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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00261
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: March 7, 1908
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00261
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text




SUSTRIAI


RECORD


Egi.1 hnY NAVAL IToRES,
4sf RERN fEEGRAb
I 4OV&TRIJAlo FINA9MIAs
G5 NEWSPAPEk


The Question of Wages.
The RECORD has sounded the warning.
Some operators are paying too much. We
know them. We shall not hesitate to pub-
lish their names. The policy of the factor-
age houses is to help those who conduct
their operations along safe and sane business
lines.
There is no occasion for exceeding the
wage scale, adopted at last meeting of the T.
O. A. It has been fully demonstrated that
reckless business methods lead to ruin.
In conducting your operations this year,
for "Heavens Sake", do so in a safe and con-
servative manner.


Ii


___________________________ m --- --ks~


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


SAVANNAH, GA.


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_____ I


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TURPENTINE BARRELS ATLANTIC COOPER.AGt CO.
"-MANi ACTURERS HAND-~M-b f iRPMNTI UBAiRMLS
We have been Manufacturing our own Staves for years and select the very best stock for oar barrels.
Skilled Coopers employed. Just beginning business in Jacksonville and we solicit a share of your pat-
ronage. Send us a trial order.
J. AeN4. WIUGIOT. fhamteer 3oO Dyal-Upehurht Eslludlms Jaelamonavl. PFlea.


SJ. W. tz aI CPaks JansMeNst W. W. Wiaer, a1 aa as I s as
L P Vlie-P Seo &Tres ---- -- East Coast Lumber Co.

CJohn R. Y00 Co.,] 0 ROUGH AND DRESSED LONG LBAP
C Yellow Pine I.Umber
Commission
Merchants. |IBundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots
SSteamer Shipments a Specialty.
Nval Stores factors. Wholesale Grocers. WTOW roRi
WATIRTOWN, FLORIDA
Savatnnah a Brunswick. Ga.

THE COMMERCIAL BANK
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. kBraches Ocala ad ke Cfty
L O C Trn t OtlVeS a a i d Ca r S The largest leading State Bank in Jacksonville. Is cdmsted In an od-
fashioned strictly consrvative inammr and is subject to relar exambmtamU
LOCOMOTIVES. ALL CLASSES. BOUGHT AND SOLD by the ptrer.
LOGGING CARS AND LOCOMOTIVES A SPECIALTY rIX individual and Saving Aessos solicited.
.L R OBIeSON, W. a OWm, E. GAhLJ.AN
GEORGIA LOCOMOTIVE AND CAR COMPANY, ATLANTA, GA. iPreslent Vice-PrersidiY
o0.. 0. CHEA-UHA. Oemalradl naoaer
Wa 1000


CONSOLIDATED


NAVAL STORES COMPANY.
t


flome Office: JACKSONVILLE, FL4.
Branches: Savannah, Ga., and Pensacola, Fla.

qFFICFRS.
WALTER F. (OACHLMAN, President; DI McMILLAN, H. L. COVINGTON, JOHN H. POWELL, R. B. POWELL and W. J. KELLY, Vice President.
J. C. IATTL, Seretary and Treasurer at Jacksonville; J. Q. HODGES, Assistant Secretary at Savannah; J. K. ROZIER, Assistant Seeretary at Peameola.
xx Lxu'IIVJC OOMMITTEE: W. W. Cammer, W. F. Coachman, W. J. Hillman, C. B. Rogers, and A. S. Hubbard.
DI(BUOBB: W. J. Hilman, W. W. Cummer, D. H. McMillan, W. F. Coachman, W. C. Powell, H. L. Covington, C. B. Rogers, John H. Powell, A. 8. Hub-
bard, S. A. Alford, C. W. Deem, R. B. Powell, W. J. Kelly.



NAVAL STORES FACTORS


Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
The "Consolidated" Is purely a co-operative Company. Its interests are Identical wfb those
of MHe Prodsicers. The patronage of turpentine operators everywhere Invited.
Two Million acres of Land and Timber for sale on easy terms.
Prod .oers are invited to call or correspond.
ssum- % %r%.w ss se*1-s mn-mwnsssw .












WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL


RECORD.


PUIRISHD VERY SATURDAY. DEVOTED TO NAVAL STORE LUMBER AND MANUFACTURING UINltma~r

MOW SOtg AX 9 by AfctlmR im C,.r r da Tup Opmmff is *is is I B i Geu.. MO i o ,& .i Spt.L O02.t Au C...ia.l = so OfcM Orpm &o of . Goe l AsomA Adini Su .I.L B -*
0sr 011 o0..s d T-wpem Opm.i... Am..i m.. Ade Apw 27.303. -an- 0r ..1 G d d.how.6 c..Co Gv.w A.. i.a .hr. i. b OG. Sa mil. Aow &MO.i qps d Sor9. s ai..m.. i.



Unless There is a Change of Front on the Part of


Southern Sentiment, Capital Knocking at Our

Doors Will Be Turned Away Through

Fear of Confiscation.


The Record publishes below liberal ex-
tracts from a letter given to the press to-
day by Middendorf, Williams & Company,
ad very heartily endorses every word of
it. Lnless there is a change of front on
the part of Southern sentiment capital
that is knocking at our door will be turned
away through fear of eonfisaetion.
The extracts referred to follow:
atratas from Middeorf, Williams a
Company's Weekly Letter of Marc 7.
Part South Will Play in Next Decade.
Now that the force of the present wide-
pread depression seems to have spent it-
self and that matters financial, commer-
lal and industrial are so shaping them-
selves as ,to prepare the way for another
tremendous leap forward, no question is
of more vital interest than that which has
to do with the part the South will play
In the decade or two of progress and de-
velsipnt which must inevitably follow
the great crisis of 1907-1908, just as the
unparalleled prosperity of the decade from
17? to 1907 followed the trying period
from 1893 to 186. In the decade of un-
precedented agricultural, business, indus-
trial, railway and other progress, which
bgn after the Presidential inauguration
in March 1897, and ended only with the
scute crisis of October, 1907, the South's
forward leaps were among the most mar-
velous achievements of a marvelous time;
s section of the country made such phe-
nw al strides in this period, which saw
te end of one century and the beginning
of another, and no section of the country
has to its credit a more splendid record
eo aeeomplishment in so brief a span of
year. It may be said for purposes of
emparison that half a decade before the
ld century came to an end, the South was
th poorest section of the country-poor
In known wealth, poor in recognized re-
sourmes, poor in manufactures, poor in
agricultural production with the prices
whik then prevailed, poor in railways
-d other forms of transportation, poor in
hanwn mineral resources, poor in every-
t l ,. we may say, save hope and ideal
lofty purpose; half a decade after the
dawa of the new century, a wholly differ-
eat picture was presented, a new Empire
of the South, builded on the solid, rough-
ewn foundation of that old South, the
memuries of which are still treasured by
ll, an empire of tremendous wealth and
rourm e, rich in transportation facilities,
rik 3f agricultural prodnets, rich in manu-
features, rich in mineral wealth, rich in
idustry of all kinds, rich in lumber--in
a word, a wealthy empire instead of a-pov-
esty-stricken group of States. The South
teday is far mmo difreat from the South


of fifteen years ago, than was the South of
that day from the South of 1863, although
30 years had elapsed and one-half that
time had elapsed since 1893.
* * *
Evils Incident t Rapid Progress.
The real problem, therefore, for the
South to solve at this time, the problem
of first, of overwhelming importance, is to
what limits the campaign of anti-corpo-
rate hostility which has been pushed vig-
orously in almost every Southern State
for several years, is to be carried. Un-
questionably, when growth and develop-
ment go at such a vigorous pace as was
the case in the South during the decade
mentioned, evils must of necessity creep
in; and it was doubtless a wise procedure
to halt and take stock before these evils
had gone too far, with a view of weeding
them out and clearing the way for further
advance along right lines. But, we regret
to say, dispassionate hostility to corpo-
rate evils soon gave way to dispassionate
hostility to corporations themselves, and,
in time, dispassionate hostility gave way
to passionate hostility and in a number
of instances even to wild fury. The mil-
lenium has not been reached, nor is there
any likelihood of it being reached on this
earth at any time in the near future; and
if the South hopes to bring about the mil-
lennium by its too often arbitrary action
in the present anti-corporate campaign, it
may awake some day to and that the mil-
lennium, which is unreal, has not dawned,
and that prosperity, which is real has
fown. It was well enough to attack evils
and root them out; it was well enough
to proceed against the various wrongs
which had crept into railway operations,
secret rebates, diseriminations, unjust tar-
iffs; but to attempt to dictate to owners
of a property exactly how that property
shall be operated, to legislate away almost
every right which inheres in control, to ar-
bitrarily enforce reductions of revenue at
a time when hundreds of millions are need-
ed by the railways of the South for
growth and expansion and improvement, is
in a way to kill the goose which has left
so many golden eggs scattered through the
South. It wa well enough, as we have
said, to search out the evil, but in the ve-
hement and too often blind search, the
good was confused with the evil and the
whole has suffered.
Sheld Dema That Railroads Charge
Self4ustainelf Rates.
Instead of hammering rates sad forcing
the margin of proat of railroads to the
lowest extremity, the people of the South
will fare much better by insisting that
the railroads charge, for services rendered,
rates which will yield a fair return on the


investment and provide from surplus earn-
ings, betterments and reasonable and nec-
essary extensions to their property. Ham-
mering rates down forces railroads to pro-
vide for extensions and betterments by in-
creasing capitalization; thus the Legisla-
tures and not the railroads become re-
sponsible for any overcapitalization which
occurs. A continuance of the hammering
process, furthermore, reduces the margin
of profit below a reasonable compensation
for the use of the money and promptly
stops all extensions and betterments. The
only sound policy, therefore, is not only
to permit but to force the railroad to
charge sufficiently high rates to enable it
to carry safely its capitalization, and to
provide from earnings for the safe trans-
portation of the public and accommoda-
tions necessary by the extension of busi-
ness.
Extremes to Which Law-Making Has Gone
As an illustration of the extremes to
which the present anti-railroad crusade
has been carried, we direct attention to
various bills passed by the law-making
bodies of different States in comparatively
recent months. A glance at these laws
will show the scope and power given to
the public authorities over these instru-
ments of commerce. They stipulate how
many trains shall be run each day, how
many men shall be employed to operate
each train, how many hours railway teleg-
raphers shall work, how cars shall be
equipped, how crossings shall be guarded,
where trains shall be stopped, where and
how stations shall be built, how quickly
cars shall be furnished following the re-
quests of shippers, how many miles per
day cars shall be moved, the number of
days within which freight claims shall be
paid, what shall constitute a cause of
action to an injured employee, what de-
fense the companies may make, how ac-
counts shall be kept, what valuations shall
be for purposes of taxation ,and what
rates shall be charged for the transporta-
tion of persons and property.
* * *
No Prosgres Possible in Face of Legisla-
tive Warfare.
We ask in all earnestness and serious-
ness, can the South hope to revive the
freshening and life-giving power of capi-
tal, can the South hope to call the all-
powerful forces of new enterprise into
being, go forward and grow and expand
and open new territory by railway exten-
sions, and develop its vast resources in
the face of a legislative state of mind
similar to that which produced the laws
above enumerated? Can the South hope
to be other than isolated and neglected


by outside capital, so essential to the wel-
fare and prosperity of any growing region,
while the public mind is directed against
all manner of corporate enterprise? This
is the great question the South must an-
swer, must find an answer for?.
Helpless without Arterie of Cmmerce.
President Roosevelt has described rail-
ways as the arteries through which the
commercial life blood of a nation flows.
In our opinion, nothing has contributed so
signally in the past decade to the com-
mercial and industrial growth and develop-
ment of the South, to the opaeig up of
its vast resources and the uncovering of
its great natural wealth, as the icrase
of railway mileage in that section and the
establishment of through connections by
the linking up of shorter lines into big
systems. Without its great railways, the
South would have been as helpless a with-
out outside capital, and the ne has eon-
tributed as much as the other to the won-
derful progress and achievemet of the
past decade. If the South refused to eo-
operate with these great arteries and
blinds itself to the tremendous advantage
of railway growth and extension, refu
to encourage them and meet them in a
spirit of fair play, then the new South
must inevitably be stunted in its infancy,
before its commercial strength has devel-
oped beyond a bare beginning. We Irve
been interested in railroads in the South
for many years and have done our fuB
share towards giving this section these
sinews of commercial and indutrial pow-
er: and we speak with a reasonable au-
thority when we say that the South ean-
not expect outside capital to risk itself
further in Southern enterprise until there
is a disposition shown to welcome and
encourage and protect investors.
* * 5
It has been charged time and again that
American railways are over-aptaled.
The net capitalization of all railroads in
the United States in 1906 was $*1Illn,4,-
649, and the total mileage 214,475. The
average capitalization per mile was $*,-
421. The following figures show the mpi-
tal or cost of construction per mile of
railroads in other countries as of the year
named in the left-hand column:
Oapitaliatio or
o0t of 0ostrLe-
tim pa mae
Passenger ile
1905-United Kingdom ..........W M
1903-Russian Europe ........... NJM
1905-German Empire ........... 10641
1904-France ..................... 13Ml
1904-Austria ................... 1043
1903-Ital ................... 19ls
1903--Spa ............... ..... 9M
1906-United States ............. 6,4







4 THE WEEKLY miVutriaIIAL BROOD.



VVVHITE OAK SPIRITS BARRELS

Guaranteed to conform to specifications Savannah and Jacksonville Board of Trade.

Write t Columbus Barrel Mft. Co., Columbus, Ga., or to HENRY EL SON. Florid Mbr., JMCsokil&. fia.
NEW


It will be seen at once that the capitali-
zation per mile in the United States is less
than half of the capitalization or cost of
construction per mile of railways in Eng-
land, Germany, France, Austria and Italy,
and but little over half of the average for
Russia and Spain. More than this Ameri-
can railways have been constructed by
high-grade labor, the wages being from
two to twenty times as great as the
wages paid in foreign countries. Compari-
son with England shows that railways in
the United States are capitalized at one-
fifth the capitalization of British railways.
It is difficult to understand, therefore, the
repeated charges that our great transpor-
tation systems are heavily overcapitalized.
Freight Tarifs Much Lower Here Than
Abroad.
Passing on to the question of rates,
comparison of freight trails in this coun-
try with the tariffs of foreign countries
shows that rates in this country are vastly
lower despite the fact that wages are
uniformly higher. In the South in the
past five or six years operating costs of
every kind have advanced. Wages, sup-
plies, materials of all kinds, fuel, every-
thing that enters into the cost of opera-
tion is from 10 to 100 per cent. higher.
Despite these advances in all operating
costs, however, freight and passenger rates
remained about the same until drastic ac-
tion in a number of States forced reduc-
tions. The following comparison between
190B and 1906, for four of the largest sys-
tems in the South shows how freight and
passenger tariffs remained unchanged in
the face of the steadily increasing costs of
operation:
Pass. Mile Cts. Ton Mile Cts.
1906 1902 1906 1902
Southern Ry. ... ..41 2.24 0.93 0.93
L. & N......... 2.43 2.32 0.80 0.74
A. C.L. .........2 5 '... 1.29
Seaboard ........ 2.38 2.35 1.12 1.0
This four year period covers the time
of the greatest advance in all operating
costs, yet, as the comparison shows, rates
were virtually unchanged. In the face
of this, however, drastic acion has been
taken in a number of States to enforce
lower passenger and freight schedules.
In that same period and despite the ex-
cessive costs of all new construction and
operation, these four roads found the fol-
lowing nereaaes of mileage necessary in
order to meet the growing needs of the
territory traversed:
Average ee Operated
1906 1902
Southern .......... 7,374 6,744
L. & N. ..........4,131 3,327
A. c. L........... 4,7 1,76
aboard .......... 2,611 2,603
Term of Milias Heeded: Where Will It
came fram?
Over 4000 miles of new construction or
about 1,000 miles a year. For this new
construction about 00,000 a mile was re-
quired, making the total construction re-
quirements for each year of the four about
00, 000. As the South has just begun
to grow and develop, can it hope to forge
ahead without a vast amount of new rail-
road construction each year? And can the
South reasonably expect investors to sup-


Industrial Record's Buyers' Directory
P 161MLIM16f40~l


ACCOUNTANTS.
T. G. Hutchinson, Jacksonville, Fa.
Walter Mueklow, Jacksonville, a.


J. D. Weed & Co., Savannah, Ga.
BAINK
Commercial Bank, Jackionville, Fa.
BEER-WHOLLSAL.L
Chas. Blum & Co., Jacksonville, l.
ooseph Zapf & (o, Jacksoville. Fla.
BARXUEL STAVES.
East Cast Lumber o., Watertowan
Florida.
BOXES AND CRATES
rummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, a.
CROCKERY.
Knight Crockery and FhUN Lt,
Jacksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING.
Crate & Bro, J. A, Jacksonville. Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville. lVa.
COPPER SMITHS.
McMilla Broters, Jaeksmalll, kvan-
ash and MWobe
M. A. Baker, Brunswick, 0a.
COOPERAGE.
blorlda Cooperage Co.Jaeksonville, Fla.
Atlantic Cooperage Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUG&
Wm. D. Jones, Jacksonville. PFa.
DRUGS-WHOLESALE.
Groover-Stewart Drug Co. Jaeksorvill,
Fla.
Tampa Drug Co., Tampa, hi.
Southern Drug Mfg. Co., Jacksom.vie, Fa.
NGINKS.
Smrhfield's Bone Co., J. S., Maeos, Ga.
ombard Iron Works sad Spply Cn, As-
gnu. Oa.
ftu*iLrUtk
Knight Crockery and Fumrtre C.,
Jacksoville, Fla.
RamLa, Jaeksonville, Fla.
PERTIIZEBRL
Bours & Co. Wi. A., Jachsonvfle, a.
FOUIDRII&
-holeld's Sons Co.. J. 8.. Mama. Ga.
Lombard Iron Works & Bupply Co, Au-
-ust&, Ga.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS.
The Chas. A. Clark CO, Jaekonvile, Fla.

GAS.
Jacksonvllel. C.an Co.. Jacksnnville. Via.
GENTS' FURNISHRs.
Rtandard CotbhiE Co.. Jacksonville. Fla.
Stuart-Bernstein Co., Jacksonvile, FLa
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jaeksoavill, Fa.


ply hundreds of millions for this new con-
struction, while railroads are considered G S-WHOL
the playthig of lawmaking bodies? Un- Williams Co., J. P., avannah. Ga.
til the South come to a fnl realization Young 04o John B., Savaa, Ga.


HARDWARIL
Tap Hardware C., TM p Fla.
Weed CO.. J. IX. 8avaum. U.
HAY AND JRAJN.
Bours & C.. Wm. A., Jaeknovill. la
HATILS.
Craig & Bro, J. A., Jacklnavdlle Is.
Standard Clothing Co.. lacasonvilli. Fa
HOOP IRON.
J. D. Weed & CkO, Savannah, Oa.
HOTELS
Duval Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
Zahm's Europeaa Hotel, Jackmrville, Fa
IRON WORKB.
Schoeeld's o8m .), J. 8L, Maso. Oa
JEWEL Rb.
R. J. Biles Co., Jaksnvills Is.
Greenleaf A Crosby Co., Jackaenville, Fa
He & tlager, Jacksonvill, Fla.



Florida.

LIQUOR.
Blum Co., Chas., Jackrsville, Fla.
Altmayer & Flatau Liquor Oa., Maen,
Ga., and Jaekaevlf Fla.
Joseph Zapf & Co. Jackoville, Fla.
erMCI'^
opener Medleme Co.. hattanooga, Tam.
MACRINE WORM.
ichofeldM's Son Co, J. 8., Masm. O
Loinbrd Ire Works. Aumta, O.
MATERIAL8 FOR litrma sam P0M-

BehoSeleds Som OC, J. 8., Maaro, Ga.

MammIA. Bes. ft, jagmswa Sams-
sab and Modd
Baker, A., Bnrunwiek, Ga., and ea&-
colh, Flal.
MILL SUPPLY
Seho8eldo BSo Co, J. ., Mase, Ga
Tampa Hardware Co, Tamps, FIa.
Weed & Co., J. Savannah, Ga.
Lombard Iroa Works & Supply 1a., An-
gusta, Ga.

Tamps MamMrl Wmaa Ta Ik.
MUL- AND MIU M.
W. A. Cook. Tampa. P.
NAVAL STORES
Penai- iar Naval Store Co., Jaerkoville
and i amps, Fla.
riarns & Jessup Co.. Jacksnville. im.
Coneolklated Kaval Stores Ca., Jaskses
ville, Ia.
West-Flyn-Harrls Co.. Jacksonville, ia.
Williams M., J. P.. tvanemhb, a.
Youun Co., John R.. Savannah. Q.
Seoher States Naval atres OsC snwa
X@1k 0116


PAWMR
Bond & Bouer (. Jamksinille 1La.
PHONAT STUPPLIE
Tampa Hardware a., Tamp, IL
PLAIG MILL.
Daval Planing Mi Clo., Jasksonvilm, I.
POPgHA E MACHINERY.
Lombard Iroa Werks a buspy CI, An-
g-ta Ga.

SkCood's BSa O J. S. Man, a.

Atlnatle at Ls.


Labard Iron Works & S-l 0a4 LA
-Atisl Ga
Bm
Bem & Coa Wa. A.. J smn
SHIV ThROB,
Cummer Lumber ., Jasdsevals IP.

Hutehlimen bee Os., Jasheaml IL
Joe. RBoenhlm hme Co, Savanmm, O.
TANE.
G. Ml Davis & 8No PalathI, ML.
Seodelas BSru Co, J. 8., Mames, n.
Preston MIlr CO., OmsCt Ciy, Ia.


Atlantice Ceprage O., Jacksenvillw
Viln laspA -ug. Oa., JaO nwa4 VIa







TLIMag LAXMD



TOVt inizW TOOL
Combat Tee Oa., Jasme 0Mq Pz h
O~rd VZI Zo. OTUL & p


J. D. Wea & Ok.a h, a o.
WAInCHs.
Gwlcaf f Or-B C., J-dwvil *te.
savannah A" nf


















-Ost omet omt CO, Watert, Ia .

WM. D. JONES



...re i3..
FAMILY DRUQQIOT

aOt .. AsY OT.











,_ THB WEEKLYY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


THE GROOVERwSTEWART DRw .,



Wme Dauqe Dht ftWIm&% --- ad OmmImdy -o eeds
J, mmAW .LU F1.01111


that progress without railroads is impos-
ltle, that railroads cannot be built with-
nat capital and that capital will not risk
Itself in the face of injustice and legisla-
tive onslaughts, little headway can be
made.

Fiad Charges Barely Earae.
Those who were loudest in their outcry
in the South a few months back claimed
that the facilities of the railroads for
headling the traffic offered were by no
means adequate. But a hickory club in
the hands of a State Legislature or a
State commission could not hope to make
them adequate. Money is needed here
just as it is needed in all forms of expan-
mki and development: money and money
alone will supply the necessary equipment.
But where is this money coming from?
Not from surplus funds, for the Southern
railways are doing little more than earn-
iag their necessary fixed charges at this
time, and despite this legislatures and
eemmissions are ordering radical reduc-
tims; salvation does not lie in this quar-
ter then. Where else then can the rail-
road seek the millions necessary to equip
their lines with adequate rolling stock
and bring their lines to the highest efi-
clemey Where, indeed, except among in-
vetors at home and abroad? And it is
just here that the widespread anti-corpo-
rate hostility lays a chilling hand on the
South's advance. Investors are unwilling
to place their funds in enterprises against
which the public hand is raised; they will
ant run any risk of confiscation, even
though that risk is remote in the extreme.
This, then, is the situation in which most
of the Southern roads find themselves; a
public on the one hand clamoring for
greater facilities and lower rates, and. on
the other an investment sentiment para-
lyed by this very clamor. Between these
two millstones are the railways of the
South, and what the outcome will be time
alone can tell. Without money there can
be no increased efficiency; without this
increased efficiency there can be no prog-
res; without public goodwill and hearty
public co-operation there can be no money,
investors holding back in fear.

A Final Plea to Sothern Lawmakers.
The South is now facing a far greater,
a far more serious crisis than it realizes,
and we make a final plea to Southern law-
makers aad to others influential in shaping
opinion in the South to do everything in


their power to stem the tide of feeling
which must inevitably recoil upon this
section. The South has barely begun to
taste the fruits of commercial and indus-
trial well-being, and those in power should
think long and carefully before doing the
slightest thing to retard the already long-
delayed progress. The reservoirs of stored
energy are now filling rapidly and matters
are shaping themselves for another long
upward swing which will carry this coun-
try to a higher vantage ground of achieve ?
ment. Will the South take its rightful
place in this onward movement? Will it
encourage commercial and industrial devel-
opment, bringing happiness and prosper-
ity, or will it make politics its chief in-
dustry, appealing to prejudice and hate by
adopting any kind of law just so it is
against railroads or corporations, and fol-
low a policy which can only paralyze the
wheels of commerce, and spread poverty
and destruction over a land teeming with
natural wealth and opportunity? Provi-
dence has done everything for the South;
given it mineral wealth, agricultural
wealth, favorable climate, artificial power
in coal, to ship to its neighbors, and nat-
ural water power to run its mills. Capi-
tal can do the rest and make it one of
the richest, most prosperous and happiest
sections of this great country, if it is per-
mitted to do so. Will its own people lock
the door of opportunity, destroy what
capital it now has, and turn into other
channels the tide of industrial activity
which has during the past decade contrib-
uted so much to its national welfare?
Capital Will Hot Come Unless Given
Protection.
The South cannot hope to go forward
unless it gives evidence of willingness to
encourage and welcome capital and give
it protection, and capital can be encour-
aged and welcomed only through sincere
assurances of fair play. Capital has proved
what it can do for the South and politics
has shown what it can do to capital. It
now remains for the South to say whether
it wishes to continue the advance begun
so splendidly a decade ago and halted only
when the feelings of the people got the
better of their judgment. Capital is now
looking toward the South because it knows
of the tremendous possibilities of that
great region; but unless the South is will-
ing to guard and protect invested funds
and give its great corporations fair and
square treatment, capital will hold back.
The South at this time owes a duty to it-
self, a duty of tremendous and incompara-


ble import, the duty of showing to the
country, to the world, that it is just and
fair and willing to protect the interest.
of those who confide their all to her If
the South fails in this duty at this time,
it will mean a tremendous backward step.
Will the South do its duty to itself?

FLORIDA PHOSPHATES.
Mr. C. G. Memminger, president of the
State Bank of Lakeland, Fla., has pub-
lished in circular form an interesting paper


Monday .....47
Tuesday ....47
Wednesday 50
Thursday .... 50%
Friday ...... 50


48
50

51%


upon the phosphate industry of the State
as contributing a definite supply of new
wealth, disbursing large sums of money,
and employing many classes of labor.

Shipments of Peace River phosphate
rock made by the Peace River Phosphate
Mining Co., through the port of Punts
Gorda, Fla., during February amounted to
1630 tons, making a total for the first two
months of the year of 3.380 tons.


COMPARATIVE MARKET REPORTS.

SPLITS OF TURPETI E FOR THE WEsB HZER AND AT SAVAJUA.L
rist. Sale. irpMNanN. B ptae ema
Jax. SBa. Jan. Bsr. Ja. te. Jag. Bsv. J". fB.
Monday ....... .... 50/ .. 1 5871 255 16120,438
Tuesday ....... .... 114 479 10 220,713
Wednesday ....48/ 49 357 7 ... 401 134 420,706
Thursday ..... .... 49 .. ... 214 532 75 7200
Friday ........ 471/ 48 1 16u 2281 ... 265 123 159120,700
OSIN FOR THR WEEK HERp AND AT SAVANIAH.
Monday. Tuesday. Wednesday. Thursday. Friday.
Jax. Sa. Jax. Sa. Jax. Sa. Jax. sav. Jax. B'v.


.VW ............. .... .10
.WG .................. i.00
S .................... 5.60
M .................. 5.25
K ..................... 4.60
I ................... .3.80
H .................... 3.50
G . . . ....... . . . . ..
F ................... 3.45
E .................... 3.45
) .................... 3.45
CBA ................. 3.45


6.3560.05
6. 2515.95
3.563.635
5.255.30
4.95 4.75
3.703.85
3.453.50
3.423.50
3.353.45
3.353.45
3.303.45
3.303.45


0.1516.10
5.8516.00
5.65j5. 08
5.2515.30
4.954.75
3.703.85
3.453.60
3.403.45
3.403.45
3.353.45
3.303.45
3.:24 3.45


0.150.10
5.850.00
5.655.05
5.255.30
4.954.75
3.753.85
3.503.50
3.473.45
3.453.45
3.423.45
3.37 3.45
3.303.45


0.00
5.90
5.665
5.20
4.95
3.65
3.40
3.40
3.40
3.40
3.40
3.40


fi1 90,8 27,in
11821,S 3,3
214212.63 26,=8
160121A0 36,743
13121AN 0,M12


Jacksonville,

THE DUVAL flolda.

This Hotel has recently changed hands, and is under New Management
Throughly Renovated Throughout
IHeadquarterm for Turpentine Operators


F. BARTOW STUBBS,

Proprietor.


I. D. CRAWFOID,

MMugr.


IIuuIuIuhIIIuu*IIuIIE IIIIIIuaII IBIlIIBII 11111111-llt
*. A. a. QasoN, President J. .. Duassiay. U Vice-Prtesdent
?.A. J a and V6Preddeat. H. EL -Kao., M Vice-wddenatnd S Sec.
HL F. EL Scnunran Trinswer.


J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY, E


iiigg ouun m uimui, mm.ro
Mae" offe.s 011LVAXNIOM, OOMOmaAL
eftmoi Offees I J&CUSI0f4aLW. 1n atMt 01P000117 "o06,
1 f CO&LOUUS. GAL. -
Nval StMnO Preduce are Invited to Correpoad W1t0 Us.
naaaaaaaaaaaaaa mmmammamama iami maamaaa .aaa a a


------- --------------------@


Standard Clothing Company


One Price


9a
Sit(l}
^^IfliJ'I~ril.


One Price


i FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
* 17 Mad 9 West Bay Street, Jackuoville, Pinrad
Stetson and Hawes Hats. Special Attention Gives to Mail Orde1 s


REPORT OF ROSMI MOVEMENT HERE AND AT 8AVANXA.L
Sales. HMpmin.emUi BRa pts tig
Jax. Sav. Jax. Bar. Jan. 8 Jan. Iv.










6 'Ti~ WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


INuvS i K.IAL RECORD
JAMPS A. iHOLLOMON. Edkor-i-Chief
J. .LA FONTISUE Asociate Editor
A. IL MARML, minutes Mager
R. T. ARNOLD. Advertiel Manaeer
PuV lhed f.vBr Saturdfy.
so t(Dmast..3.00 Per Annami

"The Pine and Its Preduomts.
ADa cmamu ati e ehuld be addree m
Thi Induetrlal ILecord Company,
JaeckL onvill. ila.
rem EJdMegtea b mnd IJuaWme Offloc a
avmsn sh. Ga.
Mattered at the Postoafe at Jacaonville. Fla..
a seoond-class matter
Adopted by the Executive Committee of
the T t pertor As e ssociation
- -er 1t, 138, as its exclusive offi-
e s. Adopted in manual eonven o
t- i b11 a the ora also of the pum-
end aseriatica.
Adapted April 27th, 190, a the offii
ra of the Interstate Cane Growers' As-
elatio1. Adopted September 11, I0, as
the only edidl a ot-a of the T. A.
Commaded to lumber people by special
eeliath adopted by the Georia Sawmill
AMsolatit..


H RECORD'S OFICKS.
The i plsat and the main of-
Sof the Industrial Reord Company
aes loated at the intersection of Bay and
merma Street, Jacksonville, a., in the
ry heart of the great turpentie and
y ow pin industries.
The avaamh, Ga., offes in the Board
of Trade Buildi Savaiah is the lead-
ng eMra ml stores market in the world.


NOTICE TO PATROL .
Ah pnymt fr advrti-c in the In-
J~Wtitl ried reberd -, thersto
must ben a direct to the home aS s in
Jahm Tvle. Agts ar net allowed to
mab ellewtin ader any clrbatan
ies f r dvrti aMd m curipti an
mat et km te bm uin4 vbm "%
and an zwmltame muot be ade direct
to thi al.



HICKORY SUPPLY CLOSELY
WATCHED.
Automobile and carriage manufacturers,
along with the men of the allied vehicle
industries, are giving very serious consid-
eration to the question of the future sup-
ply of hickory timber. This wood, which
is one of the most important of all woods,
sihe no satisfactory substitute for it has
been found, plays a more important part
among the commercial timbers than many
people realize.
For automobile and carriage wheels,
where strength, toughness and resiliency
are essential qualities, no other wood has
been found in this country that will take
the place of hickory. Manufacturers say
that no steel or wire spoke has yet been
found that will withstand the wear and
tear of the hickory spoke and for this rea-
son the welfare of the vehicle industry
seems dependent upon the conservation of
the hickory supply.
Three of the largest associations of
hickory users in the country, the National
Wagon Manufacturers Association of
America, the Carriage Builders National
Association, and the National Hickory
Association have completed a series of co-
operative tests with the United States
Forest Service and the trade considers the
results highly important. The tests cov-
ered a close study of the properties of
different woods used in vehicles and im-
plements, supplemented by mechanical
tests to ascertain the relative strength
of different woods and different forms of
construction and to test the accuracy of
the present system of grading.


The following communications speak
for themselves. We urge operators to car-
ry on their operations in a safe, conserva-
tive manner. There is no reason for pay-
ing big prices for labor. It is not neces-
sary in order to get all that is needed.
There is no sense in wild, reckless, extrav-
agant operations. For the past few
months operators have been sorely tried.
Many of them have seen the folly of
their earlier recklessness. We must get
the turpentine business down to a system-
atic,. economically administered, business-
like method. Shall we do it?
Following are the communications re-
ferred to:
Act Conservatively.
Mascotte, Florida, March 5, 1908.
Industrial Record, Jacksonville, Fla.
Gentlemen-I see in your last issue that
some of the operators are going wild on
prices again. I cannot see anything in the
future to back them up in raising prices.
The operators in this section are sticking



In a report of the tests made by H. B.
Holroyd, forest assistant. and H. S. Betts,
engineer in timber tests, of the Forest
Service, the fact is brought out that
there is an error of over 50 per cent in the
grading of vehicle stock, due largely to
the prejudice of the manufacturer against
the use of red hickory. It is shown that
in clear stock, weight for weight, the red
hickory is as strong as the white. By
bringing this fact to the attention ofthe
manufacturers, it is hoped that much of
the hickory which was formerly left as
waste in the woods will be utilized by the
trade and thus prolong the rapidly disap-
pearing supply of hickory.
Such practical results as are given in
this report, which a letter to the Forest
Service at Washington will secure free for
ony one who wishes it, show conclusively
the value of such studies in solving prob-
lems connected with the grading of stock,
the utilization of new for old woods, and
the conserving of our future supply of
timber. The supply of good hickory in the
United States is known to be very limit-
ed. The cut last year for lumber was a
little less than 150 million feet, and it is
estimated an even greater amount was
used for automobile and carriage wheels,
axle caps, gears, axles, poles, single trees
and neck yokes, and it is figured that at
the present rate of cutting the supply will
last about 15 years.
Reports are made from time to time of
the discovery of suitable substitutes for
hickory in foreign countries. The two
woods which come nearest to having the
quality of the hickory seem to be one of
the eucalyptus and the crowfoot elm, both
of Australia. Only time will tell whether
these woods will prove satisfactory substi-
tutes. In the meanwhile, American hick-
ory users will be obliged to conserve the
present supply and take steps to guaran-
tee a future supply by encouraging pri-
vate planting of the tree, whose wood is
becoming more precious each year.

TREES AS CROPS.
"It is as sure that forest land can be
made to grow successive crops of trees
under proper methods as that plow land
can be made to grow successive crops of
wheat," says the Secretary of Agriculture
in the part of his annual report wherein
he speaks of the National Forests.


closely to association prices and labor
seems to be well satisfied. The box cut
through this section is about 70 per cent
short from what it was a year ago. I
hope that all operators who have as yet
not affiliated with the Operators' Associa-
lion will do so for their own as well as
their neighbors' good.
OPERATOR.
Up to the Factors.
Pinckard, Dale Co., Ala., Mar. 3d, 1908.
Industrial Record, Jacksonville, Fla.
Say, Mr. Hollomon, I thank you for try-
ing to get some sense into the turpentine
operators, but am not sure of your suc-
cess. People say its up to the operator to
keep prices up and control labor, but I
think its time for a new song. The aver-
age operator has for several years past
demonstrated his inability to do anything
but spend the factor's money, if he could
get it. If the bettering of the situation
is up to any one class of men (and I think
it is), then its up to the factors.


This country which once could boast of
forest resources richer than any other
nation in the world, has been cutting three
times as much timber for a number of
years as there is grown, and the consid-
eration of timber as a crop to be carefully
harvested has come at a time when many
of the virgin forests are already depleted.
Continuing, Secretary Wilson says in
part:
"Just as American farming has had to
develop and is still developing methods
adapted to the conditions of each region
to make the best use of the agricultural
lands, so must the forester learn by scien-
tific study and practical trial to make the
best use of our timberland. And the best
use means, of course, not merely its best
use for the growing of trees, but its best
use with reference to all interests direct-
ly or indirectly affected by it.
"As time passes, it will doubtless appear
that the principles which centuries of ex-
perience in older countries have placed at
our command can be applied with increas-
ing good results as we grow more familiar
with our own special conditions. The is-
sue is sharply between caring for our
forests by applying a system of known
efficiency, or suffering certain loss not only
of the forests, but of usable water and soil
as well, through the operation of causes
as certain to act as are the rivers to run
to the sea."
The Forest Service now has administra-
tion over more than 164,000,000 acres of
land. This is slightly more than one-
fifth of the country's total forested area;
the remainder is in the hands of private
owners. Nearly ol the timberland of the
unappropriated public domain is now in
the National Forests. This means that it
is being protected against fire, theft and
wasteful exploitation, that its power to
grow wood and store water is being safe-
guarded for all time, and that nevertheless,
its present supply of useful material is
open to immediate use whenever it is
wanted. The report says:
"The timber in the National Forests,
which is the legacy of the growth of cen-
turies, is now in the truest sense public
property, administered for the benefit of
the people-primarily for the benefit of
the people of the West, since they are
nearest at hand, but on the whoie, for
the benefit of every part of the country,


THE CILOTIrEtS
14 nd 11UWd %IIIW. kuauuut FI


MLE AGENTS Ft

KNVX ATS.



MART, sCHrAF-
NER AND MARX
CLOTHES.

WE
AIM
TO
PLEASE


OUAuIM

OUR
SPECIALTY


THE STUART-IBERSTEIN CO.


since the welfare of every section is in-
terwoven with that of al! other. The
communities and settlers adjacent to the
forests are safe from any fear of monop-
oly of one of the chief necessities of eivi-
lized man."
The Secretary tells interestingly of how
the government manages its timberlanda
as a trustee. It gives timber away through
free-use permits in small quantities to the
actual homemaker, who comes to develop
the country, and in larger quantities to
communities for public purposes. Its sys-
tem of management is vastly different
from that of a landlord. When large
quantities of timber are harvested from
the National Forests, sales are made to
the highest bidder, but under such restric-
tions as look to the maintenance of a
lasting supply answering to the needs of
the locality, to be had without favoritism
and without extortionate demand based
upon the necessity of the consumer.



WATCHES

That Keep Time.

And that keep time under any and all dir-
cumstaanes, are what turpentine and lum-
ber men require
These requirements are not met in every
watch, as all men know. It takes a good
watch to stand the rough mage of the
woods, so when you want one to stand
these exposures and to look nice, too-
one that you can use in the woods or in
the parlor-let us show you some of ours.
We are Timekeepers for the railroads,
and always have the best. Send for cata-
logue.

R. J. RILES CO.,

15 V. By St. Jaconvilk, Fla.


Will Operators Act Wisely?











THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RR3ORD. 7



O. This Easy Chipper Saves time and Money.


' '. Chip escapes easier on account of hollow back.
Cuts a shade streak easier as hollow back allows hack to WRITE
to be closed more FOR
Gum flows easier as there is less steel to drag over the
fresh cut. ES.


Operator's Tool Company, Green Cove Springs, Fla.

4. 3,


TENNESSEE COPPER CO.
The report of the Tennessee Copper Co.,
main office at 11 Broadway, New York,
shows that the profits for 1907, after de-
ducting $70,000 for depreciation of plants
at Ducktown, Tenn., amounted to $800,-
634, and the surplus, after deducting the
dividend, amounted to $150,034. President
J. Parke Channing, in his remarks to the
stockholders, stated that the increased cost
of production of copper for the year was
due to higher wages and greater cost of
supplies, a condition usually co-existent
with higher prices for metal. He stated
that while the company had not reduced
wages since the fall in the price of copper,
the increased efciency of the labor at
the mines and smelter, incident to a sur-
plus of available men, had made a most
marked reduction in cost for the past two
or three months. This increase of avail-
able labor, he stated, has permitted the
company to resume sinking at the various
mines, and it will be able to show a mark-
ed increase in the ore in sight by this
*time next year. Treasurer J. H. Sussman
reported that the production of ore
amounted to 12,599,019 pounds of fine
copper. In addition to this, 206,133 pounds
were produced from custom ore, 2,230,136
pounds were electrolytically refined during
the first half of the year, and the remain-
der marketed in the form of pig copper.
There was also recovered 14,905 ounces of
silver and 85 ounces of gold, part of which
was derived from custom ore, and the pro-
ceeds from their sale credited to copper
sales. The cost of electrolytic copper, af-
ter allowing for the gold and silver, was
12.l cents per pound. The cost of pro-
ducing and marketing fine copper in pig,
according to the report, was 11.70 cents
per pound.

FINANCAL NOTE&
MeMullen county, Texas, is reported to
have redeemed $2,000 of bridge bonds.
Burnett county, Texas, is reported to
have redeemed $2,000 of bridge bonds.
Travis county, Texas, is reported to
have redeemed $12,000 of bridge bonds.
Reports state that Lee county, Texas,
has redeemed $7,000 of courthouse bonds.
Rome, Ga., is reported to have retired
$5,000 of the new bond issue for public
improvements.
The Bank of Rison, at Rison, Ark., is re-
ported to have decided to increase its cap-
ital $10,000.
The Alabama Bankers' Association will
hold its annual meeting at Montgomery
May 15th and 10th.
The Tennessee Bankers' Association
will hold its annual convention at Mem-
phis May 26 and 27.
The Bank of Oaney at Caney, Okla., is
reported to have increased its capital from
$10,000 to $18,000.
It is reported that the First National
Bank of Albany, Ga., has absorbed the


Third National Bank of Albany.
The annual convention of the Virginia
Bankers' Association is to be held at Hot
Springs, Va., June 18, 19 and 20.
The North Carolina Bankers' Associa-
tion will hold its annual meeting at More-
head City, N. C., June 24, 25 and 26.
The Bank of Charles Town at Charles
Town, W. Va., is reported to be doing
business in its new building on Main
street.
The Unio nSavings Bank at Jackson-
ville, Fla., is now doing business in its
new quarters, corner Forsyth and Hogan
streets.
It is reported that the North Carolina
Fire Insurance Co., of High Point, N. C.,
has decided to increase its capital from
$50,000 to $100,000.
The Consolidated Cotton Duck Co., of
Baltimore, has declared a semi-annual div-
idend of three per cent upon the preferred
stock, payable April 1, 1908, to stockhold-
ers of record March 20. David H. Carroll
is treasurer.
The Manufacturers' Record is informed
that after April 1 the name of the Bank
of Beulah at Bethlehem, 8. C., will be
changed to Bank of Olanta, Olanta, S. C.
The directors are D. W. Alderman, Alcolu,
S. C.; S. R. Chandler and T. J. Cotting-
ham, Olanta, S. C.; J. C. Lynch, Cowards,
S. C.; Duncan McKenie, John McSween
and W. H. Keith, of Timmonsville, S. C.
At the annual meeting of the United
States League of Local Building and Loan
Associations, held at New Orleans, La.,
February 28 and 29, the following officers
were elected: President, W. G. Weeks,
New Iberia, La.; first vice-president, B. H.
Jones, Boston, Mass.; second vice-presi-
dent, Jay W. Sutton, Sault Ste. Marie,
Mich.; third vice-president, James M. Mc-
Kay, Youngstown, Ohio; treasurer, Joseph
K. Gamble, Philadelphia, Pa.; secretary,
H. F. Cellarius, Cincinnati, Ohio; assist-
ant secretary, Addison B. Burk, Philadel-
phia, Pa. Philadelphia has been selected
as the next meeting place.

NOTES ABOUT LUMBER.
Northern lumbermen hardly know
whether to prefer warm weather or cold
weather. In the one case they will lose
some logs and in the other they will lose
some money. So they are glad to leave
the matter in the hands of Previdence--
they give it up.

The members of the National Wholesale
Luminbr Dealers' Association are getting
nearly as familiar with the New Willard
hotel at Washington, D. C., as they are
with their respective domiciles-and, be-
sides, they have less difficulty in finding
the keyhole at the New Willard.

Senator Overman has introduced a bill
to provide that whenever the President
shall be satisfied that any company, com-


JOS. ROSENHEIM SHOE CO.
NANUFAC""311 1 AM 01 1 OF


SIHOES,



Bsat Shms Minis tar Ce mmlumy Trni.
asAAE IGltesRG6IA8


WANTED
AND

FOR SALE
Rate for this column is I emnt per word
for afi insertio and 1 ent pr weod Sr
following i nrtis. No advertiemmt
taken for Iwe than 40 ents for Art, ad
20 cents for following isemrtans. Cah
must accompany orders unlmes you a v
an account with a-

WANTED-To buy round timber or tur-
pentine plants in operation. Give sched-
ule, location and lowest price. Our mot-
to, "DO BUSINMIS." Address Naval
Stores, care Industrial Record, Jackson-
ville, Fla. 2- t- MS
POSITION WANTED by turpentine
woodsman. Can furnish good references.
Address Box 37, DeVon, Fla. 2-22-2t


WANTED-All ommiseris to dema up
their barns of al kids of seed iack and
burlap. We buy everything n the way
of seks. Write us. Ammlemn Fibre Co.
Jacksonville, Fla.

WANTED-A number of honest young
men from this vicinity interested to read
our convincing catalogue. (Free). Tampa
Business College (The College with a home
for its students.) Tampa, Fla. L. M.
Hatton, President. 1-11-2 mos.
FOR SALE-Small turpUtina plae for
cash. Price $8a 0.0 Good baking. Ad-
dress Operator, care Industrial Record. tf


WANTED--NAME FOR NW HOTEL.
Now Nearing Completion at Wayeree, Ga.
A premium of $5.00 will be paid to the
party suggesting a suitable name for
above described hotel. Suggestions re-
ceived to first day of February. Directors
of Hotel Company will make selection of
name from suggestions received.
Address,


Duval Planing Mill Co.
Seventh and laesd A, Jmckses Fk.
Bid Ms an Ctacters Will D Well t
Have Us Bd en Their Werk
in eor Lime.
Pheme 1749.


WANTE-A stillman to run a 25-bbl.
*till. stilL Must have good recommenda-
tions. Apply at once to the Mexioan Trad-
lg Co., Morelia, Mich, Mexico.
1-4t
A successful operator bringing fifteen
hands can buy an interest o eay terms,
or get position as woodsman, seven miles
west of Suwannee River on oast IAne.
Ten thousand acres round timber. Good
building and equipment every way.
Healthy place. Four crops virgin, eleven
2d and 3d year. Gsalden, Eugene, Pla.
2-7-08-3t

DO YOU WAKT rumsalua ?

For it will pay yno to ee the ew Pur-
niture at-


Raimls's


main stree


Jadeaimve,


Walter Mucklow,
CIRTIIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT,
Reem, 46-47-4 Mautul IUfe 8
Telepheme sL
IACKUONVILL.. IlA.


WHISKIES

GINS AND RUMS



$1.50 to$5.00 per Gallon

...... AG NCY DM B......

B amutIaP 108* n-U Mss Srwi


Controllers Blum's Monogram and Sylvan
Rye-Agets for Juna t ClsnInnati and
Past Milwaukee Bees Prie a p
plication.

CHAS. BLUM A CO.
517 and CI l WLT RAT S.TiT
JACESONVILLE FMA.


W aycroe Hote Company, ay fm wsr
WayeroM Ga. Pur Rye W bIIuS.










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. ___


biation, monopoly or trust is so organ-
led, managed and controlled that the ar-
tiles, goods, wars and merchandise so
manufactured and exported are sold in any
foreign markets at a less price than they
are sold at in the home markets, he shall
have the right and will be authorized to
suspend, by prolamation to that effect,
either the whole or a part of the cus-
toms duties or taxes collected on any
articles, goods, wares r merchandise of a
like character upon their importation into
the United States, and this order would
aat for such time as to the President
may seem proper. The bill has been re-
ferred to the finance committee.

A general resumption of operations by
the m-all interir mills in the Savannah
district is denied by those who are in a
position to know. For several weeks it
has been rumored that all of the mills in
that vicinity had begun to cut lumber
again and would continue to do so regard-
less of what they were ableto realize for
their output. This report created a good
deal of uneasiness although the rumors
were heavily discounted. Under present
snditions the mill owners cannot afford
to free operations, for while there has
been increase in the demand and a gain
in consumption it is not sufficient to take
care of all the product of the yellow pine
,. ills east or south.
The Gulf a Ship Island railroad traffic
men report that 85 per cent of the saw
mills on that Mlssissippi line were shut
down in January, and that the number
of aem of lumber hauled over the line has
fallen off 50 per cent. These assertions
were brought out before the railroad com-
mittee of the legislature which was inves-
tinting the earnings of the railroads with
the view of reducing passenger rates.
Some were invidious enough to say that
the railroad attorneys shaped their figures
to suit their argument against reduction
of rates.


DCATY I WOOD PREVENTED.

ma savd and Laess Material *eled.
It is estimated that a fence post, which
under ordinary circumstances will last for
perhaps two years, will, if given preserva-
tive treatment costing about 10 cents,
last eighteen years. The service of other
timbers, such as railroad ties, telephone
poles and mine props, can be doubled and
often trebled by inexpensive preservative
treatment. Today, when the cost of wood
is a big item to every farmer, every stock-
maa, every railroad manager-to everyone,
In fact, who must use timber where it is
likely to decay-this is a fact which
should be carefully considered.
It is easy to ee that if the length of
time timbers ean be used is doubled, only
half as much timber will be required as
before and only one-half as much money
will need to be spent in the purchase of
timber. Moreover, many woods which
were for a long time considered almost
worthless can be treated and made to
ast as long as the ssarer and more ex-
pensive kinds.
Of the actul saving in dollars and cents
through preservative treatment, a fence
post such as was mentioned at the be-
ginning might serve as one example. The
post is of loblolly pine and costs, un-
treated, about 8 cents, or, including the
cost of setting, 14 cents. It lasts about
two years. Compounding interest at 5
per cent., the annual charge of such a post
is 7.53 cents; that is, it costs 7.53 cents


servative treatment costing 10 cents will
increase its length of life to about eighteen
years. In this case the total cost of the
poet, set, is 24 cents, which compounded
at 5 per cent, gives an annual charge of
2.04 cents. Thus the saving due to treat-
ment is 5.49 cents a year. Assuming that
there are 200 posts per mile, there is a
saving each year for every mile of fence
of a sum equivalent to the interest on
$219.60.
In the same way preservative treat-
ment will increase the length of life of a
loblolly pine railroad tie from five years to
twelve years, and will reduce the annual
charge from 11.52 cents to 9.48 cents,
which amounts to a saving of $58.75 per
mile.
It is estimated that 150,000 acres are
required each year to grow timber for
the anthracite coal mines alone. The av-
erage life of an untreated mine prop is
not more than three years. By proper
preservative treatment it can be prolonged
by many times this figure. Telephone and
telegraph poles, which in ten or twelve
years, or even less, decay so badly at the
ground line that they have to be removed,
can, by a simple treatment of their butts,
be made to last twenty or twenty-five
years. Sap shingles, which are almost
valueless in their natural state, can easily
be treated and made to outlast even paint-
ed shingles of the most decay-resistant
woods. Thousands of dollars are lost ev-
ery year by the so-called "bluing" of
freshly sawed sapwood lumber. This can
be prevented by proper treatment, and at
a cost so small as to put it within the
reach of the smallest operator. *
In the South the cheap and abundant
loblolly pine, one of the easiest of all
woods to treat, can by proper preparation
be made to take the place of the high-
grade longleaf pine for many purposes.
Black and tupelo gums and other little-
used woods have a new and increasing im-


Cypress Tanks
Fr All Purposes
BEST MADE
Write for Catalue

Preston Miller Co.


Dept. B


Crescent City, Fla.


PECANS
Anwvze the word.

PameUat Profts
Fcm0my of care
Certabty of results

Amll crops
Noairpriduae product
Superor to al nuts.

THE OPPORTUNITY OF TODAY
The flrs to plant a pecan grove
ill be the first to reap a
great harvest.
For full Inforation apply to

THE 6RIFFING BROS. Go.


a year to keep the post in service. Pre-


portance because of the possibility of
preserving them from decay at small cost
In the Northeastern and Lake States are
tamarack, hemlock, beech, birch and ma-
ple, and the red and black oaks, all of
which by proper treatment may help to
replace the fast-diminishing white oak and
cedar. In the States of the Mississippi
Valley the pressing fence-post problem
may be greatly relieved by treating such
species as cottonwood, willow and hack-


berry.
Circular 139 of the Forest Service, "A
Primer of Wood Preservation," tells in
simple terms what decay is and how it
can be retarded, describes briefly certain
preservatives and processes, gives exam-
ples of the saving in dollars and cents,
and tells what wood preservation can do
in the future. The circular can be had
free upon application to the Forester,
Forest Service, Washington, D. C.


J. S. Schotleld's Sons Com ay

Heelutriwmlr ~

Distiller's Pumpinj
Outfit.
No plant complete without on..
Hundredsaof them in -mi In
SFlorid. Aa, Mieeppsi
South Carmlina Wite us
Iwo =al Pria. We ala. n t
ghluses, meows aIm nHigh

*4as well ascary a full and mplunple

MIN s 8uDCom Poe,
mell Tubes, Ete
j Advise your wants.
Macon,, Georgia.
Aeb t ftf ofe a. P
+ KM& .1 To* %A 1. TWFIftSWW Fpl




CumO ER Lumuea Cu~mmimA

JACKSONVILLE. LA.


Rouigh & Oreaod Lu"Doer


Long Loaf eYllow Pfe.


BOXES A" RMA7.





ATLANTIC COASTLINE R. RL

GOES EVERYWHERE

North, South East and


West

Through Pullman Service on All Trains


CONSULT THE "PURPLE FOLDER"

For detailed information, schedules, rates and
reservations, seeyour nearest Ticket Agent, or
write or call on


A. W. FRITOT. or
Division Pans. Agent
Atlantic Coast Line.
Jacksonville, Iln.


FRANK C. BOYLSTON.
Trav. Pmae. Ag4mt
AtlGntic C r.t Line
J chmonvlli. r&L


Jacksenville. Florlila






STH WUINKLY INuDUt IAL RBCOD.

Capital $2M00Ol

HUTCHINSON SHOE COMPANY
VICTOR SHOES AND HATS
Wholesale Jacoonille, Fla.


LIGHT SAW MILLS CHASE LARK, In.
Ah Dho n w iem w l,
Shone 186. Jacksonville. Fla.
I aM& anJ @hImmI* M**U--


LM = 41 man



saws and 5'rmr"s,.


Sftam mad Gasofim


Eugsinsa


Try


Cook If not.
WITH Why not
JACKSONVILLE
G as GAS COMPANY


HUTCHINSON AUDIT CO.
PUBLIC ACCOUNTARTS & AUDITOR&
Dyas-Upek. J Buildi
Phmse 1.% Jaebunvlm M


PbSni Madbwy

CasUn d -i D



lAwn EUIeAI HOTEL


-1 now KNI


me$ =a Ss oa at r P MeshL at
SAN 3 we X. Dy Stret
jACKSONILL, FLA_


Barnes & JeS

Jcklonvil

NovYl Stores ract
Merch


OFFI
C eMBrnes. PreiAdent.
E.IL Wedll S.er"

DILKCTORLSi C H. B
J. N. SaLders. C. Long, W.
Jennatn W. Taylor.
aiimifii mii m 4p ON A_ A


Wholesale Dealers in and Bottlers f
ANHEUSER.-BUSCH

St. Louis Lager Beer
Wholesale

LiqNr, Wins, N INral Waters
Writo for Prices


5sup Company

I.. FOriOMda.

ors and Commission O
fants.


CER.S.
J. A. Ewirg. Vice-Preident.
iary aend Treasurer.

nee. J. A. Ewing, R. S. Hall,
E. Cumaer, E. B. Wells. W. S.

M8M8K115 5%%%$g1Mi11ac%%$5


*eY Wm*t a Tu eentinettono?
You Wat a SaweiN Lecaton?
You Wat my Kibd of ForItd Lmad?
OYN Me 1m- me5agss?
I* cn ntl or Wr*af ft

J. H. Livingston & Sons,
OCI.A. rLODA.


INEQUALITY OF TAXATION OF MIS-
SISSIPPI TIMBER HOLDERS.
New Orleans, La.-A wrangle over con-
stitutional amendments may result in
lightening the burdens of timber holders
in southern Mississippi, if the hint that
has been given out in Jackson is made
good. Southern Mississippi members of
the legislature have long complained that
they are not receiving the legislative rep-
resentation to which they are justly en-
titled by reason of increased population,
and further, that the assessments are in-
equitable, being much higher in southern
Mississippi than in other portions of the
State. They sought to secure a constitu-
tional convention at the present session
in orde rto make a new reapportionment
and to secure a system of tax equalization.
This proposal was voted down in the State
senate, and there has been some talk of
reducing assessments in southern Missis-
sippi counties to such an extent that the
State revenues from that source will fall
off about $50,000. The chairman of the
house ways and means committee makes
light of the gossip, for the reason that
"thousands of acres of land in every
county in southern or southeastern Mis-
sissippi are owned by non-resident persons
and syndicates, and the boards of super-
visors cannot well afford to reduce assees-
ments of individuals and neglect to re-
dudce assessments of syndicates." He ad-
mits. however, that "lands in the south-
eastern portion of Mississippi are over-
assessed in about the same proportion that
lands in the Delta are under-assessed."
Citizens of the southern portion of the
State are growing restive under the con-
tinued injustice that is being done them.
They pay an unduly large share of the
State taxes, have an unduly small repre-
sentation in the legislature and receive, it
is claimed an unduly small proportion of
the common school fund distributed an-
nually by the State. Most of the com-
plaints are admitted to be not altogether
groundless by the legislation from other
sections. but every attempt to secure relief
is met by opposition from the majority.
The inequality is caused by the fact that
the appodtion was made by the constitu-
tion of 1800, before the southeastern Mis-
sissippi lumber industry was developed
and that section was then poor and
sparsely settled. Now it has become prob-
ably the richest part of the State, and
the population has increased vastly. Tax-
ation and assessments have been raised to
provide revenue for county improvements,
and with every advance of assessments,
the State profits by its share of the tax
lexied.

DUWS WEEKLY REVIEW.


New York, March 6.--R G. Dun & Co.'s
weekly review -of trade tomorrow will
say:
Favorable symptoms are numerous in
the commercial outlook, especially in re-
spect to growth of confidence. Jobbers
note more pressure to replenish depleted
stocks of staple merchandise, orders in
many cases being for delivery next fall.
The advancing season has also cotrib-
uted to the better feeling by accelerating
the distribution of spring goods and stim-
ulating interest In building peMatioa


Industrial plant are more active, pig iron
production rising to the best weekly av-
erage in three months. Creditors we still
closely scanned and mereatile eolleetias
are by no means satisfactory, yet pay-
ments are more prompt ad the volume of
business is distinctly heavier.
There is a suggestion of permame in
the steady improvement in the ires amd
steel industry. Each week brings a few
more mills and furnaem into the active
list. New business appears i many de-
partments, warmer weather beiag espee-
ially helpful in restoring postponed build-
ing operations.
Dry goods have dome more bumines than
expected but thus far there i little im-
provement in the primary market and few
mills have extended activity. Jebbera will
not begin road operatlm as early as
usual, so that sale will be oser to ae-
tual retail distribttie, sn the sease 's
aggregate busies will be mm hle spec-
ulative than in any rent ywm. Omatrama
extending well into smmr have beea
placed for sheeting -and i uiries fro
the bag trade promise good move t of
odd construetias.


PROKGUSIIvXX TUAT PAYS.

The Stuart-Bera tesi Compe' lpr
me-at Bring Xay Co llm it
One of the best evidemo 4f Jarkasm-
ville's remarkable growth eam rin the
late financial troubles, is the reat im-
provement being made in all esaties
the retail district. Amog the nmt itrik-
ing examples of this is the mw tere of
the Stuart-Berstoa Company, the sh-
iers.
This company has douhed h er space
renting the store next to its o. stan ad
knocking out the partition betwe the
two. This gives tem floor op equal
to, if not larger than amy other smer
in the city mad the store is fa el pg-to-
date clothing, hats ad soes, the he de-
partment being a recet adltm.
The Stuart-Bernsteil Omsamy believe
in pushing certain leading tbram i all
departments and their aeletim i a good
one.
Hart, Sehafnar & Marx suit al deoth-
ing, Knox Hats aad Florsialm aad D. T.
Barry shoes are their leaders those
lines and they haves remarkaly tfe hos-
iness in all other lines. Teir Boys' at
Children's Departmats, als e the ig ed
floor, is becoming more polar every day
and bids fair to become o oft their lead-
ing departments.
Modern fixtures throughout, iaaing a
ned idea in Ms for Fay Vests and
Summer clothing, add greatly the ap-
pearance of an already Ae nste. The
Stuart-Bernatein Compay is to e ea-
gratulated upon its push m.dlrig~ aty.

Nmr2
Notice is hereby give tWt Manh
24th, A. D. i M I wIl as gn.- o
Vivian Y. Barker, aply to the d n H. B.
Phillipe, County Jadge a# Diavl hO ty
Florida, for an ord to Ml at privaIe aM
all the rii title d ln erd of Vivir
Y. Barker, a miaor, in and to labt One (1)
and Two (2) in Mak l7t"w4 (42)
Springfield. ty of Ja il Duval
County, Florida.
(cLARAB. L AW ,
Cuardla of Vlvwi Y. lifker.
lb. 141


LO MBARD JOSEPH ZAPF CO


AUGUSTA, GA.





3 1THg WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Southern Drug Mfg. Company
WHOLESA E DRUGGISTS AND MANUFACTURERS OF
Flavoring Extracts, Packed Drugs, B. B. Bluing, Vinegar and Pyne's Popular Remedes.
We himdle everythlag in the Drus wnd Mdictne Une. Write for price. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


INVENTOR AND
M. AKERDAM"~N"A
A. BAER MANUFACTURER OF
BAKER IMPROVED SEAMLESS TURPENTINE SILLS.


THE


BEST TANKS
ON EARTH
Ar*e nd l Pin atka, PF., by Q. N. Davis
Son. They selected wood Welk-
m -sp equal to the Qi of the materUia
and t eombinatio i IMa toey quaI
f tr dubity. Write them forprie. and fsN
bteratim before you buy a tuk.
O. M. DAVIS & SON, Palata, PIs.


W. a. HINDrSON, Pr.
L & CRAnT, Vie-Prs.


wrEs .... 0.5 anv-.t.sa^^hetmfe*. eta.
w** f O.B. *jvlt lrwr-- bl.
mSid nader a sm a s m
WORK TnrovoG THr COvNTrrT rLONMPLY ATTE.DEr TO
The Larget d Oldest Copper Works Ii the South.
My speelalty is large wrm a 4 heavy bottoms that do not leak
RUNSWICK, GA. ald PENSACOLA, FLA.



DIAMONDS AND WATCHES
We ~Mhy "as a car. We caw ar w ~, at correct a mwey
msearf oes," m Ya ppers r eaae p9re wate perfect
MAiOWDS. It is er odesre aw cefBtle aJg te aIrgest
cm~rms NeiN lWfwW ft Watches.
samamed ieamers Ca JachaseoMe, aa e iar spedarty Io Wee eaaa-
-- ^ *^Weaa. gl.ac


HESS & SL1AGE1R "11-a ws. Jmed.


- -.. --.....*. ...*--------.--*-----a^

Craig Bros Co.
239 W. B1yi Stroe EVIUETT BLOCK.

Leaders in Men's and Bors' Fine Cloth-
Inu and Up-to-Date Furnishinls.

Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hat; largest stock in the City.
--- -- ------


othrkn Stalts Naval Stores Co.


rFactors
hip to Sancuaba


Savannah, Ga.
and Coarmifn ion Merchants
I I- A"- -""- 121.2- 10 '0- a^.I-


-'-I---m
Cwmrrp


L. nan, G. sa. M t VISO pu,
JNO. V8AVAXX, ft a
B. T. RICHARD, 8u'y.


TAMPA DRUG CO.
Wholesale Manufacturing Drugists.
TAMPA, FLORIDA.
Full and complete one of all hlads of Drags, Chaluiat
and Patent Medicines.
SPECIAL ATTENTION 10 COMMISsARY TRADE.
PROMPT ATTENTION TO ALL ORDERS.
* ******* ----*********-----a****


L V. vW T,
Prelidnt


D.M.R.1FLYM
w'. t~ mmy.
Vbvt6&vA


SL 11310A
Ed.d Tn
&.3 LEZ
Adk8W.i TxEN.


WEST FLYNN HARRIS CO.
r GERMANIA ,LO. Sme ias. (o
GENEtAL OF WTSdIC1
,T oWESMT aULUG. jmo Vi76

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
NAVAL 8TORB8 R3CZIVD~ AT UAVMAJIA, G., JAC V.I
FLA, AND IIAuWDanA 71A.
Wholesale Grocer also Dealers in Hay. Grain and Heavy
Hamei*
SOLE AGENTS f tb' Cso MIM" T"y -' A-
MBRCHANTI VARBHOUSI
SAVARNAH, GA. JACKSONVILL, FLA TAiMA, &rA
0001.0-00- Goose ee -- -----


WILLIAM A. BOURS JAME 0. DARBY

WILUAM A. BOURS & CO ANY
n m .e Esvu mwa m ura ui E-ms a-n .a I A.
Hay, Grain, Feed, Garsd


r Wr p r Xd WGrIts, M eal ami f rt IErs.
OUR "OTTO: III 3sbim*. obli 4806s,


ca""M res


Vv LAM@ mc wi., IM smi a a IL.,


I


i


L


-NO W- 3bW`*3&WA7'WXW'W-%Nw-*%


r~r-~uruyrurrYu-~C-i1SI-~LI-liW-i~,~~~


.r rrrm~rrr~rr~r~r~il~:~-~-r-uuuuuuu


r









BEFORE MAKING YOUR PURCHASE!
-See The-

KNIGHT CROCKERY

-And--

FURNITURE COMPANY
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


SEEN


D6 C. A461y.
Q~ A. Fqeawev.
1P. 1- Weeak.
L Q. Ca~od.
IL Wambmi.
. I Brm


D. C. ASHLEY. Psident.
. W. BLOUNT. lt Vice Pregient
aad Genera MaMr.
G. A. PETTEWAY, 2od Vice P-es.
J. M. ASHLEY, 3d Vice Pre.
SH.L BERG. Sec. and Trea.


DIRECTORS:
B. W. Bount,
B. A. Cater,
T. G. Culbreth,
A. S. Pedleton.
B. G. Lasiner,
J. M. AhLey.
W. T. B. Harrison.


PENINSULAR NAVAL STORES CO.
Commission Merchants
and Wholesale Grocers
Receiving Podnts-Jacksoville, Tampa and Fernandina,
Fla, Savannah, 0G .

Capital Stock. o$1.000.000.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. KRENSOI


J. P. WEED & CQ.,


PLANTERS

"Old Time" Remedies
THE JOY OF THE HOUSEHOLD.


and Cubes a he joy of the houMaeo. With them r -at ead
ma is redy for say emerge y. He ham a safe, rlMable aml aY
for wife, ehldrum, mf or etoek. With thee remaedie- m ep te -
doctor'n hands out of your pockets, and yet have a y, h-fu
Bemsi, you ean eme your stock of ay al9met that -yb th-.
VUBIA TXA-In Litald Porar I er gMt Satm rmatm. It
will e re aB form of Liver and Kidney ompaiBt..t, Pkmr MaiMls
Fever. Cures the co ano ilmerts of hld n; -d as a Imeta tel ik wMI b t
an equal-te ad rebkMe. the liquid, it b extremely paltab- e Ma
like it-adn it is READY FOR U8K
BXREDICTA is a women's medicine. It will cre all te dime mm to
women, ad ela a as Female Trublee. It will bring youth baek to t dhe a a wmM
who has r oe serving because she thought it womatb lot. It wl n esr tlo
yomun girl jut nt g womabood and prepare the yog womn te O a m
duties of wifo ad moth.
CUBAN RELIXE-The instant Paint Killer, for either ma or bas M Re2Mg
instantly, Colic, Crampe, Cholera Morbus, Diarrhoea, Dytmtery and Mek Hea-M
r olie in horse it is a infallible remedy and is guaranted to give re If t
minutes.
CUBAN OIL-The Best Be aud Nerve Lainmeat. 1s amtsahi far n,
jagged or torn Besh, and will instantly relieve the pain. Cures inmet tas Mad tMag
mald and burns, bruises and sores, ehapped hands and face, oe mad tmder ha.
Relieves rheumatic pains, lame back, atif joints, and in stoek eau wir fee -
scratehes, thrush, splint, collar ores, saddle galh, sad disad boo.
Writ for PiesM.
SPENCER MEDICINE CO.. Chattanooga. Ton

t. E. PRITCHETT. Press. P. L. BSTHIM AND), Viee-Prf. A. XD. OVIGTON, Sec'y.
J. P. COUNCIL, Treas and Geal Mgr.

THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.,
General Offices: JACKSONVILLE, FLA
Factory: WANNANISl, N. C.
M aefwa r f g h *e am reaT
s or nowt opmesm 0~01010so.


W. L. WILSON,
Pres. & Treas.


JNO. E. NIAIIS,
Vice Pres.


*. J. SCO@VL,
Se'y a MgW


Savannah, Georgia

ClEADQUARTERS FOR


Hoop Iron and TurpFntine


Boxing Axes.


McMIHlan Bros.


Florida Cooperage Company
(Iocorpormad) Caplitl Stook 100.@00
mIAnurACcLdaTs or
Turpentine, Cotton Seed OiC, p

and Syrup fTrre f.
ofrrse mui astery fatsrprwse -a Ests Streets.
Telephone 1855 JacksoavIlle, flA.


Southern Cppper
Works

Maniufdcturrs of TURPENTINE STILL
Complete Outfits and Extra Ketlaes, Caps, Arms, Woiar, mar-
nace Doors and Grates always on hand
Old Stills taken in partNew I o and repairin do
payment for in the conutry
Heavy Cepperunlthlg. Steam Pipe and Speeal Cipper Woe
Jacksonville, Fla.
AS Fayetteville,N. C. Savannah, ia. Mob*


MEN-- --








S 1 W p p p P a a a a a *- p p a a 1-I -W 31K W WW'W'


*~ii S~ .. 5SS fbr 5 se a .


AT THE S


THE BIG

You wtil not in all your shopp
so many appropriate, pretty and
together for your selection as he
upon you that while we do not ke
Jewelry that is cheap-honest, rel
tion that Uves up to what we repr<
excellent Shaving Sets, Fine Umr
Knives, etc.; etc.


Gireenleaf &

41 West Ba

Quality, Low Price and Variel
offer you to favor us wi
WRITE FOR CATALOG.


I l nk n rr-


ivl 11 1 I 5g I -I1-Iv I I u I Ia a I I I- I ;O;i ; -I -
__ __ I~-- Nanol


HALF TONES-ZINC ETCHINGS
Illustrating and tiagraving Department
or
THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION
Spleedidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc
Etchings made to order in the most improved and artistic
fashion. illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of Com-
ercial Work, Pamphlets, Etc,
A mSpeelrty Ma of SegiIing Rete dng amd
EmbeMsbht PbstsBo ma d Pturss
I Wurit o a rlylyW for Prices, Gie the Most Explicit Description of What is
Wanted. Good Work sad Prmmpt Deliveries Promised.
.. A Frlopl M ExnergprlIe. Try It.
-mm -
"= OUWT WISr m Y HOUge 01
2 sUT.r (uatablmeh I*a -z.)
E O M SHARP WILLIAMS-Pre pri
f p ^ o. By the gallon .T5; four f
VU4w 42 express prepaid-
GD. J. ODOLUMa-Pnre Ry; U
ANVIL Y ER-PIure gstaatlal Yesty
Skey. By the gaHon SaLiO fr fo.

CNJHi OLD S&IrTuKX C^DIreit from.
*Warehouse; fhe aad old. By the
$ o; four funll quart $3j5 express
PO IND TEB CLUB OOBN-Rie and

meAlma 4I r u6 ILquor Company
S-'i .-2. IMtI v - JackhonvUie, .1
F. O. Ia% aS s .
I:- L k.
!fe iiS ...


e Metropolis
Is the Paper you want. It is pblihrid
daily and is from IS to hoIurr hMad of
any other daily newspaper in Florid.

$5O0 a Year $2.2 Six Moaths
Full Telegraphic and Steak reports. If
you want to keep posted an the news, get
the Metropolis.

CARTER & RUSSELL PUB. CO.
VWLA6tW.0


Mc KOY PATENT

Turpertine Cup.
The best a ina est cap
ao toh --ae Detachable
Qimtr cawaity, esier
dinue saoar easily plsad
e tree, qtiap -d paM-
tically indestustiMa. WWl
not rust. For eataleo ma
priem Bwrits


'FIrewWUE WGI
I-~~4 ,r-osllbJ "-


w.


IGN OF


CLOCK.

ing, find a single place where
useful' things are gathered
re, and we want to impress
ep CHEAP Jewelry we keep
able fewelryof every descrip-
esent it to be. We have some
wrellas, Silver Handle Pocket .



Crosby Co.

y Street.

ty are the inducements we
th your patronage.
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
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