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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00244
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: November 2, 1907
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00244
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text
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SUSTRIA


EiCORD


fY] Y fAVAL IToRES.,
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fD\rVTiTJAAl Vh FNAtIlAh
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JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


SAVANNAH. GA.


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CONSOLIDATED NAVAL STORES COMPANY.

\ Home Office: JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
SBranches: Savannah, Ga., and Pensacola, Fla.

OFFICERS.
W. C. POWELL, Pree it; B. F. BULLA hD, H. L COVINGTON, J. A. CRANFORD, D. H. McMILLAN, B. R. POWELL. C. M COVINGTON, JOHN H.
POWELL, Viee Presidents; C P. DUSEN BURY. Secretary and Trearer.
T.XEC-UTVE COMMII1TEE: W. C. Poweb. C. I Hogers. H. L Covington, B. F. Bullarl. .. A. Cranford.
DIL'CTORS: W. C. wellel, B . Bullard. C. B. Rogers, .. A. Cranford. W.. Hillman, John H. Powell, W. F. Coachman. I.I- Covington, C. Dowiiing. D. H.
MeMillan, R. B. Powell. C. M. Covington. S. A. Alford.


I NAVAL STORES FACTORS


I Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
The 'Consolidated" is purely a co-operative Company. Its Interests are Identical with those
Sof the Producers. The patronage of turpentine operators everywhere Invited.
Two Million acres of Land and Timber for sale on easy terms.
$ Producers are invited to cell or correspond.
^v ^^r--r -- ------ rirc Cl~arrr^v^MiA:~~-:riaa B;---;;i-;;----------


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COVINGTON COMPANY,
WHOT FRALE MERCHANTS.

Dry Goods. Notions, Men's Furnishirgs
Blankets. Comforts, Convict Clothing,
UNION-MADE OVERALLS.


McMillan Bros.


Southern Copper
Works

Manufacturers of TURPENTINE STILLS
Complete Outfits and Extra Kettles, Caps, Arms, Worms, Fur-
nace Doors and Grates always on hand
Old Stills taken in part New Work and repairing done
payment for in the country
Heavy Coppersmithiag, Steam Pipe and Speial Cpper WLrk
Jacksonville, Fla.
Aus Fayetteville,N. C. Savannah, Ga. Mobile, Aa.


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WEEKLY


INDUSTRIAL


RECORD.


PUDBrIPg EVERY SATURDAY. DEVOTED TO NAVAL STORES. LUMBER AND MANUFACTURING Irl a bKts

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"FUTURE OF THE TURPENTINE INDUSTRY,"

(From the Savannah Cotton Trade Journal's Naval Stores Edition.)


Before long the naval stores industry
may expect to see the results of power-
ful operations now in progress, which ap-
pear innocent enough in their nature,
while working for apparently gigantic
control. Compared to what the trade have
complained of heretofore, what threatens
now would seem in its fullest reality to
beggar description.
The question of attempts at absolute
control of the naval stores industry by
exporting interests seems no longer to
perplex those hearing to imagine the prob-
able intent of large purchases into fac-
torage concerns by them. The policy
of the exporters long dominant in naval
stores appears to be to so interest them-
selves also in the factorage end of the
business, in the control of lands, and by
connections with producers, as will either
better conserve their interests or enable
tkem to wield more power and control.
It -should be plainly stated that our
purpose here is not to arraign any par-
ticular interest, but to consider an im-
portant condition to the industry. In oth-
er words, abundant reason exists for be-
Heving that the exporters who dominate
the market are now moving rapidly to-
ward an important position in the pro-
ducing feld by such connections as will
make them to an extent independent of
factors. That the combined exporters,
with their ingenuous leader, are moving
surely and steadily, and that their policy
is now as plain to outsiders as intelligent
people require for conviction, is no longer
in serious doubt, and the question is,
whether the ultimate result yill be for
the good or evil of operators, the advan-
tage or disadvantage of factors.
The manner exporters are buying into
factorage concerns and starting others are
matters of such well known trade knowl-
edge as to render needless resort to per-
sonalities. We have been surprised re-
cently to visit factorage offices and find
expert accountants going over the books
preparatory to a passing of control from

RAILROAD CONSTRUCTIOW.
Atlanta, Ga.-The Atlanta, Birmingham
A Atlantic Railway has, it is reported,
completed its line to a point within 31
milesof Atlanta, and this distance is ex-
pected to be covered by December 1.
Cairo, Ga.-C-pitalists of Valdosta, Cor-
dele and Atlanta propose, it is reported, to
build a railroad from Cairo south via Ha-
rvna, Fla, to the Gulf of Mexico and
northward to Pelham, Ga. The Cairo
Lumber Co. may be interested.
Center, Texas.-The Gulf, Colorado &
8ata Fe Railway Co. has just amended
ts charter for building the proposed con-
meetion from Center to Timpson, Texas,
17 miles, to unite the Gulf, Beaumont &
Oeat Norther and the Texas & Gulf


the owners to big exporters. We have
also been surprised to have the president
of a factorage company make a decision
upon a business proposition contingent
upon its approval first by a big exporter.
These companies have been giving their
especial attention of late to timber lands.
And there is no danger in getting these
companies mixed up with the old-line, in-
dependent factors. Neither is there any
danger of mixing up exporters, for the
line is very clearly drawn between the one
and the other, and in a majority of cases
in plain English. The importance of the
movement referred to, however, asserts
itself at this time because the exporters
have proceeded far enough to disclose be-
yond doubt their policy to enter actively
into operations behind the factor, upon


whom they have up to this time depend-
ed for their supplies.
The trade need not worry as to what
will follow with exporters in undisputed
control of distribution, also progressing in
acquiring the balance of power in con-
trolling the source of supply. At the rate
the acquisition of power is moving to
this time the next decade threatens .to
find one great company in absolute dom-
ination, controlling the distribution, the
market, the supply. The last of these is
all required now to complete the policy.
It is needless" to say that if such a
condition is finally realized the usual
course will be followed of reducing costs
to their lowest basis by eliminating every-
body possible. It is not a rule of such
concerns to carry ballast, as the organi-
zation is usually so perfect as to make it
run with a minimum of help. It would
mean much slaughter in the ranks of mid-
dlemen.
Granting the policy of the exporters is
attempted control of production, the ope-
rator may well consider what the effect
of this would be upon him. Would the
dominant interests then favor high prices,
or would it be money to them to have low
prices? Would they beat down prices and


buy in what they did not control, then
advance them for selling off? Or would
the law of supply and demand be allowed
to apply? Where would the turpentine
operator stand with one single company
absolutely controlling distribution, abso-
lutely controlling the markets, absolutely'
controlling production? Where do the in-
dependent oil operators of Ohio and In-
diana stand today?
It is useless to speculate upon the pos-
sibilities of the future in this regard. It
is enough for the trade to know the rea-
sons for believing that such forces are at
work on such a policy. And it may be
said that the work is in the hands of ex-
tremely patient, shrewd and far-seeing
men, who are quite willing to outline pol-
icies requiring a decade for their execu-
tion. Cornelius Vanderbilt said of the
Standard Oil men who dealt' with him
when he presided over a great railroad in
New York, that "they are extremely sa-
gacious business men. They are too smart
for me."
The people have taken a stand on at-


tempts to control business and crush out
competition which has manifested itself
with such might and vengeance recently
that fear need not be felt of their oppres-
sion by the designs of rapacious financiers.
The grasp of the people seems sufficient
to protect themselves, and when necessity
seems to call for action it appears that
remedial measures for commercial evils
may be effectively applied.

Certain Questions to be Considered by Na-
val Stores Producers.
Editor of the Record:
Is the Naval Stores Industry about to
be swallowed up by a small ring of capi-
talists engaged in the exporting and hand-
ling of turpentine and rosin?
Events transpiring within the last three
to five months lead us to believe that
there is a decided Ethiopian in the wood-
pile.
The action of the Savannah factors in


Railroads. The Texas & Gulf is also to rers' Record that the company does not
be extended northward from Longview, contemplate the construction of a branch


Texas, to connect with the Santa Fe north
of the Red River. C. F. W. Felt is chief
engineer at Galveston, Texas.
Covington, Tenn.-The Memphis, Cov-
ington & Northern Railway Co. has been
chartered with $14,000 capital to build a
line in Covington, Tenn., and also an in-
terurban railway in Tipton and Shelby
counties. The incorporators are G. B. Gil-
lespie, John T. Garner, J. B. Withering-
ton, W. M. Abernathy, H. N. Sullivan,
C. H. Stovall, W. A. Black and R. W.
Sanford.
Fayette, Miss.-An officer of the Yazoo
& Mississippi Valley Railroad (Illinois
Central System) informs the Manufactu-


from Melton Station to King's point.
This denies a recent press report.
Greenville, Texas.-Mr. J. T. Jones,
chairman of the executive committee, in-
forms the Manufacturers' Record that the
proposed interurban railway from Green-
ville via Wolf City to Bonham is only in
its primary stages. A civil engineer will
be engaged immediately to survey and
locate the line, which, it is expected, will
occupy two or three months. When this
is done the company will be incorporated,
and it is intended to begin construction
early next spring. The line will be about
35 miles long and will have local railways
in each of the three cities.


letting" the market go down both on tur-
pentine and rosin without making a strug-
gle even to stop the raid on the market,
looks very ugly. When we consider that
these people have millions of dollars due
them from operators in the woods and that
if the prices of naval stores reach such
a low level that it costs more to make the
stuff than they receive for it, the factor
faces inevitable loss in collecting his ac-
counts and the producer, of course, faces
bankruptcy.
It is certain that turpentine and rosin
cannot be produced at 50c. per gallon for
turpentine and $3.50 for common rosin.
It is certain that the crop this year is
less than last year.
It is certain that the consumptive de-
mand has been good and general condition
favorable, yet in the face of it all, we
have seen the market ABSOLUTELY
choked down and "sandbagged" on the
Savannah Board of Trade which (unfor-
tunately) controls prices for the whole
world.
Therefore, some explanation must be
rendered to the turpentine producers aa
to why their factors have allowed the
market to go to bankruptcy figures with-
out even making an effort to stop the de-
cline, and also it should be explained why
one of the largest houses in the business
-The J. P. Williams Co.-has recently
openly joined the "wreckers" and assist-
ed in throwing the naval stores business
oon the scrap-pile.
Can it be possible that these worthy
gentlemen have a comfortable OPTION
locked up in their safes on their entire
business by which they will be paid for
their accounts and investments plus a
handsome bonus and are only waiting for
the winter and the close of the naval
stores season to turn over to the NEW
MONOPOLY the absolute control of the
naval stores business?
Finally: Will the turpentine operators
agree to be sold like so many sheep to
this crowd of sharks and naval stores


wreckers?


OPERATOR.


Houston, Texas.-The International &
Great Northern Railroad is reported to
have begun survey for additional track in
Houston. O. H. Crittenden is engineer at
Palestine, Texas.
Huttonsville, W. Va.-The Western
Maryland Railroad Co., it is reported, con-
templates building an extension from
Huttonsville to Webster Springs, W. Va.,
40 miles. J. Q. Barlow is chief egineer
at Baltimore, Md.
Joplin, Mo.-The Manufacturers' Record
is informed that the Joplin & Pittsabrg
Railway Co. contracted with A. L Regis-
ter & Co., of Philadelphia, to build abo
50 miles of line, and they now have under
construction 25 miles of interurban elee-
tric railway between Joplin, Xe., and


7









4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



WHITE OAK SPIRITS BARRELS

Guaranteed to conform to specifications Savannah and Jacksonville Board of Trade.

Write to Columbus Barrel Mfg. Co., Columbus, Ga., or to HENRY EL SON, florida Mgr., Jacksonville, Fla.


Pittsburg, Kan. They are also building
10 miles of electric railway in Joplin, be-
sides six miles between Seammon and
Mineral, Kan. A five-mile branch from
Pittsburg to West Curranville, Kan., and
another five-mile branch not yet fully de-
termined are also to be built.
Joplin, Mo.-The Southwest Missouri
Electric Railway is reported to have added
10 miles of new line to its trackage and
will soon have cars in operation from Jop-
lin to Duenweg. The main line extends
from Carthage, Mo., to Galena, Kan., 31
miles.
Lafayette, La.-James J. Lewis, of Eu-
nice, La., is reported as saying that an-
other new railroad company will be or-A
ganized within two weeks to build a line
out of Eunice. This is in addition to the
Eunice, Lafayette & Abbeville Railroad,
of which he is president.
Lake Charles, La.-The Cobb Car Co.
has been granted a franchise to build a
standard gauge railway over several
streets.
Lumberton, N. C.-The Virginia & Car-
olina Southern Railroad has put in use 11
miles of its line and is- about to extend
it two miles farther to St. Paul's, 13 miles
from Lumberton.
Little Rock, Ark.-The Rock Island sys-
tem, it is reported, will build a belt line
in Little Rock in connection with its other
projected improvements. J. B. Berry is
chief engineer at Chicago, Ill.
Little Rock, Ark.-An officer of the Rock
Island system writes the Manufactureis'
Record that the amounts which it was re-
ported the company would expend at Lit-
tle Rock and other points are stated too
large. Only four storage tracks are being
built at Little Rock; at Winnfield some
buildings and a yard will cost about $150,-
000; at Eldorado, $250,000. H. Dalhoff, of
Little Rock, has grading contract at Little
Rock and Winnfield, Ark. No contract
yet let at Eldorado. H. G. Clark, district
engineer, is in charge.
Marshall, Texas.-Mr. Ben B. Cain, Ty-
ler, Texas, informs the Manufacture s'
Record that he represents a majority of
the bondholders, and plans have been con-
sidered to rehabilitate the property of the
Texas Southern Railway and reorganize
the company. Plans are not matured.
The road is now in the hands of a re-
ceiver, and until a sale has been made
nothing can be done. C. L. Taylor is
receiver at Marshall, Texas.
New Iberia, La.-The Bayou Teche Elec-
tric Light & Railway Co. has, it is re-
ported, let contracts to build its line in
New Iberia and also from New Iberia to
Jeanerette. P. M. Seineidau is president.
P1eos, Texas.-Reported that citizens
have organized to build the Peeos, Sara-
gosm and Balmorea Railroad; capital
$4000. The proposed line is from Pecos
to Balmorhea, 40 miles. The mayor may
be able to give information.
Piedmont, W. Va.-Tbe Baltimore &
Ohio Railroad is reported to have let a
contract to F. H. Clement & Co., of Phila-
delphia to build a line for a flying junction
on the 17-mile grade.
Rusk, Texas.-The State is pushing
work on the extension of its railroad to


ACCOUNTANTS.
T. G. Hutchinson, Jacksonville, Fla.
Walter Mucklow, Jacksonville, Fla.
AXES.
Briggs Hardware Co., Valdosta, Ga.
BANKS.
Commercial Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
BEER-WHOLESALE.
Chas. Blum & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
.oseph Zapf & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
BARREL STAVES.
East Coast Lumber Co, Watertown,
Florida.
BOXES AND CRATES.
Cummer Lumber Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
BRICK.
Geo. R. Foster, Jr, Jacksonville Fla.
BUILDING MATERIAL.
Geo. R. Foster, Jr, Jacksonville, Fla.
CROCKERY.
Knight Crockery and Furniture Co.
Jacksonville, Fla.

CLOTHING.
Craig & Bro, J. A, Jacksonville. Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
COPPER SMITHS.
McMilan Brothers, Jacksonvlle, Savan-
nah and Mobile.
M. A. Baker, Brunswick, Ga.
COOPERAGE.
Florida Cooperage o.,Jacksonville, Fla.
Atlantic Cooperage Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS.
Wm. D. Jones, Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS-WHOLESALE.
Groover-Stewart Drug Co, Jacksonville,
Fla.
Tampa Drug Co., Tampa, Fla.
Southern Drug Mfg. Co., Jacksonville, F.
DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co. The. Jacksonville, Fla
ELECTRIC LIGHT AND POWER
PLANTS.
Karl Fries, Brunswick, Ga.
EHNGUIES.
Schofield's Sons Co, J. 8, Maeon, Ga.
Lombard Iron Works and Supply Co, An-
gusta, Ga.
Karl Fries, Brunswiek, Ga.
FURNITURE.
Knight Crockery and Furniture Co,
Jacksonville, Fla.
FERTIIZELRS
BourS & Co, Wa. A, JwbauvW FIG.
FOUIDRIM
choaeld's Sons Co., J. I., Maeom, Ga.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co, Au-
gusta, Ga.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS.
The Chas. A. Clark Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GAS.
Jacksonville, Gas Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GENTS' FUUINISHWRS
Stuart-Bernatein Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothirg Co., Jacksonville, Fla.


GROCERS-WHOLESALE
Williams Co., J. P, Savannah. Ga.
Young Co, John K., Savannah, Ga.
HARDWARE.
Bond & Bours Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Briggs, W. H., Hardware Co., Valdoeta, Ga
rampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co.. J. D.. Savannah. Ga.
HAY AND RAIN.
Bours & Co.. Wm. A.. Jacksonville, Fla.
HATS.
Craig & Bro, J. A., Jackannvalle, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co. Jacmoaville, Fla.
HOOP IRON.
J. D. Weed & Co., Savannah, Ga.
HOTELS
Duval Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
Zahm's European Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
IRON WORKS.
Schofield's Sons Co, J. S, Maeon, Ga.
JEWELERS.
R. J. Riles Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hess & Siager, Jacksonville, Fla.
LUMBER.
East Coast Lumber Co, Watertown,
Florida.
LIQUORS.
.R. M. Rose Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Blum & Co., Chas., Jacksonville, Fla.
Altmayer & Flatau Liquor Co., Macon, Ga.
Joseph Zapf & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
MEDICINES.
Spencer Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tenn.
MACHINE WORK&
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S, Maon, Ga.
Lombard Iron Works. Augusta, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR TURPENTINE PRO-
CESS.
Schofleld's Sons Co., J. S, Macon, Ga.
METAL WORKERS.
McMillan Bro. Co., Jacksonvile, Savan-
nah and Mobile.
Baker, -M. A., Brunswick, Ga, and Pensa-
cola, Fla.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S, Macon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co, J. D, Savannah, Ga.
Malsby Machinery Co., Jacksonville, FI.
Briggs Hardware Co., Valdosta, Ga.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co, Au-
gusta, Ga.
MOMUME3TS
Tampa Monumental Works, T Fl.M
MULES AMD HORSES
W. A. Cook, Tampa. F
NAVAL STORES
American Naval Stores, Co., Heom O .e,
Savannah, Ga.
Peninsular Naval Stores Co, Jacksonville
and Tampa, Fla.
Barnes & Jessup Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Al.
West-Flynn-Harris Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.


Young Co, John R., Savannah, Ga.
Southern States Naval Stores Co., SBaa-
mah, Ga.
PAINTS
Bond & Bours Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Tampa Hardware Co, Tampa, Fla.
PHOSPHATE MACHINERY.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co, Aw-
gusta, Ga.
PUMPS
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co, J. S., Maeon, Ga.
RAILROADS.
Atlantic Coast Line.
REAL ESTATE
Brobston & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
SAWMILLS
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co, Au-
gusta, Ga.
SEEDS
Bourn & Co., Wm. A, Jacksonvile, F.
SHIP YARDS.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
SHOES-WHOLESALE.
Hutchinson Shoe Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Jos. Rosenheim & Sons, Sarannah, Ga.
STEAMSHIPS.
Clyde Steamship Co. The, New York City.
TANKS.
G. M. Davis & Sons, Palatka, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
Preston Miller Co, Crescent City, Fa.
TURPENTINE BARRELS.
Atlantic Cooperage Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
TURPENTINE STILLS
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga, and Pee
cola, Fla.
McMillan Brothers .Co., .Jackaemvn
Savannah and Mobile.
TURPENTINE TOOLS.
Council Tool Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Operator' Tool Co, Green Cove Springk
Fla.
J. D. Weed & Co., Savannah, Ga.
WATCHES.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
R. J. Riles Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
YELLOW PINE LUMBER.
Cummer Lumber Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
East Coast I umber Co. Watertown. Fh.


Walter Mucklow,
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTAT
ROemm, 4-47- Mutufl LUfe Dig

JACKSONVILLE, lA.

DO YOU WANT kuxnIiUKE?
For it will pay you to ee the ev Fm-
niture at-


Rarmis's


Main Street.


Jackao ve.


BUYER'S DIR ECTORY


I __










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5



THE GROOVER-STEWART e"""mco.,

FOERMI.M TIE OMST a 5aiEOVR vmeo 00".
Wlilesal9 Drues, Chlemsls, Druggists Sw dries and OemmIlssry eedss
JMA0WinLLE. FOIm.


Palestine, Texas, and about three miles
are practically completed. When the line
is finished it will be 32 miles long, from
Rusk to Palestine.
San Antonio, Texas.-Reported that
Northern capitalists contemplate building
an electric interurban railway from San
Antonio via Segnin and Lockhart to Aus-
tin, Texas, and have secured options on
water-power on the Guadalupe river be-
tween New Braunfels and Seguin. The
San Antonio Board of Trade may be able
to give information.
Sanford, Fla.-Dr. George T. Bennett,
of Orlando, Fla., is reported as saying
that he is interested in promoting an elec-
tric light, power and railway company
which will build a line from Sanford via
Orlando to Kissimmee, Fla., 40 miles, and
subscriptions are now being secured.
Tampa, Fla.-The Tampa & Sulphur
Springs Traction Co. will, it is reported,
increase its capital stock from $100,000 to
$300,000 to build its proposed extensions.
The directors are A. W. Swann, Eugene
Holtsinger, L. Brill, who is manager; Jo-
siah Richardson and Dr. F. W. Inman.
Tarboro, N. C.-Dr. J. A. McLeay, of
Atlanta, Ga., is reported to be promoting
plans to build a railroad from Hamilton,
N. C., via Tarboro to Rocky Mount, N. C.
It is also reported that several construc-
tion companies are making estimates for
the line.
Tennille, Ga.-The Wrightsville & Ten-
nille Railroad,Co. has been granted per-
mission to issue $250,000 of bonds, pro-
eeeds to be used for betterments. A. F.
Daley is president at Tennille.
Velasco, Tex.-Felix Jackson, vice-presi-
dent and general manager of the Houston
Brazos Valley Railroad, is reported as
saying that the extension will be from
Anchor to Duke, Texas, 25 miles, and that
about four miles are completed. Plans to
build as far as Houston are not matured.
Waycross, Ga.-Reported that construc-
tion has been resumed on the Waycross,
Nashville & St. Mary's Railroad, and the
line to Nashville will be rushed to com-
pletion. It will be 60 miles long, and is
being constructed by the Bailey Company
and others of Waycross. Now 12 miles
are completed and 25 miles of rail are on
hand, while an order has been placed for
17 miles more.
Weatherford, Texas. The Chicago,
Weatherford & Brazos Valley Railroad Co.
will, it is reported, build a line 38 miles
long between Weatherford and Bridge-
port, Texas, via Springtown or Pooleville.
This statement is credited to Gid R. Tur-
ner, who also proposes to build an intcr-
urban railway from Fort Worth via
Weatherford to Mineral Wells, but he de-
eines to state whether the line will be
steam or electric.

USE OF BEECH FOR RAILROAD CROSS
TIE

Throuh Treatment With Woee Preser.
vatives, Timber May Be Made to Out-
last White Oak.
Experts in wood preservation in this aul
other countries have discovered that the
beech makes a most lasting and durable
cro-tie, when properly treated. In the


lends itself readily to impregnation with
preservative substances, but the heart-
wood of white oak is very resistant.
Heartwood in most cases is naturally more
durable than sapwood on account of its
structure and the preservative substances
which it contains, such as resin in the
ease of pine and tannin in the case ,of
oak. The white oak, therefore, is durable
on account of its large proportion of de-
"ay-resisting heartwood. On the oth,.r
hand the heartwood of white oak cannot
be impregnated with preservatives, except
with great difficulty. This fact of itself
is of little importance on account of the
natural durability of the wood, but it
tends to bring out the difference between
white oak and beech. In the latter tree
the heartwood does not begin to form be-
fore the tree is moderately old and even
then without regularity. Consequently
the beech ti is composed largely of sap-
wood and this partly accounts for its la-!k
of durability. However, because of this


porosity beech easily allows itself to be
impregnated with preservative substances,
thus rendering it possible to guard effect-
ively against decay.
Many preservatives have been employed
for protecting beech tie abroad, particu-
larly in France and Germany. After num-
erous trials the most efficient preservative
under all conditions of exposure has proven
to be creosote or dead oil of coal tar. Con-
cerning the length of life of a properly
treated beech tie, Mr. Rutgers, proprietor
of a treating plant in Germany, says:
"In the year 1897 I undertook to de-
liver 50,000 beech ties impregnated with
oil of tar and warranted to last ffteen
years. I have only to regret that the rail-
way exchequer does not practice reciproc-
ity and offers no compensation for the
ties which last longer than fifteen years."
Of all the European roads, the Eastern
Railway of France has obtained the best
results from treated ties. It usms beech
(Continued on page 9.)


search for railroad tie timber to fill the
wide gaps made by the dwindling supply
of white oak, lumber manufacturers hate
been compelled to turn to many woods
which were once considered inferior, brt
which under creosote or other chemical
treatment have been found to furnislh ex-
cellent substitutes for the oak.
Railroad builders have rejected beech
heretofore because it decays quickly in
damp places. They wanted oak, and when
that could not be had they took other de-
eay-resisting woods, but in most cases
they did not consider beech at any priae,
except as a temporary makeshift. Yet it
has been proved by actual tests of long
duration that a beech tie may be given
a preservative treatment which will make
it outlast white oak. It is possible to
turn this knowledge to great practical
use in relieving the enormous demand upon
the limited supply of good tie timoer.
The beech is found widely distributed
throughout the eastern portion of the
United States, reaching its best develop-
ment in the basin of the lower Ohio River,
and on the slopes of the Allegheny Moun-
tains. It grows to an average height ef
70 to 80 feet, but occasionally trees of 120
feet in height are found. The diameter
of mature trees is often three of four feet.
In the forest, the beech forms a compara-
tively slender stem clear of branches for
more than half its length. The wood is
hard, strong, tough and very close grain-
ed. Its use is largely limited to the man-
ufacture of chairs, shoe-lasts, plane-
stocks, handles and for fuel.
The ideal timber used for cross-ties is
white oak. This combines all of the gool
qualities of the beech and in addition
is very durable. Consequently it has becl
widely employed by the railroads for tie
purposes. It not only is an excellent wood
for ties but is widely used in ship-build-
ing, for construction, and in cooperage, the
manufacture of carriages, agricultural im-
plements, the interior finish of houses, and
for furniture. On account of its exten-
sive use the supply has been greatly re-
duced, and a great many railroads ire-
now force dto pay almost prohibitive
prices for white oak ties or to substitute
other cheaper woods to replace the white
oak ties rapidly disappearing from their
lines. Michigan cedar or aborvitae has
been extensively used to take the place of
white oak. This is very durable, but un-
der heavy traffic is severely cut by the
rails which necessitates the use of tie
plates and other protective devices. The
available supply of cedar is now running
short and it is necessary to seek further
for new tie timbers.
Beech suggests itself. It has all the
good tie's qualities except durability.
When laid in the track decay quickly de-
stroys beech timber unless rendered im-
mune by preservative treatment. It re-
ceives such treatment readily-much more
readily than oak which needs it less.
Ther is a reason why beech is more sus.
ceptible to treatment than white oak
Very early in the life of a white oak tree
Sit begins to form heartwood. As a result
When the tree is large enough for ties ii
contains sapwood only through the widtl
Sof a few outer annular rings. SapwooK


ATLANTIC COOPERAGE COMPANY
Manufacturers
Hend-Mad Turpentine Barres
We have been manufacturing our own staves
for years and select the very best stock for our
barrels. Skilled coopers employed. Just begin-
ning business in Jacksonville, and solicit a share
of your patronage. Send us a trial order.
J. Mce. WRIGHT. Manager 320 Dyal-Velhmh aUl
Jokmonavilne. rla.


m10


East Coast Lumber Co.


ROUGH AND DRESSED LONG LEAF


Yellow Pine Lumber



Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots
Steamer Shipments a Specialty.


WATERTOWN. FLORIDA_











: One Price ,One Price




17 Sand 19 West Bay Street, Jacovle, Flra
StetsoM and Hawes Hats. 8ecial Attentone trees to Mail Orderm

T---------RPENTINE- BARRELS
'TURPENTINE BAI I ELS


Am











6 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



.- This Easy Chipper Saves time and Money.


1-4 Chip escapes easier on account of hollow back. WRITE
Cuts a shade streak easier as hollow back allows hack to
to be closed more FOR
Gum flows easier as there is less steel to drag over the PRICE
fresh cut.


F- Operator's Tool Company, Green Cove Springs, Fa.





CALL FOR ANNUAL MEETING OF THE



TURPENTINE OPERATORS' ASSOCIATION.



The regular annual meeting of the TURPENTINE OPERATORS' ASSOCIATION

is called to convene at the Board of Trade Auditorium, Jacksonville, Fla.,

at 10 o'clock a. m., on Friday, November 8, 1907.
A cordial invitation is extended to all turpentine operators to attend

this meeting; and, if not already members, to become allied with the

Turpentine Operators' Association.

J. A. HOLLOMON, W. M. TOOMER,


Secretary.


President.


Dated Jacksonville, Fla., October 18, 1907.


ANOTHER ALLEGED PEgOAGE CASK.
Another case of alleged peonage bobbed
up before United States Commissioner E.
O. Locke in Jacksonville on Thursday.
The complaint is made by Mr. A. J.
Hoyt, special agent of the department of
justice, who wast sent into the south
when the peonage agitation was on last
year to assist in working up evidence.
The defendant is William C. Thomas,
who is in charge of a large place near
Orangedale, in St. Johns county.
The charge is the old familiar one, of
returning to a condition of peonage cer-
tain alleged peons, and holding them in a
condition of peonage, contrary to the
provisions of section 5526, Revised Stat-
utes of the United States.
Mr. Thomas, it was stated yesterday,
would be represented by Col. J. N. Strip-
ling, formerly United States district at-
torney in this district.
The warrant for the arrest of the de-
fendant was served by Deputy United
States Marshal T. J. Bundrix.
The defendant was brought before Unit-
ed States Commissioner E. 0. Locke yes-
terday and waived preliminary examina-
tion.
Commissioner Locke thereup held him
for the United States grand jury, fixing
the bond at $500.
Because the hearing was waived the
evidence of the government did not come
out in detail.
The charge, as set up in the complaint,
is that Thomas, in August of this year,
"returned from Martin, Fla., to Orange-
dale, Fla, to a condition of peonage, Neff


Claridy, Henry Claridy, Joe Claridy, Lu-
ther Claridy, Luther Claridy, Bud McCoy,
Adam Besant, Dave Bryant and Henry
Smith."
It is further charged that ever since
then and until now he held these alleged
peons ni a condition of peonage.
This is the second peonage case to be
started this fall, the first one being against
J. B. Brinson, of Lake City.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR LET-
TERS PATENT.
Notice is hereby given, pursuant to the
statutes of the State of Florida, that we,
the undersigned, intend to apply to Hon.
Napoleon B. Broward, Governor of the
State of Florida for Letters Patent, to be
issued to THE KENNEDY-BROWN AD-
VERTISING COMPANY, in accordance
with the articles of association herein-
after set forth, and adopted as a pro-
posed charter.
E. LESLIE KENNEDY,
WM. W. BROWN,
HARRY G. AIRD,
S. F. HALL,
CHAS. S. ADAMS.
Jacksonville, Florida, October 26, 1!07.

PROPOSED CHARTER OF THE KEN-
NEDY-BROWN ADVERTISING
COMPANY.
We, the undersigned, have associated to-
gether for the purpose of forming a cor-
poration for profit, under the laws of the
State of Florida and adopt the following
as a proposed charter:
Article L
The name of the corporation is THE
KENNEDY-BROWN ADVERTISING
COMPANY, and its principal place of bus-
iness is in Jacksonville, Duval County,
Florida.
Article IL
ThO general nature of the business to
be conducted by this corporation shall be


to manufacture, buy and sell advertising
specialties; to purchase, lease, handle and
control patents, copyrights and trade-
marks; to conduct a printing and litho-
graphing business; to buy, own, lease,
mortgage and sell real and personal prop-
erty in the State of Florida and else-
where; to have all the rights, powers and
privileges of corporations organized under
the laws of Florida and to do all such
other and further things as may be deem-
ed necessary or expedient in the successful
transaction of the business by the com-
ipany.
Article III.
The capital stock of this corporation is
Thirty Thousand ($30,000.00) Dollars, to
be divided into Twelve Hundred (1200)
shares, at a par value of twenty-five
($25.00) dollars each; all or any part of
the capital stock of said corporation may
be payable in property, labor or services
at a just valuation to be fixed by the
Board of Directors, at a meeting called
for such purpose.
Article IV.
The term for which this corporation is
to exist is ninety-nine (99) years from
and after the date of Letters Patent.
Article V.
The business of said corporation shall
be conducted by the following officers: A
President, Vice-President, Secretary,
Treasurer, and a Board of Directors, con-
sisting of Five (5) stockholders. The Di-
rectors shall be elected by the stockhold-
ers at each annual meeting and no per-
son can be a Director unless he is a stock-
holder qualified to vote at the election
at which he is chosen.
All other officers and agents of this
corporation shall be chosen or appointed
at the time or times and in the manner
provided by the By-Laws.
The annual meeting of the stockholders
of this corporation shall be held on the
first Saturday in May of each year, be-
ginning in the year 1908. Until the offi-
cers elected at the first annual meeting of
the stockholders shall be qualified, the


business of this corporation shall be coa-
ducted by the following officers: Les-
lie Kennedy, President; Wm. W. Brown,
Vice-President; Henry G. Aird, Treasurer;
S. F. Hall, Secretary, and they together
with Chas. S. Adams shall constitute the
first Board of Directors.
Article VL
The highest amount of indebtedness to
which this corporation can at any time
subject itself shall be Ten Thousand ($10,-
000.00) Dollars.
Article VII.
The names and residences of the incor-
porators and the amount of capital stock
subscribed by each are:
E. Leslie Kennedy, 400 shares, $10,000.0
Win. W. Brown, 200 shares, $5,000.00.
Henry G. Aird, 8 shares, $200.00.
S. F. Hall, 16 shares, $400.00.
Chas. S. Adams, 2 shares, $50.00.
All residents of Jacksonville, Fla.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the subscrib-
ing incorporators have hereunto set their
hands and seals.
E. LESLIE KENNEDY, (Seal).
WM. W. BROWN, (Seal.)
HENRY G. AIRD, (Seal.)
S. F. HALL, (Seal.)
CHAS. S. ADAMS, (Seal.)
State of Florida, County of Duval:
Before me this day personally appeared
E. Leslie Kennedy, Win. W. Brown, Heary
G. Aird, S. F. Hall and Chas. S. Adams,
who are well known to me and known to
me to be the persons described in and who
executed the foregoing charter and artiels
of incorporation, and severally acknowl-
edged before me that they executed the
same for the purposes therein expressed
and set forth.
WITNESS my hand and official seal
this 25th 'day of October, A. D. 1907, at
Jacksonville, in and for said county and
State.
T. J. BROOKS,
Notary Public State of Florida.
(Seal.)
My Commission expires Sept. 18, 1911.
10-26-5t


___I_


- --- -






Do You Believe In the Policy of the


Industrial


IF SO,


Record ?


SUPPORT


How?


In


Two Ways.


One way is to send us strong, vigorous views on the
SNaval Stores situation as YOU see it.


THE


INDUSTRIAL


RECORD


Is the forum of the turpentine man. Your views
will be read by practically every man engaged in
the Naval Stores business.
THE OTHER WAY is to support the Industrial
Record FINANCIALLY. There is nothing cheap
about the publication. Look at it typographically
aside from its news and editorial features.
It Costs Lots of Money to Issue Such a Paper.


The Industrial Record has
thousands of dollars to the


been worth hundreds of
Naval Stores Operators.


It Worth


$3.00 Per


Year to


You?


If so, fill out the below blank and send it to us NOW.

1907.
INDUSTRIAL RECORD, Jacksonville, Fla.:
Please find enclosed $3.00 for which send me The Weekly
Industrial Record for one year, beginning with the current Issue.
Signed
Address


IT.


Is


III- IN M


i_- ..~. .~Y_~~ -LCUi A


THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


7








8 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD


INDUSTRIAL RECORD
JAMBS A. OLLOMOI. EdjlMar-C lof.
A. I. MAILSL, Bl iness Manager.
PuUalhed Even Saturday.
Smamrrmoi (Domestic)... 3 .0 Per Annum
S(foreien) ....83.50 **
-Thte rPn and It Prourcs."
AB emmralcatleas ashea be addresse
The Indumtritli Record Company.
JLcdkuonville. IFl.
btmhs Edw eral ad Bnesi Offices a
SavannAh. Ga.
tgtedL at the Postoffce at Jacksonvile. Fla..
as necol-cla matter
Adopted by the executive Coummittee of
the Turpentine Operators' Association
epteber 12, 1902, a its exclusive offi-
cial organ. Adopted in annual convention
September 11 as the organ also of the gen-
eral sociation
Adopted April 27th, 1903, as the official
rgan of the Interstate Cane Growers' As-
sociation. Adopted September 11, 1903, as
the only official or.an of the T. O. A.
Commended to lumber people by special
resolution adopted by the Georgia Sawmill
Association.

THE RECOUORS OFFICES.
The publishing plant and the main of-
ees of the Industrial Record Company
are located at the intersection of Bay and
Newnan Streets, Jacksonville, Fla., in the
rr heart of the great turpentine and
ye w pine industries.
The Savannah, Ga., office is in the Board
of Trade Bnding. Savannah is the lead-
ing open n Ial stores market in the world.

NOTICE TO PATRONS.
All payments for advertising in the In-
dustrial Record and sascriptions thereto
must be made direct to the home office in
Jackloeviue. Agents axe not allowed to
make collections under any circumstance.


Do Your Duty, Men In the Woods.


We urge every producer of naval stores,
east and west of the Alabama river, to
attend the Convention of the operators
next week and to attend it prepared to
assist in some way in wrenching the in-
dustry from its present deplorable con-
dition. -
The Record has exposed the methods of
the Shotter combination. It has chanm-
pioned the cause of the producers and
fought all over the field. It will continue
to do so; but we want to say emphati-
cally and frankly, the operators them-
selves must help in winning this fight.
In the days of prosperity there is no
cooperation. There is no need for it, one
will say. Perhaps so. At any rate the
fact stands out that in days of plenty
and peace and prosperity, with every man
the absolute master of his own situation,
lender instead of borrower, with a bank
balance instead of a load, of interest and
discount Ipapr--how easy it is to get along
without the advice, cooperation, or even
the friendly interest of brothers engaged
in a similar industry. It is only adversity
that makes industrial cooperation possi-
ble. It was adversity that gave birth to
the Tupentine Operators' Association.
Most of us remember the years immedi-
ately preceding the meeting in the little


church shack in Jacksonville in September,
1901. We remember the depressed con-
dition of every operator; we remember
the tottering condition of the industry
as a whole. That convention, when the
operators agreed to stand shoulder to
shoulder in their mutual interest, was the
turning point. The industry-the opera-
tors-began to slowly but gradually
emerge from the darkness that surrounded
them. In two years they were making
money. In four years they were at the
very top of financial and industrial lib-
erty and independence. Then there was
no need for the Association they thought,
and they began to neglect it. Resolu-
tions were passed merely as pastime.
There was no effort toward continued co-
operation. Every man could strike his
own purse and declare himself his own
master, independent of others, or the ac-
tion of others. Ahl! how easy to forget.
It is unnecessary for us to dwell again
upon the conditions as they exist today.
In 1901 the conditions were not so bad.
At that time the vast fortunes were not
tied up in the industry as today. Condi-
tions were bad then, but there were dimes
at stake where there are dollars today.
Let us urged you, friends, attend the
Convention; let us get together again, and
do our duty!


The Financial Situation Clearing Up.


at out fm he home office, when due, New York, Nov. 1.-The financial situa-
and all remittance must be made direct tion was gradually clearing today with-
to t Industrial ec p out showing any striking features. Runs
-on the banks and trust companies are
BETTER UTILIZATION OF YELLOW practically over, money which was tempo-
PINK rarily withdrawn from banks subject to
runs is flowing into the stronger banks
Tree's Waste Products Valuable. and currency is being provided in most
cases where the demand for it is consid-
Wise Utilisation of Whole Tree Will Fore- ered legitimate. Further engagements of
stall Shortage in Southern Yellow gold by Boston and other points have
Pine. brought up the total engagements abroad
"In fifteen or twenty years, at the pres- under the recent movement to $26,550,000.
ent rate of cutting, the supply of the long The Lusitania, which sailed from Liver-
leaf yellow pine of the South, one of pool today, has on board about $10,000,-
America's most useful forest trees will 'e 000 in gold, one of the largest single ship-
nearly exhausted," say the experts of the ments ever made. Prices on the stock
United States Forest Service. If these exchange were firm during the early part
pine forests are wiped out one of the of the day, and did not yield seriously
South's important industries will die-the at any time. The fact that the stock ex-
production of the so-called naval stores. changes of London and Paris were closed
The lumber of the Southern yellow pine on account of All Saints' day prevented
brings $15 to $35 per thousand feet, its any comparison of quotations or arbi-
turpentine 56 cents per gallon, its rosin trage operations.
from $435 to $6.95 per 280 pounds, and Balances at the clearing house have
its pitch $3.25 per 280 pounds. All of settled down to a normal condition, but
these prices are gradually becoming high-
er and higher on account of the increased The situation calls for making the very
demand and the scarcity of the products, best use of the present supply.
Formerly, turpentine could be purchased There are at present in the woods of
for 30 cents a gallon. Now 56 cents must the South vast quantities of pine logs and
be paid at wholesale, and the consumer of tall stumps left as a result of careless
gallon lots will pay at times as high as lumbering in the past. This material is
$1.00. rich in turpentine and could be made to
In the face of these fast increasing yield from ten to fifteen gallons of refined
prices, people are still found who say that spirits per cord. Besides this, there is
there is yet an inexhaustible supply of a great waste at the sawmills in the form
yellow pine in the South, and that all of slabs, edgings, and sawdust, all of
talk about a famine is unwarranted. Such which must have a value, but at present,
statements are not justified by conditions is for the most part, simply burned to get
and the yellow pine lumbering industry it out of the way. In fact, not more than
will moon be in the face of a serious short- 50 per cent of the tree as it stands in the
age unless decided changes are made in forest comes to market in the form of val-
the present methods, and unless valuable unable materials.
products now going to waste are utilized. In the year 1906 the reported cut of
The long leaf pine is a slow growing tree Southern yellow pine was some 12 billion
and does not make timber with anywhere board feet. A conservative estimate of
near the rapidity that it is being cut. the actual amount of turpentine alone, to


there is still something of a blockade in
domestic exchange through the unwilling-
ness of New York banks to pay currency
on drafts from other cities and the un-
willingness of other cities to pay out
their currency upon drafts from New
York. The condition of affairs indicates
a continued pressure for currency rather
than a breakdown of credits, but reason-
able demands are being met for regular
customers of the banks. The possibility
of hastening the export movement of
wheat and cotton still engages the atten-
tion of foreign exchange dealers, and also
of those who endeavor to keep in touch
with the general situation. Doubt is ex-
pressed whether the secretary of the treas-
ury will be able to carry out on any con-
siderable scale the project of the New Or-
leans exporters for accepting cash at gov-
ernment fiscal agencies abroad and trans-
ferring it by telegraph to points in this
country, but Secretary Cortelyou is un-
lerstood to be willing to make such de-
nosits of public money at cotton export-
ing points as will to a considerable extent
-elelieve the strain.


say nothing of wood fiber and other ma-
terials, which could be produced from the
wastewood of this one year, would place
the amount at not less than 30 million
gallons. This is a surprising figure, when
it is remembered that it represents an
amount almost equal to the present an-
nual production of gum spirits in this
country. If this product were extracted
from the wood and sold at even the cur-
rent price of good wood turpentine, the
gross saving would be easily $14,400,000.
Men have realized for some time that
an enormous waste of valuable substances
is going on, and a few have succeeded in
extracting the turpentine and placing on
the market a material of a fairly good
quality. In the majority of cases, how-
ever, the article has been of an inferior
grade, due generally to the fact that the
technical methods used have been faulty.


I THE CLOTHIERS

SOLE AGENTS FOR KN HATS


Our Clothing


THE STUART-BERNSTEIN CO.
14 WEST BAY ST. JACKSONVILLE, LA.

As a result of this, wood turpentine is at
present often considered as an adulterared
material, or at best as a poor substitute
for gum spirits. It is true that in some
cases these opinions are well founded, but
inferior products have put an unnecessary
damper on the whole industry.
The Section of Wood Chemistry of the
Forest Service has lately been investigat-
ing this subject and some valuable results
have been obtained. It has been found
that for the recovery of turpentine from
wastewood, the steam distillation process
is far superior to that of distilling the
wood destructively. The crude turpentine
is in all cases more uniform, and the final
refined materials are as a rule of better
grade and can demand a higher price.
When properly made and refined, experi-
ments have shown that the steam turpen-
tines are in many cases even more uniform
in composition than the gum turpentines,
and for all practical purposes contain the
identical substances. The odor often can-
not be distinguished from that of gum


The Wealth of the

Old Families.
Often disappeared, evaporated, ad the
new generation was left but om or two
things of real value. Aong these valu-
ables (in 99 cases out of a hundred) was
x chest of old silver, the most mueful sar
beautiful heirloom that the young genera.
tion treasured.
Have you such a treasure to hand down
to your heirst If not, ew is t time tn
start gathering it. If you are interest,
come down and let us show you something
in that line that is WORTH HAVING
NOW and which will be highly treasured
by your sons aad daughters.

R RILE COMPANY,
15 W. Bay t.,
Jaclao mill, Firila.


_ ~ __3









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


spirits, but even if it could, this is a small
matter in many cases, as infinitesimal and
undetectable amounts of certain impuri-
ties left in the refined product as the
result of the methods .of production can
produce this slight difference in odor, and
the wood turpentine should not be con-
demned for practical purposes on this ac-
-eont. This becomes still more evident
when it is known that the sweet odor
of the gum turpentine is not character-
istie of itself, but is due to an impurity
produced by the chemical action of air
upon it.
These are important discoveries and are
well worthy of consideration. If they
are true, then refined steam turpentine,
properly prepared, should bring at least an
equal price in this country with the gum
turpentine. Indeed, abroad, this is often
the ease, and instances'are on record where
the refined steam turpentine has, by vir-
tue of its more uniform composition,
brought five cents a gallon more than the
gum spirits, and is in much greater de-
mand. Further investigations along these
lines will be pushed vigorously by the
Forest Service.

Use of Beech for Railroad Ties.
(Continued from page 5.)
timber and injects a large amount of crm-
omote of high grade. Oak ties had to be
removed from its track after fifteen years
of use while beech ties impregnated with
4reosote lasted thirty years. Many other
instances of long service from creosoted
beech ties might be given.
The Forest Service of the U. S. Depart-
ment.of Agriculture has spent considera-
ble time in developing a cheap, yet effici-
rent method of treating certain classes of
timber in order to preserve them against
decay, and information on the investiga-
tions may be obtained by writing to the
Forester, Washington, D. C. This is known
as the "Open Tank" method and is prob-
ably well adapted to the treatment of
beech ties and similar timbers which con-
tain a large amount of sapwood. The
treatment consists in immersing the tim-
bers in alternate baths of hot and cold
creosote, or other preservative. The ties
are placed in a tank of hot creosote for a
few hours, the length of time depending
upon the amount of moisture contained in
the timber. They are then placed in a
bath of cold preservative for a short pe-
riod which completes the treatment. When
the wood is heated in the first bath the
air and moisture in the wood cells and in-
Sterellular spaces is expanded and some of
it is driven out. Upon immersion in col.i
preservatives the difference in tempera-
ture causes the expanded air and moist!tre
to contract, thus forming a partial vac-
uum which causes the liquod to penetrate
the wood to the desired depth. The ties
abould be air-seasoned before being sub-
Jested to treatment. This can be accomp-
lished in a short time by piling them in
open piles, thus allowing the air to freely
direulate around them. Beech checks very
little when properly piled. In this re-
peet, it excels white oak.

2T WANING HARDWOOD SUPPLY.
Although the demand for hardwood
lumber is greater than ever before, the
annual cut to-day is a billion feet less
than it was seven years ago. In this
time the wholesale price of the different
lasses of hardwood have advanced from
25 to 65 per cent. The cut of oak, which
in 1899 was more than half the total cut
of hardwoods, has fallen off 36 per cent.


Yellow poplar, which was formerly second
in point of output, has fallen off 38 per
cent, and elm has fallen off one-half.
The cut of softwoods is over four times
that of hardwoods, yet it is doubtful if
a shortage in the former would cause dis-
may in so many industries. The cooper-
age, furniture, and vehicle industries de-
pend upon hardwood timber, and the rail-
roads, telephone and telegraph companies,
agricultural implement manufacturers and
builders use it extensively.
This leads to the question, Where is the
future supply of hardwoods to be found?
The cut in Ohio and Indiana, which, seven
years ago, led all other States, has fallen
off one-half. Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky,
Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New Jer-
sey, Tennessee, Texas, West Virginia and
Wisconsin have also declined in hardwood
production. The chief centers of produc-
tion now lie in the Lake States, the lower
Mississippi Valley, and the Appalachian
Mountains. Yet in the Lake States the
presence of hardwoods is an almost certain
indication of rich agricultural land, and
when the hardwoods are cut the land is
turned permanently to agricultural use.
In Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi
the production of hardwoods is clearly at
its extreme height, and in Missouri and
Texas it has already begun to decline.
The answer to the question, therefore,
would seem to lie in the Appalachian
Mountains. They contain the largest body
of hardwood timber left in the United
States. On them grow the greatest varie-
ty of tree species anywhere to be found.
Protected from fire and reckless cutting,
they produce the best kinds of timber,
since their soil and climate combine to
make heavy stands and rapid growth.
Yet much of the Appalachian forest has
been so damaged in the past that it will
be years before it will again reach a high
state of productiveness. Twenty billion
feet of hardwoods would be a conservative
estimate of the annual productive capacity
of the 75,000,000 acres of forest lands in
the Appalachians if they were rightly
managed. Until they are we can expect a
shortage in hardwood timber.


WANTED

AND


FOR SALE

Rate for this column is 2 ents pr word
for first insertion and I cent per word for
following insertions. No advertisement
taken for less than 40 cents for first, and
20 cents for following insertions. Cash
must accompany orders unless you 'rave
an account with us.

WANTED-At once, two good, sober,
reliable turpentine woodsmen. Give ref-
eences and salary wanted in application.
Romeo Turp. Co.. Romeo, Fla. 11-2-3z

WANTED-Ten good woodsmen to go
to Louisiana. Must be good, sensible men
who can take labor and control it. The
country is exceedingly fine and healthy,
more so than the best high woods in
eorgia. Fine salaries to the right men.
Address Pridgen & Ewing, Baden, Ga.
I0-12-4t

WANTED-All eommisaries to es up
their barnm of all kinds of seed macs and
hurlape. We buy everything in the way
of sacks. Write us. Amrican Fibre C.,
Jacksonville, Fl.


FOR SALE CHEAP-Turpentine location,
15 crops virgin, yearling and 3rd year
boxes. 3,000 acres round timber. Lot of
high boxes can be worked for protecting
from fire. Homesteads being proved up in
abundance. 20 miles from Pensacola.
Water rate. A bargain to the man with
the mony. J. F. Mathis, Pensacola, Fla.


FOR SALE-Small turpentine place for
cash. Price $8,500.00. Good backing. Ad-
dress Operator, care Industrial Record. tf

WANTED-Position by woodsman; 10
years' experience. Best of references,
Apply at once. Smith, box 142, Kissim
mee, Fla.

FOR SALE--A turpentine location in
Alabama on direct line to Pensacola and
Mobile. Good freight rates to either
place. Firm opened last winter. Plenty
of round timber. No trouble to control
labor at this place. Will sell cheap to
quick buyer. Address Smith & Godwin,
Thorshy, Ala. 9-28-4t

FOR SALE-A desirable turpentine lo-
cation, well located on railroad, fifteen
crops of boxes; timber to cut about nine
more crops. Moderate price. Schedule upon
application. Address N. R. Hays, Apalach-
icola, Fla.

WANTED-Position on turpentine place
where I can fill two positions, managing.
book-keeping, commissary and riding
woods. The very best of references. Good
salary expected. Address P. 0. Box 474.

WANTED High-class scheme goods
salesmen that will command big pay, to
tell drug specialties among commissaries
principally. We don't want a cheap man.
Will pay either salary or commission.
Commissary Supply Company, Birming-
ham, Ala. 6-22-tf

WANTED-By experienced turpentine
man, position as stiller or woodsman. Can
give good references. Address C. A. W,
Box 24, Homerville, Ga. 10-12-41


WANTED-Partner, with $15,000 or
$20,000 to take half interest in turpetine
plant now in operation. Party advertising
owns land. Address Turpentine, Box A,
206 Main st. 10-19-3t


WANTED-By a young married mas
with four years' experience, a position as
salesman in dry goods or general store,
or assistant book-keeper. Can commence
work January 1st. Place in Florida pre-
ferred. Satisfaction guaranteed. Refer-
ence present employer. Address E. W. (),
care Box 301 Laurenburg, N. C. 10-12-4t


HUTCHINSON AUDIT CO.
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS & AUDITORS

Dyal-UpcareCh Bulf


Phone r3.


Iaekmewnl 7W


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
AMENDMENT OF CHARTER.
Notice is hereby given that on the 18th
lay of November, A. D. 1907, the under-
signed will apply to the Governor of the
-tate of Florida for an amendment to its
-harter in accordance with the following
solutions adopted at a special meeting
luly called for that purpose on the 7th
lay of October, 1907, at which three-
7ourths of the stock was represented by
personn and proxy.
Resolved, That that part of Section three
of the Charter of this Corporation read-
ing as follows: "Payment of said capital
stock shall be received only in cash," shall
be amended to read as follows:
"Payment of said capital stock shall be
received in cash or in property in lieu of
cash when said properties have been duly
appraised and accepted as such payment
for stock by the Board of Directors.
JACKSONVILLE DEVELOPMENT COM-
PANY,


By J. A. HOLLOMON,
Sc-et-r.


10-9-5t


COMPARATIVE MARKET REPORTS.
And still the decline continues. Spirits dropped slowly all week reaching
the low water mark of 48% at Jacksonville on Friday and 49/4 at Savannah.
There was a slight advance on the better grades of rosin over last week's
closing prices.
SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE FOR THE WEEK HERE AND AT SAVANNAH.
Price. Sales. Shipment. Reeipts. tSteas.
Ja. v. Ja. Sa. Jan. a v. Jax. Sav. Jax. Se.
Saturday .501 50/4 434 471 32 239 452 652 25,480 30,949
Monday .....50 521/4 960 604 143 3,560 642 502 25,900 28,031
Tuesday ........ 501/4 ... 642 225 40 781 857 26,399 32,065
Wednesday ..... 50 ... 678 55 22 441 50826.955 3-,541
Thursday ... 491/2 50 835 129 ... 581 314 79927,341 32,759
Friday ......481/ 49% 247 1,023 121 1,904 441 56327,655 31418
ROSIN FOR THE WEEK HERE AND AT SAVANNAH.
Saturday. Monday. TueMay. Wednesday. Thursday. Friday.
Jax. Say. Jax. ay. Jax. Sav. Jax. iSa. Jax. b. Jax. bae.
i WW .......5.95 5.8515.95 5.90j6.00 6.1016.10 6.106.10 6.106.00 6.10
WG .......5.90 5.855.90 5.755.90 5.906.00 5.906.00 5.905.90 5.90
N ......... 5.55 5.455.50 5.355.50 5.605.55 5.505.55 5.605.40 5.00
M ........... 5.10 4.955.00 4.955.00 5.005.00 5.005,10 5.064.90 5.06
K ......... 4.90 4.704.80 4.754.80 4.854.80 4.804.85 4.804.70 4.80
I .......... 4.30 4.404.30 4.654.30 4.304.30 4.404.30 4.404.20 4.30
H .......... 3.90 4.154.00 4.624.05 4.204.10 4.204.10 4.204.00 4.15
G ......... 3.80 4.053.90 4.654.00 4.174.00 4.154.00 4.203.90 4.10
F .........3.75 4.003.85 4.573.95 4.024.00 4.104.00 4.123.90 4.06
E ......... 3.70 3.953.80 4.403.90 4.004.00 4.003.95 4.063.85 4.00
I D ......... 3.65 3.903.75 4.303.90 3.853.95 3.953.95 4.003.80 3.95
CBA ......3.65 3.903.75 4.253.85 3.853.90 3.753.90 4.003.80 3.90
REPORT OF ROSIN MOVEMENT HERE AND AT SAVANNAB
Sakle. Shipment. Receipts. Wtoek
Jax. Sae. Jar. Sav. Jan. Sae. Jax. Mv.
Saturday ................. 1,259 2,94711,470 2,259|1,579 2,342)45,006 89.925
SMonday .................. 2247 2.13011,600 3,62312,175 2,268 45,115 86.517
i Tuesday .................. 2,247 2,131,600 3,623,175 6814,115 8517
I Wednesday .............. 1,527 2,8781,400 151,458 1,5417275 93.406
I Thursday ................. 1,016 2,681 .... 1,49 871 21 47,33 94,0
Friday ...................1 919 2,3771 765 6,22311,872 2,87748204 91,463





10 THE WHEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


TAMPA MONUMENTAL WORKS,
DEALERS IN
Monuments, Headstones, Iron Fencing and Italian Statuary
NO JOB TOO LARGE. NO JOB TOO SMALL.
MAIN OFFICES 310 ZACH STREET. TAMPA. FLA.


Reliable Whiskies.
When we make Claims for our goods we are certain of
the facts. We operate the finest open fire copper Distill-
ery in the World. We do our own bottling and packing
and no expense or labor is spared to have every drop of our
Whiskey absolutely pure and of the highest quality.
We guarantee every Order to be perfectly satisfactory,
or return your money.

Four Full Quarts Rose's

"Old Corn" or "Old Rye" or assorted $3.40, express
prepaid. Write for complete Price-List.

R. M. Rose Company,
16 West Forsyth Street, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
"ASK THE REVENUE OFFICER."


ELECTRIC LIGHT AND POWER PLANTS
FOR MILLS AND FACTORIES.
REMINGTON OIL ENGINES
OPERATING ON KEROSENE.

KARL FRIES - BRUNSWICK, GA.


1111 SLDIT i wviasw Uno B
GOR MIA. (mbaumbeI hm USaL)
OLD SHARP WVH.UJAMI-Pre Plus ONI
Rye. B- the gallon S;.; tou full qarts
$3.50, e3xress prepaidM.
GEO. J. COLEMAN-Pure Pemaylea
Rye; Rich and Mellow. By the gallo
$2.75; four full quarts .M.I express prupal
ANVIL RTE-Pure Substantial amily
Whiskey. By the gallon 8S.S; tour fu
quarts 32.90, express prepaiL
CLIFFORD RYEBy the gallon U ;
four full quarts 2.E, express prepaid
OLD K.N UCKY. CORN-Direct from
Bonded Warehouse; fine and old. By the
gallon $.06; four full quarts 3.51 exrm
prepaid.
OLD POINTER CLUB CORN Bh
and Mellow. By the gallon $t.a; four ful
quarts $.0. express prepaid.
We handle all the leading brands of Rye and Bourbon Whiskles in the market
and will save you from 2 to 50 per cent on your purchase. Send for price Ift and
catalogue. Mailed free upon application.
The Altmayer a lataxi Liquor Company
MACON. GEORGIA.
iI:I:II !!11111 1t ttllfletallll r tll Ill dll lllllrl lllllltll


SJ. P. WILIAMS. President
ST. A. JuNaINGS. 2nd Vice-President.
. H. L. KAYTON, Secretary.


J. A. G. CABSON, st VibPrieidest
J. F. DUsm uI, 3d Vice-Preldest
H. F. E. ScaRsrua, Trasurer.


: J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

- illI III m OEmOIR C R fME E INDi. o
Main, Orflee mAVANNRIH, GOIROGIX.
Mraneb Ofri: I )POClBCOL-, FLX. Brcane Orocery How,
J.CKra orn jcr vanLL, WL. f COLUMSIUS Oa.e
SNaval Stores Producers are Ilvited to Correspoud With Us.
IIt l l t l 1ti 1 i I i i 1 11111 11111 1 lIII li 11 1 I ll *L"
WILLIAM A. BOURS JAMES 0. DARBY


WILLIAM A. BOURS & COMPANY
THE OLDEST ESTAUUMMED AMI U S IEEIB IOUE TME STATE
Hay, Grain, Feed, Garden
Seeds, Pultry Supplies, Four,
Grits, Meal and fertilizers.


W. W. ASHBURN, Mooltrie, Ga. N. EMANUEL. Brunswick, Ga.
W. R. BOWEN, Fitzgerald, Ga. D. T. FURSE. Savannah, Ga.
J. J. DORMINY. Broxton, Ga. R. G. KIRKLAND, Nichols, Ga.
O. T. McINTOSH, Savannah, Ga.

Southern States Naval Stores Co.
Savannah, Ge.
Factors and Commission Merchants
Ship to Savannah Get Competition Highest Prices Promptest Returns
Correspond With Us


I,.O..I.ug...II uu.IIOe.l...r...ll 1918 .6.lululll

JOS. ROSENHEIM SHOE CO.
SMANUACTVIERS AND JOBBERS OF


SHOES

SAVANNAH. GEORGIA
Best Shes Made for Cuumissary Trade."


OUR


S.


9
9

Io
9

*
9







'I


MOTTO: Pript Shipumet, Reiae Ceeds. CaMtalwsl rme
206 EAST BAY T., JACKSONVILLE, FIA.
ft--M&**--A**kw*##w#---*# 00-14100


*


1. V. WEST,
Praident.


D. K FLY
IO1& HAIMs
V. J KXEEY.
Vwlmfmidev.


HL L R MPD
Sv sod Ties.
D. L. VRIM
Am't Soee on Tim.


WEST FLYNN & HARRIS CO.
SGIERMANIA B.DG. Savannah. Ga.o
GENERAL OFFICES G A LN N anh..
WEST BE.DG. JacksesvieFla.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
NAVAL STORES RzIVED AT SAVAINAH, GA, JACKSO VILLE,
FL, AND FERNANDINA, FLA.


Wholesale Grocers also Dealers in Hay. Grain and Heavy
Harne.


SOLE A(ENTNS for the Cdebated Union Turpentine Aes,
and wilson &Childe Phadelprui WaOs
MERCHANTS WAREHOUSES.
SAVANNAH, GA, JACKSONVIrLL, FLA TAMPA, ILA


muh"::"u"u:uuuuuuuuu"uotamse1isI~uum 0#f~w#1~ .r..s.. a ..s;..u


AWWSL;-Cs~~


Og


4rh


;SiJFSFI; OESr~c~L~c~J~i ~a~s~Es~Es~Escsmmama


as wwWW 4**"-L~-~Y'---~----


- - 11~3


*^


0










-CrHE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11YPI


Greenville, Florida,


Offers opportunities to the
Investor and Homeseeker


A town with a steady growth inspired by the thrift and energy of its home people, and insured against back-sets
by a diversity of industry unsurpassed by any town in the entire State of Florida.
Greenville is located in Madison County in the heart of the best farming section of Florida, and has three
lines of railroad furnishing quick transportation to all sections of the country.
There will be a sale of lots at Greenville on Tuesday and Wednesday, September 24th and 25th, with a grand
Free Barbecue. Come and see for yourself, and in the event you purchase one or more lots your railroad fare
will be paid, for a distance of two hundred miles or less.
Greenville will interest you, so meet us there on Tuesday and Wednesday, September 24th and 25th.
Lots will be sold on easy terms.

Greenville Investment Company.


For further particulars, address,


W. 1. PHILLIPS, Miager, Grmdilk, Fla.


SMALL BANKS IN THE SOUTH.
How rapidly and extensively the bank-
ing facilities of the South have grown
within the last seven years is shown, at
least in part, by a recent bulletin issued
by the Comptroller of the Currency. This
reveals incidentally the great increase in
the number and total capitalization of
national banks in the 14 Southern States,
especially of small banks in country
towns and villages, many of which places
were without banking accommodations be-
fore the establishment of these financial
institutions. The bulletin does not, how-
ever, give figures on State banks or trust
companies, of which there is a large num-
ber in the South; in fact, there are no
complete figures concerning such institu-
tions, as all the States do not keep sta-
tistice concerning the banks chartered by
them.
The total number of national banks now
in the South is 1421, and their total cap-
ital is $154,066,735. More than two-thirds
of this number, or 959, have been estab-
lished since the approval of the act of
March 14, 1900, which permitted the or-
ganiation of national banks with less
than $50,000 capital. The total capital of
these comparatively new banks is $54,723,-
500, of which amount $39,315,000 repre-
seats 383 banks with capital of over $50,-
000 each. These latter figures indicate
very plainly the Southern demand for
national banks with capital of between
$5,000 and $50,000, and how well it is
being supplied.
Small national banks are numerous. In
Texas, for instance, out of a total of
392 national banks organized since the act
of 1900, there are 275 of the smaller class.
In Kentucky, out of 74 so organized there
are 49 of the little ones. In Virginia there
are 43 out of 09, in Alabama 34 out of 63,
in West Virginia 33 out of 62, in Georgia
32 out of 64, in Maryland 27 out of 38,
in Tennessee 24 out of 42, in North Caro-
lina 0 out of 35. Yet in some of the
Southern States the little national banks
are in the minority, State banks or trust
companies of small capital affording bank-
ing facilities to communities which would
not support institutions of large dimen-
sion. Thus in Mississippi there are on-
ly 3 small national banks out of a total
of 18 organized since 1900, in South Caro-
lina 4 out of 14, in Florida 9 out of 25,
in Louisiana 10 out of 27, and in Arkansas
13 out of 33. It is probable that with the
steady increase of population, commerce
ad industry in these States the number
of national banks therein will inereae.
There would no doubt be more of these


now but for the fact that $25,000 is the
smallest capitalization permissible for a
national bank, and consequently if a bank
is needed and that amount of capital can-
not be secured a State charter is sought
and a bank with less capital is organized.
Not a few State banks have capital of
only $5,000 each.
ROUND TRIP RATES.
Via Atlantic Coast Line Railway to the
S Jamestown Exposition.
$4.40 Coach excursion to Norfolk, on sale
Tuesday and Fridays, limit ten
days, no stop-overs.
2b3.5 Fifteen-day tickets, good in sleep-
ers. Stop-overs allowed within
limit.
$a8oo Sixty-day ticket. Good in sleepers.
Stop-overs allowed within limit.
33-55 Season tickets. Good in sleepers.
Stop-overs allowed with limit of
December 15th.



FCAS-. A. ArdK CO.|

Phone 196. Jacksonville. Fla.



Cook If not.
WTrH Why not
JACKSAVILLE
GaS GAS COMPANY



WHISKIES
GINS AND RUMS
FROM

$1.50 to$5.00 per Gallon
......AGENCY OR ......
Lewis 1866 amd Mont Vernmo
Pure Rye W islles.
Controllers Blum's Monogram and Sylvan
Rye-Agents for Jungt Cincinnati and
Past Milwaukee Beers. Price on ap
pliation.


LIGHT SAW MILLS

Lath ad Skiiglle Macli

Saws and Supplies,

Steam and Gasoline

Engines

Try

LOMBAR D
AUGUSTA, GA.

Phosphate Machinery
Casting and Dryers


PECAN S
Anmlvze the wrt

pemamAent Profts
Economy of care
Certain ty of rests

Ainal crops
N -perishable product
Superi to all Mts.

THEl OPPORTUNITY O TODAY.
Tme first to p~it a pe. rmove
wil be the first to rea a
great harvest
Fo full IforaulMI apply to

THE GRIFFl 6 MROS. G.
Jasi-ts-o-u-i FeloidBa.


ZAHN'S EUROPEAN HOTEL Duval Planing Mill Co.
WDER NEW MANAGIEMEMT Sevmasts a9 AMe JadAma, b."a
aMliers an Contractors Wi Do Wel to
Rooms, soc to S.0o Per Nig*t. Meals at Have Us Bid e Tktir Wat
Al Hour. zil I. Bay Street. in our Lie
JACKSONrLLE, FLA. Phone 1749.



IheM etropolis

Is the Paper you want. It is
published daily and is from 12
to 16 hours ahead of any other
daily newspaper in Florida ..

$500 a Year $2.5o Six Months

Full Telegraphic and Stock
reports. If you want to keep
posted on the news, get the
Metropolis.


CHAS. BLUM a CO. CARTER & RUSSELL PUB. CO.


517 nd S19S WEST BAY STREET
JACIKSONVILL FLA.


JACKSEINVIII. FLODA.


__


V--~*-----CII---4C'C~.--^ ---YIY-~.--CICY- -~~LI LrYC-~--CLrY--LI~n-CY--L----^ IXlrl~lrlrY--L---rY---~--CY--LU~LCY


-1~-- ---.-L~Lj~~ ~-liY'-~gs~l---


TIHE WNEEKLYP INDUSTRIALL RECORD.


11








12 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

Capital $20000

HUTCHINSON SHOE COMPANY
VICTOR SHOES AND HATS
Wholesale 0 t 0 Jacksonville, Fla.


Consult Your Best


Interests!


If you do you will buy the famous RIXFORD
TURPENTINE AXE. Don't let your dealer per-
suade you that some other axe is "just as
good."
Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery.
The RIXFORDis ever being imitated, but nev-
er equaled. BuY THE BEST--BUY RIXFORD'S.



W. H. Briggs Hardware Co.

Sole Southern Agents

VALDOSTA, GEORGIA
W, --- ----- -- ------------^


W. B. HENDERSON, Press.
L CRAFT, Vice-Pres.


E. BERGER, Gen. Mgr. and Vice- Pre.
JNO. SAVARESE, Treas.
R. T. RICHARD, Sec'y.


TAMPA DRUG CO.

Wholesale. Manufacturing Druggists,

TAMPA, FLORIDA.


Phf and complete fne of all kinds of Drugs, Chemicals
and Patent Medicines
SPECIAL ATTENTION 10 COMMISsARY TRADE.
PROMPT ATTENTION TO ALL ORDERS.



Now Is the Time to Visit


JAMESTOWN EXPOSITION

It Is Complete in Every Department


The War Path, Air Ship, Naval

Display

Wi inerestw and Insaruct you. Do Not Fatt to go at once.
For Beatmb wusratedfolder. conatansbr maps, dscrlp-
iv. maer, list of aotetrs, set., wrte

FRANK C. BOYLSTON. Dis. Pam. Agt.
Jacksonville. Florida.


Clyde Steamship Company
a


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
The magnificent steamships of this line are appointed to sail as follows, eating at
Carleton, S. C., both way.


From New York,
(Pier 36 North River.)


Saturday,
Monday,
Wednesday,
Friday,
Saturday,
Tuesday,
Thursday,
Saturday,
Monday,
Wednesday,
Thursday,
Saturday,
Tuesday,
Wednesday,
Friday,


From Jacks-vf fe
STAMR.L CharkateR ald New Ye


Nov. 2,at3:00pm ....COMANCHE.... Thursday, Nov. 7, at 10:00a
Nov. 4,at 3:00pm ...... HURON....... Saturday, Nov. 9, at 10:00m
Nov. 6, at 3:00pm .... IROQUOIS .... Monday, Nov. 11, at 10:Otm
Nov. 8,at 3:00pm ..... APACHE ..... Wednesday, Nov. 13, at 10:00a
Nov. 9,at3:00pm ....ALGONQUIN.... Friday, Nov.15, at 10:001
Nov. 12, at 3:00pm.... ARAPAHOE ... Sunday, Nov. 17,at 10:00ai
Nov. 14, at 3:00pm ....COMANCHE.... Tuesday, Nov. 19, at 10:006m
Nov. 16, at 3:00pm ...... HURON....... Thursday, Nov. 21, at 10:00an
Nov. 18, at 3:00pm ..... IROQUOIS..... Saturday, Nov. 23, at 10:00am
Nov. 20, at 3:00pm .......APACHE..... Monday, Nov. 25, at 10:00am
Nov. 21, at 3:00pm ... ALGONQUIN ... Tuesday, Nov. 26, at 10:00-L
Nov.23,at3:00pm ...ARAPAHOE...... Thursday, Nov. 28,at 10:01001
Nov. 26, at 3:00pm ......APACHE...... Sunday, Dec. 1,at 10:00m,
Nov. 27, at 3:00pm ....ALGONQUIN.... Monday, Dec. 2, at 10:01im
Nov. 29, at 3:00pm .... IROQUOIS .... Thursday, Dec. 5,at 10:00m


*Freight only.


tNew York direct.


CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
Freight Service Between Jackanrlle, Beaten at Providece, anr all Eante Poae i
Caoim at Chalrete BM Woays.


From South 8ide


FREIGHT ONLY.


Frm feet Cstheine StrS,


Lewis Wharf, Bostoe STEAMER Jackeavmfe
Saturday, Oct. 12, at 3:00pm....ONONDAGA.....Saturday, Oct. 19,at 10:00m
Thursday, Oct. 17, at 3:00pm ......*CHIPPEWA... Wednesday, Oct. 23, at 10:00a
Saturday, Oct. 19, at 3:00pm ..... KATAHDIN... Saturday, Oct. 26, at 10:00ka
Saturday, Oct. 26, at 3:00pm....ONONDAGA..... Saturday, Nov. 2, at 10:00am
Thursday, Oct. 31,at 3:00pm ..... .KATAHDIN... Wednesday, Nov. 6,at 10:00-m
*Via Brunswick, Ga.

CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
Between Jackoevile and Sanford
Stopping at Palatka, Astor, St. Francis, Beresford (DeLand), and intrmeiala
landings on St. Johns River.
STEAMER'"CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
Is appointed to sail as follows: Leave Jacksonville, Sundays, Tuesdays and Thei-
days, 3:30 p. m. Returning, leave Sanford Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 9:30
a. m.
SCHEDULE
SOUTHBOUND INORlHBOUnD
Read down | Rted up
Leave 3:30p.m................... Jacksonville ............... e :a.m.
LIave 8:46p.m.................... Palatka ....................L e 8:0 m.
Leave 3:00sa.m................... Astor ..................... av 3::30pm.
............................. Beresford (DeLand) .............. eav 1:p. m
Arrive 8:30...................... Saford ................... i e 9:30.m.
Arrive 10:00 ................... Enterprise ................ Leae 10:00a.m
GENERAL PASSENGER AND TICKET OFFICE, ias W. BAY ST., JACK'VIUI
F. M. IONMOoweaG JR, A. e. P. A., Jac ae, Fi.
JOHN PEH DREL, T.P. A., A. C. HAGERT, r A.
Jackseoville, F. Pier 6 N. ., Nev YUk.
0. H. TAYLOR, P. T. M, C. C. BROWN, G. P. A,
ago Bredway, New York.
L. D. JONES T L. .SCOLXC.
Jackaonrvile, FIa. iL:;brw la.
W. COOPER, JR, F. A CLYTD MILU, G F. A,
Jackne.wie, F. Pie s36 ., NeOr TYe
C. P. LOVELL, Ageat, Jaan fle, Fla.
GENERAL OFFICES, PIER 3, N. R. Branch, apo Breai y, New TYL


ATLANTIC COAST LINE
The Short Through Car Lie I


I


--







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 13
W^M^%XX3A^^^^^^^& 3 N.A BRMN Treasurer.


E. S. NASH. President.
J. F. C. MYERS. Vice-President.


American


S. P. SHOTTER..
Chairman Board of Directors.


Naval Stores
[OF WEST VIRGINIA]


G. M. BOARDMAN. Treasurer.
C. J. DeLOACH. Secretary.


Company


Successors to S. P. Shotter Company, Patterson Downing Company,
Expo. ters and Dealers in All Grades of ROSIN, PURE SPIRITS TURPENTINE.
TAR, PITCH. ROSIN OIL and all other products of the pine tree.

HEAD OFFICES: SAVANNAH, GLORGIA.
BRANCHES:


NEW YORK
PHILADELPHIA
CHICAGO


ST. LCUIS
CINCINNATI
LOUISVILLE


WILMINGTON
BRUNSWICK
JACKSONVILLE


FERNANDINA
TAMPA
PENSACOLA


NEW ORLEAHS
MOBILE
GULFPORT


You Want a Turpentine Location?
You Want a Sawmill Location?
You Want any Kind of Florida Lan
You Mean Business?
IF Csl on or Wrte to

J. H. Livingston &
OCALA. IrLIORDA.


Id?



ions,


Brick and Building Material.
When you need these, Portiand Cement, Plaster Paris. Hard Wall
Plaster, Nair for Plastering, Shingles, fire Brick or Clay, Write to
GEO. R* FOSTER, Jr.. Jacksonville. Fla.

THE COMMERCIAL BANK
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. Branches: Ocala and Lake City
The largest leading State Bank in Jacksonville. Is conducted in an old-
fashioned strictly conservative maer and is subject to regular examination
by the Comptroller.
A Individual and Savings Aeeouts solicited.
H. ROBINSON, W. B OWEN, H. GAILLARD,
President. Vice-President. CahUier.
----- ----- ----- ----xxxsss- -----cxxxxsxx


W. J. LIENGLE.
President.


J. W. WADE,
Vice-Presidet.


EC. HUGHES,
Ass't. Sec'y and Treas


Union Naval Stores Co.


MOBILE, ALA.


PENSACOLA, FLA


NAVAL STORES


A. NEW ORLEANS. LA.
FACTORS.


.........DEALERS I ..........

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can ffer at preast quite a large umber of desirable location i West Fer-
aM, Albama sad Miiadippi Lberal advance made agahst asimet Car-
reap"Meec saolited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.

MACHINERY
Portable and Stationary Engine-
and Boilers, Saw Mills, Wood-
working Machinery and Supplies,
Complete line carried in stock.
Liberal Terms. Write for cata-
logue.
State Agents for the Olds Gas
and Gasoline Engines.
Address all communications to
MALSBY MACMINERY CO., 22 Ocean IStreet, Jacksonville, Florida
Long Distance Phone ~47.


SMc KOY PATENT

Turpentine Cup.

The best and simplest cup
on the market. Detachable
Greater Capacity, easier
dipped ,more easily placed
on tree, stronger and prac-
tically indestructible. Will
not rust. For catalog and
price list write


SM'KY PIITEN TliRPEIITIE P CO.
S1015 Iibrnia Building,
New Orleans. Louisana.


Barnes & Jessup Company

Jacksonville. Florida.

Naval Stores Factors and Commission
Merchants.

OFFICES.
C. H. Barnes. President. J. A. Ewing. Vice-Preeident.
E. B. Wells, Secretary and Treasurer.

DIR.ECTORS: C.H. Barnes, J. A. Ewing, R.S. Hnll,
J. R.. Saunders, E. C. Long, W. E. Cummer, E. B. Wells. W. S.
Jennings. G. W. Taylor.


I


ci -' Turpentine Cups


A"


IMPORTAUM
As our supply of eump ia lumte, w a .
gest that intending parehasirs .aj ia
their orders promptly to Ia sue iMda .
For Pris. on
Cups, Gutters and an Took
Used is the rty ta-
Addrew
Chattanooga Pottery


Company
Jacksonville, Florida


1'


___ ___ ~


---- -- ----aJ~ar~~\ c u E~


~---~-~-~---~-


u~cc~EcccLl~cuu~cccu~cccr~ELlcrrc


Yr-~-c- -- rr~~ u ~u~rr


-XXS-SkSOB'


-nc~


smass


-- - - -- - -- --Cjr~


V.

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2








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.,



Southern Drug Mfg. Company
WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS AND MANUFACTURERS OF
Flavoring Extracts, Packed Drugs, B. B BBling, Vinegar and Pyne's Popular remedies.
We handle everything in the Drug and Medicine line. Write for prices. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


M. A. BAKER,
BAKER IMPROVED SEAMLESS


INVENTOR AND


MANUfACTURER OF
TURPENTINE SI ILLS.


THE


Write ne for prices 7 B. any point In the turpentine belt
AU stills sold wnder a gua.rante.
JOB WORK THROVCG THE COUNT A.Y PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO
The Largest and Oldest Copper Works in the South.
My specialty is large werms and heavy bottoms that do net leak
BRUNSWICK, GA. and PENSACOLA, fLA.


'e. 1 u Wu ui *W|,* | gi| g D h -*u ***u g| u u O Ou h gugggmg
W. W. Carsie, Pns. W. C.Q T-a, Mnaaer. & C, arama -- TIM

- --- -- ---
i Tampa Hardware Co.

Wholesale
C Hardware

Turpentine, Mill and Phosphate Salpplies.

+ TAMPA. FLORIDA.
V' Geseol iSM 8092 1948 128 24 111 little of9981te88911119194ee

BEST TANKS
ON EARTH

Are made in Palatka, Fla., by G. M. Davis &
Son. They se elected cypress wood. Work-
manship equal to the quality of the material. I
and the combination is abolutely unequalled
for durability. Write them for price and full
information before you by a tan k.

(I. M. DAVIS V & SON. Palatka, Fla.


DIAMONDS AND WATCHES
We smply as a call. We cam saw yea, at correct aad mmey
rmts prices, mmy papers or loose pare white, perfect
DIAMONDS. It Is r desire to condatie befa te Ilrgest
DaiNead dealers s Jaclksgarlle, mad ea specialty Is nwe re d-
cat sI g m and -tgrde waltam uad Elfa Watces.

UE. O 0 APnuD Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry,
HEM n SO LR 11-13Umi I-a ., w33a. hj, JMeiuh,` F.
1!E^rr L NUL KXXX------ -1- ---


239 W. Bay Street EVERETT BLOCK.

I .aeAers in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-
ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings. 0

Agents for Dunlap and Steteon Hate; largest stock in the City.
-------- **-- **----*-- --------*


DIRECTORS:
D. C. Asdey,
G. A. Pettewy,
Cb.. H. Brows.
P. L. Weeks.
J. G. Craniford
H. Weibea.
SH.H Ben.


D. C. ASHLEY, Preuidern
L. W. BLOUNT, 1st Vice Preidef
sad Gemranl Mmur.
G. A. PETTEWAY. 2ad Vice P-es
J. M. ASHLEY. 3d Vice PNre
& H. BERG. Sec. and Trm.


DIRECTORS:
I. A. Car.
T. G. CAmedi.
A. S. P1amds.
B. G. Ladm r.
J. M, Aide.
W. T. HLmrie


PENINSULAR NAVAL STORES CO.
Commission Merchants
and Wholesale Grocers
Receiving Points-Jacksonvile, Tampa and Fernandlua,
Fla, Savannah, GC


Capital Stock. $1.000.000.


H. D. WEED.


TH uV r: uu /Jacksonville,
THE DUVAL Florida.
This Hotel has recently changed hands, and is nnder New Management
Throughly Renovated Throughout
Headquarters for Turpentine Operators
F. BARTOW STUBBS, D. CRAWFORD
Proprietor. Manager.


J.D. WEED I CO.,

Savannah, Georgia

HEADQUARTERS FOR


Hoop Iron and Turpentine

IBoxing Axes.


0


W. D. KRENSON.


%4 &,Lo


C- 1 11
rP


q
q
I
q
q
q
q
q
i
I
q


TH[










PLANTERS

"Old Time" Remedies
TIE JOY OF THE HOUSEHOLD.


Th4 four great remedis, *EaaM Tea, Benedicta, Culib Relief I
and Cu 00 ar he t joy of the houehold With them near at hand, a Nu@
mi i ready for any emergency. Be has a safe. reliable and speedy relief Tern[
for wife, ehildrel, self or stock. With these remedies you can keep the Cen
deter' hands out of your pockets, and yet have a healthy, happy famny. CIo
Beiles, you eam care your stock of auy ailment that may befall them.
UBIAN TEA-la Liquid or Powder Form-Is the great family medicine. It
Ii ewe all forms of Liver and kidney Complaints, Prevents Chills and Malarial
hrver. Cures the common ailments of children; and as a laxative tonic it is without
en equal- dfe and reliable. In the liquid, it is extremely palatable-eveo children
like it-and it is READY FOR USE.
BtENDICTA in a wonmr.'s medicine. It will cure all the diseases conimon t.
women, and Classed ax F le ale Treobles. It will bring youth back to the iaded woman
Whs has gone one suffering because he thought it woman's lot. It will care for the
young girl ju~t entering womanlani; and prepare the young woman ror tie sacred
duties of wife and mother.
CUBAN RELIEF-The instant Paint Killer, for either man or beast. Relieve.
instantly, Colic, Cramps, Cholera Ilerhs, Diarrhoea, Dystentery and Sick Headache
rW colic in horses it is as infallible remedy and is guaranteed to give relef in five
mintea.
CUBAN OIL-The Beat Bene al Nerve Liimebt. Is antiseptic for cuts,
anggied or to s flesh, and will instantly relieve the pain. Cures insect bites and stings.
eahd and burns, bruises and sores, chapped hands and face. ore and tender feet.
Releves rheumatic pains, lame back. stiff joints. and in stock cures wire fence cuts
scratches, thrush, splint, collar sores, saddle galls, and diseased hoofs.
Write us for Price.
SPENCER MEDICINE CO., Chattanooga, Ten.



BEFORE MAKING YOUR PURCHASE!


CUMMER LumBER CoMA
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
Rough anr Dressed Lumahr

Long Leaf Yelfow Plea.
BOXES AMH ORATES.


SJ. S. Schofields Sons Co an),

Headquarters fw
*


S ; DDistiller's Pumping
Outfit
No plant complete without one. *
|, Hundreas of them in use in Georgi,
0 Florida, Alabama, Mieissippi and *
0- *| Skith Carolina. Write us for purtic-
S_ -Ilamrs and pries. We also m-ufacture
Engines, BSlers aln Hligh
: Grae MacIM. *
Sas m well as carry a full and complete
Stckof-
i Mill Suppies, Pipe,
3 Benller Tubes, Etc. ,
Advise your wants.
SMacon, -Georgia.
U tnuo a 0
** luh of Tag%* Nut T ualiiifSinlms* ri 6


-See The-


KNIGHT CROCKERY


-And--


FURNITURE COMPANY


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


H. E. PRITCHETT. Pres. P. I. SUTIIERLAND. Vice-Pres. A. COVINGTON, See'%
J. P. COUNCIL. Tress and Genl Mgr.


' _ril 14 l II 51 il llla I II *BI l W WW9. ------------
. J V Motte C. B Parke> Janes MeNatt W. W.WIer,
President Vice-Prem. Vlee-Pres. See. Tre s.


John R. Young Co.,

: Commission

SMerchants.

: Naval Stores factors. Wholesale Groces.


THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.,


General Offices: JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Factory: WAMNNAISH, N. C.


-Ems .of Nigh aralf TOWS


JNO E. ARRIS,
Vice Pres.


SavInra*h t& BrunsvickX GeL


..e.,ts s..,.s..i.t.,uuumiuuuuiimu.uuuuusiuiuuim.: e*


JOSEPH


ZAPF CO.


6. J. SCOWIL,
Sec's & Gen. War.


Florida Cooperage Company
(tecorposted) Capital Stock 0100,000
MAN UFACTUERS OF


Turpentine, Cotton


Seed Oil, Dip


and Syrup Barrels.
aNes M rFatery Eterprlse and [stele Streets.
Telephone 1855 Jacksonville. Fla.


Wholesale Dealers in and Botti trs cf


ANHEUSER.-BUSCH
St. Loxis Lager Beer


Win; Niwi Watm


Write for Pricew


Cypress Tanks
for Al Purpses
BEST MADE
%"e for Caehaosw
Preston Miler Co.
Dept. B Crescent City, no.

WM. D. JONES
pesmIPTI aScamJST
...M....
FAMILY DRUGGIST
107 E. BAY ST.
man 0oimn 8nB--1.


W. L. WILSON,
Pres. Treas.


^ ----r~ i


j/
~
I








r

V'












\ -


NorveltIva,
Toilet
Articles.

Prenipt
Att e s
to
lAt the Sign
At the Sign


of the
WRITE


Big Clock, -
FOR CATALOG


GR.EENLEAF & CROSBY CO.,41 West Bays8
Diamonds, Wedd~ag
Watches, and
SFine Anniver-
Jewelry, sary GIk-
Clocks, Sterllng
Cut GlassS
,- .... ,.SIverwart


"1847 |
Rogers"I
Plated Ware


d ric
yvited


JsCk-mnnvjviolI1
Ir- 1)


^ -------- -------- ------ ------- -------- ------ ------- -------- gas sea smelts"wP ^
ct-------------------- ------- -------- ----------


Half Tones--Zinc Etchings

i Illustrating and Engraving Department
OF


THE FLORIDA


TIMES-UNION


Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of Commercial Work, Pamphlets, Etc.
A Slb ly Is Maif d ifipl RtuC il ad Fi jsiq Phioqs ad PIri s.
In Writing or applying for Prices, Give the Most Explicit Description of What I--
Wanted. Good Work and Prompt Deliveries Promised.


A Florida Enterprise.


Try It.


___--------- ----- ---- ---- ---- -- ------


1ir
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'9


i