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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00266
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: April 11, 1908
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00266
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text





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T. g. A. Enuetl Curo tilmb Apr15,
Every member of the Exeeutive Committee of the
Turpentine Operators' Aesoeiation is urged to be in
attendance at the meeting of the Committee at 10:30
o'clock Wednesday, April 15th. The meeting will be
held in the office of the Secretary, J .A. Hollomon, in
the Realty Building.


JACKWU VILLI, FLA.


SAVANNA, OGA.


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TW3P3NTINE BARRELS ATLANTIC COOPELRAO CO.
We have b ees M llr ov Staves for yeas and seleet tO vry best took for our barrel.
killed Onopers Imp olB J emt bealaing baiuess in Jacksmville and we solicit a ahae of your pat-
reSge. Sped as elsodeor.
J. M~ldW r.w T. VA s.e. 00 em5..e. - a s.lle v .hm


.M...O *m:=.


-b--------h--imnsu"u' i.:,hhm'hboas::huuuuhhhhu


W. Wni.
Sea. & Yraas


John R. Young Co.,

Commission
Merchants.

Mla Stres rgts. Wuae racers.
Savamah a Brunswict. Ga.


--------------- ---------


obeomotlives and Car
3LOCOMOTV. ALL CLASSES. BOVOUT AND SOLD


a


LOOOUI CArS AND LOCOMOTIVES A iSPCIALTY


-i-nM Ir-IMOW ANm CAR COMPANY, -
0.. cmRIATAs. 0wI oaw**


ATLANTA, GA.


East Coast Lumber Co.
SouMH AND DRBSSE D LONO LBA

Yellow Pine Lumber

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lot
IStessmer Shipmefts a Spely.

WATERTOWN. FRLO ,DA


THE COMMERCIAL BANK
JACKSONILLE. FLA. Brmc es: oals d uo
Te largpt .le.adles Sbae B k Jacksamvnll. l em-dmd e s d M
fashioned striel.y smewalve m ad is e o e to tmo gr emmp
by the aCompr erit
arIndiMseem a" won, Ais maldias.
L. Rasma, Vw.. a owVs, N.
Puit. Viow-prelem. ar.


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-----"-_ -- --I --- -- ------ --


L -

CONSOLIDATED NAVAL STORES COMPANY.

Home Office: JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Brachles: Savannah, Ga., and Pensacl9/a, Fla.

OFFICERS.
WAurmR i. OQUCWMAN, Premidt; D. H. Mm rAN, H. L. OOVINGTON, JOHN H. POWELL, R. B. POWELL and W. J. KELLY, Vim Preaidet.
J. a JTTL, asry and Trurr at Jacksonvlle; J. Q. HODGER, Amuitant Secretary at Savannah; J. K. ROZIER, Assstant Secretary at Pinmeal
JXUL6xrIlV CODmaLxxl d: .W.W. summer, W. F. 08mhman, W. J. Hillma, C. B. Rogers, dad A. Hubbard.
DMZl~TOa: W. J. HPilm W. W. Summer, D. H. MeMllan, W. F. oadhmun, W. C. Powell, L. L ovingtoi, C. B Rogers, Jon H. Powell, A. Hb-
hbd. A A d,. W, C. . Power, W. . Klly.



NAVAL STORES FACTORS


Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
The Csolldated" Is purely a co-operatlve Company. Its Interests are Identical with these
of t9k Producers. The patroage of turpentlne operators everywhere lavited.
Two MIllon acres of Land and Timber for sale on easy terms.
Pwr*due are Invited to call or orrespond.


JA-d I^ft


188


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WEEKLY


INDUSTRIAL


RECORD.


PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. DEVOTED TO NAVAL STORES, LUMBER AND MANUFACTURINmG iriK mfl

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Leaders of the Shotter Combine Again Indicted For

Combining to Restrain and Monopolize the Naval

Stores Trade, and the Industry.

Read the indings of the Grand Jury and Recall Some of the Charges Made From Time to Time in the Indusrial Record.


The federal grand jury at Savannah re-
turne indictments late Saturday eight
agait te la f the of entire Shotter
camrin% including Shotter, Nash and
Myew--the -"ig three"--ad all of the de-
fedants, of which Carl Meller, the mana-
ger of the Jacksonville branch, is one, have
been pced under o bonds each.

Some weeks ago it was stated in the
Record that a federal grand jury in Sa-
vannah would soon be called upon to in-
vestigate the Shotter combine to ascer-
tain whether or not the American Naval
Stores Co., and allied corporations, were
violating the Sherman anti-trust law.
It will be recalled that it was not so
many months ago that one S. P. Shotter,
together with a number of other of his
immediate business associates, were fined
heavily by Judge Emory Speer, of Geor-
gia, for a violation of the same law. Now
it is alleged the same old crowd is back
at its same old tricks.
A large number of witnesses from Flor-
ida and Georgia points and from New York
and other selling points, were summoned
to Savannah and the hearing before the
grand jury began Thursday. From ques-
tions asked the grand jurors to test their
qualifications it was made to appear that
the operations of the American Naval
Stores Company, the Atlantic Naval
Stores Company, the Peninsular Naval
Stores Company, the Patterson-Downing
Company, and the Downing Company will
be under fire. The jurors were asked spee-
ially whether they are employed by or re-
lated to Messrs. Spencer P. Shotter, J. F.
Cooper Myers or E. S. Nash.
Judge Shepard, of Florida, who presided
in the absence of Judge peer, delivered
the charge. The judge didn't enter into a
discussion of the turpentine industry par-
ticularly, but gave in the charge in gen-
eral terms the Sherman law relating to-
combinations in restraint of interstate
commerce. The court room was crowded
Sand the charge was listened to with great
interest.
In his charge to the jury Judge Shep-
pard said:
"You have been called together at the
instance of the United States attorney to
investigate such matters as may be
brought to your attention by that officer.
All offenses against the United States,
which may be punished infamously, must
be begun and investigated by your body,
and your power in this respect is unlimit-
ed.
"Courts of the United States have no
common law jurisdiction, therefore your
inquiries must be directed only to such
offenses as have been created by act of
Congress. There are many and various


statutory offenses, and I assume that dur-
ing your deliberations at this term you
will have only to deal with that offense
denounced by Congress as unlawful com-
binations in restraint of interstate com-
merce.
"Modern development of the resources
of the country and the consequent combi-
nation of capital and investment make
necessary the protection of the public
from monopoly and combinations, which
affect commerce between the States and
foreign nations. Therefore Congress has
enacted what is known as the 'Sherman
act,' or anti-trust law, three sections of
which I quote:
Retraint of Trade.
"'Section 1. Every contract, combina-
tion in the form of trust or otherwise, or
conspiracy, in restraint of trade or com-
merce among the several States, or with
foreign nations, is hereby declared to be
illegal. Every person who shall make such
combination or conspiracy shall be deemed
guilty of a misdemeanor.
"'Section 2. Every person who shall
monopolize, or attempt to monopolize, or
combine or conspire with any other per-
son or persons, to monopolize, any part of
the trade or commerce among the several
States, or with foreign nations, shall be
deemed guilty of a misdemeanor.
'Section 3. The several Circuit Courts
of the United States are hereby invested
with jurisdiction tS prevent and restrain
violations of this act.'
"Monopoly in the prohibited sense in-
volves the element of exclusive privilege
or claim which restrains others from the
exercise of the right or liberty, which they
had before the monopoly existed. In com-
mercial law it is said to be the abuse of
free commerce, by which one or more in-
dividuals obtain the advantage of selling,
alone, or exclusively, all of a certain kind
of merchandise or commodity to the det-
riment of the public.
What Monopoly Means.
"It will be observed that by an analy-
sis of the term monopoly, there are found
two elements, vis.: an exclusive right or
privilege on the one side, and a restric-
tion or restraint on the other, which will
operate to prevent the free exercise of a
right or liberty open to the public before
the monopoly was secured. This I think
is the general meaning of the term as im-
plied in the second section, which reads:
'An attempt to monopolize any part of the
trade or commerce among the States,' and
must be an attempt to secure or acquire
an exclusive right in such trade which pre-
vents others from engaging in such trade.
"A monopoly which would be a violation
of section 2 of the Sherman anti-trust aet


could be said to exist when one or more
persons or companies, by any means other
than fair and legitimate competition, se-
cure control of a substantial part of the
trade between the several States and for-
eign nations in any particular articles of
commerce, such as turpentine and rosin,
commonly called naval stores. It need
not be a complete monopoly, so long as
their methods have a natural tendency to
drive out legitimate competition and se-
cure a substantial combination and con-
trol of such commerce.
"Such monopoly might be secrd by
one person or company or by several per-
sons or companies acting jointly in com-
bination or conspiracy with each other, in
divers ways, such as manipulation of mar-
ket quotations by fictitious sales or pur-
chases; by secret contracts or agreements
with supposed competitors not to bid
against each other for the purchase or
sale of such commodity; by the division
of territory for purchase or sale of msuh
commodity between the parties of such
combination; by overbidding for the pur-
chase and underbidding for the sale of
such commodities against their competi-
tors at ruinous prices; by false grade aad
gauges of such commodities-if all or any
of such methods are adopted for the pur-
pose of driving competitors out of such
business and thereby securing for them-
selves a more complete control of such
commerce.
A Conspiracy De ned.
"This offense, which I have previously
defined within the purview of the Sherman
act is committed generally by a conspiracy.
A conspiracy as an offense against the
United States defined and denounced by
section 5440 of the Revised Statutes, is
committed when two or more persons agree
together to commit any offense against
the United States, and one or more of
such persons to the agreement do any act
to carry out the object to the agreement
or conspiracy. Therefore, if you in your
investigation should find that there has
been a conspiracy to violate the provis-
ions of the statute I have just read to
you, and in your judgment the testimony,
which may be presented before you, unsx-
plained and uncontradicted, would warrant
a conviction for such offense, it would be
your duty to return a true bill.
"It is not the province of a grand jury
to hear both sides of a case. It is essen-
tially a secret investigation. The accused
is not put on trial until there is an in-
dictment, when he is arraigned in the
court, he is to be heard by himself, his
counsel and witnesses. What evidence or
kind of evidence would warrant an indict-
ment, you must be the judges. Evidence


before you is not to be judged by its vol-
ume, but rather by its signliane, it an-
not be measured, counted or weighed in
any sense of the words. The only stand-
ard for measuring or weighing evidence is
by its effect upon the belief and conmsiene
of fair and impartial men, trying to amser-
tain the truth.
Should Scrutinaia Testimony.
"The grand jury in all case should saru-
tinize the testimony before them, and
should be satisfied before bringing in an
indictment that the evidence before them
and the testimony adduced, meostradieted
and unexplained, would warrant a ptt
jury in finding the party charged guilty
of the offense
"Any other sort of investigation or iad-
ing might subject innoent prseams to
grave injustice and hardship for which
there is no reparation.
"Exercising the right of scrutiny over
the proceedings of your body, you may
look to the motives, the bis, aad preju-
dice of witnesses called before you, no
good citizen should be subjected to the
vindictiveness of his enemies in the grad
jury room. On the other hand, let your
investigation be fearless and untrammeled.
You should inquire into the conduct of in-
dividuals should they be charged with la-
fractions of the law, no matter who or
what they may be. The law is intended
for all, ad as long as it is fearlessly and
impartially enforeed against the rich and
strong, as well as agaiat the poor and
weak, just so long the people will have
confidence in the administration of justice
and respect the courts.
"I am sure you understand aad appre-
eiate fully the responsibilities imposed by
your oath, they are co-ordinte with those
of this court, we hae the one purpose and
desire to do our duty as we see it. We
may risk with eonfidenee the consequences
of duty well and impartially done"
Investigation Threogh.
The examination of witnesses continued
through Friday and Saturday, the grand
jury going carefully and determinedly into
the entire situation.
Late Saturday afternoon, a result of
its investigations, an indictment on three
counts was returned by the United States
grand jury against the interests that have
been charged with effecting and meatain-
ing a combination in restraint of the ma-
val stores business of the country.
Made defendants under this indictment
are the Americae Naval Stores Oempany,
the National Transportation and Terminal
Company, 8. P. Shotter as chairman of the
board of directors of the American Naval
Stores Company, Bdmund BS Nash as Ht
president, J. F. Cooper Myers as its vice-









4 THB WmEIKLY muvUtrrKA RECORD.



rVHIITE OAK SPIRITS BARRELS

Guaranteed to conform to specifications Savannah and Jacksonville Board of Trade.

Write to Coumbus Barrel Mt C., Columbus, Ga., or to HENRY ELSON, florida Mgr., JackMeuvll, rl.


president, C. J. DeLoach as its secretary,
George Meade Boardman as its treasurer,
and Carl Moller as manager of its Jack-
sonville branch.
Immediately after the grand jury made
its report to the court, Judge William B.
Sheppard, presiding, four of the defend-
ants, who were in Savannah, were arrest-
ed.
Bond was fixed at $5.000 each, and this
was promptly furnished, and the men re-
leased from custody.
What Is Charged.
The defendants, as named above, are in-
dicted jointly. The three counts in the in-
dictment are as follows:
The first count charges the defendants
with combining and conspiring in restraint
of trade in naval stores.
The second count charges them with
combining to monopolize the naval stores
trade.
The third count charges them with mo-
nopolizing and attempting to monopolize
the naval stores industry.
The indictments, with its three counts.
is brought under sections one and two of
the Sherman anti-trust law.
The indictment, after setting up the
three charges as given above, alleges that
these purposes were accomplished by:
"Centreltag, manipulating and arbitra-
rily bidding down and depressing the mar-
ket price of spirits turpentine and rosin,
- that competitors and producers could
nt sell said artices of commerce except
at ruinous prices"
It is further alleged that these things
were done, in part, by "Coercing and
causing naval stores receipts, which nor-
mally and naturally flow to one port of the
United States, to be diverted to another
port of the United States.
"By purchasing thereafter at divers
times a large part of its supplies at naval
stores ports known as closed ports, and
wilfully and with deliberate intent and
purpose of depressing the market, refrain-
ing from purchasing any appreciable part
of its supplies of naval stores on the Sa-
vannah market, where its purchases, if
made, would tend to strengthen price and
the market therefore, the said Savannah
market being the basis or primary market
in the United States for naval stores, the
defendants taki the receipts at the
desed perts of Pensacola, Tampa, Fernan-
dina, Gulfport and Mobile on a basis of the
market at Savannah.
By coercing factors and brokers into
entering into contracts with the defend-
ants fr the storage and purchase of their
receipts, ad refusing to purchase from
such factors and brokers unless such con-
tracts were entered into.
"By circulating and publishing false
statements as to naval stores production
and stocks in hands of producers and their
immediate representatives.
"By issuing and causing to be circulated,
ad hypothecating fraudulent warehouse
receipts.
"By fraudulently grading, regrading and
raising grades of rsins, and falsely gag-
ing spirit of turpentine.
Attempting to Bribe.
"By attempting to bribe employes of
competitors and factors so as to obtain in-
formation as to competitors' business and
stocks.
"By inducing consumers by payment of
bonuses, and aby threats of boycott, to
postpone dates of delivery of contract sup-
plies, thus enabling the defendants to re-
frain frm purchasing such supplies, which
purchases would ted, if made, to strength-
en the market and prices.
."By making tentative offers of large
quantities of naval stores, under prevail-
ing markets, intending then and there to
accept only contracts for small quantities
and to cover these sales by subsequent
purchases to be made on a market thus de-
presed by the aforesaid fraudulent offers.
"By at divers times selling spirits of
turpetine and rosin at prices far below
tho actual cost themselves, so as to cem-


ACCOUNTANRTS
T. G. Hutechinoa, Jacksnville, Fa.
Walter Mauekiw, Jacksoville Fl
AXES.
J. D. Weed & Co., Savannah, Ga.
BArXS
Commercial Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
BEER--WTOI Ifa ?g
Chas. Blhm & CO., Jacksonville, fm.
.oseph Zapf & 00, Jackaowvfll. rAI
BAREL STAVELS
East Coat Lumber C., Watertown,
Florida.

BOXES AND CRATS.
Cummor Lumber Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
CROCKERY.
Knight Crockery and F enitme Ia,
Jacksonvile, Fla.

CLOTHING.


HATS.
Stuart-Bernstein Co., Jacksonville. Fla.
HARDWARE.
amp Hardware Co., Tamps, Fla.
Weed & Co.. J. D.. JSavannah. Oa.
HAY AND JRAII.
Bour A Co.. Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla
HATS.
Standard Clothing Co.. Jacksonville. Fla
HOOP IRON.
J. D. Weed & Co., Savannah, Ga.
HOTELS
Duval Hotel. Jacksonville. Fla.


PAINTS
Bond & Bours Co, Jascki ille F
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Ma.
PLANINO MILL
Duval Planing Mill Co., Jacksoanvle, a.
PHOSPHATE MACHINRI Y.
Lombard Iron Works & aSpply C., Au-
gusta, Ga.
PUMPI.
Schofeld's Sons Co, J. 8, Masea, Ga.


I A4tlantil Cost Line.
Zahm's European Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.


IRON WORKS.
Sehofeld's Sons Jo., J. 8., Maeon. Ga.
JEWELERS.
R. J. Riles Co., Jacksonvill, Fla.
Greenleaf & Croeby Co., Jacksonville, As
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
LUMBERI


Standard Clothing Co.. Jacksonville. Fla. D" Onst Lumber o., Watertown,
Stuart-Bernstein Co., Jacksonville, Fla. Florida.


COP-ER SMI
McMian Brothes Jachsavie, Savan-
nah and MoNe.
M. A. Baker, Brunswlek, Ga.
COOPERAGE.
blorida Cooperage to.Jaeksonville, Fla.
Atlantic Cooperage Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS.
Wm.. D. Jones, Jackaovile, F.
DRUOS-WHOLESALE.
Groover-tewart Drug Co, Jacksonville,
Fl.
Tampa Drug CO., Tampw NI
Southern Drug MA. CO., Jasksonville, Fla.
ZeGIWnZ
Sehoield's Sons Co, J. 8., Mason, Ga.
Lombard Ire Weks and apply Co, Au-
1s0a. Ga.
ruujzuuxE.
Knight Crockery and Furnitue Co.,
Jacksoavill, FL.
Ramis, Jaeksoavme, F.


Bours & Co., Wa. A., Jackonville, Fla.
moUUDRKUma.
Shofield's 8oa- 0, J. 8. Macon, Ga.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS.
The Chas. A. Clark C, Jacksonville, 1Fs.

GAS.
Jacksonville. Oas Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
GUTlSr FURNISHERS.
standard Clothlr Co., Jacksonville. Fla.
Stuart-Berstena Co., Jacksonville, Fl.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
Williams Co., J. P, Savannah. Ga.
Young Co, Joh ., avanamh, OG.


LIQUORS.
Blum a Co., Chas., Jacksonville, Fla.
Altmayer & Flatau Liquor Co., Maoon,
Ga., and Jacksonville, Fla.
Joseph Zapf & Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.
MEDICI ES.
Spencer Medicine Co.. Chattanooga, Tean.
MACHINE WORKS.
Schofleld's Sons Co., J. 8, Maeon. Ga.
Lombard Iron Works. Augusta, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR TURPKNTINE PRO-

Schofield's ons Co., J. 8., Macon, Ga.
METAL WORKERS&
McuMla Bros. C ., Jacfonvfl, mau-
nah and Mos.
Baker, M. A, Brunswiek, G., and Pensa-
eola, Fla.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Sebofield'e Sons Co., J. S., Maeon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co, J. D., Savannah, Ga.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
MONUMENTS
Tampa Monumental Works, Tampa, FIL
MULES AND HORSE
W. A. Cook, Tampa. IL
NAVAL STORES.
Penin-ilar Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville
and lampa, Fla.
Barnes & Jessup Co.. Jacksonville. Fl.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
West-Flynn-Harris Co., Jacksonville, Fa.
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
Young Co., John R., Savannah, Ga.
Southern States Naval Store C., Savn-
ah, Ga.


SAWMILUA.
Lombard Iron Works & upply Co., Au-
gusts, Ga.
-ZZL
Bours & Co.. Wi. A, Jacksmsuvll, Fa
SHNP TARBD
Cummer Lumber Co, JaeksonvnIle F
SHOES-WHOLESALI.
Hutclinson Shoe Co, Jacksonvll Fi.
Jos. Rosenheim Shoe Co., Savanaah, a.
SHOES-RETAIL.
Stuart-Bernstein Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
TANKS
G. M. Davis & Sons, Paltka, Fa.
Schofleld's Sons Co., J. 8, Maces, Ga.
Preston MIler Co, Cresent City, Fa.
I uRPsau xs ARMRELS.
Atlantie Cooperage Co., Jacksoville, la.
Florida Cooperage Co., Jackaovife, ra.

TURPNllArs STILLS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswik, Ga, and Pw-e
cola, Fln.
McMilla Brthers .C, .JaStassdvea
Savannah and Mif.

TIMBER LAD
Jaeckonville Development OC, Jakson-
ville, Fla.
TUEPE LINS TOOLS.
Council Tool Co., Jaksonvlle, Fla.
J. D. Weed a Co. avannah, Ga.
WATCHED.
Greenleaf & Croby Co., Jacksonville, Fla
Hess & 81ager, Jacksonville, ia.
R. J. Riles Co., .laksoevifll, Fa.
YELLOW PINE LUM ER.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, FM
East Coast Iumber Co., Watertow. Fa


WM. D. JONES

PRESCRIPTIsU S OCIUsJLT


FAMILY DRUGGIST
107 1. BAY ST.
Mail OCdo BSoud-a


Industrial Record's Buyers' Directory

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TPHU WEEIKLY ThNT)TRTRT AT flWMfTI


i


THE GROOVER-STEWART ORIm 0.,

roMfmv. THE OIrWT. W _in.
Whuleeale DBegsw, OI"me el, DreWats amre Om.msVy 8eelV s
-am n -s.


pel competitors to meet prices which would
be ruimou to themselves a well as to
their competitor.
"By wilflly and arbitrarily fixing the
price of turpentie in the United States
below the cost of production."
The Former Indictment.
Ever since the present investigation be-
gan references and inquiries have been
many as to the former indictments, and
when the present indictment was returned,
many interested in the battle that has now
begun in earnest have asked which of the
defendants indicted this time were made
defendants under the old indictment.
The former indictment was returned by
a grand jury in Judge Speer's court on
February 11, 1907. Those who are de-
fendants in the present case and who were
also defendants in that case, are as fol-
lows:
8. P. Shotter, chairman of the board of
directors of the American Naval Stores
Company, and at that time president of
the S. P. Shotter Company.
J. F. Cooper Myers, vice president of the
American Naval Stores Company, and
then vice president and general manager
of the S. P. Shotter Company.
Carl Moller, of this city, whose position
then was similar to that he holds now.
The National Transportation and Ter-
minal Company.
Those indicted this time, and who were
not defendants in the other case are
George Meade Boardman, treasurer of the
American Naval Stores Company, C. J.
DeLoach, secretary of the same company;
the American Naval Stores Company, and
Edmund S. Nash, president of that com-
pany.
At the time the other indictment was
returned, the bond of the defendants was
fixed at $10,000 each, and this bond was
promptly furnished.
The report in the Times-Union, from its
special correspondent in Savannah, stated
that "one indictment containing eight
counts was returned against each of the
defendants."
The number of defendants in the former
action was larger than that in this new
case.
On February 18, 1907, the pleas of guilty
were entered, and the report of those pro-
ceedings, of February 19, 1907, reads:
"In the United States court the S. P.
Shotter Company, the Patterson-Downing
Company, the Standard Naval Stores Com-
pany, and the Belgium Company, crporra-
tions, and S. P. Shotter and J. F. Cooper
Myers, individuals, known as the Turpen-
tine Trust, entered pleas of guilty to a
violation of the Sherman anti-trust act.
"Judge Emory Speer fined each individ-
ual and corporation $5,000, making an ag-
gregate of $30,000.
"The other individuals indicted had their
indictments nolle pressed.
"Shotter and Myers agreed, in writing,
not to violate the law again."

HUTCHINSON AUDIT CO.
PUBLI ACCOUNTANTS & AUDIT
Dyal-Upc ceh Buihiac
phmns r up a N'u viN* u
Pheme ass. Seekeeville, 1


TO THE NAVAL STORES MEN OF
FLORIDA.
I would invite your attention to some
of the various legislation which was intro-
duced in the Florida House of Represen-
tatives during the session of 1903. A bill
was introduced with a view of securing
revenue out of the naval stores business.
The argument was presented that by fur-
nishing certain tags or labels, as is done


might be well or some of you gentlemen
to know who has been your friend in the
legislature. As you know, I am a can-
didate for Governor of Florida. Any as-
sistance you can give me will be highly
appreciated. I have the honor of being,
Very respectfully yours,
ALBERT W. GILCHRIST,
Candidate for Governor of Florida.

Plank's Chill Tonic is guaranteed to
cure chills, fever, colds, la grippe. 25c.*


Cypress Tanks

FTe AN Purp-e
BEST MADE
Write r CteIfs

Preston Miller Co.

Dept. B Crescent City, ia


COMPARATIVE MARKET REPORTS

SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE FOR THE WEEK HERE AD AT SAVAMAH.
Price. ales. dipmae. ResiP ek.
Jax. Say. Jax. Say. Jax. Say. Jan. anv. Jax. 8
Monday ....... 46 46 586 3,007 200 6701 445 55912,06
Tuesday ....... 4 1 47 87 5 500 30 150 722,30
Wednesday .... 147 47% 395 69 790 422 21 21,9
Thursday .... 471/s 47/i 437 863 ... 105 334 876121,400
Friday ....... ..... 48 ... 1711 ... 64 292 41121,794
ROSIN FOR THE WEEK HERE AND AT SAVANNAH.
Monday. Tuesday. Wednesday. Thursday. Friday.
Jax. Say. Jax. Sa. sJa Jax. Ift. JaI. 8.


in the inspection of fertilizers, a revenue
to the State could be made out of this
business. The naval stores people would
not pay it; tlat it would come out of
the purchasers of these supplies. This bill
was killed. I made a speech in opposition
to it. My recollection is that I am the
only one who made such a speech. There
may have been o hers.
There was a committee of men, engaged
in the naval stores business, at Tallahas-
see during the session of the legislature.
Owing to my record, being friendly to
their interests, I was requested to intro-
duce and take charge of the following
bill: "House Bill No. 547, a Bill to be
entitled an Act to Prevent and Prohibit
the Adulteration of Spirits of Turpentine
and Naval Stores, etc."
I do not take any credit for simply
doing my duty. I think, however, it
DO YOU WANT FURNITURE?
For it will pay you to see the new Far-
niture at-


Ramris's


Main Street


Jackeearns.


W w ................. 5.60
W <. .................. 5.60
N ................. 5.60
M ................... 5.60
K ................... 5.30
I ................... 4.00
II .................... 3.55
( .................... 3.45
F .................... 3.40
E' ................... 3.30
D .................... 3.30
CBA ................. 3.25


5.755.50
5.705.50
5.65 5.50
5.505.35
5.005.00
4.054.00
3.553.50
3.553.35
3.453.30
3.303.25
3.303.25
3.303.20


5.70
5.70
5.66
5.60
5.20
4.05
3.55
3.50
3.45
3.40
3.35
3.30


REPORT OF ROd J MOVEMENT HERm AND AT SAVANAHB.
Siam. BMpse s.r R eeks
Jax. Sav. Jax. Bav. Jax. Dsv. Jax. Bav.
Monday ................... 816 1,1441,200 1,1161,302 1, 24,527 55,6 51
Tuesday ............ 1,633 1,7302,600 2 639 1,75524,689 57,281
Wednesday .............. 1,080 5042,126 735 830 1,6622668 58,258
Thursday ........... 254 1,817 0 1811,078 1,55121,372 5 78
Friday ............. 454 2,32 0 1,957 462 1,13921,794 58,70





TH DUVALlorda.

This Hotel has recently changed hands, and is under New Management
Throughly Renovated Throughout
Headquarters for Turpentine Operators


F. BARTOW STUBBS,

Proprietor.


1. D. CRAWFORD,

Manager.


----'------------


l I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I l( I II I I I I I II1 I:1 1'I -
SJ. A. (. CAJmON, Presmidet J. F. DISBHsUaT, 1st VIce-President
T.A. Jinm a os. lSd VloePresident. H. L. KArATN. 3d Vice-President and Sec.
H P. ScHnurma. Trearer.

J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

H illSTI I FIB UO IW ilEU E (flCERS.
Mai Of ie SAVANN HI GOROOIA
swaemOn Ofrfis JJCKSONVIstLLX, FLA. mnebh OOCerYI Hou,
COlMPiUe, ots.
Naval Stores Prodmcers are Ivited to Correspond With Us. -
. La I fa*t an a laaI I I I I II S Ei nt111 11 11I nii z-isa


Standard Clothing Company


One Price


One Price


FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
17 a d 19 .West Bay Street, JacksoMeval, Fkie
lteten and Hawes Hat. Special AtteUtlem ivre to Msa Or.de
--------'------""


THN WEEKLY NDTTRM.TA ltVM11?T% I





1









INDUSTRIAL IRECOILD
JAM8 A. HOLLOMON. borle-.Ci
A.. MAJH ss Mamer
IL T. ARNOLD. Adverdt Marmr
Ptaslhed Evo BmAutdm.Y.
ueswrm } *.;.,! s Po Amm. -
The Pase and as Prasedsa.
AN eesmm. tleo ishl.e.m a sernI
The InduMtrlJ IRecord Company.
JackAonvllle. fr.
saen6adah. Ga.
ated at the Poetofice at Jacksonvile. Fla..
as aeoomd-oael matter
adopted by the Exeutive Committee t
=r TpiM Optar' Asmsriatio
p-tr U13, 198, as its exeiauiv as5-
ham. opted in aa nnrl earvnmto
eptember 11 as the rema also io the ga-
mAdoL td Aril n.TtSSo as the o tel
or a thidtentato r Owoerd As-
msathti. Adopted lootibr 11, 1300, am
the aoly ead arcu of the T. A.
(omll d to lumber people by peeial
nation adopted by the Georgi Sawmi
Amuodiatior
THE mRCORD'S OFFICE.
The publishita plant and the masn of-
ees of the ladustrial Record Omtpany
are loented at the ntersetion of By and
Newman Street&, Jacksonville, Fla.. the
ry heart of the great turpertine and
y, r pine industries
The Savanah, Ga., offices i n the Board
f Trade Building. Savamant I the lead-
q open m fal toeem market In the world.
NOTICE TO PATROLS.
AU payments fr pyrtet in the In-
Jatris BReerd sa ahe therete
mug be mae -iIt te the bon es ti
Jackeavik. Agents ar mt alwerrd to
ake callectines vaoer my Circumatacem.
ils ftr d&VrtidMg 0ad 0ineriptin arem
sent out from the ben e- a, whon ue,
ad an remitamce ust be asde direct
to tUhs Piaw l Ca.


GROWING LAND VALUES THROUGH-
OUT FLORIDA.
A prominent New York financier figures
that the greatest increase in population
in the next decade will likely take place
in New York City and the lake cities,
especially Chicago, Cleveland, Toledo and
Duluth. Buffalo's small banking capital
and proximity to New York are adverse
factors in her development.
Chicago and New York will gain in
population at about the same percentages
as in the past, but not in manufacturing,
which is already beginning to seek loca-
tions with lower land values and less
complex conditions of living.
Seattle and Los Angeles will both give
San Francisco a hard chase for the Pa-
cific supremacy, though the land-locked
harbor of San Francisco gives her a nat-
ural advantage difficult to overcome.
The depression in Pittsburg will be
short lived, though it is severe, but her
tremendous manufacturing interests and
the peculiarly skilled character of her la-
bor will always keep her in the front of
the iron and steel manufacturing cities of
the Union.
St. Louis is slow and conservative, with
a large German population. Her land
values will be held up to a price level un-
attractive to most investors.
Milwaukee is another German city, much
of the style of St. Louis, and her charac-
teristics in growth and opportunities for
real estate investment are very similar.
Cincinnati might be mentioned as another
city of this type, but with the disadvan-
tage of being rapidly left in the race by
her dependence upon the uncertain trans-
portation of the Ohio river. The develop-
ment of Oklahoma and Indian Territory
sad the other agricultural regions of the


THE WEEKLY INUtBrTIAL RKOORD.


Ftcutive Committee of the T. 0. A.


The Executive Committee of the Turpentine
Operators Association will meet in Jackson-
ville, at the office of J. A. Hollomon in the
Realty Building, Newnan and Forsyth streets,
Wednesday, April 15th. at 11 o'clock.
There will be several matters of importance be-
fore the Committee, and it is urged that every
member meet on this occasion.

J. G. BOYD,
President.
J. A. HOLLOMON,
Secreary.


SCOL. W. M. TOOMER
The Brilliant Jacksonville Lawyer and Naval Stores Operator Who
Has Led the Fight in the Interest of the Naval Stores Producers.

great Southwest insures her a steady population insures increase in land values.
growth. The percentage increase of popu- Thfs, added to the increased favor which
nation in Duluth will probably be as great real tesate will occupy in public opinion,
as any in the country, while Minneapo- will bring it more nearly on a level with
lis will continue to forge ahead of St. European standards, and thus furnish a
Paul substantial, in fact, an enormous enhanee-
Another prominent financier says: ment over present values before specula-
"The South will show remarkable gains, tive prices are reached.
both in agriculture and in manufacturing.
Jacksonville, Fla., is one of the most rap- GREAT REAL ESTATE BOOM.
id growing cities in the country."
The percentage of growth of American It Will Be the Greatest in the History of
cities in the next decade will probably the Country.
not be as great as in the past; neverthe- William E. Harmon, whose companies
less, growth will continue and increase in operate in many of the principal cities in


THE CLOTHIERS
14nd hunt hip. JodmdlFh.


sOLE AGENTS r
KNm HATS,
rumsmIEM
smas.
HAr, SCnArr-
NER AND MARX
OCLTMS.

WE
AIM
TO
PLEASE

QUALITY
IS
OUR
SPECIALTY


THE STUART-BERNSTEIN CO.


the United States, and who has been mak-
ing a thorough study of the real estate
situation from a national point of view,
draws the conclusion that conditionss
point to a world-wide real estate move-
ment which will make for many years
to come large profits for all reasonably
careful investors.
"The signs point strongly in this direc-
tion. Something may intervene to divert
public confidence. Some one has said the
inevitable rarely happens, but certainly
no form of investment today will stand
an analysis like real estate for present
strength and future possibility."
Mr. Harmon's analysis of the situation
in full follows:
"The history of real estate the last
fifteen years has been one of uninterrupt-
ed progress in public confidence. Its free-
dom from legislative attacks, its gradually



WATCHES


That Keep Time.

And that keep time under any and all air-
cumstances, are what turpentine and lum-
ber men require.
These requirements are not met in every
watch, as all men know. It takes a good
watch to stand the rough usage of the
woods, so when you want one to stand
these exposures and to look nice, too-
one that you can use in the woods or in
the parlor-let us show you some of ours.
We are Timekeepers for the railroads,
and always have the best. Sead for eata-
logue.

R. J. RILES CO.,

15 Bay St Iacdoavile. Fla








THE WNrKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. T



be aQualitt of L our Emblem Sboulb Squal

Zbat of Vour Loboe.
The selection of a Lodge Emblem should be made with the greatest care to get QUALITY
as well as beauty and usefulness.
It cheapens a man in the eyes of his associates to wear "cheap" jewelry-even though he
may have paid a high price for it.
Specmll Dmalign and Prices Feuarnihed on Appliation.
Buy your Emblems from us and you will always get full value, artistic designs and good
workmanship. Send for our beautifully illustrated catalogue with cuts of the different em-
blems and pries.
R. J. MILES COMPANY 1a w. BAY STREET JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


increasing productive power, whether
measured in rents or in products of the
soil, have given it a high place in the con-
fidence of mankind. It is today almost
alone in its freedom from confiscatory at-
tacks through national or State legisla-
tion, and its diversified ownership guaran-
tees its future immunity.
"In England, Germany and France real
estate sells on a two to two-and-a-half
per cent income basis, although the best
type of municipal and State securities
brings fairly nearly equal prices in Ameri-
ca and abroad. This indicates that we in
the United States have not been educated
to a full comprehension of real estate as
an investment. The time is coming when
land in this country will sell on the same
income producing basis as abroad. This
alone means an inem se ot more than one
hundred per cent in the average piece of
property. We are inclining more strongly
each month to the conviction that this
rise will take place within the next cycle
of prosperity.
"We believe the conditions point to a
wide real estate movement which will
make for many years to come large
profits for all reasonably careful investors,
and which will in the end lead to a specu-
lation in real estate that will carry it
beyond the level of reason and in all like-
lihood be a large factor in the precipita-
tion of the next panic. The signs point
strongly in this direction. Something may
intervene to divert public confidence.
Some one has said the inevitable rarely
happens,' but certainly no form of invest-
ment today will stand an analysis like
real estate for present strength and fu-
ture possibility."


and 18 years.
"There is another way of looking at the
question: The two leading kinds of lum-
ber on the market now are Southern yel-
low pine and Douglas fir. The cut of yel-
low pine is nearly one-third of the total
lumber cut, and is nearly, if not quite, at
its maximum. Our minimum and maxi-
mum estimates of yellow pine stumpage
are 130 and 300 billion feet. The present
rate of cutting will exhaust the supply in
about 10 years in the first case and in 25
years in the second case, neglecting annual
growth. As it is probable, however, that
the cut will more than double within a
few years, the outlook is that there will
be comparatively little Douglas fir left in
from 25 to 30 years. The case of Douglas
fir now is closely parallel to that of white
pine in the Lake States 30 years ago, and
there is much reason for believing that
the supply of fir, outside of the National
Forests, 30 years hence, will be as limited
as that of white pine now.
"At present only about 22 per cent of
our total forest area is in State or Nat-
ional Forests, assuming a forest area of
700,000,000 acres, the remainder being on
unreserved public lands or in private
hands. The forest area of the United
States is amply sufficient, if rightly man-
aged, to produce eventually enough tim-
ber to supply all our needs. Yet private
owners, as well as the State and National
Governments, must use their forest lands
in a right way if we are to maintain our
timber supply."

OKLAHOMA IDEA POPULAR.

Require All State Banks to Provide Fund
to Protect Depositor.


HOW LONG WILL THE TIMBER LAST? Guthrie, Okla., April 8.-When the So-
Under this caption, R. 8. Kellogg, who Ions of the Oklqhoma Legislature passed a
is well known to many Floridians, and is law requiring all State banks to subscribe
now in the State, and who is connected as to a fund for the protection of depositors
Chief with the office of wood utilization, against loss though bank failures, the wise
Department of Forestry, diesusses the men of the East indulged in some very
"drain on the forests." Among other flippant and cynical criticisms of the
things he says: scheme and declared that it would be a
"The estimates of standing timber in failure. While the period of less than two
the United States are by no means satis- months that has elapsed since the law be-
factory. The most detailed ones range came effective may not have been suffi-
roughly from 1,400 to 2,000 billion feet. cient to provide a fair test, there is every
Assuming a atumpage of 1,400 billion feet, probability that the Oklahoma law has
an annual use of 100 billion feet, and neg- come to stay and that other States will
lecting growth in the calculation, the ex- be forced to pass similar laws in order to
haustion of our timber supply is indicated protect their own banks.
in 14 years. Assuming the same use and Whatever may be said against the law,
stand, with an annual growth of 40 billion it has served to restore public confidence in
feet, we have a supply for 23 years. As- the banks and to bring out much money
suming an annual use of 150 billion feet, from hiding. The national banks have
the first supposition becomes 9 years, and generally stood aloof from the law, and
the second, 13 years. Assuming a stand have suffered somewhat from the competi-
of 2,000 billion feet, a use of 100 billion tion of the State guaranteed banks. While
feet, and neglecting growth, we have 20 there has been no remarkable rush of
years' supply. Assuming the same con- money from other States, hundreds of
editions, with an annual growth of 40 people have taken advantage of the pro-
billion feet, we have 33 years' supply. tection afforded by Oklahoma banks to
With ah annual use of 150 billion feet, send their savings here. At first, these
these estimates become, respectively, 13 importations of money were small sums,


Ies& a losses .04 i s00 8084s08u 0 0 su g1 0 $ho 1111h11100 900

SJOS. ROSENHEIM SHOE CO.
MAVNACTVUERS AND JOBBERS OF


SHOES


: SAVANNAH. GEORGIA

"Best Shoes Made for Commissary Trade."
t1 44~I**8 4s8444 i *A48 I8888lAI at **i**te sog8 8 8S


but now many large corporations in oth-
er States are looking up the advantages
offered by the banks of the new State
and are making propositions to deposit
large sums. Most of the bankers are fight-
ing shy of too large deposits, fearing that
the returns would not be adequate after
paying the 1 per cent. protection assess-
ment to the State.
The banks across the State boundaries,
in Kansas, Texas and Arkansas are begin-
ning to feel the effects of the Oklahoma
competition through a shrinkage of de-
posits. The drain has not set in heavily
as yet, but with increasing public confi-
dence in the practicability and desirability
of the new act, there is no doubt that
these States will, in the course of a few
years, be forced to adopt a similar meas-
ure. As these commonwealths will, in
turn, act upon others, Oklahoma may
have started a movement that will not be
completed until it has reached from ocean
to ocean and from the Canadian border
to the gulf.


WANTED
AND

FOR SALE
Rate for this column is 2 cents per word
for firs insertion and 1 ent per word for
following insertions. No advertisement
taken for less than 40 cents for first, and
20 entts for following insertions. Cash
must accompany orders unless you wve
an account with us-

WANTED.-Good, reliable stiller wants
position. Can furnish best references.
Address P. W. Eldridge, Westville, Fla.
5-11-9t

FOR SALE-Small turpentine place for
cash. Price S8.500.00. Good backing. Ad-
dress Operator. care Industrial Record. tf

WANTED-NAME FOR NEW HOTEL.
Now Nearing Completion at Waycross, Ga.
A premium of $5.00 will be paid to the
party suggesting a suitable name for
above described hotel. Suggestions re-
ceived to first day of February. Directors
of Hotel Company will make selection of
name from suggestions received.
Address,
Waycross Hotel Company,
Waycros, Ga.


WANTED-All commissaries to es p
their bars of all kinds of ed os sld
burlap.. We buy everything I the way
of sacks. Write us. Amerimpa 1W O,
laeksonville. Fla.

FOR SALE-Great bargains will be
given in quick sale of 40,000 acres fe
timbered lands in Clinch county, Ga.
Southern Railroad running through the
lands. W. L. English, Americus, Ga.
14-4t
WANTEI-A number of honest young
men from this vicinity interested to read
our convincing catalogue. (Free). Tapa
Business College (The Oolleg with a home
for its students.) Tampa, Fla. L. IL
Hatton, President- 1-11-2 mos.
SALESAMEN-You receive $1000 cash
daily selling merchants our $20.00 Auto-
matic Soda Fountain. Grant Mfg. Co.,
Pittsburg, Pa. 4-11-0t
POSITION WANTED-By experimened
turpentine man as manager of turpentine
place. Will buy an interest. Good refer-
ences. Address A. M. C., 511 Ashley St.,
Valdosta, Ga. 3-28-4t
WANTED-A partner with $600 to go
into the naval stores business. Business
now open with good prospects. A perma-
nent business undertaking. D. D., care
Record. 4-4-3t



WHISKIES

GINS AND RUMS
FROM

$1.50 to 5.00 per Gallon

......AGENCY POR......

Lewis 1866 ad Mount Vernom
Pure Rye WMhkes.
Controllers Blum's Monogram sad yrhlva
Rye-Agents for Junwit Cinenati ad
Pabst Milwaukee Beer. Priam e ap
plication.

CHAS. BLUM & CO.
517 mrd 519 WEST MAY STUrET
JACISONVILL PF A.







M WUNKLY INDIJSTRIAL Rfl0OED.


WOOD PL8UERVATION AND THE PRO-
CE88 OF PRODUCING CREOSOTE OIL.
One of the significant signs of the times
is the awakening of the American people
to the dangerous destruction of their for-
est wealth, and the necessity of a wise use
of what remains of it. Undoubtedly, in
the future the nation must utilize its for-
est crop less wastefully, both in the
woods and in the mill, and must make pro-
vision for future crops; but that is not
the only way to prolong the timber sup-
ply. If the service of the wood which is
used can be lengthened, it will largely de-
crease the amount of timber which must
be cut. And this can be done, by treating
the wood with chemicals which will poison
the low forms of plant life which attack
it and cause it to decay. The growth of
timber is slow, and when the dearth of
it becomes pressing, a new crop cannot be
grown quickly enough to prevent a time of
severe shortage. Preservative treatment
of timber has the advantage, as a remedy,
that it can be applied immediately. Its
importance is therefore attracting increas-
ing attention.
Many chemicals have been used for the
preservation of timber, among them being
blue vitriol, corrosive sublimate and chlo-
ride of zinc. The most effective preserva-
tive is the substance called "creosote oil,"
or "creosote." On account of the similar-
ity of the names, many people suppose
this to be the creosote obtained from wood,
such as can be obtained, refined for me-
dicinal purposes, at the drug stores. But
the two are quite different, and should not
be confused. The creosote used in wood
preservation is obtained from coal, by a
most interesting process.
Nearly every city now uses gas for light
and fuel, and many people know that this
illuminating gas is often made from coal.
But the many things besides gas which
are obtained in this process are not so
well known. It is one of these other
products from which is obtained the cre-
osote oil used for wood preservation.
To understand how all these things are
produced, it is necessary to know some-
thing which the chemists can tell us.
Coal, they say, is composed partly of the
substance called carbon, partly of com-
pounds of this carbon with the gas hydro-
gen, which they have named "hydrocar-
bons." When the coal is heated sufficient-
ly, away from air, the hydrocarbons are
driven off in the form of gas. Illuminat-
ing gas is made by subjecting coal of the
proper kind to this process, which is
known as "dry distillation." The coal is
put into a long, fire-clay oven, or "retort,"
shaped much like a giant model of the lit
tie cakes which the bakers call "lady
fingers," the retorts being about thirteen
feet long, two feet wide and sixteen inches
deep. A number of these retorts are built
side by side, in three rows, one above the
other, the ends of the retorts being sup-
ported in a brick wall which also extends
around the ends of the rows and over the
top, and thus entirely encloses the retorts.
Fire, from furnaces below, is carried by
blues into this enclosure, so that the retorts
are entirely enveloped in flames and can be
heated to a very high temperature.
The retorts are partly filled with noal,
after which they are sealed, so that no
air can get into them. They are then
heated to a temperature of aboue 2,100 de-
grees, Fahrenheit. Under this intense
heat almost all the hydrocarbons of the
coal pass off, leaving behind only the
"fixed" carbon, which comes out of the
retort as coke. Many of the lighter com-
pounds distilled off by the heat will now


remain in the form of gas when they are
cooled to ordinary temperatures, and it
is some of these which make the gas final-
ly used for lighting and fuel. But as it
comes from the retorts, the gas is like a
thick, yellowish-green smoke, and could
not be used at all for such purposes. This
gas escapes from the retorts into a series
of large and costly machines where the
lighting gas is cleansed from its impuri-
ties, and the different by-products are sep-
arated from each other. First are great
"condensers," in which the gases are cool-
ed. The cooling condenses the heavier
compounds into thick liquids, which are
then left behind.
One of the substances later removed
from the gas is ammonia. and from such
gas works comes the ammonia water which
is used in every household. Another im-
portant product of the gas making process
is the coke which is left in the retort.
Every year an increasing number of people
use this coke for burning in kitchen stoves,
and even in furnaces, instead of coal, for
it makes a very hot fire and burns with-
out any smoke.
The heavy, strong smelling, black liquid
which is collected in the cooling of the gas
is what we know as coal tar. This is an
exceedingly complex mixture of substances.
From it are obtained not only creosote oil,
but most of the dyes which are used now-
a-days, perfumes, and even favoring ex-
tracts.
Gas, coal tar and coke are also made in
what is known as the by-product coke
oven. which is adapted to different ob-
jects, but is operated on the same princi-
ple. Its coal tar is equally as good as the
gas works tar for making creosote oil.
In recent years a great amount of gas
has been made in the United States by an-
other process, and is known as water gas.
This process also produces a tar, which
looks much like coal tar and is often diffi-
cult to tell from it. But this tar is really
derived from petroleum, and does not
make make a good oil for preserving
wood from decay. Wood creosote, with
which so many people are familiar, is
likewise obtained from a wood tar which
is produced by distilling wood. But like
water gas tar creosote, wood creosote is
not so good for wood preservation as is
the coal tar creosote. When creosote is
bought for that purpose, therefore, it
should be certain that it is coal tar creo-
sote.


To obtain creosote oil from coal tar the


PEC AN S
Aawvle the word.

permanent Profits

Economy of care

Certainty of results

Animal crops

onperishable product
Superior to all nuts.

THE OPPORTUNITY OFTO DAY
The fr to plant a pecan grove
wil be the first to reap a
great harvest.
For full Information apply to

THE GRIFFIN BROS. Co.

Jacksonville. Florida


tar is, in its turn, distilled. But this dis-
tillation is like that used for other liquids
instead of that employed for the coal.
The still is heated, and as the heat in-
creases the "light oils" first pass over.
Among these is the familiar carbolic acid.
This is a powerful antiseptic, but is not
desirable in a wood preservative, for it
evaporates so readily that it soon becomes
lost from the wood. When a temperature
of about 400 degrees has been reached, the
distillate is turned into another receiver,
and from this point on to 600 or 700 de-
grees creosote oil is produced. One of
the substances which is contained in this
mixture is "napthalene," from which com-
mon moth-balls are made. Coal tar creo-
sote, thus produced, is the great wood
preservative.
The residue remaining in the still after
distillation is "pitch," which is used
chiefly in the preparation of roofing felt.
In America roofing pitch is the chief end
for which tar is distilled. In Europe this
is not so true. Now pitch for roofing


must be rather soft. Therefore tar distil-
lation is not carried so far in this country
as it is in Europe. For creosote oil it
would be better if it were carried farther,
since the substances which distil at the
higher temperatures, in most cases neither
evaporate in the air nor dissolve in water
as readily as those which distil more eas-
ily. Consequently they stay in the wood
for a longer time, and protect it eorres-
pondingly longer from decay. Much study
is being devoted by the United States For-
est Service to creosote oil, to determine
what its composition should be to give the
best results in preserving timber, under
different conditions, and how the most
desirable creosotes may be obtained. The
reports of these studies, together with
detailed description of the more eeonomi-
cal processes of applying the preservatives
to wood have been worked into eirculars
which the government has placed at the
disposal of all users of timber and which
will be furnished to all who make the re-
quest of the Forester at Washington.


DIAMONDS AND WATCHES

We simply ask a call. We ca show yes, at correct adw money
saving prices, many papers of le pr wu, perfect
DIAMONDS. It Is our desire to condsle hefta th largest
Diamond dealers la Jacksnavllle, aud our specialty Ito ~ rted
cat gems sad hlgh-grade Walth uad igctis WAtc&&

U I P DDiamo.mi Wateles, Jewelry,
IHESSL LAGERn I -3faK., w3 lI. J moMIk.FI





CUMMER LUMBER COMPANY

JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Rough s Dreossed Lu


Long Loaf Yellow PhM.


BOXES AND ORATES.



Bulletin No. 2.


PARTY FARES


Effective April 3, 1908.

For parties of ten (10) or more traveling to-
gether on one ticket two (2) cents per mle per
capital; minimum per capital fare teen( 1)cents.


THESE RATES

Are open to the public and apply between

any point on the


Atlantic Coast Tines


W. J. CRAIG,
Passenger Traffic anaer.


A. W. FPRIOT.
Divisai onaseesgr ANSEL


T. C. WHITE
General Paenger Agent.
WILMINGTON, N. C.









THU WMKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

Capital $200,00

HUTCHINSON SHOE COMPANY
VICTOR SHOES AND HATS
Wholesale Jacksonville, Fla,


NOTICE OP ANNUAL MEETING THE
COUNCIL TOOL CO.
In pursuance of the provisions of the
by-laws of the Council Tool Co., the an-
ual meeting of the corporation for the
purpose of receiving reports. for the elec-
UOn of directors for the ensuing year and
for the transaction of such other business
a may come before the meeting, will be
held at eleven a. o m Wedaeday, the
UK day of April, 196, in the offieea of
the msolidated Naval Store Co., in the
city of Jaekomville, FI.
K. B. COUNCIL,
Mah 1, 190 Secretary.

NOTICE
Notice i hereby given that the annual
meeting of the Hillman-Sutherland Com-
pamy for the election of directors and such
other business as may come before the
meeting, will be held at the office of the
company in Jacksonville on Tuesday,
April 14th, 1908, at eleven o'clock a. m.
W. J. TILLMAN,
3-21-4t President.


The annual meeting of stockholders of
the Herty Turpentine Cup Co., for the
election of Directors and for such other
buinem as may come before the meeting,
will be held at the office of the Secretary
in Jacksonville, Florida, on Wednesday,
April 16th, 1908, at 3:00 o'clock p. m.
CHASE. H. RTY,
President.
Jacksonville, Fla., March 9th, 1908.
3-14-St


NOTICE O0 IrTrNTION TO APPLY FOR
LETTERS PATET.
Notice is hereby given that the under-
signed intend to apply to the Honorable
N. B. Broward, Governor of the State of
Florida, at Tallahassee, Florida, on the
10th day of April, 1908 for Letters Patent
incorporating OSSINSKY & KLEPPER
(COTHING COMPANY under the laws of
the State of Florida, with and under the
following proposed Charter, the original
of which is now on file in the office of the
Secretary of State of the Sttae of Florida
ALEX 088INSKY,
SAMUEL KLEPPE,
EMMA OS8INSKY,
SALLIA KLEPPER.
PROPOSED CHARTER OP
08SINSKY & KLEPPER CLOTHING
COMPANY.
The undersigned hereby associate them-
selves together for the purpose of becom-
ing incorporated and forming corpora-
tion under and by virtue of the laws of
the State of Florida, with and under the
following proposed Charter:
L
The name of this corporation shall be
OBBINSKY & KLEPPER CLOTHING
* COMPANY, and its businesses shall be
eoadueted in the State of Florida, and in
other States of the United States of
America and foreign countries wherever
necessary or convenient. The principal
oee of said corporation shall be in the
city of Jacksonville. Florida.
IL
The general nature of the businesses to
he trabsacted by the said Company shall
be to buy and sell, trade and deal in dry
goods, clothing. ladies' and children' gar-
ments, shoes and hats, and a general stock
of dry goods and gentlemen's furnishings,
and to do a general dry goods business
and all things incident thereto, and for
the purposes aforesaid to buy, sell, own,
rent and use property, both real and per-
sonal, including buildings, trade fixtures
and such other property as may be neces-
sary for the conduct of said business, and


to have and exercise such powers as may
be incident or convenient to the business
of said corporation, and all of the rights,
powers and privileges of a corporation or-
ganized under the laws of the State of
Florida.


State of Florida, County of Duval:
On this day personally appeared before
me Alexander Ossinsky, Samuel J. Klep-
per, Emma Oainsky and Sallie Klepper,
who are well known to me and known
to me to be the individuals described in
and who executed the foregoing articles
of incorporation, and acknowledged that
they executed the same for the purposes
therein expressed.
Witness my hand and official seal at
Jacksonville, Florida, this 14th day of
March, 1908.
M. H. LONG,
(Seal.) Notary Public.
My Commission expires January 8. 1911.


Walter Mucklow,
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUTAT.,
Rooms, 4-47-48 MatUl Life mg
Telhe"m.e s na
Idudan LA.


LIGHT SAW MILLS


Lathl ad Shligle iacilnes



Saws and Supplies,


Steam and Gasoline


Engines


Try


LOMBARD


Cook


r Why not

Gas 8AS coWnu


Duval Planing Mill Co.
Sivrth a'd IdsrsdAve Jsctimltk
Builders ad Contractrs Wil Do We
Have Us id ea Their Week
in our L e
Phone z749.


m.
The amount of the capital stock of said
corporation shall be Three Thousand Dol-
lars ($3,000.00) to be divided into Thirty
(30) shares of the par value of One Hun-
dred Dollars ($100.00) each. All or any
part of the capital stock of said corpora-
tion shall be payable in or issued or used
for the purchase of property, labor or ser-
vices at a just valuation thereof to be
fixed by the Board of Directors at a meet-
ing called for that Vurpose.
The term for which said corporation
shall exist shall be ninety-nine (99) years.
V.
The business of said corporation shall
be conducted by a President, a Secretary-
Treasurer and a Board of Four (4) Direc-
tors. The number of the Directors may
be increased or diminished by the By-
Laws. The Directors shall be elected by
the stockholders at each annual meeting.
All other officers of this corporation shall
be elected annually by the Directors. The
annual meeting of this corporation shall
be held on the third Monday in April of
each year at eleven o'clock a. m., unless
otherwise provided by the by-laws. The
incorporators and stockholders shall meet
at the offices of said corporation in Jack-
sonville, Florida, on the 20th day of April,
1908, at 11 o'clock a. n., for the purpose
of adopting By-Laws, completing the or-
ganization of this corporation, electing
officers for the ensuing year, and transact-
ing any business which may come before
such meeting. Until the officers elected at
the first annual meeting shall be qualified,
the business of this corporation shall be
conducted by the following officers: Alex-
ander Ossinsky as President, Samuel J.
Klepper as Secretary-Treasurer, and Alex-
ander Ossinsky, Samuel J. Klepper, Emma
Ossinsky and Sallie Klepper as Directors.
VI.
The highest amount of indebtedness or
liability to which this corporation shall at
any time subject itself shall be Fifteen
Thousand Dollars ($15,000.00).
VI.
The names of the subscribing incorpora-
tors of said corporation, together with the
amount of stock subscribed for by each,
are as follows:
Alexander Ossinsky ........... 14 shares.
Samuel J. Klepper ............. 14 shares.
Emma Ossinsky ................ 1 share.
Sallie Klepper .................. 1 share.
All of said subscribers and incorporators
reside in the city of Jacksonville, Florida.
ALEX OSS1NSKY,
SAMUEL J. KLEPPER,
EMMA OSSINSKY,
SALLIE KLEPPER.


AUGUSTA, GA.


Phosphate Machinery

Casting and Dryers



ZAHN'S EUROPEAN HOTEL


UNDIE NEW MANAGEMENT


Rooms, soc to lio Per Might. SaIu at
An Hoeu. tsal Bay Stnree
JACKSONILLE, FLA.


Wholesale Dealers in sad BotUersc
ANHEUSER-BUSCH
St. Louis Lager Beer
Whtalesale

Liqnrs, Wimt, UMnr Wts
Writo for Prkie


Barn----es & Jessup Comp

Barnes & Jessup Company |


Jaeksonville rloridw.


NavEl Stores Factors and Comm"ssion
Merchants.


OFFICERS.
C. H. Barne. President. J. A. Ewinsp Vice-Preldent.
E. B. Wells, Secretary and Treasurer.

DIRECTORS: C.H. Barnes, J. A. Ewin, IL S. Mal,
J. R. Saunders. E. C. Long, W. E. Cummer, E. B. Wells. W S.
Jennings. G. W. Taylor.


You Want a Turpentine Location?
You Want a Sawmill Location?
You Want any Kind of Florida Land?

You Mean Business?
Cli on or Wrte to

J. H. Livingston & Sons, i
OCALA. rLORIDA.
qq^bikKgi* i*


CHAS. A. CLARK, i.

Phone Is6. Jacksonvuile, Ia.


If not.


CO.


A


W


JOSEPH ZAPF








10 THN WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RBOORD.


S'Southern Drug Mfg. Company

WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS AND MANUFACTURERS OF
Flavoring Extracts, Packed Drugs, B. B. Bluing. Vinegar and Pyne's Popular Reondies.
We handle everything in the Drug and Medicine Une. Write for price. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


M. A. BAKER, INVENTOR AND THE
e A. IBAKVD, MANUFACTURER OF
BAKER IMPROVED SEAMLESS TURPENTINE STILLS.


W. a HEMDKSON, Pn.
L 8. CRAFT, ViM-Pre.


Write msf 0r. 0. 5. uy poant the trpentine belt
AlEtiti sold undw ~% r uastr.
WORK THROUGH THE COVUT r.Y PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO
The Largest and Oldest Copper Works in the South.
My speelaty is larle worms at d heavy bottoms that do not leak
BRUNSWICK, GA. and PENSACOLA, FLA.


b
J. S. Schofield's Sons Company,
*O.OOoo*o*.Oeoo*O**OOO6O*SO@o*O*O**ooo-o**OOS*OtOSOO
S1- nHeadiarters for
f Distiller's Pumping
oz Outfit.
No plant complete without one.
SHundreds of them in use in Georgia,
Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and *
| South Carolina. Write us for particu-
I lars and prices. We also manufacture
E Engines, Boilers and High
Sas well as carry a full and complete
'; Min Supplies, Pipe,
Sr; Beler Tubes, Etc.
C Advise your wants.
Macon, -- Georgia.
c -----c---tf r
SKmals r iTk Wst fa r T-l-m-lss P-hrs -
OsOO***** eO*****-***-******* -O************ ****- *


*ttMBMBMBMGMG GM&^eM&MS~filFaSiI


Southern States Naval Stores Co.


Factors
Ship to Savannah


Savannah. Ga.
and Commission Merchants
Get Competition Highest Prices Promptest Returns
Correspond With Us


-%%, % %%, M%%%I M- W,%%%


La. a mft, e. Mg. and is- Pues
JNO. SAVARESRICH I
R. T. RICHARD, 8bS'.


TAMPA DRUG CO.
Wholesale Manufacturing Druggists.
TAMPA, FLORIDA.
Ful and omplet ne of anl ind of Drugs, Chincal
and Patert Medicnes.
SPECIAL ATTENTION 10 COMMISsARY 1RADE.
PROMPT ATTENTION TO ALL ORDOa8.
Uaeeaaeeeeeeoeeoeeeaaeaoee a as *v'*r av ----


L V. WBST,
Preid.MI


SM. PL.M
VIE4 L HA.U
V. I KE1ZT.


ILL R93
In*d Tam
IX Lul 1LA
h=%&@v Turn.


WEST FLYNN HARRIS CO.
lGEMANIA BLDO. Swaah. On
GENERAL OPVC-DO.ES . I

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
NAVAL STORES RECEIVED AT 8AYVANAH, A., JACOvn VIL
nL., AND e9NArDIwa. nI4A.
Wholesale Grocers also Dealers in Hay. Crain and Heavy
Hwarnek
fs.or the Caskabd Un.. Tu. -d. AIM%
SOLE AGENTS *0 C is'& Vale TUI3ida A+s@
MERCHANTS VAREHOUS
SAVANNAH, GA. JACKONVUILL, InA TAMPA, VLA


WILLIAM A. BOURS JAMES 0. DARBY


WILLIAMA. BOURS& COMPANY
TNr OiHEST eSTiAUS OMMI AW S ur. ISE TIE STATE.
Hay, Grain, feed, Garden
Seeds, Prultry Supplies, flr,


GrIts, Meal and rtilizers.
OUR MOTTO: Prempt Smo-t,. mfemi Oe*. caselas rres
206 EAST BAY ST.. JACKSONVILLE. FIJ


~P,~~iO aoaaoooaoCIww ~-~Y-c~- I- ------ -----


r
r
r



r








FO I MIONG YOUR PURCHASE


KNIGHT CROCKERY


FURNITURE COMPANY
A65eNVtr. r.W


6 SWISM0 0 r 0 hiW


a-& biow.. Zw
C_ I&
?.l*.mimm GA.P3
4L C11001" L A
LM.A
3. I as. K


1W7~. he Tim r Ii
FIRWAY. 2n Vim P60&
inZY. 3 Vko Pem
wmm 210- 0101 Trow.


13mocroms.
IL W. Bloo
A, A. Gwm.
T. cr.
A. L ftdobm
W. T. K ,.im


PENINSULAR NAVAL STORES CO.
C(omimlsion Merchants
and Wholesale Grocers
aueuvus eapsr -Jectmupls, Toe mk. FSernam.Od
Pie., seemav& Gc.
Capital Sowk. 51.000.000.


H D. D WD.


W. D. KRI.HnSO


J. D. WEED X CO.,

Savannah, Georgia

HEADQUARTERS FOR

loop Iron and Turpentine

Boxing Axes.


-a


%%Mnd noloumy mumua sm a - 8
am Iam out I a" = sad yut hew IS.W.S1J
e, y u mem d m e in"W l k f m O" i a
-orm an 1w.. me Uvw "ad K h rr
in. Owes ohe essmmon si~s d and inshf
&" "A"I&r~ in as ftims k it~
mIsand iwbib In NUuM it hrl ou4 -
~~CrREAD VUS (753.I eYa a
wVITA is a owasm inuii. I% wo son al fft
M% a" ehad as PmLs T1o.shhm ]t wE 7101 INp t
hem - 1mmm sthe. 01 0010 I t 0011 4 wo an
~a p atr N o hw e a n d ra W n o "
Comm zra-u--mw" t" MisrY, for Sms W W" "M~
CUDAN in~Maws x1omst .a "100100, _.re ~ -
a=iim in barM a n" remmady sa" fi 1*9040


C="AN OU-TbM IWO Mom a" So I isSwaft
Er Qu lah, a" w 6llo, him "iza he "
ma d Imm on hs miane, iamin W sk W= ula an zb am f- W


SPENCER MEDICINE CO.. Chrttu~aa~ oe

H. r. PkWlvfrtnin Pm. P.L I& MWAND Vhes-fa A. ODTIW, U'y.
J. P. OGUMJM Tkoom a" own M&
THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.,
0mamez OM.: JACKSOYIU, FL..
Faserny: WAUW4N70% 3. C.
~A @ mer of Mph Werod rat~

W. L WILSON, JNO. f. NAMUS, A. We'N,
hw.. a Tress. MIce 1gOA6 OeeY &. am&
Florida Cooperage Compay
aow"1011 Smoak 411 01040111
MtANUFACMDRMS OP
Turpentine, Cotton Seed OM, Dip
and Syrup Barre~i..
Weiss ai antdr) Cutm inmi Caleb 40dCOM
Telephone 1855 JAckAMvfrll P17g


McMillan Bros.


Southern Copper
Works

Manufacturers of TURPENTINE STILS
Complete Outfits and Extra Kettles, Caps, Arms, Worms P w-
nace Doors and Grates always on had
Old Stills taken Ne Work "part
paymentfor New Work in tre.. h+,f,,i,"
Heavy CppwramlthW-l g Steam PIpe a0d Spled C6m Wit
Jacksonville, Pla.
A. Fayetteville"N. C. Savanma. Ga. Mokl. Ab.


PLANTERS

"Old Time" Remedies
TME JY TiE mr nOUl


I


"r ~i4Yll~ii.~~i;ii~IMU~i;;~;iW~r
c~------


1 ~111


5;~'
;r.







'-: -s In 1


AT THE SIOGN O


THE


BIG


CLOCK.


You will not In all your shopping, find & single place where
so many appropriate, pretty and useful things are gathered
togetbhr lor your selection as here, and we want to impress
upon you that while we do not keep CHEAP Jewelry we keep
Jewelry that s cheap-honest, reliable jewelry of very descrip-
Sen that lves up to what we represent it to be. We have some
excellent having Sets. Fine Umbrellas, Silver Handle Pocket
Knives. eto.. etc.


Oreenleaf &
41 West Ba
Quality. Low Price and Varie
,, oofer you to favor us wi
WIITS IO CATALOG.
--1 i i niI i n V*t ti t t n V itt ttti ttt t


Crosby Co.
ay Street.


,ty ar the inducements we
th your patronage .
SATISFACTION GUAMANTB7D


- I V V V I f 1


HALF TONES-ZINC ETCHINGS
r ei 0---A an d IdtagrVindv Deoprtment
\ or
T Pr FIORIDA TIMtS-UNION
pthdiedly equipped for businem. Half Tones and Zinc
Utheuis i.de to ordje in the most improved and artistic
fashior llbiwtratioss for newspapers and all kinds of Com-
ercial Work, Pamphlets, Etc,
A "sd& i Maidsof aiftmgums. tassehilng asnd
r p-- --* -Ptegrs% and PtWes.
. Wuitw aw rtrtnpeI Prees, Giv te Moat Explliit descriptionn of What is
Weamr -bod Work sat Prompt Delivrle Promised.
A Frlda erpr e. Try It.
THE 0l.WHSl WIISKY HOUSE IN
TEK SOUT. (abMish d in aI.)
OLD KMh WILLIAMS-Pure inF
ou Ry yea y Um llo., 3.00; four full
a=OL J. -UiLEAII-re Rye; BRi
and Mri_. By the galona $.75; four
Subantial Family
f pnus $L60; M for
f..r ai f S.&.a, expre pai...s.
aDo Jl itL Co5RN--Diret from
O- Nd Wralsmous; %' sad old. By the
s ReMs f M t quarMts u n rprm
a nfOur R CLUB OOcLRN-ki uda
. > r a l irU fui aluu=r Coxmprepad.
O f F9Uth Lft- or Company
I" W. uSeet - J e..eavle., via
e.a .. a... e..


rh Metropolis
Is the Paper you want. It is puI-
dally and bi from IS to 1 heaun sbe ad
any other daily newspaper in ioria..
$5O a Year $2:5 Six Moths
BFll Tflraphie and Stock npoert. I
you want to keep poted on the wM, at"
the Metropolis.
CARTER & RUSSELL PUB. CO.
JAucKmnuIE, tLm .


.~ Me KOY PATENT

m Trpt-oe-e


The hst sad s-lmp
an ithe MpeWL Do fteie
diPd in" --
a"ee, am -
,not rumst. Nad eiW d-

'. N w Bn