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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00217
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: March 23, 1907
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00217
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text





'"C 0R
pUSTRIALR.. 07






fYg6Y IAVAI gToRE0
ALV I EKR GUERAbl
frD0DTV&TRIJAI FI4AMGIAh
E7f5EWFSPAPEk


.Xl | That Immigration Number. ,o \ c '.
The forthcoming Immigration Number of the IN-
DUSTRIAL RECORD promises to be a record-breaker. The
subject is one that everybody is talking about and,
of course the Record, of all mediums, is the natural
exponent of the movement. Already leading rail-
roads, manufacturing plants, wholesale houses, fac-
torage houses, real estate corporations, etc., have sub-
scribed for copies and space and every day adds big
"-R strength to the already successful beginning. Indica-
l '}.y tions are that this will be the largest and most success-
4\ P ful special edition ever put out in Florida, and that it
I |will be of untold advantage to the State goes without
saying.


p


: JACKSONVILLE, fLA. SAVANNAH, GA.


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CONSOLIDATED


NAVAL STORES COMPANY.


Home Office: JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
s Branches: Savannah. Ga., and Pensacola, Fla.

W. C. POWELL, Preudent; B. F. BULLED, H. L. COVINGTON, J. A. CRANFORD, D. H. McMILLAN, B. R. POWELL, C. M COVINGTON, JOHN H.
POWELL, Vies Presidents; C. P. DUSENBURY, Secretary and Treasurer.
LXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: W. C. Powelh, C. B. Rogers, H. L. Covington, B. F. Bullard, J. A. Cranford.
DILoCTOR8: W. C. APowell, B. F. Bullard. C. B. Rogers, J. A. Cranford, W. J. Hillman, John H. Powell., W. F. Coachman, H.L. Covington, C. Downing, D. H.
I McMillan, R. B. Powell, C. M. Covington, S. A. Alford.


I NAVAL STORES FACTORS

I Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
The "Consolidated" is purely a co-operative Company. Its Interests are Identical with those
of the Producers. The patronage of turpentine operators everywhere Invited.
Two Million acres of land and Timber for sale on easy terms.
Producers are invited to call or correspond.


COVINGTON COMPANY,
WHOLESALE MERCHANTS,

Dry Goods. Notions, Men's Furnishings
Blankets. Comforts. Convict Clothing,
UNION-MADE OVERALLS.


McMillan Bros.


Southern Copper
Works
Manufacturers of TURPENTINE STILLS
Complete Outfits and Extra Kettles, Caps, Arms, Worms, Fur-
nace Doors and Grates always on hand
Old Stills taken in part New W rk and repairing done
payment for IWV in the country
Heavy Coppersmithing. Steam Pipe and Special Copper Work
Jacksonville, Fla.
Also Fayetteville, N. C. Savannah, Ga. Mobile, Ala.


6 101iIA-1 'A *), N IsN Is 4- N 11. \A -















WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL


RECORD.


PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. DEVOTED TO NAVAL STORES, LUMBER AND MANUFACTURING Irillalbi,

vllid Sl. IL. B02. by the Ensadite Comminef oltie Turpenmine Opeaors' Assoddion a ts Exdui&v O cim ~ rgn. and adopted Sept. S. in Annum l Convavum. m Ofid Organ ~o a~s Gemid Andim. Adl sed Sept. L 803 as ue
Only Oid Orp Turwpea Operaorn' A .aociagon. Ad p 27d Aai 27,1903. a O rsf a d th cn erotSe Cne GreaweSar' Arrli dihulm. Em d by S W miw S m ma Ai n ai l n Gni G m Ael


East Coast Peonage Charges are De- Rights of States to Assist Immigra-


tion.


Under New Law Passage Money May Be Paid out of Funds of the
State, But Individuals Cannot Contribute to This Fund. Bona-
parte Answers Various Questions on This Subject.


Miami, Fla., March 21.-The Miami
board of trade held a special meeting on
the evening of the 20th, to take some ac-
tion relative to the peonage prosecutions
by which the agents of the Florida East
Coast railway are now being annoyed. A
clipping taken from the New York Herald,
in reference to this outrage was read and
then the matter was opened for discussion.
W. W. Prout, the president of .the board
of trade, presided at the meeting and in
his explanation why the meeting was call-
ed, said in substance, "that in his opinion
the time had come when it was the duty
of .the citizens of Miami, to defend the
charges made against the Florida East
Coast Railway, and to give them thlir
moral support, refuting the charges that
the laborers on the extension of the Flor-
ida Fast Coast railway are being treated
unfairly, or held in bondage against their
will
The meeting was addressed by T. V.
Moors, Hon. J. W. Watson, representative-
elect in the legislature, A. L Keller of
tue Keller Grocery Company, Alderman J.
I. Wilson, E. B. Douglass, proprietor of the
Ideal Dry Goods Stores, Col. E. T. Bying-
ton, editor of the Morning News, and
others.
After the discussion the following reso-
lutions were adopted :"Whereas, Infor-
mation has been received through the pub-
lic press that the United States Court in
New York State is prosecuting or endeav-
oring to prosecute men engaged in an
einort to secure laborers for the comple-
tion of the Florida East Coast Railway
extension, from Miami to Key West, un-
der the charge of peonage; and,
Whereas, the conditions now existing,
and heretofore existing, in prosecuting the
work of the extension, do not in any way
warrant the charge of peonage; and,
Whereas, the State of Florida is abun-
dantly able to defend all its citizens with-
in its precincts from peonage practice and,
Whereas, the citizens of said State arc
amply able to uphold and enforce its laws
regarding peonage without federal assist-
ance or interference, especially from fede-
ral officers who are located in another
State, therefore be it
Resolved, 1-That the Miami Board of
Trade unanimously condemn the prosec'u-
tion in New York of cases from which evi-
dence therein can only be obtained in
this State.
Resolved, 2--That the Miami Board of
Trade, being situated in close proximity
with the work of the extension, finds no
basis for even charges of peonage.
Resolved, 3-That a copy of these reso-
lutions be sent by the secretary of this
body to the Associated Press, and a copy
to the attorneys, both prosecuting and de-
fending the ease."
After reading of these resolutions, an-
other discussion was held and it was de-
termined that the board would adopt still


further resolutions of a broader scope, go-
ing specifically into the matter of alleged
peonage, not only at Key West extension,
but in the State, and condemning the
charges be prepared by a committee to
be appointed by the president. These will
be in addition to the resolutions adopted
*and will be published broadcast for the
information of the public at large.
There are no people in any section of the
United States, who are so familiar with
the extension work and the treatment ot
the employes, as the people of Miami, and
the citizens of Miami are not only ready
but anxious to publish to the world the
utter falsity of the charges of peonage in
any form along the line of the extension.
The officials of Miami have had their
experience with many of the laborers who
have been brought here to work on the
extension and know of their utter unre-
liability. The agent for the East Coast
Railway in New York has not been able
to secure at all times the choicest class (;f
laborers for this work, which has resulted
in the bringing south many of the most
depraved classes and it is largely this class
who have made the charges against the
employees of the company.
Never in the history of railroad building
has those who have had charge of thl
work been put to so much expense andl
trouble to make their employes comfotia-
ble as has the East Coast Railway Conm-
Ipany.
Field hospitals, m charge of competent
physicians, have been established along
the line of the work for those who were
temporarily ill. At Miami, one of the
best and most modern hospitals has been
established and maintained for those who
were seriously ill or for any of the em-
;loyes who met with accidents. Every
possible convenience has been furnished
t.e laborers fo their comfort, and the bert
of food has been served.
Among the thousands of iaoorers who
have been brought south for this work
th re are many who are of the idle class,
and many who are addicted to the use cf
liquor. This class when pay day comes
iouild come to Miami, spend their earn-
inlgs for whiskey and would wind up in
Ihe lockup. They had spent their last
'ollar. had no money or friends to pay
th.ir fines, which resulted in their being
sei to the street gang, then the cry of
peonage was heard. When a laborer was
lissatisfied and wished to return north
frmi the extension work, he was permitted
to come to Miami on any of the exten-
sion boats. The people of Miami are thor-
SI.tIly aroused over what is considered an
overt act on the part of those who are
pro-eciuting the agents of the Florida
Fast Coast Railway on the charge of
1: onage, and the forthcoming resolutions
of the Miami Board of Trade, will be a
stinging rebuke to those who are engaged
in prosecuting these agents.


Washington, March 22.-Attorney Gen-
eral Bonaparte has sent to President
Ri;sevelt a communication containing an-
swers to various quespaons affecting the
administration of the immigration laws
propounded by Gov. Ansel, of South Caro-
lina. The attorney general upholds the
legality of a State advertising its induce-
nents to immigration, including a state-
inenr of prevailing wages, and upholds the
egalityy of introduction of immigrants,
\where they are otherwise qualified, and
nad not been solicited or encouraged ex-
celt by payment of their passage front
t,,e State's public funds. The State's ac-
ceptance of contributions to the immigra-
tion department funds and advertisement
o. its inducements therewith, and its pre-
payment of the passage of aliens would
not exclude the immigrants, but might
tender liable to the law the parties con-
tiibuting the money. All these are with
,l.e proviso that no agreement or contract
.e entered into. With the changes made
.i the new law, aliens are excluded when
-olicited by promises or offers, even when
there is no contract or agreement, and
while payment of immigrants' passage
fromn State public funds is not barred, its
iaymient with funds contributed by any
society or association makes the immi-
grants liable to exclusion. The prohibi-
tion does not apply to contributions of
Passage money by individuals as such.
The governor's letter to the president
tears date of March 16.
The questions are the outcome of the
recent conference held at the White House
Letaween the president, Attorney General
lBcnaparte and South Carolina officials,
hlien an opinion of the attorney general
regarding the matter of assisted immigra-
tion was under consideration. Three of
the governor's questions answered by the
attorney general relate to the existing
law, and the fourth to the new law of
February 20 last, which becomes operative
IJuly 1.
She first question asked, whether it is
a violation of the immigration law in force
up to the time of the taking effect of the
act of February 20, for a State, acting
through its officers, to advertise its in-
dutements and publish abroad the scale
of wages prevailing within its borders,
provided no contract or agreement is en-
tered into. In his answer the attorney
general, after quoting various sections of
the existing law, says:
"These provisions contain substantially
all the law in force at the present time,
and until the act approved February" 20,
1907, shall become effective in accordance
wih its terms, that can be material to de-
termine the answer to the foregoing first
question, and I therefore reply that it is


lawful for a State to advertise its induce-
ments to immigrants and to state, as part
of such advertisement, the scale of wages
generally prevailing within its territory, it
ueing my understanding of the question
that such advertisements be limited to
setting forth the inducements offered by
conditions prevailing within the State to
immigrants, leaving the said immigrants
to draw their own conclusions from such
advertisements to the advisability of
coming to the said State."
-While the parties providing the money
for the publication of the advertisements
might be," continues the attorney general,
"in my opinion, liable to the penalties im-
posed by section 5, df the present law,
the immigrants themselves, upon the hy-
pothesis of the third question could not
be excluded."
.The fourth question submitted by Gov.
Ansel was:
"Will the answers to the foregoisg ques-
tions be materially different after the
taking effect of the act approved the 20th
of February, 1907, and if different, in what
respect?"
This question Attorney General Bona-
parte says must be answered in the affirm-
ati\e. He refers to the provisions of sec-
tion 2 of the new act which specifies what
classes of aliens shall be excluded from
this country and says:
"These provisions change the law in two
particulars; in the first place aliens solic-
ited or induced to migrate by reason of
offers, or promises, even when there is no
contract of employment, will be excluded
after this act taffes effect. At present, al-
though their importation is unlawful and
subjects the parties responsible for it to
punishment, the aliens themselves are al-
lowed to enter. Secondly, the person
whose passage money is paid by another
must be prepared to show, not merely that
he does not come within any of the cate-
gories of immigrants to be excluded, but
also that his passage was not paid by a
corporation, an association, a society, a
municipality or a foreign government; and
this provision against such payment by
any of the agencies mentioned is effective
whether the payment be made directly or
indirectly.
"While, therefore, the payment of the
passage money of such immigrants by a
State with its public funds is not pro-
hitited, its payment with funds contrib-
uted by any society or association renders
the immigrant liable to exclusion, al-
though the payment may be made through
tie agency of the State or its offers and
although the immigrant would otherwise
Le entitled to admissions. The ame pro-
hibition, however does not extend to the
payment of the panapa s y by iadviii-


dared to be Untrue.










4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.




-1 BUYER'S DIRECTORY

^^^^^^^^^ '~~*^x^^^^<^^yyt~y%^^cycyas<4^tx3


Buy the Sikes Patented
Rims and Heads

for Dip Barrels. Adds two inches to ca-
pacity of barrel; does not leak; drains
contents perfectly. Over 20,000 sold in
twelve months. Sold by the following
jobbers
United Grocery Co, Jacksonville and
Tampa, Fla.
Cemasn iated Grocery Co, Pensacola, Fla.
Penacola Grocery Co, Pensacola, Fla.
J. L. Sakum Co, New Orleans, La.
Downing C., Brunswick, Ga.
Br Hardware Co, Valdosta, Ga.
The above also handle the Bikes Patent
Dip Buckets. Write for prices, cuts, etc.


ACCOUNTANTS.
H llutchinson, .iacksonville, F'a.
Walter Mucklow, Jacksonville, Fla.
AXES.
Briggs Hardware Co., Valdosta, Ga.

BANKS.
,,oercial Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
luorda Bank and Irust Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
BEER-WHOLESALE.
Chas. Blum & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Soseph Zapf & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
BOXES AND CRATES.
.'ummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
BRICK.
Geo. R. Foster, Jr., Jacksonville, Fa.
BUILDING MATERIAL.
Geo. R. Foster, Jr., Jacksonville, Fla.
BUSINESS COLLEGES.
Tampa Business College, Tampa.
CARPETS.
E. E. Cleveland Furniture Company.
CIVIL ENGINEERS.
Roland Woodward, Jacksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING.
L'raig & Bro, J. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
COPPER SMITHS.
MnMilas Brothers, Jacksonille, Saa-
nah and Mmoie.
31. A. Baker, Brunswick, Ga.
COOPERAGE.
Cq-- Th Ji Lo-i- Fla


HATS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jackscoville Fla.
Standard Clothing Co.. Jacisoaville, Fla.
HOTEL&.
Aragon The, Jacksonv: e Fla.
Fifth Avenue Hotel, New York, N. Y.
Telford Hotel, White Springs, Fla.
IRON WORKS.
Mlerrill-Stevens Cu., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
INSURANCE.
Florida Life Insurance Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Cay & McCall, Jacksonville Fla.
JEWELERS.
R. J. Riles Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville. Fla.
LIQUORS.
R. M. Rose Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Casper Co.. Roanoke, Va.
Blum & Co., Chas., Jacksonville. Fla.
Altmayer & Flatau Liquor Co., Macon, Ga.
Joseph Zapf & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
MEDICINES.
Spencer Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tenn.
MACHINE WORKS.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
Lombard Iron Works. Augusta, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR TURPENTINE PRO-
CUSS.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. 8., Maeon, Ga.
MEDICINES.


uals, whether directly or through the agen- 1-'1i 'v Continental Mfg. Co., Birmingham, Ala.
cy of a State, provided that their action DRUGS. The only line of medicines made ex-
is, and is satisfactorily shown to be, in W m. DJones, Jacksonville, Fla. elusively for commissaries.
good faith and is not attended by such C. C. Bettes. Jacksonville, Fla. METAL WORKERS.
combination or concert of action as would
make it substantially the act of an a DRUGS-WHOLESA McMlln Bro Co., Jacksonvlle Sava-
sociation or society."t Tampa Drug Co., Tampa, Fla. nab and Moble.
sociation or society. Southern Drug Mfg. Co., Jacksonville, Fla. Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga., and Pensa-
Groover-Stewart Drug Co., Jacksonville, cola, Fla.
A STEAMSHIP DEAL. Fla.
DRY GOODS-WHOLSAL. MILL SUPPLIES.
Merchant & Miners Will Now Have a n L Schofield' Sos Co., J. S., Meon, G
rFleet o MintFou hi e Covington Co. The. Jacksonville, Fla. Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, FLa.
eet of wenty-For ps LCTRICAL GOODS. Weed & Co., J. D., Savannah, Ga.
The Merchants & Miners' Transporta- Standard Electric Co., Jacksonville, Fla. Malsby Machinery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
tion Co. of Baltimore, which operates Brigg Hardware Co., Valdosta, Ga.
steamers to Norfolk, Newport News and GI MONUMENTS.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fl. Tam Monumental Wors, Tmp, P
Savannah, as well as to Philadelphia, Schofleld's Son Co., J. 8., Macon, Ga. Tampa Monumental Works, Tamp,
MULES AND HORSES.
Providence and Boston, has purchased the Lombard Iron Works and Supply Co., Au- W. A. Cook, Tampa. Fla.
Boston & Philadelphia Steamship Co., NAVAL STORES.
which operates between Boston and Phila- FRTILIZERS. American Naval Stores, Co., Home Office,
phiH Te Mercants & Mners has ours & Co., Wm. A., Jackonrville, Fla. Savannah, Ga.
delphia. The Merchants & Miners has 17 Peninsular Naval Stores Co., Tampa, Fla.
steamers, and the company which it has FURNITURE. Barnes & Jesup Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
purchased has 7, which will give it a E. E Cleaveland Furniture Co., Jackson- Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
vuchse haa ~ ville, Fla.
total of 24 steamers. The terms of the ville Fa. Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
FOUNDRIES. West-Flynn-Harris Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
deal have not been made public, but it is 'Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
said that the price paid was about $2,- hoi Sons Co., J. Maon Ga. Young Co., John R., Savannah, Ga.
00,000. Payment will be made by a stock FUEL. out State Naval Store Co., avan-
issue of the Merchants & Miners Corn- Southern Fuel & Supply Co. The, Jack- PAINTS.
pany, which wii one acted upon at a meet- sonville. Fla.
ing on March 20. The company now has Bond & Bours Co, Jacksonville. Fla.
$2,00,00 of stock, but at the session f GENTS' FURNISHERS. PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
the Maryland Legislature a year ago it Stuart-Bernstein Co.. Jacksonville, Fla. Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
SCraig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, VLa.
was authorized to increase its capital o Standard Clotbhig Co., Jacksonville, Fla. PLUMBER
$6,000,000, this step being prompted, it is Ooons & Golder, Jacksonville, Fla.
presumed, by expectations of a deal. GROCERS-WHOLESALE. PUMPS.
The Boston & Philadelphia Steamship Jacksonville Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla. Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Co., which haa been acquired, succeeded Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga. Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
the Massachusetts Steamship Co. in 1902. Young Co, John ., Savannah, Ga. RAROADS.
Its capital stock is $1,500,000, upon which HARDWARE. Atlantic Omast Line.
dividends amounting to 6 per cent a year
have been paid. The total assets of the Bond & Bours Co. The, Jacksonville, FIa REAL ESTATE.
corporation are $2,292,408. The company Briggs, W. H., Hardware Co., Valdosta, Ga- Henry Sundheimer & Co., Savannah, Ga.
was owned by the New York, New Haven rampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Ila. Brobston, Fendis & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
& Hartford Railroad Co., which operates Weed & Co.. J. D.. Savannah. Ga. SIKES' PATENTED RIMS AND HEADS.
& Hartford Railroad Co., which operates
several steamer lines in connection with HAY AND JRAIN. SEDS.
its trains, most of them along Long Island Bour Co., Wi. A., Jackaoavill, lna. [ Bors & Co.. Wm. A, Jaekaonvll Ia.


SHIP YARDS.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Merrill-Steven a Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.

SHOES-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla.
.los. Roienheim & Sons, Savannah, C;a.

STEAMSHIPS.
Clyde Steamship Co. The. New York City.
TANKS.
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
Schofleld's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
TURPENTINE STILLS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga., and Pensa-
cola, Fla.
McMillan Brothers .Co, .Jackoavile,
Savannah and Mobile.
TURPENTINE STILL TUBS.
Davis & Son, G. Mb., Palatka. Fla.

TURPENTINE TOOLS.
(ouncil Tool Co.. .Jacksonville. Fla
Operator' Tool Co., Green Oove Sprin,
Fla.

WATCHES.
Greenleaf & Croeby Co., Jacksonville, Via.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
R. .1. Riles Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

YELLOW PINE LUMBER.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
East Coast lumber Co., Watertown. la




WHISKIES

GINS AND RUMS


$1.50 to$5.00 per Gallon
......AGENCY FOB......
Lewis 1866 Mad Mount Verne.
Pure Rye WhMskles
Controllers Blum's Monogram and Sylvan
livye-Agents for Jungst Cincinnati and
Pabst llilvaukee Beers. Prices on ap
plication.

CHAS. BLUM & CO.
517 rnd 519 WEiT BAY STREET
JACKSONVILLC FLA.




Coons & Golder

Operators on Turpentine

Pipe, Boilers and Pumps

Epmrt mc1ulu M l A n lEnS
22 W. Adams St. Jackscville, Fla




WM. D. JONES
PRESCIPTIO SPECIALIST
... am..I
FAMILY DRUGGIST
107 E. BAY ST.
Mail Ordes Soliied.









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


Sound and the New England coast. The
line purchased was known as the Winsor
line, from the name of its president, Mr.
Alfred Winsor, of Boston.
It is stated that the Merchants & Mlin-
ers' Transportation Co. is by the deal
strengthened in its position in conducting
its coastwise transportation, but it will
not result in any official changes, and the
directors will continue unchanged. It
will still be a Baltimore company, and it,
operations will continue as they have been
conducted from this city. The president
is Mr. Joseph ('. Whitney, of Baltimore,
who has grown up in the service from
boyhood, and who last July succeeded Mr.
Michael Jenkins as executive. The conm-
pany, it is stated, is in a strong financial
position, and has a bonded debt of only
$300,000. It pays 8 per cent annual divi-
dends. It is not yet stated how much
Sstock will be issued to close the deal.
The par is $100, but it has recently sold
in the market at $235. There has been
talk to the effect that the company would
establish a steamer line to Jacksonville,
A -a., but no such announcement has yet
been made. The directors of the Mer-
chants & Miners are Michael Jenkins, N.
W. James, W. Kennedy Cromwell and De-
catur H. Miller, Jr., all of Baltimore, and
E. P. Whitney, of Boston.

A GOOD ROADS BILL.

For Legislatue, Suggested by State Asso-
ciaties of County Commiaioners.
Orlando, March 23.-The State Associa-
tion of County Commissioners of the State
has done much valuable work for good
roads in the State: It has a standing
committee on legislation for good roads,
and last November a majority of the com-
mittee met in Orlando to consider needed
legislation. The members present were:
H. H. Dickson, the chairman of the county
board of commissioners; W. L. Palmer and
H. K. Fuller. This majority agreed on tihe
main features of a bill to be submitted to
the legislature soon to convene. The
prominent provsiions are as follows:
First-The creation of a State commis-
sion of three competent and skilled men
who shall be known as the State Road
Commissioners. The state authorities
shall give control of all able-bodied con-
victs to these State road commissioners
for building State roads. The State re-
tains absolute control of the convicts, reg-
ulates their work, protects their health,
insures humane treatment and proper pro-
tection.
Second-The bill provides for employ-
ment of a competent State engineer, and
the location and building of State roads,
these State roads shall run east, south,
north and west through the State.
Third-Provisions are made by which
counties not traversed by the State roads
shall, if they desire, have aid by the
rtate convicts in constructing county roads
connecting with the State roads.
Fourth-The bill also provides for es-
tablishing a State farm for disabled con-
victs.
The bill works the gradual but sure
acolishment of the present convict lease
system. It puts the road question to the
front, and makes it the pa-amount busi-
ness question of the State. It takes the
convicts out of politics, and removes them
frcm competition with free labor. It pro-
vides for fair and humane treatment of
the convicts at all times, shuts out the
speculation in leasing them and makes
abuses impossible.


The committee will submit their sugges-
tions to the legislature along with other
bills on the subject of good roads. It will
I.e observed the suggested bill is i: some
features along the lines of Mac\Villiaiis"
1ill.
The State Association of County (o11-
ni:s-ioners will, it is believed, stand by
Itn sugo-,tted legislation. but are not par-
ticular as to details thought necessary to
a complish the main objects of the bill.
The entire committee was to convene
and consider the details of the proposed
bill, but it is thought that this will be
impossible before the legislature convenes,
out the committee will meet in Tallahas-
see early in April. The following gentle-
men compose the committee appointed by
the State association: H. II. Buckman,
W. L. Palmer, Syd L. Carter. H. K. Ful-
ler and J. R. Steward.

JACKSONVILLE TALKS TO TAMPA.

Tampa, March 21.-A most gratifying
interchange of initial telephonic messages
between Tampa and Jacksonville was had
at the office of Chief of Police Walker in
the city hall yesterday morning about 11
o'clock. It was the occasion of the com-
pletion of the long distance service of the
Southern Bell Telephone companyy bI-
tween this city and the State's metropolis.
Manager Brorein, of the Peninsular Tel-
ephone Company, which will handle the
long distance business at this end of the
line, had invited the mayor and other city
officials, together with the presidents of
the board of trade and chamber of com-
merce, and newspaper men to be present
at the opening of the connection wli
.Jacksonville, and these officials \sith mein-
hers of the local press, were interesteIl
and highly gratified witnesses to the ef-
fective service inaugurated.
The first to test the new service was
Mayor William H. Frecker, who called out
through the transmitter in the chief's of-
flee, "This is the may or of Tampa. I
wish to extend congratulations to the city
of Jacksonville on being brought into tele-
phone connection with the most progres-
sive city in the United States, Tampa."
Manager Bragg, of the Jacksonville of-
fice of the telephone con.pany resp, ndcl.
his voice being clearly and distinctly heard
by Mayor Frecker, who was much pleased
over the distinct manner in which the re-
sponse came over the 212 miles of wire.
President W. R. Fuller, of the board of
trade and Max P. Moritz, vice-president of
the chamber of commerce, followed with
congratulatory phone messages to Jack-
sonville and Chief of Police Walker sent a
message of congratulation to the chief of
police of tile sister city, in thie north end
of the State, with the e-xpressed hope ard
belief that tile new service would be pro
moti\v of even greater expedition in the
(al:turing of criminals.
lAiter in the day Mayor Flrecker ,,ecure.i
the far of Mayor Baker, and the Jackson-
ville end of the phone service and re-
peated his congratulations. The local
new spaper offices were a l-o plu in com--
lmunicatien with the Jacksonville news-
pape:s. and held congratulatory convers.a-
tion, with them. The new service is a
most effective one and promises to be of
vast benefit in promoting the commercial
relations between the two cities.


BOASTING

Is very abhorrent in any business. Equally so is false mod-
e-tv. We believe our stock to be unquestionably the best'and
most comprehensive in this section, and we say so just as
forcibly as we cnan. SEE OTHERS, SEE US,

Then Decide for Yourself. That's All!


E. E. Cleaveland Furniture Co.,

OMest and Lartest Furonture Store In Jacksoville.



11 14*1 14 II*tS I I I I 4 I I *ti+t 1 gII> g < g I

SStandard Clothing Company


One Price


0..


One Price


S FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
* 17 and 19 West Bay Street, JacksoMvlls, Piends
4 stetson and Hawes Hats. Speelal AttentlUi Give to Mail Orders.
Ia*I*C4 l4 I$ 1$ i (4,4i 4SI 6i 81 II.e u s u 1 g


Mc KOY PATENT


Turpentine Cup.


The best and simplest cup
on the market. Detachable
Greater Capacity, easier
dipped ,more easily placed
on tree, stronger and prac-
tically indestructible. Will
not rust. For catalog and
price list write


110Y M P NIEIfTW TII CUP WO.
I'^ '1015 Hibernia Buildiog,
/< "New Orleans. Louisana.


INVENTOR AND
M. A. BAKER, MANUfACTURER OF THE
BAKER IMPROVED SEAMLESS TURPENTINE SI IL S.


Write me for prices F 0. B. ny point in the turpentine belt.
a. stills sold under aL uarntee.
JOB WORK THROUGH THE COVNTILY PLOMPTLYATTEIDEDTO
The Largest and Oldest Copper Works in the South.
My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do mot leak.
BRUNSWICK, GA. and PENSACOLA, FLA.









6 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



-4 This Easy Chipper Saves time and Money.

'"''.: -I Chip escapes easier on account of hollow back. WRITE
2 Cuts a shade streak easier as hollow back allows hack to I
to be closed more FOR
S Gum flows easier as there is less steel to drag over the PRICES.
fresh cut.


.Operator's Tool Company, Green Cove Springs, Fla.

'4k


THE STATE CONVICTS. were James Johnson, Will Davis, Ed. Wil-
liams, William Johnson, Lewis Hall and
Much Ilteresting Information from Cor- John Aiken.
missioner cLin's Report. Of all the prisoners of 1905, 176 were
A copy of the ninth biennial report ot natives of Florida, 118 of Georgia, 29 c-f
B. E. McLin, Commissioner of Agriculture Alabama, 26 of North Carolina, 45 of
of Florida, for the period beginning Jan- South Carolina, 11 of Virginia, 16 un-
uary 1, 1905, and ending December 31, I known, and of the 474, 27 were from other
1906, has just been received, and in glane- States and foreign countries.
ing over it we find much useful and inter- One white female, 45 white males, 4
eating information, especially that which colored females and 424 colored males
refers to the State convicts. we e received from the counties in 1906,
There were in prison January 1, 1905 IDuval sending 87, Hillsborough (Tampa)
1,174 convicts, 474 were committed that 42, St. Johns (St. Augustine) 37, Jackson
year, 15 recaptured, 321 were discharged, i 23, Escambia (Pensacola), 20, Alachua 18,
33 died, 38 escaped, 35 were pardoned, 87 Leon 13, Monroe (Key West) 12, Nassau
were sent from Duval (Jacksonville) coun- 10, Putnam 17, Suwannee 11, Volusia 14,
ty. Walton 12, Dade 14, Polk 11; the other
Duval Convicts Pardoned. counties sending less than 10 each.
Record for 1go6.
Those from Duval pardoned in 1905 were The report also sh that i 1906 435
J. B. Kestzemiger, assault to murder, sen- convicts were received, Duval county head-
tenced for 18 years, October 25, 1898; pr- ing the list, with 108, Hillsborough sent
downed January 25, 1905; Tom Johnson, 41, Escambia 35, St. Johns 19, Santa Rosa
murder, life, November 11, 1890; pardoned C mbia 1, Dade 12, Jacon 11, Su-
Janury 5, 1905; James16, Columbia 14, Dade 1, Jackson 11, Su-
Jan ury 5, 1906; James Adams, breaking wannee 12, Volusia 11; all other counties
and entering, 18 years, January 30, 1899, les than 10 each.
pardoned July 26, 1905; Frank Kimball, There were 40 white males, no white
attempt to rob, 5 years, January 6, 1903; females, 382 colored males and 13 colored
pardoned December 8, 1905; Henry L. Oli- females
ver, larceny, 3 years, January 25, 1905, females.
ver, nlareny, 3 years, January 25, 1, Of the 435, 166 were natives of Florida,
pardoned December 8, 1905. All white ex- 114 of Georgia, 60 of South Carolina, 23


cept Johnson and Adams.
Thoem Who Escaped.
Those from Duval county who escaped
in 1905 were George Sallett, breaking and
entering, 18 years, sentenced June 27,
1809, escaped May 11, 1905; Will Davis,
grand larceny, 3 years, sentenced April
26, 1904, escaped May 31, 1905; William
Johnson, breaking and entering and lar-
ceny, 20 years, sentenced November 20,
1890, escaped June 22, 1905; Hugh Wilson,
grand larceny, 1 year, sentenced July 30,
1905, escaped September 9, 1905; F. Jen-
kins, larceny, second larceny and receiving
stolen goods, 15 years, sentenced March 28,
1905, and escaped September 28, 1905;
John Aiken, burglary, 31-2 years, sen-
tenced October 28, 1902, escaped Septem-
ber 17, 1906; Lewis Hall, assault to mur-
der, 3 years, sentenced August 24, 1905,
escaped September 20, 1905. All negroes.
Them Who Died.
Those who died in prison in 1905 from
Duval county were Richard Jefferson,
grand larceny, 1 year, sentenced August
23, 1904, and died May 17, 1905, of con-
sumption; Andrew Taylor, assault to mur-
der, 4 years, sentenced January 20, 1904,
and died August 10, 1905, of consumption;
Henry Hicks, arson, 10 years, sentenced
April 15, 1908, died August 15, 1905, of
heart disease; George Jackson, second lar-
ceny, 10 years, sentenced September 2,
1902, and died October 1, 1905, of con-
sumption; Prince Landy, second larceny,
10 years, sentenced February 28, 1899, sui-
cided October 22, 1905. All negroes.
Recaptured.
Those recaptured from Duval county


of North Carolina, 11 unknown, Virginia
9. The rest come from 16 States, and 5
from foreign countries, 430 being Ameri-
cans.
Fifty-four were pardoned and those from
this (Duval) county were as follows:
G. A. Morighne, false pretenses, 8 years,
sentenced August 15, 1905, pardoned Feb-
ruary 2, 1906; Richardson Percy, receiv-
ing stolen goods, 3 years and 7 days, sen-
tenced December 20, 1904, pardoned Feb-
ruary 2, 1906; Lem Davis, second larceny,
18 years, sentenced August 28, 1899; par-
doned March 2, 1906; Alex Henderson, sec-
ond larceny, 10 years, sentenced April 3,
1900, pardoned August 3, 1906; S. H. An-
derson, assault to murder, 8 years, sen-
tenced July 3, 1901, pardoned August 3,
1906.
Those Who Escaped.
Thirty-one escaped in 1906, 4 from Du-
val county, as follows:
Thomas Patterson, grand larceny, 10
years. sentenced February 27, 1906, es-
caped March 2, 1906; Lem Davis, second
larceny, 18 years, sentenced Augusl 28,
1899, escaped June 2, 1906; John Smith,
larceny and receiving stolen goods, 6 years,
sentenced June 19, 1906, escaped October
1, 1906; James Johnson, breaking and en-
tering, 60 years, sentenced October 27,
1896, escaped October 31, 1906; all negroes.
Only two from Duval died in 1906, Dave
Copeland, of meningitis, and H. Weather-
spton, of pneumonia; both negroes.
Sixteen were recaptured in 1906. Those
from Duval were Arthur Wright, second
larceny, 10 years, sentenced February 25,
1903, escaped February 14, 1904, and re-


PEC A N S
Analyze the word.


permanent Profits
Economy of care
Certainty of results

Annual crops
Non-perishable product
Superior to all nuts.

THE OPPORTUNITY Of TODAY.
The first to plant a pecan grove
will be the first to reap a
great harvest.

For full Information apply to

THE GRIFFIN BROS. Co.
Jacksonville. Florida.


-.W -
REFLECT A MOMEtT.
Would it not pay you in more ways
than one to give us your business
Our good name is a business asset whick
we value too highly to loe it by
selling you anything but the purest and
best on the market.
Why not let us help you build up a se-
cessful drug business by supplying yJO
with' the best DRUGS on the market at
prices which enable you to keep up with
competition and make good profts.
The Groover-St art Drug Co,
15-17-19 East Adams SL,t.
JACKSONVII LE. - FLORIDA.


j J. A. Craig Bro.

239 W. Bay Street EVERETT BLOCK.

L Leaders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-
S ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.

Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.



W. W. Carne, Pres. W. C. Themaa Manager. S. Carma, aat Trean .


STampa Hardware Co.


Wholesale

Hardware

* Turpentine. Mill and Phosphate Supplies.


TAMPA. FLORIDA.
i~rai*itjitii~ici ir r~ Iit


B. PHONE 941.


ROLAND WOODWARD,
CONSULTING AND CIVIL ENGINEER.
Rem 6, Beard of Trade BuNdiag, JACKSONVILLIE. FL


ROTARY PUBLIC.


BLUE PRINTING,
Examination and Timber Estimates.









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7




Southern Drug Mfg. Company

WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS AND MANUFACTURERS OF
Flavoring Extracts, Packed Drugs, B. B. Bluing. Vinegar and Pyne's Populer Remedles.
We handle everything in the Drug and Medicine Une. Write for prices. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


-01 aVCCEieS

. iAATTEIND .0


captured June 15, 1906; Lem Davis, sec-
ond larceny, 18 years, sentenced August
28, 1899, escaped June 22, 1906, recaptured
June E2, 1906; John Smith, larceny and
receiving stolen goods, 6 years, sentenced
June 19, 1906, escaped October 1, 1906, re-
captured October 6, 1906; James Johnson,
breaking and entering, 60 years, sentenced
October 27, 1806, escaped January 1, 1905,
recaptured November 1, 1906.
On January 1, 1906, there were 1,234 in
..e pen, 435 committed in 1906, 16 recap-
tured, 287 discharged, 54 pardoned, S pa-
roled and 25 died.

SHIPMENT OF COTTON..

Cotton Manufacturers Demanded Change
in Present Methods.
Charlotte. N. C.. March 21.-Leading cot-
ton manufacturers of the two Carolinas
met here this afternoon to take action re-
garding existing evils in the methods of
shipping cotton from the Mississippi delta
to this section.
The complaint of the mill men, stated
briefly, is that they receive a bill of lad-
ing with draft attached, for cotton that
they order from the South, and it is neces-
sary to pay this draft at sight. In the
meantime the railroads, the mill men
claim, take their own time about shipping
this cotton, and it is sometimes weeks be-
fore the delivery of the goods.
The mill men want to change things so
tnt when a bill of lading is made out it
Contain the car number and lettering
so that the consignee will know that this
cotton has been loaded, and will be in a
position to have shipments hurried up. In
a nutshell, the mill men do not want to
pay for goods that are held back for ship-
ment, until they know that the cotton has
been loaded and is in the hands of the
railroad.
Strong resolutions were adopted in
which the spinnrs represented agreed 'to
decline to honor drafts unless accompanied
by hills of lading covering cotton actually
in cars, containing car numbers, said ear
numbers coverlag cars actually holding
cott-a represeted in the bill of lading.
The resolutions e4o upon the various as-


sociations of cotton manufacturers of the
country to stand by the southern spinners
in this action.

Completing Big Power Plant.
A dispatch from Great Falls, S. C.,
makes some interesting references to the
water-power-electrical plant which the
Southern Power Co. of Charlotte, N. C.,
has been building. It states that water
was turned through the gates on March
11, and summarizes further facts as fol-
lows:
"The company began construction in
August, 1905. It took eight months to
finish the dam at Mountain Island and
one year on the concrete wall at the
power-house. The dam at the power-
house is 10 feet wide at the top, 80 feet
wide at the base and 106 feet high. It is
650 feet long from hill to hill There are
100.000 cubic yards of masonry in both
walls. In the power-house are two direct-
current generators and eight alternating-
current generators and 40,000 horse-power
will be developed. Mr. W. S. Lee, Jr.,
vice-president and chief engineer of the
company, expects to be ready to deliver
power inside of two weeks. The power
will conveyed on a tower line."

PONCE DE LEON CELEBRATION-ST.
AUGUSTINE.
On account of the Ponce de Leon Cele-
bration at St. Augustine, Fla., April 2 to
4, 1907, inclusive, the Atlantic Coast Line
Railway will give a special rate of one
and one-third first-class fares for the
round trip. For Pullman reservations and
detailed information, see the Atlantic
Coast Line agert or write Frank C. Boyls-
ton, district passenger agent, Atlantic
Coast Line, Jacksonville, Fla.

SOPCHOPPY NOTES.
Sopchoppy, Fla., March 20.- essrs. 9G.
E. McGriff and H. TL Grigery, of Tallahas-
see, passed through en route to Panacea
Springs for rest and in quest of health.
Col. Julius L. Brown, of Atlanta, Ga.,
purchased Mr. D. A. Murray's farm, four
miles below here, and will erect a hand-
some and modern country home. All va-
rieties of fruit trees will be planted. Col.
Brown is a prominent lawyer of his city
and a soldier in the Confederate army. He
says the winters are too severe for him
in Atlanta, and he will come here the 1st
of December and remain until the Ist of
April henceforth.
We are informed that Carrabelle and
vicinity would like to be annexed to
Wakulla County and Sopehoppy be made
the county seat. "Barkis is willing," and
this section don't intend to let East and
West Florida have all the "divisions." The
coming legislature will be burdened with
petitions galore from Wakulla and Frank-
lin County citizens.
Postmaster Roberts has installed new
equcipnent for third class postoffice, an4
all are learning" how to work their combi-
nation to the Ibxes.
Mr. Jas. H land is talking of building
a hotel. It is much needed. We are in-


formed he will build of concrete.


I.8.


Barnes & Jessup Company

Jacksonville. Florida.







orICERS.
C. H. Barner. Preldent. J. C. Little, Vice-Preelea..
E. B. Wells. Secretary and Treasurer.

DIRIECTORLSs C. H. Barne. J. C. Little, Ralph Je uj .
J. R. Saunders. E. C. Long, W. E. Cummer, R. H. Paul. W.
Saxon, G. W. Taylor.



H. E. PRITCHETT, PresP.P. L UTHERLAND, Vice-Pres. A. ID O0VINOTON, See'y
J. P. COUNCIL. Tress and Grl hp.

THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.,
General Office: JACKSONVILLE, FLA
Factory: WANNANISH, N. C.

MA maof rwr o of1 Hli OrpiM Trael



- I i ii- 11111 111111 i I III11 II II 11 III11 I 1 ll llllllllll.


" J. P. WImaLL ., President.
ST. A. JanHIoa. 2nd Vies-President.
SH. L. Karos, Secretary.


J. A. 0. CaOnb, Ist Vio.-Pnrddexi
J. F. DeUUMMUsY, 3d Vime-Praidea
H. F. a Sc~urrun, Trasurer.


- J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

- MIIL SIOiB 11 E 01QTTO FKI0I Hi UEWlENU "
SMnMain Offices AVANNMH, O3OM1OE.
Branch Offices: ) PRENSACOLA, FLX. ra Orer Hoese,
JaCSaoONVILLSs, rLA. t COLoaU ,O oa.
Naval Stores Producers are Ivited to Cortmapoea With Vs. =
I I I I I I I I I 1 4 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I


W. J. L'ENGLE.
President.


J. W. WADE.
Vice-Presideat.


sC. HUOH S,
Am't. Seey sad Treas


Union Naval Stores Co.
MOBILE, ALA. PENSACOLA, PLA. NEW ORLEANS, LA.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
.........DEALERS IN..........

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of deirable iea-tls t Wet Her-
ida, Alabama and Mismiaippi. Liberal advances made against eeaam-tas. Cr-
respondence olidted.

Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.


Brick and Building Material.
When you need these, Portland Cement, Plaster Paris, Hard Wall
Plaster, Hair cor Plastering, Shingles, Fire Biek or Clay. Write to

GEO. R. FOSTER, Jr., Jacksonville. FIa.


I I


a~hni~; -~










8 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



THE GROO VER-STEWART oemw co.,


FrRafO M THE OwIJarI--o eVR BIRU @Oo

Whelmeale Drg, Olemleols, PDruggsts Sumdrles ad Oeummlursy aesl
-* ma" FwrA.


TeB OLDEST WHISKa Y ROUM8 UI
O UOEGIA. (atablIshed Iin 1881.)
OLD SHARP WILLIAMS-Pure Fine Old
Rye. B- the gallon $.00: four full quarts
13.60, express prepaid.
GEO. J. COLEMAN-Pure Pennsylvania
Rye; Rich and Mellow. By the gallon
S. 75; four full quarts 13.00. express prepaid.
ANVIL RYE-Pure Substantial Family
Whiskey. By the gallon $2.50; four full
i quarts $2.90, express prepaid.
CLIFFIORD RYE-By the gallon 2.25.
four full quarts $2.65. express prepaid.
OLD KENTUCKY CORN-Diiect from
Bonded Warehouse: fine and old. By the
gallon $3.00; four full quarts $.50 express
prepaid.
OLD POINTER CLUB CORN Rich
and Mellow. By the gallon $2.50; four full
quarts $2.0, express prepaid.
We handle all the leading brands of Rye and Bourbon Whiskies in the market
had will save you from to 50 per cent on your purchases. Send for price list and
catalogue. Malled tree upon application.

The Altmayer SL Flatau Liquor Company
MACON. GEORGIA.

-i-iii i* .
gngaggggaggggggggggggCggggggCVV^I.^Ctfg^tCV IMa^^^L^amL^'t^C^VVVVV rVV e


Hundreds of Lumbermen

ARE LOSING

THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS

Each year investigating worthless propositions submitted by un
reliable brokers.
We have spent a great deal of time and money investigating
timber lands in Florida and Georgia. and are prepared to give
you absolutely reliable information regarding any tract of any
size in either State.
Propositions that we offer have been in,-estigated by our ex-
perts before being offered on the market.
You might have your bank look us up before consulting us.
Correspondence with bona-fide purchasers solicited.


Brobston, Fendig & Company
sa6 West Forsyth Steet. a s Newcastle Street.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA BRUNSWICK. GA.


.4


I


FACTS AND FIGURES RELATIVE TO THE TURPENTINE INDUSTRY OF
FLORIDA COMPILED FROM THIRD CENSUS JUST ISSUED
BY THE STATE OF FLORIDA.


No. of Es
tablish-
Counties. ments.
Alachna .............. 17
Baker ................. 4
Bradford ............. 12
Brevard .............. :
Calhoun .............. 17
( itrus ................ 1I
( lay ................. 8
Columbia ............. 6
Dade (a) ............ .
DeSota ............... 15
l)uval ............... 7
Escambia (a) ..........
Franklin .............. 3
(adsden .............. 3
Hamilton ............. 4
Hernando ............ 8
Hillsborough .......... 9
Holmes ............... 14
.Jackson .............. 18
Jefferson ............. 5
Lafayette ............. 13:
Lake ................. 12
Lee (b) ............... .
Leon ................. 4
Levy ................. 13
Liberty ............... 3
Madison .............. 14'
Manatee .............. 4
Marion ............... 25
Monroe (b) ........... .
Nassau ............... 6
Orange ............... 5
Osceola ............... 3
Pasco ................ 13
Polk .................. 9
Putnam .............. 10
St. Johns ............. 18
S:anta Rosa ........... 17
Sumter ........... ... 5
Siwanneie ......... 4
Taylor .......... .. 17
Volusia .. ........... 14
A\ akulla ......... .... 9
W alton ............. 1!9
Washington ............ 19
Total ....... ... 42-)


Capital
Invested.
$ 527,250
63,000
277,000
115,000
370,000
510,000
337,000
154,000

253.000
286,200

33,000
50,000
377,000
317.500
409,000
314,000
42,640
247,500
66 .500

.50.000
238,000
47,000
251,000
90,000
716,160

234,000
128,000
57,000
651,000
295,000
187,000
562,150
600,000
295,000
30,000
;50,503
708,800
102,000
499,000
158,000

$11,3M0,480.50


Average
No. Wage Total
Earners. Wages
733 $ 190,700
177 39,000
412 04,488
166 86,730
532 106,700
840 175,000
429 106,000
586 168,000

467 76,750
450 28,500
89 35,000
84 15,000
173 43,000
481 92,000
298 144,400
533 184,600
548 108,645
177 44,000
426 87,540
550 156,60

106 63,200
521 95,800
103 30,500
497 107,900
120 26,000
1,118 281,680

551 150,000
260 118,750
93 19,000
595 99,00
300 75,000
525 115,465
622 111,500
1,296 421,500
420 130,000
47 10,400
774 133,700
466 67000
455 107,000
726 216,180
922 180,170
18,755 $4,53,318


Value of
Products.
$ 341,100
50,500
200,000
174,000
241,700
157,000
218,500
347,000

199,060
66,000

150,000
32,000
160,000
315,000
201,000
296,000
309,875
95500
198,000
3560,700

58,500
270,000
55,000
207,000
86,000
594,500

157,900
315,540
336,500
191,000
214,00
305,000
777,000
294,000
62,000
494,000
192,275
303,500
438,976
421,611

$10,195,827


0


(a) Has no turpentine industry.
(b) No turpentine industry at time of census.


A LIVE OAK ENTHUSIAST.

17 A N I ~Rev. C. A. Ridley Talks Entertainingly of
THE AAHis Growing Town.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA. Rev. C. A. Ridley of Live Oak was in
Under new management. Though Jacksonville for a few hours yesterday )on
Under new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, in- his way home frol Fernandina where he
eluding new electric elevator and our has been for ten days delivering a series
own electric light plant. ,,f sermons in the First Baptist church.

H. N. O'NEAL. Prop. Mr. Ridley spoke enthusiastically of Fer-
naindina and declares that it had one of
the finest water fronts he had ever seen,
gll aJu ggI ,4, uA III4* 6 +It0I1 5I*t 614$114 4 and when connected with Live Oak by
|10 DO FIHN FIIM Hl 0F PO the extension of the Florida Railway,
JOS. ROSNHEIM SHOE COe would, as Mr. Ridley put it, "be one of
MAvACTV S AND JOBBERS the most important little vitie. in the
MA]NWFACTUIAIt AND JOBBERS OF
State."
-- "I find," continued Mr. Ridley, "that

S H O E S 0 the people of Fernandina are more hope-
I ful than ever of Mr. Drew's road. Since
.- s return from New York he announces
SA VA N NA G O R G A definitely his plans for building in the im-
"Best Shoes Male for Cmilsary Trade." In.eliate future. He is in Fernandina to-
"la i 1I kin;l after hli details of the work,
,t I 54 *a 8 u S*4I88 **8| 0 SIS+ S5US0 44 t~weing the board of tra .e. etc.


"'Live Oak, when connected thus with
deep water, will be able to secure a decent
freight rate, which will mean a great deal
for her business men. Much of her freight
at present is shipped to Jacksonville and
then reshipped in order to save money by
getting the Jacksonville rate from the
markets. She is also buying stuff south,
in the markets at New Orleans, etc., and
having it shipped by boat up the Suwan-
nee river to Wilmarth on the Florida Rail-
way near Live Oak. So you see how much
the new road is going to mean to u
Wholesale freight rates, I am told, when
there is direct connection by rail with the
boats, are very little higher for 100 miles
inland than for the port itself."
Capt. Hillman' Liberality.
In speaking of Live Oak's business men,
-Mr. Ridley said: "We have a set of men
in Live Oak who, for broad-minded, big-
hearted and level-headed mpen, are not sur-
passed in Floridai. I noted with pleasure
your reference to Capt. Hillman and his
magnificent gift to the Salvation Army
building. Well, that is just like Hillman.
He never does things by halvs, Ha has


a


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-------- -- -


EI









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


TAMPA MONUMENTAL WORKS,
DBEALER IN
Monuments. Headstones, Iron Fencing and Italian Statuary
NO JOB TOO LARGE. NO JOB TOO SMALL.
MAIN OFFICES 310 ZACH STREET, TAMPA, FLA.


a big head and heart and he thinks big
thoughts and does big things in a big way.
He has meant much to the life and prog-
ress of our city. No matter what is pro-
posed, if it looks to the public good, we
put Hillman down at the head of the list
as one of our largest donors or stock-
holders. The gift referred to illustrates
the man's unselfish spirit.
Live Young Live Oak Mea.
"And do you know, Live Oak is getting
some fine advertising from her public-
spirited and philanthropic citizens. Up to
S a year or two ago they were all taken up
with making money, but now some of
them are engaged in spending it. We have
several young men who will be capitalists
inside the next five years if fortune does
not reverse itself on them. Take our
man, C. H. Brown, only a young fellow,
but one of the finest business men in any
man's town. Then there is J. B. Barton,
Wiley Taylor, C. B. McLeod, Lee Byrd and
others. All these men are making money
and making it fast. With a comparatively
small investment one of them told me a
few days ago that he cleared $25,000 last
year on turpentine alone. And thus runs
the story. Give us a freight rate and we
will show you a volume of business the
like of which has not been seen in any
eILy of similar size.
"I also notice that since I left home
there has been quite a bit of trading going
on among the moneyed men of Live Oak
themselves. I see where J. B. Barton and
C. B. McLeod have sold one of their tur-
pentine farms near Citra to Wiley Taylor,
all of Live Oak, for 600,000. Wiley has
been restless for several months trying to
get back in the business. He is quite a
young man, but has spent almost all his
business life, up-to-date, in turpentine and
naval stores operations. At present prices
Wiley bids fair to make quite a little
money. He is a fine fellow and deserves
success."-Times-Union.

ANOTHER BIG CORPORATION.

Ewing-Meggs Company Is Now Applying
for a Charter.
The Ewing-Meggs Company is being in-
corporated under the laws of Florida, with
principal offices in Jacksonville, and a cap-
ihal stock of $150,000.
The general nature of business to be
conducted by this corporation is to buy,
sell and lease land; to erect turpentine
stills and naval stores plants; to erect and
operate saw mills and planing mills, and
to buy and sell naval stores, cross-ties,
lumber and manufactured products and
products in all stages of manufacture
from naval stores and lumber; and to
lease and acquire land for naval stores
and lumber and cross-tie purposes, and to
dispose of such leases; to lease, own and
operate turpentine farnns and turpentine
distilleries, and saw mills and planing
mills, to build, buy, sell, lease, manage,
own, contract, hire, charter or operate
vessels, boats, tram-ways, railways,
dredges, lighters, engines, ears or other
vehicles gr mea of transportation of
property gr prodgetq held, controlled,


owned or manufactured by said corpora-
tion, or manufactured or consigned to
other persons or corporations, but not to
use said means of transportation for the
purpose of doing the business of a com-
mon carrier; to buy, sell and deal in gro-
ceries, dry goods, hardware, and all kinds
of merchandise and still and mill supplies
of any kind; to advance and loan money
upon securities of land, crops, personal
property or commercial paper; to manu-
facture, own, buy, sell and deal in bar-
rels, staves, heading, still supplies and ma-
terial of similar kinds; to act as broker,
factor or agent in the purchase, sale or
management of real property and the
products thereof; to have agencies and
employs agents at such places in this and
other States as may be required or neces-
sary for the carrying on of said business,
and furthering the ends of said corpora-
tion, to borrow money and secure the same
by mortgages, deeds, collateral securities
or otherwise and to issue options, notes
and other obligations thereon, or for
money otherwise owing; to buy, sell, own,
and lease all necessary personal property
to advantageously carry on, and to do all
such other and further things as may be
necessary or expedient to be done for the
successful transaction of the business of
the corporation.

RAILROAD PROBLEMS OF THE DAY.

Southern Railway President Speaks on
Relation of the Railroads and the
People and the Government.
Atlanta, March 19.-At the annual din-
ner of the Atlanta Chamnler of Cemmereo
tonight. Fre-ident AW. W. Finley of the
Southern Railway. who was one of the
principal speakers, devoted his remarks
entirely to the relations between the rail-
roads, on the onehand, and the people and
the State and national governments on the
other hand. Without referring to any spe-
cific action by congress or the State legis-
latures. Mr. Finley indicated his belief
that the present trend of legislation en-
dangers the prosperity of the railroads and
of the country alike. Mr. Finley said it
had always been the desire of the railways
to maintain cordial relations with the peo-
ple along their lines and that the railways
must cultivate the good will and co-opera-
tion of the public by the adoption and pro-
mulgation of economically and commercial-
ly sound principles in the conduct of their
business. Mr. Finley reviewed the prog-
ress of the South and said that its press-
ing need today is for better and more ex-
tensive transportation facilities.
New Capital Required.
"If the railways are to secure the large
amounts of new capital required to enable
then to meet the rapidly increasing de-
mand for. their services," he said, "their
credit nlust be such as to assure investors
of i reasonable return upon their money.
The South now has rates that enable the
Southern producers to market their prod-
(Continued on page 13.)


Reliable Whiskies.

When we make Claims for our goods we are certain of
the facts. We operate the finest open fire copper Distill-
ery in the World. We do our own bottling and packing
and no expense or labor is spared to have every drop of our
Whiskey absolutely pure and of the highest quality.
We guarantee every Order to be perfectly satisfactory,
or return your money.

Four Full Quarts Rose's

"Old Corn" or "Old Rye" or assorted $3.40, express
prepaid. Write for complete Price-List.


R. M. Rose Company,
16 West Forsyth Street, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
"ASK THE REVENUE OFFICER."


W. B. HENDERSON. Press. JOHN SAVARESE, Trasurw.
W. R. FULLER. Vice Pres. E. BERGER, Secrmy-TressmrT.


TAMPA DRUG CO.
Wholesale Manufrctu-ring Druggixts,
TAMPA, FLORIDA.
Full and complete line of all kinds of Drugs, Chemicals
and Patent Medicines.
SPECIAL ATTENTION 70 COMMISsARY TRADE.
PROMPT ATTENTION TO ALL ORDERS.


C. C. Bettes,


DRUGS. s3I IuVmmTy
0 ft mi LALRA


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Florida Mail Order Drug Store. Supplies Everything a Drug Store
Ever Kept. Write to Us.


WILLIAM A. BOUR8 JAMES O. DARBY


WILLIAM A. BOURS & COMPANY
THE OLDEST ESTA"BISIED RAIN AM SEEU MOUS M TmE STATUS
Hay, Grain, Feed, Garden
Seeds, Poultry Supplies, Flour,
Grits, Meal and fertilizers.
OUR MOTTO: Prempt nSielpoet. ReliaMe OG41*. Catalogs rres
206 EAST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FiA.










10 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL RECORD
JAMESA. HOLLOMON. Edter.mn-C tef.
A M. MAILU Businems M sanger.

Pubshiehed Evn sAturdy.
SammcMsom (mme)..A3 40 per Annum
(Forei) .... 3.50 "

"The Poure and It Preduolw."

All oammsurlatkmm aealh be 8a6dreene
The Industrial Record Company.
Jsckeonvillo, rin.
ranme Mb E and ausiuess OsfOe a
Sveanisab. Ga.
ase at the Postoaoc at Jacsonaille. Fla..
m seoo-allass matter

Adopted by th Executive Comitts of
the furpete Opntan ta a omtw
eptember 1, 19 as its elusive ai-
Sorgun. Adopted i annual eooavti
Septemberu 11 M the org also of the ea-

Adopted April 27th 19M, as to os5ial
or- of tlnterstate Cae Gr(kowers' As-
oiatio. Adopted September 11, 1908, ma
the only A' orga i of the T. 0. A.
Osaumaded to luber people by epecal
resolution adopted by tho Georgia Swmill
Aociaoti.

THE RECORD'S OFFICES.
The pu ing plant and te main of-
cam of the lad trial Record Co ay
are located at the interaetiom of Bay and
Newman Streets, Jaoonville, Fla., is the
ve heart of the gret turpntie mad
yow pine duinatrim.
trade o the tire South.
The h-anniah, Ga., office is in the Board
if Trade Buslding. Savanhah is the Imd-
ing open naval torem market in,the world.

NOTICE TO PATRONS.
AD paymenta fe adytitVig in the In-
latrial RPWod a ahubcriptun theret
muat he maeo direct to the bhome oite i
JackaTville. Agents an st allowed to
maik eollkatis nmd ay reiwatmstAm.
ba for advertisag am ubacriptiea ae
aet "rt fire the beie office, whim .
and an remittat e muls be mad dirct
to this c-- y.


OUR CONGRATULATIONS.
The Record congratulates two well-
known turpentine men, in particular, this
week. One of them is Mr. J. W. Ward,
Jr., of Floral City; the other is Captain
W. J. Hillman, of Live Oak. We congrat-
ulate Mr. Ward for deciding to make Jack-
sonville his home. He has bought the
handsome Zapf residence, in Riverside,and
will soon move his interesting family here.
Captain Hillman we congratulate for
starting off the Salvation Army building
in Jacksonville with a donation of $2,500.
Captain Hillman's virtues are many, and
one of them is his liberality in good
causes.


during the coming session, as Senator H.
H. Buckman in his successful campaign,
declared that lie would urge no changes
in the charter unless the people at a
special election should recommend them.
No such election has been proposed, and
the people seem to be satisfied with the
present form of government under which
Jacksonville has had marvelous prosperity.
Harmonious Delegation.
Jacksonville's delegation are personal
friends and it is generally understood
that they will work harmoniously togeth-
er on all matters of State. Representa-
tive Farris' hobby is good roads, and he
has a bill which he believes will pass.
Next to the good roads proposition the
people are anxious for amendments to the
primary, which will allow candidates to
run with less expense. The army of
grafters and political bums is now the
great obstacle, and aspirants for office in
most cases have bad to spend more money
than the offices sought for pay.
Broaard's Coming Message.
Governor Broward has bien busy on
his message to the Legislature, but what
it will contain no one dares venture to
assert. The Governor will still cling to
his Everglades scheme, and he also urges
good roads, and more temperance legis-
lation. It is not known whether or not
he will still make a fight for State life
insurance, a measure which met with op-
position during the last session. Brow-
ard's friends are not sure that both
branches of the Legislature will be in har-
mony with him. In fact, it is believed
that his political opponents will organize
the Senate, but the majority will be small.
The administration forces are also not
so sure as to the control of the House,
as they have not yet settled on a speaker
for this body.
However, which ever way the "cat
jumps" the next Legislature will be a
most interesting one, and in a few days
the machinery will all be in motion.

SOUTH MISSISSIPPI LUMBERMEN.
The South Mississippi Lumbermen's As-
sociation met at Hattiesburg, Miss.. on
March 8 with an attendance said to be the
largest the association has ever had. Pres-
ident J. F. Wilder called the meeting to
order and read his annual address, in
which he detailed the general conditions
of the business for the past year. referring
especially to the lumber industry in Mis-
sippi. Secretary W. C. Rodgers made his
financial report to the association. The
car situation was discussed at some length,
and a committee appointed to confer with
the New Orleans & Northwestern Railroad
with reference to securing a better car
supply. The subject of arranging a new


YLORIDA LEGSLLATURE. unce-list was also considered, but no ac-
tion taken. It was decided to engage a
It Will Cnvene One Week from Next paid secretary for the association, but
Tuesday. final action was deferred, the association
One week from next Tuesday the Legis- adjourning for a week and a committee
lature of Florida will meet, and many be- being appointed to investigate and report
lieve that it will prove one of the most as to the form of organization necessary
interesting sessions in the history of the to existing conditions. President Wilder
State. was re-elected.
There are many important State prob-
lems to be solved, and the matter that Big Turpentine Plant.
will prove of most interest to the State Col. Sam Park, of Beaumont, Texas, and
generally is the good roads bill. The memn- Newton R. Wilson of Monterey, Mexico,
bers realize that this is a most important president and vice-president, respectively,
measure, and that some bill equally just of the Industrial Lumber Company of
to all sections will pass. Beaumont, are reported as organizing a
Jackoeville' Charter. company for the purpose of establishing
Previous legislatures have consumed a large turpentine distilling plant in I.on-
much time wrangling with amendments to isiana. It is understood that the Indus-
the Jacksonville city charter. It is not trial Lumber Co. has conveyed to the new
believed that any such effort will be made company the turpentine rights on 60,000


acres of pine timber lands in Calcasieu,
Vernon, Rapides and St. Landry parishes,
Louisiana, and that the p:opo-ed plant
will be located at Elizabeth, a new town
on the Jasper and Eastern extension of
the Santa Fe railway. The capitalization
of the new company, it is stated, will be
from $100,000 to $500,000, and work on
the construction of the plant will begin
immediately.

Turpentine from Mill Refuse.
The Emporia Manufacturing Co. of Em
poria, Va., wants to communicate with
manufacturers of turpentine from mill
refuse-slabs, edge strips. board ends and
sawdust.


SBIG DEAL IN OCALA.

Jacksonville Development Company Buys
a Beautiful Suburb There.
The Ocala Banner, of Thursday, has the
following to say of the development work
undertaken in Ocala by the Jacksonville
Development Company:
James A. Holloman, treasurer and gen-
eral manager of the Jacksonville Develop-
ment Company, was in the city yesterday,
accompanied by Roland Woodward, the
company's engineer, and J. W. Edmnond-
son, superintendent of the company's field
force. These gentlemen were making the
preliminary survey and locating streets.
etc.. in their beautiful sub-division in this
city which will be known as Ocala
Heights. This property, which is on Lake
Weir avenue, inside of the city limits, is
decidedly the most attractive residential
vacant property in the city, and with a
live, progressive firm like the Jacksonville
Development Company behind it, with
plenty of capital to develop along high
lines, there is no doubt that the property
will be eagerly sought for as soon as
placed on the market.
In speaking of his company's entering
the city, Mr. Holloman made the follow-
ing statement to a reporter of the Ocala
Banner: "Our property, which we call
(h*ala Heights, is inside the city limits,
situated on the west side of Earle street,
*-r Lake Weir avenue, as I hear it more
frequently termed. We have only about
100 lots and we shall develop along the
highest possible lines. The streets will be
properly graded and tile or cement side-
walks will be laid in front of every lot.
Ornamental shade trees, possibly palms,
will he set out on both sides of every
street, and the property parked and beau-
tified to make it an ideal residence sec-
tion. The city water extends now to
within two blocks and we shall at once
make an effort to carry it right to the
properly. We do not expect to get this
on the market until the latter part of
April, although our street force will be :it
work in the next week. All the lots in
(Oala Heights will be large, with an alley
in the rear. and as you probably know,
this property, is exceptionally high, al-
most overlooking the city, as a matter of
fact. We shall sell the few lots we have


at reasonable prices and on easy terms,
and shall sell them quietly. employing
only the most dignified, husiness-like
- methods. The Jacksonville Development
( company does not operate free gift sales,
*r use other- fictitious methods in its op-
erations. It quietly and conservatively in-
vests its money where others can afford
to invest, and it sells its properties ab-
-olutely upon their merits, and in keeping
titll actual and not fictitious values. We
-h;;l i<,s-il.ly nake it a condition of our
sales in Ocala Hleigl ts that no residence


THE CLOTHIERS


SOLE AGENTS f= KMX HATS


Our Clothing

Cwt
Right


Made
Right
Looks
Well
Hamgs
Well
Feels

Swell


Nff
Said


THE STUART-BERNSTEIN CO.
14 WEST BAY ST. JACKSONVMILE.. LA

costing less than $1,000 will be permitted
built in the sub-division, and it will also
Ican money to all purchasers for building
purposes. Of course, only desirable white
people will be permitted to buy in Ocals
Heights. On the whole the sub-division
will be attractive, and kept so, and we ex-
pect to sell the best lots we have only
to the very best class of the local people."

FACTS ABOUT JACKSONVILLE.

Interesting Information Published by the
Real Etate Board.
The Jacksonville Real Estate Board has
just issued an interesting folder and map
of "Greater Jacksonville," which will be
generally distributed, ind which will re-
sult in great good to this city and county.
This organization is composed of ener-
getic business men and they have per-
formed a great benefit for Jacksonville by



The Wealth of the

Old Families.

Often disappeared, evaporated, and the
new generation was left but one or two
things of real value. Among these valu-
ables (in 99 cases out of a hundred) was
a chest of old silver, the most useful and
beautiful heirloom that the young genera-
tion treasured.
Have you such a treasure to hand down
to your heirs? If not, now is the time to
start gathering it. If you are interested,
come down and let us show you something
in that line that is WORTH HAVING
NOW and which will be highly treasured
by your sons and daughters.


R. J. ILES COMPANY,

15 W. Bay St.,

JacMkpmi 1Hrid








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11



FLORIDA LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY.

CAPITAL STOCK Writes all Forms of LAfe nd En-
ONE MILLION DOLLARS 1 dowment Insurance.


their unique and interesting advertising
methods. This board comprises the fol-
lowing officers: President, J. E. Johnson;
vice-president, Charles L. Bonney; secre-
tary, Edward Anderson; treasurer, J. D.
Shaylor; directors, Edward Anderson, C. L.
Bonney, George E. Brown, William Bur-
bridge, J. E. Johnson, J. D. Shaylor and
W. C. Warrington.
Facts Are Gives.
Among other things covered by this
progressive real estate board is the follow-

"On February 13, 1899, Jacksonville had
2 inches of snow. It had a snow flkrry in
188, 1802, 1893 and 1901. A very good
record.
"The average number of days below
freezing for each year for Jacksonville is
7. December averages 2; January 3; Feb-
ruary 2. Occasionally, November and
March may have one freezing day.
"The lowest temperature in Jacksonville
was in February, 1809, when the mercury
dropped to 10 degrees. In December, 1894,
it had 14 degrees; in January, 1886, it
had 15 degrees; in March, 1899, it had 2
degrees. The average for December is 56,
for January 55, and for February 58.
As a Summer Resort.
"Jacksonville never has a sunstroke.
"It always has a cool ocean breeze.
"Its nights are 15 to 20 degrees cooler
than its days.
"Phoenix, Aris., holds first prize as the
hot spot of the nation, having recorded a
temperature of 119 degrees, and its neigh-
bor, Yuma, is next, with 118.
"Fresno and Redbluff, Cal., each has a
record of 114.
"Walls Walla records 113, El Paso 112,
Boise and Miles City have 111.
"Sacramento and Pierre have 110 de-
grees, Los Angeles and DesMoines 100.
"San Antonio, Hannibal, Fort Worth,
Dodge, Keokuk, Huron and Marquette
each record 108.
"Yankton, North Platt, Sioux City,
Evansville, Springfield, IlI., St. Louis
Louisville, Montgomery and Shreveport
are in the 107 class.
"Bismark, Davenport, Dubuque, Indian-
apolis, Kansas City, Omaha, Little Rock
Lincoln and Topeka each 10.
"Cincinnati, Lewiston, Independence and
Augusta 1056.
"Jacksonville, St. Paul and LaCrosse
are in the 104 class.
"Chicago, Pittsburg, Philadelphia and
Washington record 103. New York has
only 99, but think of the sunstrokes!
Federal government improvements ar<
shown to $535,000 for the government
building and $3.900,000 for a twenty-foul
foot channel to the sea.
County Improvements.
liver improvement bonds ........$300,00(
Court house .................... 175,00(
Schools ......................... 230,00
County jail ..................... 52,00(
Armory ......................... 45,00
Hospital ........................ 30,00(


832,000


City Imrovements.
City hall ................... ..
City crematory ................
Fire department ...............
Police department .............
Eighty-four acre of parks .....
Public Library, 12,000 volumes.
Electric light plant ............
Wate-works system ...........
Sewerage system ..............
Paved streets ................ 1
Bridges and viaducts ...........


170,000
20,000
103,657
04,321
205,550
65,000
457,660
524,048
412,975
1,018,500
352,000


$3,393,711
Total Public Improvements.
Federal government, 51 p. c.....$4,444,000
City government, 40 p. c. ........ 3,393,711
County government, 9 p. c. .... 832,000

$8,669,711
Populatim.
"Jacksonville is the most cosmopolitan
City of the South. It has people from
every country of Europe and Asia. It has
natives of every State in the Union. Its
largest foreign colony is German and Brit-
Sish next. The colonies from the Eastern
,and Western States are large. The 1906
directory population is 51,865, and its tre-
mendous visitor population is estimated
by traffic managers at 200,000 per annum.
It has a suburban population of about
15.000.
"The Half Million Club of Greater Jack-
sonville estimates that the local popula-
tion at the next Federal census in 1910
should be 125,000 people."




WANTED
AND

FOR SALE
Rate for this column is 2 cents per word
for frst insertion and 1 cent per word for
following insertions. No advertisement
,taken for less than 40 cents for fnt, and
20 cents for following insertions. Cub
must accompany orders unless you have
an account with us.

POSITION WANTED.-As woodsman
or stiller. Can do either; with reference.
Have 18 years' experience at the business.
IAddress C., care Industrial Record. 4t

FOR SALE-10,000 acres virgin L. L. pine
in Calhoun County, West Florida, one
S mile south of Dalkeith Landing, on Ap-
alachicola River. S. S. Alderman, owner.
Address M. C., Tressahitchka, West
Florida.
3-83-07 to 5-11-07

WANTED-Position as woodsman or
stiller. Ten years' experience. The very
0 best of references. Apply at once to S.
0 Smtih, Box 255, Kissimmee, Fla.
0 3-27-05--3t


WANTED-Position with mill or tur-
pentine operator as ocmmissary clerk.
Have some knowledge of bookkeeping.
State salary. Address "Clerk," ear In-
dustrial Record. 3-9-7-4t


EXPERT ACCOUNTANT.
ANY BUSINESS correspondence solicited;
-reference the best Fred R nkin,
Jacksonville, Fla. Long distance phone
2776. P. O. Box 572.

WANTED-All commlessries to clean up
their bars of all kinds of eed saks and
burlaps. We buy everything in the way
of sacks. Write us. Amerian Fibre On,
Jacksonville, Fla.


HUTCHINSON AUDIT CO.
PUBLIC ACCOUMTANTS & AUDITORS.
Dyal-UpchuAc Bulldina
Phone 31s. Jeabhoemdn M


To Improve Feight Uervie.
Mr. A. H. Plant, comptroller of the
Southern Railway Co., announces that the
company has established a force of trav-
eling freight claim agents, each of whom
will be assigned to a certain territory and
who will travel therein contimously, vis-
iting the local agents of the company sad
the company's patrons for the purpose of
securing prompt handling and settlement
of all fair and honest loss, damage and
overcharge freight claims against the com-
pany, and also to semre the highest ef-
ciency of local agents in the handling of
freight and in their dealings with the
public. Other improvements along these
lines are also sought.


A Pointer to the Commissary


Man Only.
Below is a list of our leaders and we are the only medical coeoar who make a
line exclusively for commissaries, heace we know what they aed, having studied
their wants for ten years, which' we fnd to be different from other general trade and
to induce every commissary keeper to give us their busiest, or allow us to get
started with them, we will for one year give a premium with every purchse of
our medicines, which premiums are such as Iron Safes, Computing OommLisary
Scales, Typewriters, Computing Oil Tanks, Computing Cheee Omtters, al breeds
bird dogs that are thoroughbreds and all other breeds t Jhabiagh% l in the way
of dogs and game chickens. We give all other commissary fxtures, rol top
desks, scales, etc., etc.
Cactus Compound retails at $1.00, which is for chrome blood diseases, syph-
iletic affections and female diseases. Painolin (vs. Pain) sels at 25e. Witea Han
Liniment sells at 50e. Killer (for gonorrhoea ad kidneys) sells for $1e. Ant
Kreon, a 25e. pill that cures colds, chill and fixes the liver. For particular ad-
dress-

CONTINENTAL MANUFACTURING COMPANY,
BIRMINGHAM, ALA.


COMPARATIVE MARKET rwuR iRS.
Very little doing in spirits this week, though the price was high and
steady. Rosin also was steady in price, excepting the lower grades ad only
a comparatively small amount of it was handled this week.
SPIRITS OF TURPENPTIN FOR THE WEEK HERE AMD AT VAVTANA.
Price. Bas. shipmm. Reeapts. sha.
Jax. Sar. Jax. Bv. Jan. 8av. Jan. av. uJa. sar
Saturday ...... 74% 74% 51 .... I .... 35 57 171 7,35
Monday ....... 174% 74% 142 5 700 .... 85 7,415
Tuesday ....... .... 74% 2.... 2 .... 415 67 8 ,791
Wednesday ..... 74% 74% 202 961 282 322 10 0 8,8
Thursday ...... 74% 75 114 271 175 1 149 .... ,745
Friday ......... .... 74% .... 991 25 270 75 Za 6,719
ROSIN FOR THE WE W HXZR AND AT 8AVAMNAH.
Saturday. Monday. Tuesday. Wednesday. Thursday. riday.
Jax. Sav. Jax. Sav. Jax. av. Jax. asv. Jaz. isv. Jan Biv.
I WW ...... 6.25 6.356.25 6.2516.25 6.256.25 6.258.25 6.256.25 6.25
WG .......16.10 6.106.10 6.1016.10 6.106.10 6.160 6.110 .I 6.10
SN .........5.75 5.755.75 5.75!5.75 5.755.75 5.755.75 5.755.75 5.75
M. ......... 5.60 5.605.60 5.605.60 5. 5.605 60560 5.0 .0.60 5.60
K .........5.50 5.505.50 5.5015.50 5.505.50 5.505.50 5.505.50 5.50
1..........4.60 4.604.65 4.0014.70 4.604.70 4.704.75 4.704.75 4.70
H ......... 4.55 4.554.60 4.554.65 4.554.66 4.654.70 4.654.70 4.70
G ......... 4.30 4.304.35 4.354.40 4.404.40 4.404.45 4.464.45 4.45
F .........4.25 4.304.30 4.304.35 4.354.35 4.354.40 4.44.40 4.40
E ......... 4.20 4.254.25 4.254.30 4.254.30 4.304.35 4.354.35 4.35
D ......... 4.20 4.204.25 4.204.30 4.204.30 4.304.35 4.354.35 4.35
CBA .......4.20 4.204.25 4.204.30 4.204.30 4.304.35 4.304.35 4.35
REPORT OF ROJIN MOVEMENT HERB AND AT 8AVMANAB.
Sales. Sbpmw- m. aba Ste .
Jax. 8v. Jan. J v. Jay J. JaE. av.
Saturday .............. 587 53612,100 1,03|! 756 5945,552 50,219
Monday .............. 815 2101,900 4,0451 782 50044,90 46,63
Tuesday ................ 772 21111,400 1,480( 215 71843,00 45,21
Wednesday.............1.731 49814,655 7,12011,235 35741,005 30,158
Friday ............... 181 5091 705 8860 277 w 07,41
-_


L--.i- I- .. . .. -




12 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Book and Pamphlet Work

IS OUR SPECIALTY.


With


a large


corps


and well
of expert


equipped


workmen,


plant


we are


Prepared to ExecuteHigh-Grade


Work


Promptly


And at Reasonable Prices


Industrial Record Pub. Co.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


and a full









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 13



Jacksonville Grocery Comp'y

Wholesale Qrooerw and Dlsllesr' Suppli s.
W D amel WAnd .m Wfnk A. O.t L .. .- k O


(Continued from page 9.)
cets in widely separated home and for-
eign markets on such terms that they can
compete successfully with similar products
from other localities, but it has not the
means of moving those products to mar-
ket as promptly as is desirable. Every
shipper wants low rates, but when rates
are so low as to enable him to reach com-
petitive markets on terms at least as fav-
orable as those of his competitors, prompt
and efficient service becomes of more im-
S portance than rate reduction. The im-
perative need of the South today is im-
proved transportation service. I am sure
that the intelligent business men of this
section will agree with me that improved
facilities are more urgently needed than
any reduction in charges."
Need of Encouragement.
After referring to the public aid given
to railway construction in the early days,
.,r. Ainley said the great need in the
economic situation in the South today is
that the entire people of that section
should realize that the period of railroad
construction has not passed and that there
is now as much need of encouragement,
not financial, but of the moral favor and
support of the public as ever.
While approving the policy of improv-
ing rivers and harbors at public expense
Mr. Finley contrasted the attitude of the
public toward carriers by water and by
rail, pointing out that the former pays
nothing for his highways; that it is main-
tained and improved at public expense,
while the carrier by rail must construct
.his own highway, must pay heavy taxes
and is subjected to increasing government-
al supervision and regulation. He urged a
popular understanding of the fact that
rail transportation is more important than
water transportation, expressing the be-
lief that when the interdependence of the
railways and the people is understood, the
people will be as reluctant to place obsta-
cles in the way of railway improvement
as they would be to oppose the improve-
ment of the waterways.
Car Shortage.
late Epressing the belief that "there is
danger that legislation intended to regu-
late railways may prove to be an obstacle
to their extension and development, and
may tend to make worse, instead of bet-
ter, the conditions sought to be remedied,"
Mr. Finley cited as an illustration, legis-
lation proposing to impose penalties for
failure to supply cars or to perform other
services. without regard to whether such
failure is the result of willful negligence.
He pointed ott that the present demand
for cars is beyond the capacity of the
railways and the car builders to supply,
and that the imposition of car service
penalties would compel discrimination in
favor of shipments wholly within the bor-
ders of the State imposing the penalty.
"It must be apparent." sano he, "that the
inevitable result of this will be to bring
about a competition of greed and rivalry
between the States to see which can im-
pose the heaviest penalties and secure the
largest supply of cars, and the most
prompt service. and that every penalty
imposed for failure to do the impossible
must reduce the ability of the road to se-
cure more cars and other needed better-


Carrier and Public.
"It has become popular," he concludes,
"to discredit the purposes of therailroad
manager. Whenever he announces a pol-
icy intended to improve the relation be-
tween the carrier and the public and
founded upon broad and just principles.
there are those who question his sincerity.
An effort is made to make of him a thing
apart from the good and patriotic men
of the community. I appeal against such
a sentiment to the sense of right and jus-


tiee of the American people. We are striv-
ing to improve conditions and to perform
our public duties, must be admitted to
your confidence and upheld by your en-
couragement. The task at best is hard.
The conditions that surround us are most
trying. We can only succeed if the sin-
cerity and honesty of our purposes are
recognized by the people and we are up-
held by their generous favor and co-opera-
tion."
The address of President Finley was the
feature of the dinner.
An attendance of 400 representative cit-
izens, a number of prominent railroad


men, and a large representation from the
Seed Crusher's Association of Georgia
made the occasion of more than usual in-
terest Besides President Finley, the
speakers were: President James A. Ay-
cock, of the Seed Crushers' Association, on
The Cotton Oil Industry, the retiring and
incoming presidents of the chamber of
commerce.
Among those present were Gov. J. M.
Terrell, president; J. F. Hanson, of the
Central of Georgia, railroad; C. A. Weck-
ersham, president of the Atlanta and West
Point railroad, and other prominent ril-
road officials.


ments. It must also be apparent that
such a policy is in direct violation of the
common law rule forbidding discrimination,
which has been incorporated in the fede-
ral and State statutes. It compels dis-
crimination in favor of transportation
wholly within the State imposing the
heaviest penalty against other States and
against interstate traffic."
Obligation of Shipper.
After referring to the radical difference
between the obligation upon the shipper to
pay demurrage charges when he withholds
from its proper use property which does
not belong to him, and the proposition to
penalize a railroad for failure to perform
services beyond its ability, Mr. Finley
said:
"In this matter and others which it is
proposed to regulate by legislation, it is
for the best interests of all concerned that
the relations between the railway and
those buying transportation from it,
should conform to the well-established
business rules that govern commercial
transactions of all kinds. There seems
to be an idea in the minds of some that
the business of transportation by rail is
so different from all other forms of hu-
man activity, and that the railday cor-
pcrtaion is so different from all other busi-
*-ess concerns, that they should be hedged
about with restrictions, which would be
recognized as being fatal to the success of
an individual or corporation engaged in
any other business. A railway corporation
differs from other corporations generally
in that it requires a larger amount of
capital for the creation and operation of
its plant than is need in most other lines
of business. Its capital can only be se-
rored if those seeking investment can be
reasonably sure of a fair return, and its
business can only be conducted success-
fully, and its facilities expanded if its in-
come can be kept up to the point necessary
to sustain its credit and enable it to se-
cure new capital when required for these
purposes.
Solving the Problem.
"The transportation problem cannot be
solved in prejudice or passion or in any
misunderstanding of the conditions that
surround it. Its just solution calls for
moderation and justice on the part of the
people and a full understanding and co-
operation between our State and national
government and the railroads. In such an
effort to work out successfully the prob-
lem. which is the great business and gov-
ernmental problem of the times and which
can only be solved on principles of con-
struction and not destruction, and in full
recognition of the high and just purposes
on both sides, may God speed the rail-
roads, and the people of the great State
of Georgia.


I. W. VEST,
Proidea


IL L I
8fy MW T9=
DP. L VRAJA
Aid Smy smiT,...


WEST FLYNN & HARRIS CO.
SGERuMAnA LDO. Savwaah. Oa
GENERAL OFFICES
I WEST BL.DG. JaekashamSis Vla


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
NAVAL STORES RECEIVrE AT SAVANNAA, A JACKoWIVHJ
FLA., AD gFrMAWDrWA, FIA.

Wholesale Grocers also Dealers in Hay. CGin and Heavy
Hamnes.


SOLE AGENTS' 0 the Cdedd U"i Td* ia Am.
and Vilsnn fctildi Ptih iijdb n VIii


SAVANNAH, GA.


MERCHANTS WAREHOUSES.
JACKSONVILLk, FA.


TAMPA, VA


Dn. ILYYt K
10M R HARM
V. j, XulS,
Viob-paidow


RIXFORD TURPENTINE AXES g


Are the best, beware

of imitations or "the


I
l just as good" kind. If

you want the best or-

der the genuine article

from



W. H. Brlggs Hardware Co.

Sole SOuthern A&gfts

VALDOSTA. GEORGIA.

Jobbers of Mill and Turpentine Supplies.
3>aootxxEcrrrr~ro~.ocrffig^^^


-^w--******-*-*************************


~0~,~~,1~---------------"''-'-""









14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
~Lj*LE. S. NASH. President. S. P. SilO TTER.. 0. M. BOARDMAN. Treasurer.I


L S. NASH. President.
J. F. C. MYERS. Vice-President.


American


S. P. SHOTTEl.,
Chairman Board of Directors.


Naval Stores
(OF WEST VIRGINIA)


G. M. BOARDMAN. Treiurer.
C. J. DeLOACH. Secretary.


Company


Successors to S. P. Shetter Company. Patterson Downing Company,
Exporters and Dealers in All Grades of ROSIN. PURE SPIRITS TURPENTINE.
TAR. PITCH. ROSIN OIL and all other products of the pine tree.

HEAD OfrIGES: SAVANNAH, GEORGIA.


WnW YORK
PHILADELPHIA
CHICAGO


ST. LOUIS
CINCINNATI
LOUISVILLE


BRANCHES:
WILMINGTON
BRUNSWICK
JACKSONVILLE


FERNANDINA
TAMPA
PKNSACOLA


NKW ORLEAHS
GULFPORT


A EW INDUSTRY FOR GEORGIA

Rich China Clay Deposits Are Found by
Geologist -
Atlanta, March 18.-There is an oppor-
tunity which confronts Georgia to become
a producer of medium and even the finest
grades of china made from its own clays.
A careful investigation is now being
made of the white clay belt which extends
entirely across the State from Augusta
on the east to Columbus on the west, with
Macon about its center. This work is
being done by the State Geological De-
partment. It has been placed especially
in the hands of Assistant Geologist Otto
Veach, who is devoting all of his time to
* this particular work.
Already something like 30,000 tons of
kaolin are being shippen annually from
Georgia to other States, most of which
is being used by the Northern paper
manufacturers as a filler.
A large quantity of this kaolin, how-
ever, is shipped to Ohio and New Jersey
potteries, where some of the finest grades
of table china are manufactured. Ohio
is the greatest pottery center in the
United States, and yet not one pound of
white clay has been found there.
The Georgia Geological Department be-
lieves that this industry can be built up
right here at home-that we can estab-
lish successful potteries for the manufac-
ture of all grades of china, even approach-
ing the finest, practically right at the site
of the mines. The work of the depart-
ment is being done with this hope and
this end in view.
First Pottery in Augusta.
Already in Augusta there has been es-
tablished a small pottery for the purpose
of demonstrating that porcelain and china-
ware can be made from these Georgia
clays.
This small plant was built by Augusta
capitalists last fall, and is now in opera-
tion for the purpose for which it was in-
tended, that solely of demonstration. In
this pottery some splendid grades of china-
ware have already been manufactured, and
it has been shown beyond doubt that the
Georgia clays can be made to serve this
purpose.
There are no other potteries in the State
engaged in the work of making high grades
of porcelain or china-ware. There are two
Georgia companies which use this kaolin
to some extent in making fire brick, but
outside of this, their only other product of
importance is terra cotta sewer pipe. This
covers the entire manufacture in Georgia,
With tin eiaption of a few small potteies


scattered over the State, which practically
make nothing else except jugs for the
whisky trade. The most important de-
posits yet discovered and opened up for
commercial mining are located at Dry
Branch, nine miles southeast of Macon, in
Twiggs County, and at Hepzibah, in Rich-
mond County.
These are the principal sources of
Georgia kaolin at present, though Mr.
Veatch states that it may be found in
many places within the belt across the
State already described.
Why there should not be an extension
of the manufacturing industry right here
at home it is difficult to see. Doubtless
it will come, however, within a short time.
Source of Kaolin.
In a recent article on the subject of
kaolin mining in Georgia, published in the
Engineering and Mining Journal, Mr.
Veatch says. among other things:
"The best exposures of kaolin are at
Dry Branch, nine miles southeast of Ma-
con, where mining is carried on. The kao-
lin here is in white to cream-colored mas-
sive beds, which are overlain uncomforta-
bly by a maximum of about 100 feet of
loose tertiary sand and impure clay. The
kaolin is cream, drab or gray color, be-
coming a pure white when dry. It often,
however, contains yellow iron and black
manganese stains along joint places, but
these oxide of iron and manganese have
been carried in solution from the over-
lying red sands and clays and are not
segregated from the kaolin itself.
"The clay in its crude state is very
free from grit, the top and the bottom of
the bed being most likely to be quartzose
and micaceous. Also, curious, isolated
'fingers' of sand about an inch in diameter
and from a few inches to two or three
feet in length, are seen in a number of
places, and are found in a mass of clay in
which no grit whatever can be detected by
the eye or by the sense of touch. The
sand forms, however, a very small per cent.
of the kaolin mass, not more than 4 or 5
per cent., and as low as 45 per cent. are
shown by rational analyses. Thisis re-
markable inasmuch as Florida kaolins are
being mined which contain as high as 75
per cent. of sand.
"The clay varies from very soft, about
the consistency of cheese, to too hard to
be scratched by the finger nail. The soft
clay breaks with a peculiar fan-like or
dendritic fracture, while the hard clay
breaks with a conchoidal or hackly frac-
ture. Tn some localities the kaolin has be-


THE COMMERCIAL BANK
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. racbhes: Ocal and La City
The largest leading State Bank in Jackonville. Is oadeted in an old-
fashioned strictly conservative maner and is subject to regular examination
by the Oomptroller.
rwIndividual and Savings Aesount solicited.
H. ROBINSON, W. B OWEN, H. GANlr.IA
SPresiMet. Vice-Promeat. Casdr.


I i


*~LJL


come indurated to such an extent that the '..; ..'.. .
term 'flint kaolin' has been applied to it.


A"D

6 Full Quarft Fw295
Carolina Whiskey bWS21e
COMB" Whbali wo d'sm It it a Well I
article and in owr sthatasa. far supueio toQa. damethw ra man
tureasdd 1w V bt esmosible nag oria =5 W
ma on. elaeke acaal o fye -t Shaw
awe are notfrak7.wkindfeaitioa Oru zeaft.erimf
&I-Wwate~rsenterawdorwhiob" onnein 1be"All
SAb. ite M" aw 0"wea.
M A=C bw exorema 0 1" omrts a Cre n ft %e
71M p. ram~r has eeU...uauieryne
I V ed M C~sa.
Srza U lnO1wl we d"li, the ashor. exao mrwhine
In Norta =nhIMnls and Weat Vinl ut cinma lying
in etber jatna r "eb A" Adama 8= ot Chea
mI rit -W. extra. Bers Xat =. N
a-na other ex-a li- nmstad )6f the 6 quarts andS mampla
bo#ttleandwewll pray moz= Rm etemIt with oerdes d n:
TIER CASPXI. CO.. Zese. Raat.eh.. Y.
(Abe U.C) (sn 3.abfr~sd i.7 a US N.CV.
AII WbhWI M -de zud. mP,--i ;,g of Tr. K 0.u -, ..d g-.9..... p w td h
)t.....,.. I'mr. Food "d WIe ll W.


* I Turpentine Cups
':*'.' ;-', ..*i :DIM }PORTANT.
SAs our supply of cups is limited, we sug-
gest that intending purchases send i
their orders promptly to insure delivery.
For OPrioOn
Cups, Gutters and a Tools
Used In t e Nrt system


Chattanooga Pottery

SCompany

-.: -... '-'; Jacksonville, flrilda


W -


ir`m~i~icr~








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. i1
. .... -- [ I


Such clays break like fint, resist the ac-
tion of weather and have almost no plas-
ticity even when finely ground. Soft and
semi-hard kaolins predominate, however.
Method of Mining.
"The kaolin is mined in open pits. The
overlying strata, or "overburden," is re-
moved by hand labor or by steam shovels.
The overburden varies from nothing to 100
feet or more, but the price received for the
clay does not warrant the removal of a
thickness greater than thirty or forty feet,
since the overburden itself is valueless.
After a face has been exposed and the
overburden stripped off for a few feet from
the face, the clay is mined with broad-
pointed, curved picks and shoveled into
cars. The clay is broken off in flat chunks
one to two feet in length. Blasting with
powder is rarely resorted to, since the
clay is blackened thereby and on account
of the softness and elasticity of the clay
only small quantities are torn off. The
jointing is taken advantage of and large
wooden or iron stakes are driven back from
the face and large masses are forced off.
Drainage is one of the difficulties in kaolin
mining, since the clay bed forms an im-
pervious stratum for the water, which
seeps through the loose overburden of sand.
A small drainage ditch is usually dug on
top of the clay bed a few feet back of the
face to carry off the water which issues
at the contact between the overlying sand
and clay. Water is kept from the pit by
drainage ditches where practicable and by
pumps.
Preparation for the Market.
"The kaolin is hauled from the pit ;n
large chunks to long, open drying sheds,
where it is placed in racks and the air al-
lowed to circulate freely through it. After
a few weeks of drying it is either shipped
in bulk or is crushed into flour and small
chunks and shipped in sacks and wooden
casks.
"The kaolin is shipped largely to North-
ern markets, and is used in the manufac-
ture of paper and pottery. The soft, flour-
like kaolins are most suitable in paper
manufacture, where they are mixed with
the wood pulp and act as a filler and give
weight. Some of the lower grades are
shipped to terra cotta and fire-brick manu-
facturers."


SAWMILL MEN MEET.


Annual Convention of North Carolina
Pine Asocitiato.
Norfolk, Va., March 21.-The annual
meeting of the North Carolina Pine Asso-
ciation controlling all the large lumber
mills and plants in eastern Virginia, North
Carolina, South Carolina and a portion of
eastern Maryland, was held in Norfolk to-
day with 125 lumber manufacturers in at-
tendance Routine business and the read-
ing of the annual reports of President F.
C. Fosburg and other officers consumed
the morning session.
At the afternoon session $2,600 was ap-
propriated for an exhibit at the James-
town exposition by the North Carolina
Pine Association. Officers for 1907-08 were
also elected. They are: President, E. C.
Fosburg; vice president for Virginia, R. J.
Camp; vice president for South Carolina,
G. J. Cherry, succeeding D. T. MeKeithan;
treasurer, W. B. Roper; secretary, John R.
Walker.
The annual banquet followed the night
session.


Will Furnish 3,oo0 Horse-Power.
The stockholders of the Savannah River
Power Co. held their annual meeting at
Anderson, S. C., on March 9. At the close
of the meeting it was announced by the
officers that the company's water-power-
electrical development at Gregg Shoals is
approaching completion, and will be pre-
pared to furnish electricity for lighting
and power purposes in April. About 3,000
horse-power is Lein developed, but only
about 750 horse-power will be leady for
distribution next month. Mr. 1. A. Orr
was re-elected president of the company.

IN CIRCUIT COURT.

Fourth Judicial Circuit of Florida, in and
for Duval County.
In Chancery.
Jacksonville Development Co. vs. Ralph
H. Dome, et al. Notice to non-resident:
to Ralph H. Doane, Andrew J. Mosley and
Bertha M. Mosley, his wife:
You are hereby required to appear to
the bill of complaint filed herein against
you in the above entitled cause on or be-
fore the 3d day of June, A. D. 1907.
"'The Industrial Record" is hereby des-
ignated as the newspaper in which this
order shall be published once a week for
eight consecutive weeks.
Witness my hand seal of office this
21st day of March, A. D. 1907.
(Seal) P. D. Cassidey, Clerk,
By E. J. Candee, Deputy Clerk.
Owen & Royall, Solicitor for Complain-
ant.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR DIS-
CHARGE,
Notice is hereby given, in pursuance of
law, that the undersigned as Administra-
tor of the estate of Josephine C. 8. Schu-
macher will make return of his final a-
counts and apply for a final settlement and
discharge as such administrator to Hon. H.
B. Phillips, County Judge of Duval County,
Florida, on Monday, June 3d, A. D. 1907.
JAMES M. SCHUMACHER,
As Administrator Estate of Joephine
C. S. Schumacher.
Nov. 22. 1900--Gmo.


NOTICE TO NON-RESIDENT.
In Circuit Court, Fourth Judicial Circuit
of Florida, in and for Duval County.
In Chancery.
G. A. Henry vs. Creo. Henry.
To Creo. Henry:
You are hereby required to appear to
the Bill of Complaint filed herein against
you in the above entitled cause on or be-
fore the Oth day of May, A. D. 1907.
"The Industrial Record" is hereby desig-
nated as the newspaper in which this order
shall be published once a week for eight
consecutive weeks.
Witness my hand and seal of office this
19th day of February, A. D. 1907.
P. D. CASSIDEY, Clerk.
By E. R. HEDSTROM, Deputy Clerk.
C. B. PEELER,
Solicitor for Complainant.




Walter Mucklow,
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT,
ma, 46-47-48 Mutual Life Bldg
Telephone s7s
JACrSOVMILLx, LA.


SAM JONES'
LIFE AND SAYINGS
ll IWlt Agent are coining money. Send sao or CaseOu msd
lOutft and Contract for territory.
,*, Fres." L. J. NICHOLS U., "


PLANTERS


"Old Time" Remedies

THE JOY Of THE HOUSEHOLD.

These four great remedies, Nubian Tea, B-emi.s, Cabas Belief
and Cuban Oil, are the joy of the household. With them near at hand, a
man is ready for any emergency. He has a safe, reliable and speedy relief s
for wife, children, slf or stock. With these remedies you ea keep the
doctor's hands out of your pockets, and yet have a healthy, happy famny. O
Besides, you can cure your stock of any ailment that may befall them.
NUBIAN TEA-In Liquid or Powder Form--s the great family medicine. It
will cure all forms of Liver and Kidney Complaints, Prevents Chills and Malarial
Fever. Cures the common ailments of children; and as a laxative too it is without
an equal-safe and reliable. in the liquid, it a extremely palatabl--evr children
like it-and it is READY FOR USE.
BENEDICTA is a woman's medicine. It will cure all the diseases common to
women, and classed as Female Troubles. It will bring youth back to the alded woman,
who has gone one suffering because she thought it woman lot. It will eare for the
young girl just entering womanhood; and prepare the young woman or the asaed
duties of wife and mother.
CUBAN RELIE--The instant Paint Killer, for either man or beast Relieves
instantly, Colic, Cramps, Cholera Morbus, Diarrhoea, Dystentery and Siek Headss.
For colic in horses it is an infallible remedy and is guaranteed to give relief in Ive
minutes.
CUBAN OIL-The Best Bone and Nerve Ltiment. Is aatiseptie for emts,
snagged or torn flesh, and will instantly relieve the pain. Cure insect bites and stinp,
sealda and burns, bruises and sores, chapped hands and face, ore sad tender fees
Relieves rheumatic pains, lame back, stiff joints, and in stock ears wire fames ets,
sratches, thrush, splint, collar sores, saddle galls, and dieased boofs.

Write us fr Prices.

SPENCER MEDICINE CO., Chattanooga, Ten.


FIFTH A VENUE HOTEL
Madison Square, New York.

American Plan $5 per day. European Plan $2.00 per day
The most famous representative hotel
in America. New as the newest, always
fresh and clearl.. The location in Madison
Square is the finest in the city.
HITCHCOCK. DARLING L, COMPANY.


DIAMONDS AND WATCHES

We simply ask a call. We can show yeo, at correct sad money
saving prices, many papers of loose pare white, perfect
DIAMONDS. It Is our desire to coatiue being the largest
Diamond dealers in Jacksonville, and oa specialty Is fteC rome-
cut gems ad high-grade Waltham uad Elgi Watches.

I O /P01 O Diamonlds, Watches, Jewely, I
HESS & SLAGER 11-13Mi2.", 3L1-ki, JG .d.v |

ileelt#el lei4,U JIIOIIOSSW I J81.S I IIIIOSISSIIOIJISII
itit* 8 ** 8m****m 5t W M 6rts M 6% VS%= W 1z

MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


Boilermaking and Repairing

S Still Boilers and Pumps.
SHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.
JsLcksonvIBle. Fla.
ta a sssaa sll In I tS Il I t l t I I I sta-st IaS I4e


~C~?FlflfESFS~fllEJFlf~Tr~






16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


"TO OWNERS OF PINE LANDS."
"'f you want to utilize your light wood
with good profit, write us for particulars.
We are builders of wood turpentine
pla~. t, manufacturing a first-class ar-
ticle and guarantee sale of products at
high prices."

HENRY SUNDHEIMER & CO.
SAVANNAH. GA.


1 You Want a Turpentine Lecateon?
You Want a Sawmill Lecation?
You Want any Kind of Florida Land?
Y"u Mean Busness?
IF Ca en w Write ti
J. H. Livingston & Sons,
ocaLA. PLOROIA.



TheMetropo/ls

Is the Paper you want. It is
published daily and is fi om 12
to 16 hours ahead of any other
daily newspaper in Florida ..

$500 a Year $2.5o Six Months
Full Telegraphic and Stock
reports. If you want to keep
posted on the news, get the
Metropolis.
CARTER & RUSSELL PUB. CO.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


SUMMER LuMBER COMPANY
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
Rough fa& Draeed Lumber
Long Leaf Yellow Pino.
BOXES AND ORATES.


SJ. S. Schofield's Sons Compan), |
e*********************;*** *********4.-************.
S. Headquarters for
Distiller's Pumping
Outfit
S. No plant complete without one.
4 Hundreds of them in use in Georgia,
Florida, Alabama, Miasisppi and
Soth Carolina. Write us for paricu-
- lars ano prices. We also mauacture :
Engines, Boilers and Hlbh
.* Grade Machinory,
*+ 4' as well as carry a full and onmplete
-stockof-
; Mill Supplies, Pipe,
$ Bailer Tubes, Etc. ,
*B Advise your wants.
t Macon, -- Georgia.
A Lw KiMy of al-
*** Kimht TI *** ** frwl tmmP** l* *

u-*reieuusmesueaeesiiuuossuuuuemeeuaaa ull


J. W. ItO.,
Preisent.


C. B. Parke
Vice-Prea.


James MscN&M
Vies-pres.


W. W.Wadser,
see. & Trans.


John R. Young Co.,


Commission
Merchants.


Naval Stores factors. Wholesale Grocers.


HEAVY TURPENTINE
AND SADDLE AND DRIVING
ALWAYS ON HAND. PRICES


MULES,
HORSES
RIGHT.


Savannah tL Brunswick. Ga


W. A. COOK, Sals Stales, 1" ", TAMPA.
-' - - c


JOSEPH D. WWED.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. KRENSON.


J. D. WEED X CO.,
SAVANNAH. GCEORwGI
Wholesale Hardware,


RAILROAD


SPIKES,


Bar, Band and Hoop Iron.

Turpentine Tools, Etc.


DIRECTORS: D. C. ASLEY, President DIRECTORS:
D. C. Ashley, B. W. BLOUNT, 1st Vice President B. W. Blmat.
G. A. Petteway. and General Manager. B. A. Carter,
Chas, H. Brown, CARL MOLLER. 2nd Vice Pres. T. G. ClMbre
A. C. BaconA. Vs. Pndlts.,
J. G. BCrnford, G. A. PETTEWAY, 3d Vice P-es. BG. LPe.lws
J. G. Caford, B. G. Lasira,
LH Weibert. S. H. BERG, Sec. and Tress. Cri MoIer,
S. H. Ber. A C. BACON, Ast. Sec. and Tress. W. T. B. Hariso.

PENINSULAR NAVAL STORES CO.
Commission Merchants
and Wholesale Grocers
Jacksonvile and Tampa, Florida.

Capital Stock. $1.000.000.
irrraraM<<^v^x3^auot3 SE^^CfyqgsE^








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 17


W. W. ASHBURN, Moaltrie, Ga. N. EMANUEL Brunswiok, Ga.
W. R. BOWRN, ntgerald, Ga. D. T. FURSK Savannah, Ga.
J. J. DORMINY, Broxton, Ga. G. KRKLAND. Nichols, Ga.
O. T. MeoINOSH, Savausak, Ga.

SSouthern States Naval Stores Co.
Savannah. Ga.
Factors and Commission Merchants
ship to -avannah Get Comnitititnu Highest Prices Promp:est Return ,
Correspond With Us




Malsby Machinery Compaxny

of Jacksonville. Fla.

Portable, Sttouary ls Eq ad hiler
Saw MI am Wrkli Maebilr,.
Pertable Oits a Specialty.
Write for haiudlse lst'd 1906 catalog


22 Ocean Street.


East Coast Lumber Co.

ROUGH AND DRESSED LONO LEAF

Yellow Pine Lumber


Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots
Steamer Shipments a Specialty.
WATERTOWN, FLORIDA





Atlantic Coast Line


Famous Trains.


New York and Florida Special leaves Jacksonville
daily except Sunday, 12:30 p. m., for all points East.
Solid Pullman.
Chicago and Florida Limited daily, solid vestibule,
leaving Jacksonville 9:30 a. m. for all points East.
SCoach on this train also.


For rates, Pullman reservations and
all other detailed information, write or
call on


FRANK C. BOYLSTON.

District Passenger Agent Atlantic Coast Line


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Clyde Steamship Company




^A -LJ7
4 JIadA


NEW YORKo, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
The magnifent stenmhips of this line are appointed to mail as follow, dealing at
Char itoB, S. C., both way.
From *ew York, frm Jacmvin* ea
(Pier 36 earth Rirve.) STKAMN L Charlte andt ew Yek.
~ wednesday, Mch.20, at3:00 pn.... IROQUOIS ....Thursday, April 4, at 10:00am
Tuesday, April 2,at3:00pm.... ARAPAHOE ...Sunday, April 7,atl0:00am
Wednesday, April 3,at3:00p p... ALGONQUIN ...Monday, April 8, at 10:00am
Friday, April 5, at3:00pm... COMANCHE ....Wednesday, April10, at 10:00am
Saturday, April 6,at3:00pm ..... HURON ...... Thursday, April 11, at 10:00am
Tuesday, April 9,at3:00pi ..... APACHE .....Sunday, April 14, at 10:00am
Wednesday, April 10,at 3:00pi .... IROQUOIS ....londay, April 15, at 10:00am
Friday, April 12, at 3:00pmn.. ARAPAHOE ... Wednesday April 17, at 10:00am
Saturday. April 13, at 3:00pm ... ALGONQUIN ...Thursday, April 18, at 10:00am
Tuesday, April 16, at 3:00pm... COMANCHE ....Sunday, April 21, at 10:00am
Wednesday, April 17, at 3:00pm ..... HURON ...... Monday, April 22,at 10:00am
Friday, April 19, at 3:00pm ..... APACHE ..... Wednesday, April 24, at 10:00am
Saturday, April 20, at 3:00pm ... IROQUOIS .... 1 nursday, April 25, at 10:00am
Tuesday. April 23, at 3:00pm.... ARAPAHOE ...Sunday, April 28, at 10:00am
Wednesday, April 24, at 3:00pm.r... ALGONQUIN ... Monday, April 29, at 10:00am
Friday, April 26,at3:00pm... COMANCHE ....Wednesday, May 1, atl0:00am
Saturday, April 27, at 3:00pm..... HURON ...... 1 .ursday, May 2,at 10:00am
Tuesday, April 30, at 3:00pm..... APACHE .....Sunday, May 5, at 10:00am
*Jacksonville to New York direct.
CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
Freight Service Between Jacksonville Bostoon ana PrevMemM, m all Eastern Pha
Calling at Charleston Bth Way.
FREIGHT ONLY.


LFrom South Side
Lewis Wharf, Boston
**Via Charleston.


STEAMIR


Vm ~o Catheb dimo ams,
Jadwavmd


*Via Brunswick.


Mondayy, March 11i.......... *CHIPPEWA .......... IMonday,
Saturday, March 161.......... "KATAHDIN ........... iSaturday,


March 18
March 27


CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
Between Jacki ville and usfeL.
Stopping at Palatka, Astor, St. Francis, Bereaford (DeLan), aMd latmldiate
landings on St. Johns River.
STEAMERS "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
AND "FREDRICK DE BARYr"
Are appointed to sail as follows: Leave Jacksonville daily except saturday at
3:30 p. m. Returning, leave Sanford daily except Sundays at 9:30 a. m.
8CHEDUIB


oJu .iiuunijm
Read down


n an.u1


Leave :w p. ................ Jacksonvilu ................ Z:wa. .
Leave 8:46p.n ..... ............... Palatka .................... .Lsve 8:p,
Leave 3:00a. ...................Astor ........ ............ .L v :Mp.m.
............ ............ Bereford (Deand)..............L e 1:00 p. R.
Arrive 8:30m. ................... anford ................... Iov 9:Wa.
Arrive 10:OOan..................... Etrpr ...... ...... :Wa.

GENERAL PASSENGER AND TICKET OFFICE, ass W. BAY 8T, JACK'VILLL
F. x. IRONMONTER, Jr., A. . A., Jacksoe lile, FIs.
JO n PENDREL. T. P. A. .. c. efAs r., e. P.. A.
Jacksovarlle, Fla. Prer J. R., New York.
0. N. TAYLOR. Pass. Traffle Mar. C. C. BROWN. e'I Pass. Agent


L. D. JONES. T. F. A.
Jacksonville Fla.
W. COOPE.. Jr.. F. A.
Jrcksomvvlle. Fla.


290 Broadway, New YOrk.
L. S. SChROB, C. A.
Leesburs. P l.
CLYDE MILNEI, W. f A.
Pier 36 N. ., Noew York


C P. LOVELL, Agent., Jacksoriulle, Fka.


Standard Electric Company
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
X EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL X


pl~n~P~,,







1i TiE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Prospectus Florida Immiaration Number of the Weekly Industrial
Record.


The INDUSTRIAL RECORD PUBLISHING COMPANY will issue at some date on or about the
first of May next, a special number, to be entitled "The Florida Immigration Number."
This edition will comprise something like 100 pages, carefully compiled and edited, and will be inter-
estingly illustrated, all illustrations bearing upon the subject in question and designed for the purpose of
attracting to the State of Florida desirable immigrants, both from the domestic immigrant centres and
from foreign countries..
It is the purpose of the Industrial Record Co. to issue an edition of fully 50,000 copies, and to circu-
late it by its regular hannels of circulation, augmented by the industrial departments of various railroads
coming into the South, and through individual and corporate interests throughout Florida which may
have their own individual sources of distribution. It will be mailed to all the newspapers of the country,
with requests for favorable mention, and will be advertised through the leading magazines and farm jour-
nals, to be sent upon request to interested parties who may have their attention thus directed to Florida
and to its advantages from a farming, ommereial and industrial standpoint.
In order to attract the attention of those people who may not read the English language, an epitome
of the entire edition will be printed in several languages, namely: German, Italian, Scandinavian, Rus-
sian, and a many others a we may deem advisable.
The edition, from an editorial and compilation standpoint will cover all subjects setting forth the ad-
vantages of Florida to the capitalist, immigrant and the homeseeker, and will have a lage number of
special articles by well known authorities on the various phases of the immigrant situation. Among these
will be articles by Commissioner Watson, of South Carolina, telling ,of his visits to Europe to get immi-
grants and the establishment of an immigrant line between European points and South Carolina ports;
an article setting forth the means used by other States in the South in inducing immigration-the officials,
amount of money expended, etc.; an article covering the work being done by the railroads in inducing do-
mestic immigration to the Southeastern States. The edition will also contain an article from the Gover-
nor of the State of Florida upon the subject in question; from the Department of Agriculture, giving
detailed and tabulated information as to Florida lands, advantages, opportunities, etc. It will contain
among other things an article on the effort now being made (and we trust will have been accomplished by
the date of the issue) for the estobliehm-nt in Florida of a Department of Immigration, which matter will
come before the approaching Florida Legislature. It will contain articles from the heads of various com-
mercial organizations in Florida, notably from Mr. Bawls, President of the Florida State Board of Trade;
Mr. Fuller, of the Tampa Board of Trade; Capt. Garner, of the Jacksonville Board of Trade; CoL W. P.
Corbett, Chairman of the Immigration Committee of the Jacksonville Board of Trade; Mr. Edwin Brob-
ston, whose efforts are well known in immigration work, and others. It will contain in a concise, paragraph
form "one thousand facts about Florida" for the quick reader who wants to know all about the State be-
fore visiting it. It will set forth the advantages of specific localities for specific purloses; for instance, the
fruit section, the vegetable section, the general farmmg section, and the opportunity es offered by Florida
today for the location here of large maunfactories and smaller industries of all kinds It will contain facts
of interest regarding the various towns and cities of the State, their adaptability and desirability, matters
of transportation, etc. It will deal with every phase of the labor question to attract a airable labor to this
State
All in all, the edition is planned upon a most elaborate scale and is planned to cover every point of
interest that may appeal to the man who has his eye on Florida and to the man who is looking for a
desirable farming, manufacturing or business location in the South.
The editor-in-chief of the Industrial Record, Mr. J. A. Hollomon, will have directorship of all articles
prepared for this special number, and the detail preparation will be in the hands of a staff of competent
writers, already employed for that purpose.
This "Immigration Edition of the Industrial Record" will no doubt mark an epoch in trade journal-
ism in the South, and it is fitting that the Industrial Record should issue an edition of this kind, in view of
the fact that it is the exponent of the leading industrial and commercial organizations of the State, be-
ing the official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association, the Southeastern Cane Growers' Asso-
cition, endorsed by the Georgia-Florida Sawmill Association, etc.
In preparing the data for this special Immigration Edition, much attention will be given in gather-
ing facts and figures which will prove valuable to the energetic and progressive organizations and private
cities in getting passed by the coming Legislature a bill creating an Immigration Department and in ask-
ing the Legislature to appropriate a liberal fund for carrying on this great work.
The Industrial Record will work hand in glove with the Florida State Board of Trade, and individual
boards of trade of the State, in their efforts to successfully solve the question of increasing the population
of the.8tate with a desirable citizenship.


THE BOND & BOURS CO.
WHOLESALE C .lBTAIL

HARDWARE
SASH, DOORS, BLINDS, PAINTS.
Oils, Olass, Stoves, Tinware, Country Holloware.
N \ wmS mAT ST UsmT. JACKSOVILLEU. IrA.


Cay & McCall
11M INSU3AN
Lesas~latet BduIL NIm g*ll


LIGHT SAW MILLS
SHINGEL AND LATH MACHINERY
AND SUPPLIES
Ces eEsom rEtsua aRnd meno
Try
LOMBARD WORKS 0
AVGUVTA. GEOKt1GA.


CO.


Wbhoesae Dealerm in sad BotU( : I
ANHEUSER-BUSr.H
St. Louis Lager Beer

Lio rs, Wins, mial Walrs
Write for Priceo


TYPEWRITERS.
All Makea *O1 Up.
Underweed No. 4 Good as
New $80.00
Oliver Ne. 3 New $75.00
Reasdngton No. 6 New $75.00
GASH WJl ORDER

GRIVOT sk.


Successful Men
appreciate, use and advise Life Insu-
rance. The advice of successful men
is worth following. Insure in

THE PRUDENTIAL '""" 'W


JOBN F. DEYDEN, Pw.
sai Seem". INewark. J


WALTER P. CORNETT. Aa-cer.
409 West EML.. J--Kie Fa.


_


X-11I







Industrial


Publishing


X


PUBLISHERS


Record


Co.


X


PRINTERS


x


With one of the largest and best equipped
South and with a full complement of skilled
to execute high class work promptly and at


printing plants in the
labor, we are prepared
reasonable prices.


No Job too Large or too Small for our Careful Attention


4^i^%^^%^v^^I~:wkIxlrafxxxwc----------


_ __


-~-- - --~~-~


-~---


Crr~r







GREENLEAF 6 CROSBY CO., 41 West Bay Street
Diamonds, Wedding
Warthes, g and
Fine Anniver-
Jewelry, sary Gifts
Clocks, Sterling


uW ut a33a
Novelties
Toilet
Articles,
Prompt
Attention
to
3Md Orders


Silverware,
"1847
Rogers"
Plated Ware

Comparison
of Prices
r&t A


At the Sign of the Big Clock, - Jacksonville. Fla
____ WRITE FOR CATALOGUE '___


Half Tones-Zinc Etchings

Illustratina and Engravina Department


SOF


THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of Commercial Work, Pamphlets, etc


I SPEIILIT IS IIE 1 OF ISmllKG118 ilCIfiG lll 1 11i 1,I1110 FII01I~IFIlS lID PMI ES.


IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPTrDELIVERIES PROMISED.


A Florida


Enterprise.


Try It.


r ------ 'K*K c7t13>aaixxxxxxxxEx