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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00219
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: April 6, 1907
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00219
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text
LItIARY
RZCE iV FB


ipUSTRflAL




RECORD


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JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


SAVANNAH, GA.


The Record and the Legislature.
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD WILL MAKE A FEATURE OF
ALL THE NEWS OF INrEREST TRANSPIRING IN LEGISLA-
TIVE CIRCLES DURING THE PRESENT SESSION OF THE
FLORIDA ASSEMBLY. THERE WILL BE SCORES OF INTER-
ESTING HAPPENINGS THAT WILL BE OF PECULIAR MOMENT
TO THE READERS OF THE RECORD-MATTERS THAT THEY
SHOULD KEEP POSTED ON, AND BE PREPARED AT THE
PROPER TIME TO DEFEND THEIR INTERESTS. FOR THIS
REASON THE RECORD HAS PLACED A STAFF CORRESPOND-
ENT AT TALLAHASSEE TO KEEP HIS WEATHER EYE OPEN
AND TO KEEP THE READERS OF THIS PAPER THOROUGHLY
POSTED ON WHAT IS TRANSPIRING, AND WHAT IS .3OUT
TO TRANSPIRE. IT WILL BE TO YOUR INTEREST TO WATCH
THE RECORD'S COLUMNS CLOSELY FROM NOW ON.


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Aflnfn= $


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CONSOLIDATED


NAVAL STORES COMPANY.


Home Office: JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Branches: Savannah. Ga., and Pensacola, Fla.


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COVINGTON
WHOLESALE


COMPANY,
MERCHANTS,


Dry Goods. Notions. Men's Furnishings
Blankets, Comforts, Convict Clothing,
UNION-MADE OVERALLS.


McMillan Bros.


Southern Copper
Works
Manufacturers of TURPENTINE STILLS
Complete Outfits and Extra Kettles, Caps, Arms, Worms, Fur-
nace Doors and Grates always on hand
Old Still taken in pat New Work and repairing done
payment for Win the country
Heavy Coppersmithing, Steam Pipe and Special Copper Work
Jacksonville, Fla.
Alo Fayetteville, N. C. Savannah, Ga. Mobile, Ala.


OFFICERS.
W. O. POWELL, Presient; B. F. BULLAhD, H. I.. COVINGTON, J. A. CRANFORD, D. H. McMILLAN, B. R. POWEILL, C. M COVINGTON, JOHN H.
POWELL, Vie Presidents; C. P. DUBENBURY, Secretary and Treasurer.
AXECUTIVE COM.MITTEE: W. C. Powell, C. B. Rogers, H. L. Covington, B. F. Bullard. J. A. Cranford.
DILCTIOR8: W. C. welll, B. F. Bullard, C. B. Rogers, J. A. Cranford, W. J. Hillman, John H. Powell, W. F Coarhman. H.L. Covington, C. Downing, D. H.
McMillan, R. B. Powell. C. M. Covington, S. A. Alford.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS

Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
The 'Consolidated" is purely a co-operative Company. Its interests are Identical with those
of the Producers. The patronage of turpentine operators everywhere Invited.
Two Million acres of land and Timber for sale on easy terms.
Producers are invited to call or correspond.
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__I _______ ___














WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL


RECORD.


PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. DEVOTED TO NAVAL STORE, LUMDER AND MANUFACTURING Wrfi -lfIbw

4dmgisd SIP. 12 L0MM by s iam jmmt bw Cmiuasse o i the Tcven6a Opwadm' Amac e as i sbive lisd (hpn. i Oiudq SaL L 0ML is A=W MW OU m o do Gesd A mi AdepOi SVS. =n 3mse be
Osly 0eim ii. Tpy.n Opae.- Ainoa Adpwed Apri 27.03.. M3 w Od O.m dt aw 5wSU C. Gwas Amamim. irww by Guinewim S"wi Asem.iW of(him .1msii She& mab C A==As


WHAT A GEOLOGICAL SURVEY


WOULD DO FOR FLORIDA.

A Comprehensive and Satisfactory Presen-
tation of the Claims of the
Proposed Bil.
A.r. Lt. S. kliot, a valued attache ol
mte ,umiuissioner ot Agriculture a office,
in a recent article, emphasizes the neces-
sity for a geological survey, in the follow-
ing signlncant manner:
It is a common belief that this State
rents upon a coral formation. This error
has prevented, in a large measure, the
experts in mining and metalurgy from giv-
nug the State any attention as a possible
area for metallic and non-metalli prod-
ucts.
It is common belief that the origin ot
the peninsula and its relation to the main-
land aie such, that a partial or a com-
plete submergence of the peninsula is -at
any time possible. This has materially
affected the minds of many persons in re-
gard to permanent residence and a per-
manent pursuit of wealth in the State.
It is also a common belief that the
peninsula is without continental relation.
As a matter of fact the continental rela-
tion is clearly defined. This proves at
once the permanence and value of the
peninsula as a place of residence, and as
an aiea for mineralogical exploration.
The subterranean water supply of the
State is one of the most important factors
in its development. Up to the present
time, this water supply has been exploited
without serious regard to system. 'the
whole subject demands a most careful
study from the geologist's point of view.
This study would include the comparison
of records of wells that have been drilled,
or that may be driltd and the study of
specimens from the wells and comparative
analysis of water derived from different
locations and from different geological hor-
izons. The economic advantage of this
would show the probable permanence of
our subterranean water supply, and thus
make successful irrigation possible. It
would also furnish a safe guide as to the
localities in which the water might lie
expected to be found, and would advise
the general public as to the character of
the water and the quantity of the supply
to be found in various horizons.
All of the above, it may be said, might
be included in general scientific statement,
and the information which the geological
survey would acquire might be acquired
from scientific treatises, but the supreme
advantage of having this work done by a
survey would enable the State to publish
the facts on its own authority.
Official corrections would therefore be
given to the errors, regarding the conti-
nental relation and the geological condi-
tion of Florida, which prevail among our
own people, which are commonly published
in newspapers, and which have been re-
peated over and over again in scientific
journals, in encyclopedias, in works of ge-
ology and in school books used in every
State in the Union, including Florida.

(Continued on page x4.)


Hon.


The Record
of certainty t
known Pensa
be a candidate
an interview
Journal, while
out openly as
office of chiel
nevertheless s
announcing a
for the office
his friends a:
become a candy
He has recei
past year reqi
these have co
est men in th
Edil
The Pensae
didacy of Mr
really:


Hon. T. A. Jenning, Vice-Pre. J. P. Williams Co, Pensacola, Fla.


In another column of the Journal this
morning will be found an interesting inter-
view with one of Pensacola's distinguished
citizens. For some months there have been
rumors to the effect that Hon. T. Albert
Jennings of this city, woud be a candidate
for governor in the primaries next spring,
and many attempts have been made to
secure some definite expressions from his
on the subject, but not until yesterday has
lie made any public statement of his in-
tentions in the matter.
Mr. Jennings does not say positively
that lie will be a candidate for governor,
and yet he says enough for his friends to
thoroughly understand his position. He
intimates that he will be a candidate if
conditions present themselves in a favora-
ble light at the proper time, and this state-
ment from him will no doubt be the signal
for his friends in all sections of the State
to rally to his support, and to those who
know how legion are the friends of Albert
Jennings the statement will have a deep
and a significant meaning.


Native Floridian.
That Mr. Jennings will prove a formida-
ble candidate should he decide to enter
the fight, there is little doubt. He is a
native Floridian, was born and reared in
Hamilton county, has lived on the East
Coast and the West Coast of the penin-
sula, and is now a citizen of West Florida.
He has never been a partisan in politics,
and yet his stand in past political cam-
paigns has always been open and above
board. As expressed by him in the inter-
view, he has never yet tried to dodge an
issue-something that few politicians can
claim. While interested financially in pri-
vate corporations, yet he has steadfastly
maintained his position that corporation
influence in politics is bad, and in every
campaign in this State where the issue
has been upon this point, he has taken his
stand on the people's side.
Mr. Jennings makes a distinction be-
tween public service corporations, seeking
special privileges, and mere private corpo-
rations, and the point is well brought out
by him. Florida is a big State and wants


Poplar in P acola.
There is perhaps no more popular man
in the city-none who stand closer to all
the people or who have interests' of the
city and her people more at heart. Such
a man is a credit to any community, and
Pensacola is proud to be known as the
home of Albert Jennings, for as an ideal,
useful and progressive citizen, he has few
equals and no superiors.
There are many reasons why the Jour-
nal would be glad of the opportunity to
support Albert Jennings for governor. He
is just in the prime of life, is a vigorous
and progressive man and has made a cbm-
plete success of his own business affairs,
which would naturally presage a success-
ful administration of the people's busi-
ness. He is not a wealthy man by any
means, but he has accumulated enough of
this world's goods to be able to promise
the people that he would, under no cir-
cumstances, accept a contribution to his
campaign fund-a pledge that means he
would go into the executive office at Talla-
hassee without embarrassment, financial or
otherwise. He takes an open stand against
the public service corporations seeking spe-
cial privileges, or attempting to interfere,
as corporations, in the political affairs of
the State, and yet at the same time he
hulds out a promise to them of fair and
impartial dealing, which shows him to be
neither in the grasp or control of what is
generally known as the "corporation
crowd" in this State, nor in the ranks
of those who believe that nothing of good
can come from these corporations. He
has never depended upon politim for a


AaVi117 and needs the money of the foreign capi-
T. Albert Jennings Will untalist or corporation to exploit its vast
T. Albert Jennings Will Run l the num of the I s
domain, to open up new industries, and
For G governor. to populate its cities and towns and rich
country districts, but he realizes fully that'
unless some assurance is given to these
can state with some degree Mr. Jennings is right when he says that tat ter proery and their invest
hnii that their property and their invest-
hat Albert Jennings, the well he has no desire to precipitate the aem- ments will be protected against unjust
cola naval stores man, will paign by any official announcement at this legislation and unfair taxes, it cann not
tfor Governor of Flida Ino time. He has been urged to make known be secured. He would have these foreign
sr. Jennings does not come his intentions in regard to making this capitalists feel that their investments in
Mr.orida are as safe as they would be in
an avowed candidate for the race, by newspapers in different sections .,f ori a are as sae as the w ld e ai
f executive of the State, he the State for many months, but up to thy oe tim hehe would warn them that
states his reason for not now the present time has refused to be inter- no interference, as corporations, with the
s not to precipitate a fight viewed, or to give expression to any senti- political affairs of the State will be tol-
,and plainly states that if ment that would cause any unusual or rated.
nd supporters desire him to premature discussion of the next guber- The people of Pensacola, of Escambia
lidate, he will announce later. natorial campaign. He has within the past county and of West Florida generally,
ved many letters during the few weeks, however, betn strongly urged without regard to local or State factional
testing him tb announce, and by his friends to make some statement differences, will take a special delight in
me from some of the strong- of his intentions in order that they might voting and in working for this popular
he State. ao nothing that would embarrass them in citizen. Albert Jennings has lived in
trial Indorsement. case of the subsequent announcement of Pensacola for several years, and has be-
ola Journal indorses the can- his candidacy, and this is perhaps the come fully identified with her every inter-
. Jennings, and says, edito- reason which prompted him to submit to eat. With the foresight of the shrewd
the interview found in the Journal today. business man that he is, he soon saw the
great possibilities of the city and with
the energy, the vim and the enthusiasm
with which he has always been possessed,
he joined in'the work of building a greater
Pensacola, and no man in the Deep Water
City today has done more for the building
up of Pensacola than the public spirited
man who today presides over her cham-
ber of commerce.








4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.




BUYER'S DIRECTORY


ACCOUNTANTS.


Buy the Sikes Patented
Rims and Heads

for Dip Barrels. Adds two inches to ca-
pacity of barrel; does not leak; drains
contents perfectly. Over 20,000 sold in
twelve months. Sold by the following
jobbers
United Grocery Co, Jackonville and
Tampa, Fla.
CeUselate Grocery Co, Pensacola, Fla.
Pesmeola Grocery Co., Pensacola, fla.
J. i. sund-- Co., New Orlean, La.
Downing Ce, Brunwick, Ga.
Brigp aurwae Co., Valmta, Ga.
The above also handle the Sikes Patent
Dip Buckets. Write for prices, cuts, etc.

living, and has never been a candidate for
any otlice with which any tee or salary
was attached. He is a firm believer in
the theory that the office should seek the
man, and not the man the office, and has
followed this course consistently in his
iast political life. He is honest, frank and
iearless in the discharge of a public duty,
and is entirely beyond the reach of the
mercenary politician or the moneyed corpo-
ration.
If the people of Florida want an able
man, an honest man, a progressive man, a
vigorous and enthusiastic man, a native
k loridian, a man who in politics is without
a price, and whose past political record
has been entirely consistent and open, as
their next chief executive, then Pensacola
can furnish him, and Albert Jennings will
fill the high position once occupied by our
gallant and gifted Perry with as much
grace, dignity and honor as any citizen of
this great State. When the people of
Florida come to know Mr. Jennings as do
the people of Pensacola, they will be just
as proud of him.

A NEW METAL.
They have now discovered and named
a new metal, tantalum, which will replace
platinum in the newspapers for the next
few weeks. When the excitement is over
tantalum will retire from view to join
radium, helium and other imponderables
and impracticables, and platinum will go
on enjoying a monopoly for certain very
valuable and important uses. The metals
remaining yet undiscovered are so rare and
so hard to get out that they will probably
never become commercially profitable. No
elementary substance can hope for much
honor and popularity in this world unless
it is commercially profitable. If you hap-
pen, therefore, to discover anything, apply
the test of commercial profit to it. If it
does not meet this requirement, put your
hands in your pockets and go whistling
along just as if you had seen nothing
whatever.


I. ,. Hutchinson, .iacksonville, Fla.
Walter Mueklow, Jacksonville, Fla.
AXYES
Briggs Hardware Co., Valdosta, Ga.

BANKS.
um.olmercial Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
BEER-WHOLESALE
Chas. Blum & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
uoseph Jpft Oo., JarckU .il, FI.
BOXES AND CRATES
Cu Lumber Co., Jack.omvlUe, Fa.
BRICI
Geo. R. Foster, Jr, Jackonville, Fla.
BUILDING MATERIAL.
Geo. B. Foater, Jr, Jacksovill, Fa.
BUSINESS COLLEGES.
Tampa Business College, Tampa.
CARPETS.
E. Cleveland Furniture Oompany.
CIVIL EKHGINEER.
Roland Woodward, Jacksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING.
Craig 4 Bro., J. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co, Jacksonville, Fla.

COPPER SMITHS.
MeMila Brothr, Ja anrvlle, Savan-
ah and MeW .
M. A. Baker, Brunswick, Ga.
COOPERAGPE
,'ooperage Co. The, Jauksonville, F.
DRUGS.
Win. D. Joam, Jackonville, Fla.
C. C. Better. Jacksoarille, Fa
DRUGS--WnHOLIB I
Tamr Drug O n, Tampa, Fi
Southern Dr M. Co., J1ackenill ae.
Groover-Stewart Drug Co, Jaekaonvllla
Fla.
DRY GOODSI-WHOLB ALB.
Covington Co. The. Jackonville, Fla.
ELECTRICAL GOODS.
Standard lectrie Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
UGINES.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jaeksonille, Fla.
Schofleld' Sons Co, J. S., Maeon, aG.
lombard Into Works and Supply Qo, A.-

FERTILIZERS
nours & Co., Wm. A., Jackonville, Fl
FURNITURE.
E. E. Cieavelad Furniture Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
FOUNDRIES.
-hotieid's Sons Co., J. 8., Mae.o, Ga.


GETS' FURNISHERS.
Stuart-Bernstein Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, a.
Standard ClotMUg Co., Jacksoille, Mf
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
Jacksonville Grocery Co., Jacksornvl, fia
Williams Co., J. P, Savanuh, Ga.
Young Co., John R., Savamah, Ga.
HARDWARE .


Bond & Bous Co. The, Jackonille, fa.
Briggs. W. EL, Hardware Co., Valdoeta, Ga.
Tampa Hardware o., Tamp, fla.
Weed& Co.. J. D, Saana. Ga
HAT AND tRAIN.


HATS.


Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksoanvle. Fla.
Standard Clothing Co.. Jacksoaville. Va.
HOTEL&.
Aragon The, Jackmonv-lle Fla.
Fifth Avenue Hotel, New York, N. Y.
Telford Hotel. White Springs, Fla.
IRON WORKS.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonarle, Fla.
Sehofeld's Sons Co.. J. S., Maeon. Ga.
INSURANCE.
Florida Life Insurance Co., Jacksornille
Fla.
Cay & Mecal, Jacksonile, l8
JEWELERS.
R. J. Riles Co., Jackroville, fa
Ureenleaf & Croeby Co., Jaeksomville, Fla.
RHee 8&ager, Jacksonville, Fl
LIQUORS.
R. M. Rome Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Casper Co.. Roanoke, Va.
Blum & Co, C.as., Jaksonville, Fla.
Altmayer & Flatau Liquor Co, Mason, Ga.
Joeeph Zapf & Co., Jacksoavlle, Fla.
MELDICINS.
Spener Medieie C, Ch aooga, Team.
MACHINE WORKS.
choedd. Bon Co., J. ., Maeon, Ga.
Lombard Iron Works. Auguta, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR TuRPEL xLaS PRO-

SehoIeld's So Co., J. S., Maeon, Ga.
manlxcnw-
ODntinaetal Mfg. Co., Birmgham, Ala.
The only lie of medicine made ex-
elusaively for eomnn_--mrL-
METAL WORK3&S.
McMilla Bres. C., Jackmesnsie Sava-
nab nd MeNIs.
Baker, M. A, Brunswick, Ga, and Pema-
cola,


MILL SUPPLIES
Sehodsld' Soe Co., J. S, Maeuo Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fa.
Weed & Co., J. D, Savannah, Ga.
Maleby Maddry C, Jakoille, ia.
Briggs Hardware Co, Valdoeta, Ga.


MONUMIETS.
Tampa Monumental Works, Tamps, Fa.
MULES AND HORI 8.
W. A. Cook, Tampa. ia.
S NAVAL STORES.
American Naval Stores, Co., Home Ofice,
Savannah, Ga.
Pinular Naval atoren Tampa, f
Barnes & Jemup Co, Jaeksonme, fla.
Consolidated Naval 8tres Co., Jaeksoa-
viS, Fi.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
Wegt-Flynn-Harris Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
Young Co, John R, Savannah, Ga.
Soethen States Naval Store. Co., Savaa-
AM ,
PAIrT&


Bond & Bors Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Tampa Hardwre Co., Tampa, Fla.
PLUMBERS.
Coons & Glder. Jacksonvile, Fla.
PUMPS.
Merril-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofleld's Sons Co., J. 8., Maen, Ga.


RAILROADS
Atlantic Ooast Lie.
REAL ESTATE
Brobeton, Fendia A Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
SIKES' PATENTED RIMS AND HEADS.
8EDS.


Bens & Oa., Wi A., iJaskhssbll, fla. een & O6. Wa. A., Jackenerll mla.


SHIP YARDS.
Cummer Lumber Co, Jacksonville, Fa.
Merrill-Steven a Co. Jacksonville, Fla.

SHOES-WHOLESALI.
Covington Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Joe. Rosenheim & Sons, Savannah, Ga.

STEAMSHIPS
Clyde Steamship Co. The. New York City.
TANKS.
Schoneld's 8on Co., J. 8., Maeon, Ga.
TunPn]lirs 8TILLS.
Baker, A., Brusewlk, Ga., and Pam-
cola, Fla.
MMeMiu Brethrs .Co. .JaMek-arl,
Savannah Ua mWb.

TUPEJ Jll E TOOLS.
Council Tool Co, Jaeksorille, Fla.
Operator' Tool Co., Gree Cove Spri,
F.

WATCHED.
Greenleaf & Croby Co., Jaksoaville, Fla
Hem & SllaT, JacksMvife, la.
R. J. Riles Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

YELLOW PIm LUMMER.
Cummer Lumber Co, Jacksonvlle, la.
East Coat timber Co., Watertowm V-





WHISKIES

GINS AND RUMS


$1.50 to$5.00 per Gallon
...... AGECY FOB......
Lews 1886 md Meuat Vernea
Pure Rye WMAhie.
Controllers Blum'siMonogram and Sylvan
Rye-Agents for Jungt Cincinnati and
Pabst Milwaukee Beer. Prices on ap.
plication.

CHAS. BLUM & CO.
SIT and 51 WEST BAY STREET
JACESONVIILLE FLA.





Coons & Golder

Operators on Turpentine

Pipe, Boilers and Pumps


EzpOt M IMuiu ai rura
22 W. Adams SL Jscksuovllc, Fli


WM. D. JONES
Prscinrt sm SPMCIAUT


FAMILY DRUGGIST
107 E. BAY ST.


Marl Order SolleteL


~ ISS~IS~ Ff~1------- ----------i;~,c-~;~i








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


NEW LOCOMOTIVES FOR
THE EAST COAST RAILWAY.

According to the Miami Record, the
rast Coast Railway Company intends to
make some big improvements in the sched-
ule of the winter trains next season.
This winter the road has been handi-
capped by not being able to secure boiler-
makers enough to keep engines in repair.
New engines had long been ordered, and
were expected to arrive in time to take
the burden of this season's travel, but
the scarcity of labor in the North delayed
the shipment of the new locomotives,
which only arrived a couple of weeks ago
at St. Augustine, too late for the winter's
travel. The work forced on the old loco-
motives has been so great that the ma-
jority of the big ones are now ready for
.visits to the shops in St. Augustine.
Since a recent strike of the boilermakers
employed in the railroad shops, not enough
skilled workmen could be secured, and
the repairs on all the engines are greatly
behind.
Nearly a dozen locomotives are now be-
ing fitted at the company's shops, but
now that the season is at an end these
will not be placed on regular passenger
train work until next winter. Most of
the new locomotives are of the famous
Pacific type, and are capable of long runs
and great power. A few of them are of
the Atlantic type, which are calculated
more for speed than for heavy hauling.
These new steam giants, at work on
what will be the only rock ballasted road
in the State, will make a better schedule
time than any Florida road has ever been
able to boast of. The conditions obtained
from the improvements of the present and
future will attract a larger travel to the
East Coast next winter than has previous-
ly been known.
It is also reported, on good authority,
that during this year there will be a ma-
chine shop built here, for the purpose ot
repairing rolling stock at this end of the
road. With the completion of the railway
to Key West this will be a necessity, and
although the need has been seen before by
the railway officials, the rapid expansion
of the business has retarded the com-
mencement of the work.

THE SOUTHERN CORN CROP.
Writers both in and out of the South
have been so accustomed to giving promi-
nence to the cotton crop of this section
as to convey the impression that there
was no other agricultural product of the
South that merited comparison with it.
While the South has indeed practically a
world monopoly of the cotton crop, and
while that is the source of very great
productive wealth, still it is by no means
of such transcendent importance as to
overshadow all other crops of the South,
as the following facts will demonstrate:
The corn crop of the United States for
S the year 1906 was valued at $1,106,626,479,
of which the South produced nearly one-
half, or in round numbers $500,000,000.
The value of the cotton crop for last
year was about $650,000,000. Had the
average yield per acre of corn raised in
the South been up to the general average
of the country at large this crop would
have equalled the cotton crop, but if prop-
er cultivation had prevailed it would have
been largely in excess of the cotton crop
in farm value.
The average yield of corn per acre in
tl Uifted States was 30.3 bushels, while
the average for the South was only 23.0


bushels per acre. Had this yield been
brought up to that of the highest, as given
to the States of Ohio and Wisconsin,
which were 4.2.6 and 41.2 bushels per
acie respectively, it will be seen how far*
the corn crop of the South would have
exceeded its cotton crop, and this yield
cain e readily obtained all over the South.
In tact, it would not be extravagant to
say that 50 bushels per acre could be
generally produced in the South under
proper methods of cultivation. In many
ca-s a there have been yields of 100 bush-
els per acre, and a South Carolina farmer
holds the award of the highest yield pro-
duced in the United States last year,
which was said to be 160 bushels per acre.
In this one crop alone it can be seen
just what the South is losing every year
in and through negro farm tenancy. We
can safely estimate the loss in this one
crop at $500,000,000 annually, since the
depreciation in the land under negro ten-
ancy is something that should be consid-
ered.
It is knowledge of these facts that has
led The Tradesman to advocate bringing
into the South agricultural immigrants in
preference to all others. From the above
figures it will be seen that the States of
the South can afford to bring into this
section one million agricultural immi-
grants, paying, if necessary, $500 for each
one, and make money by the operation.
This is one illustration as to why the
States of the South are willing to assist
in bringing in such immigrants as they
want, for agricultural immigrants have
been trained in intensive farming, and
such a system, with the soil and climate
as they exist in the South, would enrich
this section more rapidly than could be
hoped for in any other direction. This is
what the right kind of immigration means
to the South, and this is why every pos-
sible effort should be put forth to ob-
tain it.-Chattanooga Tradesman.

A SERIOUS OMISSION.
Attorney General Bonaparte skins sev-
eral teeth in. pronouncing upon the new
immigration law, About all that is left
of it is the privilege to theState to spend
money in advertising and soliciting immi-
gration. The l re.ed-. gentleman did not
say whether individuals could aid the
State by financial eontrilutions.-Tampa
Times.

TU THE JAMESTOWN EXPOSITION
VIA THE ATLANTIC COAST LINE RY.
People all over Florida, see the Atlantic
Coast Line "Purple Folder" for schedules
to the Jamestown Exposition. Two daily
trains each way, with through Pullman
buffet sleeping cars.
Season sixty days and fifteen days limit
excursion tickets on sale, daily from April
19th to Nov. 30th, at low rates. Chach
excursions at very low rates.
For further information see your near-
est railroad agent,. or write Frank C.
Boylston. District Passenger Agent, Atlan-
tic toast Line, Jacksonville, Fla.

DREDGING AT PENSACOLA.
The government dredge Caucus, which
has been undergoing repairs on the Span-
ish dry dock at the Pensacola navy yard
for several weeks, was launched to-day,
and will at once resume dredging on Pen-
sacola bar. The tug Hercules. which has
I-en here since the storm of September
issisting in raising sunken vessels, will be
locked tomorrow and placed in condition
to return to the Norfolk navy yard.


For the masses as

well as the classes




FURNITURE

At Astoundlaly Low Prices


E. E. Cleaveland Furniture Co.,
OMet a"d Larest Fursiture Store Jel, vlle.




- gStandard Cloth ing Company i 1 i I
- Standard Clothing Company :


SOne Price


* I...
S


One Price


FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
17 and 19 West Bay Street, Jacksonville Fior
Stet.e. and Hawes Hats. Special Attention Gilve to Mail Orders.


SISf Mc KOY PATENT

STurpentine Cup.


The best and simplest cip
on the market. Detachable
Greater Capacity, easier
dipped ,more easily placed
on tree, stronger and prac-
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not rust. For catalog and
price list write



A MH'KOy PIfTIIRIET JITIpI CiPO.
1015 Hibernia Building,
/ New Orleans. Louisana.


M. A AK INVENTOR AND
M. A. BAKER, MANUFACTURER OF THE
BAKER IMPROVED SEAMLESS TURPENTINE S ILLS.


Write me for Pc F. any point in the turpentine belt.
All taus ol uAnder auk gurantee.
JOB WORK THROUGH THE COVNTIY PROMPTLY ATIENDMD TO
The Largest and Oldest Copper Works in the South.
My specialty Is large worms and heavy bottoms that do not leak.
BRUNSWICK, GA. and PENSACOLA, FLA.


4








6 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



This Easy Chipper Saves time and Money.

Chip escapes easier on account of hollow back.
Cuts a shade streak easier as hollow back allows hack to WRITE
to be closed more FOR
G.- Gum flows easier as there is less steel to drag over the
fresh cut. P S.


Operator's Tool Company, Green Cove Springs, Fla.

^ JT


THE PANAMA CANAL AND WHAT ITS
COMPLETION MEANS TO THE
SOUTHERN STATES.
A correspondent of the Chattanooga
Tradesman, signing himself "A. W.,"
writes the following interesting article for
that journal:
As the government has taken direct
charge of the Panama canal, there is little
doubt but that it will be actually in opera-
tion within a few years considering the
magnitude of the work, judged by the force
of men now on the isthmus and the ex-
tent of the machinery which is being uti-
lized for excavation.
For this reason recent calculations which
have been made about the revolution in
commercial routes which will be caused by
the isthmian waterway is of especial inter-
est to the South, since this revolution n ill
so directly affect the Southern States. In
a general way it is appreciated that tlhe
canal will be of great benefit. It will of
course afford a direct route to the west-
ern coast of South America and give
Southern exporters an opportunity to ob-
tain what trade there may be from this
quarter although they will have competi-
tion from Great Britain and Europe. We
also appreciate that the Pacific coast of
the Unted States is brought into closer
touch with the South Atlantic and Gulf
Sates, but it is doubtful if we realize the
truly vast benefit which will accrue to the
South directly as soon as the waterway
is ready for the passage of vessels.
What it means to the ocean trade of
such cities as New Orleans, Galveston, Mo-
bile and the ports on the South Atlantic
coast may be partly appreciated when it
is stated that the shortest route from the
Pacific end of the Panama canal to China
and Japan is along what the geographer
calls a great circle. By following tihe
great circle a steamship goes within 125
miles of the harbor of San Francisco.
Consequently she can enter and leave this
port with the loss of but twenty-four
hours time on the outward or return voy-
age. San Francisco will naturally become
the principal port of call not only for ves-
sels bound from the Atlantic and Gulf
seaports of the United States to the orient
but for the great fleet of vessels front
London, Liverpool, Hamburg, Bremen and
other foreign cities which will utilize this
route not only because it is shorter than
by way of the Suez canal but because the
Panama canal is so much larger that it
will accommodate ships of great draught.
How many vessels will be on this great
trade route of course cannot be calculated
but remembering that the average ship
tonnage passing through the Suez in a
year is no less than 8,000,000 tons, some
idea can be gained in the increase of com-
merce of San Francisco.
The question may arise to what extent


this interests the South. When it it re-
membered that San Francisco will be the
principal coaling port for vessels bound
both ways and that the Panama canal
brings the coal mines of the Southern
States nearer to this city than the fuel
deposits of Australia and other competitive
regions, the market which San Francisco
alone will afford to the Southern coal
miners can be realified. There is no rea-
son l hy the mining companies of Alabama,
Kentucky, Tenne-see and possibly West
Virginia should not furnish the bulk of
the bunker coal required for all of this
shipping at San Francisco as well as the
coaling stations which will doubtless be
established at one or both ends of the
canal. This means that a fleet of colliers
will be required for handling coal alone
from Southern ports through the canal
to the Pacific coast.
The route which vessels will take from
the canal to the orient is no less than
1,500 miles from the Sandwich islands.
therefore Honolulu will become insignifi-
cant as a seaport and Hawaii will lose
much of its importance as a competitor of
thlie Soutlh. One reason why the sugar
industry has reached such proportions in
the Sandwich islands is because the prod-
uct could be loaded upon liners and other
vessels calling at the islands on their way
across the Pacific but with only the ex-
ports which Hawaii itself produces, such
a small tonnage of freight will le offered
that it is doubtful if a single line of
steamships would have enough business to
make regular trips to Honolulu except dur-
ing the sugar season. The cane planta-
tions of Louisiana and the Southwest will
have a far better opportunity to compete
with the Hawaiian producers in the Ameri-
can market.
The new route from the canal to East-
ern Asia is so far to the north of the
sandwichh Islands that it nearly skirts the
Aleutian Islands and is not far from the
entrance to Puget Sound. It will afford
an opportunity to increase the commercial
relations between the South and such
cities as Seattle and Tacoma. What this
means to the textile interests of the
Souptlh can be appreciated, bearing in mind
the exten-ive market on the Pacific coast
not only for cotton manufactures but for
the rnaw material. It is not improbable
that the cotton trade with the United
States west of the Rocky Mountains will
ie muichl more than doubled, since the
canal will allow the material to be car-
ried to this section at much lower rates
than overland by rail as at present.
But possibly the chief item of interest
to the South through the completion of
the canal is the expansion which will take
place in the Southern iron and possibly
steel industry. It may be needless to say
that up to the present time the construc-
tion of buildings and other developments


in the communities on the Pacific coast
has been greatly retarded by the expense
of securing structural steel and metal in
other forms. Undoubtedly ship building
on the Pacific coast would assume much
greater dimensions if it were not for the
excessive cost for frame work and hull
plates for vessels most of which is now
brought across the country by rail. In
spite of the remarkable growth of the city
of Seattle as an industrial center, at the
present time the production of iron and
steel is practically nominal for the reason
that the raw material for these metals is
not available, the iron ore not being of
a quality which will allow it to be smelted
to produce iron of suitable composition.
As the coaf mines are brought near to the
Pacific coast cities, the iron makers will
enjoy an equal advantage and their is no
question but what the building of the
canal will so increase the demand that
despite the proportions of the industry at
present it will be greatly enlarged, since
the use of structural material alone will
cause tile Pacific coast to become a very
broad market, saying nothing of the re-


PEC AN S
luAlv" U wro&


permanent Profits

Ecomayof cre
Certainty of results

AnUal crops
Noau-perhae product
Superior to al nts.

THE OPPORTUNITY Of TODAY.
The first to plut a peean grve
wNll bhe first to reap a
great harvest.
for full inftrmatlo apply to

THE GRIFFIN HOS. Co.

JackisonvIe. FlorIla.


I J. A. Craig 40 Bro. |

* 239 W. Bay Stroot EVERETT BLOCK.

Leaders in Men's and Bors' Fine Cloth-
Ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.

Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest took in the City.


,iI6 SII6IIww6I 9 lassoes$ uggggggIg.h
W. W. Cars, Pres. W. C. Thm, Emagr. R.. Cam. sr as TIarn


Tampa Hardware Co.


Wholesale

Hardware

Turpentine. Mill and Phosphate Supplies.

TAMPA.
g TAMPA. FLORIDA.
8 e0 *eOm0g444 8 e888064u04Qog 11gggag 8 1 1 >ggbggggugg


NOTARY PUBLIC.


0. PIomc 941.


BLUE PtRITINO.


Examinuatie am Tlmber Estimates.

ROLAND WOODWARD,
CONSULTING AND CIVIL ENGINEER.
Room 6. Bard of Trade BSdih. JACKSONVM.LE, iLA


--










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7




Southern Drug Mfg. Company
WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS AND MANUFACTURERS OF
Flavortng Extracts, Packed Drugs, B. B. Bluing. Vinegar end Pyne's Popular Remedies.
We handle everything In the Drug and Medicine line. Write for prices. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


quirements for shipbuilding, the construe-
tion of railroads, electric power plants and
other enterprises needing large quantities
of metal.
The trade of the South with the Orient,
as well as South America, will doubtless be
considerably enlarged, but to what extent
is problematical, except as regards cotton.
With the opportunity to nad cotton by
ship load through the Panama waterway
to the markets afforded by Chili and
Ecuador also to China and Jajan, the eul-
tivation of this staple will unquestionably
be greatly extended-if sufficient labor can
be secured to till the cotton felds. Exca-
vation of the isthmian passage will prob-
ably do more to keep up the priea of raw
cotton than any other factor in the history
of this material.
The Panam canal will be a most serious
rival of the Sues passageway for several
reasons. Steamers bound from such ports
as London, Liverpool, Bremen and Ant-
werp for not only Eastern Asia but for
Australia, as well as New Zealand, Vill
save at least 1,00 miles by using the
Panama instead of the Suez route. This
fact in Itself will tempt a large amount of
traffic seros the Atlantic which now goes
through the straits of Gibraltar and into
the Indian ocean by way of the Sues pas-
sage. The Panama waterway, however,
will have a decided advantage, as it will
allow vessels requiring from 35 to 40 feet
of water when loaded to pass through it.
As is well known, the maximum depth of
the Suez canal permits vessels of only
28 feet, so that the Panama will accom-
modate the largest types of liners now
crossing the Atlantic and any of the ves-
eln which are in service in the fleets of
such great companies as the Peninsula and
Oriental or the Castle lines. To what ex-
tent the traffic through the Suez canal
will bediminished, cannot be calculated at
the present time, but it will be very large.
The Suez route is the principal way for
vessels bound from northern and southern
Europe to southern Asia, East Africa, and
the islands of the Indian ocean, as well as
to some of the ports of Australia. The
Panama route, however, not only gives
exporters to these markets an advantage
over the present route but affords a much
shorter way for European shipping com-
panies trading with Japan and China to
reach these markets, as it shortens the
voyage from such cities as Bremen, Ham-
burg, London and Liverpool, from 2,500 to
4.000 miles, according to the port for which
Sthe vessel is destined. This will be one
of the most important results of the com-
pletion of the Isthmian channel, hearing
in mind the great extent of this traffic.
The opportunity for utilizing larger ships
in this trade, it is believed, will cause the
canal to considerably increase the con-
struction of vessels abroad sinee the di-
mensions of the Sues canal has limited
the tonnage of craft intended for the
Oriental trade. The carrying depth of the
Panama canal will permit a vessel bearing
from 20,000 tons to 25.60 tons of cargo
to pass through it--a cargo fully 25 per
cent greater than the maximum eargo
whMih c b sapt by way of the Sues.
A. W.


SHIPMASTERS ORGANIZE.
The Brotherhood of American Shipmas-
ters has been organized in this city at
a meeting held in the office of Charles
H. Howard, stevedore, on Laura street,
south, attended by sixteen captains of
vessels now lying in port.
The object of the association is the
mutual benefit of the shipmasters, with
sick benefits and death claims, and to
bring the masters of vessels closer to-
gether in a brotherly way.
Another object is to protect the mem-
bers with a view of obtaining first-class
olcers and seamen for their vessels. There
will be no discrimination against members"
of the seamen's unions, but steps will be
taken to secure for all members of the
association only first-class men, and in
this manner do away with desertions in
southern waters and the payment of run
money. All members of the association
agree that they will not ship the crew
of another member of the association. Ef-
forts will also be made to abolish all
shipping masters. In case a master of a
vessel is in distress the members will see
that he gets safely to his home port.
It is the intention to establish halls for
the accommodation of the members in
all the principal seaports, where the mem-
bers can find an abundance of reading
matter and writing material andi where
they can pass the time pleasantly.
Will Incorporate.
It is the intention to keep the charter
open until 100 members are enrolled. When
the membership reaches that number a
permanent organization will be affected
and the Brotherhood of American Ship-
masters will be incorporated.
All masters of steam and sail vessels
are eligible for membership and are in-
vited by the originators to join the broth-
erhood. All information will be furnished
on application to Capt. Theodore G. Krum,
of Melrose. Mass., and all applications for
enrollment as charter members should be
addressed to Capt. Krum, who was named
as temporary secretary of the brother-
hood.
List of Members.
The masters of vessels present at the
meeting and who signed the membership
roll were as follows: Capt. W. H. Gould,
of the schooner Savannah; Capt. Theodore
G. Krum, schooner Maud B. Krum; Capt.
TJ. G. Cook, schooner Zaccheus Sherman;
Capt. S. L. Wiley, schooner William H.
Clifford; Capt. M. J. Marsten, schooner
Melrose; Capt. A. E. Hooper, schooner
Bertha F. Walker; Capt. A. Hyers, schoon-
er John B. Manning; Capt. C. Halland,
schooner D. J. Sawyer; Capt. C. D. Perry.
schooner Evie D. Hall; Capt. C. H. Young,
schooner Henry Lippett; Capt. J. H. Cole,
schooner Julia P. Cole: Capt. A. T. Han-
sen. schooner Linah C. Kaminski; Capt.
John R. Megee, schooner Joel F. Sheppard;
Capt. William Stille, schooner John H.
May; Capt. Howard A. Flynn, schooner
Fannie Prescott; Capt. Walter Small,
schooner Pendleton Sisters.
It is expected that before Capt. Krum
leaves port that quite a number of other
shipmasters will apply for membership in
the brotherhood.


Barnes & Je

Jacksonv

Na.veal Stores Fect

Merct


OFF
C. H. Barnes. President.
E. B. Wells. Secret

DIRECTORS: C. H. Bar
J. I.. Saunders. E. C. Long, W.
SSaxon. G. W. Taylor.

511 NN IXXXXXXXXX*i N 11


ssup Company

ille. Florida.

tors and Commission

&ents.


ICERS.
J. C. Little, Vice-President.
tary and Treasurer.

neo. J. C. Little, Ralph Jeesup.
E. Cummer, R. H. Paul, G. W.

>xxxxxissakhikck


H. E. PRITCHETT, Pres. P. L. SUTHERLAND, Vice-Prs. A. D. COVINGTON, Se'y
J. P. COUNCIL, Tress and Gr' Mar.

THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.,
General Offices: JACKSONVILLE, FLA-
Factory: WANNANISH, N. C.

Msalufalturers of High ira.d Trelw
feIp lMar repes Ouaplsr.

--4 111 I1 I I II-1i ISlt II 4I I I 1 It 1 I I I I I I I I I I I li I ll I
J. JP. Wi.LIAMS. President. J. A. G. CAssoN, let VicEPrlstdent
T. A. JENNINGS. 2nd Vice-President. J. F. D8usNBNU7 .3dVice-P ideB t
-. H.L. LKATON. Secretary. H. F. E. SCHusTB, r TroSurer. i


E J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

- Wi STOIBS IiO WON FT ICT I ImiSEI I Ii. ll.
SMain Officre eAVANNXH, ORGoIAo. -
-e PENeSCOLA, FLa. I Braneh Oroeery Ious,
i Braneh oices: JACKsONVILLE, ]LA. ( CO.LuJMBUI, oX.

Naval Stores Producers are Invited to Correspowd With Us.
t11 I lli t I I l t li l I I llill l 111liili ii5 1 I i -


W. J. L'ENGLE.
President.


J. W. WADE,
Vice-President.


E.C. HUGHES,
Aas't. See'y sa Tress


Union Naval Stores Co.
MOBILE, ALA. PENSACOLA, FLA. NEW ORLEANS, LA.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
.........DEALERS IN..........

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable location in Wet Flir-
ida, Alabama and Mississippi Liberal advances made against cIasignmisla Cr-
respondence solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE. ALABAMA.



Brick and Building Material.

When you need these, Portland Cement. Plaster Paris, Hard Wal
Plaster, Hair Ier Plastering, Shingles, Fire BriEk or Clay. Wrte to
GEO. R. FOSTER.Jr., Jacksonville, Fla.


i 1


~c









8 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



THE GROOVERaSTEWART Olm co..

FinIUY THE ODYu"IUSTICaYl-VER DfOt M Ao.
WllSmle Druys. OlMmlJoal, Drlmgit Dlrdris rad O*minlsry Qieeds
-cIWWWMJ umj.


Tru OLDmsrT wnazswT Mn0os I1
e isrU (U OLD SHARP WILLAMS-Pure Pine Old
Rye. B- the gallon 8.0; four full quart
$1.P0, e-,ee prepaid.
GEO. J. COLEMAN-Pure Pennsylvania
Rye; Rich and Mellow. By the gallon
s.15; four full quarts 3.00, express prepaid.
ANVIL RYE-Pure substantial Family
Whiskey. By the gallon $S.50: four full
quart U., express prepaid.
C LIFPORD RYE-By the galon a t.:
four full quarts 2.46. express prepaid.
OLD KENTUCKY CORN-Direct from
Bonded Warehouse; fine and old. By the
gallon 0.4; four full quarts 1.50 express
prepaid.
OLD POINTER CLUB CORN Rich
and Mellow. By the gallon Sa.0; four full
quarts 8.N. express prepaid.
We handle all the leading brands of Rye ind Bourbon Whisakes In the market
and will save you from 2 te 0 per cent on your purchases. Send for price list and
catalogue. Wailed free upon application.
The Altmayer QL Flatau Liquor Company
MACON. GEORGIA.

_000 m 0!


490G369M


Hundreds of Lumbermen

ARE LOSING

THOUSANDS Of DOLLARS
Each year investigating worthless propositions submitted by un
reliable brokers.
We have spent a great deal of time and money investigating
timber lands in Florida and Georgia, and are prepared to give
you absolutely reliable information regarding any tract of any
size in either State.
Propositions that we offer have been investigated by our ex-
perts before being offered on the market.
You might have your bank look us up before consulting us.
Correspondence with bona-fide purchasers solicited.


Brobston, Fendig & Company
ai6 West Forsyth Street. s Newcastle Stret.
IACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA BRUNSWICK. GA.


I


I


THE ARAGON
JACISOVILNL. ILA.
Under new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
eluding new electric elevator and our
own electric light plant.
Am H. N. O'NEAL. Prop.


in .lI ll.uu* I lll.u l.*u u LOII s Wll I OIIIII4 i I l i i

: JOS. ROSENHEIM SHOE CO. "
SMANVFACTVAIEtR AND JO"BERS OF


SHOES


SAVANNAH. GEORGIA f
"Best Shoes Made for Comilssary Trade."
11118181 I so loseI88881 1 11811et1*11614#I64*44641*1


WATERWAY ASSOCIATION work of the committee is not so arduous.
COMMITTEE HOLDS MEETING. At the meeting yesterday the members
of the committee decided that they would
A meeting of the executive committee of continue in their efforts to secure the pas-
the Inland Waterway Association was re- sage of the immigration bill by the State
gently held in Charleston, S. C. There Legislature.
were present J. H. Estill, Savannah, pres- There was a ful and free discussion of
ident of the association and committee; the probable effect of the national legis-
lation relative to immigration, and it was
members committee, ames H. Chdbour, the general opinion that such legislation
Wilmington, N. C.; Edward B. Taylor, as has been adopted by congress, and in-
Columbia, S. C'.; John H. Small, Washing- terpreted by the attorney general, will
ton, D. C. not hinder the State from securing a de-
The resignation of C. H. Forest, Secre- sirable class of foreign immigrants. In
Sw a H R fact, it was held that it would really ea-
Sable the State to secure a better class of
Charleston, was elected The next meet- immigrants than would have otherwise
ing of the association will he held in Char- been possible, or rather, probable.
leston, Wednesday, November 6, 1907. The committee is strongly of the opin-
The president and executive committee ion that the Florida legislature will pass
were authorized to prepare for this meet- the bill providing for a State department
ing. It was resolved that Mr. Small pre- of immigration as recommended by the
pare a brief setting forth the advantages committee and by the State Board of
and the necessity of the construction of Trade.
the chain of inland waterways along the
entire Atlantic seaboard; and further that COTTON CONGRESS.
such memorial should he submitted to the
national commission on improvement of Ample Stocks Reported to Be on Hand.
waterways, recently appointed by the The International Cotton ongre at
The International Cotton Congress at
president. On motion of Mr. Chadbourn,
President Estill, of the association, pre- Manchester, England, as a result of in-
pared the following telegram to the presi- investigations conducted in fourteen Euro-
dent of the United State: pean countries for a period of three years,
"Charleston, S. C., March 29, 1907.- has received a report showing that the
The President, Washington: The execu- s
tive committee of the Inland Waterway stocks of cotton held in Europe today
tire committee of the Inland Waterway
Association, in session today in this city, are estimated at nearly 8500,000 spindles;
directs me to congratulate you upon the tl:at Europe will have sufficient raw ma-
personnel and the purposes of the cor- trrin to keep the mills running until the
mission apiotned by you to consider the naniiv ,I of next season's crop in September,
vital subject of the chairman of our wat- anl that the cotton still due to arrive,
erways.
Serwas. estimated at over 2,000,000 bales, will pro-
"I am also directed to call vour atten- '
tin and through u to the commission vide an ample surplus, thus obviating any
to the importance of the construction and chance of a shortage or danger of a panic
to the importance of the construction and
maintenance by the United States of the by opening opportunities for.speculators.
chain of inland waterways long the At- This report is held to prove the value of
chain of inland waterways ong the At-three years go
lantic seaboard from Boston and Florida, the oranization formed three years ago
and the gulf, and particularly to the at Zurich, which from the original o-
waterway from Norfolk. Va., to Beaufort operation of nine countries, while Japan
; lsor has joined, and India and some other
Inlet. N. C.. which will avoid the dangers has joined, and India and som other
at Cape Hatteras and Diamond Shoals. cotton states are apt to oin. Full details
(Signed) "J. H. ESTILL, President." of what the congress has accomplished
e e e c e e d c will be presented at the next annual meet-
The executive committee extended con-.
ing. to be held in Vienna in May.
gratulations to commercial interests of the
country upon the fact that congress re-
cently made an initial appropriation for PANAMA CANAL COFERNC.
the Norfolk-Beaufort Inlet waterway, in C. C. Goodman, W. C. Jones, John W.
the sum of $650,000. .candley and W. I. Sturtevant, who at-
tended as delegates from the chamber of


THE IMMIGRATION QUESTION.
An Important Meeting of the Board of
Trade Committee.
A meeting of the immigration commit-
tee of the Jacksonville Board of Trade
was held in this city last week. Col.
Walter P. Corbett, chairman, presided, and
there was ai good attendance of the mem-
bers df the committee, which have proven
itself to be one of the most energetic of
the board of trade committees.
Now that the State oBard of Trade
has taken up the matter that the commit-
tee set out to accomplish, and has in-
ilrsed the bill recommended by the com-
n.:t'ep looking to the establishment of a
'aie 'l epa.rtnkwit of immigration, the


commerce of this city the Panama canal
conference and congressional smoker at
New Orleans, have returned home and
report having spent a most enjoyable and
profitable stay in New Orleans. The con-
ference was for the purpose of taking
some action relative to alleged discrimi-
nation against gulf ports in favor of east-
ern ports. and resolutions were adopted
entering a protest. The delegates from
this State said that the feature of the
meeting was the address of Senator Joe
Blackburn, of Kentucky, who attended the
conference as a representative of the
president and war department.


P I --


~~~~_~_~___~~~~ ~~


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4&,gL%%ILS-MJR%-6 -%-L -pgG%-_


r~rrrrrrrrrrcccrr~E~crcr~r~3afSr~:li~2


;___


~_









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


TAMPA MONUMENTAL WORKS,
DBALBRS IN-
Monuments, Headstones, Iron Fencing and Italian Statuary
NO JOB TOO LARGE. NO JOB TOO SMALL.
MAIN OFFICES 310 ZACH STREET, TAMPA, FLA.


NOTICE OF GARNISHMENT.
State of Florida, County of Duval, urth
District, Court of Justice of Peace.
T. J. Mott vs. A. 8. Murphy, Garnishee.
Anheuser Busch Brewing Association, Gar-
nishee, to A. S. Murphy, defendant, and
all others whom it may concern:
You are hereby notified that a writ -f
garnishment has been issued in the above,
and that your property in the hands of
Anheuser Busch Brewing Association has
been garnisheed and that unless you ap-
pear before said court on or before the
6th day of May, A. D. 1907, judgment by
default will be entered against you.
T. J. MOTT.

IN CIRCUIT COURT.


dation on the other, will be questions to
be determined. I do not feel at liberty, Fourth Judicial Circuit of Florid, in and
with this notice, to submit either my views for Daval County.
as to what should be done or a plan as In Chancery.
to how it should be accomplished; but I Jacksonville Development Co. vs. Ralph
will do this in my annual report to be H. Done, et al. Notice to non-resident:
submitted at that meeting. I may say, 'io Ralph EH Doane, Andrew J. Mosley and
however, at this time, that the action to
be taken by he stockholders in reference
to the future of this company will, in my You are hereby required to appear to
judgment, affect materially the prices the bill of complaint filed herein against
which shall prevail during the producing you in the above entitled cause on or be-
months of each year of the life of this fore the 3d day of June, A. D. 1907.
industry. Yours very truly, "The Industrial Record" is hereby des-
W. M. TOOMER, President. ignated as the newspaper in which this
order shall be published once a week for
ANOTHER PENSACOLA RAILROAD. eight consecutive weeks.
t P a a s ae to t e witness my hand seal of office this
Recent Pensacola advices are to the ef- st day of Mrc A. 1907.
21st day of March, A. D. 1907.
feet that a force of civil engineers, who (Seal) P.D. Cassidey, Clerk,


are to survey the route of the Pensacola
and Northeastern railroad, which is to con-
nect Pensacola with Andalusia, Ala., a dis-
tance of about seventy miles, reached the
city, iecompanled by some of the promo-
t-rs of the road, and it is the intention to
immediately begin setting trade stakes in
order that the Ipilding of the proposed
road may commence at once. Offices have
been secured here, and it is proposed to
have the work proceed without interrup-
tion. The route will be along a formerly
surveyed and partly graded road, and
therefore it will not be necessary to do
as great amount of work as would be the
case were the road to go through new ter-
ritory. The men behind the movement
are New York promoters, who are also
being assisted by local capitalists, and it
is proposed to build the road without
delay. The promoters deposited the sum
of $15,000 on March 1 in a local bank as
guarantee that twenty miles of this road
Sand twenty miles of the Pensacola, Ala-
bama and Western road will be completed
and ready for use within six months. The
latter road is to run from Pensacola to
Meridian, Miss., and thence to Memphis.
Tenn. Those composing the party to
reach here today are J. L. Miller, C. M.
Gordon, John E. Habach and W. F. Scott.


Walter Mucklow,
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOU=TAT,
Reg, 40-47-48 Mutual Life lBM
Tulapme aiA
JelePheae spas


NAVAL STORES EXPORT COMPANY
STOCKHOLDERS MEET NEXT
WEEL.
The following circular letter has been
issued to the stockholders of the Naval
Stores Export Co.:
Jacksonville, Fla., April 1, 1907.
To the Stockholders of The Naval Stores
Export Co.
Gentlemen-The place of holding the
annual meeting of the stockholders of this
company, fixed for April 9, 1907, has been
changed from the offices of the company
to the auditorium of the Board of Trade,
in Jacksonville, Florida.
This meeting will be one of vital impor-
tanee to the stockholders, a majority of
whom are turpentine producers. The con-
tinued existence and active operation of
the company on the one hand, or its llqui-


W. B. HENDERSON. Pres.
W. R. FULLER. Vice Pre.


JOHN SAVARESI, Trsur.
E. BERGER, Secretar-Treamer.


m A r or A- w


By E. J. Candee, Deputy Clerk. A MA D U
Owen & Royall, Solicitor for Complain- I


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR DIS-
CHARGX
Notice is hereby given, In pursunane of
law, that the undersigned as Adminiara-
tor of the estate of Josephine C. 8. Sehu-
macher will make return of his final ac-
counts and apply for a fnal settlement and
discharge as such administrator to Hon. H.
B. Phillips, County Judge of Duval County,
Florida, on Monday, June d, A 1907.
JAMES M. SCHUMACHEB,
As Administrator Estate of Joeephne
C. 8. Sehumaeher.
Nov. 22. 190O.--bo.

NOTICE TO NON-RESIDENT.
In Circuit Court, Fourth Judicial Cireuit
of Florida, in and for Duval County.
In Chancery.
G. A. Henry vs. Creo. Henry.
To Creo. Henry:
You are hereby required to appear to
the Bill of Complaint filed herein against
you in the above entitled cause on or be-
fore the 6th day of May, A. D. 1907.
"The Industrial Record" is hereby de-g-
nated as the newspaper in which this order
shall be published once a week for eight
consecutive weeks.
Witness my hand and seal of olee this
19th day of February, A. D. 107.
P. D. CA88IDEY, Cierk.
By E. R. HEDSTROM, Deputy Clerk.
C. B. PEELER,
Solctor for Complainant.


Wholesale Marufacturing Druggists,
TAMPA, FLORIDA.
Full and complete line of all kinds of Drugs, Chemkwa
and Patent Medicines.
SPECIAL ATTENTION 70 COMMISsARY TRADE.
PROMPT ATTENTION TO ALL ORDERS.


DRUGS. 5* SwsT
20 oa Sa0Uf LAUA


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Florida Mail Order Drug Store. Supplies Everythifa a Drug Store
Ever Kept. Write to Us.


WILLIAM A. &OURS


JAMES 0. DARIY


WILLIAM A. BOURS & COMPANY
THE O ESTAMJUSR RAIN AND GEED MOUSE IN THE STATE
flay, Grain, feed, Garden
Seeds, Poultry Supplies, flour,
Grts, Meal and fertilizers.


CaeMeI rra


206 EAST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FIA.


Reliable Whiskies.

When we make Claims for our goods we are certain of
the facts. We operate the finest open fire copper Distill-
ery in the World. We do our own bottling and packing
and no expense or labor is spared to have every drop of our
Whiskey absolutely pure and of the highest quality.
We guarantee every Order to be perfectly satisfactory,
or return your money.

Four Full Quarts Rose's

"Old Corn" or "Old Rye" or assorted $3.40, express
prepaid. Write for complete Price-List.


R. M. Rose Company,
16 West Forsyth Street, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
"ASK THE REVENUE OFFICER."


C. C. Bettes,


DUI "OTTO: Pr~m0 sbimse, Rea-e 000.4.


I










10 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL RECORD
JAMES A. HOLLOMON, EdurJI--Ch.
A. L. MAILSRH Business Mainder.
PusAblhed Ever 8sturday.
sumwcrrroun (Dameotc)S r Aainum
(FABe**. .... 8.titm
"The Pteo and Its PredsMoatL

Anl c--- eauur i II a diMened
The Industrial .Record Company.
Jacksonville. Fla.
raach s Ed taesel and Buiaes OflBo a
Savannfia Ga.
Entered at the Pastoffie at Jachesonve. Fla..
as seoomdllase matter

Adopted by the EKxutive CoMmtte of
the Turpentine Opertors' Asaolti
September 12, 19(0, as its exclusive oa-
al organ. Adopted is annual enventio
September 11 a the organ also of the gm-
erl association
Adopted A l 27th, 10 as the 0 -
organ of the ltertate Cae Growers A-
sociation. Adopted September 11, 19S, as
the only ofilcil organ of the T. O. A.
Commended to lumber people by peoial
resolution adopted by the Georgia Sawmill
Association.

THE RECORD'S OIICES.
The publishing plant and te man of-
ice of the Industrial Record Company
are located at the intersection of Bay ad
Newnan Streets, Jacmonville, Fl., i the
very heart of the great turpetin sad
yellow pine industries.
rade of the entire South.
The hrannah, Ga., office is the Board
jt Trade Bulding. Savannah ia the lead-
ing open naval stores market in the world.

NOTICE TO PATROL.
All payments for advtertl i& the I-
dustrial Record ad subecriptis thete
mut be mad direct to.the home Seeo is
Jack ville. Agents are net alowe to
make dectin under any cicumatancs.
Bill for advertising and mabcriptis are
aett ut frem 4t home e% whn du
and all remittances must be mad direct
to this c y
i~- Ria ecesd CP l~t^ *


THE GOOD ROADS ISSUE.
While the Industrial Record earnestly
favors the improvement of our public
highways, it is by no means as certain
as some of our contemporaries seem to be
that the present Legislature can be abso-
lutely depended upon to give us the re-
quired relief.
Too many cooks proverbially spoil the
broth, and we are of the opinion that
so many bills upon this all-important
are likely to be introduced at the present
session as to lead to confusion, delay and
disappointment.
Up to the present moment, at least three
good roads bill are ready for introduction
-namely, the Farris bill, the measure
prepared by Representative MacWilliams,
of St. Johns county, and the so-called Or-
ange County bill.
As for the last, those who are "on the
inside" do not need to be told that its
object is less to improve the roads than
to deal a death-blow to the convict lease
system in this tSate. The other two
bills are offered in good faith, and we sin-
cerely trust that the members behind them
will "get together" and from the two
measures frame a bill that will so fully
and completely cover the situation as to
leave no room for failure.

THE LEGISLATIVE SESSION.
The legislative session of 1907, which
Pliened in Tallahassee last Tuesday, prom-
ises to be one of the most important and
interesting held in this State for some
years: and all signs now point to sixty


days of active work-both partisan and
practical. ,
We need hardly say that this paper is
much more interested in the practical
outcome of the session than in any parti-
san issues that may be sprung upon a
long-suffering people. Nevertheless, as the
partisan situation may at any time affect
the practical side of the question, it is
not amiss to consider the situation from
that point of view.
It may at the outset be said that the
election of Senator Hunt Harris, of Key
West, as President of Senate, and the Hon.
Eugene S. Matthews, of Starke, as Speak-
er of the House, is, to say the least, any-
thing but a victory for the administration;
and that Governor Broward is likely to
have all he can do to secure the legislative
endorsement he is said to have in view.
Be this as it may, partisan feeling
should never be permitted to obscure those
practical issues in which the people of
Florida are so deeply interested.
Our State needs many things. We need
better roads and more of them; we need
more sme and more money; we need an
entire revision of our system of taxation,
with a view to the equalization of.taxes;
our transportatoin facilities, both by land
and water, are clearly susceptible of im-
provement; and we think that all thought-
ful eitfsen will agree with us when we
say that a thorough geological survey is
among the most urgent needs of the State.
All these questions will be fully and
freely discussed in these columns from
now on, and from week to week will be
given a review of the legislative proceed-
ings by the staff correspondent who will
represent The Record in Tallahasee dur-
ing the entire session.

(From our Staff Correspondent.)
Tallahassee, April 5, 1907.
The legislative session is now well under
way, and enough has already been done
to indicate the probable course of the two
Houses.
For one thing it is clear that the "cor-
porations" need expect little mercy, and
the "vested interests" may as well begin
to "pull down their vests."
Already a bill has been introduced in
the Senate by Mr. Trammell, of Polk,
placing the telegraphs and telephones in
the hands of the Railroad Commission;
While Senator Crane, of Tampa, is the
proud author of a bill imposing a penalty
of twenty-five plunks upon telegraph com-
panies for any failure to deliver a message
"within a reasonable time."
The express companies are also coming
in for their share of the good things, a
bill having been put into the Senate fix-
ing the charges on packages of five pounds
at 25 cents, and making that rate a basis
for a fixed tariff. And so it goes.

Government by commission seems to be
the craze here just now and we are threat-
ened not only with a State insurance com-
mission, but a school book commission and
heaven only knows what other choice
speciments of delegated authority.


In one of his special messages defending
the Trustees of the Internal Improvement
Fund. Governor Broward comes down on
the newspaper men with a heavy hand,
and advises that some of the fraternity be
put on the witness stand when the time
comes. And thus a new horror is added to
an occupation that is already arduous
enough.


If the affairs of the Internal Improve-
ment Fund are not thoroughly ventilated,
it will not, at any rate, be for want of
resolutions; and there is good reason to
believe that the true inwardness of the
situation will be brought to light ere the
close of the session.

The "Jim Crow" principle has evidently
come to stay. We already have "Jim
Crow" cars, and "Jim Crow" waiting rooms
in railroad depots are now being advo-
cated by Senators Trammell and Hudson.

Nothing has as yet been heard of the
division of certain counties, but the ques-
tion is bound to come up, although it
will necessarily involve a re-apportionment
of the State since under the present con-
stitution the Legislature is limited to
100 members; and it is obvious that unless
that number he increased by a constitu-
tional amendment, any new counties that
may be created will be left without rep-
resentation.

The temperance people are certainly up
and doing this year. It is rumored that
a bill is to be introduced providing that
any wholesale liquor dealer who ships
goods out of his own county shall take
out a license of $10,000. Another propo-
sition is that booze factories shall close
at 10 p. in., and still another is a little
constitutional amendment prohibiting the
traffic.
This sort of thing can, however, have
but one effect. Such legislation will not
in the least reduce the consuniption of
liquor, it will simply drive the wholesale
dealers, with their capital, into Georgia,
where, under the inter-State Commerce
Law, they can ship whatever they see fit
over the line into Florida.

A committee is to be appointed to visit
the convict camps, but nothing has yet
been heard of good roads, immigration, or
the equalization of taxes. But these little
matters will, no doubt, be taken up in
good time and make life a burden for the
merry legislator.

A Child Labor Bill.
The following measure will be intro-
duced early next week:
The bill provides that no child under
fourteen shall work at any time in any
factory, workshop, bowling alley, bar-room,
beer garden, place of amusement where
liquor is sold, or about any mine or quar-
ry.
No child under fourteen shall work dur-
ing school hours at any time.
During vacation time any child can work
in stores, offices and mercantile estab-
lishments or laundries. provided a phy-
sician certifies that the child is physically
able to perform such duties; but no child
under fourteen may work more than nine
hours a day., nor before 6:00 a. m., or
after 9:00 p. m.
This clause, however, does not apply to
evening or morning papers.
Every child must furnish a certificate
of age and a penalty is provided for false
recording of parents or guardians.
No child under sixteen shall be allowed
to work in or about any factory, mine or
quarry during a school term.
No child under fourteen shall work more
than six days in any one week, or more
than nine hours a day.
Tt is made the duty of the Commissioner
I-*' ilhor Statisties to enforce the provis-
4 in,:- of this net.


I THE CLOTHIERS

SOLE AGENTS rFe KNOX HATS


Our Clothing

Cut
,Right
Fit'
Right
Made
Right
Looks
Well
Hag,















SOUTHERN BUSINESS OUTLOOK.
Well
Feels
Well
Awful
Swell

Said


THE STUART-BERNSTEIN CO.
14 WEST BAY ST. JACKSWO VILLL A.


SOUTHERN BUSINESS OUTLOOK
\Wall Street may control the finances of
the North and East, but is does not rule
those of the South. The bulls and bears
may have their conflicts and the national
government feel called on to relieve the
situation such conflicts produce, but the
South goes on its way undismayed by
either bull or bear victory.
When John P. Morgan feels called on to
rush to Washington city to plead with the
president to do something to relieve the
anxiety of financiers, and leading northern
journals are predicting an impending finan-
cial crisis, the South pursues the even
tenor of its way and becomes indeed a
mere "looker-on in Venice" at the situa-
tion as it exists elsewhere.
Never before in the history of this coun-
try was the South so completely the
master of its own business affairs and so



The Wealth of the

Old Families.

Often disappeared, evaporated, and the
new generation was left but one or two
things of real value. Among these valu-
ables (in 99 cases out of a hundred) was
a chest of old silver, the most useful aad
beautiful heirloom that the young genera-
tion treasured.
Have you such a treasure to hand down
to your heirs? If not, now is the time to
start gathering it. If you are interested,
come down and let us show you something
in that line that is WORTH HAVING
NOW and which will be highly treasured
by your sons and daughters.

R. J. RII~S COMPANY,

15 W. Bay St.,

JackovonvM, Flida.


a










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11



FLORIDA LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY.

ONE CAPITAL STOCK JACKSONVILLE FLA. Writes all Formsa of Life: and En-
ONE MILLION DOLLARS t dowment Insurance.


free from the influences of financial pan-
ics and business depressions elsewhere as
it is at this time. The investments that
are truly Southern, i. e., such as belong
to residents of the South, are in such
channels as render them comparatively
free from all outside influences, and their
natural returns are enough to keep them
from possible losses, and so we find that
business conditions in this section at this
time are exceedingly promising and there
is not a rift in the cloud of prosperity
anywhere on the Southern horizon.
There is some degree of apprehension in
certain quarters over railroad and corpora-
tion legislation in the South, and possibly
this has gone too far in some instances,
but the sober, conservative sentiment
which has always represented the business
South is not going to be stampeded for
any cause, nor will it in the least relax
its energies to further advance the South
for any reason that has its inspiration in
Wall street.
There was never a time when money
was more plentiful throughout the South,
due to the splendid returns that have been
received for several years in succession
from our agricultural and manufacturing
interests. It is the part of prudence and
wisdom, however, not to become improvi-
dent, or so much carried away with pres-
ent prosperity as to neglect the dictates of
ordinary foresight and permit improper
practices or policies to mar our splendid
future outlook.
There is no earthly reason why the
South should not continue prosperous for
many years to come, and if we will only
keep our heads level and not permit dema-
gogues and politicians to carry us too far
from conservative anchorages, we can still
watch the conflicts of Wall street with
absolute indifference as to whether panics
reign, bulls gore, bears claw or lambs be
shorn in that financial arena.

CONVICTS FOR ROAD WORK.

A Tourist Suggets a Compromise Ar-
rangement Between the State and
Counties.
When convict labor on the roads of the
State was suggested, and the active cam-
paign to secure it begun, attention was
called to the fact that the convicts, for
the most part, are already leased, and
that the lease runs for some time yet.
A northern visitor to Florida, who is a
good roads enthusiast of wide fame, in
a letter to the Times-Union takes up this
phase of the question, and declares in
favor of a compromise between the State
and those who now have the convicts
under lease. This compromise, he be-
lieves, could be reached if the proper per-
sons took it in charge.
He further discusses the good roads
question, so far as Florida is concerned,
and cries out against the delays that
have marked work thus far. Replying
to the suggestion that has been made in
some quarters that Mr. Flagler take up
the work, the writer calls attention to
the fact that Mr. Flagler has already done
more than his share, and that it is time
for the ones who have been praying in-
stead of working, to exchange places with


those who, for years past, have been
working, and not merely ending their
labor with praying.
Letter of Tourist.
The letter, which is signed as "Tourist,"
the nom de plume taken by the writer,
is as follows:
"Jacksonville, Fla., March 29, 1907.
"Editor Times-Union, Jacksonville, Fla.
"Dear Sir: The letter from one of your
correspondents in your Thursday's is-
sue about good roads was a new and in-
teresting contribution to the discussion
on good roads and how to build them.
"The question of using prison labor in
the construction of such roads seems to
meet with the approval of a very large
majority of the people, but your corres-
pondent calls renewed attention to the
fact that the convicts for the most part
are at present leased, and the leases run
for a considerable time yet.
Favors a Compromise.
"That is unfortunate, as no time should
be lost in commencing the good roads
work by the State.
"Not many people, however, would ad-
vocate the breaking of such leases entered
into in good faith by the employers of
labor with the State, so it seems to me
that some arrangement or compromise be-
tween the State and those who have
leased the prison labor might be arrived at
so that at least half of those now em-
ployed under lease might be utilized in
constructing good roads.
"The suggestion by the same corres-
pondent that a differential tax be levied
on those who will benefit directly by good
roads is good. However that is a question
for the legislature to deal with, and I
have no doubt they will deal with it sat-
isfactorily to all.
State and Counties.
"The State and counties might join
hands in allowing companies or individ-
uals to build certain 'connecting roads
and allow them to have a liberal right of
way and to locate toll gates so as to pay
interest on the investment, the roads
thus built to become the property of the
counties, say at the end of five years.
"It seems to me that there has been
too much waiting for some one to build
roads.
Mr. Flagler's Full Share.
"I have heard it expressed many times
that such men as H. M. Flagler should
undertake to build roads.
"Mr. Flagler has done his share, and a
big share, in benefiting the State, and Is
now engaged in a tremendous undertak-
ing.
"It seems that there are people who
will pray if you do the work of bringing
to them what they are praying for with-
out the expenditure of new labor. This
reminds me of a story:
An Illstrative Story.
"A boatman engaged to ferry over a
river a stalwart preacher and a little
man. A big storm arose and the little
man immediately grasped a pair of oars
to help the boatman, while the big
preacher dropped on his knees and com-
mepced to pray for the safety of his
party.


"When things looked very hopeless, the
boatman made the suggestion to the
preacher and said to him, "Suppose you
take the pair of oars from the little fel-
low and let him do the praying."
"I am convinced that a good system of
roads is about to be begun in the State
of Florida, and the initial building of
them will have a great deal to do with
their final completion, the quality of the
material and the proper construction of
the roads must be safeguarded at the


start.


"Yours truly"
"TOURIST."


FOR SALE-Turpentine lease on ten
thousand acres timber, three miles from
transportation. Apply to King Lumber
and Manufacturing Company, Nocatee,
Florida. 3-30-07-4t


FOR SALE-10,000 acres virgin L. L. pine
in Calhoun County, West Florida, one
mile south of Dalkeith Landing, on Ap-
alachicola River. S. S. Alderman, owner.
Address Wewahitchka, West Florida.
3-23-07 to 5-11-07


SWANTED-Position with mill or tur-
pentine operator as commissary clerk.
Have some knowledge of bookkeeping.
A 1 State salary. Address "Clerk," care In-
AD dnstrial Record. 3-9-7-4t

AND -
ER EXPERT ACCOUNTANT.
FOR SA L ANY BUSINESS correspond olited
Rate for this column is 2 cents per word reference the bet. Fred E. Rankla
for first insertion and 1 cent per word for Jacksonville, Fla. Long distance phone
following insertions. No advertisement 2776. P. 0. Box 572.
taken for less than 40 cents for first, and
20 cents for following insertions. Cash
must accompany orders unless you have
an account with us. WANTED-Al onmmismamries -, d .l


POSITION WANTED.-As woodsman
or stiller. Can do either; with reference.
Have 18 years' experience at the business.
Address C., care Industrial Record. 4t


WANTED-Position as woodsman or
stiller. Ten years' experience. The very
best of references. Apply at once to 8.
Smtih, Box 255, Kissimmee, Fla.
3-27-02-3t


-- -- ---I .l
their barns of all kinds of weed useks and
burlaps. We buy everything in the way
of sacks. Write us. Americaa Fibre C.,
Jacksonville. Fla.




HUTCHINSON AUDIT CO.
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS & AUDITORS.
Dyal-Upchurch Buildi
SPhone 3ms. Jifheu 0 Vl.


COMPARATIVE MARKET REPORTS,
Though spirits have again declined in price this week, the market is com-
paratively very steady for this season. The demand is so great that the price
will always remain good, though fluctuating a little with the seasons. On
Tuesday especially, of this week, a large quantity of spirits was sold, and
at the lowest prices any time during the week, those holding it evidently
expecting the price to continue to decline.
SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE FOR THE WEEK HERE AND AT SAVANNAH.
Price. Sales. Shipment. Receipts. Btocks.
Jax. Say. Jan Say. Jax. Say. Jax Say. Jax. Say.
Saturday ...... .... 69 ... 1691 2 263 333 475 6,802
.Monday ....... 671/ 671/21 138 1571 .... 50 329 84 7,133
Tuesday ....... 664 61/2 2,536 1,0171 144 336 47 158 7,402
Wednesday ....67 67 116 26) .... 100 195 232 7,365
Thursday ..... 67 674 117 1841 777 5361 57 287 7,560
Friday ........ 671/2 67% 255 2:9i 915 2271 390 252 6,840
ROSIN FOR THE WEEK HERE AND AT SAVANNAH.
Saturday. Monday. Tuesday. Wednesday. Thursday. Friday.
Jax. Say. Jax. Say. Jax Say. Jax. Bay. Ja. Say. Jax. Say.
WW ...... 5.40 5.5015.50 5.505.50 5.5015.40 5.4015.50 5.505.60 5.60
WG ......5.30 5.3515.40 5.405.40 5.4015.30 5.30)5.40 5.405.50 6.50
N ......... 5.15 5.2015.25 5.255.25 5.255.20 5.205.30 5.305.40 5.40
M ......... 5.10 5.1015.20 5.205.20 5.2015.10 5.1015.20 5.205.25 5.25
K ........5.00 5.0515.15 5.155.15 5.15|5.05 5.055.15 5.155.15 5.15
I .......4.50 4.504.60 4 604.60 4 004.60 4.604.65 4.654.70 4.70
H ......... 4.40 4.454.55 4.554.55 4.554.55 4.554.60 4.604.62 4.62
G ......... 4.15 4.304.30 4.304.30 4 304.35 4.354.40 4.404.40 4.40
S......... 4.15 4.254.25 4.254.25 4.54.30 4.304.35 4.354.35 4.35
E ........4.10 4.204.20 4.204.20 4.204.25 4.254.30 4.304.35 4.35
D ......... 4.10 4.154.20 4.204.20 4.204.25 4.254.30 4.304.32 4.32
CBA ...... 4.05 4.054.20 4.204.20 4.204.25 4.254.30 4.304.30 4.30
REPORT OF ROIN MOVEMENT HEiE AND AT SAVANNAH
Sales. Shipments. Reeelpts. Stocks.
Jax. Say. Jax. Say. Jax. Say. Jax. Bay.
Saturday ................ 673 33514,100 1.(I08I.001 1,061 30,009 42,416
Monday .................. 11.833 1,44213.700 1001 770 11126.910 42,427
Tuesday .................. 631 .... 1,360 413! 169 30623,980 42,320
Wednesday ............... 1.220 2p822,700 4.800 740 51022,789 38,030
Thursday ................ 418 41013,561 6251 264 1,27920,89 38,634
Friday ................... 496 1.27613.150 315[ 620 85317,532 39,2=2


I_ __ ___ _




12 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

Book and Pamphlet Work

IS OUR SPECIALTY.
*

With a large and well equipped plant and a full
corps of expert workmen, we are

Prepared to Execute High-Grade
Work Promptly

And at Reasonable Prices


Industrial Record Pub.Co.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 13



Jacksonville Grocery Comp'y

.. Wholesale O*wooers amd DBIMlers' Supplies.
mamm. e Wafense md a W Ast A. 0. L. Ry. eul, flo*de


NOTICE OF MASTER'S SALE.
Under and by virtue of a certain final
decree of foreclosure made by the Circuit
Court of the Fourth Judicial Circuit of


for nuts and bolts; 19 cigar boxes of
nuts and bolts; 2 magneters, second-hand;
1 mat, rubber, for auto car; 1 steam
whistle; 1 box of numbers, aluminum; 2
number pads.


Florida in and tor Duval County in Chan- Oils.
cery sitting, on the 4th day of April, A. 1 bbl. dope; 2 60-gallon cans of oil;
D. 1907, in a certain cause therein pend- 2 ie-allon cans No. 1 Mobiloil oil; 1
gallon eagleine; 1 gallon vacuum marine
ing wherein D. H. McMillan is complain- motor oil; 1 gallon vacuum mobiloil; 1
ant and the Clarke Automobile & Launch can Adam Cooke & Sons' dope; 1 quart of
Company, a corporation organized and ex- oil; 2 pints of oil; 1 gallon Standard
isting under the laws of the State of gas engine oil; 1 gallon best motoocylin-
der. oil (Buffalo); 1 quart standard gas
Florida, and others are defendants, the engine oil; I can valve voline, five gal-
undersigned, W. A. Hallowes, Jr., as Spec- ions; 1 can of monogram oil; 16 cans non-
ial Master in Chancery in said cause by fluid oil; 1 small oil can; 3 oil guns; 5
said order appointed, will on Monday, the second-hand oil guns; 3 second-hand oil
6tu day of May, A. D. 1907, during the cups.
legal hours of sale, commencing said sale Oe Fixtures.
in front of the court house door in Jack- 1 bookkeeper's desk; 1 inkstand; I
sonville, Duval county, Florida, and con- Carey safe; 1 clock; 1 typewriter and
tinuing said sale at the place of business desk: 1 Knight and Thomas fire extin-
of Hutto & Company on the St. Johns guisher: I small fire extinguisher; 1 roll-
River front between Main and Laura top desk and chair; 1 letter press; 1 wa-
strcets in said Jacksonville, Florida, where ter cooler; 1 pair scales; 1 loose-leaf led-
the property herein described now is, offer ger; 1 journal; 1 cash book.
for sale and sell to the highest and best Paint.
bidder for cash therefore the property de-
scribed in said decree, as follows: a can of aluminum paint; 1 quart of
a.sphaltum; I quart Davy's wood filer;
Automobiles. 1 quart brown paint; 5 gallons of as-
1 Ford engine, number 429, very incom- hialtum; 3 1-quart cans aluminum paint;
plete; 1 Ford engine number 530-1, runa- 3 1 pint cans aluminum paint; 1 half-pint
bout; 1 'ord engine, number 482, runa- can.
bout, very incomplete; 1 Oldsmobile, very I small pump; 1 Bowser long-distance
incomplete; 1 Cadillac runabout, No. 11; pumping outfit. No. 88177: 1 tank for
1 Pope-Hartford, No. 16; 1 Cadillac, No. above; 1 Bowser double oil cabinet, No.
13; 1 Cadillac, No. 5; 1 Cadillac runabout; 09277: 50 feet iron gas pipe; 35 boxes
1 Cadillac No. 1; 1 Northern runabout, Cadillac parts (cigar boxes); 4 boxes balls.
No. 8; 1 Cadillac, Model A, city number Polish.
267; 1 Northern touring car.
1 demijohn of sulphuric acid; 1 work- 10 I-quart cans of Monarch; 9 1/-gal;
bench; 1 box brass for beat railing and 1on cans of Globe; 5 1-pt. cans Brunqwick;
flags; 4 boxes balls; 18 bull dog battery 3 -1 t. cans of Globe; 21 1-pt. cans Burn-
connections; 1 roll Gandv belt (stock ishine:'3 I-gallon cans solarine; 9 1-gal-
room); 1 2-gal. rubber cement; 1 old work Ion cans of brilliant; 3 jugs, 2 gallons each,
cabinet; 2 side curtains, rubber; 1 bdl. lustre; I bundle eleven patent rims; 3
canvas curtains; 2 cylinder coils, second- pieces of steel, five feet each; 1 bundle
hand; 3 Veeder cyclometers, complete; 1 of four springs; 1 bundle of three springs;
Veeder Cyclometer, incomplete; 3 linen 2 boxes of stationery, advertising matter;
dusters; 1 2-horse power pumping engine; new sprockets: I steering wheel; I ci-
2 funnels; 7 second-hand Columbia genera- ""r box of spark plugs; 5 switches; I
tors; 2 second-hand "Neverout" genera- bundle of separator's storage batteries;
tors; 1 6-inch dragon horn; 1 broken Ga- 2 stove and pipe.
briel horn: 1 Cadillac hub cap; 3 Oliver Tkes.
jacks; 1 Oliver jack, broken; 1 Duf Mfg. I Hartford 28x3, No. 712062; 1 Hart-
Co. jack; 1 Oliver jack. second-hand; 15 ford. 28x3. detachable; 2 Goodrich, 30x3;
boxes of auto parts, etc.; 3 drawers of 1 Goodrich, 30x31; 1 Goodrich. 30x4,
auto parts; 1 Dunlap Motor carriage re- Won't Slip; 1 Goodrich 28x31, No. 2078;
pair kit; 6 lamps, broken; I part box in- I leather-covered. 30x4. No. COSj08 .1
candescent lamps, 16 c. p.; 1 new tail Diamond single-tube-tire, 2fc2%.; 3 see-
lamp; 1 new side lamp; 2 old headlights; ond hand casings, vulcanized, no nmrkr;
2 arc lights, second-hand; 7 lamp brack- 1 old Continental, 28x3.
ets.
eta. machinery. Inner Tubes.
1 emorv stand and wheel (Stand B., 1 Goodrich, 28x3%. marked "pro three";
Diamond Machy. Co.); 1 work bench; 2 1 Goodrich 30x3; 2 Diamonds, 30x2%;
vises, 1 piece gone; 1 American drill 1 Pennsylvania R. Co., 760x90; 2 Penn-
press, No. 2480, American Tool Works, sylvania R. Co., 30x3; 1 Pennsylvania R.
Cin., O.; 1 air pump. 3 cyl. (Con. Peters Co. 30x4; I no name "August" 28x3; 1
Pump. Co.. New York.); 1 milling ma- Diamond, 30x4. second-hand; 2 Goodrich
chine, No. 2112. Universal (Garvan Mach. 30x31/.. second-hand: 1 Goodrich, 30x3%,
Works); 1 lathe: 1 tool stand; 1 2 H. P. second-hand: 2 30x4 Goodrich, second-
motor; 1 9 K. Watt generator (No. 1636 hand: I second-hand inner tube.
Bullock); I five-horse power gas engine 2 boxes of %-pound rolls, M. & W. tire
(Nat. Eng. Co., Saginaw); 20 feet line tave; 25 feet of copper tubing; I roll of
Shaft; 4 line shaft hangers; 2 double rubber tubing; 1 2-cylinder timer; r Fisk
drive friction C. shaft with hangers; 1 sin- vulcanizer: g cones;. 8 blocks.
ule line friction shaft; 275 feet belttng; 1 1 auxiliary exhaust valve (Franklin);
?-eyl. Repose Beaver engine: 1 2-cyl. 30- 11 bundles of insulated wire; I large can-
horse power marine engine; 4 rheostats; ony top: I canvas folding top; 3 second-
800 feet wire, Nos. 2 and 4; 1 switchboard hand water tanks; 2 second-hand gasoline
complete: 1 hoisting block and chain; I tanks.
2 H. P. National engine (Type 2. Speed W. A. HALITOWES, JR..
375); 10 pulleys: 1 anvil; I forge; 1 bench Special-Master.






IHI TOM
AIBDY !AMID- Aceni seoining money. lendatO e lb l
AinuIfu Otft ndContlrct form t o for
mig nok.x.pM L. J. IIOLS MCI sol ATLANTA
Cleare. ULO GA.


FIFTH AVENUE HOTEL
Madison Square, New York.

American Plan $5 per day. European Plan $2.00 per day
The most famous representative hotel
S, i' n America. New a the newest, always
Sresh and[clear. The location in Madiso
S- Square is t.e finest in the city.
HITCHCOCK. DARLING d1 COMPANY.


WNSE3S 30


I ATTENTION !

Sawmill & Turpentine Men "

If you use Axes and want the
best buy RIXFORD'S. They are
a little high priced, it is true, in
S fact the highest club axe made-
$14.00 per dozen in any weight,
but you get more than your mon-
ey's worth in quality. The best
is none too good, and always the
cheapest.

Send Your Orders Direct To


W. H. Briggs Hardware Co.

Sole Southern Agents
VALDOSTA. GEORGIA
Jobbers of Mill and Turpentine Supplies.
. . . . ...W<"5"t -_ -%" -


e,~~,.aeareeaeeeeeeeeeeoeee


L W. WEST, DL X .YNft
10M & HARRMun
President. V. KaiL"Y .
VimWfa~eMi1s


FL L RWIN
SWIy dl Tram
D.L RL. A
AsiSse'y mW T,.


WEST FLYNN & HARRIS CO.
GERNEA BLOo. savannaH. Ga.
GENERAL OFFICES IERMASIA LDG. sMh. Ge.
WEST RLDG. Jackaemvil.l el

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
NAVAL STORES RECEIVED AT SAVANNAH, GA, JACKSOM VILLA,
FLA, AND FERNANDINA, FLA.

Vholeiae Gr.ocms alRo Dealers in Hay, Grain ad Heavy
Harnebs.

Q for the celel!rw Urno- TurpalinS Axe.
AS,4 Q1^ 1ENT $4ilRN Sola W REH PhiluSdeS phs.
MERCHANTS WAREHOUSES.


SAVANNAH, GA.


TAMPA, LA


7 7 :.11 1 1 1 -- -, - _- _-:- -


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


ji~i*;+s*~+~\t~\~F1F


1 _









14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


E. S. NASH. President. S. P. SHOTTEIL. G. M. BOARDMAN. Treasurer.
J; F. C. MYERS. Vice-President. Chairman Board of Directors. C. J. DeLOACH. Secretary.


American Naval Stores Company
(OF WEST VIRGINIA)
SSucesswrs to S. P. Shetter Company, Patterson Downing Company,

Exporters and Dealers in All Grades of ROSIN, PURE SPIRITS TURPENTINE,

TAR, PITCH. ROSIN OIL and all other products of the pine tree.


HEAD OFIfOES: SAVANNAH, GLORGIA.


NEW YORK
PHILADELPHIA
CHICAGO


ST. LOUIS
CINCINNATI
LOUISVILLE


BRANCHES:
WILMINGTON
BRUNSWICK
JACKSONVILLE


FERNANDINA
TAMPA
PENSACOLA


NEW ORLEANS
MOBILE
GULIPORT


(Continued from page 3.)

The economic value of geology has
shown itself so great in every way that
it presents a forcible argument for the es-
tablishment of a survey in Florida. In
proof of this the revenue derived from the
phosphate regions of the State is a con-
vincing argument. In addition to this, it
may be said that there are certain sections
of the State where conditions in sedimen-
tation exist, such as are found possibly
nowhere else in the world. The result is
that certain filtering earths have a special
economic value. It is highly probable
that in these areas there are quantities
of clays of various kinds which would be
well adapted to the making of pottery.
It is a self-evident fact that nothing
is more needed in Florida than a thorough-
ly good brick clay, which would produce
brick of fine quality for building pur-
poses. The same is true with reference
to building stone-it is possible that we
have both, and in both these particulars
the survey would be of the greatest ad-
vantage in bringing to the public notice
local areas which might produce building
material which would save immense sums
of money in freight and other particulars,
and at the same time provide labor for
our local people, as well as profit for land
owners and those who engage in the in-
dustry of their production. While it is
not to be supposed from the general geo-
logical character of Florida that it will
prove itself rich in any of the precious
metals, yet its geological resources are so
entirely unknown, that a desire for knowl-
edge alone should profit the establishment
of the survey, keeping in mind the item
of possible profit.
The recent oil development in Texas
and southern Louisiana is an immediate
result of geological research, as applied
to those States. While we will not pre-
diet any oil horizon for the State of Flor-
ida. yet it is possible there may be such
and others of equal economic value.
No State in the Union has been more
in the public eye of the world because
of its climatic conditions as a health re-
sort. It has been shown beyond a doubt
that an important element in climatic
condition is found in the geological forma-
tion. To show. as can undoubtedly be
shown. that the sand mantle of Florida is
but the porous covering of an open and
porous limestone, would be an important
factor in disarming the argument regard-
ing malarial conditions in the State.
Inquiries regarding the geological con-


editions from scientific students in colleges
and universities and from mining compa-
nies and engineers, both in this country
and abroad, have been most frequent. As
a matter of fact, there is no standard
work of reference which states the truth
regarding the geological status of Florida,
and. except a few fugitive publications of
the proceedings of the American Institute
of Mining Engineers, there are no private
contributions to the truth regarding Flor-
ida to which students or practical business
men can be referred. In addition to the
above, there are many other reasons, too
numerous to be stated, which might be
added; reasons that will suggest them-
selves to all who are interested in the
public good. are impelled by State pride,
and who keep pace with the progress of
the times.

FLORIDA'S FISHERIES.

The Necessity of Protecting by Legislation
One cf the State's Most Val-
uable Resources.
Few Floridans-even those to the manor
Ixrn--realize the vahle or importance of
the fisheries of their State, or the rapidity
witi which these resources are now being
depleted. "for revenue only."
The commercial destruction of fish in
this State has now reached a point where
some restrictive legislation is imperatively
demanded: and yet few of our people
have ever given this subject even a passing
thought or considered for a moment the
immense advantages to be gained by both
State and fishermen by judicious legisla-
tion. Some have vehemently opposed any
action looking to any legislation that
would in any manner interfere with the
present wasteful, destructive system, ap-
parently failing to realize that it is only
a question of time when all these immense
food supplies will be entirely destroyed
unless protective and restrictive legislation
intervenes to save it to the people.
The wise man learns by observation.
The wise community can likewise profit
by the results of the experience of others.
It. however, often happens that the neigh-
lor. fr< m interested motives, does not
want others to profit by observation and
resorts to all sorts of means to stop prog-
ress, nevertheless the wise community will


.y Turpentine Cups
' .. IMPORTANT.
.s our supply of cups is limited, we sug-
-.. that intending purchases end ln
I heir orders promptly to insure delivery.
For Ptees On
Cups, Gutters and al Tols
Used I te Nerty system
of Turpestlu
Address

SChattanooga Pottery

... Company

. .- Jacksmvll, Florida


THE COMMERCIAL BANK
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. Bracbes: Ocals a Lake City
The largest leading State Bank in Jacksonville. Is conducted in an old-
fashioned strictly conservative manner and is subject to regular examination
by the Comptroller.
trIndividual and Savings Accounts solicited.
H. ROBINSON, W. 5 OWEN, H. GAILLARD,
Presidet. Vice-President CasbMr.
ia6X

karrmmmraPuJuraruiarrumJ;mrrrrr~nrrmrrramou








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 15


be governed by results and not by the
venement protestations and arguments of
the interested ones. It acts upon what
is manifest.
Let any one suggest State control of
the water products and immediately the
cry "free fish," "God-given rights," and a
uozen other catch-penny, clap-trap argu-
ments and shouts fill the air, all from
certain quarters. Why? Because the peo-
ple who want to continue to waste and
destroy the substance of the majority are
utterly regardless of the consequences to
those who may come after them. While
perhaps not expressing in so many words,
the sentiment is the same as that of a
man in a neighboring county who two
years ago brutally and honestly voiced his
selfishness when expostulated with for his
ruthless destruction of timber, some on
* his own land and very much more on land
on which he held timber leases, said in
reply to the question: "If you keep this
policy up, what will posterity do?" -- -
posterity. It can take care of itself the
best way it can. I am looking out for
myself." Each of these fishermen is look-
ing out for himself in his own selfish, de-
structive way.
Over fifty years ago the fishermen of
Maine were waked up to the need of laws
that would protect and encourage this
particular industry. It was a selfish mo-
tive that prompted the first move. The
law grew out of the desire of the Maine-
ites to get all the fish for themselves,
they objected to the "other fellow" fish-
ing on their shores. The law enacted
was so effective in stopping depredations
and putting a stop to wasteful destruction
that it was amended and made more strin-
gent several times and each time with ad-
vantage to both fish and fishermen. The
effort to keep the "other fellow" out re-
sulted in protection against home waste-
fulness and the industry has steadily
grown in importance until the Maine fish-
e-rmen have over $3,000,000 invested in
boats, nets and other appliances for sea
and shore fishing. They get in annual re-
turn values, nearly $3,500,000 from sea
and shore fishing which does not include
the sardine fishing; this, when packed
ready for shipment, amounts to over $5,-
000,000, and the State gets a revenue of
over $100,000 per annum from the sea and
shore fish industry. There is yet another
advantage that has grown out of the fish
laws, not anticipated or contemplated, and
that is the comparative certainty of the
catch. The protective laws have insured
the continuity of the supply, a thing that
the fishermen never thought of when they
were endeavoring to "keep the other fel-
low off."
The same selfishness that prompted
the Maine fishermen to demand laws
that would protect their fish from the
depredations of "the other fellow" prompts
some of these provident fellows to shout
S"free fish" for Florida, for when their
coasts are bound in ice, they sail, or steam,
down to the Florida coast and fish in the
most profligate manner and they are not
alone, for all the Atlantic coast contrib-
utes to the depredating hords of fishermen
who want "Free Fish" in Florida so that
they may be undisturbed in their destruc-
tion of Florida's water wealth. The less
we have the more we will be compelled to
buy from our neighbors. Is it the part
of wisdom to permit this sort of thing
to continue?
In addition to the revenue derived from
sea and shore fishing the State of Maine


Tam"B Dusiem Caloeo
S s UNtebe"placeto t 0


A Geed nualmm Easad
0 0 0 O
Sl A Complet Set of Books* Aj
,t The Beat System of Shorthand J
J Staadad Typewriter
J Rail Road iipatches J JR
Busin Letters, and ll Business
Paljpe Used by Busines Houses
S ee
SSenad for Prices and Specimens Jl
Addr.. L. M. EATTON. Presided
Kraue Bu ldin. Tamp. Florida


got last year $31,509.37 for non-resident
hunting licenses and lines, and $10,113.41
our other licenses, connected with hunting
and fishing, maLking u i41,az2.i7 realized
irom her forests and streams. It pays.
is ttere any greater inducement
11 Aamne can, by legal enactment side
depredation and trom pirates of home
production and in so protecting her inter-
ests increase the product of her water
arms, what can not florida do with her
immense water resources and her splendid
climate? An expert from Washington has
predicted that the shell tish supply of the
whole United States will very soon be
dependent upon Southern waters. Is it not
then the part of wisdom to look well into
the future and by the enactment of judi-
cious laws prepare to meet this demand,
to profit by it and to continue indefinitely
the source of supply Proper manage-
ment under good laws strictly enforced
will perpetuate every variety of food fish
for an indefinite time.
Maine fishermen are not the only ones
who "know a good thing when they see
it." Virginia fisheries employ 35,000 men.
Her oyster business amounts to about $3,-
750,000 each year and her revenue from
shell fish amounts to over $70,000 a year.
Virginia estimates her oyster interests at
nearly $8,500,000 per annum and her crabs,
clams, and terrapins at $1,250,000, or her
snell fish industry at $9,750,000 per annum.
As in Maine, Rhode Island, Maryland and
elsewhere the fish are looked after, the
resources of the waters have constantly
increased in importance and in value and
as a natural consequence the fishermen
have thriven with the rest of the people.
If Florida will act wisely and adopt
good fish laws, laws that will protect
the fish and the legitimate fishermen, a
like condition will soon prevail here. Rev-
enues from now wasted or neglected re-
sources are clear profit to the people not
only in reducing taxation but in increased
products. Make our big water farm pro-
ductive to their limit and Floridians will
all feel the good effects. These "farms"
of ours are peculiarly rich in variety and
productiveness; we have nearly every va-
riety of fish that any section can boast of
and a number that are only known to our
waters alone; we have oysters, clams.
scalops, crabs, shrimp. sea crawfish and
sponges, with an abundance of foul fish
to turn into valuable fertilizer and other
products, all sources of great wealth just
waiting proper protection so that perma-
nency may be guaranteed to those who
wil turn these products into money.


* 4.
MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


Boilermaking and Repairing

S S Still Boilers and Pumps.
SHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.

Jacksonville. Fla.









DIAMONDS AND WATCHES

We simply ask a call. We can show yeo, at correct and mosey
saving prices, many papers of loose pure white, perfect
DIAMONDS. It Is oar desire to coatinle being the largest
Diameod dealers it Jacksonville, uad oar specialty Is floe roed-
cut gems and high-grade Waltham and Eigl Watches.


1UHESS SLAER II-3 St., W3 h. s, Jaewlry,
X~fct;<^^~g^%L~L~i^vg~aat^ xssaaW gfaasxt


PLANTERS


"Old Time" Remedies

THE JOY OF THE HOUSEHOLD.


Thee four great remedies, ubian Tea, Benedicta, Cuban Relief
and Cuban Oi, are the joy of the household. With them neur at hand, a
man i ready for ay emergency. He has a safe, reliable and speedy relief i t-u
for wife, children, self or stock. With these remedies you ean keep the
doctor's hands out of your pockets, and yet have a healthy, happy famny.
Besides, you can cure your stock of any ailment that may befall them.
NUBIAN TEA-In Liquid or Powder perm-Is the great family medicine. It
will cure all forms of Liver and Kidney Complaints, Prevets Chil and Malarial
Fever. Cures the common ailments of ehildrea; and a laative toni it is without
an equal--afe and reliable. In the liquid, it i extremely palatable-eves children
like it-and is READY FOR USE.
BIINDICTA is a woman's medicine. It will cure all the diseases common to
women, and classed as Female Trouble. It will bring youth beck to the laded woman,
who has gone one suffering because she thought it woman' lot. It will eare for the
young girl just entering womanhood; and prepare the young woman for the sacred
duties of wife and mother.
CUBAN RELIEF-The instant Paint Killer, for either man or beast. Relieves
instantly, Colic, Cramps, Cholera Morbus, Diarrhoea, Dystentery and Sick Headache.
For colic in horse it is an infallible remedy and is guaranteed to give relief in five
minutes.
CUBAN OIL-The Beat Bone and erve Liniment. Is antiseptic for cuts,
snagged or torn flesh, and will instantly relieve the pain. Cure inset bites and stings,
scalds and burs, bruises and sores, chapped hands and face, ore and tender feet.
Relieves rheumatic pains, lame back, stiff joints, and in stock cures wire fence cuts,
scratehee, thrush, splint, collar sores, saddle galls, and diseased hoofs.

Write s for Pricea

SPENCER MEDICINE CO., Chattanooga. Ten.




When You Come to White Springs Register at the



TELFORD HOTEL

Modern Conveniences. The Nearest Hotel to the Spring
RATES FURNISHED ON APPLICATION.


T. R.. WOODSON, Proprietor





16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


fcfcM ^1^ Y"_ Want a Tpene Locaston? *
I r0.. W41ant a supuli Locaten?
SYou Wa ant ay kniif lerida and?
Yu YMean Business
CafllJ n sa Werit to
J. H. Livingston & Sons,
OCALA. FLORIDA.


heM etropolis

Is the Paper you want. It is
published daily and is Tfom 12
to 16 hours ahead of any other
daily newspaper in Florida .
$50 a Year $2.50 Six Months
Full Telegraphic and Stock
reports. If you want to keep
posted on the news, get the
Metropolis.
CARTER & RUSSELL PUB. CO.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.

HEAVY TURPENTINE MULFS
AND SADDLE AND DRIVING HORSES
ALWAYS ON HAND. PRICES RIGHT.
W. A. COOK, Sals St&lsi, *J"w.1 s e.. TAMPA.


JOSEPH D. WEED.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. KRENSOE.


J. D. WEED & CO.,
SAVAholeal GEadGIA.
Wholesale Hardware,


RAILROAD


SPIKES,


Bar, Band and Hoop Iron.


Turpentirne 'Tools,


Etc.


"TO OWNERS Of PINE LANDS."
"If you want to utilize your light wood
with good profit, write us for particulars.
We are builders of wood turpentine
plants, manufacturing a first-class ar-
ticle and guarantee sale of products at
high prices."

HENRY SUNDNHIMt CO.
SAVANNAH ,-GA.


SJ. S Schofield's Sons Compan),

Headquarters
f Distillers Pumping
No plazt -.qoaqtpl.. without soe.


SGrade Machinry,
a as well as carry a full and complete 4
.kof- :
Mill Supp ies, Pipe, J
oi >l sBalter TubeIt, Etc.
Soih Advise your wats. i
SGMacon, Georgia.
S4. as well asca-ry A full andi of m pletI


S-n; Mio *m 1pe Pipe" f
* er TulrIes, [t." *
Advise your wants.


**** ************ ***********************
t-0ro0 4ioroi4i ii ire 4i iir $ei-- c oim mios iiiii


J. W. Motte.
President.


Joh





Naval St
S.


C. B. Prke.
Vice-Pres.


Jaml. McNatt,
Viee-Pres.


W. W. Wilder,
See. A Trens.


n R. Young Co.,

Commission
Merchants.


ores Factors.


Wholesale Grocers.


LvUsflnh 4k Brunswick. G.


m4


*4,


DIRECTORS: D. C. ASLEY. President. DIRECTORS:
D. C. Ashley. B. W. BLOUNT. Ist Vice Presdent B. W. Blount.
SG. A. Peteway, and General Manaser. B. A. Carter.
Chb, H. Brown, CARL MOLLER, 2nd Vice Pres. T. G. Culbreth.
A. Baca.r G.A. PETTEWAY, 3d Vice P-es. S. PLetinoer,
J. G. Crnford, B.G. ,
H. Weibet. S. H. BERG, Sec. Mad Tres. Carl Moler.
S. H. Bers. A C. BACON, Aat. Sec.- and Treas. W. T. B. Harrison.

PENINSULAR NAVAL STORES CO.
Commission Merchants
and Wholesale Grocers
,- jJacsenvUie and Tamnpa, Florda.

Capital Stock, $1,000,000.
ItM:.i)L:.s. .c3fSSav


SUMMER LumBER COMPANY
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
Rough ra Dressed Lumber
Long Leaf Yellow Pine.
BOXES AMN OArs.







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 1
THE WEEKLY INDUSTBIAL BECOBU). 17


W. W. AS~BURN, Moaltrie, Ga. N. EMANUEL. Brourawlok, Ga.
W. R. BOWEN., itaed.ra, Ga. D. T. FURSI Savalms GaO.
J. J. DORMINY, Broxton, OG. R G. .KIRKLAND. Nicbols, Ga.
0. T. McINTOSH, Savanas, Ga.

SSouthern States Naval Stores Co.
Savannah, Ga.


Factors
Ship to Savannah


Clyde Steamship Company


and Commission Merchants
Gat Competition Highest Prices Irompltest Retirnj
Correspond With Us


Malsby Mechinery Compeny


of Jacksonville, Fla.
o- .
PetaMw, -i I m mOiam M

frtlaMs outfit a Specialty.
Write ftr handse iust'd 196 catale

22 Ocean Steet.


East Coast Lumber Co.

ROUGH AND DRESSED LONG LAF

Yellow Pine Lumber


Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carlad Lots
Steamer Shipments a Specalty.
WATERTOWN. FLORIDA





Atlantic Coast Line


Famous Trains.


New York and Florida Special leaves Jacksonville
daily except Sunday, 12:30 p. m., for all points East,
Solid Pullman.
Chicago and Florida Limited daily, solid vestibule,
leaving Jacksonville 9:30 a. m. for all points East.
Coach on this train also.


For rates. Pullman reservations and
all other detailed information, write or
call on


FRANK C. BOYLSTON,
District Passenger Agent Atlantic Coast Line

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


NEW YORK, CHsARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
Tno ra iMl st.asp rhi O thi a riM ft si. t Mi, w ass, sa at
chriesa., a C., be& way.
(P, N IrthL iv 2) BArLKa. Char- aMi Bee York.
Vedelday, Mch.20,at 3:00pm.... IROQUOIO ....Thursday, April 4,atl0:00am
Tuday, April 2,at3:00pm.... ARAPAHON ...Sunday, April 7,Atl0:00am
Wednesday, April 3,at3:00pm... ALGONQUIN ...Monday, April 8,at lO:00Q
Friday, April 6,at3:00pm... COMANCHE .. ..Wednesday, April 1 at 10:00am
Saturday, April 6,at3:00pm ... HURON ...... Thursday, April 11, at 10:00am
Tuesday, April 9,at3:00pm ..... APACHE .....Sunday, April 14, at 1 s 00a
Wednesday, April10, at 3:00p... IROQUOIS ....Monday, April 1, at 10:00am
Friday, April 1, at 3:00pm... ARAPAHOE .. Wedneay, April 17, at 10:00al
Saturday, April 13, at 3:00pm... ALGONQUIN ...Thursday, April 18, at 10:00am
Tuesday, Aprill6,at3:00pm... COMANCHE ...Sunday, April 21, at 10:00am
Wednesday, April 17,at3:00pm .... HURON ...... Monday, April 2, at 10:00am
Friday, April 19, at 3:00pm. ..... APAC ..... Wednesday, April 2, at 10:00am
Saturday, April 20, at 3:00pm.... IROQUOI8 .... hurday, April 2, at 10:00am
Tuesday, April 3, at 3:00pm.... AAPAHOB ...Sunday, April a, at 10:00am
Wednesday, April 4, at3:00pi... AUiOWQUIN ...Monday, April2, at 10:00am
Friday, April 26, at 3:00pm... COMANC ....Wedamsday, May atl0:00am
Saturday, April 27,at 3:00pm..... HURON .....luurday, May 2,atl0:00am
Tuesday, April 30, at 3:00pm..... APACH S .....Sunday, May 5, at 10:00am
*Jaeksoa vi to Naw York direct.
CLYDE NBW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN UNES.
Fraiwt serves tw J e asM PY a a oomast eTt.


,EGR $@MA Mie


rma hut Cab~iae tait.


Lewb Waif, Btom T6AMJU-
**Via Charlton. *Via Bruaswic.
Monday, March 11.......... *CHIPPEWA........... Monday, March 18
Saturday, March 16 .......... **KATAHDIN ...........jaturday, March27


CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER UINE
Bstwem Jadmarvls a4 Sftaa L
Stepping at Palatka, Astor, 8t. fsda, 1Bralrd (DaLad), a9 itermediate
ludiW M fSt. Jona R1er.
STEAMERS "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
AND "FREDRICK DE BARY"
Are appointed to sail as follows: Lave Jaeksonville daly aapt astwJay at
3:30 p. m. Returann, lave Sanford daily excpt Sndays at 9:3 a. m.

bUUT 1BOUND4 ut m-la]RUT-
aead dov, 1 se __
Lmave *:p. m ................... Jaek.tka ................ A i: m.
Leave 3:00a.m.................. Aaor ....................Ilw 3:3p.I.
............... .......... ... B r feu (DIo .mB ) .............. L v 1:0 p. R.
Arrive 8:30a.. .................... patord .................. vI :Osa.
Arrive 1dS0 aj...................... s r ..................iL 1- :0a. O m

G JER.AL PASSNGER AMD TICERT OFFIC, saa W. BAY 8T, JACK'VILLL
P. M. IIMO SNER. Jr., A. 6. P. A., Jackserleil, P a.
JON PMERREsL, T. P. A. A. c. AeC6LXrr, E. P. A.
Jac*/srle. JIa. P/er.r . N., aew rrk.
o. TA YLOr Pass. Trae iMar. C. C. SlROW s'l Pass. Agent


. P. j.os r. r. A.
Jacksrllle PFa.
w. 6. C Pco Jr.. r. A.
Jrckseavrrle, Fla.


290 rodwa.y, New rOrk.
L. S. COE E, C. 4.
Leesberg, I1a.
CLYDE MILNEr . A.
Pier J N. .., New York


C' IYLOV L,. Agent., Jc.vaw'rU., P ..


Standard Electric Company
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
X EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL X






18 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Prospectus Florida Immigration Number of the Weekly Industrial
Record.

The INDUSTRIAL RECORD PUBLISHING COMPANY will issue at some date on or about the
first of May next, a special number, to be entitled "The Florida Immigration Number."
This edition will comprise something like 100 pages, carefully compiled and edited, and will be inter-
estingly illustrated, all illustrations bearing upon the subject in question and designed for the purpose of
attracting to the State of Florida desirable immigrants, both from the domestic immigrant centres and
from foreign countries.
It is the purpose of the Industrial Record Co. to issue an edition of fully 50,000 copies, and to circu-
late it by its regular channels of circulation, augmented by the industrial departments of various railroads
coming into the South, and through individual and corporate interests throughout Florida which may
have their own individual sources of distribution. It will be mailed to all the newspapers of the country,
with requests for favorable mention, and will be advertised through the leading magazines and farm jour-
nals, to be sent upon request to interested parties who may have their attention thus directed to Florida
and to its advantages from a farming, commercial and industrial standpoint.
In order to attract the attention of those people who may not read the English language, an epitome
of the entire edition will be printed in several languages, namely: German, Italian, Scandinavian, Rus-
sian, and as many others as we may deem advisable.
The edition, from an editorial and compilation standpoint will cover all subjects setting forth the ad-
vantages of Florida to the capitalist, immigrant and the homeseeker, and will have a large number of
special articles by well known authorities on the various phases of the immigrant situation. Among these
will be articles by Commissioner Watson, of South Carolina, telling of his visits to Europe to get immi-
grants and the establishment of an immigrant line between European points and South Carolina ports;
an article setting forth the means used by other States in the South in inducing immigration-the officials,
amount of money expended, etc.; an article covering the work being done by the railroads in inducing do-
mestic immigration to the Southeastern States. The edition will also contain an article from the Gover-
nor of the State of Florida upon the subject in question; from the Department of Agriculture, giving
detailed and tabulated information as to Florida lands, advantages, opportunities, etc. It will contain
among other things an article on the effort now being made (and we trust will have been accomplished by
the date of the issue) for the establishment in Florida of a Department of Immigration, which matter will
come before the approaching Florida Legislature. It will contain articles from the heads of various com-
mercial organizations in Florida, notably from Mr. Rawls, President of the Florida State Board of Trade;
Mr. Fuller, of the Tampa Board of Trade; Capt. Garner, of the Jacksonville Board of Trade; CoL W. P.
Corbett, Chairman of the Immigration Committee of the Jacksonville Board of Trade; Mr. Edwin Brob-
ston, whose efforts are well known in immigration work, and others. It will contain in a concise, paragraph
form "one thousand facts about Florida" for the quick reader who wants to know all about the State be-
fore visiting it. It will set forth the advantages of specific localities for specific purposes; for instance, the
fruit section, the vegetable section, the general farming section, and the opportunity es offered by Florida
today for the location here of large maunfactories and smaller industries of all kinds. It will containn facts
of interest regarding the various towns and cities of the State, their adaptability and desirabiity, matters
of transportation, etc. It will deal with every phase of the labor question to attract a sirable labor to this
State.
All in all, the edition is planned upon a most elaborate scale and is planned to cover every point of
interest that may appeal to the man who has his eye on Florida and to the man who is looking for a
desirable farming, manufacturing or business location in the South.
The editor-in-chief of the Industrial Record, Mr. J. A. Hollomon, will have directorship of all articles
prepared for this special number, and the detail preparation will be in the hands of a staff of competent
writers, already employed for that purpose.
This "Immigration Edition of the Industrial Record" will no doubt mark an epoch in trade journal-
ism in the South, and it is fitting that the Industrial Record should issue an edition of this kind, in view of
the fact that it is the exponent of the leading industrial and commercial organizations of the State, be-
ing the official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association, the Southeastern Cane Growers' Asso-
ciation, endorsed by the Georgia-Florida Sawmill Association, etc.
In preparing the data for this special Immigration Edition, much attention will be given in gather-
ing facts and figures which will prove valuable to the energetic and progressive organizations and private
citizens in getting passed by the coming Legislature a bill creating an Immigration Department and in ask-
ing the Legislature to appropriate a liberal fund for carrying on this great work.
The Industrial Record will work hand-in glove with the Florida State Board of Trade, and individual
boards of trade of the State, in their efforts to successfully solve the question of increasing the population
of the State with a desirable citizenship.


Cay & McCall
mrmats asmk c.
-uwite Bite n-i *.


LIGHT SAW MILLS
SHINGEL AND LATH MACHINERY
AND SUPPLIES
ErIes Ener, rtls amd Reps.
Try
LOMBARD WORKS
AVGUTA. GEORIGIA.


CO.


Wholeale Dealer in ad BotUts c f
ANl.EUSER.-BUSCH
St. Louis Lager Beer

Liers, Wie, MiNral Watrs
Wrie for Price



TYPEWRITERS
$10 Up
Repairing. AH Makes
Ribbns for all machines, SOc
Carbon Paper $1 a hundr
GRIVO TYPEWRIT R
GRIVOT COMPANY,
6 West Bay St. Jackssvile Fl.


THE BOND & BOURS CO.
WHOLESALE i RETAIL

HARDWA-RE
SASH, DOORS, BLINDS, PAINTS.
Oils, Glass, Stoves, Tinware, -Couinttf5 olloware.
i0 WEST BAY STREET. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Successful Men
appreciate, use and advise Life Insu-
rance. The advice of successful men
is worth following. Insure in

THE PRUDENTIAL 4"W" "


WAL VTTI&r.
41&ftWtCW6W9=1e" n


JOHN F. DRYDEN, Pm..
Uumn Oftfe. Neweih.% J


_ _


___ _~


I.J"'I







Industrial

Publishi


AX


PUBLISHERS


Record I


X


PRINTERS


A


r-uL


A4


With one of the largest and best equipped printing plants in the
South and with a full complement of skilled labor, we are prepared
to execute high class work promptly and at reasonable prices.
No Job too Large or too Small for our Careful Attention


0


~dS;~j~~i~i~i~i_~'ii~ilr~c_~S~;~ cCTT~Cl~rrrr~mccrrcrurcrrr~c~Lecccccrrc i


__ __


- -- --- -- --- --


---- -~---~ ~~-


E1L~nnc~;~-~-~~~-tr;~;~;r~~;~iucrrr






GREENLEAF & CROSBY CO., 41 west Bay Street


Diamonds,
Watches,
Fine


Wedding
and
Annlver-


Jewelry, Asry Gifts
Clocks,
Cut Glass Sterling
Novelties Silverware,
Toilet "1847
Articles, Rogers"
Plated Ware
Attention Comparison

to of Prices
Mail Orders h vited
At the Sign of the Big Clock, - Jknnvlle. Fla.
WI ITE FOR CATALOGUE


~dL~~)IPil'~_~]F~I;~-~ ~-~ i t l~rr r


Half Tones-Zinc Etchings

Illustratina and Engravina Department
-OF- -

THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of Commercial Work, Pamphlets, etc
A SPECIALLY IS MADE OF DESIGNING RETOUCHING AND EMBELLISHING PHOTOGRAPHS AND PICTURES.
IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED.


A Florida


Enterprise.


Try It.


'-~CIC~CIC~1C~TrrTrCICICICIMmrrrr~i~~~