
render poisiom of the sum to said
iistratrix, and the Court will order
sale of said land at private sale to
the debts of said Estate
Thee are, therefore, to iete and adi
isMary B. Oam, of Barre, in the Co
of Wasingtm and State of Veram
Charles K Oram, of Brandon, Rut]
oanty, State of Vermont, Elisabetl
Oram, Lase J. Orm, Katherine M 0
and John CL Oram, Jr, all of the
town of Brandon, State of Vermont,
last two being minors, heir at lai
said decedent John C. Oram, Charla
Peeler, Esquire, as Guardian ad-litem
said minor heirs at law, and all pen
interested to appear in this Court on
30th day of May, A D. 1908, and
cause if any they have why the pr
of aid petition should not be granted
Witness my name and seal as Com
Judge of the County aforesaid this
18th day of April, A. D. 190
t court Seal.) KH PHILIP
4-45-1t County Ju

NOTICe or APPLICATION FOR L
TES PATET.
NOTICE is hereby give that the i
scribers hereto ill apply to the Gove
of the State of Florid on the 0th dal
May, A. D. 1908, for Letters Patent us
the following ppd charter
Lr l WHITE,
C L TROWEL,
PAUL NICKERSON,
FRANK HARRISON,
CLAUDE DENNY.
KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRP
ENTS, That we, the undersigned, do h
by associate ourselves together and f
a body polite and corporate under and
virtue of the law of t Stte o Flor
and do dopt the following Articles
Inorparation:
Article I.
Section 1. The name of this corporate
shall be "Whites Baking Company.
Section The general offices and
l ae of business of said corporate
county, Florida.
Article L
Section 1. The general nature of
tosR hbe in engaging in buying i
In wt holeale and retail, bake
god, bakers' supplies, fixtures and i
einy, and grosmries; maintaining
rati acd storage plant. It o
ao have full power to own, hold, b
sll, rent, lease and mortgage any aad
kinds of personal property aad real
tat; do a general brokerage and eom
alm business, either such as is neeess
to carry other huars heroin proi
: ; ur an pendt business.
Article u
. HI-m L. The amount of the auth
" mae"al stik of said eorporatian ml
he Tw y T1lln Dolua, diidid h


e-;
ds-
ary
CHAS. AL CLARK, In.
Cr- '111 '. F la ,
oi pone 186. Jachomaville. rila.
ste


Shares of One Hundred Dollars each.
Section All of the above named eapi-
tal stock shall be subscribed fr and paid
in full, either in eash, goods, property be-
longing to the besides or services render-
ed, the value of such property, labor and
services to be fixed by the undeigned in-
corporators before complete organization,
or by the Board of Director after com-
plete organlsation, at any meeting called
for such purpose.
section orty, labor and services
may be pirh d sad paid for with capi-
tal tok at a just valuation of such
property, labor and services, to be fixed by
the Board of Directors at any meeting
called for suchprp
Section 1. Said corporation shall exist
and continue for niety-nine years.
Article V.
Section 1. The business of said or-
poration shell be conducted by a Presi-
dent. Manager, Secretary, Treaurer, As-
sistant Treasurer and a Board of three
Directors, which aid Board of Directors
shall be made up of the President, Seere-
tary and Treasurer. The business of the
company shall be conducted by L. H.
White, President, Paul Nikerson manager
and C. Towell, treasurer, until the next
election of offers.
The ofies of Preident and Assistant
Treasurer may be held by one and the
same person, as well as the office of Sec-
retary and Tresurer. All of the afore-
said ofers must be stockholders and shall
be elected by the stockholders on the first
Tuesday in April, 1900, and annually
thereafter. They shall hold office until
their successors are elected and qualified,
provided always, that any or all of said
offers may, at any time, without notice,
be removed by the stockholders, and others
elected to ll suAk vacancies at any reg-
ular or speeal meting.
Article VI
Section 1. The highest amount of in-
debtedness to which said corporation can
at any time subject itself, is Five Thous-
and Dollars.
Article VIL
Section 1. The names, residences and
amount of stock subscribed for by each
of the subscribig incorporators, are as
follows:
L. H. White, Jacksonville, Fla., 185 shares.
C. L Trowell, Jacksonville, Fla., 10 shares.
Paul Nickerson, Jacksonville, Fla., 3 shares
Frank Harrison, Jacksonville, Fla., 1 share.
Claude Denny, Jacksonville, Fla., I share.
L IH WHITE,
C. L TROWEL,
PAUL NICKERSON,
FRANK HARRISON,
CLAUDE DENNY.
State of Florida, County of Duval, ss:
Personal appeared before the subsri-
ber, a Notary Public in and for the State
of Florida at Lage, L. H. White, C. I.
Trowell, Paul Nikeron, Frank Harrison
and Claude Denny, who are each person-
ally known to me, and known to me to be
the persons who signed the foregoing Ar-
ticles of Incorporation And each acknowl-
edged to me that he signed and made him-
self party to sueh Articles of Incorpora-
tion for the purposes therein expressed.
In witness whereof, I have hereunto t
my hand and od(ial seal this 10th day of
April A. D. 190.
8AML W. FOX,
(Seal.) Notary Public.
Commission expires July 31, O199.


DIAMOND VALUES DON'T FAIL

W hen your m money is invested In good D ia e ds, you eed sn r
worry about the markets. We have one of the most superb Hne of p u
Diamonds in the South. Come and ee for yourself.

11-13 339
an St. HESS & SLATER 3.9BS
M4ain St.
Jaemonvmsse, Pla.




BEST TANKS
ON EARTH

Ar AM s in Pi, Fla., by IL Davis a
son. hqsalstsd n rid Woek-
oof e au tth e
..d the ene1biandom **.
r fiMt. Writth faor p ieSd fti
toermadieIs you buy A too

SO. M. DAVIS & SON, Paltka a. faL











Savannah, Ga..
Fehctors .nd Commission Merchsnts r
Ship to Savannah Get Competition Highest Prie Promptest Retarn
Correspond With UV




************Oo ********************e**. ,******** s***O

SJ. S. Schofeld's Sons Co pany,
*******************-.*** **-*** *****-*. *-*s* *


; 1 Distiller's Pumping

Outfit.
0 No plant complete wishlto om.
SH udedsof Eg thes in s- in e-MorNgA
,South Wuaronna. r o p i
Sland prIce. we a manfmctr $e
5 lEumais, eHirns. Woa

Grk MUM. Y.
as well as carry a fall and e mplete

i MW Suppims, PlM
-- ~ TOeM -

iH Advise your wants.
SMacon, -- Georgia.
Si as do*************
* MiN at Tmi Wi t far TIhmmdms Fems *









BEFORE MAKING YOUR PURCHASE!
--se The-

KNIGHT CROCKERY



FURNITURE COMPANY
rrmmsIO~~Y Ifi xL


06 Q. Ambli.
CL A. Faemwor
." EL an&.
U. atWee1
S. U Usa.
QIL JIM&


D. Q m1UmWr. m Vim hdIL
and Cement in~r
G. A. P9T1hWAY, Ud Vis IP-es.
. 11 ASHLEY. U Vik Pr..
S. IL WG. Xwc MA Trresi


DIRECTORS:
I. W. aonst
L A. C r.
T. G. c~dha9..h
A. &. ftsilao.,
AL G. Leanhair.
. K. AAibty.
W. T. &. llrdmo.


PENINSULAR NAVAL STORES CO.
Commission Merehents
and Wholesale Grocers
wshUs- bjwT fanpiad TFernauWidinba,

CapitSl stock. $1000.000.
c, ii. ...a.x........T .ooo...,,,:,,,,...wK,


. D. W .n.


W. D. KRENSON


J. D. WEED L CO.,

Savannah, Georg&i

HEADQUARTERS FOR

Hoop Iron, Turpentine Tools,

Batting, Etc.


PLANTERS

"Old Time" Remedies
THE jot or THE NOSNL
Theiss few Its D ua 2l0
a" cu OIL C ); bowo@K Wih own-a W-dot
Mo e inready sa BeI ha ai ftbg ft* SI.uiu "u6"a


=nAl?.Jummsd ama p . yuu rirs 1CkrY
CUaN 3Wf~~ilV-rth mfa wPait Kflr w
CU@6 N OmuILofb. ggin, a Nr m Ian& IA IN
aleym rh"mi. sca sees y a wintusan al any f vhs am


as se n se Amnesi a ON m a. rres; and a Is a b i
rL es IT r b 'YoW I 511111 ItsmM
wousm and ioppedan famal Trouble. rz wM brlin yo* bma ts

CuM. LM-lisinstnt ~ KloBfr ~Coew
%amw omr awhi m g oabr Dlr~r w, vbnbn IL'-"
81=i rri a an htdnmft rowdy a" Issobviffieted 6 at "" fin a



MWd us frM
SPENCER MEDICINE CO. C Tof i t' d

C LUIUM Cnwub i t I Wl._ KYI




CuWW Leaf O AD Pft
MOXXV AM Mln II


W. L. WLMON,
Pres a Iemes.


JNO. f. EANNIS,
Yce hm.


4Le a MC WW'


Florida Cooperage Compeny

MANVFACTUREVA OF


Turpentine, Cotton


sedw Oil Dup


and Syrup Barrels.
Office mId wFasty Enterprlie mi rEm SMb.
Telephone 1855 Jacksovlllle, Ie


McMillan Bros.


Southern Copper
Works

Manufacturers of TURPENTINE STILLS
Complete Outfits and Extra Kettles, Caps, Arms, Worms, fIr-
nace Doors and Grates always on hand
Old Stills taken' New Work "saits
pay= M dw ent~a xtuts


Heavy C.pers-iti.g Steam Pipe anl
Jacksonville,


8"" cow W"
FMae.


Mm Fayettevlk.N. C.


-- ------9-r~isrrr


I


Savanah, 6a.


Aw-"s W~











Special Watch Sale



Price $15 Complete < Price $15 Complete


(


Filled


Case


15 JEW E.ED

WALTHAM

MOVEMENT


14 Kt. SoUd Gold sem


14 Kt.


So"d God SAM


Greenleaf & Crosby Company

41 West Bay St. Jacksonvile, Fla.


ni-u.. iuumu:uu *uu:uuuu uuuuuuu ; iii :1131 iii ~


a ** aI


a a ******* a


9 9 rr U wa- I- 1 TOW


Barnes & Jessup Company


Jaftknvillft Florea.


Nl..e Stor. rector. and Commisson 7
Merchants.

ornICEiLS
C. L. Uwnesi Pro~ant. J A. Ewlg. Vio-Proldent.
5. W Sereteary umd Treasurer.
DIWLRCTOLa C.k Bare. J. A. EIa. R.S. Hal.l
J..L ERC.a Lag, W. E. CUnamr, E.b W0111. W .
Jeafmlad. 0. W. Teyler

THU OLUMT WHISEY HOUSE IN
THE BOUTH. (atablisbl in zixs.)
OL) H.A3 P WLLjAMIS-Pure FIrn
OM !wf D tw lB Uk. S3.0; four full
and MHllow. By the gallon *.75; four
funi
WhhkeY.By the plkm P1o; four full
four fun qmts *A.M, expvm prepai
OLD MIVtiA.X CKORN-Diret from
Badn Waswas; s.e and od. By the
= : p,; fer Ma qwuats $3.j cpres
OwD P oor= C UB ORN-b sa"o

th a mvr a rlftau Liquoer Company
?4, 13&. is. TAM W. a&y aoe" J- ae*aMvl r,
a'a3 l .. unima4


L V.


- I
F 11 1


aM. K InY
L tHA--
yhnpaujbef


tmfet Iea
A^WL N -


WEST FLYNN HAIS CO.
on--, orwe-m0ol ^"^ M
WEST ULDS. Jiihanili.bi.

NAVAL STORES FACTmOR
NAVAL STORES 3CUVU AT SAVAIAM., A, JAmM---* I
nFLA. AD rrWamWrWA, nA.
Wlhalue GroC aim Dealers in Hay. Graa a" Hwny
Harne.

SOLE AGENTS *" .-,
MUHMANF VARSHOUKM
SAVA AH JACKIaONVILm IA TAMIA, w
- - - - - -


WILLIAM A. SOURS


JAMS. I*M OT


WIWAMLBOURS bA
1u -er aImwaiue ss ss am-l a nmue
lb,. Oral e4d, on
seeb, Pulry spli S W.
aOt Mw1 -- -I-I-i-L
m mUen: neUT s.AYk T1nsift M 4"
20 eAST mY ST.. JammrhSUmL A


25 YEAR

14 Kt. Gold


4


a a a


- ~- "------~


I __ _


------'-"""'


"'


v v v v v


V V V . . . . .


, w w