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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00221
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: April 20, 1907
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00221
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text



pUSTRIAC
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E, PIY 1AVAL IToRE,
4 Is L WERKo GENERAL
f lD\rOTRIAlAh nfAtGIA
&5NEWPAPEI)


I JACKSONVILLE, FLA. SAVANNAH, GA.


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CONSOLIDATED


NAVAL STORES COMPANY.


I


Home Office: JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Home Office: JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Branches: Savannah. Ga., and Pensacola, Fla.
OFFICERS.
W. C. POWELL, Preudent; B. F. BULLAAhD, II. L. CO)VINGTON, J. A. CPANFORD, D. H. McMILLAN, B. R. POWELL, C. M COVINGTON, JOHN H.
POWELL, Vice Presldents; C. P. DUSEKBURY, Secretary and Treasurer.
LXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: W. C. Poweli, C. B. Rogers, H. L. Covington, I. F. Bullard. J. A. Cranford.
DIL ICTOR8: W. C. jIowell, B. F. Bullard. C. B. Rogers. J. A. Cranford, W. J. Ilillmnan, Johln H. Powell, W. F. Coachman. H.L. Covington, C. Downing, D. H.
leMillan, R. B. Powell. C. M. Covington, S. A. Alford.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS

Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
The "Consolidated" is purely a co-operative Company. Its Interests are Identical with those
of the Producers. The patronage of turpentine operators everywhere Invited.
Two Million acres of land and Timber for sale on easy terms.
Producers are invited to cell or correspond.


COVINGTON COMPANY,
WHOLESALE MERCHANTS,
Dry Goods. Notions, Men's Furnishings
Blankets, Comforts, Convict Clothing,
UNION-MADE OVERALLS.


McMillan Bros.


Southern Copper
Works
Manufacturers of TURPENTINE STILLS
Complete Outfits and Extra Kettles, Caps, Arms, Worms, Fur-
nace Doors and Grates always on hand
Old Stills taken in part Nw Work and repairing done
Sll payment for Wo in the country
Heavy Coppersmithing, Steam Pipe and Special Copper Work
Jacksonville, Fla.
Also Fayetteville, N. C. Savannah, Ga. Mobile, Ala.


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WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL


RECORD.


PUDUISHED EVERY SATURDAY. DEVOTED To NAVAL STORES. LUNMER AND MANUFACTURING wImubi b.

sdSept. 12. 8W, by. y EIkeia romeeCewmdoe cid she T,.wkur AOpeime' a Ai fedmumue Olidd Oegm. ld adeold SeWS. DU in Aand COumue0kbe = w CivW Oft= ube of domGmed Asmo Amdi AdIopd SqS. U IL -3 e
Only Offod Gie oI Twpl Ogfte rpwbws Ainedu AAsarkd Ape 2.V D0a aaGrip = of dw be lke e C c GeweWr Aftein Enbem by Gmuim SGawmW Ammio. Oldd[Lft f .Smu SMee Gemws A


Brobston & Co., a New Firm; Suc-

ceeds Brobston Fendig & Co.


An Observant Wisconsin Man Finds

No Traces of Peonage.


The well known real estate firm of
Brobston, Fendig & Co. has been succeed-
ed in Jacksconville by Brobston & Co.,
Col. Edwin Brobston, the senior member
of the old firm being the senior member
S of the new firm. The change does not
effect the status of the business in the
slightest, save that the business will
possibly be enlarged and the volume in-
creased under the new organization. No
man in Florida deserves greater success


"Personally, I believe that the future
brings to the South three great cities,
cities of world-fame. These will be At-
lanta, Jacksonville and Tampa. I have
cast my lot in with Florida, and I sin-
cerely believe that Jacksonville is going
to be the great city, or one of the great
ciL.es of the South of the future.
"Years ago, before Brobston, Fendig &
Co. were personally interested in Florida,
we were doing a big realty business here.


Following interview with Mr. George F.
Peabody on his return from Florida is
printed in the Appleton (Wis.) Post:
George Peabody has returned home from
an extended sojourn in Florida. He de-
clares that this has been a star winter
for the tourists, there having been no
rain since November until Monday morn-
ing, April 1. Sunshine every day. The
orange growers, however, have had a hard
fight to keep their trees alive. Except


AN IMPORTANT DUTY
(From Florida Times-Union.)


h fom the people of Florida than Edwin then, with the growth of the business it


Brobston, for certainly the commercial


and industrial interests of Florida have
no greater friend, or a friend whose ef-
forts are more availing in the upbuilding
of the State.
Col. Edwin Br bston, when asked about
the change in firms said, among other
things:
"Yes, the change has come, and it is
with the sincerest regret that I lose the
brilliancy of Mr. Fendig, my life-long
friend. .But the change that has come
has been a natural one, one that was fore-
seen years ago.


became necessary for one of ous to come
here. The lot fell to me. As the busi-
ness increased, the need of a Florida
company became more and nure manifest,
and finally came the change announced
today.
"Mr. Fendig retires, and my brother
takes his place. Our aim shall be the


old one, to give Brobston & Co. such a
name in the realty world that the entire
business world, knowing that Brobston &
Co. are endorsing a certain section or
movement, will know that it is a coming

(Continued on page 6.)


where freely watered the leaves are curled
and withered. Groves usually filled with
blossoms at this season are bare.
Generally speaking, Florida is prosper-
ous, more prosperous than ever in her his-
tory. Hotels were filled and during the
height of the season it was difficult to get
accommodations at the more popular
places.
Asked as to which was his favorite spot
in Florida, Mr. Peabody replied that Bis-
cayne bay and the Florida keys were as
near perfection as any spot in the world
provided one wanted to combine climate,
good fishing and sailing. No one not fa-
miliar with the waters can imagine their


beauty. Brilliant blue or green, clear and
transparent to great depths and filled
witu the many colored vegetable and
animal life of southern seas they offer
perpetual interest to the lover of the beau-
tiful. The dark green of the islands or
keys, as they are called, that are scat-
tered over the water add to the beauty of
the scene.
It was a revelation to Mr. Peabody and
his party to see the work of the East
Coast Railway extension from Miami to
Key West, a distance of 100 miles where
a railway is being built from island to isl-
and across the sea. No work of the pres-
ent day except the Panama canal com-
pares with it for difficulties to overcome
and enormous expense, and when one real-
izes that this tremendous work is being
done by one man, not a dollar of the
bonds or stock being owned except by
Mr. Flagler, it assumes a magnitude of,
operation that eclipses anything that has
ever been accomplished. Arches of con-
crete with foundations from 30 to 60 feet
in the sea making a viaduct 20 miles long
is one example of hundreds of like prop-
ositions met with in this work. No de-
scription could give any idea of the diffi-
culties met with. For example, there is
not a drop of fresh water to be found
within 100 miles north of Key West, ex-
cept rain water. Every bit of water for
the dredges, steamboats, locomotives and
5,000 men has to be brought by steamers.
There is a perpetual line of these boats
running night and day pushing two or
three barges, each carrying 5 to B tanks,
each tank holding 5,000 barrels.
Mr. Peabody was asked if he saw any
evidence of peonage along the work of
the East Coast Railway Company. He
replied that he had heard nothing on that
subject and had not read the magazine
articles until after his return from the
first five month's cruise among the keys
and believed he and his friends could pro-
nounce all of these stories as absolute and
unqualified falsehoods, inasmuch as they
visited a large number, in fact, the prin-
cipal camps of the extension work; saw
the men at work; saw them at rest; saw
them eating and also noted the perfect
sanitary conditions of their camps. Mr.
Peabody recalls a discussion with the first
assistant engineer in charge of the work
as to the cost of feeding the men. He
stated that the average cost for food per
man was 66 cents per day or 22 cents
per meal. The quality of the food was
discussed and comparison was made with
that of Mr. Peabody and his friends on the
yacht and was found to be practically the
same, 22 cents per meal per man. The
comment was made that undoubtedly the
men working on the East Coast extension
line never lived so well in their lives.
Again, Mr. Peabody said, we had more
than a dozen opportunities of seeing the

(Continued on page 11.)









4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


BUYER'S


DIRECTORY


FLORIDA GOOD ROADS LAW.

A Satisfactory Measure Likely to Come
Out of the Committee Room.
"Motoring" Morgan, of New York, one
of the country's most famous good roads
advocates, has just returned to Jackson-
villa from a several days' visit to the
State Legislature at Tallahassee, and he
is inclined to the belief that some de-
sirable good roads measure will be enacted.
Regarding this matter, he said:
"The legislators all seemed to be en-
thusiastic for good roads.
"Some of them are not well informed
as to the good results that have followed
the introduction of good roads in other
States and the tremendous increase in the
value of land after the introduction of
good roads.
"It seems to me that a number of good
roads enthusiasts should go to Tallahas-
see when the bill is introduced, and assist
in giving the legislators all the informa-
tion possible, and thus help through a
suitable good roads bill.
"If they cannot go to Tallahassee, then
it would be well for every voter that be-
lieves in good roads, to write his repre-
sentative.in both houses, urging them .o
give the bill their careful consideration
and support.
"This I feel sure will have a good effect,
as the representatives of the people usu-
ally do what the people wish done.
"Mr. W. A. McWilliams, of St. Johns,
introduced his bill the day I reached Tal-
lahassee, and had it referred to the good
roads committee, of which he is a mem-
ber, preferring to see what the other bills
contained that will be also offered and
referred.
"That showed Mr. McWilliams' unsel-
fishness, as he does not want to make
aepital out of what he knows the State
needs worse than he needs additional glory
or praise for his efforts to get good goads.
"The Hon. I. L. Farris, of Duval, told
me that he was heartily in favor of a
committee bill, and his bill would soon
be introduced, and he would ask that it
be referred to the committee.
"The Hon. John B. Parkinson, chair-
man of the good roads committee, will in-
troduf his bill, and-that also will be re-
ferred to the committee.
"The Orlando Board of Trade also has a
hill. and they will be asked to have it
referred to the committee.
"Out of these combined bills should come
a splendid single measure that the people
of Florida will welcome, and it matters not
what legislation may be passed at Talla-
hasaee this spring, no measure, I feel sure


ACCOUNTANTS.
T. G. Hutchinson, Jacksonville, Fla.
Walter Mucklow, Jacksonville, Fla.
AXES.
Briggs Hardware Co., Valdosta, Ga.

BANKS.
Commercial Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
BEKR-WHOLESALE.
Chas. Blum & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
ooseph Zapf & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
BOXES AND CRATES.
Cummer Lumber Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
BRICE
Geo. R. Foster, Jr, Jacksonville, Fla.
BUILDING MATERIAL.
Geo..R Foter, Jr, Jacksonville, Fa.
BUSINESS COLLEGES.
Tampa Business College, Tampa.
CARPETS.
. B. Cleveland Furniture Company.
CIVIL ENGINEERS.
Roland Woodward, Jacksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING.
Craig & Bro, J. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

COPPER SMITHS
Meman Brothear, Jacksmovile, Savan-
ash and Mele.
M. A. Baker, Brunswick, Ga.
COOPERAGE.
Cooperage Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS.
Wm. D. Jones, Jacksonville, Fla.
C. C. Better. Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS-WHOLESALLE
Tampa Drug Co, Tampa, Fla.
Southern Drug Mfg. Coa Jacksonville, Fla.
Groover-Stewart Drug Co., Jacksonville
Fa.
DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE.
covington Co. The. Jacksonville, Fla.
ELECTRICAL GOODS.
Standard Electric Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGINES.
Merrill-Staves Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. 8., Macon, Ga.
Lombrd Iron Works and Supply Co., Au-
gusta. oa.
FERTILIZER.
Bours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, FIa.
FURNITURE.
E. E. Cleaveland Furniture Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
FOUNDRIES.
Shodfeid's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
GETS' FURNISHERS.
Stuart-Bernstein Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Craig & Bro, J. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fa.
GROCIRS-WHOLESALE.
Jacksonville Groeery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
Young Co, John R., Savannah, Ga.
HARDWARE.
Bond & Bowrs Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Briggs, W. H., Hardware Co., Valdoeta, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weed Co.. J. D.. Savannah. Ga.
HAY AND RAI N.


HATS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonvlle, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co.. Jaccksoville. Fla.
HOTELS.
Aragon The, Jacksonville Fla.
Fifth Avenue Hotel, New York, N. Y.
Telford Hotel. White Springs, Fla.
IRON WORKS.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sonn Co., J. 8., Macon, Ga.
INSURANCE.
Florida Life Insurance Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Cay & MeCall, Jacksonville, Fla.
JEWELERS.
R. J. Riles Co, Jacksonville, Fa.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hea & Slager, Jacksonville. Fla.
LIQUORS.
R. M. Rose Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Casper Co.. Roanoke, Va.
Blum & Co., Chas., Jacksonville, Fla.
Altmayer & Flatau Liquor Co., Macon, Ga.
Joseph Zapf & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
MEDICINES.
Spencer Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tenn.
MACHINE WORKS.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S, Maeon, Ga.
Lombard Iron Works. Augusta, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR TURPENTINE PRO-
CzSS.
Schofield's Sonas Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
MEDICINES.
Continental Mfg. o., Birmingham, Ala.
The only line of medicines made ex-
elusively for commissaries.
METAL WORKERS.
McMillaa Br. Co., Jackeanvfle, Savan-
nah and MeIla.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga., and Pens-
cola, Fla.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Schofeld's Sonas Co., J. S., Maeon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co., J. D, Savannah, Ga.
Malaby Macairy Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Brigga Hardware Co., Valdosta, Ga.
MONUMENTS.
Tampa Monumental Works, Tampa, Fla
MULES AND HORSES.
W. A. Cook, Tampa. Fla.
NAVAL STORES.
American Naval Stores, Co., Home Office,
Savannah, Ga.
Peinsular Naval Store Co., Tampa, la.
Barnes & Jessup Co, Jacksonville, Fa.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
vills, Fa.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
West-Flynn-Harris Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
Young Co., John K., Savannah, Ga.
Southern States Naval Stores O., Sava-
nab, Ga.
PAINTS
Bond & Bours Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fa.
PLUMBERS.
Coons & Golder, Jacksonville, Fla.
PUMPS.
Merrill-Stevena Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Maeon, Ga.
RAILROADS.
Atlantic Cbast Line.
REAL ESTATE.
Brobston, Fendig & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
SIKES' PATENTED RIMS AND HEADS.
SEEDS.


Ba OC. Win. A., Jakonville, la. Boar & Co., W .L A Juaekaawiee, MI.


SHIP YARDS.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Merrill-Steven a Co.. Jaekonaville. Fla.

SHOS--WHOLESALE.
Covington Co. The, Jacksonvill, Fla.
Jos. Rosenheim & Sons, Savannah, Oa.

STEAMSHIP&
Clyde Steamship Co. The. New York City.
TANKS
Schofield's Sons Co., J. 8., Macon, Ga.
TURPENTINE STILLS
Baker, M. A., Bruaswick, Ga., and Penam-
cola, Fla.
MMcilan Broters .Co., .Jackavfle,
Savannah and Mobil.

TURPENTINE TOOLS.
Council Tool Co., Jacksonville. Fla
Operator' Tool Co., Green Cove Springs,
Fla.

WATCHES.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
R. J. Riles Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

YELLOW PINE LUMBER.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jaeksonville, Fla.
East Coast Lumber Co. Watertown Fil





WHISKIES

GINS AND RUMS
FROM

$1.50to$5.00 per Gallon
......AGENCY ORB......
Lewis 1866 aMd MeuMt Vernwm
Pure Rye Whikes.
Controllers Blum's Monogram and Sylvan
Rye-Agents for Jungat Cincinnati and
Pabst Milwaukee Beers. Prices on ap.
plication.

CHAS. BLUM & CO.
17 and 519 WEST BAY STREET
JACKSONVI.LL FA.





Coons & Golder

Operators on Turpentine

Pipe, Boilers and Pumps

EWpet meuL mi hirnb
22 W. Adams St. Jacksevlle, Fla





WM. D. JONES
PRESCIPTIO SPECIALIUUST


FAMILY DRUGGIST
107 E. BAY ST.
Mail Ordrs SoldteU


~* J~*r~~r~~c`~l~*)JJ~,~r~s~'_- N \ -, Z. 777. IfJSE1C~








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


will be as important to the interests of
the people as that for good roads.
"The kindness extended by the good
rbads investigating committee of Duval
county, consisting of Dr. Stinson, Hon.
A. S. Mann and C. H. Mann, in sending to
Chairman Parkinson of the good roads
committee of the house, handsome volumes
of all the leading States' good roads law-,,
was very timely, as they can be used to
great advantage in missionary work.
The volumes of golo roads literature can
he seen at chairmann Parkinson's residence.
"I think it would be a splendid thing
if the Duval good roads committee could
go to Tallahassee while the state good
roads bill is being introduced."

COOPERAGE COMPANY SELLS OUT TO
FLORIDA COOPERAGE COMPANY.
The Cooperage Company of Jackson-
* ville, has been purchased by the Florida
Cooperage Company. The purchasing com-
pany has a capital stock of $100,000, and
is owned and managed by a strong set of
men, who are well known in the naval
stores business.
The new company will continue to ope-
rate the large plant in the western part
of Jacksonville and will increase the ca-
pacity of the plant as necessity demands.
W. L Wilson, of Savannah, a capitalist
and well known naval stores man of Sa-
vannah, is president and treasurer of the
new company, John E. Harris, of the
West-Flynn-Harris Company is vice-presi-
dent and G. J. Scovel, a man of ability
and long practical experience in the coop-
erage business, is secretary and general
manager. The following gentlemen form
the board of directors:
J. A. Cranford, Jno. E. Harris, C. H.
Barnes, W. L. Wilson, W. E. Huger, G. J.
Scovel.
The plant of the Florida oCoperage Com-
pany is now turning out about 3,000 bar-
rels a week. The following circular let-
ter has been recently issued by the com-
pany:
Dear Sirs-We beg to inform you that,
having purchased the plant and business
of The Cooperage Company at Jackson-
ville, Fla., we are prepared to furnish the
turpentine operaors of Florida, Georgia
and Alabama, first-class spirit barrels,
made of the best Western white oak, and
conforming strictly to the requirements of
the Board of Trade of Savannah, Georgia.
We are employing skilled labor, are
using the very best materials obtainable,
and are manufacturing first-class packages
which will give entire satisfaction both to
operators and buyers. Owing to the large
capacity of our plant we are in a position
to fill all orders for barrels promptly. We
will offer our barrels during the entire
season at as low a figure as is consistent
with the price of materials.
We respectfully solicit your patronage,
and assure you that your orders will re-
S eive prompt and careful attention.
Yours truly,
FLORIDA COOPERAGE COMPANY.

OBSERVE "ARBOR DAY."

President Teddy Issues a Proclamation
to That Effect
Washington, April 14.-President Roose-
velt has addressed "To the School Chil-
dren of the United States" a message on
the significerne of Arbor Day, which, dur-
ing the month of April, is celebrated in
many of the States. It follows:
"To the School Children of the United
States-Arbor day (which means simply
'tree day') is now observed in every State


in our Union-and mainly in the schools.
At various times from January to Decem-
ber, but chiefly in this month of April,
you give a day or part of a day to special
exercise and perhaps to actual tree plant-
ing, in recognition of the importance of
trees to us as a nation, and of what they
yield in adornment, comfort and useful
products to the communities in which you
live.
"It is well that you should celebrate
your arbor day thoughtfully, for within
your lifetime the nation's need of trees
will become serious. We of an older gen-
e.ation can get along with what we have,
though with growing hardship; but in
your full manhood and womanhood you
will want what nature once so bountifully
supplied, and man so thoughtlessly de-
stroyed; and because of this want you
will reproach us not for what we have
used, but for what we have wasted.
*For the nation as for the man or
woman and the boy or girl, the road to
success in the right use of what we have
and the improvement of present oppor-
tunity. If you neglect to prepare your-
selves now for the duties and responsibili-
ties which will fall upon you later, if you
do not learn the things which you will
need to know when your school days are
over, you will suffer the consequences. So
any nation which in its youth lives only
for the day, reaps without sowing and con-
sumes without husbanding, must expect
the penalty of the prodigal whose labor
could with difficulty find him the bare
means of life.
"A people without children would face
a hopeless future; a country without
trees is almost as hopeless; forests which
are so used that they cannot renew them-
selves will soon vanish, and with them
all their* benefits. A true forest is not
merely a storehouse full of wood, but, as
it were, a factory of wood, and at the
same time a reservoir of water When
you help to preserve our forests or to
plant new ones, you are acting the part
of good citizens The value of forestry
deserves, therefore, to be taught in the
schools which aim to make good citizens
of you If you arbor day exercises help
you to realize what benefits each one of
you receive from the forest, and how by
your assistance these benefits may con-
tinue, they will serve a good end.
"(Signed). THEODORE ROOSEVELT."

FREIGHT RATE AGITATION.
Owing to the recent agitation of freight
rates, great attention has been attracted
to Savannah as a desirable business loca-
tion. For instance, in the shoe business,
nearly fifty per cent of the entire shoe
trade for the South passes through Sa-
vannah, and the inland jobbers and manu-
facturers are thus compelled to pay water
rates to there and then rail rates to their
warehouses, besides the expense of trans-
ferring from the boats to the cars.
The Rosenhein Shoe Company, who
manufacture the celebrated Hub Shoe,
showed great wisdom in locating at Sa-
vannah. They save at least two freight
rates; their warehouses are back of the
docks, and all necessary is to unload the
hoats into their sto:e rooms. They offset
quite a big saving here, and have an ad-
vantage over their inland competitors, for
they can afford to put this money into the
qIuality of their shoes.
It is said that this concern has made
greater strides and progress than any
other house in the South, and their won-
derful growth is no doubt due to their


The Furnishing of a Home.

Is one of the most Important things that comes
into one's domestic life

We Ask You To Come

To this store for the Best In furniture because we think
you wll get the kind you want Our store includes *
all of those pieces that appeal to geed taste
and discrimination.

E. E. Cleaveland Furniture Co.,
Lwarest ad OMeat frwlture Stere I Jamseou e.






Standard Clothing Company


One Price


49


One Price


* FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHES,
S17 and t9 West Bay Street, Jack.sorvfl, Prand
S Nteteen and Hawes Hats. Speelal Attentiou Give to Mail Orders.
tam.. ane i iiiniiieeeeaaa Bil seeoo


SMc KOY PATENT


Turpentine Cup.

The best and simplest cup
on the market. Detachable
Greater Capacity, easier
dipped ,more easily placed
on tree, stronger and prac-
tically indestructible, Will
Snot rust. For eataloW and
price list write


MW'KON PIIITTWIIE UP Co.

New Orleans. .I J;'t-p.



INVENTOR AND
M. A. BAKER, MANUfACTURER OF THE
BAKER IMPROVED SEAMLESS TURPENTINE STILLS.


Write me for prioo O. y poInt Ia the tuareti e b t.
All 0utl sold und.r : tueurnte.
JOB WORK THROVUG THE COVNTIY PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO
The Largest and Oldest Copper Works ia the South.
My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do not leak.
BRUNSWICK, GA. and PENSACOLA, ULA.








6 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



This Easy Chipper Saves time and Money.

. Chip escapes easier on account of hollow back. WRIT
Cuts a shade streak easier as hollow back allows hack to W
to be closed more FOR
Gum flows easier as there is less steel to drag over the PICES
Fresh cut.


Operator's Tool Company, Green Cove Springs, Fla.
< 5-


advantageous location and low freight
rates. Other lines in Savannah and some
of the other seaports, have also shown the
benefit of this saving in freights and the
closeness in every line of merchandise
now-a-days is drawn down to such a point
that the advantage of water rates cuts
quite a figure in the competitive bidding
for trade. This, no doubt, accounts largely
for the general agitation of freight rates,
which in all probability has emanated
from some inland point where the keen
edge of competition has been felt.-At-
lanta Journal.

BROBSTON & CO, A NEW FIRM,
SUCCEEDS BROBSTON, FENDIG & CO.
(Continued from page 3.)
section, a great movement, a safe invest-
ment."
The Atlanta Constitution.
Recently Edwin Brobston was in At-
lanta, in connection with the work oi
settling up the realty business with Mr.
Fendig. TWhile in the Georgia capital
he was interviewed (and no doubt wined
and dined) by E. C. Bruffey, one of the
oldest and best known newspaper men of
...e South, and writing of the Jackson-
ville real estate man, Mr. Bruffey, in the
Atlanta Constitution, says:

"Among those registered at the Kim-
ball was Edwin Brobston, one of the pro-
gressive, energetic and successful business
men, up to a short time ago, of Bruns-
wick-by-the-sea, but now a -prominent
worker of Jacksonville, the metropolis of
the land of flowers.
"And over that autograph many stu-
dents of hotel registers puzzled yester-
day. Ed. Callaway and the new-made
Floridian being about the only two who
could work out the puzzle.
"Ed Brobston was once a newspaper
man, and during those days stories were
being told of Horace Greeley's handwrit-
ing, and that of Spinner, whose name
made good United States treasury notes
a decade ago. In many a print shop copy
in shorthand was about as easy as was
much of the manuscript turned in. It be-
came a fad with some editors to see how
miserably they could write, and in that
fad Ed Brobston managed to spoil a hand-
writing that was once copy plate, so says
Ed Calaway, of the Kimball, known also
to fame as the only author of a publi-
cation on hotel register entries, a book
given by the compiler to his friends only
as a souvenir.
"'I knew the time,' said Mr. Callaway,
as he was deciphering the hieroglyphics
for a student, 'when that man put his


some other editors of whom I have known
he thought it was the proper thing to see
how badly lie could write, and then when
)le went out of the newspaper business
and tried to write a neat hand he found
lie had ldst the art. Now that's all there
is to it. You will find all about it in my
book on page 13.' "
Visit to Atlanta.
"1 came up to Atlanta," said Mr. Brob-
ston, "to attend a meeting of the board of
directors of the Tallulah Falls Railroad."
For a number of years Mr. Brobston
has been the personal representative of
George L. Prentiss ,of New York, who
owns the road, and who is now pushing
its extension right along to Franklin, N.
C.
"'Then, too," continued Mr. Brobston,
--1 have been busy today inspecting some
land out near College Park, which I and
some Florida friends have just purchased,
and which we propose developing during
the coming summer. We bought a tract
of 300 acres near that delightful suburb
and within a few months we will begin
grading and will build a number of houses
with a view to making that immediate
section still more inviting to those seeking
suburban homes. As soon as we get the
work of improvement well under way
I shall come to Atlanta and remain here
several months, directing personally the
finishing touches and possibly see myself
to the sales, if any are made. But the
truth is we are not at all anxious to sell
in anything like a hurry for no one real-
izes better than we do that real estate
near Atlanta is constantly on the increase
and that the longer we hold the more
freiluent will be the demands made upon
us by those wanting homes and the more
remunerative these sales will be."
Ga., and for years was owner, publisher
Ga., and for years was owned, publisher
and editor of the Madisonian. Selling
that paper, he went to Brunswick and
established the Times, of that city, which
is now still in the running and is well
up with the procession.
Some fifteen years ago or more he dis-
posed of the Times and entered the real
estate business in Brunswick. That was
during the boom days of Brunswick and
in his new field Ed Brobston made good.
The firm of Brobston, Fendig & Co., es-
tablished a reputation throughout the
country and devoted much of its time to
industrial work.
But recently Mr. Brobston withdrew
from the firm and moved from old Geor-
gia home to Jacksonville, where he has
already taken a prominent place in every
movement looking to the advancement
and betterment of the State of his adop-
tion.
Work for Immigration.
Immigration has attracted the attention
of Mr. Brobston, especially since moving
to Florida, and few men in the South have


given that subject more thorough and
devoted study than he. Not long ago
lie was invited to Savannah by the cham-
ber of commerce to discuss a plan for
launching an immigration movement in
Georgia and the present effective organi-
zation is working along the lines suggest-
ed by him in that address.
Just now Mr. Brobston is bending his
energies towards an enactment by the
Florida legislature of some practical meas-
ure looking to encouragement of immigra-
tion and a wider advertising of Florida's
resources.
"In my opinion." remarked Mr. Brob-
ston, "Atlanfa, Jacksonville and Tampa
are destined to become the three great
cities of the South and that too in the
very near future. I say that after having
given the situation and the conditions
existing now a complete exhaustive study.
"Those three cities are in a line to
get the most direct benefit from the isth-
mian canal and from the development of
Cuba. At present there is under contract
and under construction more than $12,000,-
000 of improvements."


PECAN S
Allvze Uth woL


permanent Profit

economyy of care

Certainty of retMts

Annual crops

Noa-perIshalMe product
Superior to all nrts.

THE OPPORTUNITY OF TODAY.
The first to plat a peemn igrve
wl be the first to reap a
treat harvest.
For full Infoeratlno apply to

THE GRIFFING BROS. Co.

Jacksonville. Florida.


U e...*.o**eoe*eooee6*o*o**o#****-e------e----


J. A. Craig ( Bro.

a 239 W. Bay Street EVERETT BLOCK

: Leaders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-

* Ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.

Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.

SWWWWWW---------- -C-W'-MM

1 i 1 1 8 >* 8 Iiiiii 8 19***** 1 8 S i *tr 8 8 8 1 1 1 8
*W. W. Care, Pru. W. C. Thein, Manager. R. & Ca a, m. ant T


STampa Hardware Co.
*

Wholesale

i Hardware

STurpentine. Mill and Phosphate Supplies.


TAMPA. FLORIDA.
t> gIao $ IIIaahIiitsiI u a s I Ilah I IaII tse sam Iseas 884uI


NOTARY PUBLIC.


BLUE PRINTING,


L.PHONE 941


ExamlMatl adi T ber EstmItes.

ROLAND WOODWARD,
CONSULTING AND CIVIL ENGINEER.
Reno 6, Board of Trade BuiMIdag, JACKlS N.LE, rLA










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7




Southern Drug Mfg. Company
WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS AND MANUFACTURERS OF
Flavoring Extracts, Packed Drugs, B. B. Bluing. Vinegar and Pyne's Popular Remedtes.
We handle everything in the Drug and Medicine line. Write for prices. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Negroes in the Civil Service; Warn-

ing to Southern Whites.


"The only chance to prevent the United
States Civil Service from becoming Afri-
canized is for the white people of the
South to become alive to this situation
S and to take an interest in civil service."
This was the casual but deliberate state-
ment of Hon. John A. McIlhenny, recently
appointed United States civil service com-
missioner by President Roosevelt, and it
was the expression and opinion of a South-
ern man, a Louisianaian. Senator Mcll-
henny believes the time has come when
the Southern people must arouse them-
selves to this issue.
"The negroes of the South are alive to
this great opportunity for them," added
Commissioner McIlhenny. "The blacks
see in civil service a great opportunity, and
they jump at the chance to take the ex-
aminations and get into the government
service in this manner, thereby avoiding
manual labor. But the white people of
the South are standing aloof, and for that
reason I am making every effort to sound
this note of warning. To my mind it is
absolutely essential that the white people
of the South work to retain their positions
in the civil service and to stand for these
examinations. As I said, it is the only
chance to prevent the Africanizing of the
civil service. I propose to make special
effort to arouse in our Southern people
the feeling that civil service is a worthy
and honorable service for our people to
engage in.
"The whites, through prejudice or igno-
rance, refuse to take the examinations,
while the negroes, inspired with the hope
of getting away from hard manual labor,
jump at them. Therefore the burden rests
not with the civil service, but with the
white people, who fail to take advantages
offered them."
Commissioner Mellhenny referred to re-
cent examinations held at Dallas and Ather
points in Texas, and at Alexandria and
Baton Rouge, in Louisiana. At Alexan-
dria and Baton Rouge, only negroes took
the examinations. Not a single white per-
son applied, and of that list of cities only
at Dallas did the whites exceed the blacks
in number.
"There is no politics in the civil service,"
* declared Mr. Mellhenny. "That was one
of the things for which I was appointed.
Neither is there politics in the civil ser-
vice commission, nor in its appointees in
the different departments. Wherever a
charge of political preferment is made
against a head of a department, it is in-
vestigated at once, no matter where it is
found or whom It affects.
"There is no longer what was once
known as the life tenure. A man enters
the service on a probationary period of
six months. If he proves satisfactory he
will be retained. But even then. after
receiving final appointment, if he should
not fll the bill he may be discharged at
any time for cause. Therefore, his reten-
tioq depends upon the supervising officials,


superior official, and not only has he the
authority, but it is his duty to dismiss
an incompetent man."
Mr. Mellhenny left for Washington yes-
terday, after two weeks in Louisiana,
where he was interested in conducting the
rivers and harbors committee through
the State, he having been largely instru-
mental in bringing the congressional party
to the State. After getting matters
straightened up in Washintgon, Commis-
sioner Mellhenny will begin a tour of the
South May 15th, to try and arouse inter-
est among the Southern white people in
the civi Iservice. He will start in North
Carolina, and visit practically every South-
ern State.
In his talks and addresses on that tour
he will explain that the Civil Service
Commission is absolutely nonpolitical;
that applicants are judged entirely upon
their merits; that the criticism and the
idea that there is an effort being made
by the administration or the Civil Ser-
vice Commission to Africanize any single
department is erroneous; that the com-
mission deals with the applicant with im-
partiality, and if the white people refrain
from taking the examinations, then the
burden of the situation rests with them.
-New Orleans Picayune.

COTTON GOODS RATES.

Hearing Before the Interstate Commerce
Commission Friday.
Washington, April 19.-Rates on cotton
goods from southern points to the Pa-
cific coast, China and Japan was again
the subject of the hearing before the In-
terstate Commerce Commission today. J.1
Southall. representing the complainants.
nmde a formal motion for the postpone-
ment of the hearing until he could secure
the defendant railroad and steamship
companies with a subpoena duces teeum
to compel the production of the minutes
of the conferences held in 1899, which re-
sulted in the deal and agreement to raise
the rates. The defendant companies fi-
nally agreed to produce these minutes to-
morrow, and the hearing was continued.
Mr. Southall said to the commission that
he intended to show by the minutes of
these conferences that they were partici-
pated in by railroad men, notwithstanding
the denial of this during testimony yes-
terday. The railroad representatives re-
plied that the minutes would not show
the presence of railroad men at the con-
ferences, and claimed. further, that no
agreement was entered into by them re-
garding the rates in question. It is claim-
ed that if an agreement was reached be-
tween the steamship lines it is beyond the
jurisdiction of the Interstate Commerce
Commission. Secretary Ayers, of the
China and Japan Trading Company, ex-
plained the exact method of purchases,
prices of goods and rates paid for ship-
ment, both from New York to the Orient,
via the Suez canal, and from the Pa-


cific coast. The defense rested their case been reduced from $1.85 per one hundred
after the testimony of Lincoln Green, pounds to San Francisco, to $1.15, the
through the traffic manager of the South- present rate. The commission took the
ern Railway. Mr. Green told tie com. case under advisement and indicated that
mission that the rates complained of were
fixed on an exceedingly low basis, because its conclusions would be announced to-
of water competition, and that it had morrow.




Barnes & Jessup Company

Jacksonville, Florida.

Navel Stores Factors and Commission

Merchants.


OFFICERS.
C. H. Barnes. President. J. C. Little, Vice-Prelident.
E. B. Wells. Secretary and Treasurer.

DI1RECTORS. C. naernoe J. C. Little, Ralph J im l
J. R.. Saundera C. Long, W. E. Summer, R. H. Paul. G. W.
Saxon. G. W. Taylor.


H. E. PRITCHETT, Pres. P. L. SUTHERLAND, Vice-Pres. A. D. OVINGTON, 8ee'
J. P. COUNCIL. Tres and Gi'l My.

THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.,
General Office: JACKSONVILL, FLA.
Factory: WANNANISH, N. C.

Mmwuf r9 ofe High 8Ermde Teeol
fep NIwl f lapse. efi.e


THE COMMERCIAL BANK
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. Brauces: Ocal aMd Lake City
The largest leading State Bank in Jacksonville. Is conducted in an old-
fashioned strictly conservative manner and is subject to regular examination
by the Comptroller.
gwIndividual and Savings Accounts solicited.
H. ROBINSON, W. 3 OWE, H. GAILAwUD,
Presiaet. Vice-President. Camte
- -S S------------------------------


W. J. L'ENOLE.
President.


J. W. WADE
Vice-President.


EC. HUGHE8,
Ass't. Se'y and Tras


Union Naval Stores Co.
MOBILE. ALA. PENSACOLA, FLA. NEW ORLEANS, LA.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
.........DEALERS IN..........

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable loctte ia West Flor.
ida, Alabama and Misssippi. Liberal advances made asaint eigm-Mta. Ce-
respondence elicited.

Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.


Brick and Building Material.

When you need these, Portland Cement, Plaster Paris, Hard Wal
Plaster, Hair for Plastering, Shingles, fire Briek or Clay. Write to
GEO. R. FOSTER, Jr., Jacksonville. Fla.


h~:s~c~r~c~,~cs~amaacscscsmcsc


4 ft %V w_ h X -*% V _V I m %


_r









8 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



THE GROOVER-STEWART Omm co.,

FOM 00I10Y TC O STe IB-e0IEgts *oe 00.
WhlMlwl Dr, Olwmil9, OD ulft Siuidra Md Owminsawy *.
~1-I nr Ina.


Im eauu e U wamHxn eourn In
0OIQ8A. (astalbshe sa In a1.)
OLD BHARP WITLIAMS-Pure Flne Old
Rye. B- the gallon 3.0; four full quarts
U.94 easoress prepaid.
SGO. J. COLEMAN-Pure Pennsylvania
SRye; Rich and Mellow. By the galloa
.'5:; four full quarts 8.0, express prepaid
ANVIL RrE-Pure Substantial Family
Whiskey. By the gaUon a.M0; four full
quarts 2.1, express prepaid.
CLIFFORD RYE-By the gallon t.5;;
four full quarts .5. express prepaid.
OLD KENTUCKY CORN-Direct from
Bonded Warehouse; fine and old. By the
gallon S.;: tour full quarts .a express
prepaid.
OWLD POINTER CLUB CORN Rich
and Mellow. By the gallon a2.50; four ful
quarts 8.0, express prepaid.
We hanude an the leading brands of Rye ad Bourbon Whtskles in the market
ad wll save you from ta SO per cent on your purchase. Send for price list and
eatalogue. ValIed tree upon application.
The Altmayer a Flatau Liquor Comprny
MACON. GEORGIA.




Hundreds of Lumbermen
ARE LOSING

THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS
Each year investigating worthless propositions submitted by un
reliable brokers.
We have spent a great deal of time and money investigating
timber lands in Florida and Georgia. and are prepared to give
you absolutely reliable information regarding any tract of any
size in either State.
propositions that we offer have been investigated by our ex-
perts before being offered on the mArket.
You might have your bank look us up before consulting us.
Correspondence with bona-fide purchasers solicited.


Brobston, Fendig & Company
sz Wet Feroyth Stret. mai ewcatle Stret.
JIACKSONVILLE FLORIDA BRUNSWICLK GA.
sWW SB *'W Kx55 k M ...TW5 %% WWMLMW% ;


THE ARAGON
SJAC OMVILLE, FLA.
Under new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
cluding new electric elevator and our
own electric light plant.
H. N. O'NEAL. Prop.


es 8i8ii8s oIII iesi a i III ***t*81 1 i ** 11 1* 11 AsS1111

JOS. ROSENEIM SHOE CO.
SMAIVNACVTUdEE AMD JOMIERm OF


SHOES


SSAVANNAH. GEORGIA -
Best Sies Made fr ComIauar Trade."
B1t 8 1 4 1 4 .. ..-.. .. ."_"" "" "1 1 1 ****t


securities or obligations of other corpora-; The business of said corporation shall
tions whatsoever wherever located or or- he conducted by the following officers: A
ganized, engaged in or pursuing any one President, a Vice-President, a Secretary
or more of the kinds of business, purposes, and a Treasurer and a board of directors
objects or operations indicated herein or consisting of not less than three nor more
owning or holding any property of any than thirteen members, the number to be
kind mentioned herein or of any corpora- fixed by the by-laws of the company. The
tion holding or owning stocks or obliga- offices of Secretary and Treasurer may be
tions of any such corporation and while helu by the same person. The annual meet-
the owner or holder of any such stock, ing for the election of officers by the
bonds and obligations to exercise all the stockholders of the company shall be held
rights, powers and privileges of ownership on the first Saturday of May of each
thereof and to exercise all and every vot- year, and each year on said date thereafter


T


6-


NOTICE OF INTENTION TO APPLY ing powers thereof; to sell, mortgage, sub-
FOR LETTERS PATENT. let, pledge, hire, lease, or convey property
Notice is hereby given that the under- of the said corporation or any part thereof
signed will apply to the Governor of the at will and to invest the proceeds of the
State of Florida, at Tallahassee, Fla., on same at pleasure in any manner as may
tie seventh (7) day of May, A. D. 1907, be determined by the by-laws; to conduct
e e ) day of May, A. D. 17 any part of its business and to establish,
for letters patent incorporating the South- any part of its sines and to etablih,
ern Lumber Company, under the following operate and maintain lumber yards and
to have offices and agencies and to employ
proposed charter.
E. H.d HARRISON, all officers and agents at such places in
E. H. H RISN, this State and other States and in foreign
H. NIELSEN, countries as may be necessary and re-
L. HARRISON.
L. HAR O. quisite for the carrying on of said business
Proposed Charter of Southern Lumber Co. qui furthering theends of said burpors s
The undersigned hereby associate them- n rterin te sad corpor
selves together for the purpose of becom- tion; to borrow money and secure the
ing incorporated under the laws of the same, and moneys otherwise owing by
State of Florida, for the transaction of mortgages, deeds, bonds, notes or other
business under the following charter: obligations therefore; to receive payment
business under for capital stock subscribed for in money
Article L or in property, labor or service, at a just
The name of this corporation shall be valuation thereof in the discretion or
SOUTHERN LUMBER COMPANY. Its judgment of the board of directors; to
principal office shall be in the city of Jack- make contracts of any kind whatsoever
sonville. Fla., and its business shall be con- for the furtherance of its purposes and
ducted in other places in the State of Flor- business including agreements or contracts
ida and elsewhere through offices, branches between the said corporation and individ-
or agencies or otherwise as may be nee- uals or other corporations in any of the
essary or convenient, lines of the busineu of this corporation;
Article IL to have a lien upon all of the shares of
The general nature of the business to be any stockholder who may become indebted
transacted by said corporation shall be to this corporation, either individually, as
that of manufacturing, buying, selling, co-partner, surety or otherwise, with the
handling, forwarding and dealing in lum- right to sell and dispose of such stock,
ber of all kinds, cross-ties, shingles, laths, or such portion thereof as may be nee-
and all kinds of mill products, both whole- essary to pay off seh indebtedness, at
sale and retail, on commission or other- either public or private sale, and upon
wise; and buying, selling, renting, leasing, such notice and terms as the board of
using and operating saw mills, plants, directors may prescribe, and with the fur-
tram roads, machinery and supplies, tim- their right to refuse to transfer such stock
ber and lands of every description; to until full payment of all such indebtedness
acquire, hold, use, mortgage, lease and and to make such by-laws in furtherance
convey all such property, real or personal, hereof as may be deemed best, and gen-
in any part of the world, including the rally to exercise such power as may be
capital stock and bonds of other corpora- incident or convenient to the purposes or
tions as may be necessary or convenient the business of said corporation; and to
in connection with the said business; to have, exercise and enjoy all the rights,
advance and loan money upon securities of powers and privileges incident to eorpora-
land, personal property or commercial pa- tions organized and existing under and by
per; to buy, own, use, mortgage and lease virtue of the laws of the State of Florida.
lands; to operate mills and machinery for Article II.
the manufacture of lumber and timber The amount of capital stock of said
products; to enter into, carry out or other- corporation shall be 310,000, to be divided
wise turn to account, contracts of every into 100 shares of the par value of 100.00
kind; to act as broker, factor or agent each. The capital stock may be payable
in the purchase, sale, management and either wholly or in part in cash or may
disposition of real property and the prod- be issued or used wholly or in part for
ucts thereof and commodities, goods, wares the purchase of property, labor and serv-
and merchandise of every kind; to act as ices at a just valuation thereof to be
broker, factor or agent for the purchase, fixed by the board of directors at a meet-
sale, management or disposition of lands ing to be called for that purpose.
and products thereof; to subscribe for, Artile IV.
purchase, receive, own, hold for invest- The term for which said corporation
ment, or otherwise, sell, dispose of and shall exist shall be ninety-nine (99) years.
mako advances unon stocks, shares, bonds. Article V.









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


TAMPA MONUMENNTAL WORKS,
DBEALERS IN
Monuments, Headstones. Iron Fencing and Italian Statuary
NO JOB TOO LARGE. NO JOB TOO SMALL.
MAIN OFFICES 310 ZACH STREET, TAMPA, FLA.


the stockholders shall meet for purpose
of electing directors and other officers. The
date of the annual meeting may be chang-
ed by the by-laws. The stockholders shall
meet on the eleventh day of May, A. D.
1907, being the first annual meeting at the
office of the company in the city of Jack-
sonville, Fla., for the purpose of organizing
the corporation, adopting by-laws, electing
officers, and for the transacting of such
other business as may come before the
meeting. Until the officers elected at the
first election shall be qualified, the busi-
ness of this corporation shall be conducted
by the following named officers: E. H.
Harrison, as President; D. H. Nielson, as
Vice-President; L. Harrison, as Secretary
and Treasurer, and E. H. Harrison, D. H.
Nielsen and L. Harrison as director.
Article VL
The highest amount of indebtedness or
liability to which the corporation may at
any time subject itself shall be $20,0000.
The names and residences of the sub-
scribing incorporators of such corporation
together with the number of shares of its
capital stock subscribed by each are a
follows: E. H. Harrison, residing in Jack-
sonville, Fla., fifty (50) shares; D. H.
Nielsen, residing in Jacksonville, Fla.,
forty-five (45) shares, and 4L Harrison, re-
siding in Jacksonville, Fla., ive (5) shares.
E. H. HARRISON,
D. H. NIELSEN.
L. HARRISON.
State of Florida, County of Duval, s.:
Before me, a notary public in and. for
the State of Florida at large, personally
appeared E. H. Harrison, D. H. Nielsen
and L. Harrison, who are well known to
me and known to me to be the Individuals
described in and who executed the fore-
going charter, and severally acknowledged
to and before me that they executed the
same for the uses and purposes therein ex-
pressed.
Tn witness whereof, I have hereunto set
my hand and affixed my official seal at
Jacksonville, in the County of Duval and
State of Florida, this sixth day of April,
A. D. 1907.
J. 8. HARRISON,
Notary Public in and for the State of
Florida at large.
My commission expires April 22, 1900.
(Notarial Seal.)

TO THE JAMESTOWm EXPOSrTION
VIA THE ATLANTIC COAST LINE NY.
People all over Florida, see the Atlantic
Coast Line "Purple Folder" for schedules
to the Jamestown Exposition. Two daily
trains each way, with through Pullman
buffet sleeping ear.
Season sixty days andfifteen days limit
excursion tickets on sale daily from April
1lth to Nov. 30th. at low rates. Coach
excursions at very low rates.
For further information see your near-
est railroad agent, or write Frank C.
Bovlston. District Passeprer Agent, Atlan-
tic Coast Line, Jacksonville, Fla.

Walter Mucklow,
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT,
ema6 46-4-448 Mutual Life Mug

JAC4WIUVIMIA, FLA


NOTICE OF GARNISHMENT.
State of Florida, County of Duval, xxth
District, Court of Justice of Peace.
T. J. Mott vs. A. S. Murphy, Garnishee.
Anheuser Busch Brewing Association, Gar-
nishee, to A. S. Murphy, defendant, and


all others whom it may concern:
You are hereby notified that a writ -f
garnishment has been issued in the above,
and that your property in the hands of
Anheuser Busch Brewing Association has
been garnisheed and that unless you ap-
pear before said court on or before the
6th day of May, A. D. 1907, judgment by
default will be entered against you.
T. J. MOTT.

Im CIRCUIT COURT.

Fourth Judicial Circuit of Florida, in and
for Duval County.
In Chancery.
Jacksonville Development Co. vs. Ralph
H. Done, et al. Notice to non-resident:
'to Ralph H. Doane, Andrew J. Mosley and
Bertha M. Mosley, his wife:
You are hereby required to appear to
the bill of complaint filed herein against
you in the above entitled cause on or be-
fore the 3d day of June, A. D. 1907.
"The Industrial Record" is hereby des-
ignated as the newspaper in which this
order shall be published once a week for
eight consecutive weeks.
Witness my hand seal of office this
21st day of March, A. D. 1907.
(Seal) P. D. Cassidey, Clerk,
By E. J. Candee, Deputy Clerk.
Owen & Royall, Solicitor for Complain-
ant.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR DIS-
CHARGE.
Notice is hereby given, In pursuance of
law, that the undersigned as Administra-
tor of the estate of Josephine C. S. Schu-
macher will make return of his final ac-
counts and apply for a final settlement and
discharge as such administrator to Hon. H.
B. Phillips, County Judge of Duval County,
Florida, on Monday, June 3d, A. D. 1907.
JAMES M. SCHUMACHER,
As Administrator Estate of Josegae
C. S. Schumacher.
!ov. f2. 19on.--mo.

NOTICE TO NON-RESIDENT.
In Circuit Court, Fourth Judicial Circuit
of Florida, in and for Duval County.
In Chancery.
G. A. Henry vs. Oreo. Henry.
To Creo. Henry:
You are hereby required to appear to
the Bill of Complaint filed herein against
you in the above entitled cause on or be-
fore the 6th day of May, A. D. 1907.
"The Industrial Record" is hereby desig-
nated as the newspaper in which this order
shall be published once a wek for eight
consecutive weeks.
Witness my hand and seal of office this
19th day of February, A. D. 1907.
P. D. CASSIDEY, Clerk.
By E. R. HB STROM, Deputy Clerk.
C. B. PEELER,
Solicitor for Complainant.


Reliable Whiskies.

When we make Claims for our goods we are certain of
the facts. We operate the finest open fire copper Distill-
ery in the World. We do our own bottling and packing
and no expense or labor is spared to have every drop of our
Whiskey absolutely pure and of the highest quality.
We guarantee every Order to be perfectly satisfactory,
or return your money.

Four Full Quarts Rose's

"Old Corn" or "Old Rye" or assorted $3.40, express
prepaid. Write for complete Price-List.


R. M. Rose Company,
16 West Forsyth Street, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
"ASK THE REVENUE OFFICER."


W. B. HENDERSON, Pres.
W. R. FULLER, Vice Pres.


JOHN SAVARZSE. Trumau~.
E. BERGER. Swerion-Tgessuaur


TAMPA DRUG CO.


Wholesale Manufacturing Druggists,
TAMPA, FLORIDA.
Full and complete line of all kinds of Drugs, Chemicals
and Patent Medicines.
SPECIAL ATTENTION 70 COMMISsARY TRADE.
PROMPT ATTENTION TO ALL ORDERS.


C. C. Bettes,


DRUGS. -m" 5sMAY
a SOUTM LAIBA


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Florida Mail Order Drug Store. Supplies Everything a Drug Store
Ever Kept. Write to Us.


WILLIAM A. BOURn JAMES 0. DARBY


WILLIAM A. BOURS & COMPANY
TIE OLKST STAUUWM GOAIN m sR mN M TMM-IAT.
fay, Grain, feed, Garden
Seeds, Poultry Supplies, flour,
Grits, Meal and fertilizers.
OUR MOTTO: Prompt Silipnt, ReliaMe GOees Catalos rre
206 EAST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FlA.


I










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL RECORD
JAMU A. HOLLOONO. derIu.-e-C al
A. H. MARILS. assInes Mafs'eW. d4
er
Pu tMishd Ev sn sr v. F
samm o rioE ^ .... Anm lia

*The, Pkne arnd s Predu'e th
w

The Industrial Iecord Company. pr
Jaickoonvll*. Fi cc
efnae rdUIael I "and knaes mOfes a
vsannf Gah ti
- -te ed at tm Pastoaoe at Jao~e vlle, I a-. a
as solusd-rrlase mat er E

Adopted by the Eeuitiv, Coim Ateo B
the Tuipeatins O atom o T

September 11 a the ora elso of a1- o
eral aceistion. v
Adopted Aril 27h, 19, as tUe 141041
elua of tlmitnuSto OMs Growers' A-
oiatio Adopted September 11, lS, a
he only oaia oqr of the T. 0 A.
Commanded to lumber people by upaiel
resolution adopted by the Georgi awill G
Aesodetio. M
G
THK RECORD'S OFFICE. ro
The nublibhiqg l t ad the mai o-
Sow of thbeMIZ IResd Oumany Y
are looted at the interetion of y nd N
ewnanu Streta, JaemoMvll w l., in th
very heart of the g t turptin and
yellow pie lndutri. G
trad of the mtirem Sut tr
Thae '-nh, Ga., offl i in the Bard
af Trade BldMing. Savannah is the lead-
ing open naval tore market in the world t
-to

NOTICE TO PATRONS. fi
ABl payments ftu a ttigK the an- pI
trialil Reor ad stubsudtin th to
muat be mrd eiret to th be m sn in
Jackanville. Agtes ar t M aw to
r.aM ceiectile U r any cicsurmsae t
Wil fe advertising ad abriptiasm an a
sMt oat twm tLhe mM s*, s sI m
ad all remittances u b me dioct
ltr t Oc-- Rev" P .dd. 06 w
of

DEATH OF JAMES H. ECKLES. p
ff
In the sudden death at his home in t
Chicago this week, of James H. Eckles,
president of the Commercial National tc
Bank of that city, and former Comptroller PI
of the Currency under President Cleve- d
land, the business world loase one of its d
ablest men and certainly one of the best 0
examples of the quiet, honest, conserva- bh
tive men of affairs. Eckles was in every m
respect a national character, or
The death of Mr. Eckles came on the ar
eve of a breakfast party which he had
planned for a number of friends and rela- to
tives. Judge K. M. Landis, of the fede- w
ral district court; Mrs. Landis, Mr. and g
Mrs. B. MI. Gary of New York; George le
M. Eckles, a brother, and his wife and S1
others were to have been guests. d
James A. Eckles, of Princeton, Ill., fa- sp
their of James H. Eckles, died recently. ai
On the day of the death of the older m
Eckles, the son was a host of former in
President Grover Cleveland. The former je
president and Mr. Eckles were at break-
fast when news of the father's death was
received at the Eckles residence. n,
Mr. Eckles was kept in ignorance of the re
fact for several hours until Mr. Cleveland (
had left the city. A
It developed that the person who was it
trying to communicate with Mr. Eckles la
over the telephone-the ringing of which cr
led to the discovery of the death-was in
George M Eckles, a brother. Half an hour of
later the brother was called to his own w
telephone and informed of the death. cl


A postmortem examination was held
id a statement issued giving the cause of
cath as organic heart disease. The fun-
al will be held Tuesday afternoon at the
fourth Presbyterian Church. Rev. Wil-
am B Notman will deliver the oration.
he body will be placed in a vault until
ie return of Mrs. Eckles and daughter,
hen a private funeral will be held.
Mr. Eckles was a stockholder and was
eminent in the management of several
incerns, among them being the Hewitt
manufacturing Company, the Union Trac-
on Company; the Featherstone Foundry
id Machine Company; the Chicago Real
state Trustees' Association; the Allis-
halmers Company; the American and
ritish Securities Company; the Bankers
rust of New lork, and the First Nation-
SBank of Baltimore. He was a member
the leading clubs of Chicago and of
rious clubs in the east.

IMMIGRANTS FOR GEORGIA.
Hon. G. Gunby Jordan, of Columbus,
a., president of the Eagle and Phoenix
manufacturing Company, and head of the
eorgia Immigration Association, is en
ute to Europe, having sailed from New
ork on the Kaiser William H., of the
orth German Lloyd line on the 9th inst.
Hon. Hoke Smith, governor-elect of
eorgia, is also en route to the old coun-
y, going to aid and co-operate with
resident Jordan in carrying out plans of
ke State Immigration Association looking
the securing of a sufficient supply of
rst-class European laborers to meet the
resent urgent demands in Georgia.
President Jordan has gone on this per-
mal tour at the arnest solicitation of
le executive committee of the association
nd Georgia manufacturers and business
en generally are confidently anticipating
eat results from his visit. Mr. Jordan,
ho was only recently elected president
Sthe State organization, has been vice-
resident of the association since it was
irmed and one of the prime movers in
ie cause of State immigration.
Being head of one of the largest cot-
in mills in the South, Mr. Jordan is
possibly better posted on the labor con-
tiones than any other one man in Geor-
a, his big mills having suffered much
luring the past year from the dearth of
operatives. Mr. Jordan is opposed to
singing over any and all classes of im-
igrants to this country, and insists that
ily high class and desirable laborers
e wanted in Georgia.
While Gov. Smith is strongly committed
white supremacy in this State, it is
ell known that he believes in exercising
ood judgment and discretion in the se-
ction of the future citizens of this
tate. No man is better equipped for
ding the State great service in this re-
iect than Governor Smith. He has given
ready careful study to this, and supple-
enting it with a tour of observation and
quiry, will make his advice on the sub-
ct invaluable.
Foreign Corporations in Georgia.
Of the foreign corporations doing busi-
ss in Georgia through agents who have
gistered with Secretary of State Phil
ok ,as required by law passed last
ugust, there are 484, with a total cap-
alization of $2,479,545,681. .Under the
w imposing an occupation tax on all
corporations doing business in the State,
accordance with the amount of capital
Each the total income for the State
ill be $30,250. About 3.000 corporations
artered by the State have registered.


The registration represents probably less
than half of the corporations doing busi-
ness in the State.

GEORGIA ELECTRIC LINE.

It will Run from Macon to Albany, g99

The Georgia department of State has
issued a charter to the Macon, Americus
and Albany railway, a corporation that
proposes to build a line of electric road
from Macon to Albany, 190 miles in
length. The following well-known Geor-
gians are the incorporators: W. J. Mas-
see, M. Felton Hatcher, J.. T. Moore, M.
H. Massee, M. J. Hatcher, J. N. Neel and
D. W. Davis of Macon; N. J. Cruger of
Albany; J. C. Walker, of Marshallville;
A. C. Riley. of Fort Valley. The com-
pany is capitalized at $200,000. An in-
terurban line which will connect Atlanta
with Marietta. Powder Springs, Douglas-
ville, Roswell, Alphaetta, Cumming and
Gainesville, has been planned by a number
of Atlanta, Marietta and Gainesville cap-
italists and well-known promoters living
in the towns along the proposed line.
The official plans of the promoters have
not been announced.

THOMASVILLE TO QUINCY.

New Line to Come Into a Prosperous
Florida Community.
A dispatch from Thomasville, Ga., con-
tains the following interesting facts:
It has been authoritatively announced
taat the board of directors of the Mexican
Gulf Railroad Company will build a line
from Thomasville to Quincy, Fla., a dis-
tance of about forty-five miles, on the
condition that reasonable support is given
them along the line in regard to the se-
curing of right of way and other neces-
sary things of minor importance.
This line of road will traverse one of
the richest sections of South Georgia and
North Florida, and will give a means of
direct communication to the North, via
Thomasville and the Atlantic Coast Linle.
It is understood on good authority that
the work will be begun in the immediate
future, terminal property for. tracks and
passenger station having already been
purchased at the Thomasville end of the
line.
It is planned ultimately to build the
line to Indian Pass, a point on the Apa-
lachicola Bay, that being one of the best
deep water harbors on the Gulf of Mexico.
From this end it will extend northeasterly
to Sparks, Adel or some point on the line
of the Georgia Southern and Florida Rail-
road.
There are immense tracts of timber all
along the proposed route, heavy sections
of long leaf pine being the principal va-
riety, though there is a considerable quan-
tity of cypress and cedar within easy ac-
cess of the line. .
The entire length of the road when
completed will be about one hundred and
fifty miles, and will furnish a direct
means to water communication for all
points on the Gulf of Mexico and the
Southern waters.
This line, with the Tampa Northern,
which is being built by the owners of
the Atlanta, Birmingham and Atlantic
system, will make Thomasville the great-
est railroad center in that section of the
State of Georgia, and it is likely that the
frwn will grow more rapidly than in any
I erio:! f its history within the next two


I THE CLOTHIERS

E AGt NTS iO K"OX HATS


Our Clothing


Right

Riaht





Crt


















H. M. \hitney, a prominent Massaehu-
Awful

lieutenant governde l
Naff
Said


THE STUART-BERNSTEIN CO.
4 WEST receivedY ST. JACKS. BryanL, dealing

BRYAN ON THE RAILROADS.

He Ventilateds is Opinion On tter wat-
Uatio3.
H. M. Whitney, a prominent Massachu-
setts Democrat, and former candidate for
lieutenant governor, has made public a
letter received from W. J. Bryan, dealing
with the railroad question. The letter was
in response to one from Mr. Whitney, in
which he asked:
"Whether in your judgment there is any
danger of regulating being carried to a
point preventing a reasonable return on
money invested in the railroads of the
country, and whether in case of adoption
of government ownership by the national
government or by the several States, the
stockholders could expect to receive a
price equal to the value of the physical
railroad properties!"
Mr. Bryan writes, in part, as follows:


The Wealth of the

Old Families.

Often disappeared, evaporated, and the

new generation was left but one or two
things of real value. Among thee valu-
ables (in 99 cases out of a hundred) was
a chest of old silver, the most useful and
beautiful heirloom that the young genera-
tion treasured.
Have you such a treasure to hand down
to your heirs If not, now is the time to
start gathering it. If you are interested,
come down and let us show you something
in that line that is WORTH HAVING
NOW and which will be highly treasured
by your sons and daughters.


X. J. RXLE COMPANY,

15 W. Bay St,

Jlsokmaris, FaridM.


__ ___ _ __


16










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11



FLORIDA LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY.

CAPITAL STOCK I JACKSONVILLE, LA. }Writes all Forms of Life end En-
ONE MILLION DOLLARS Adowmnent Insurance.


"I am in favor of both national and
State regulations, and I also believe that
public ownership on this subject I have
pointed out that because of the danger of
centralization in ownership by the federal
government of all the lines, I prefer a
system in which the federal government
will be confined to the necessary trunk
lines, and the ownership of the rest of the
lines be left to the States. This, however,
is not an immediate question; at least,
I am not sure that the people are ready
to consider that question the interest is
centered in regulation. As an advocate of
regulation of the strictest sort, I can
say to you that there is no danger what-
ever that this regulation will be carried to
the point of preventing a reasonable re-
turn on money invested in the railroads
of the country. And I also assure you
that whenever public ownership is adopt-
ed by the States or by the nation, the
stockholders may expect to receive a price
at least equal to the value of the physical
properties of the road; but no such assur-
ance ought to be necessary, because the
public has shown no disposition to reduce
railroad earnings to a point which would
deny a reasonable return.
"I have contended that the present
value of the railroads should be ascer-
tained by the Interstate Commerce Com-
mission and the commissions of the va-
rious States, in order that investors may
know when they are buying stock of in-
trinsic value, and when they are being
cheated.
"I think I can speak for those who
believe in regulation, and I know that
there is not, and never has been, danger
of injustice to the owners of the rail-
roads, and if I can speak for those who
believe that the ultimate solution of the
railroad is to be found in public ownership,
I can say that there is no disposition to
confiscate railroad property, even if the
courts would permit it."

An Observant Wisconsin Man Finds No
Traces of Peonage.
(Continued from page 3.)

men at work and the comment was made
among ourselves that the only men that
really worked were the mechanics and the
higher officials. These men were practi-
cally worked to death, not only working
all day but far into the night, and even
as late as two o'clock in the morning. It
was rather amusing after reading the yel-
low magazine articles to recall having
seen four men take 15 minutes to move a
railroad tie 8 or 10 feet. The hours for
work according to the class of work range
from 8 to 10 hours. The food was equal
to that of a northern lumber camp or bet-
ter. The men had good beds, and every
sanitary precaution was taken. One of the
chief engineers, whom we entertained on
our vacht, in answer to a question regard-
ing sickness said they knew nothing what-
ever of sickness-neither he nor any of the
two or three hundred men in that camp
had any use for a doctor or medicine.
From observation and conversation with
the officials (and this, mind you, before we
had any suspicion that charges had been
made or were to be made against the


company for ill treatment of its men) we
became satisfied that in all the history of
employment of labor, never was an em-
ployer more imposed upon than the East
Coast Railway by their common laborers.
They had brought thousands of white men
from New York and the East down there
who engaged themselves not for the pur-
pose of work, but to get down South
without cost and then desert the job. In-
stance after instance was told of starting
from some Northern city with a hundred
men, more or less, and when ready to
board the train at Jacksonville to have
but ten or a dozen men left. The only
class of common labor that they coud rely
upon at all were the negroes from Nassau
and the Bermudas. It is true that the
work is not inviting except for a sober and
industrious man who wants to save his
money. Such men could save their entire
wages as there are no ways of spending
money, no towns within a hundred miles
and no means of getting to them except
by leaving the work. As far as I could
see, said Mr. Peabody, there was not the
slightest restraint upon these men and
every day there would be a steamboat
load of men deserting their work and be-
ing carried north by their employers in
their own steamers. The pay of common
labor is $1.50 a day and board with trans-
portation. Mechanics get from $2 to $4
a day and board, according to their skill,
and in conversation with a number of the
higher paid mechanics, men of intelligence,
a.i spoke highly of their employers, which
would make it reasonable to say that all
of this peonage stuff that is filling the
magazines is on a par with the worst of
yellow journalism. It is disgraceful that
such falsehoods should be published and
inclines one to the conviction that most
everything from Ida Tarbell and Thomas
Lawson down must be imaginative, sensa-
tionable and unreliable.
Key West was touched by Mr. Peabody
and his party on their yachting cruise.
Mr. Peabody says Key West is the dirtiest
and most ill-smelling place he ever saw.
Out of a population of 20,000, one-half are
employed in the cigar factories which is
a very extensive industry. Indeed, it is
the only industry of the place except the
government navy yard, which is impor-
tant.
On the other hand, Miami, a little city
that six years ago had a population of
a half dozen and now has a population )f
6,000, is one of the cleanest and handsom-
est little cities in America, with two bank
buildings that would put to shame any-
thing in the Fox river valley. Hotels and
residences that would do credit to a city
of 100,000 inhabitants. Its streets-hard,
clean and well paved.
Speaking of street and public improve-
ments. a day in Jacksonville, Mr. Pea-
body said, was a revelation and made him
blush to think of Appleton. Here were
miles of beautifully paved streets, splen-
did and artistic public buildings with large
,paces of ground around them. The visi-
tor was struck with the evidence of civic
pride and good citizenship that must con-
trol its government.
With all Florida's attractions Mr. Pea-
body said that the best part of his trip


was getting home, although having re- NOTICE.-It costs money to trade. It
ceived great benefit from the outdoor life. takes time and trouble to do shopping.
His opinion is from observation and con- Let me buy your goods and send them to
tact with many elderly men that their you without any charge for the service.
lives have been extended years by the I represent the most reliable houses, and
practice of spending their winters in Flor- can give my time and experience in se-
ida. The climate offers great attractions lecting the best goods. Give me a trial
to elderly people, but very little for the order. MRS. JAS. E. FARMEB,
young and vigorous. It is surprising to Phone 2437. 811 May St.
see a hotel filled with guests nearly all of References, Fla. Nat. Bank.
from 50 to 80 years of age. Not invalids,
but generally good, vigorous old people
who are kept vigorous by living out of FOR SALE-Turpentie lease on ten
doors in the sunshine. thousand acres timber, three miles from
Mr. Peabody was accompanied by Henry transportation. Apply to King Lumber
Smith, of Neenah and Dr. A. W. Hoyt, of and Manufacturing Ommpany, Noeatee
Chicago, and all united in saying they had Florida. 3-30-4t-
the time of their lives.


WANTED
AND

FOR SALE
Rate for this column i cents per word
for first insertion and 1 ceat per word for
following insertios. No advertieet
taken for lea than 40 cents for Ant, an.
20 cents for following inaertioM. ash
must company orders unles you ba
an account with e.


POSITION WANTED.-As woodsman
or stiller. Can do either; with reference.
Have 18 years' experience at the business.
Address C., care Industrial Record 4t


FOR SALE-10000 acre virgin L L. pla
in OClhoun 0ouaty, West Florida, one
mile south of DIlkeith Landing, oa Ap-
alachicola River. 8. 8. Alerman, owner.
Address Wewahitehka, West Florida.
3.3-0 to 5-11-07


WANTED-Positio with min or tur-
ntine operator as oemmlsary elerk.
yave some knowligs of bookkeeping.
State salary. Address "Clark," ar In-
dustrial Record. 3-9-7-4

UXPKRT ACCOUNTAJT.
ANY BUSINESS 'empmieIse Il tliid
reference the baet. 1Fred saklm,
JacekMowli Fk. IV a -Lt, aM pbM
2776. P. 0. Bonx 7.t


i WANTED-AD ommisarles to dess up
WNTED-Potion a woodsman or their barns of all kinds of mdMi u assd
stiller. Ten years' experience. The ve urlap We buy everthing is s wway
best of references. Apply at one to l e e
Bmtih, Box 255, Kissimmee, Fi. of seek. Write s. American I e Ga.
3-27-0--3t Jacksonville Fla.


COMPARATIVE MARKET Rkxk l.
The spirits market was dull this week, with a decline of two cents. Rosin,
on the other hand, is holding its own, and remains at almost a uniform price.
Only a relatively small quantity of each was handled this week.
SPIRITS OF TURPEPTIR FOR THE WEEK HE l AND AT SAVANAH.
Prise. Sal3. shipments. easipvs. moes.
Ja. Say. Jax. HBr. Jax. 8. Jan. AD. Jan Sa .
Saturday ...... .... 67% .... 526 1,500 7221 40 430 2,483
Monday ....... .... 67 .... 126 1,425 144 293 1,22
Tuesday ...... 67 67 292 497 330 1,619 666 00 5,367
Wednesday .... 66%/ 66% 500 507 1,007 16 173 460 5,653
Thursday ..... .... 66% .... f 120 156 356 357 4,819
Friday ........ .... 65 340 7521 46 281 5,055
ROSIN FOR THE WEEK HBEr AND AT SAVAuNAH.
Saturday. Monday. Tussay. Wedaday. Thurey. Mday.
Jax. Sav. Ja. sa. JaL. av. Jan. a. Ja y b. JaL Ha.
W\W ......5.70 5.705.75 5.755.75 5.805.75 5.755.75 5.805.75 5.75
W'G .......5.65 5.655.65 5.655.65 5.655.65 5.655.65 5.655.65 5.65
N .........5.55 5.555.55 5.555.60 5.605.60 5.6 0 .05.60 5.605.0 5.60
3 ......5.40 5.405.40 5.405.40 5.405.40 5.405.40 5.405.45 5.45
K ..... 5.35 5.355.35 5.355.35 5.365.36 5.355.35 5.355.35 5.35
I -....... 4.85 4.854.90 4.904.90 4.904.90 4.904.90 4.904.95 4.95
H ...4.70 4.704.70 4.704.70 4.704.70 4.704.70 4.704.75 4.75
G ........4.50 4.504.53 4.5t4.52 4.524.52 4.554.55 4.574.00 4.60
E ........4.45 4.454.45 4.454.50 4.504.50 4.504.50 4.504.50 4.50
D ........ 4.40 4.40;4.40 4.4014.40 4.4044 4.454.40 4.4514.40 4.40
ClIA ......4.30 4.30,4.30 4.3014.30 4.30 4.30 4.304.30 4.3014.30 4.30
Saturday ...............1,587 1,1911 300 235j 397 9971 4,617 40,659
REPORT OF ROddN MOVEME1T HERE AMD AT SAVAANAI.
Sales. B- Rosa& stocka.
Jax. LSa. Jan. SaT. Jan. Sav. Jan. Sat .
Monday .................. 602 1,131 1,000 2,99311,439 1,041 4,714 38,707
Tuesday.................3,001 1,3293,790 23211,490 1,68345,053 40,138
Wednesday ...... ..... 1,568 1,3821,600 69111,056 96341,753 40,430
Thursday ................ 1,366 1,6411,419 2,992 916 1,79041,09 39,158
Friday ................... 1,30 1,2093,014 2,1601,550 8640,656 37,867

Jim mmbm..M


I








12 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Prospectus Florida Immigration Number of the Weekly Industrial
Record.


The INDUSTRIAL RECORD PUBLISHING COMPANY will issue at some date on or about the
let of June next, a special number, to be entitled "The Florida Immigration Number."
This edition will comprise something like 100 pages, carefully compiled and edited, and will be inter-
estingly illustrated, all illustrations bearing upon the subject in question and designed for the purpose of
attracting to the State of Florida desirable immigrants, both from the domestic immigrant centres and
from foreign countries.
It i the purpose of the Industrial Record Co. to issue an edition of fully 50,000 copies, and to circu-
late it by its regular channels of circulation, augmented by the industrial departments of various railroads
coming into the South, and through individual and corporate interests throughout Florida which may
have their own individual sources of distribution. It will be mailed to all the newspapers of the country,
with requests for favorable mention, and will be advertised through the leading magazines and farm jour-
nals, to be sent upon request to interested parties who may have their attention thus directed to Florida
and to its advantages from a farming, commercial and industrial standpoint.
In order to attract the attention of those people who may not read the English language, an epitome
of the entire edition will be printed in several languages, namely: German, Italian, Scandinavian, Rus-
sian, and as many others as we may deem advisable.
The edition, from an editorial and compilation standpoint will cover all subjects setting forth the ad-
vantages of Florida to the capitalist, immigrant and the homeseeker, and will have a large number of
special articles by well known authorities on the various phases of the immigrant situation. Among these
will be articles by Commissioner Watson, of South Carolina, telling of his visits to Europe to get immi-
grants and the establishment of an immigrant line between European points and South Carolina ports;
an article setting forth the means used by other States in the South in inducing immigration-the officials,
amount of money expended, eta.; an article covering the work being done by the railroads in inducing do-
mestic immigration to the Southeastern States. The edition will also contain an article from the Gover-
nor of the State of Florida upon the subject in question; from the Department of Agriculture, giving
detailed and tabulated information as to Florida lands, advantages, opportunities, etc. It will contain
among other things an article on the effort now being made (and we trust will have been accomplished by
the date of the issue) for the establishment in Florida of a Department of Immigration, which matter will
come before the approaching Florida Legislature. It will contain articles from the heads of various com-
mercial organizations in Florida, notably from Mr. Rawls. President of the Florida State Board of Trade;
Mr. Fuller, of the Tampa Board of Trade; Capt. Garner, of the Jacksonville Board of Trade; Col. W. P.
Corbett, Chairman of the Immigration Committee of the Jacksonville Board of Trade; Mr. Edwin Brob-
ston, whose efforts are well known in immigration work, and others. It will contain in a concise, paragraph
form "one thousand facts about Florida" for the quick reader who wants to know all about the State be-
fore visiting it. It will set forth the advantages of specific localities for specific purposes; for instance, the
fruit section, the vegetable section, the general farming section, and the opportunity es offered by Florida
today for the location here of large maunfactories and smaller industries of all kinds. It wil! contain facts
of interest regarding the various towns and cities of the State, their adaptability and desirability, matters
of transportation, etc. It will deal with every phase of the labor question to attract a wirable labor to this
State.
All in all, the edition is planned upon a most elaborate scale and is planned to cover every point of
interest that may appeal to the man who has his eye on Florida and to the man who is looking for a
desirable farming, manufacturing or business location in the South.
The editor-in-chief of the Industrial Record, Mr. J. A. Hollomon, will have directorship of all articles
prepared for this special number, and the detail preparation will be in the hands of a staff of competent
writers, already employed for that purpose.
This "Immigration Edition of the Industrial Record" will no doubt mark an epoch in trade journal-
ism in the South, and it is fitting that the Industrial Record should issue an edition of this kind, in view of
the fact that it is the exponent of the leading industrial and commercial organizations of the State, be-
ing the offeial organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association, the Southeastern Cane Growers' Asso-
ciation, endorsed by the Georgia-Florida Sawmill Association, etc.
The Industrial Record will work hand in glove with the Florida State Board of Trade, and individual
boards of trade of the State, in their efforts to successfully solve the question of increasing the population
)f the State with a desirable citizenship


Cay McCall
FMu I1nSUAcL.
1L.oauSite DlIhg. Boat& f


1 1


LIGHT SAW MILLS
SHINGEL AND LATH MACHINERY
AND SUPPLIES
En~ies mese., ruags mE spim.
Try
LOMBARD WORKS
AVGUVTA. GEOILGIA


SIKH I'^ \


JOSEPH ZAPF & CO.


Whoileae Dealers in and Bottcrs cf
AN.H USER- BUSCH
St. Louis Lager Beer
Wheles...
Limis, Wim, Mimal Watrs
Write fto Price



TYPEWRITERS
S10 Up
Repargin. All Makes
Ribboms for all machines, 50c
Carbon Paper $1 a huMdr

TGIV T TYPEWRIT-'R
GRIV OT ay S.
m6 West Bay St JKfasvifc. Fta.


THE BOND & BOURS CO.0
WHOLMESALE a RET SUCA

HARDWARE a r
ra
SASH, DOORS, BLINDS, PAINTS. is
Oils, Glass, Stoves, Tinware, Country Holluware.: THE
10 WEST DAY STIRET. JACKSONVILLI. IrA. WALTE PC. CWs T.is MsaUefr.
4 West 5Mg.. JIae smu1i u


cessful Men
preciate, use and advise Life Insu-
rnce. The advice of successful men
worth following.. Insure in

PRUDENTIAL o"" MER'.
JOHN F. DRYDEN, Press.
MM OfrNfl. NewarhI J


__ ___


L_









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 13



Jacksonville Grocery Comp'y

... WholesIle tsaroeer amd DIsUHler' Supplles.
m011wa Waheindm Vlr aot. O. L o Rye F.


NOTICE OF MASTER'S SALE.
Under and by virtue of a certain final
decree of foreclosure made by the Circuit
Oourt of the Fourth Judicial Circuit of
Florida in and for Duval County in Chan-
cery sitting, on the 4th day of April, A.
D. 1907, in a certain cause therein pend-
ing wherein D. H. McMlillan is complain-
ant and the Clarke Automobile & Launch
Company, a corporation organized and ex-
isting under the laws of the State of
Florida, and others are defendants, the
undersigned, W. A. Hallowes, Jr., as Spec-
ial Master in Chancery in said cause by
said order appointed, will on Monday, the
6mt day of May, A. D. 1907, during the
legal hours of sale, commencing said sale
in front of the court house door in Jack-
sonville, Duval county, Florida, and con-
tinuing said sale at the place of business
of Hutto & Company on the St. Johns
River front between Main and Laura
streets in said Jacksonville, Florida, where
the property herein described now is, offer
for sale and sell to the highest and best
bidder for cash therefore the property de-
scribed in said decree, as follows:
Automobiles.
I Ford engine, number 429, very incom-
plete; 1 Ford engine number 530-1, runa-
bout; 1 Ford engine, number 482, runa-
bout, very incomplete; 1 Oldsmobile, very
incomplete; 1 Cadillac runabout, No. 11;
1 Pope-Hartford, No. 16; 1 Cadillac, No.
13; 1 Cadillac, No. 5; 1 Cadillac runabout;
1 Cadillac No. 1; 1 Northern runabout,
No. 8; 1 Cadillac, Model A, city number
267; 1 Northern touring car.
1 demijohn of sulphuric acid; 1 work-
bench; I box brass for boat railing and
flags; 4 boxes balls; 18 bull dog battery
connections; 1 roll Gandy belt (stock
room); 1 2-gal. rubber cement; 1 old work
cabinet; 2 side curtains, rubber; 1 bdl.
canvas curtains; 2 cylinder coils, second-
hand; 3 Veeder cyclometers, complete; 1
Veeder Cyclometer, incomplete; 3 linen
dusters; 1 2-horse power pumping engine;
2 funnels; 7 second-hand Columbia genera-
tors; 2 second-hand "Neverout" genera-
tors; 1 6-inch dragon horn; 1 broken Ga-
brief horn; I Cadillac hub cap; 3 Oliver
jacks; 1 Oliver jack, broken; 1 Duf Mfg.
Co. jack; 1 Oliver jack, second-hand; 15
boxes of auto parts, etc.; 3 drawers of
auto parts 1I Dunlap Motor carriage re-
pair kit; 6 lamps, broken; 1 part box in-
candescent lamps, 16 e. p.: 1 new tail
lamp; I new side lamp; 2 old headlights;
2 are lights, second-hand; 7 lamp brack-
ets.
M, cc kl


for nuts and bolts; 19 cigar boxes of
nuts and bolts; 2 magneters, second-hand;
1 mat, rubber, for auto car; 1 steam
whistle; 1 box of numbers, aluminum; 2
number pads.
Oils.
1 bbl. dope; 2 60-gallon cans of oil;
2 five-gallon cans No. 1 Mobiloil oil; 1
gallon eagleine; 1 gallon vacuum marine
motor oil; 1 gallon vacuum mobiloil; 1
can Adam Cooke & Sons' dope; 1 quart of
oil; 2 pints of oil; 1 gallon Standard
gas engine oil; 1 gallon best motor cylin-
der oir (Buffalo); 1 quart standard gas
engine oil; 1 can valve voline, five gal-
lons; 1 can of monogram oil; 16 cans non-
fluid oil; 1 small oil can; 3 oil guns; 5
second-hand oil guns; 3 second-hand oil
cups.
Office Fixtures.
1 bookkeeper's desk; 1 inkstand; 1
Carev safe; I clock; 1 typewriter and
desk' I Knight and Thomas fire extin-
guisher: 1 small fire extinguisher; 1 roll-
top desk and chair: 1 letter press; I wa-
ter cooler; 1 pair scales; 1 loose-leaf led-
ger; 1 journal; 1 cash book.
Paints.
'I can of aluminum paint; 1 quart of
asphaltum; 1 quart Davy's wood filer;
I quart brown paint; 5 gallons of as-
phaltum; 3 1-quart cans aluminum paint;
3 1 pint cans aluminum paint; 1 half-pint
can.
1 small pump; 1 Bowser long-distance
pumping outfit. No. 88177: 1 tank for
above; 1 Bowser double oil cabinet, No.
98277; 50 feet iron gas pipe; 35 boxes
Cadillac parts (cigar boxes); 4 boxes balls.
Polish.
10 I-quart cans of Monarch; 9 '/-gal-
lon cans of Globe: 5 1-pt. cans Brunswick;
3 1-nt. cans of Globe; 21 1-pt. cans Burn-
ishine: 3 1-gallon cans solarine: 2 1-gal-
lon cans of brilliant; 3 jugs, 2 gallons each,
lustre: 1 bundle eleven patent rims; 3
nieces of steel, five feet each; 1 bundle
of four springs; I bundle of three springs;
2 boxes of stationery, advertising matter;
5 new sprockets; I steering wheel: 1 ci-
"ar box of spark plugs; 5 switches; 1
bundle of separator's storage batteries;
2 stoves and pipe.
Tfes.
1 Hartford 28x3. No. 712062: 1 Hart-
ford. 28x3. detachable; 2 Goodrich, 30x3;
I Goodrich, 30x3%: 1 Goodrich, 30x4.
Won't Slip; 1 Goodrich 28x3%, No. 2078;
1 leather-covered, 30x4. No. C03608; 1
Diamond single-tube tire. 28x2/.%; 3 sec-
ond hand casings, vulcanized, no marks;
1 old Continental, 28x3.
Inner Tabes.


-.c -
I emorv stand and wheel (Stand B., 1 Goodrich. 28x314, marked "pro three";
Diamond Machy. Co.); 1 work bench; 2 1 Goodrich 30x3: 2 Diamonds, 30x2%;
vises, I piece gone; 1 American drill 1 Pennsylvania R. Co., 760x70; 2 Penn-
press. No. 2480, American Tool Works, sylvania R. Co.. 30x3; 1 Pennsylvania R.
Cin., 0.: 1 air pump, 3 eyl. (Con. Peters Co. 30x4: 1 no name "Autnst" 28x3: 1
Pump. Co., New York.): 1 milling ma- Diamond. 30x4, second-hand: 2 Goodrich
chine. No. 2112, Universal (Garvan Mach. .0x3/.. second-hand: 1 Goodrich, 30x3%,
Works): I lathe; 1 tool stand: 1 2 H. P. second-hand; 2 30x4 Goodrich. second-
motor: 1 9 K. Watt generator (No. 1163 hand: 1 second-hand inner tube.
Bullock); I five-horse power gas engine 2 boxes of %-pound rolls. M. & W. tire
(Nat. Eng. Co.. Saginaw); 20 feet line tape; 25 feet of copper tubing; I roll of
shaft: 4 line shaft hangers; 2 double rubber tubine: 1 2-cylinder timer; I Flsk
drive friction C. shaft with hangers; 1 sin- vulcanier: 8 cones: 8 blocks.
ale line friction shaft; 275 feet belting; 1 1 auxiliary exhaust valve (Franklin);
?-cyl. Benose Beaver engine: 1 2-cyl. 30- 11 bundles of insulated wire; 1 large can-
horse nower marine engine: 4 rheostats; opy top; 1 canvas folding top: 3 second-
800 feet wire. Nos 2 and 4: I switchboard hand water tanks; 2 second-hand gasoline
complete: I hoisting block and chain: 1 tanks.
2 H. P. National engine (Type 2. Speed W. A. HALLOWES. JR..
375); 10 pulley.; 1 anvil: 1 forge; I bench Special Master.


HEAVY TTRPENTINE MULES,
AND SADDLE AND DRIVING HORSES
ALWAYS ON HAND. PRICES RIGHT.

W. A. COOK, Sales Stabls, *. 't.. TAMPA.


FIFTH A VENUE HOTEL
Madison Square, New York.

American Plan $5 per day. European Plan $2.00 per day
The most famoum representative hotel
in Ameri. New as the newest, always
fresh and clear. The location n Madisem
Square is te fnet in t&e city.
HITCHCOCK. DARLING fe COMPANY.




"*Ii* *4 **i8 *Si t | i8r 8 ii r *1 811 1 0 m i 8l i i iii

MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


SBoilermaking and Repairing

0 Still Boilers and Pumps.
S SHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.
Jackuonville. Fla.








DIAMONDS AND WATCHES

We simply ask a call. We cam show yea, at correct ald moaey
sayvlg prices, masy papers of loose pare white, perfect
DIAMONDS. It Is oar desire to coatlame being the largest
Dlamoad dealers Id Jacksonville, and oar specialty Is flie romed-
cat gems aud ligh-grade Waltham aud lgl Watches.

Dialnmuld, Watches, JeweIry,
HESS O SLA.RL i-131n. t.. 333.hy, JauilFh
8BgSBOB^<3M'Je *ee1 ee eeeeg5 eeS


*^******t468****************--**4*


I. W.


VEST,

Frukle-L


?OHIM E. HAMUS,
v. J. mizE.
V1W&*t9Wd9Nf


FL L RICHNK.
Sg.y ow Thin,
EL L vw
Ain y i r,..


WEST FLYNN & HARRIS CO.
SGERMANIA BLDG. Uvannah. Ga.
GEMEAL, OFFICES WEST BLDG. Jacksevlile. Fla.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
NAVAL STORES RECEIVED AT SAVANNAH, GA., JAC O VIULL,
FLA, AND FZIKANDIA, FLA.

Wholesale Grocers also Dealers in Hay. Grain and Heavy
Hamebs.

SOLE A NT for the Celebrated Unin Turpenine Axe.,
SOLE Gv and Wildoa & Child Philadelphia Wagon
MERCHANTS WAREHOUSES.


SAVANNAH, GA.


JACKsrVILLE, FLA.


TAMPA, LA


_r_


~~;;~~H~3~3~0~C~;Sr~C~~W1I1'---------- c---


-P









14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

,I .S ASH. President. 0. M. iSRmDA6rare


IE . NAS. President.
J. F. C. MYERS. Vice-Preident.


American


S. P. SHOTTEIL.
Chairman Board of Directors.


Naval


Stores


G. M. BOARDMAN. Treasurer.
C. J. DeLOACH. Secretary.


Company


OF WEST VIRGINIA)
Suesessors to S. P. Shotter Company, Patterson Downing Company,
Exporters and Dealers in All Grades of ROSIN, PURE SPIRITS TURPENTINE,
TAR, PITCH. ROSIN OIL and all other products of the pine tree.

HEAD OFFlGES: SAVANNAH, GEORGIA.
BRANCHES:


NEW YORK
PHILADLPHIA
CHICAGO


ST. LOUIS
CICIICNATI
LOUISVIL8 .


WILMINGTON
BRUNSWICK
JACKSOHVILLE


FERNANDINA
TAMPA
PENSACOLA


NEW ORLEANS
MOBILE
GULFPORT


Production of

South

Day Allen Willey writes for the c
issue of the Chattanooga Tradesm
article entitled "How the South B
by its Production of Naval Stor
subject at once interesting to the r
of the Industrial Record. Mr. V
however, shows in many features
miliating lack of practical knowlem
the industry, and his article sound
a "government report," written by
orist and not a man of the manner
Readers of the Record as a rule are
tical men and will be amused at Mi
ley's article, which we publish in f
low, not on account of its genera
mind you, for the author is not far
in his figures and certainly does n
tend to be critical, but on account
general lacking in a correct fami
with the subject, which should be
make his position strong. The
article follows:

(From the April 15th Chatti
Tradesman.)
It may be needless to say that
the naval stores industry in the
States is confined to a very small
of the country, the income from th
duction of these materials comes
entirely from the South, since i
section are located practically all
distilleries and other plants for tl
the material. Obviously the So
States form the natural site for
featuring naval stores, owing to th1
tensive forests and loblolly pine
yield the bulk of the turpentine an
of commerce. What this asset me
the South can be realized by quo
few figures. As recently as 1890 tl
pentine farmers of Florida product
than $200,000 annually of spirit
rosin. At the present time Florid
the credit of the largest output, b
industry is also expanding very r
in the State of Georgia, where it is
that the lumber industry at the p
time, including naval stores, is actui
more value than all of the cotton
fractured within the limits of the
In a single year the revenue to the
from naval stores has reached the s
nearly $25,000,000, of which $15,0
represented turpentine and nearly
000,000 rosin. The annual average


~c~I8881~f~CE1881151ii8111581*UIEIISSW II Sl


N aval Stores in the J.P. WIIA Presidea. J. A. C ., l.t Vic Pr dent
ST. A. JUNNINrs. 2nd Vie-Presidaent. J. F. Duari. ar,3 Vic-Prlden
her H. S. L KATTON, Secretary. H. I.E. Scamrr Trerer.
hern States.
J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,
current spirits of turpentine in gallons at pres- P
an an ent is over 30,000,000 with about 3,500,- I i E
benefits 000 barrels of rosin. The manufacture V, WomenJ.
of the last mentioned article has in- Mai On VLNIL, 0L C OIL.
Sa creased so rapidly that the present out- nlarnech offieies j aCOvl FL. OLUr, oL
leaders put is nearly 50 per cent more than in -
Willey, 1900. It may be needless to say that Naval Stores Producers ar larVted to COI~fa md Wth Us.
a hu- a very large proportion of naval stores :11 alllllllllll iilllll llM I 111116111 1i 11111 1 1 111
dge of are sent to the foreign markets. The
Is like extent to which this export business has
a the- increased may be shown by comparing
a ethe value of foreign shipments in 1901
r born. with those of the year 105. While the B H
prac- total for 1901 was less than $5.000.000.
r. Wil- the figures for 1905 aggregated over $7.-
ull be- 000,000. in increase of 40 per cent in only
I tone, four years. W hisk
wrong It must be admitted, however, that
lot in- the production of turpientiine has consid- Full Q uarts
of its erably decreased in the last few yea s.
hilarity owing principally to the wasteful metlho
had t,
for securing tile sap from the trees. also C s Wbu em11 s-ldl It Is a well ad
Willey 4 5 frtia ane to ar e msses% fr s UmPe e decnWOt Ami a xd
to the extensive lumbering in the pine tures old br repoable man rder h ou es to m(S
forests, especially of South Carolina. tinlt| rr6 OIup 0Aatiwi s "iM
The first process in .eculring tle tu.- U cl Mlakh e M =1tllhgl1 lll LL hi seln thelrll
pentine is very similar to that emplloyed Is3 SAMPLE 1m rnT s d IR
while in gathering the sap of the maple tree. iwe m01 mil 1 i t
United except that the incisions made in the j i.smm.e sb .n m y.at .6 u bo.tt Wsc
action trunk of the pine are larger and deeper. IZ- w i
ie pro- The sap as it exudes is gathered into ;a S L O.NOTlKEI W dder tihe aor me aM a~wr
almost variety of receptacles- whatever may le is North i hl m iS a" Wat V but ustm ri'i
this most convenient-thence taken to the dis- must Nrc at extra. Bar eet ua MhiDPl ,ier eii m
n this some other express n mut mind for the 6qums and a mumel
of the tillery. These are located wherever there bottlesad we will yrp~a s RSiteshwitherd ndam:
rating are enough turpentine farmers operating 'TnHr CASPER CO.. Ime. R onoh Va.
uthern to provide for the capacity of the still. (A bre .*-Sa.n .e.) ow.vA. 6.s.-l ft"msl~la MGim. ,v.
uthern l A w I n ervisil.u L. Of1 r "d m U td u-e0 Idr *te
m In fact, the same plan is followed in iN ,i.i 1o00. l .d Di wsL.
eir ex- erecting them as is followed in establish-
which ing cotton gins in the vicinity of the -
Srosin helds. The process of distillation is so Ten in
ans to familiar that it does not need explanation W T turpentine C ups
Except to say that the resulting product
he tur'- i usually redistilled where the spirits is '1i: i t- IIPOKTAT.
d less intended for an ingredient in varnish, for As our supply of eups is limited, we sg-
Sand medical purposes or is to be used in some gest that intending purehasmes md Ia
a has other commercial form. It is calculated their orders promptly to inur delivery.
ut the to obtain an oil which represents from F a Pri s On
rapidly 14 to 16 per cent of the crude material, Cups Gutters an all Tools
a fact water being added in sufficient quantities C G e an allToo
resent to properly complete the distillaton. In Used t h rts s"te
lly of obtaining the oil of turpentine the crude A r
gum is usually strained to free it from
St a certain portion of the impurities be-p
State. h p ont rmd itites be Chattanooga Pottery
South fore the heat is applied.
uum of The distilling apparatus is heated by C m pany
1,0,00 fires of wood which give a varying tem- .
$10,- perature, but are far more economical '. .J sn::.. lloria
$10* t .:~" JfacfnMviu e, lrori a


_ _


I-


o m as used. Usu-


ge of an coa or p


0








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


ally the packages to be filled with the
liquid and solid output of the plant are
manufactured at some cooperage shop in
a nearby community and hauled to the
plant, but some of the larger distilleries
have a plant for making packages adja-
cent to them.
The cuts or incisions made in the pine
tree are frequently so much larger and
deeper than is necessary that the life of
the tree is considerably shortened, while
a large quantity of the sap has been
wasted by the leakage of receptacles used
to gather it. Recently the bureau of for-
estry of the government has been inves-
tigating the industry with the view of
introducing more economical process, and
already the benefit of its work is very
apparent. It has been instructing the
turpentine operators in what is known as
the "cup and gutter" system by which the
* waste of sap is reduced to a minimum.
Excessive "turpentine farmers," especially
in Florida, have been adopting the cup
and gutter system in place of the other,
with the result that their annual prod-
uct has been considerably increased, even
where only the same number of trees
were tapped. Experiments on a very ex-
tensive scale have also been conducted
in Florida with the view of ascertaining
if the life of the turpentine forests could
be lengthened and the value of the trees
maintained by smaller incisions. No less
than 8.000 trees have been studied to
secure data of this sort. Incisions have
been made in these trees on different
sides of the trunk, also of varying
lengths. The tests which were begun
two years ago have already advanced far
enough to show that by making a com-
paratively small cut in the tree as much
sap can be secured as through a larger
incision, provided care is taken to make
the incision in the proper place. It is
believed that this method will teed to
considerably expand the industry in the
near future.
The many beneficial properties of the
sap of the yellow and other species of
pine have greatly extended its use in re-
cent years. At the present time about
15,000,000 gallons are utilized in var-
nishes and other compounds for covering
material. Only in recent years has it
been utilized extensively for soap, but
now a number of the principal varieties
of toilet soap are composed largely of
some form of turpentine, while it may
be called one of the necessary ingredients
of some of the most popular patent medi-
cines.
The advance in the price of pine lum-
ber caused by the great demand for this
material for building and other purposes,
has checked the turpentine industry to
a certain extent. Up to ten years ago
the comparatively low price obtained for
the lumber induced the turpentine faf-
mers to operate very extensively. Since
* the extraction of the sap from the tree
not only hinders its growth but injures
it in other ways, much of the turpentine
secured at present comes from the poorer
grades of pine such as the loblolly, and
care is taken to save the larger trees
of yellow pine from being tapped.
A new process for securing turpentine,
however, has recently been attempted in
Florida which may revolutionize the in-
dustry, since by it turpentine can be dis-
tilled direct from the waste products of
the ordinary pine saw mill. This is the
claim of the company manufacturing tihe
turpentine at present, and as it isproduc-
ing about 4,000 gallons per month with
the small plant it is operating apparently


the process is successful. In obtaining
the spirits by these methods it is only
necessary to take the waste material,
such as chips and splinters of the yellow
and loblolly pine, and run them through
a machine which will grind them into
snall particles. Then with the other
refuse from the saws the material is car-
ried by means of a conveyor to retorts
where steam is applied for an hour. In
this way the crude turpentine is obtained,
which is passed into a tank with con-
densed steam, causing tihe oil of turpentine
to rise to the top. This is taken to an-
other still from which it is passed through
a cooling worm which prevents it from
evaporating. After being purified in vats
it is ready for commercial purposes. It
will be noted that this process is very
similar to the ordinary distillation of the
spirits from the crude sap, while a gallon
of the commercial product can be secured
at a cost of 30 cents for manufacturing.
As the raw material costs practically
nothing, the expense is merely for the
process of manufacturing.
This may be of great moment to the
South as the discovery that cotton seed
makes a valuable oil as well as stock
feed and fertilizer. Before this discovery,
which is only of recent years, cotton seed
was thrown away as waste material, ex-
cept the small quantity needed for agri-
cultural purposes. Where sawdust and
other refuse is not used as fuel at the
modern pine lumber mill it is frequently
heaped into greatpiles or destroyed in a
waste burner. The company which has
been making turpentine from sawdust has
tested not only the ordinary pine dust
but ft lightwood as well as yellow pine
stumps. It has been found that a cord
of the ordinary dust yields from 5 to 10
gallons of the liquid, a cord of lightwood
from 16 to 20 gallons, while good pine
stumps yield from 20 to 30 gallons. It
is safe to say that hundreds of thousands
of acres in Georgia, Florida and South
Carolina pine forests contain many
stumps which could have been made prof-
itable, but have gone to waste through
decay. The process, however, could be
utilized where tracts of timber land have
recently been cut. It is not improbable
that plants for manufacturing the tur-
pentine can be operated in connection
with the sawmills in the yellow pine
lands, just as many cotton gins have
auxiliary mills for securing cottonseed oil
and converting the by-products into fer-
tilizer.

THE CAMPHOR TREE IN FLORIDA.
On a parity with tea raising In South
Carolina, which is now an acknowledged
success at the Pinehurst tea gardens, near
Summerville, in that State, may be placed
the production of camphor from the cam-
phor tree in Florida.
Both industries are alike of oriental
origin and indeed until recently neither
was spoken of as possible outside the Far
East. but the genius of American enter-
prise does not know any limits to its
Experiments, and with these experiments
are coming many practical matters of ser-
vice and profit to mankind that were for-
merly undreamed of among the possibili-
ties.
In this latter class may be placed the
production of camphor, which as a com-
mercial product no one appears ever to
have thought of for the South until quite
recently. It is true that the camphor tree
had been grown in Florida as a foliage
plant and something of a curiosity for
some years, but it was not until within


the past year that tests were made of its
commercial possibilities.
During the past year a number of these
trees in different parts of Florida were
placed at the disposal of experts in the
Department of Agriculture at Washington,
and from these trees some thirty pounds
of camphor gum were produced. This was
refined and proved to be in every respect
a perfect substitute for the oriental arti-
cle. These experts declare that the cam-
phlor tree can be grown successfully in
many portions of Florida, even where the
cultivation of the orange tree has been
abandoned owing to its liability to frost,
and from which we may infer that the
camphor tree is not as tender, or so sus-
ceptible to being injured by frost as is
the orange tree, and if this be a fact
then there is a new industry open for
Florida of considerable value.
If sufficient camphor gum can be pro-
duced to even supply a portion of our do-


W. L. WILSON,
Pres. & Treas.


mestic markets it will be well worth in-
augurating, and we have no doubt but that
the experiments of the past year will
have such results. As yet no details are
available as to the cost of producing this
material, but as the main question is the
adaptability of soil and climate to the
growth of the camphor tree, the gather-
ing and refining of the gum should be a
simple matter and one with no very great
expense attending it.


HUTCHINSON AUDIT CO.

PUBLIC ACCOUNTAWTS AUDITORS

DyPi -Upchurh -.flwS ,

Phe1e 31i. Jedm f Ml.


6. J. SCOVIL,
Sec'y & f ea. lgr.


Florida Cooperage Company

(Incorposrted) Capital 0Stoak 8100.000
MANUFACTURERS OF

Turpentine, Cotton Seed Oil, Dip


and Syrup Barrels.
Office and Factory Enterprise and Estele Streets.
Telephone 1855 Jacksonville, Pia.





SATTENTIONe Men


I Sawmill & Cross-Tle Men


0, -


If you use Axes and want the best
buy RIXFORD'S. They are a little high
priced, It is true, in fact the hihst
priced club axe made-$14.00 per dozen
in any weiglt, but you get mere than
yeur nmney s worth In quality. The best
Is none too good and always the cheapest.


SEND YOUR ORDERS DIRECT TO


W. H. Briggs Hardware Co. j

Sole Southern Agents

VALDOSTA, GEORGIA

Jobbers of Mill and Turpentine Supplies.




You Want a Turpentine Location?
You Want a Sawmill Location?
You Want any Kind of Florida Land?
You Mean Business?
IF cJIan on or Wrnteo

J. H. Livingston & Sons,
OCALA. FLORIDA.


JNO. E. HARRIS,
Vice Pres.


..j~





16 THE WEEKLY INDUTRIA RECORD.
16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


PLANTERS

"Old Time" Remedies
THE JOY Of THE HOUSEHOLD.


Thee four great remedies, ulaian Tea, Benedicta, Cuban Relief
and Cuban O, are the tjoy of the household. With them near at hand, a
man is ready for any emergency. He has a safe, reliable and speedy relief emediets
for wife, children, elf or stoek. With thee remedies you can keep the C
doctor's hands out of your pockets, and yet have a healthy, happy famny. M
Beide., you can cre your stock of any ailment that may befall them.
/ NUBIAU TEA-In Liquid or Powder Faen-I the great family medicine. It
will ure all form of Liver and Kidney Coplait, Prevt Cills and Malarial
Fever. ures the common il t of children; and a a laxative tonic it is without
an equal-safe and reliable. In the liquid, it i extremely palatable-even children
like it-ad it s RBADY FOR USE.
BIEEDICTA is a woman's medicine. It will eure all the diseases common tc
women, and classd as Female Troubles. It will bring youth back to the laded woman,
who has ome suff aerg because he thought it woman' lot. It will care for the
young girl just entrn womanhood; and prpre the young woman tor the sacred
duties of wife and mother.
CUBAN RELIEF-The instant Paint Killer, for either man or beast. Relieves
intently, aDie, Cram Cholera Morbu, Diarrhoea, Dystentery and Sick Headache.
for coIl in horse it s an infallible remedy and guaranteed to give relief in ave
minute.
CUBAN OIL-The Beat Beas and Eme Liniment. Is antiseptic for cuts,
s aggd or tor eh, and will imtantly lieve the pain. Cures insect bites and stings.
aalda and burns, bruise and moes, chapped hands and face, ore and tender feet.
Relieves rheumatic pans, lame bck, tijoints, and in stoek cures wire fence cuts.
cratcheu, thruk, splint, collar ora, ddle gaml, ad diseased oofs.
Write for Prices
SPENCER MEDICINE CO., Chattanooga, Ten.




The M etropols

Is the Paper you want. It is
published daily and is from 12
to 16 hours ahead of any other
daily newspaper in Florida .

$500 a Year $2.50 Six Months
Full Telegraphic and Stock
reports. If you want to keep
posted on the news, get the
Metropolis.

CARTER & RUSSELL PUB. CO.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


JOSEPH D. WEED. H. D. WEED. W. D. KRENSO~.

J. D. WEED A CO.,
OAVANNAW. CEOCGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

RAILROAD SPIKES,

Bar, Band and Hoop Iron.

Turpentinre Tools, Etc.


CUMER LUMBER COMPANY
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
Rough a Dressed Lumber

ong Loaf Yellow Pine.
BOXES AIMD ORAI.


J. S. Schofield's Sons Compan),
***.e*.*es.e.*.*.ee. *** **e********* ************
-* yHeladqarters fr
SDistiller's Pumping
N Outfit
SNo plant complete without one.
0 Hundreds of them in use in Georgia,
Florida, Alabama, Miamlippi anad
South Carolina. Write u for p u-
0 lars and prices. We also manufacture
Grade Mainlrwy,
S0 as well a carry a full and complete
---stockof-
*; ; Mill Supplles Pipe,
Beller Tubes, Etc. ;
i Advise your wants.
-; Macon, - Georgia. f
S-- .A tM SaI Idilty e a
WKar of Took Work far TwrgesthmeargeP psm


Ailiaaiisa ait ilaiiaisa s


0suo 606-rages Or-.so-s --


tuuauaauuemuuusu1uu1 u.uueusumsuus)asuu1uuuuu~u(


J. W. Pot.
President


C. B. Parke
Vioe-Prs.


Jamo MeNatt.
Vies-Pres.


W. W. Wilder
Sec. & Trea.


John R. Young Co.,


Commission

Merchants.


Naval Stores factors. Wholesale Grocers.
Sav- ,ah SL Brunswick G._


DIRECTORS: D. C. ASHLEY, President. DIRECTORS:
D. C. Ashley, B. W. BLOUNT, slt Vice President B. W. Blount,
G. A. Petteway. and General Manager. B. A. Carter,
Chas, H. Brown, CARL MOLLER, 2nd Vice Pres. T. G. Culbreth.
A. C. Bacon, G... A. PETTEWAYV 3 vi.c ps A.S. Pendleton'
J. G. Cranfard. B. G. Latinger,
H. Weibet, S. H. BERG, Sec. and Tress. Carl Moner,
S. H. Berg. A C. BACON. Amt. Sec. and Tres. W. T. B. HaLrison.

PENINSULAR NAVAL STORES CO.
Commission Merchants
and Wholesale Grocers '
Jacksonville and Tampa, Florida.

Capital Stock, $1.000,000.
fc^T^TW^^W6^^L%^. W^








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 17


W. W. ASHBURN, Moultrie, Ga. N. EMANUEL, Brunswick, Ga.
W. R. BOWEN, Fitzgerald, Ga. D. T. FURSE. Savannah. Ga.
J. J. DORMINY, Broxto, Ga. G. KIRKLAND. Nichols, Ga
O. T. MoINTOSH, Savannah, Ga.

Southern States Naval Stores Co.
Savannah. Ga.


Factors
Ship to Savannah


Clyde Steamship Company


and Commission Merchants
Get Competition Highest Prices Promptest Returns
Correpond With Us


Malsby Machinery Company

of Jacksonville. Fla.

Pertable, StatiMuar Eagis rld Biller
Saw Mill l Wlrklg Maldihry.
Portable Outfits a Specialty.
Write for Lhaudsm ilst'd 1906 ctalo g

22 Ocean Street.





East Coast Lumber Co.

ROUGH AND DRESSED LONG LEAF

Yellow Pine Lumber


Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots
Steamer Shipments a Specalty.
WATERTOWN. FLORIDA


Atlantic Coast Line


Famous Trains.


New York and Florida Special leaves Jacksonville
daily except Sunday, 12:30 p. m., for all points East.
Solid Pullman.
Chicago and Florida Limited daily, solid vestibule,
leaving Jacksonville 9:30 a. m. for all points East.
0Coach on this train also.


For rates. Pullman reservations and
all cther detailed information, write or
call on


FRANK C. BOYLSTON.
District Passenger Agent Atlantic Coast Line


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


NEW YOAK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
The magnificent steamships of this Hm a ae appolat to ail a follows, alling at
CLharmts a C., both wV ..
Fra New Yr k, iem Ja kmarvil fso
(Pier gs Nesa River.) STKAMR. CrimtM- ard new York.
NAednesday, Meh. 20,at3:00p .... IROQUOIS ....Thursday, April 4,at 10:00am
Tuesday, April 2,at3:00pm.... ARAPAHOE ...Sunday, April 7,atl0:00am
Wednesday, April 3,at3:00pm... ALGONQUIN ...Monday, April 8, at 10:00am
Friday, April 5,at3:00pm... COMANCHE ....Wednesday, April 10, at 10:00am
Saturday, April 6,at3:00pm ..... HURON ...... Thursday, Aprilll, atl0:00am
Tuesday, April 9,at 3:00pm..... APACHE .....Sunday, April 14, at 10:00am
Wednesday, April 10, at 3:00pm.... IROQUOIS ....Monday, April 15, at 10:00am
Friday, April 12, at 3:00pm... ARAPAHOE ... Wednesday, April 17, at 10:00am
Saturday, April 13, at 3:00pm... ALJONQUIN ...Thursday, April 18,at 10:00am
Tuesday, April 16,at3:00pm... COMANCHE ....Sunday, April 21, at 10:00am
Wednesday, April 17, at 3:00p ..... HURON ...... Monday, April 22, at 10:00am
Friday, April 19, at 3:00pm..... APACHE .....Wednesday, April 24, at 10:00m
Saturday, April20, at 3:00pm.... IROQUOIS ....Thursday, April at 10:00am
Tuesday, April 23, at 3:00pm.... ARAPAHOE ...Sunday, April 28, at 10:00am
Wednesday, April 24,at3:00pn... ALGONQUIN ...Monday, April 29, at 10:00am
Friday, April 26, at 3:00pm... COMANCHE ....Wednesday, May 1,at 10:00am
Saturday, April 27, at 3:00pm..... HURON .....laursday, May 2,atl0:00am
Tuesday, April 30, at 3:00pm..... APACHE .....Sunday, May 6,at 10:00am
*JaekMoville to Now York direct.
CLYDE NBW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
FreigSt service lBtwe Jackea Bfl sta PMn riVm as all Ematers Pr nta
CH atOChailatn eth Way.
FP3XI0T ONLY.


ria Soath i


Film soet Catharine gotu.e


Lewis Whai, Bmetst STEAMEKR Ja-d m
"Via Charlston. *Via Brunswiek.
Monday, March 11|.......... *CHIPPEWA........... Monday, March 18
Saturday, March 16 .......... KATAHDIN .......... .Saturday, March 27


CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
Between Jachnavtil an S aafr.
Stopping at Palatka, Astor, St. Framies, Bersford (DaLsed), a"d kteranM ate
landings on St. Johns River.
STEAMERS "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
AND "FREDRICK DE BARY"
Are appointed to sail as follows: Iave Jacksonville daily exempt Saturday at
3:30 p. m. Returning, leave Saaford daily except Sundays at 0:30 a .
8CHKDUL-


d'dsuu1


I ead a.""


eave 3:0 p.m1 .................. Jacksonville ............... :
Leave 8:46p.m. ................... RPal a ..................... e0 p.m.
eave 3:00a.m.................... Astor .....................[ F v 3:30p.m.
................ ............. Baw ford () n ) .............. e 1: p. m.
Arrive 8:30sam.l................ ..... Saford ................... La 9:30 :M a
Arrive 10:00 .a .................... Eaterpisel .................. av 10:00a.

GENERAL PASSENGER AMD TICKET OFFICE, isa W. BAT ST., JACK'VUI.L


P. m. IROMONM ER. Jr., A. S. P. A., Jacksomarlle, P6.
JOan PS n L, T. P. A. A. c. Asecsary, e. P. A.
Jacksevlle, Fla. Pier 36 N. .., New York.
0 rA YLOR, Pass. rraWe Mar. C. C. 5OWW. W4ema Pass. Agent
290 Broadway, Now YOrk.


L. JOmNe, r. r. A.
Jacksonville Fla.
W. 6. COOPMr, Jr., F. A,
Jrcksoarvile. rFa.


L. S. SCROsLE. C. A.
leesbur., Fla.
CLYDE MnILN, 6. r. 4.
Per J3 N. R Now York


C, P. LOVELL. Agemt.. Jacksoanvlle. Fl.


Standard Electric Company
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
X EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL X


A





THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


I FREE ATTRACTIONS
2 TWICE DAILY 2 1


-U U -


Other Attrasct
Roller
Coaster
Candy
Stand
Merry-go-
Round
Bowling
Alleys
Mexican
Burros
Popcorn
Stand
Japanese
Garden
Doomsday
Photo
Gallery
Snow
House
Mysterious
House
Shooting
Gallery
Penny
Arcade
Refresh-
ment
Pavillion
Dancing


DIXIELAND


The FPlayground
of the South.
FOR WHITE PEOPLE ONLY

Open Every Afternoon and Night
Three Minutes by Ferry from Jacksonville.
Boats Leave Every Seven Min-
utes from Slip Foot of
Main Street.

IF YOU WANT TO

forget Your Troubles!
KILL TIME!
Come Over the River to DIXIEL A
All Attractions Polite, High-Class, Ele-
vating as Well as Amusing.
Remember! Remember I
SOc Admission and SS.00 Worth of Free Attrac-
tions for Your Money.

DIXIE THEA TER
.THE FINEST PLAYHOUSE II THE SOUTH.
1,200 Seating capacity. Electric Fans, Perfect Ventila-
tion. Performances Afternoon and Night.
POPULAR PRICES.
Advance Sale at Bettes' Drug Store, and Tickets
Purchased There Include Admission
to Park Free.
CHARLES W. DA COSTA,
General Manager Dixieland Amusement Co.


2 FREE ATTRACTIONS
12 TWICE DAILY


Oter Attractlu
Electric
Fountain
Ostrich
Farm
Circle
Swing
The Old
Tree
Animals
Birds
Maypole
Two
Swings
Flowers
House of
Trouble
Illusions
Whirlgig
Fish Pond
Cane Rack
Knife Rack
Dixie Slide
Maggie
Murphy
Japanese
Ping
Pong


Free
Band Concerts


Free
Band Concerts






I
I


0


I
I

I



I


0


PUBLISHERS

4X


4X


PRINTERS


7--
^- -


With one of the largest and best equipped printing plants in the
South and with a full complement of skilled labor, we are prepared
to execute high class work promptly and at reasonable prices.
No Job too Large or too Small for our Careful Attention


Industrial Record

Publishing Co.


- 7


Y~L~mY~C~~Yl~`".~"i~~~lt~L1C1~C~CSrSmmrr


--------- --- ----- --


-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --


;~E1F**f~f*~r~l~F1~ErrXJ~~\3X\\~l~.\~i~


--







GREENLEAF & CROSBY CO.. 41 West BayStreet


Diamonds,
Watches,
Fine
Jewelry,
Clocks,
Cut Glass
Novelties
Toilet
Articles,
Prompt
Attention .--
to
Mail Orders
At the Sign of the Big Clock, - Jac
WRITE FOR CATALOGUE


Wedding
Sand
Anniver-
sary Gifts
Sterling
Silverware,
"1847
Rogers"
Plated Ware

Comparison
of Prices
Invited


ksonville.


Fla .


Half Tones-Zinc Etchings

Illustratina and Engravina Department
OF

THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of Commercial Work, Pamphlets. etc
A SPECIALTY IS MADE OF DESIGNING RETOUCHING AND EMBELLISHING PHOTOGRAPHS AND PICTURES.
IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION CF WHAT IS WANTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED.


A Florida


Enterprise.


Try It.