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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00215
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: March 9, 1907
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00215
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text

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JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


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Industrial Record's Immigration Campaign.
The WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD is waging
Vigorous campaign for desirable Immigration, both
foreign and domestic, to the South and to Florida in
particular. It is champion of the active movement that
is now being discussed and legislated on in the Southern
StAtes. It is printing each week valuable data and dis-
cumsions on the subject. The Immigration question is one
of importance to every citizen of the State. Florida is
teeming with opportunities for a larger population. Other
Stases are devising ways and means for increasing citi-
zenship. Florida cannot afford to lag behind in the
movement.
THE FLORIDA IMMIGRATION SPECIAL of THE
WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD, which is now be.
ing compiled, and which will be issued early in May, will
mark an epoch in Florida journalism. Itwill contain
approximately one hundred pages, and will cover all
subjects setting forth the advantages of Florida to the
home-seeker. Fifty thousand copies of the edition will
be printed and sent broadcast throughout the United
States.
Every citizen who is interested in the splendid work
the RECORD is doing is invited to become a regular
reader and supporter of the publication.


3


__


.... 07


SAVANNAH, GA.







CONSOLIDATED NAVAL STORES COMPANY.
Home Office: JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Branches: Savannah. Ga., and Pensacola, Fla.
OFFICERS.
W. POWELL, Premdet; B. F. BULLAD, H. L COVINGTON, J. A. CRANFORD, D. H. McMILLAN, B. R. POWELL, C. M COVINGTON, JOHN H.
POWELL, Vie Presddets; C. P. DUSENBURY, eeretary and Treasurer.
ALECUTIVE COMMJITEE: W. C. Poweh, C. B. Roges, H. L. Covington, B. F. Bullard, J. A. Cranford.
McMillan, R. B. Powell, C. M. Coington, 8. Alford.


I NAVAL STORES FACTORS

Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
The 'Consolidated" Is purely a co-operative Company. Its Interests are Identical with those
of the Producers. The patronage of turpentine operators everywhere Invited.
Two Million acres of land and Timber for sale on easy terms.
Producers are invited to call or correspond.


COVINGTON COMPANY,
WHOLESALE MERCHANTS,
Dry Goods, Notions, Men's Furnishings I
Blankets, Comforts, Convict Clothing,
UNION-MADE OVERALLS.


McMillan Bros.


Southern Copper
Works
Manufacturers of TURPENTINE STILLS
Complete Outfits and Extra Kettles, Caps, Arms, Worms, Fur-
nace Doors and Grates always on hand
Old Stills taken in part w o and repairing done
Payment for New Wok in the country
Heavy Coppersmithing, Steam Pipe and Special Copper Work
Jacksonville, Fla.
Als Fayetteville, N. C. Savannah, Ga. Mobile, Ala.














WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL


RECORD.


PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY. DEVOTED TO NAVAL STORES. LUMBER AND MANUFACTURING I I Mca~r


lori Sdap. IL. H by doER* CAri InTdi.un Oasopmd..* Andimaes ol EduisOai Orpm i sapisi SeL a enW. i Augi C COW 0. d dmi biy^.in. Lik i1 AdI SFLt. i 3 = di
ayasiv*aOr of. Tui.lnA Op..i.os AmisiL Adopd Apil 27. -01m WO a Ors. l d.. b .Sk C.m Gsws A- min < u ir d b GOmrs S w i|| AiY.. 4 CI-- 11- s- im Ones Amikiel


Florida Tourist Industry as Seen by Linking Florida Cities With Good


a Journalist.


Hard Roads.


Following is the full text of a letter
written from Palm Beach by William E.
Curtis, and published in the Washington
Star and CLicago Record-Herald:
It would be interesting to know how
many tourists and health and pleasure
seekers come to Florida during the winter
and how much money they spend. It is
difficult to make more than a rough esti-
mate.. In Switerland, they can tell al-
most to a mananda dollar, because daily
registers are published of arrivals and the
bank deposits at the resorts show exactly
how much money is taken in; but there
is no such system here, and, consequently,
no sound basis for a calculation. We can
get at it in a sort of a way, however.
There are on the East Coast railway
south of Jacksonville 164 hotels. There
are twenty-four in that city accommodat-
ing from 20 to 600 guests, respectively, or
a total of about 3,000. At St. Augustine
are twenty-seven of similar size, that can
accommodate 3,500 people; at Palm Beach
there are fifteen with a capacity of 4,00 .
gets; at Daytona thirty-one, with ac-
commodations for from 20 to 200; Palat-
ka and Ormgnd have seven each, with a
capacity of 20 to 600, and at Miami are
twelve, of about the same size.
The 188 hotels on the East Coast rail
road can accommodate altogether not less
than 26,000 people, and there are boarding-
houses in every town and village which
charge from $1 a day upward. You can
find a list in one of the railway advertis-
ing books giving the locations, the names
of proprietors, the number of rooms and
the charges by day or week. This year
they have all been filled and people have
been packed away on cots. Last winter
was a poor season; it was so warm in the
North that people did not come so far
south. The hotels at Washington were
crowded all winter with people who usually
come to Florida. The winter of 1904-05
was the banner season-the most profit-
able ever known, because it was cold and
stormy in the North, and it is estimated
that 200,000 strangers came into the Stat
for pleasure or profit, and probably each
of them spent $100. That is a low esti-
mate, because the railway fare from
O Washington Palm Beach and return is $60,
without including sleeping berths. The
total for railway fare, board, amusements
and purchases must have aggregated as
much as $20,000,000 and it was undoubt-
edly nearer thirty millions.
The Flagler Hotela,
Mr. Flagler can tell exactly now many
people are taken care of at his hotels, be-
cause, as I told you in a previous letter,
he gets a report every morning. The ca-
pacity of his nine hotels is as follows:
Guests.
Ponce de Leon, St. Augustine ...... 500
Alcazar, St. Augustine ............. 00
Continental, near Jacksonville ...... 300
Ormond, at Ormond ............... 600


The Breakers, Palm Beach ......... 600 Orlando, Fla., March 6.-About fifteen
Royal Poinciana, Palm Beach ....... 1,500 years ago Messrs. Guernsey, Cheney, Pell-


Royal Palm, Miami ................ 500
Colonial, Nassau ................... 700
Royal Victoria, Nassau ............. 400

Total ............... ............. ,700
Some of these hotels open in December
and the rest in January and all of them
close about the first of April except the
Continental, which is a summer hotel for
southern patronage on the sea beach twen-
ty miles from Jacksonville, and is open
from March to October. The big Poinciana
is open from January 10 to March 31, an
average of eighty days a year, which is
about the same as al the rest.
Last winter a total of 189,844 guests
were reported in the daily returns from
the six winter hotels in Florida belonging
to Mr. Flagler. This means, of course,
that the same person is counted several
times, but that gives an average of nearly
3,200 guests per day for the entire season.
The Continental and Nassau hotels are not
included. Assuming that each guest re-
mained an average of three days this repre-
sents a total of nearly 84,000 people at
the Flagler hotels alone, without counting
the 182 hotels under other management.
The receipts of the Flagler hotels for
the season of eighty days were $1,430,000,
which is equivalent to an average of about
$18,000 a day for the six hotels.
Interests Work Together.
There is a good deal of curiosity as to
whether Mr. Flagler's enterprises pay. As
no :eports are made the public has no in-
formation on this subject, and everybody
in his employ is exceedingly discreet in
discussing such matters. Mr. Flagler's in-
come is very large. He is one of the six
richest men in the United States or in the
world. His interest in the Standard Oil
Company is second only to those of John
D. and William Rockefeller, and even if his
railroad and hotels down here paid him an
Irish dividend every year he would not
le obliged to borrow money or appeal to
his friends for assistance. But he is an
exceedingly shrewd and longheaded man,
and the general opinion is that his interests
pay as a combination, although as sepa-
rate propositions they might not do so.
The hotels contribute business to the rail-
roads and the railroads bring down guests
to the hotels. It's a long day's trip from
Jacksonville to Palm Beach and two hours
and a half longer to Miami. The railway
makes a market for the land, and the
farmers furnish freight to the railroad.
Owning everything himself, and having to
ask no one's consent or opinion, Mr. Flag-
ler can work one of his interests for the
'erefit of the others and get all there is
to hIe ha I out of all of them.
It is an exceedinglyl satisfactory situa-
tion when a man can go into a great busi-


(Continued on page 13.)


Clarke and one or two citizens of Orlando
took money out of their pockets and built
a half mile of clay road in the viciaty of
Oakland as an experiment. Today be-
tween thirty and forty people rode over
fine clay and marl roads from this ety to
DeLand in automobiles. About a year or
two ago the work of building a road be-
yond the river at Sanford in Volusia coun-
ty was begun by Orange county people in
order to connect with some good roads
built out of Deland. A certain ex-county
official of Volusia county saw the work
begun and predicted that no automobile
would ever run over the road. Today by
the irony of fate the same ex-county of-
ficial leached the Volusia county side of
the river just as the automobile party
from this county reached the Orange coun-
ty side of the river near Sanford. He
had the pleasure (?) of sitting on the bank
and waiting till the ferry man carried the
entire party of nine automobiles and pas-
sengers over and then watched them start
out for DeLand on that same road at a
mile a minute gait. The occasion of the
journey to DeLand was a joint meeting of
the county commissioners of the two coun-
ties to transact business relating to the
ferry connecting the two counties and to
felicitate one another on the progress al-
ready made on the good roads and make
plans for further work and improvement.
The party which left Orlando in autos
this morning to make the trip to DeLand
was as follows: W. R. O'Neal, carrying
with him County Commissioners II. H.
Dickson, L. F. W. Tilden and Road Super-
visor A. G. Branham; N. P. Yowell carry-
ing Seth Woodruff, County Commissioner
J. H. Lee, and Rev. C. 0. Troves. Mr. Mc-
Ilvaine carrying Major Beaeham and D. C.
Pell; H. L. Beeman carrying William
Smith and E. T. Sperry and Frank For-
ester of Sanford; B. Drew, carrying J. H.
Starbuck, of the Democrat, W. M. Davia,
Jerome Palmer; Mr. Hopper's auto carry-
ing Mr. Loos, of New York, and F. L.
Woodruff and George H. Fernald of San-
ford. Dr. Harris, carrying Mrs. -Harris,
Mrs. Hardeman and County Commissioner
Clhappell. Dr. Whitman's auto with Mr.
Holland carrying Mrs. Branham, Mrs.
Chappel and Mrs. Dixon. J. P. Mussel-
white carrying J. L Guernsey and the
Times-Union correspondent from Orlando
and Major Hand of Sanford.
The day was a perfect one and the roads
found to be far better than expected so
that the actual running time of some of
the machines over the forty-three or forty-
four miles of road was only a little over
two hours.
Getting all the machines across the ferry
at Sanford caused considerable delay, but
the entire party arrived at DeLand before
noon, and went immediately to the court-
house, where the Volusia county commis-


sioners were in session. Chairman Dixon,
of the Orange county board, made a report
of the work already done and the further
needs of the road, especially the ferry ani
crossing at Sanford. Mr. F. P. Foster, of
Sanford, reported for the Sanford Board
of Trade as to the cost of the entire enter-
prise, and W. R. O'Neal, of Orlando, spoke
for the board of trade of this city, and
expressed the good feeling that exists here
for our sister and neighbor county. Several
responses were made by Volusia county
officials and citizens, and the county board
before adjournment, instructed one of their
members to work in harmony with the
Orange county board in improving and
keeping in good order the ferry and ap-
proaches thereto at the Sanford crossing.'
The meeting adjourned, and on the invi-
tation of the Deland people, the visitors
were all given a tine dinner at Putnam
Inn. Aftr dinner another meeting was
held at the courthouse, and at 3 o'clock the
party bade goodby to their Volusia county
friends for the return trip. Not an acci-
dent or stop of any kind occurred to mar
the pleasure of the trip, and everyone
agreed that it was one of the most pleas-
ant days they had passed in year. Suca
journeys must necessarily do much for
good- roads, and it is hoped that arrange-
ments can be made to bring a delegation
of DeLand and Volusia county people to
this place at some future time. Compara-
tively little work has been done on part
of the road, but even this part was so
good that it only emphasized the impor-
tance of further improvement and the com-
parative ease with which veritable "Ap-
pian Ways" can be made through the
State.
Good roads are not an expese. They
are simply capital invested in stock that
will return large interest to every property
owner and everyone who travels.
The present clay road from here to San-
ford is good. Perhaps almost good enough,
but the marl road from DeLand towards
Orange City is undoubtedly better, and
Orange county p-ople will not be satisfeJ
with any less than the best.
A broad, hard highway from this city to
the East Coast is coming and that at no
very distant day. The people all Want it
and are coming to realize more and more
that it is a necessity.
There is plenty of marl not very far
away to build, improve or repair, and all
Orange county may be depended upon to
do her share in this or any other worz
and expense that will bene ft the State or
community.
Report of Meting
DeLand, March 0.-Every effort is being
made by the residents of this side of the
county and the board of county commis-
sioners to formulate some plan for a hard
road to the coast. The Young Men's Busi-
ness League of this ity has become l
terested and is assising n the good wwL.









4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.




S BUYER'S DIRECTORY

OM r:aag3K'

Buy the Sikes Patented
Rims and Heads

"for Dip Barrels. Adds two inches to ca-
pacity of barrel; does not leak; drains
contents perfectly. Over 20,000 sold in
twelve months. Sold by the following

waited Grocery Co, Jacksonville and
Tampa, Fa.
Cosoidated Grocery Co, Pensacola, Fla.
?lsacoIl Grocery Co, Pensacola, Fla.
RJ Sanders Co., New Orleaas, La.
Downaig Co. Brunwick, Ga.
rigs Hardware Co., Valdosta, Ga.
The above also handle the Sikes Patent
Dip Buckets. Write for prices, cuts, etc.


They invited and entertained a delegation
of citizens and business men of Orange
county yesterday and arranged a meeting
Letween them and the commissioners or
this county. The meeting was held yes-
terday afternoon at the courthouse and a
number of the best citizens of the county
were present. The meeting was presided
over by Chairman Potter of the Volusia
commissioners, who made an address of
welcome. Chairman Dickson of the Orange
board responded and was followed by Mr.
(YNeal, representing the citizens of Sanford
and Orlando, who announced that they had
by subscription raised money sufficient to
Luild an approach and one mile of road in
this county at the ferry across the St.
Jghns river near Osteen. This piece 31
road was formally presented to the board
of this county and ion. James W. Perkins
at the request of Chairman Potter, ac-
cepted the same.
The meeting was then addressed by Mr.
Jacques, engineer of the New Process Ce-
ment Co., who has been over the proposed
road to the coast. de offered on behalf
of his assocaites to build a concrete road,
twenty-five feet wide, from Orlando to the
coast within two years, for six thousand
dollars per mile. The cost to be paid by
the counties from the tax funds each year
at the same rate that the money was now-
being expended on the road. He to be
given the right to charge tolls on the road
in lieu of interest on deferred payments.
Considerable discussion followed this prop-
osition and numerous questions were asked.
Chairman Dickson of the Orange board fi-
nally announced that the proposition
would not be acceptable to his board for
various reasons the principal one being;
that the residents of his county wouli
consider it unfair to the whole county t.;
bond the same tor such a large sum of
money and then only spend it on one road
that would not benefit the whole county.
The meeting then adjourned, after the


ACCOUNTANTS.
T. G. Hutchinson, -acksonville, Fla.
"Walter Mucklow, Jacksonville, Fla.
AXES.
Briggs Hardware Co., Valdosta, Ga.

BANKS.
n-mmereial Bank, larksonville, Ia.
Florida Bank and I ruit Co., Jacksonville,
FVa.
BEER-WHOLESALE.
Chas. Blum & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
. oseph Zapf & Co., Jacksonville, Fa.

BOXES AND CRATES
'ummner Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
BRICK.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jack-
sonville, Fla.
Geo. R. Foster, Jr., Jacksonville, Fla.
BUILDING MATERIAL.
Geo. R. Foster, Jr., Jacksonville, Fla.
BUSINESS COLLEGES.
Tampa Business College, Tampa.
CARPETS.
E. E. Cleveland Furniture Company.
CIVIL ENGINEERS.
Roland Woodward, Jacksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonvills, Fla.
COPPER SMITHS.
Mcllman Brothers, Jacksonville, Savan-
nah and Mobile.
COOPERAGE.
"ooperage Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS.
\'Vm. D. Jones, Jacksonville, Fla.
C. C. Bettes. Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS-WHOLESALE.
Tampa Drug Co., Tampa, Fla.
Southern Drug Mfg. Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Groover-Stewart Drug Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE.
(ovington Co. The. Jacksonville, Fla.
ELECTRICAL GOODS.
Standard Electric Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGINES.
\lerrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Sehofield's Sons Co., J. 8., Macon, Ga.
lombard Iron Works and Supply Co., An-
gusna. Ga.
FERTILIZERS.
Hour & Cc., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
FURNITURE.
E. E. Cleaveland Furniture Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
FOUNDRIES.
+hoiheld's Sons Co., J. 8., Macon, Ga.
FUEL.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co. The, Jack-
sonville. Fla.
GENTS' FURNISHERS.
I'raig & Bro., J. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
tsandard Clothi-g Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GROCERS-WHOLESALrE
lacksonville Grocery Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams Co., J. P, Savannah, Ga.
Yomng Co, John R., Savannah, Ga.


HATS.
traig & Bro., J. A., Jacksaonvlle Fla.
Standard Clothing Co.. Iae-uonville, Fla.
HOTEL
Aragon The, lJaksonv !ie Fla.
Fifth Avenue Hotel, NX, Yora, N. Y.
Telford Hotel, White Springs, Fla.
IRON WORKS.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. 8.. Macon, Ga.
INSURANCE
Florida Life Insurance Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Cay & McCall, Jacksonville. Fa.
JEWELERS
R. J. Riles Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
(reenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville. Fla.
LIQUORS.
R. M3. Rose Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Casper Co.. Roanoke, Va.
Blum & Co., Chas., Jacksonville, Fla.
Altmayer & Flatan Liquor Co., Macon, Ga.
Joseph Zapf & Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.
MEDICINES.
Spencer Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tean.
MACHINE WORKS.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. 8, Macon, Ga.
Lombard Iron Works. Augusta, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR TURPENTINE PRO-
CESS.
Schofeld's Sons Co., J. 8., Macon, Ga.
MEDICINES.
Continental Mfg. Co., Birmingham, Ala.
The only line of medicines made ex-
elusively for commissaries.
METAL WORKER.
McMillan Bros. Co, Jacksolille, Savan-
nah and Mobie.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga., and Pena-
cola, Fla.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Schofeld's Sons Co., J. 8., Macon, OGa
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fa.
Weed & Co., J. D, Savannah, Ga.
Malsby Machinery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Briggs Hardware Co., Valdosta, Ga.
MONUMENTS.
Tampa Monumental Works, Tampa, FIL
MULES AND HORSES.
W. A. Cook, Tampa. Fla.
NAVAL STORES.
American Naval Stores, Co., Home Offie,
Savannah, Ga.
Peninsular Naval Stores o., Tampa, Fla.
Barnes & Jesaup Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Consolidated Naval Store Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
Union Naval Store Co., Mobile, Ala.
West-Flynn-Harris Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
Young Co., John R., Savannah, Ga.
Southern States Naval 8tore Co., Saa-
nab, Ga.
PAINTS.
Bond & Bours Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Tampa Hardware Co.a,Tamp Fla.
PLUMBERS.
Coons & Golder, Jacksonville, Fla.
PUMPS.
Merrill-Stevens Co, Jacksonville. Fla.
Schofleld's Sons Co.. J. S., Macon, Ga.
RAILROADS.


lHADWArE. Atlantic Coast Line.
lond A Bours Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla. REAL ESTATE.
Briggs, W. H.. Hardware Co., Valdosta, Ga. Henry Sundheimer & Co., Savannah, Ga.
ramps Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla. Brolbton. Fendit & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Wee.d & Co.. J. D.. Savanah. Ga. SIKES' PATENTED RIMS AND HEADS.
HAY AND RAIN. I SEEDS.
BoLur & Co.. Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla. Bours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksoville, Fa.


SHIP YARDS
Cummer Lumber Co, Jacksonville, Fia
Merrill-Steven a Co.. Jackonaville, Fl.

SHOES-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co. The, Jacksonville. Ia.
-lon. Rosenheim & Sons. Savaanah. (;a.


STEAMSHIPS
Clyde Steamship (;o. The. New York (ily.
TAIKS.
Davis & Son, G. M, Palatka, Fla.
Schofleld's Sons Co., J. 8., Macon, Ga.
TuRPIUTMu STILLS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswik, Ga., and Pena-
cola, Fla.
McMillan Brothers .Co .Jacksvil*,
Savannah and Mobi
TUPEN xmxa STILL TUB.
Davis & Son, G. M, Palatka, Fla.
lUKPEUTImK VAT.
Davis & BSo, G. M, Palatka, Fla
TUEPENx Li TOOLS.
Council Tool Co.. Jacksomville. Fla.
Operator' Tool Co., Gre Cove Sprin,
Fla.

WATCH.
Greenleaf Crosby Co., Jaeksonvill, Fla.
Hem & SBage, Jaeksonville, v a.

YELLOW PINE LUMBER.
Summer Lumber Co, Jabnville, Fla.
East Coast lumber Cc., Watertown. FU




WHISKIES

GINS AND RUMS
FrOM

$1.50to$5.00 per Gallon
......AGENCY BOB......
Lewis 186 am d Mo t Vernon
Pure Rye WhIMAd s.
Controllers Blum's Monogram and Syl-
van Rye-Agents for Jungst Oinein-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beer.
Prices on application.

CHAS. BLUM.A CO.
5IT and 51e WEST BAY STRmET
JACSONVItLLE PIA.




Coons & Golder

Turpentine Operators on

Pipe, Boilers and Pumps


22 W. Adam St. Jadkseuve, Fla




WM. D. JONES
pLSnCRfPTiM SMCIALST
... a...
FAMILY DRUGGIST
107 K. BAY ST.
Mail Orders Soldted.









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


citizens of Deland and the members of the
Business League were thanked for their
cou.tesy by Mr. Seth Wocdruff, one .,4
the delegate citizens of Orange county.
The Volusia county board met in first
session yesterday morning, and usual bus-
iness was transacted; with a full boar.l
present. All road and bridge districts
made reports, and the usual number of pe-
titions for reduction in tax assessments
were considered. Revolver bonds of Wil-
liam Woodward and W. E. Connor. and
rifle bond of the latter were approved,
and the clerk instructed to issue licenses.
The notary bonds of (G. A. Dimick and
Wgford Bly and W. E. Pollock were ap-
proved and allowed. Criminal court cost
bills were approved in the sum of $231.71,
and the auditor's annual report was read,
approved and ordered posted according to
law.
The treasurer's report was examined and
showed the following balances on hand:
General revenue fund ........... 2,815.12
Special hard road fund ......... 2,056.88
Fine and forfeiture ............ 768.27
The board adjourned until March 18,
when they will hold a special meeting to
confer again with Mr. Jacques, and at-
tempt to devise some means of getting
started on the road

SSafordl ad of It.
Sanford, March tL-Yesterday morning
a delegation of prominent gentlemen came
up from Orlando in their automobiles, and
were joined in Sanford by Messrs. Forster,
Fernald, Woodruff, Chappell and. Mayor
Hand, and thence proceeded to DeLanI
over the new road recently constructed
by the counties of Volusia and Orange
with the aid of private citizens, tne latter
furnishing about $3,000 of the required
sum. Those' making the trip from outside
of Sanford were County Commissioners
Dickson, Tilden and Lee, together with
Judge Beggs, H. L. Beaman, M. M. Smith,
Mussehwhite, Seth Woodruff, with several
others whose names could not be secured.
The party left Sanford about 9 o'clock in
the morning, and made the run in less
than two hours. They met the board of
county commissioners of Volusia county
in DeLand, together with a number of
prominent business men of Volusia county,
and held a very interesting session, at
which compliments and congratulations
were exchanged. Adjourning at the noon
hour, an elegant dinner was served at the
Putnam house, at which the visitors from
Orange were guests. This was the treat
of the Young Men's Business Association
of Deland.
In the afternoon another meeting was
held, at which the commissioners ot Volu-
sia expressed themselves as being well sat-
isfied with the work accomplished by the
citizens of Orlando and Sanford, and ac-
cepted the work done without objection.
several speeches were made by various
S gentlemen present, and the greatest satis-
faction was exhibited by all at the good
work already accomplished and that con-
templated for the near future.

MORSE IS REACHING OUT TO HA-
VANA.
it is now reported that C. W. Morse,
who recently visited Cuba, contemplates
the establishment of a line of fast turbine
steamships to ply between New York and
Havana. The information comes through
the Wall Street Summary, which received
a cable from Havana, in which Mr. Morse
was quoted on the subject:
"The purpose of the Consolidated Steam-
ship Lines," said he, "will be to give


Cuba as thorough and as up to date a
service as that offered by any of the trans-
atlantic lines. The service will be maue
Letter than it has ever been, first by in-
creasing the number of ships. The time
between Havana and New York will be
.Alnost cut in half by new turbine ships,
which are destined to make the run be-
tween New lork and Havana in two days.
these ships will have accommodations for
a thousand passengers each and will be
especially adapted to the Cuban-American
traffic. It is expected that these ships will
be put in operation during the present
year, so the season to follow will see some
remarkable innovations and improvements.
"After the transportation facilities as
outlined have been completed the company
will take up the question of building a
hotel in Havana equal to any resort hotel
in the world. We realize after our short
experience here that there must be im-
proved decking facilities. The annual
strikes of the docking men have demon-
strated this fact most clearly. The incon-
venience and expense which the lighterage
of freight necessitates might be endured,
but passengers will not submit to things
by which they are personally inconven-
ienced. The new company understands
these several propositions, and in order to
make Cuba the r-al Mecca for tourists and
give those who travel between Havana and
New York and Havana and Mexico direct
their money's worth, will construct
wharves where its ships can land their
passengers and cargo instead of out in the
stream, as now practised."

INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS AT SOP-
CHOPPY.
Sopchoppy, Fla., March 5.-Mr. James
HollEad's aw and grist mill has arrived
and is being installed. Mr. Holland will
make a specialty of grinding corn for the
public.
Mr. M. C. Sauce:, of Tallahassee, has
bought the holdings of the Tallahassee
Naval Stores Company's location known
as "Sanborn No. 1, on the Ocklocknee
river, and will move there this week and
operate turpentine for an indefinite period.
Hon. W. J. Oven, of Apalachicola, was
here last week investigating real estate
and incidentally writing fire insurance for
several of our progressive merchants.
Senator Rouse's mill is running on full
time, but will have to close down while
he plants his tobacco and erects shades, if
more labor cannot be secured.
The citizens are loud in their praise for
the good Senator Rouse is doing the pub-
lic road by putting the saw dust from his
mill on the sandy parts of the road near
the mill.
Messrs. Abel Strickland and Joseph
Ward, of Ward, Fla., on the Ocklocknee
river, were in-town Monday last with quite
a supply of syrup and home-raised bacon
that brought fancy prices and met ready
sale.
Mr. John Brown, of Liberty County,
"ame here last week to dispose of his
syrup, this being the best market to sell
produce in and purchase supplies.
There is talk here of putting a steam-
boat on the run from here to Carrabelle,
to connect with the Pensacola Steamship
Line.
Many were tie sad faces that came here
for dinner Saturday last from the freight
train-no corpse, either. The engine "went
dead," for lack of water (and skill?).
I.8.


WITHOUT THE SLIGHTEST FEAR OF

SUCCESSFUL CONTRADICTION.


We Insist Upon Our IM dutaMs Leader-
ship in Floria's Furniture MerwlMhidni.



E. E. CLEAVELAND FURNITURE CO.

Oldest Furnture Store In Jasvlk.




SStandard Clothing Company.

E ;I


SOne Price


One Price


FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FVIRNISNER4S
17 and i9 West hky Street, Jadcwaemavles, FPe
Steteland =4 es Eats. Na6 ecia Attendfem Given to AIM Ordsm
*~)(I58SUISS5ISIII IU+IiUIIrn**Cgggggh nppggggu'gppggpp


tMe KOY PATENT


Turpentine Cup.


The best and simplest cup
on the market. Detachable
Greater Capaeity, easier
dipped more Muly placed
on tree, stronger and prac-
tically indestruetible. Will
not rnst. For eatalo and
price lit write


^10 *1 1015 Hiberala Buidin,
New Orleans. Louaisna.



M. A AK R INVENTOR AD
M* AV BAK R MANUFACTURER OF THE
BAKER IMPROVED SEAMLESS TURPENTINE STILLS. -


A elld 1de a grae
JOB WORK THROVGm THECOVuIT .YPLOMnPTLYATTrMN TO
The Largest and Oldest Copper Works In the South.
My specialty Is large worms nul hew ay bottm thit do met
BRUNSWICK, GA. d PENSACOLA, LA.









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


This Easy Chipper Saves time and Money.

Chip escapes easier on account of hollow back.
Cuts a shade streak easier as hollow back allows hack to WRITE
to be closed more FOR
GI Gum flows easier as there is less steel to drag over the PR
fresh cut. PRICES.


Operator's Tool Company, Green Cove Springs, Fla.

L -


STATE PRISON PHYSICIAN'S REPORT care of discharged
ON TREATMENT OF CONVICTS. ing topics. The
theory that the di
Dr. H. Blitch Makes Interesting and reform the crimin
Comprekbwive Report to Commision- him, the problem
er of Ai e. get rid of the law
er of Agricultate.
lawlessness. To !
Following official reports made to Hon. pioceedings would
B. E. MeLin, commissioner of agriculture, than is necessary i
by Dr. S. H. Blitch in 1906 and 1906, win an allusion to the
be read just now with renewed interest: brought out will b
Hon. B. E. McLin, Commissioner of Ag- gress is better tha
represents one of
riculture, Tallhaaee, Fla.: forts of modern hu
Dear Sir-As directed by you I have the governorr McKay
honor to subnnt a report of my visit to was a logical and
the sessions of the National Prison Con- Nebrauk
gress held in Lincoln, Nebraska, October 21, He said Nebrask.
to the 26, 1905. In point of interest, in- cent of illiteracy
cent. of inmates in
telligence, attendance and effective co-op- of any State in th
eration no previous assemblies of the i'ini education aids in th
in this or any other land approaches th.' that the certainty
equal of this coming together in Lincoln greater deterrent (
of the three representative bodies of which verity of it; that
must begin ata hon
the association is composed-Wardens, had much to do wit
Chaplains, Doctors. No great paper mark- of the people of a
ed the occason, not a blank in the pro- hone is so will be
gram. The people who promised to write Another paper re
or speak kept their word, from governor twice of making st
of the State to modest men and women habitual criminals,
who only agreed to take part in the dis- idiots.
eussiona. The great value of all the pa- He said if this is
pers and the decidedly moral tone of all ism, then I am tha
the addresses had much to do with the Said another, adull
success of the meeting. The official and should be incarcerat
non-official element, expert and amateur, she has proven bey
met and exchanged views in this organi- will continue to wai
nation to their mutual advantage, develop and proper. Dr. K
ing ideas and standards of excellence in advocated, especially3
prison discipline and management which addicted to crime.
could scarcely be obtained otherwise, brain, claiming inju
Firnt Orgs-'-gtim. adherent membrane
The congress was organized in 1870. cause, illustrating
Governor Seymour, of New York, being the tion.
first president. This first organization was Cause
effected and annual meetings have been The following va
held ever since. The new organization congress as the caut
grew out of the pressing needs of th" 1. Tendency.
time. Problems in crime treatment wer' 2. Environment.
arising with which neither authorities nor :1. Lack of respect
social leaders were competent to deal. 4. Disease-mora
reforms were needed, but what these re .Methods of identil
forms were and how they could be brought argued in the congr
about the public had but little conception. Twenty years ago
No facilities for gathering information, for clan ot Paris, devils
comparng results, no organization to di- before the public
riect liquiry, to circulate information or to measurements. By t
bind the different sections into the united cation was supposed
effort for the repression of the old metp- the realm of probab
ods of crime treatment, but let it be of certainty, but it i
passed to the credit of this reorganization men who have had
that it is a permanent fixture, a center of tie working of the
power and influence whose assembling i; fond it so imperfe
not to formulate penological dogmas but as to ardently wish
to exchange ideas, experiences and to ex- This something has
change remedies which we believe true identification by fin
and enduring prison reform, amelioration supplemented the pf
of laws in relation to public offenders, im- ing moire simple and
provement of penal reformatory institu- The nunus opera
tions and their administration, the better sions of the fingers.


prisoners were the lead-
congress advocated the
uty of the State is to
al rather than punish
being nut so inuclh o
breakers but to abolish
peak in detail of the
re luire more matter
n this report, therefore
most important fact-i
*e ily aim. Each coi-
n the other because it
the most practical ef-
imanitarianism.
,s address of welcolene
forcible argu nent.
a Illteracy.
a had the srialllest per
and the smallest per
her penal institutions
e Union, asserting that
te suppression of crime,
of punishment is a
)f crime than the se-
to prevent crime we
ne. That environments
h molding the character
Nation; that as the
its occupants.
ad advocated the prac-
U 1 -


P E C A
Analyze the were


permanent Profits

Economy of care
Certainty of results

Annual crops
Non-perishable product
Superior to all nuts.


NS
L


THE OPPORTUNITY Of TODAY.
The first to plant a pecan grove
will be the first to reap a
great harvest.

for full information apply to

THE GRIFFIN BROS. Co.
Jacksonville. florida.


REFLECT A MOMENT.
Would it not pay you in more ways
than one to give us your business?
Our good name is a bunines. aseat which
we value too hghly to loe it by
selling you anything but the purest aad
best on the market.
Why not let us help yon build up a se
cessful drug business by uppling you
with the best DRUGS on the market
prices which enable you to keep up with
competition and make good proita.

The Grover-Stewart Drg Co.,
15-17-19 East Adamu St.,
JACKSONVII LE. - FLORIDA.


imbeciles and hopeless + -

getting back to barbar- J, A C ra l B.
t much of a barbarian.
t habitual criminals j 239 W. Bay Street EVERETT BLOCK.
ed for life when he or
ond a doubt that they i
r upon all that is right Leaders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-
on children who were a Md st in
olmer. of Indianapo is, 3 nd Up-to-Date FurnIshingrs.
an operation on the
ries to the skull and Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City. 5
s as a most frequent
this method of opera- n** *'i#] .**.g.g... ,


of Crime. 8+4 *t Il
s agreed upon by the W. W. Carne
is of crime:

Ta
't for law.
I and physical.
ication of criminals as
ess:
Dr. Bertillon, a physi- 0
ed, perfected and put e
his system of HIoduiy
this system of identiti- Turpen
Sto be carried out of 0
mility into the domain
is understood that the
the most to do with w
Bertillon system have
ct and unsatisfactory
for something better. MOTARY PUBLIC.
come in the form of
ger prints. This has
ertillon system as he- R
accurate.
di is taking impres-
Room 6


8


*** lt I I ***I lI I I I ,lglll l l llga egegaI le ,
s, Press W. C. Theao, Manager. L. & Carnmu, Sec at TIma.


ripa Hardware Co.


Wholesale

Hardware

tine. Mill and Phosphate Supplies.


TAMPA, FLORIDA.
14441I1*41 8 It I IIeII 111ugI Iiig ii h i1g 1 6 4

BLUE PRINTING. I. PHOME 941.
Examination and Timber Estmates.

)LAND WOODWARD,
CONSULTING AND CIVIL ENGINEER.
Beard of Trade BuldMn. JACKSONVILLE, FLA










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7




Southern Drug Mfg. Company

WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS AND MANUFACTURERS OF
Flavoring Extracts, Packed Drugs, B B. Bluing. Vinegar and Pyne's Popular Remedle.
We handle everything in the Drug and Medicine line. Write for prices. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


To get good impressions a certain mo-
dicum of care, practice and cleanliness are
needed. Unless greasy excreta is removed
from the fingers, good impressions cannot
be had. Apparatus required for ink im-
pressions are smooth plate of metal glass
or porcelain, printer's ink, sheet of white
paper and a roller with which to dis-
tribute the ink on the paper. The fingers
are now rolled on the ink plate and then
* on the paper with the least possible pres-
sure. The result of careful comparisons
made on many thousands of finger prints
have shown that no two sets of prints have
been found to be identically alike except
they were on those of the same individual.
Finger impressions have come to be recog-
nized as a most reliable and easy means
of effecting personal identification. Here
is another important factor: a child is born
with its fingers lined in a certain unique
way. he fingers grow in size throughout
boyhood, manhood and maturity, but the
pattern remains unchanged, after a lapse
of forty years between taking finger prints
they were alike in all the lines.
Juvenile Offender..
.Tndue Benjamin B. Lindsey, father of the
juvenile court of Denver, Col., spoke earn-
estly of the character, history, spirit and
nnurpose of the court and how a spirit of
trust and love are preferred to a spirit
of fear and hate as applied to juvenile
offenders. insisting that the purpose is not
to treat the child as a criminal. but as one
needing aid. encouragement and assistance.
TmOrove the hoy's environment, add to his
opportunity for good, correcting the child
vet protecting him. This the jail has never
done and never can do. The law declares
that when a natural parent fails in paren-
tal duty the State takes the child, not
hranding it as a criminal, but an a true
parent trvina to brine the best that there
is in the child. The State does not want
to nunish but raise enad citizens. It is
fundamental that children shall not be
mixed with adult criminals. ]Education is
the nasis of the nolic. not punishment: a
senarate. nnliftine treatment and influ-
en.c The juvenile court deals generally
with canes in which there has been a fail-
ure in the home and school, however, it in
not the province of the juvenile court to
usurn the functions of the home but rather
to see that this function is performed
as it should be done. The comiulsorv
school law. said the sneaker. is the most
important adfunct to our invenile court in
Denver. (l. The invenile court is an
Ameriean invention in criminal lnrispru-
dence and practice. Make the prison for
-,r neihhbor's son what von would want
it to he if von could imagine vour own son
-P'e -nin, there. The intermediate sen-
Sonce and parole method were advocated
Severy sneaker in the association An
intermediate sentence in one that shall
terminate whenever the convict has shown
-e sonable probability that he will live
Pt li ertv without violation of law. A
m role system renders it possible to test
the convict hv conditional release. The
mission of the intermediate pentenep is to
Irpn ha.d prisoners within prison walls inst
as much as to restore deserving men to
outside life, T'h delegates wre a unit


in the claim that the day had been reached
when society is studying and seeking the
reclamation of the criminal rather than his
annihilation. Many are accidental offend-
ers rather than instinctive or premedita-
tive criminals and a method such as an in-
termediate sentence would be more bene-
ficial than prolonged imprisonment. When
the high and sacred end of punishment
is gained punishment shall case. I know
of no valid reason why the legislature of
our great State should not follow the ex-
ample of other prominent States and
create the indeterminate sentence with its
added parole system of release. In quite
a number of the States where this plan
has been adopted it has been most satis-
factory in its results.
Chance for Prisoner.
It gives the prisoner a new chance to
show himself worthy of confidence. To
the man whose environment has been the
cause of his downfall it brings the courage
of hope: to the professional criminal it
presents a stern aspect. The most expert
criminologists strongly favor this method
as the most enlightened. progressive and
helpful in the solution of the great and
ever present problem. The adoption of
these two measures would make the fol-
lowing all the more important. With the
demand fo- reformatory instead of retribu-
tive methods in penal institutions has
core the necessity for better prison offi-
eprs than ever before. If the lives and des-
tinies of men are to be influenced or con-
trolled. study of human nature must he
required on the nart of every guard, keep
er or instructor who handles them and not
only must fitness for command he a requi-
site but character also. All people are
imitators hv natural impulse and the crim-
inpl esecially, therefore not only in the
sunerintendent but in his subordinates
also should eood qualities prevail.
Atheism. intemnerance, moral looseness
and dishonesty should he abandoned as
c-rtainlv as brntalift nnd cruelty: the
lives and actions of officers should be
-o1dels of all that we would ask the crim-
;nnl to attain. The new and higher oh-
ipets now striven for in penal work are
slowly hrincinr this to pass in the selee-
tinn and training of the official staff of
fhoi, institutions
Prison System.
The ssentiaTs of a prison vsstem as
decided uon hv the con-ress were these:
1st. Constant emnlovment of convicts.
teaching them a trade of some kind. avoid-
in., omretition with free labor.
9nd. Wdneate and awaken the mental-
ity of the convict to a dereep that makes
him effective in labor and develop his
no-pers of reison to a noint where he is
l1l1n to ti-flnrish ri-ht from wront.
.Rr liP'ioin trainin- that keens he-
for, the minad the hope of Christianitv.
4th. in intermediate sentence.
th. Parole system.
bth. A system of identification that
po'-enel the convict's history.
7th. State authority over all nenal in-
sti+ntioln=.
In snenkina of the omnlovment of con-
-iets we hv first to consider the right
(Continuel on page 15.)


Barnes & Jessup Company

Jacksonvlle. Florida.

Naval Stores Factors and Commission

Merchants.


OFFICERS.
C. H. Barnes. President. J. C. Little, Vice-Presdent.
E. B. Wells, Secretary and Treasurer.

DIRECTORS: C. H. Barnes, J. C. Little, Ralph Jeosau
J. R. Saunders, E. C. Long, W. E. Cumsmer, R. H. Paul. O. W
Saxon, G. W. Taylor.

.. .. . .. ...m ;- -




B BEST TANKS

ON EARTH

Are made in Palatka, Fla., by G. M. Davis 6
Son. They use selected cypress wod. Work-
manhip equal to the quality of the material
and the combination is absolutely unqualed
for durability. Write them for prices and full
information before you buy a tank.

O. M. DAVIS & SON, Palatka, Fla.

Oo,.



": d :1-1; 11 41 i I ill I Ii m 14 I I 1 II IIll I l II i I I I Il f 1
SJ. P. WIIJIAMs. President. J. A. G. CAIsom, lt Vice-Plident -
ST. A. JENNINGS. 2nd Vice-President J F. Dmsway.M d Vice-fPlIdt -
- H. I. KAYwTN. Secretary. H. . fScu sni rriTnlmser.


SJ. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

SNAIL STORE 110 IOT WICiW UD IHUOI -B. i
SMain Office L*AVJiNNai OOOUeGa.
B ranch Offiecs: P rNKCOLA. g rL ~. Lns a ,
JAKCX0onvILLD, FLA. CO G ,
SNaval Stores Producers are lavited to Corrempo Wit Us.
11 i l l i t il l llli llil l I il IIII I illlll l1


W. J. L'ENGLE.
President.


J. W. WADI
VioePreddeat


I G. HUGHS,
See'y ad 'rea.


Union Naval Stores Co.
MOBILE, ALA. PENSACOLA, FLA. NEW ORLEANS, LA.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
..........DEALERS IN..........

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a larp a umber of desirable leati- Wt lor-
ida, Alabama and Misiasppi. Liberal advances made aigast se-migu C-g.
respondence solicited.

Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.








8 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Mr. Flagler and His Work in Florida

Development.


PFllowing is the full text of a letter
written from St. Augustine by William E.
Cuttis and published in the Washington
Star and Chicago Record-Herald:
Mr. Henry M. Flagler owns nine hotels
in Florida, and among them one that is
counted the largest and another that is
counted architecturally the most beautiful
in the world, and a railway system 600
miles long. He is extending his railway
along the coral banks at the tip end of
Florida to Key West, but does not expect
to build any more hotels. It has been fre-
quently printed that he would reproduce
the Royal Poinciana at Key West and the
Ponce de Leon at Havana, but he tells me
that he has no such intention. He is 78
years old and is satisfied that nine hotels
are enough for a man at his time of life.
Mr .Flagler has theories about a good
many things, as people of his wide experi-
ence and knowledge are likely to have,
and one in particular about the investment
of money. He believes that plenty of rien
men will give of their fortunes for educa-
tion, for libraries, for hospitals and other
works of charity, but few are willing to
assume the rick of an uncertain business
proposition for the public welfare or act
as pioneers in promoting the development
of great enterprises. In the first place
they don't like to assume the responsibility
or be troubled with the anxiety or have
the -reputation of failure, and then they
don't like to lose money, particularly on
their own business. No matter how rich a
man is be hates to lose a dollar. But Mr.
Flagler had the enterprise, the foresight
and the courage to come into Florida ana
assume risks that attended the develop-
meat of this State. He came nineteen
years ago. A great dal of money had
already been lost here. The late Henry B.
Plant had struggled against heavy odds
to make something out of Florida and was
still investing large sums in uncertain
prospects. The population was scanty,
shiftless and indolent; the climate was de-
lightful as a rule, but uncertain in spots,
and the topography was uninviting. Yet
Mr. Fkgler assumed the responsibility and
risk of developing a sandy wilderness and
has succeeded in a most remarkable man-
ner. He has not only provided a great
playground for the people and a hea,.h
resort that has healed hundreds of thous-
ands of unhappy invalids, but has brought
in tens of thousands of enterprising set-
tiers, has developed the orange, the grape-
.ruit and pineapple industries and has
made vast tracts of vacant land accessible
to homeseekers.
Mr. JFaglai' Zterprins.
And= t has been purely an individual
undertaking from the beginning. He has
no partners; has offered no stock or bonds
for sale; he is not a borrower; all the
money invested here has come out of one
pocket; all of the interests, all of the prop-
erty belongs to Mr. Flagler himself, and
there is no excuse for complaint about
over-capitalization, because the capital
stock upon which these made enterprises
are operated is only $1,00,00, and Mr.
Flagler owns every share except four,
which he has placed in the hands of his
managers to qualify them as members of
the directory.
His interests are divided into three com-
plnies, all incorporated as a precaution.


One company runs the railroad, another
the hotels and a third the land interests.
Mr. Flagler also owns one-half of the
Peninsular and Occidental Steamship Com-
pany, which runs steamers from Tampa
and Miami to Key West, Havana and Nas-
sau. The other half interest in the steam-
ers is owned by the Atlantic Coast Line
railroad.
Nobody knows how much Mr. Flagler
has invested; nobody knows what his reve-
nues are or have been from these various
properties; nobody knows whether his
stock pays dividends, because there has
never been a financial statement published.
The public has the usual amount of curi-
osity, but no one but Mr. Flagler is inter-
ested, and it is not necessary for him to
make a report to himself. Notwithstand-
ing his age, he is as vigorous as a man of
50, and manages his business, knows ex-
actly what is going on everywhere among
his various enterprises every day. Every
morning he receives a telegram from the
manager of each of his nine hotels, giving
the number of guests that were lodged
under their roofs at midnight. The heads
of various departments of his railroad re-
port t him regularly, and he spends a great
deal of his time going about and inspecting
things for himself.
Although the capital stock of *he Flag-
ler companies amounts to only 1q,000,000,
it probably represents sixty times as much,
and those who are familiar with Mr. Fleg-
ler's affairs calculate that by the time he
has- completed his railway to Key West,
his total investments in Florida will ex
ceed $75,000,000. The officials employed
by him speak very modestly, and will tell
you that Mr. Flagler's property in Florida
is taxed on an appraisement of $25,000,000,
which is very near its full value. But
while that may or may not be the case, a
slight calculation will show that the
amount is not excessive. For example, he
has 36( miles of railway from Jackson-
ville to Miami and 160 miles of branches,
which makes 526 miles already in opera-
tion, and that must have cost an average
of $40,000 a mile, or something like $21,-
000,000 for his railways alone, while the
extension to Key West, now about !alf
completed, is one of the most exrmnsive
pieces of railway construction ever under-
taken, and is costing from $50,000 io 875,-
000 a mile.
Churches Built by Flagler
While we are enumerating his various
public enterprises, it woud not do to over-
look the churches Mr. Flagler has built.
The Memorial Church, erected to the mem-
ory of his daughter at St. Augustine some
years ago is familiar to the public by rea
son of the photographs that have been so
widely circulated. It cost $260,000. and
he has recently added a mausoleum, in
which some day his bones will be laid. He
also built the Methodist church at St.
Augustine at a cost of $100,000, and con-
tributed an equal sum to the restoration
of the old Catholic cathedral of that city.
Although he is a Presbyterian, born and
bred, the son of a Presbyterian minister,
and has been an elder in the Presbyterian
church for a third of a century, he con-
tributmr with equal liberality to all de-
nominations Catholic and Protestant-
and several eminent prelates of the former
faith are among his intimate friends and
are frequent guests at his house.


'OSEPH D. WEED.


RAILROAD


H. D. WEED.


SW. D. KMENSO0.


SPIKES.


Bar, Band and Hoop Iron.


Turpentine Tools, Etc.




The Metropolis


Is the Paper you want. It is
published daily and is from 12
to 16 hou, s ahead of any other
daily newspaper in Florida ..


$50o a Year $2.50 Six Months

Full Telegraphic and Stock
reports. If you want to keep
posted on the news, get the
Metropolis.

CARTER & RUSSELL PUB. CO.
JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA.



HEAVY TURPENTINE MULES,
AND SADDLE AND DRIVING HORSES
AL WAYS ON HAND. PRICES RIGHT.
W. A. COOK, Sals Stables, TAMPA.




Atlantic Coast Line


Famous Trains.

New York and Florida Special leaves Jacksonvlle
daily except Sunday, 12:30 p. m., for all points East
Solid Pullman.
Chicago and Florida Limited daily, solid vestibule,
leaving Jacksonville 9:30 a. m. for all points East.
Coach on this train also.

For rates. Pullman reservations and
all other detailed information, write or
cell on

FRANK C. BOYLSTON.
District Passenger Agent Atlantic Coast Line.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


J. D. WEED L CO.,
SAVANNAE EORILA.

Wholesale Hardware,


_I









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. g


TAMPA MONUMENTAL WORKS,
DE ALRs IN
Monuments. Headstones, Iron Fencing and Italian Statuary
NO JOB TOO LARGE. NO JOB TOO SMALL.
MAIN OFFICES 310 ZACH STREET, TAMPA. FLA.


He built a church for the Presbyterians
at Miami which cost $30,000, and nas con-
tributed liberally toward the erection of
every one of the five other churches
in that town.
The chapel at Palm Beach, erected sev-
eral years ago I believe is the only church
in the world that is used by both Portes-
tants and Catholies, for public worship.
It is undenominational, and has no regular
pastor or organization, but is intended for
the benefit of the guests at the hotels,
and there are always among them a num-
* ber of clergymep of both faiths. The.
Catholics have the use of the chapel in
early morning and the Protestants hold
service regularly at 11 o'clock.
Mr. Flagler also has two or the most
beautiful homes in the country. One of
tnem here at St. Augustine, is a spacious
and imposing mansion of colonial design
and the other, of Moorish design, at Paim
Beach. is recokned among the largest and
finest private residences in America.
The Growth of Florida.
There are between eight and ten thous-
and men on Mr. Flagler's payroll, 5,00f-
in the hotels and 3,000 or more on the
railway, without counting the construction
gangs, numbering 2,500 or more that are


railway one time or another, and much of
it several times over. The public lands
transferred by the United States to the
State government many years ago are
nearly all involved in litigation for that
reason and nobody can give or get a title.
Mr. Flagler bought up a lot of old grants,
including one that was given to John Jacob
Astor early in the last century shortly
after the transfer ot Florida territory by
Spain to the United States. And he has
purchased a good deal of private land also
which he is selling to settlers and town-
site and colonization companies. He has
an office for his land business at St. Augus-
tine with agents who are promoting immi-
gration by familiar methods. They want
fruit growers and farmers with money and
experience rather than ordinary classes of
immigrants. They care more for the char-
acter of the people than for their numbers.
As an illustration of the development of
the East Coast by the Flagler enterprises,
the passenger receipts on the railroad from
Jacksonville to Miami increased from $625,-
5 0 in 1900 to $1,043,464 in 1906. The in-
crease in freight receipts has been much
more rapid.
During the five years from 1900 to 1905
the total capital invested in the various


now employed on the Key West extension. industries of Florida increased from $21,-
Probably 50,000 permanent residents 507,73-2 to $25,757,481.


have been added to the population of the
State as a direct result of Mr. Flagler's
enterprise. They are engaged in business ,
in farming, gardening, fishing, keeping
boarding houses, and not less than 12,000
pr 1,tW0 are "Tem&atter"-wplIo e wm'baue'
come hre lor their health anL have in
vestments sufficient to support them with
out engaging in business or labor. The
city of Miami alone, "the magic city," as
they call it, has a population of 6,000
where when Mr. Flagler began work on
the extension of his railroad a few years
ago. there was but a single house. Andi
along the entire line are towns and villages
entirely dependent upon the railroad and
which have sprung up since the track was
laid. The growth has been slow. It is
not so rapid as the tourist business, buz
it has been sure, and the effort of the inm
migration department has been to obtain
those classes of settlers that will contrib-
ute most to the development of the mate-
rial resources and the increase of the
wealth of Florida.
There was nothing on the East Coast
except ene or two little villages of fisher-
iren when M!r. Flagler came here. All ok
tl'e towns and resorts have sprung up
since. The entire section was a wilderness
* p to twelve years ago. Steamers used
to run down that long strip of water
which runs parallel within a few miles of
the coast of Florida, and is called the
Indlian river, as far as Jupiter Inlet, where
Il'ere was a hotel much sought by fisher-
men Miami was on a military reserva-
t:' Now there is a string of towns and
villages the entire distance surrounded by
trunk gardens, orange groves, grapefruit
orchards, pineapple ranches and other
farms.
Increase of People and Wealth.
The railway received a grant from the
State, but it was largely on paper and Mr.
Flagler has never been able to get a title
to most of the land. Nearly every acre of
the iare F ors haa bes granted to a


The number of wage earners employed
in the State increased from 33,179 in 1900
to 38,356 in 1905, and the annual wages
from $10.133,729 to $14,297,671.
The value of the products increased from
1JmarAMB to 1A43a442A1.
it w\ be V otaced that whvxe thAe eapta\
increased 28 per cent, wages have increased
44 per cent and the number of wage earn-
ers only 18 per cent.
It is also interesting to know that 1,035
of the industries in the State are in the
rural districts and the villages and repre-
sent $18,462,118 of the total capital in-
vested.
There has been a remarkable advance in
wages throughout the entire South. The
pay of both farm and factory hands has
advanced an average of 30 per cent during
the last six years, which, of course, has
been attended by a corresponding increase
in their expenditures and also in the cost
of living.

NOTICE TO NON-RESIDENT.
In Circuit Court, Fourth Judicial Circuit
of Florida, in and for Duval County.
In Chancery.
G. A. Henry vs. Creo. Henry.
To Creo. Henry:
You are hereby required to appear to
the Bill of Complaint filed herein against
you in the above entitled cause on or be-
fore the 6th day of May, A. D. 1907.
"The Industrial Pecord" is hereby desig-
nated as the newspaper in which this order
shall be published once a week for eight
consecutive weeks.
Witness my hand and seal of office this
19th day of February, A. D. 1907.
P. D. CASSIDEY, Clerk.
By E. I. HEDSTROM, Deputy Clerk.
C. B. PEELER,
Solicitor for Complainant.


Reliable Whiskies.

When we make Claims for our goods we are certain of
the facts. We operate the finest open fire copper Distill-
ery in the World. We do our own bottling and packing,
and no expense or labor is spared to have every drop of our
Whiskey absolutely pure and of the highest quality.
We guarantee every Order to be perfectly satisfactory,
or return your money.

Four Full Quarts Rose's

"Old Corn" or "Old Rye" or assorted $3.40, express
prepaid. Write for complete Price-List.


R. M. Rose Company,
16 West Forsyth Street, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
"ASK THE REVENUE OFFICER."


W. R. FULLER, Vice PrOa


5.VM BEAGE, K TMA rn
A, BA94GFJL sogmar-rgT~omnw


TAMPA DRUG CO.

Wholesale Manufacturing Druggists,
TAMPA, FLORIDA.
Full and complete line of all kinds of Drugs, Chemicals
and Patent Medicines.
SPECIAL ATTENTION 10 COMMISsARY TRADE.
PROMPT ATTENTION TO ALL ORDERS.


DRVGS, "3 wgw RAT.1
20 a SOU LAU.


JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Florida Mail Order Drug Store. Supplies Everything a Drug Store
Ever Kept. Write to Us.



WILLIAM A. BOURn JAMES 0. DARBY


WILLIAM A. BOURS & COMPANY
THE OLDEST FSTAISOD GRAIM AD B MO TME TATM .

Hay, Grain, feed, Garden
Seeds, Poultry Supplies. our.

Grits, Meal and fertilizers.
OUR MOTTO: Prempt ShipmeMt, ReSfMe Osa 0 C r
206 EAST BAY ST., JACKSONVIULL, rFA.


C. C. Bettes,









10 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL RLCOR.D
JANES A. O11110olloOMOM. EANW4-I.
A.L N. HARSH. Duala.s Mer1afti.


P*ddmb Vrs 8mtusarmlTy.
samms o. oss)..t0 .P ArAnau

-*The Pen e Its P e*ir ."~

An cmmn ceaiums e esul be arieamsed
rhe lndustrlil ILecord Compuay.
JsxkmonviUg. ria.
&.ranm dmem es"a dsw uS Oalees as
Savannate. Ga.
EBtered at the Potomaoe at Jaemavile. Fa..
ass eomL-ele Imatter

Adopted by the Exeutive Committe of
the Turpeatins Opertora Asoatlo
tember 12, 190, as itsa melhive eM-
n orgL Adopted in mannsl eomvetion
September 11 as the oWa aso of tha e n-
mral a*modaiso-
Adopted April X7th 190s, the ofil
orgn of the Itarate Cha Growers' As-
oition. Adopted Septembr 11, lk, as
.dM only ofal organ of the T. 0. A.
com-ended to lumber people by ial
resolution adopted by the eorgia Sawmill
Association.

THr SECORwD OFFICE.
The publsa plt and the mana od-
Ses of the Inuatrial Reeord Compmay
are located at the intersetion of Bay and
ewmna Streets, Jacdonville, Fl., a the
very heart of the great turpetin and
yellow pie indutriM.
rxadp of the entire South.
The bp-nsah, Ga., office i in th Board
of Trade Bulding. Savannah in the ead-
ing open naval stores market in the world.

NOTICE TO PATRON
All payments for a rti~ the In-
duatrial Recd uad ube m thMereto
mut be made direct to the hBore es is
JackUnvini. Agent are nt etowed to
make cellectiesn under any ehmaemtamie.
Bill for aadertin t eabecriptimeB ame
sent out from t hedna ,e W% a b e
and all relttsacea mur be mae dtrt
to thi company.
IzoI tD I HAMPee PbOI hlOgR CoS

LORIDA'S CHAMPION IN CONGRESS


The Record commends Hon. Frank Clark
for his action in denouncing openly in Con-
gress the recent libels against Florida, pub-
lished in a magazine owned by one of
his associates in the House of Representa-
tives. It was a courageous undertaking,
particularly in view of the fact that it
brings down upon his head the wrath and
the calumny of a string of sensational yel-
low journals owned by his colleague
Hearst; and yet it was a move that any
brave, fearless representative of a libeled
and maligned people should and would
take. In openly refuting the lies against
Florida, published by Hearst, Mr. Clark
has performed his duty well, and all of the
better class of Florida people will give him
the commendation he deserves. In this
connection we publish the following edi-
torial from the Times-Union, which we
heartily endorse:


1

1

c
c


1
1


is shouted from the housetops that officials
of the courts and the courts themselves
are engaged in a conspiracy to drag the
innocent into camps where they are beaten
and starved, dragged half naked through
"poisonous saw palmettoes," and the flee-
ing chased with bloodhounds to be re-
turned to guards who watch over them
with rifles?
Let the State take action with all the
authority of a sovereign commonwealth.
Means can be found by those who diligent-
ly seek "for them instead of looking for
excuses to sit still. Meantime we thank
Frank Olark and insist that the whole peo-
ple of Florida should remember him as
their champion amid the seats of the
mighty and the thrones of authority. Mr.
Clark has done his duty. He is defending
the business and the good repute of his
people, but those who do so are not so
many that the defense should escape no-
tice and appreciation.

DIDINT VIOLATE THE LAWS.


Important Verdict in the North Carolina
Alls Labor Trials.
Greensboro, N. C., March 7.-The trial
of the test case against the Charlotte mill
men who were sued by the government
for $71,000 in penalties for alleged viola-
tions of the immigration laws, ended rath-
er suddenly and abruptly in the United
States Circuit Court this evening, when


The Times-Union having suggested that upon the motion of counsel for the gov.
the legislature at the coming session take eminent the jury was instructed to bring
some steps toward the correction of cur- in a vwrLdct in favor of the defendants.
rent libels on our State and that the gov- This carries all of the suits against th
ernor come forward in the defense of a
maligned people, an esteemed contempo- men off the docket, and a nolle prosse was
rary asks how this may be done. Well, taken in the criminal case charging them
the governor might instruct the attorney- with conspiracy. The defendants were:
general to demand a retraction from the Edward A. Smith, president of three big
Hearst magazines and that such retraction cotton mills at Charlotte; Sumner B. Sar-
appear in the Hearst papers circulating gent. manager of the D. A. Tompkins (om-
throughout the country. The legislature oany; E. C. Dwelle, secretary and treasu-
rIight make such action the duty of the rer of the mills of which Mr. Smith is
administration and provide a fund uponpresident; Thomas M. Costello, immigra-


GEORGIA WANTS IMMIGRANTS.
A correspondent writing from Atlanta to
an exchange, says:
Immigration continues to be one of the
most important subjects before the people
of Georgia. For several weeks prior to
the Macon convention little else was talked
of among business men, manufacturers and
planters and since the convention discus-
sion of ways and means for the importa-
tion of labor is heard on every side. Re-
sults that will follow the convention,
which met on the 19th, will be many and
manifold.
At this convention, where were gathered
some of the most conservative and success-
ful business men of the South, plans were
adopted which are bound to aid materially
in the solution of the labor problem. In
the first place steps were taken to raise
the necessary funds to carry on the owrk.
A committee was named which will raise
as a starter $50,000 which will be used to


the best advantage in inducing labor to
come from abroad. The matter of trans-
nortation, which is next in consideration,
was taken up. It was decided that every
facility should be provided that will make
it easy for immigrants to reach Georgia.
The steamship lines were consulted, and
not only will cheaper rates be given, but
additional vessels will be put in operation,
with regular sailins,. at least for a stated
length of time. Savannah, naturally being
a good nort, it was the sense of the con-
vention that an immigration station should
be opened there.
According to arrangements, which were
announced at the convention, regular sail-
ine vessels for bringing immigrants will be
put in operation in the next ninety days.
which is about as early as the steamship
lines can make their plans for additional
enuinment.
Tras something must be done to relieve
'-.o.., -,-~,, .+,,tion as to labor in Geor-
~; ; ...- ;, -.ir~ent. Tir, drift of negro
labor from the country to the cities and


TNH CLOTNIERS


which necessary action could be taken- tion agent. The latter is missing, and
a warning of what the libeller might ex- could not he found after the cases were
pect in the future, instituted.
Meantime, the congressman from this It was alleged in the complaints that
district has shown what he can do, and the cotton mill owners employed Costello
we commend him for a denunciation of to go to England to hire labor for their
such libels in good time and most strongly mills, and that in pursuance of this agree-
put. As Mr. Clark says, he may expect ment, Costallo went, and by promises, con-
the antagonism of all the Hearst influen- tracts and agreements secured the consent
ces for doing his duty as he sees it re- of the aliens to come to America. It was
gardless of consequences, and the people also alleged that Costello prepaid their
of Florida will do less than their duty if passage and gave them "show" money.
they foil to stand by him. He secured a There were seventy-one of the aliens
telegram from Gov. Broward declaring the who came to America to work in the miles
Cosmopolitan article "incorrect" insofar as in and around Charlotte. The defendants
it referred to any endorsement of the offered as a defense that Costello exceeded
charges, but the governor of Florida needs his authority as agent, and Gen. Boyd held
to say more than that. What does he that the government must show that the
know of the matter? What did he tell defendants shared in the unlawful purpose
the correspondent, and why did he not re- with Costello. The defendants also con-
pudiate the charges openly when they were tended that as there was not skilled labor
first brought to his attention? of a like kind employed in this country,
Meantime, the Times-Union, and we be- they were not amenable to the law. The
lieve the whole people of Florida, stand defendants brought cotton mill men from
with Mr. Clark in his declaration that the every section of the country to testify
charges are false in fact and in conclus- that there is a great scarcity of cotton
ions, that they are the work of "muck- mill help. It was shown that there is
raking yellow journalism," and that no millions of dollars worth of machinery
honest citizen of this State, in position to standing idle in the mills of the South and
be heard by the general public, can afford East on account of the scarcity of labor.
to sit in silence when such libels are pro- The department of labor and commerce
claimed abroad and the highest interests has taken great interest in these suits,
of his State attacked. How can we invite and this department is really responsible
immigration with effect while we allow for the institution of the cases. Assist-
the public to understand that we have "the ant Attorney General Cooley appeared
new slavery" as an institution too strong with the local attorneys for the govern-
for the law awaiting the settler-while it ment.


South Carolina Active for Immigration.
Quoting from the Charleston correspond-
ent of the Chattanooga Tradesman:
Interest in the immigration movement
-rows steadily. A strong effort is on
foot to make this city the chief immi-
gration port of the South, and influences
are l:enig brought to bear upon the North
German Lloyd steamship line to establish
a regular line of steamers between Charles-
ton and Bremen. The second consignment
of immigrants direct from Bremen reached
this city on February 9. There were only
121 this time, but they represented a very
desirable class of homeseekers. All were
promptly and satisfactorily placed.


The Wealth of the

Old Families.

Often disappeared, evaporated, and the
new generation was left but one or two
things of real value. Among these valu-
ables (in 99 cases out of a hundred) was
a chest of old silver, the most useful and
beautiful heirloom that the young genera-
tion treasured.
Have you such a treasure to hand down
to your heirs? If not, now is the time to
start gathering it. If you are interested,
come down and let us show you something
in that line that is WORTH HAVING
NOW and which will be highly treasured
by your sons and daughters.

R. J. RILES COMPANY,

15 W. Bay t.,

J.Skg=V4 roril% Hdb.


SOL.E AEMIS FR KNX HATS


Our Clothing

Cwt
Right

Right
Made
Right
Leoos
Well
H- angs
Well
Feels
Well

Swell

Said


THE STUART-BERNSTEIN CO.
14 WEST BAY T.. .JACKOVILLE., FLA.


tlhe fact that the question of securing farm
hands, particularly at certain seasons of
the year, has seriously obstructed agrielu-
tural development, makes the necessity of
bringing in a desirable class of immigrants
absolutely imperative.


*



I








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11



rLORIDA LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY.
CAPITAL STOCK JACKSONVILLE FLA. }Writes all Form. of Life end En-
ONE MILLION DOLLARS ( I dowment Insurance.


.0 a O IOLD 10
IUVOeNESS MA
A' 40L 40ae55lb.


Wet omel a -ood hand. bat a ood busl-
aim better a well The place todo it
to at a mood business school, and the

Tampa. BwuiM College
laatds pr -eisiently above others as
a e emess. wi Institutiton. Terms
rsonable. Open all the year. Write
L. IL WAYTOM. ,Pr.ldest.
Kmze lulding. Tampa. Florida.


NEW PASSBNHGkt STATION FOR PA-
LATKA.
Palatka, March 4.-That Palatka is in a
fair way to have a creditable union passen-
ger station, and one that will be in keep-
ing with her importance as a railroad and
transportation center, is evidenced by the
fact that the work of preparing to erect
a new structure was begun Saturday by
a gang of men. This is an improvement
that for many years Palatka has sadly
needed and for which her citizens have
devoutly wished from time immemorial.
It is learned that the present wooden
structure will be moved across toe Flori-
da Southern track and converted into a
restaurant, which will be conducted by a
Mr. Dumas, who at present runs the eat-
ing house there.


The depot will be modern in architec-
tural design and appointments and will
Iv built of white brick, trimmed with red.
The sheds radiating from the depot now
will be supplanted by iron-framed struc-
tures, the columns being placed in the
renter, and the tops being covered with
metal. These sheds will be 150 and 300
feet long, respectively, and will be ample
to accommodate the tourists and travel-
ing public.
All the aeessories of the up-to-date
passenger staton will be provided, and
what is now, and has been since Palatka
wore swaddling clothes, an unsightly col-
lection of frame buildings, will be trans-
formed into a structure of which Palatka
or any town many times its size would
be proud.
S With a sewerage system, a system of
water works, paved streets, a new pass-
eager station, a city park, some of which
are things that exist and others projected
or begun, the air is heavy with the spirit
of progress and push, and what was once
the lagging, lazy, indifferent Palatka, and
the butt of ridicule of the State, will
evolute into the new and modern Palatka,
the real Gem City of Florida, the pride of
the people, and a monument to those who
now have their shoulders to the wheel in
the onward and upward pull to greatness
and prominence. There is a grand and
glorious future ror Palatka, and now that
a rift has appeared in the cloud the dawn
of a permanent prosperity is visible even
to the most pessimistic.


WANTED
AND

FOR SALE
Rate for this column is 2 cents per word
for first insertion and 1 cent per word for
following insertions. No advertisement
taken for less than 40 cents for first, and
20 cents for following insertion. Cash
must accompany orders unless you have
an account with us.
WANTED-Position as woodsman or
stiller. Ten years' experience. The very
best of references. Apply at once to S.
Smtih, Box 255, Kissimmee, Fla.
3-27-02-3t
WANTED-Position with mill or tur-
pentine Have some knowledge of Iookkeeping.
State salary. Address "Clerk," care In-
dustrial Record. 3-9-7-4t
WANTED-An experienced turpentine
man to organize and take charge of a force
to work five thousand acres fo virgin tim-
ber per year in Louisiana. Give age, ex-
perience, references and terms. Address
"Long Leaf," care Industrial Record.
2-23-07-4t

FOR SALE Turpentine place-also
three thousand acres good sawmill timber.
T. A. Graham, Flomaton, Ala.
2-23-07-4t


EXPERT ACCOUNTANT.
ANY BUSINESS correspondence solicited;
reference the best. Fred E. Rankin,
Jacksonville, Fla. Long distance phone
2776. P. O. Box 572.
FOR SAL-Cheap--One lot of new ma-
chinery, complete for barrel factory (Res-
in, Spirits and Potato Barrels). For par-
ticulars, call at Bank of Green Cove
Springs, Fla. Or write. Valued at $3300,
will sell for $2,000. 4t
FOR SALE-Whole or half interest in
paying brick manufacturing business at
Wainwright, Ga. Address A. W. Bremer,
Wainwright, Ga. 4t
WANTED-To buy small sawmill loca-
tion, or arrange with a turpentine com-
pany to saw timber as turned loose. Ad-
dress, with full particulars, W. S. Year-
wood, Melrose, Fla. tf

WANTED-All ommissaries to clean up
their barns of all kinds of seed sacks and
burlaps. We buy everything in the way
of sacks. Write us. American Fibre Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

FOR SALE-Good turpentine place for
sale in Georgia. Good healthy location.
3ox 17, R. F. D. No. 2, Sylvester, Ga. tf
WANTED-Position wanted by a prae-
tieal turpentine man as manager or woods-
man. with ten years' experience. I un-
derstand every branch of the business and
can handle labor. I can also give good
references. Address "Rosin," care of In-
dstrisl Record.


HUTCHINSON AUDIT CO.
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS & AUDITORS.
Dyal-Upchurch Building,


Phoe 31


s. jaekaM%1 %l


A Pointer to the Commissary


Man Only.
Below is a list of our leaders and we are the only medical concern who makes a
line exclusively for commissaries, hence we know what they need, having studied
their wants for ten years, which we find to be different from other general trade and
to induce every commissary keeper to give us their business, or allow us to get
started with them, we will for one year give a premium with every purchase of
our medicines, which premiums are such as Iron Safes, Computing ommissary
Scales, Typewriters, Computing Oil Tanks, Computing Cbeeae Oatters, all breeds
bird dogs that are thoroughbreds and all other breeds thoroughbreds in the way
of dogs and game chickens. We give all other commissary fixture, roll top
desks, scales, etc., etc.
Cactus Compound retails at $1.00, which is for chronic blood disease, syph-
iletic affections and female diseases. Painolin (vs. Pain) sells at 25. Witch Hal
Liniment sells at 50c. Killer (for gonorrhoea and kidneys) sells for $1.00. Anti
Kreon, a 25c. pill that cures colds, chills and fixes the liver. For particulars ad-
dress-
CONTINENTAL MANUFACTURING COMPANY.
BIRMINGHAM, ALA.


COMPARATIVE MARKET REPORTS.
Just a little higher still went the price of spirits this week, the market
Ieing firm throughout. The lower grades of iosin also came up just a little,
though one or two of the higher grades fell slightly. Only a moderate amount
of either was handled this week, there being one or two days in which there
were almost no sales of spirits.
SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE FOR THE WBEE HIER AND AT LAVANAIH.
Price. Bale Bhipmiem. Reseipts. btoo.
Jax. Sav. Ja. Say. Jax. av. Ja. Sav. Ja. Sav
Saturday ....... 72 72 I 140 1181 .... 1821 14 26 74
Monday ........ 172 72 1 413 8 100 951 138 73 7,976
Tuesday ....... 1721% 721/4 28 126 ... 310 28 107 8,014
Wednesday ..... |72/, 721/%! 14 9438 193 287 50 8,02
Thursday ...... 1721/. 721/,2 58 41 125 141 59 72 733
Friday 7......... 2/ 144 16 50 259 72 11 7,867
ROSIN FOR THE WEEK HERE AND AT IAVNNAAH.
Saturday. Monday. Tuesday. Wednesday. Thursday. Friday.
J Jax. Say. Jax. Say. Jan. S. Jax. ay. Jax v. Ja. Ba.
WW .......16.55 6556.55 6.5516.55 6.5516.55 6.556.55 6.50.50 6.50
WG ........6.40 6.406.40 6.4016.40 6.4016.40 6.406.40 6.440 6.40
N .......... 6.10 6.106.10 6.1016.10 6.1016.10 6.106.00 6.006.00 6.00
M ......... 5.60 5.605.60 5.6015.60 5.6015.60 5.605.60 5.005.0 5.00
K ......... 5.45 5.455.45 5.455.45 5.455.45 5.455.50 5.505.50 5.50
1 .......... 4.65 4.654.65 4.654.65 4.654.65 4.654.70 4.704.70 4.70
11 ........ 4.60 4.604.60 4.601.60 4.604.60 4.604.85 4.654.66 4.65
S.......... 4.35 4.354.35 4.354.40 4.404.40 4.454.35 4.354.35 4.35
F .........4.30 4.304.30 4.304.35 4.354.35 4.344.35 4.354.35 4.35
E .........4.25 4.254.25 4.254.30 4.304.30 4.304.30 4.304.30 4.30
SD .........4.20 4.204.20 4.204.25 4.254.25 4.254.25 4.254.25 4.25
('BA 1.......4.15 4.1514.15 4.151.20 4.204.20 4.204.20 4.254.25 4.25
REPORT OF RtOdl MOVEMENT HERE AND AT 8AVANMAH
Bales. sbipmen. Ree.teia. IM1e.
Jax. av. Jax. Bay. Jax. ur Ja. 8av
Saturday ................ 1,60 91611,500 7631 165 1967,8903 60,90
Monday ............... 518 6331 800 1,3441 757 956,56 00,515
Tuesday ...............2267 48711,800 2,755( 523 1,40866,519 50,157
Wednesday .............. 479 70013,221 4071,588 024 66,442 5,371
Thursday ................ 292 1,26213.100 2,9011 208 63363,780 57,00
Friday ................... 54 69112,175 5571 409 53460,897 57,073




- "TOOWNERSOfPINELANDS"

I "TO OWNERS OF PINE LANDS." 1


,'lfyouJ want to utilize your light wood
with good profit, write us for particulars.
We are builders of wood turpentine
pl&. tS, manufacturing a first-class ar-
ticle and guarantee sale of products at
high prices."


HENRY SUNDHEIMER & CO.
SAVANNAH, GA.


U _____________





12 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Industrial Record

Publishing Co.


X


x


PRINTERS


PUBLISHERS


4X


With one of the largest and best equipped
South and with a full complement of skilled
to execute high class work promptly and at


printing plants in the
labor, we are prepared
reasonable prices.


No Job too Large or too Small for our Careful Attention


*


- -'--` - I ---


--


~'*1\~',\SIICS(LUESSIEIE~i~E~f)E~E)E11`1


gi ' --- 069"A %vWv "-I%%*-1









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 18



Jackson wllo Grocery Comply

S. Wh lefle e*Nal9 arnd Dimfllesrs' Su0pplle.
1....e mra Wwa e waidWe ae a A. 0I. A ir. s o mampmlmi aaS


RIXFORD TURPENTINE AXES


Are the best, beware

of imitations or "the

just as good" kind. If

you want the best or-

der the genuine article

from



W. H. Briggs Hardware Co.

Sole Suthern Agents

VALDOSTA. GEORGIA

jobers of Mill and Turpentine Supplies.




Jk*----* ---***** ----***----- *--*@----**** 44
L V S R FLYNN. IL L RICOND.
L KwI4N L. HAE RIS. Sc'r md Tr
IPr .. V. J. KEMl"Y, D. L. VILLIAMS
Vi*Wr An% Se'v d Tsi- 0



WEST FLYNN & HARRIS CO.
ERA I CGERNANIA BLDG. Savannah, Ge.
f WEST BLDG. Jackusonvlle. Fla r


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
AVAL STORES RECEIVED AT SAVANN, AHL, JACKSOVILLB.
FLA, AND FERNANDINA, FLA.

Wholesale Grocers also Dealers in Hay Grain and Heavy
Harneis. .

SOL for the Clebrated Union Turpentie Azes,
SOLE s and Wilson &Child Phladelphia Wagos.
MERCHANTS WAREHOUSE


SAVANNAH, GA.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


TAMPA, FLA


--'****%% I -%%%'*****W>yMW

You Want a Turpentine Location?
You Want a Sawmill Location?
You Want any Kind of florida Land?
You Mean Business?
SCll on or Write to

J. H. Livingston & Sons,
OCAI A. ILORIDA.


(Continued irom page 3.)
ness enterprise without considering
whether it is going to pay him or not,
and that is Mr. Flagler's good fortune.
His ambition is not to make money, but
to build up the State, and while the grati- t
fiction will be all the greater if he finds
a balance on the right side of the ledger,
he does not hesitate on that account.
Some of the Colonies.
Most of the colonies along the road
have been well advertised in song and
story, as well as in railway folders, and
the columns of magazines and newspapers.
Florida has a large literary population.
Lots of northern people who make their
living with their pens come down here for
the winter and write books and magazine
articles about the country, and each pro-
claims the advantages and beauties of his
favorite locality. Most of the colonies
have thus become well known, and while
they are all more or less alike, some have
a distinct individuality.
Fort Lauderdale, for example, is a trad-
ing post for the Seminoles, and the en-
trance to that mysterious region known as
the Everglades, which begins only a few
miles distant. The New river, on which
the fort was formerly located, is utilized
by them as a highway to bring out their
fish. skins, furs and other articles which
they barter for supplies of food and cloth-
ing. There is always a collection of non-
descript looking Indians around the rail-
way station and the town. It is here also
that the State authorities of Florida are
beginning to dig a canal to drain the lakes
and swamps of the Everglades.
The next town, called Delray. is settled
entirely by Michigan people, and is named
for a suburb of Detroit. Practically every
acre of land in this vicinity is tillable, and
trainloads of fruit, pineapples, tomatoes
and other vegetables are shipped north
every day during the season. There is a
large cannery here for'fruits and vegeta-
bles. They ship what they can, and can
what they can't.
Yamato is a Japanese colony of about
twenty-five families which was located
here about two years ago to grow pine-
apples and vegetables, and has been very
successful. A large tract of high pine
land. suitable for pineapples, and low muck
land, suitable for vegetables, was purchas-
ed by the promoter, a prominent Tokio
gentleman, who brought. the settlers over
and established them at his own expense.
About forty miles farther down the
road is a colony of Danes engaged in raise
ing tomatoes, pineapples, oranges and
grapefruit.
Cocoanut Grove, five miles south of
Miami, is the residence of Kirk Munroe,
who has written so many stirring and
wholesome books of adventure for boys.
He lives in a pretty cottage in sight of
a deserted lighthouse, which was the scene
of an awful massacre during the Seminole
war.
Fifteen miles below Miami, on Biscayne
bay, is a tract six miles square known as
the Perrine Grant. This land was given
by Congress in 1855 to Dr. Perrine, a lead-
ing botanist of his time, to conduct an


Sex
Sfr
fo


:perinental station on a large scale for
uit and tropical plants, but he died be-
re he could do anything. The matter lay
irmant until the East Florida railroad


was built down to Miami, when the heirs
>f Dr. Perrine undertook to arry out the
original contract wit the United States
government. Several intelligent and ex-
perienced nuresrymen have been induced
:o take up the land, and have begun some
very interesting work.
A considerable area has been taken up
for truck gardening, and is planted to to-
matoes, onions, potatoes, beets, cabbage
and other vegetables, which are shipped at
the rate of 4,000 or 5,000 crates a day to
New York, Philadelphia, Washington and
other markets during the summer.
Good RnOa ereC
An automobile road from Palm Beach
to Miami, sixty-eight miles long, a r-
cently been built by Mr. Figler through
the pine woods, the orange and grapefruit
groves, pineapple farms and truck gardens.
For a considerable distance it lies along
the banks of Lake Worth, and has not only
proved a great attraction, but is an Im-
portant object lesson in the art of road
building. It has stimulated the work of
the Good oRads Assodation of Florida,
which is trying to promote much-needed
improvements. There are a few good
roads in Florida, very few, and no couary
needs them more, because the soi in some
parts of the State is so sandy that haul-
ing is very heavy, and in other portions
it is even worse because of the deep muck
and decaying vegetation which has ae-
cumulated for ages. There Is plenty of
good road material everywhere. Chorale
rock. which s soft, easily quarried, aad
hardens upon exposure to the air and oys-
ter shells are cheap and plentiful.
As an attraction to the city of St. Aug-
ustine, which he has made his winter hoe
for several years, Mr. Albert Lewis, of
Wilkesbarre, Pa., has constructed a shell
road six miles long to a park on the bank
of the Indian river, whice he has presented
to the public. This and the Flagler road
from Palm Beach to Miami are about the
only perfect roads in the State. It is
proposed to connect them, and the Good
Roads Association has undertaken to raise
the money to build a broad, hard highway
from St. Augustine to Palm Beach shaiar
to the Lewis drive.
It is believed that mrk a.rod will soon
pay for itself by attracting automobilista
to the State. They now come to Ormond
in large numbers every year and hold rae
meetings on the sea beach. Thar is a
stretch of hard, smooth alnd twelve miles
long and two or three hundred feet wide,
at that place. Many people consider it the
finest beach in the world, and It s per-
fectly adapted to racing. People fond of
that kind of sport bring their automobile
to Ormond from all over the world. You
can read in the papers every morning of
the races that occurred the day before.
But outside of Ormond there is no plaes for
motor cars and they do not enter into the
amusements of the pleasure-teekers In
Florida.


Walter Micklow,
CERTIFIED MUMc AacoXuRM ,
Rse *gW04748 Mutul lite Eft
Tnnk e sk
JA3IYDL Mr, *I


dc







14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
K. S.agNASH. Pe'ide 0.M.aDARD Trs*or


E. S. NASH. Preeldent.
J. F. C. MYERS. Vice-Prmident.


American


P. SHOTTEIL.
Chairman Board of Directors.


Naval


Stores


(OF WEST VIRGINIA)


G. M. BOARDMAN. Treasurer.
C. J. DeLOACH. Secretary.


Company


Susoesesrs to S. P. Shotter Company, Paterson Downing Company,
Exporters and Dealers in All Grades of ROSIN, PURE SPIRITS TURPENTINE,
TAR, PITCH. ROSIN OIL and all other products of the pine tree.

HEAD OFFICES: SAVANNAH, GtORGIA.
BRANCHES


NEW YORK
PHILADELPHIA
CHICAGO


ST. LOUIS
CINCINMATI
LOUISVILLX


WILMINGTOR
BRUNSWICK
JACKSONVILLE


FERNANDINA
TAMPA
PENSACOLA


NEW ORLEANS
mLIPOLT
GULIPPORT


I6 Full Quarts For 95
Carolina Whiskey o 9L.
C=l.aWd r, s e ma at m . It is a well
artiae and in mer esthntaion far superior tothe decctioms and mix-
tare WD h trrepMauihlae an ordr whiker husae at P.00 to B
person. We make speeialprieeoe CAROLNMA W ISKEYto how
that ware afraidklafIklodiaeMpetition Our plant cover four
ten are making as the larast nmaerdur whirkeT house in the world.
S SAMPLE BOTTLES FPRE
IEEE sTeed as 52.91 uad we
wn1101p 1y *e 6 les WCm sa WhiMkey -d we
I a .*L .Ge bes, -mm ,a- m. btt I each.
SZdlm ." d a M.a- ad Cper' l2 Y w O id White CQr.
SECSIAL NOTICEI We del er the above e re p anywbhe
in North Cardia Virgini and West Virginia, but cntomers living
in other utatr leched by Adams or Southern Expre Companies.
nt remit extra. Buyers eant o Miisaippi River rddi'
inMe other express Huia must 001 $.96 far the 6 quarts and 1 mpu
bottle and we will prepay exprn fait cash with order and addrIa:
ITIE CASPXR CO., Inc., Roanoke, Va.
(Al- W N. C.) Ows.I of U. g. I .isteb rd Ditfllery Na. 6, oth DI.t., Va.
SAll Witskles lad uder pn-r~~ri. n of . Ot,.rs* and ganmnid pM* ~oder the
X..-o l 'a rood ad DrWag Law.




Brick and Building Material.
When you need these, Portland Cement, Plaster Paris, Hard WaN
Plaster, Hair for Plastering, Shingles, Fire Brick or Clay, Write to
GEO. R. FOSTER.Jr.. Jacksonville, Fla.



G 1ImUA. (<-wb'a--*a tn lUS.)
OLD sHARP WILIAMS-Pure Pine Old
Rye. B ULhe gallon 41.; four full quarts
$3.50, ex m prepaid.
GEO. J. COLEMAN-Pure Pennmuylvana
Rye; Rich and Mellow. By the gallon
38.%; tour full quarts 13.0, express prepaid.
ANVIL RYE-Pure ubitantlal Family
Whiskey. By the gallon 8.60; four full
quarts $2.10, express prepaid.
CLIFFORD RYE-By the gallon l.S:
four full quarts 2.4. express prepaid.
OL.D KENTUCKY CORN-Diect from
H-inded Warehouse; nne and old. By the
eualHln $.00; four full quarts N.50 express
prepaid.
OLD POINTER CLUB CORN Rich
and Mellow. fy the gallon $2.50; four full
'InrLts $2.90. express prepaid.
We handle all the leading brands uf hye and Bourbon Whiskies In the market
and will save you from Loe 50 per cent on your purchase. end for price lst and
catalogue. Mailed free upon application

The Altmayer L Flatau Liquor Company
MACON. GEORGIA.


THE COMMERCIAL BANK
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. Branches: Ocals ad Lake City
The largest leading State Bank Li Jacksonville. Is conducted in an old-
fashioned strictly conservative maner and is subject to regular examination
by the Comptroller.
CrIndividual and Savings Aceounta solicited.
H. ROBINSON, W. 3 OWEN, H. GAILLAD,
Presiedet. Vice-Preaident. CaddL
-- -- -------



H. E. PRITCHETT. Press P L SUTHERLAND. Vice-Pre. A D. COVINGTON, See'c
I. P. COUNCIL. Treass and Gea'l M.

THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.,
General Offices: JACKSONVILLE, FLA
Factory: WANMAJiSH, M. C.

alrfa refrps af mNig l rfad Toeha






THE ARAGON
JACMUOMVILL. rIA.
d Under new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
cluding new electric elevator and our
own electric light plant.
H. N. O'NEAL. Prop.


Turpentine Cups
IMPORTANT.
As our supply of cups is limited, we ug.-
est that intending purehasers send in
their orders promptly to insure delivery.
For Prices On
Cups, Gutters ad al Tools
Used i the earty ayse.m
se .. eetta."I'

Chattanooga Pottery

Company
-- adusnvIlle, lorida


YSS3ES~C~E~ C ~ is lemmmuTS1\ ------- ,









TIM WVkfLY INDtJSTiAL RECORiD.


(Continued from page 7.)

of prisoners to labor. The right of free
workmen with which his labor competes.
We are a unit as to necessity; without
it there can be no proper discipline, prog-
ress or reformation or intelligent prison
administration. We do not believe that
prison labor has any appreciable effect
on free labor. How can it have when
the product of convict labor in the United
States as compared with free labor in the
san.e industries is less than 2 per cent. and
the total product of convict labor as com-
pared with the total product of free labor
is only 54-100 of one per cent.
omumes could be written on the pro-
ceedwugs ot the congress; however, this pa-
per la already too long. Again the most
lupurtant features ot the congress have
b een re.eaed to ,eciamation, reformation
&au pie%*eution; tnese three, but the great-
eas of these is prevention. The Surgeons
and Paysic.ans A~jociation of the National


lrioun -_ongress elected me presiueut or
utis organiuation, and as such 1 delivered
Lile annual address, selecting for my suo-
jeer -' the Negro Criminal." A copy or
tiis atd-ess I enclose, and hope you wil
be deeply interested in its reading and
be enlightened by the statistics-mortuarv
-congress requested that I address them
upon the system and method of operating
prisons and prisoners and their manage-
ment as conducted in our State. My ex-
planation of the system and the emphasis
laid upon our open air life elicited from
Prof. Charles H. Henderson, of Chicago
University, the following remark: "Doc-
tor, the system as explained by you ap-
pears to me to be ideal, the best in the
world."
Hon. B. E. McLin, Commissioner of Agri-
culture, Tallahassee, Fla.:
Dear Sir-I am submitting herewith a
sketch to the proceedings of the last Na-
tional Prison Congress, which I shall re-
quest you to allow me to designate as an
informal report, because the local press
neglected to skeletonize the work of the
convention as promised. The National
Prison Congress, pioneer of American
prison reform and sponsor of the modern
methods of dealing with the criminal,
which has given the penal system of the
unitedd States first place in the penology
of the Nation, opened its twenty-fourth
annual convention in the city of Albany,
N. Y., on the 15th of September, lasting
up to and including the 20th. The sessions
were held in the senate chamber, whiei
brought together famous men and women
of philanthropy and prison work from all
over the United States, Canada, and as fat
away as the Bahama Islands.
The address of the president, Hon. C.
'. Collins, "Some Important Features in
Prison Development," created intense in-
terest particularly that portion which re-
* ferred to the value of saving the adult,
especially the foreign element. Of the 12.-
000 in New York prisons now, he esti
mated that they were made up large
from the cosmopolitan army of ignorance
and superstition. He said the vital sti-
tistica in New York City gave 50,000
births last year, only 11,000 of which were
of American parentage. Austria, Russia
and Italy each sent 200,000 immigrants
last year and that the congress should dis-
cuss not only local needs but put their
best efforts together and present to the
public and to our law makers a uniform
system of criminal jurisprudence that will
meet all phases of the subject and uni-
formity of the law in each State if possi-
ble.


Jail System.
I ie jail system, said he, should be cor-
recee. An endeavor to devise and put
in t -*ce some method by which the jails
may be brought up to a position of pro-
Lectivenese consistent with modern sys-
tems of reformation. The jails remain
practically the same as fifty years ago,
and its conspicuous defects still exist. In
closing he suggested that appointment of
a committee to be called "Committee on
Plan and Scope," to consider the follow-
ing recommendations:
1. A rational and uniform system At
jail administration.
2. A uniform system of education for
prison officer.
3. A uniform system of education for
convicts.
4. bo far as possible a uniform system
of prison discipline.
5. A uniform system of parole and
careful consideration ot all other matters


that in their judgment would tend to
make further reforms in the treatment ot
the criminal classes.
This committee to make a report of
their conclusions at the session of 1907.
-vii of Inhertance.
lie annual sermon was preached by
Slnaiam Cronwell Doane and was one ot
g.tcnt mileest. He dealt largely upon the
evit ot inheritance, ueclaring the prisons
whl be emptier when we have reached
the root and reason of crime. if we can
control the use of liquor and stop at least
its excessiveness; if we can stamp out
the cuise of drunkenness; if we can ar-
rest tee degradation of our slums; if we
can train up a race of children in sur-
roundings of physical healthfulness, ot
moral decency and dignity; if we can m-
stall into them principles of right living
we shall have begun at the right end-
restoration and reformation of humanity.
Prot. Charles'H. Henderson, of the Chi-
cago University, on behalf of the children,
said the proper training of a child, to
keep it from becoming criminal, began
before it was born, asserting that impres-
sions were made on babyhood at the age
of three months. Crime was not a heritage
but that criminal tendencies sometimes
we. e. The problem is ,o get back to child-
hood, back to infancy. Babyhood, he de-
clared, determined whether there should
be a large or small criminal class. If it
takes the whole force of the United States
to save one child it is well worth it, said
he.
Reformation of Jails.
Re.ormatory Methods in a otate Prison.
The Treatment of Women Prisoners.
The Prisons of Louisiana.
And a great many more papers were
read and discussed with interest and in-
struction to all, a review of which in
this report would be too lengthy.
Ine session of the Surgeons and Phy-
sicians Association had a better attend-
ance by fifty per cent. than at any pre-
vious assembling of the congress. It
evoked a deeper interest and wider range
of discussion of each subject presented
than either of the other sessions of the
association.
The ivythian Association.
President, Dr. S. H. Blitch, presiding.
President's address, "The Open vs. the
Close Penitentiary System," by Dr. S. H.
Blitch, Ocala.
Prison Sanitation, by Dr. W. D. Stewa.t,
West Virginia.
The Tuberculosis Problem in Prisons and
Reformatories, by Dr. Knoph, New York


SAM JONES'
LIFE AND SAYINOS
BYR B WZIa
Thjylg) ntg aeA coinin g money. Bend We for Canvassing
IM ad Contact for territory.
IIs'o"h~ ." L NICIOLS & CO., GA"


PLANTERS


"Old Time" Remedies

THE JOY Or TNE HOUSElOLD.


These four great remedies, labu n Tea, D- icta, Cu Relif
amd C n O, e the joy of the household With them ear at iand, a I
man s ready for any emergency. He has a safe, reliable and speedy relief tl
for wife, children, self or stock. With these remedies yon sea keep the
doctor's hands out of your pockets, aad yet have a healthy, happy famny. .,h -
Beide, you an cure your ock of any ailmet that may ll them
UBA TEA-I" Ligquad r Powder --s the great family medicine. It
will cur al forms of Liver and Kidney Complaints, Prevens s and -lrial
Fevr. C s the Oummon ailments of ehildrea; and as a laxative tonic it is without
an equalafe and reliable n the liquid, it a extremely paltablei-eve children
like it-end it is READY FOR USEL
BEI EDICTA is a woman's medicine. It will ure all the disease common to
women, and elased as Female Troubles. It will bring youth back to the laded woman,
who has go one suffering because she thought it woman lot. It will care for the
young girl t entering womanhood; and prepare the young woman for the sacred
duties of wife and mother.
CUBAN RLIKF-The instant Paint Killer, for either man or beast. Relieves
instantly, Colic, Cramps, Cholera Morbus, Diarrhoea, Dystentery and Sick Headache.
For clls n horns t it s a infallible remedy and i guaranteed to give relief in five
minutes.
CUBAN OIL-The Set Bne ad erve Liniment. 1i antseptie for cuts,
nagged or torn eh, nd will instantly relieve the pai. Cure inet bite and stings,
seab and burn, bruises and ores, chapped ands ad face, ore aad tender feet.
Relieves rheumatic pains, lame back, stiff joints, and in stock cure wire fence auts,
seratehe, thruh, splint, collar sores, saddle glls, and diseased hoofs.

Write s for Pries.

SPENCER MEDICINE CO.. Chattanooga, Ten.




FIFTH A VENUE HOTEL
Madison Square, New York.

American Plan $5 per day. European Plan $2.00 per day
The most famous representative hotel
in America. Now as the newt, always
fresh and clear. The location in MadisoM
Square is t!.e nest in the eity.
HITCHCOCK. DARLING SL COMPANY.


DIAMONDS AND WATCHES

We simply ask a call. We can show you, at correct and meey
Saving prices, may papers of l e pre white, perfect
fDAMONDS. It Is orw desire to contmie bein the largest
Diamlnd dealers Is Jacksonville, ad oar specialty is flue romd-
cant ems a d AigA-grade Waltham ad CtBim Watches.

u Q Dianmlds. Watches Jewelry
SHEuU1S 8 LAEGII1 s St.. 33r yh, Jh sk Fla



isI sti*>ll &&$I

: MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


Boilermaking and Repairing

Still BoilerS and Pumps.
S SHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.
u Jecksonville, fa.
t ooo88****8*oro888t**ee o4f8it68611e4t6*


'E1E~Elf~S~I~Sf~


?C~FIElf~E~










m--,----, i----- i 1111iI


W. W. Wilder,
Sec. & 'rea..


John R. Young Co.,


Commission

Merchants.


Naval Stores factors. Wholesale Grocers.


Savowav~mr a BrunaBwick. Go,


-uuuuuuuIuauuuuusuuuusIaIa. s.'-I)~~~+ ~ ,+ea


G. A.. Poewwow
C9 U.L Brown.
A. C. Decc..
5. C. F rd.
I. W06b
a 11. IDawar.


D. C. ASLEY, Pregset.
B. W. BLOUNT. Ist Vice Preside
und Genera Manger.
CARL MOLLER 2i Vice Pres.
G. A. PETTEWAY. 3d Vice P-ea.
S. IL BKRG, Sec. ad Trem.
A. C. BACON, As. Sec. ead Tres.


DIRECTORS:
B. W. Blount
B. A. Carter.
T. G. Culbreth,
A. S. Pendleton,
B. G. Latdncer,
Carl Moller.
W. T. B. Harrison.


PENINSULAR NAVAL STORES CO.

Commission Merchants

and Wholesale Grocers
Jackson iw amd Tampa, Florida.

Capital Stock. $1,000,000.


0. B. Parked
VioG-Pre.


Metal Defects
Mental Defects Among Prisoners, by J.
W. Milligan, Michigan City, Indiana.
The above was the program as arranged
for the physician's session of the congress
and should your board desire a synopsis
of the addresses it will be furnished later,
this report containing only a reference to
your representative's address. The Open
vs. the Close Penitentiary System. It is
believed that your Florida delegate was
foremost in openly and vigorously advo-
cating working prisoners in the open. The
many complimentary remarks of our sub-
ject, the wide range of discussion it as-
sumed and the advocacy of our views by
penologists all over the United States and
in other countries were a source of grati-
fication to us. Frederick Howard Wines,
A. M., IA. D., of Scranton, Pa., foremost
in penological studies in America, in com-
menting on our address in a short but ex-
tremely pithy talk dealt with conditions
in the South, said: "I endorse Dr. Blitch's
views. I recently visited some prisons in
the South and their open air methods,
management and quarters are ideal. The
prison question in the South is practically
a negro question, inasmuch as seventy-five
to ninety per cent. of the crimes are com-
mitted by this race. Over one-half of
these prisoners are charged with homicide
or homicidal offenses. From these facts I
draw the conclusion borne out by facts
that a little education is dangerous, for
when the average negro secures a little ed-
ucation he becomes too good to work and
is consequently led to crime. He is em-
phaticany an open air animal, and to con-
fine him is to undermine his physical be-


ing. No man who has not visited the slhoid be governed by circumstances and
South can form an opinion of Southern under the auspices of sound common sense.
people, or of the character of the majority This allusion to theorizing is not intended
of their prison population." In the North to convey the impression that the papers
and discussions are largely given over to
they have become wedded to the close sys- ad is princips are l argely givn over to
this principle-far from it-as it should
ten and have pushed it to extremes. The be remembered that many of the most dis-
practice of shutting men up has become tinguished men and progressive thinkers


a tradition. It is fraught with great evils.
Unrelieveu as it is by exercise in the open
air broods tuberculosis and other diseases.
The moral effect is still worse. Employ-
ment outside prison walls keeps convicts
from desperation-from insanity. Out-door
work is wholesome for not only our class
of prisoners, but for inmates of prisons
wherever established, and they can handle
an ax, pick, shovel or farming tools, little
as they like it. The man wuo works in
the open has a companion at his hands
that rings true-Nature. There is some-
thing uplifting, as well as revivifying, in
the mere sight of sun and sky-forest and
field. man of the basest capacity and
the basest disposition cannot be insen-
sible to the world around him. Confined
within walls and laboring within a prison
workroom, he may almost forget that he
is a man. Not so with the earth under his
feet, the very air stirring about him and
the open sky above him. The writer ac-
knowledges that there is in the congress
so-called scientiTic theories of prison re-
form and reformation of criminals, which
schemes oscillate from one extreme to the
other. One would surround the prisoner
with a praye: meeting atmosphere; anoth-
er wou.- make him sweat in the tropics
of torment; my method would be to treat
a criminal like a man, not like an infant,
nor like a wild beast, and that each case


are included in each session, by whose ex-
Ierience, learning a'd observation many
foundation facts in the science of human
betterment are established, and the sub-
ject of supreme interest to human society.
How to Eliminate Crime, is made easier
and plainer at each convention. This prob-
lem of elimination of crime is simply a
question of making it easier for human
beings to be good citizens than bad ones,
and training them to right living and right
thinning.


I am enclosing the open air address,
which I trust you can induce the board
to have read to them in a body.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR DI-
CHADG
Notice is hereby given, in pursumae of
law, that the undersigned as Administra-
tor of the estate of Joephine C. Sehu-
macher will make return of his final ac-
counts and apply for a Anal ettement ad
discharge as such administrator to Hea. H.
B. Phillips, County Judge of Duval Ctunty,
Florida, on Monday, June 3d, A. D. 19W.
JAMES M. SCHUMACHER,
As Administrator Estate of Josephie
C. S. Schumacher.
Nov. 22, 1906.-mo.


Standard Electric Compeany
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
X EVERYTHING ELECTRICAL X
sa


East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED LONG LEAF

Yellow Pine Lumber

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carl ad Lots
Steamer Shipments a Specialty.
WATERTOWN, FLORIDA


Jain" MONmtt.
vice-Pres.


J.W Bt"W i


TEIR WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


18


SUMMER LuMBER CoMPANY

JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
Rough -i Dressed Lumber

Long Leaf Yellow PlAe.

BOXES AMO OMTE.






SJ. S. Schofleld's Sons Company,
*******,* ss**********4 ******** *e***O***e** .e
SHeaduartersf,
9 Distiller's Pumping ;
u fOutfitL
SNo plant complete withma one.
A Hundreds of them in use in Georgia,
:* Florida, Alabam Missesippi and
SSouth Carolina rite us for partlcu-
s lars an prices. We also manufacture
SEngines, Beeirs and nith
jGrae Machmry.
Sas well marry a full and complete s

*^R I Mill Supplies, Pipe,M
SBSeler Tubes, Etc. ?
Advise your wants.
M Macon, -- Georgia.
& ****** *. -* Wan********* 5* -
&- .- O- O- 6 4..4,0@0- 4.6044a6e@ 4,:@: ss sO6 =6







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 17


W. W. ASHBUIN. Moultrie, Ga. N. EMANUEL, Brunswick, Ga.
W. I. BOWEN, ltagerald, Ga. D. T. PURSi. Savannah, Ga.
J. J. DORMINY, Broxton, Ga. R. G. KIRKLAND. Nichols, Ga.
0. T. McINTOSH, Savannah, Ga.

Southern States Naval Stores Co.
Savannah. Ga.
Factors end Commission Merchants
Ship to Savannah Get Competition Highest Prices Promptest Returns
Correspond With Us


Clyde Steamship Company


(d _________________XKX cm"S_3w3=77 -XK -XsX


Malsby Machinery Cornpany
4- a of Jacksonville, Fla.


Peraible, Statiary Egie and Beller
Saw Mill Me Wekliig MaiMeri .
Portable Outfits a Specialty.
Write for handsme diust'd 1906 catalog.

22 Ocean Street.


THE FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK.

of Jachamonvim.


General Banking.


496 on Savings Deposits


C. GARNER, Pre.ldest. A. F. PERRY, Vice-Preident.
C. B. ROGERS, Vie-Preident. W. A REDDING, Cashier.
G. J. Avent, Asst. ashier.


illt0 **0800 8lllt8 88l0881,t8|888 ieiiii*e tf *18*98i r4

JOS. ROSENHEIM SHOE CO.
MAVrWACTVaIERS AND JOAbER6 OF


SHOES

SAVANNAH, GZORGIA
"Best Shoes Made for Cemmissary Trade."
tsee eaeteee e ssees eoIassIeseseaseeseseaestsese5e8ee


Hundreds of Lumbermen
ARE LOSING

THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS
Each year investigating worthless propositions submitted by un
reliable brokers.
We have spent a great deal of time and money investigating
timber lands in Florida and Georgia. and are prepared to give
you absolutely reliable information regarding any tract of any
size in either State.
Propositions that we offer have been investigated by our ex-
perts before being offered on the market.
You might have your bank look us up before consulting us.
Correspondence with bona-fide purchasers solicited.


Brobston, Fendig & Company
s*6 West Forsyth Street. a21 Newcastle Street.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA BRUNSWICK. GA.
^M^^^^_% %^a4>3^xxsa . ..


NEW YORK, CHAIRLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
The magnifeent steamship. of thiu line are appointed to mail s follow, aling at
Charleston, 8. C., both ways.
From New York, rram JacknaTvif toi
(Pier 36 North River.) STEAMKR. Clarlels and New York.
Friday, Mch. 1,at 3:00pm. .... ARAPAHOE ...Wednesday, Mcb. 6,at 0:00am
Saturday, Mch. 2, at 3:00 pm... ALGONQUIN ...Thursday, Mch. 7, at 10:00am
Tuesday. Mch. 5,at3:00pm... COMANCHE ....Sunday, Meh. 10, at 10:00am
Wednesday, Mch. 6,at3:00pm..... HURON ...... Monday, Mch. 11, at 10:00am
Friday, Mch. 8, at 3:00 pi. .... APACHE ..... Wednesday, Mch. 13, at 10:00am
Saturday, Mch. 9,at3:00pm.... IROQUOIS .... Thursday, Mch. 14, at 10:00am
Tuesday Mch. 12, at 3:00 pm... *ARAPAHOE ...Sunday, Mch. 17,at 10:00am
Wednesday, Mch. 13, at 3:00 pn... ALGONQUIN ...Monday, Meh. 18, at 10:00am
Friday, 3Mch. 15, at 3:00 pin... COMANCHE ....Wednesday, Mch. 20, at 10:00am
Saturday Mch. 16,at 3:00pm..... HURON ......Thursday, Mch. 21, at 10:00am
Tuesday, Mch. 19, at 3:00 pm. .... APACHE .....Sunday, Mch. 24, at 10:00am
\ wednesday, Mch. 20,at3:00pm.... IROQUOIS ....Monday, Mch. 25, at 10:00am
Friday "Mch. 22, at 3:00 pm.... ARAPAHOE ... Wednesday, Mch. 27, at 10:00am
Saturday, Mch. 23, at 3:00pm... ALGONQUIN ...Thursday, Mch. 28, at 10:00am
Tuesday, Mch. 26, at 3:00 pmn... COMANCHE ..Sunday, Mch. 31, at 10:00am
Wednesday, Mch. 27, at 3:00pm..... HURON .....Monday, April 1, at 10:00am
Friday, Mch. 29,at 3:00pm..... APACHE ..... Wednesday April 3,at10:00am
Saturday, Mch. 30,at3:00pm.... IROQUOIS ....Thursday, April 4, atl0:00am
*Jacksonville to New York direct.
CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
Freight Service Between Jackasavl, Bostoa and Providce, and all Easters Palet
Calling at Charleston St Ways.
FREIGHT ONLY.


From South Side
Lewis Wharf, Bortoa
"Via Charleston.


Friday,
Wednesday,
Friday,
Saturday,


STEAMER


*Via Brunswiek.


From fet Catheu e Street,
Jacksemi.


Feb. 1.............. *KATAHDIN... ..........Friday,
Feb. 6............. "CHIPPEWA.............Saturday,
Feb. 15............ "KATAHDIN .............Friday,
Feb.23.......... .. **CHIPPEWA............Saturday,


Feb. 8
Feb. 16
Feb.22
Mch. 2


CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
Between Jack ville and San i.
Stopping at Palatka, Astor, St. Franeis, Bereford (Delaud), sad iatermdlato
landings on St. Johns River.
STEAMERS "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
AND "FREDRICK DE BARY"
Are appointed to sail as follows: Leave Jacksonville daily except Saturdays at
3:30 p. m. Returning, leave Sanford daily except Sundays at 9:30 a. m.
SCHEDULE
SOUTHBOUNDI INORTHBOUD
Read down Bead 1
Leave 3:ppm. .....................Jacksonville ................ rrive .m.
Leave 8:46p.m. .................. Palatka ................. ..l. vo 8:00p
Leave 3:00a. m. .................... Astor ...................... [Leave 3 :-0p.m-
................ .......... Bereford (Deand) ............. 1:00 p. m.
Arrive 8:0 a.m ................... Sanford ................... e :9 0s.m.
Arrive 10:00 a.m.l ................... Entpri se.................. Lve 10:00 a. .
GENERAL PASSENGER AND TICKET OFFICE, las W. BAY ST, JACK'VILL.
A. C. MAfEERTY, 6. f. P. A. P M. .IRO MONSER Jr., A. 6. P. -
Pler 36 N. R.. New York. JacksoUrlfe, Fla.
0. N. TAYLOR. Pass- Traffic LMr. C. C. BROWN ea'l Pass. Agest.
Brasck Office 290Broadway, New YOrk.
L. D. JOns, r. F. A. L. S. SCHOBLE. C. A.
Jacksonville Fla. Leesure. Fla.
W. COOPeR. Jr.. P. A. CLAYDE MINE, 6. P. A.
Jrcksonvvlle, Fla. Pier J3 N. R., oNw York
C- P. LOVELL, Supt., Jacksosville, Fla.



FUEL AND BUILDII IA AERIAL.


The Southern Fuel & Supply Co.
AinwEsef., m amf aEi a e ,eam r L00r 0

Foet fem Stare, JaeuvM a FamMa.


a


c.


\^








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Prospectus Florida Immigration Number of the Weekly Industrial
Record.


The INDUSTRIAL RECORD PUBLISHING COMPANY will issue at some date on or about the
firt of May next, a special number, to be entitled "The Florida Immigration Number."
This edition will comprise something like 100 pages, carefully compiled and edited, and will be inter-
estingly illustrated, all illustrations bearing upon the subject in question and designed for the purpose of
attracting to the State of Florida desirable immigrants, both from the domestic immigrant centres and
from foreign countries.
It is the purpose of the Industrial Record Co. to issue an edition of fully 50,000 copies, and to circu-
late it by its regular channels of circulation, augmented by the industrial departments of various railroads
coming into the South, and through individual and corporate interests throughout Florida which may
have their own individual sources of distribution. It will be mailed to all the newspapers of the country,
with requests for favorable mention, and will be advertised through the leading magazines and farm jour-
nals, to be sent upon request to interested parties who may have their attention thus directed to Florida
and to its advantages from a farming, commercial and industrial standpoint.
In order to attract the attention of those people who may not read the English language, an epitome
of the entire edition will be printed in several languages, namely: German, Italian, Scandinavian, Rus-
sian, and as many others as we may deem advisable.
The edition, from an editorial and compilation standpoint will cover all subjects setting forth the ad-
vantages of Florida to the capitalist, immigrant and the homeseeker, and will have a large number of
special articles by well known authorities on the various phases of the immigrant situation. Among these
will be articles by Commissioner Watson, of South Carolina, telling of his visits to Europe to get immi-
grants and the establishment of an immigrant line between European points and South Carolina ports;
an article setting forth the means used by other States in the South in inducing immigration-the officials,
amount of money expended, etc.; an article covering the work being done by the railroads in inducing do-
mestic immigration to 'the Southeastern States. The edition will also contain an article from the Gover-
nor of the State of Florida upon the subject in question; from the Department of Agriculture, giving
detailed and tabulated information as to Florida lands, advantages, opportunities, etc. It will contain
among other things an article on the effort now being made (and we trust will have been accomplished by
the date of the issue) for the establishment in Florida. of a Department of Immigration, which matter will
come before the approaching Florida Legislature. It will contain articles from the heads of various com-
mercial organizations in Florida, notably from Mr. Rawls. President of the Florida State Board of Trade;
Mr. Fuller, of the Tampa Board of Trade; Capt. Garner, of the Jacksonville Board of Trade; Col. W. P.
Corbett, Chairman of the Immigration Committee of the Jacksonville Board of Trade; Mr. Edwin Brob-
ston, whose efforts are well known in immigration work, and others. It will contain in a concise, paragraph
form "one thousand facts about Florida" for the quick reader who wants to know all about the State be-
fore visiting it. It will set forth the advantages of specific localities for specific purposes; for instance, the
fruit section, the vegetable section, the general farming section, and the opportunities offered by Florida
today for the location here of large maunfactories and smaller industries of all kinds. It will contain facts
of interest regarding the various towns and cities of the State, their adaptability and desirability, matters
of transportation, etc. It will deal with every phase of the labor question to attract desirable labor to this
State.
All in all, the edition is planned upon a most elaborate scale and is planned to cover every point of
interest that may appeal to the man who has his eye on Florida and to the man who is looking for a
desirable farming, manufacturing or business location in the South.
The editor-in-chief of the Industrial Record, Mr. J. A. Hollomon, will have directorship of all articles
prepared for this special number, and the detail preparation will be in the hands of a staff of competent
writers, already employed for that purpose.
This "Immigration Edition of the Industrial Record" will no doubt mark an epoch in trade journal-
ism in the South, and it is fitting that the Industrial Record should issue an edition of this kind, in view of
the fact that it is the exponent of the leading industrial and commercial organizations of the State, be-
ing the offial organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association, the Southeastern Cane Growers' Asso-
ciation, endorsed by the Georgia-Florida Sawmill Association, etc.
In preparing the data for this special Immigration Edition, much attention will be given in gather-
ing facts and figures which will prove valuable to the energetic and progressive organizations and private
cities in getting passed by the coming Legislature a bill creating an Immigration Department and in ask-
ing the Legislature to appropriate a liberal fund for carrying on this great work.
The Industrial Record will work hand in glove with the Florida State Board of Trade, and individual
boards of trade of the State, in their efforts to successfully solve the question of increasing the population
of the State with a desirable citizenship.


Cay L McCall
1M IN89u23a
L~onuo~iiata 3.~ih. bs


11


LIGHT SAW MILLS
SHINGEL AND LATH MACHINERY
AND SUPPLIES
Eathi* 8em ,. ritts m aipara.
Try
LOMBARD WORKS *
AOVIGTA. GEOIRIA.










JOSEPH ZAPF & CO


Wholesale Dealer in Ind BotUtl.a c
AN.HEUSER.-BUSCH
St. Louis Lager Beer

ilMr, WiNM, Miiai Wat
Write or Prices


TYPEWRITERS.
All M akes $10 Up.
Underwood No. 4 Good as
New $80.00
Oliver No. 3 New $75.00
Remington No. 6 New $75.00
GASH WNll ORDER


GRIVOT


THE BOND & BOURS CO.
WHO RESALE a LrETA.I

HARDWARE
SASH, DOORS, BLINDS, PAINTS.
Oils, Olass, Stoves, Tinware, Country Holloware.


Successful Men
appreciate, use and advise Life Insu-
rance. The advice of successful men
is worth following. Insure in
THE PRUDENTIAL '""&rOM' y
WALTLE P. CORIETTl, Maner, JOBN F. DRYVDEN, Press
40o West Wis. JskLsM Me Fla. se ffe. er


Jadusvif. L..
I6 W. Bay St.


20 VZAT MAY OTRJMT.


ISONVOWILLE. FLA








Schofield's Pumping Outfits.


Manufactured Especially for Turpentine Distilleries,
Plantations and Pumping Stations.


This cut
represents
the manner
of furnishing
water to'still
tub prior
to the invention
of an outfit
that has
met with
such universal
comnmendvtion.


Employing this
method of water
supply, is a sure
evidence o lack
of cool water, to
run the still a
full day, also
an inability to
secure the proper
quantity of spirits and
as well the purity
thereo-
KEEP FREH SUPPLY
OF WATER.


OLD WAY OF SUFHLYIG WATI.
No Distillery is Complete Without The SCHOFIELD
PUMPING OUTFIT.


In calling attention
to this Pumping
Outfit, we
have no hesitancy
in recommending
it to all Operators
as one of the most
valuable adjuncts
to their plants.
It is easy to operate,
simple, and will
pay for itself in
a short time.


They are made in
two sizes: No. 2
and No. 3. Larger
sizes furnished on
special order.
We have arranged
this season to take
care of your business
and to ship immedi-
ately on receipt
of orders.
Write for our cata-
logue and state what
size you want.
Write at once.


THE SIOFIELD OUTFIT.
We have made this one of our special studies and pride ourselves on having almost
every Operator in the Turpentine Belt using this Outfit.
We are also prepared to furnish Engines and Boilers of our own production, as well almost
anything around a saw mill, including saw mill itself.
WRITE US FOR PRICES, GIVING YOUR fULL WANTS.
Address the Manufacturers J. S. SCHOFIELD'S SONS CO., MACON, GA.


0f






GREENLEAF & CROSBY CO., 41 West Bay Street


Diamonds,
Watches,
Fine
Jewelry, ..
Clocks
Cut Glass -
Novelties-
Toilet
Articles,
Prompt
Attention -."
to
Mail Orders -'-e-
At the Sign of the Big Clock, - Jac
WRITE FOR CATALOGUE


Wedding
and
Anniver-
sary Gifts
Sterling
Silverware,
"1847
Rogers"
Plated Ware

Comparison
of Prices
Invited


ksonville,' Flo.


Half Tones-Zinc Etchings

Illustratina and Engravina Department


oF


THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of Commercial Work, Pamphlets, etc


I SPECIIT! IS 10[E OF B[SRINIG RTCCHINC 110 RERI,81IKOG FI(ECURIFHS IKR PICTURES.


IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED.


A Florida


Enterprise.


Try It.


0


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