<%BANNER%>
Weekly industrial record
ALL ISSUES CITATION SEARCH THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00200
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: November 22, 1906
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00200
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text


IU STRIA[

FORD


hYN AVAIS STORES,
LsvApERw % GEERAb
NI DVTRIAhF nFT1AtlIAhs
|5 NEWSPAPER


XII[
1~,


7-7 a21


)

2lo3 t
I


S00o
_^^3L


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


SAVANNAH, GA.


'~I
CI


F-,


L- ~L ;rl


IIR


1







CONSOLIDATED NAVAL STORES COMPANY.
Home Office: JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Branches: Savannah. Ga., and Pensacola, Fla.
OFFICERS.
W. POWELL, Prsudt; B. F. BULLahD, H. L COVINGTON, J. A. CRANFORD, D. H. MeMILLAN, B. R. POWELL, C. M COVINGTON, JOHN H.
POWELL, Vies Presdents; C. P. DUSENBURY, Secretary and Treasurer.
KECUTIVE COMMI'ITEE: W. C. Poweh, C. B. Rogers, H. L Oovington, B. F. Bullard, J. A. Cranford.
DIl. 'CORS: W. C. Lowell, B. F. Bullard, C. B. Rogers, J. A. Cranford, W. J. Hillman, John H. Powell, W. F. Comehman, EHL. Covington, C. Dowaing, D. H.
MeMllan, R. B. Powell, C. M. Covington, 8. A. Alford.


| NAVAL STORES FACTORS

Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
The "Consolidated" is purely a co-operative Company. Its interests are Identical with those
of the Producers. The patronage of turpentine operators everywhere Invited.
Two Million acres of land and Timber for sale on easy terms.
Producers are invited to call or correspond.


Success for


Is Success


C OVINGTON


Our Customers


for Us.


COMPANY,


SSHOES. DRY GOODS, W olesale
NOTIONS. . .. V OIA
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
1 sHtS, RY GODSWholsWB


McMillan Bros.


Southern Copper
Works
Manufacturers of TURPENTINE STILLS
Complete Outfits and Extra Kettles, Caps, Arms, Worms, Fur-
nace Doors and Grates always on hand
Old Stills taken if New Work a repairing done
payment for Win the country
Heavy Coppersmlthliu Steam Pipe ad Spelal Cepper Work
Jacksonville, Fla.
Ao Fayetteville, N. C. Savannah, Ga. Mobile, Ala.


0















WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL


RECORD.


PUPE W'J EVERY THURSDAY, DEVOTED TO NAVAL STORES. LNUMER AND MANUFACTURING I ir b I b


6depad Sep IL 8f. by As Illuende Ca m eld Tuwpmm Opiiiwrn. m a In fb 01! Q* mo.d SepL3 L902.ai Ammol. Cemfim. am O&Wl C0l0.ah do d Cdmoo Asldl~.io Adoo Sept,911 1l4
Ody 01 Om. Tolpoli Opm 0g Aneowdn& Adpbd Api 27.50U aCmt Ovn of hm6w. Cam Crowed Aind w oid by Gw "Sem Am. CeO& Suillinlmr ACuewwa o Amitolboo


Naval Stores Operators in Lake City Section

Form Local Organization,


A meeting of the Lake City Division of
Turpentine Operators' Association was
held at Lake City this week in the office
S of A. M. Morgan & Co.. with temporary
chairman, J. W. Hatcher, presiding; H.
M. Wilson, Secretary, and a permanent
organization was perfected.
The following constitution and by-laws
were adopted:
Cmaotituti.
Section 1. This organization shall be
known as the Lake City Division Turpen-
tine Operators' Association, and shall be a
part of and shall have its supreme head
in the General Association of Turlentine
Operators.
Sec. 2. Any individual or firm engaged
in the manufacture of naval stores shall
be eligible for membership in this Asso-
ciation.
Sec. 3. The place of meeting of this as-
sociation shall be at the Court House in
Lake City, Florida; regular meetings to be
held the first Wednesday in each month,
or whenever called for by the president
or vice-president.
See. 4. The officers of this Association
shall consist of a president vice-president,
secretary and treasurer to be elected at
the annual meetings, to hold office for one
year.
Sec. 5. It shall be the duty of the presi-
dent to preside at all meetings of this As-
sociation; appoint all committees, and
have general supervision of the affairs of
the Association. It shall be the duty of
the vice-president to preside and assume
all duties of the president in his absence.
It shall be the duty of the secretary and
treasurer to keep a record of the proceed-
ings of all meetings; keep a list of mem-
bers' names and addresses; to collect all
dues; to receive and pay out all moneys,
and to keep a record of same.
By-Lawn.
Section 1. All persons desiring to be-
come members of this Association shall be
enrolled on an enrollment sheet headed as
follows: We. the undersigned, hereby be-
come members of the Lake City Division
Turpentine Operators' As*ieiation, and
pledge ourselves to be governed by its
constitution and by-laws and all resolu-
tions and proceedings of the same.
See. 2. Each person enrolling as a mem-
ber shall pay to the secretary the sum of
Five Dollars for each still owned or ope-
rated by him. and a like sum each year
thereafter, in advance.
Sec. 3. The order of the business shall
be as follows:
1st. Call to order by presiding offleer.
2nd. Roll call by the secretary.
3rd. Reading of the minutes by the
secretary.
4th. Confirmation of the minutes.
5th. Repor: of standing committees.
6th. Unfinished business.
7th. New business.
8th. Adjournment,


Election of officers resulted as follows:
president, J. W. Hatcher, Lake City, Flor-
ida; vice-president, A. M. Morgan, White
Springs, Florida; secretary and treasurer,
H. M. Wilson, Brown, Florida.
The following resolutions were adopted
and subscribed to by every operator pres-
ent:
1st. le it resolved that we pay not ex-
ceeding 134c per box for box-cutting the
coming season unless otherwise directed by
this Association.
2nd. Be it hereby resolved and incorpo-
rated in the by-laws of this Association:
(a) That we advance no money to
! hands except in case of actual distress.
(h) That we pay no accounts for hands,
nor allow our employes to do so, without
the written consent of his former employer,
accompanied by a written and signed state-
ment of account.
3rd. Resolved, That all the members of
this Association use Saturday, December
8th, as pay day, and pay off every second
Saturday thereafter.

Fach member was appointed a commit-
tee of one to personally see every operator
in his vicinity not already a member, and
urge him to become a member of this As-
sociation, and a copy of the enrollment
sheet to be furnished each one for signa-
tures of those desiring to become members.
Adjournment.

PAPER READ BY CAPT. PURSE ON SU-
GAR PRODUCTION IN THE SOUTH.
One of the interesting features of the
convention of the Southern States Asso-
ciation of Commissioners of Agriculture
Tuesday afternoon nwas a paper by Capt.
D. G. Purse, of Savannah, president of the
Interstate Sugar Cane (rowers' Associa-
tion, on Sugar Production in the Southern
States and the Possible Return of Florida
to Leadership in the Production of That
Staple.
Capt. Purse is well known in Florida
and has always taken a deep interest in
the welfare of the State. Ilis views on
the production of sugar in this State are of
particular interest as lie is considered an
authority on the subject. His paper, in
full, was as follows:
Capt. Purse's Paper.
Mr. Pre-ident, Mlnile:-s of convention .
Ladies and Gentlemen.-louisiana for a
century has been the chief. andi much of
that time. tle only never failing contin-
uous source, contril'iting tlhe South'., quIo-
ta to the world's available cane sugar sup-
ply.
In the first quarter of the last century,
(eorg-a gave great promise of lining up
-.i h Louisiana in contributing the South's


for her, as a sugar producing State.
As early as 1767, twenty-seven years
before Etteine DeBore's successful experi-
ments in producing cane sugar in Louis-
iana, Sir Alexander Duncan and Dr. Sam-
uel Turnbull organized a company and
brought a colony of immigrants, gathered
from the western islands of the Mediter-
ranean. planted them upon the Halifax
river, founded New Smyrna, the sole ob-
ject of this venture being to cultivate su-
gar can for the production of sugar, and
tile cultivation of indigo as a companion
crop. both products for European con-
sumption. Thus Florida is entitled to the
honor of having been the first common-
wealth, within the present federal union,
into whose soil the sugar cane was trans-
planted from its native habitat.
Increasing DEmand.
The ever increasing consumptive demand
shown by the hundreds of millions paid
out for the products of foreign countries,
in some single years exceeding $100,000,-
000, so inadequate has been domestic pro-
duction for meeting this demand, though
supplemented by the sugar from the beet,
the United States today being the largest
sugar consuming country in the world, and
second only to Great Britain in her per
capital.
The inadequacy of domestic supply con-
tinues, notwithstanding tle absorption of
the Sandwich Islands, Porto Rico and the
Phillipines.
Sugar. strange as it may sound, is the
only important agricultural produdet for
which this country pays tribute to foreign
plans, though home production of both the
cane and the beet are fostered by import
for sugar in the United States is best
duties. and every encouragement afforded
to encourage and increase production; the
inducements have imparted a keen stimu-
lation to beet production where science has
outstripped itself, through selection and in
scientific farming, in imparting a saccha-
rine iehness of the beet exceeding its av-
era,:- in the cane. Seemingly, less attrac-
tive to since. until in very recent years.
tile .'inm impulse has not been given to
the 1 '1vtiation of sugar cane on a commer-
cial I:-is. and its area has continued re-
stricted within the borders of Louisiana
as a -rse for sugar, save in a limited de-
velo ,m- ent in Texas, and with these condi-
tions c fronting us we approach today,
the question of the South's possible future
in contributing to the emancipation of
the I'nitedl States from foreign countries
in providing for her con-umptive demand
for sugar.
Scil and Climate Adapted.
The soil and climate of tile southeastern
part of Sruth (arolina and southern (eor-
gia. Alal',o'a and Mi isissiippi and the
w'lole State of Fori:la. are admirably
adapted to ihe production of sugar cane
high in sugar contents; in fact. several
years ago. Dr. W. C. Stubbs, a distinguish-
ed -E'entist and sugar expert of New Or-


juota. and in the last decade. Texas has leans. reporting upon several hundred
nade. rapid strides in the cultivation of analyses of canes drawn from these states.
-ane for sugar making, and her climate said that the average sugar content in
and soil justify the expectation of her them was fully twenty-five per cent higher
agriculturists that there is a bright future than in the cane produced in the rich al-


luvial bottoms of Louisiana, and that
from a previous visit to these sections,
lie could add that the cultivation was ae-
complll' ed at one-half the cost required
in Louisiana, with an equal tonnage to the
acre under equally intelligent cultivation;
and this testimony stands today as when
uttered without one change.
The Industry in Florida.
The sugar industry in Florida spread
over tile entire State from the seed plant-
ed at New Smyrna by Duncan and Turn-
bull. and. if we may judge from the ruins
of sugar houses over southern and western
Florida. it was at its zenith from 1861 to
18t3. and after the capture of New Or-
leans by Gen. Butler, was the Confed-
eracy's chief source of domestic supply un-
til federal gunboats destroyed the exten-
sive G:amble and Braiden plantations and
sugar plants on the Manatee river. At
:le time, it is said, Mr. Gamble had thir-
teen hundred acres and Dr. Braiden four
hundred acres in sugarcane for sugar mak-
ing.
The Gamble and Braiden sugar plants
were only two of many, but were appar-
ently the most pretentious and conspic-
uous. The late David L. Yules, a dis-
tinguished citizen of Florida, and an ex-
United States senator, also had large in-
vestments in the sugar industry on the
Suwannee river, and possibly at other
points.
In the present year analyses have been
made of Manatee cane, planted in 1906,
as it continued to grow in the open field
up to last May; samples being cut and
forwarded to Washington in the months of
December, 1905, and January, February,
March and April of this year. The analy-
ses of these samples sustain those made in
1902. and show that a uniform richness is
preserved; from December to May, afford-
ing a grinding season equal to Cubs; a
most indispensable consideration in sugar-
making to obtain the best results.
'The Manatee river section seems to be
Ibut the type of a large area in Florida,
adapted to the profitable cultivation of
cr;ie for sugar.
Development of ladaltry.
The development of a sugar industry in
Southern Florida. cannot but possess a
keen interest for every member of this
convention. 1l-cause it would be reflected
upon tlhe cane cultivation in each of the
States here repr.- ente-l. and though it may
not make all of them sugar producing
States. it will strengthen their position as
syrup producers and hasten the work ef
science in developing a hardier variety of
cane, or lrick-ning the maturity of those
now cultivated.
In is iwx diversification of crops, no
product ( f t'Uc South is entitled to more
tonsideratilI as a companion money crop
for cotton than sugar cane, for in the lan-
niage of D)r. Wiley and others, who have
l;estowe:l imuch study upon tile subject, the
South has it at her command to domi-
nate the table syrup market of this coun-
try. the product of the maple being too lim-
ited in supply to be esteemed a competi-
tor.









4 TTEP WEEKLY INPITSTRTAL RECORD.


KEELEY INSTITUTE.

It Is Removed from Riverside to East
Jaekenville.
ThI Keeley Institute of Florida has been
fmedved from the old location on Stockton
add Park streets, RiveF-side, to the resi-
dence of Dr. J. N. Taylor, No. 1016 East
Duval street, and Dr. Taylor succeeds Dr.
Sengstack as physician in charge.
Aft. B. B. Tatum, of Miami, one of the
largest stockholders in the Keeley Insti-
tute of Florida, and largely through whose
fSfofls A brigttth of this idatitution was
installed in Jacksonville, was in the city
and superintended the moving of the insti-
tute, its appliances, etc.
Dr. Taylor, who has just returned from
Dwight, Ill., where he took a special course
of study in the treatment of inebriates,
under the physicians at the parent insti-
tute, will now Le in full charge of the
work, and will devote his entire time to
the treatment of the patients. His spac-
ious and commodious home will be thrown
open to the patients wh come for treat-
ment, and they will have full use of the
library, parlors, etc.
A laboratory has been installed and all
appliances for preparing the treatment
have beeit placed therein; The institute
is fully equipped, and the great success
that has marked the first year of its his-
tory in Flotida will undoubtedly be greatly
increased during the ensuing year.
Dr; Taylor is enthusiastic regarding the
work, and believes that untold good will
be accomplished through it.
The new physician in charge is well
known in Jacksonville, and in addition to
his reputation as a physician, he is well
known because of his philanthropic work.
For years he has been engaged in the work
of bettering men, and has given special at-
tention to young boys and to preparing
them to become useful citizens' His Boys'
CJubs, the first of which was organized
more than ten years ago, are well and
favorably known, and he waste the prime
mover in the organization of the local
lod ge of the Boys of Woodcraft.
Dr. Taylor was for some time in charge
of the county hospital, where he made an
enviable record.
Dr. Taylor is also proprietor of a drug
store, and all medicines used at the Keeley
Institute will be prepared, under his per-
sonal direction and supervision, at this
drug store, thus insuring that the patients
get only the best medicines and treatment.
Thirty-six patients have been treated at
the Florida Keeley Institute during the
past year. Just at present there are no
patients here for treatment, though the
applications for entrance have been filed
by three. These were held up until the
institution had been moved to its new
quarters, but they will now be admitted
at once.
Within the next few weeks Dr. Taylor
w:ll.send out circulars telling of the work
of the institute, showing what has been
accomplished here and elsewhere during
the past year, and will ask the co-operation
and assistance of business and professional
men in sending victims of the drink and
drug habits, who really wish to reform, to
the institute for treatment.
An able corps of assistants, including a
housekeeper and trained nurses, will be
secured at once, and every care and at-
tention will be given the patients.


Walter Mucklow,
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


BUYER'S DIRECTORY
| U JJXQ LAII^ 1t^X


ACCOUITANTS.
. G Htchinson. .-acksonville, Fla.
Walter Muckldw, Jacksonville, Fla.
AXES.
Briggs Hardware Co., Valdosta, Ga.
BANKS.
commerciall Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Florida Bank and Thtist Co., Jackamnvillm
Fla.
BEER-WHOLESALE.
Chas. Blum & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
.oseph Zapf & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
BOILERS.
ltoyd's Portable Fireplace, Valdosta, Ga.
BOXES AND CIAT1S.
uiminer I.umber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
BRICK.
<.,uthern Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jack-
sonville, Fla.
CLOTHING.
'raig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
COPPER SMITHS.
McMilla Btothers, Jacksoaille, Savan-
nah and Mobile
COOPERAGE.
tooperage Co. the, Jacksonville, pia.

DRUGS.
Vm. D. Jones. Jaeksonville. Fla.
C. C. Bettes, Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS-WHOLESALE.
Croover-Stewart Drug Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.

DRY GOODS--WHOLESALE.
I'n.ington Co. The. Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGINES.
\lerrill-Kttevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
-*chofleld's Sons Co.. J. S., Macon, Ga.
Lombard Iron Works and Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
FIREPLACES.
Boyd's Portable Fireplace, Valdosta, Ga.
FERTILIZERS.
Ioui', & CO., Wm. A., Jacknoeville, Fla.
FOUDRIES.
'-holield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
FUEL.
'-lnher Fuel & Supply Co. The, Jack-
-inville. Fla.

GENTS' FURNISHERS.
'raig & Bro. .1. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
Con-.lidated Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
larckonville Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
Young Co., John R.. Savannah, Ga.
GAS AND GASOLINE ENGINES.
Hicks Gas Motor Co., Waycross, Ga., and
Detroit. Mich.
HARDWARE.
Bond & Bours Co. The, Jacksonville. Fla.
Irig., 'HV. Hardware Co., Valdosta. (;
Tran,m-t Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co.. J. D.. Savannah. Ga-

HAY AND JRAIII.


HOTELS.
Travelers' Hotel, Jacksonvill, Fa.
Aragon The, Jacksonv:!ie Fla.
Fifth Avenue Hotel, Nre York, N. Y.
Telford Hotel, White Springs, Fla.
IRON WORKS.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schoield's Sons Co., J. 8., Macon, Ga.

INSURANCE
Prudential Life, Walter P. Corbett, Mgr.
Jacksonville, Fla.
Cay & McCall, Jacksonville, Fla.

JEWELERS.
(reenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
KEELEY INSTITUTES.
Keeley Institute, Jacksonville, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Blum & Co., Chas., Jacksonville, Fla.
Altmayer & Flatau Liquor Co., Maeon, Ga.
Joseph Zapf & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
MEDICINES.
Spencer Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tean.
MACHINE WORKS
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
Lomlbar(t Iron Works, Augusta, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR TURPENTINE PRO-
CESS.
Schofleld's Sons Co.. J. S., Macon, Ga.
METAL WORKERS.
McMillan Broa. Co, Jackbavil, Savan-
nab and Mobile.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga., and Pensa-
cola, Fla.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weedl & Co.. J. D., Savannah, Ca.
Malsby Machinery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Briggs Hardware Co., Valdosta, Ga.
NAVAL STORES.
Peninsular Naval Stores Co., Tampa, Fla.
Barnes & Jessup Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
Standard Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville.
Fla.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
West Fynn-Harris Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.
Willinms Co., J. P., Savrnnah, Ga.
Youn" Co., John R., Savannah, Ga.
Southern States Naval Store Co., Savan-
nah. Ga
PAINTS
Rond & Rours Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Faam!-a Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.

PLUMBERS.
Coons & Golder, Jacksonville, Fla.
PUMPS.
Merrill-Stevens Co.. J.lnksonville. Fla.
Schlfielhi's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.

RAILROADS.
Atlantic Coast l.ine.

REAL ESTATE.
,-,lroton, Fendie & Co., Jacksonville, Fa.
l.i ir:--ton & Sons, J. H., Ocala. Fla.
Deen Realty & Improvement Co., Way-
cross, Ga.
Florida Realty Co., Jacksonville, Fla.


Fours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla. SEEDS.
B,,"i- & Co., Wm. A...Jacksonville, Fla.
HATS. SHIP YARDS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksarnv!, r la. Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville Fla.
Stadard Cla thk Co., Jacakoavil, 'l, M)rrill-Steven a Co., Jakaomaville, fk


SHOE -WHOLESALE.
Covington Co. Te, JaekeovilHe, Ms.
Joe. Roemheim & ons, Saraimah, Ga.
STICAMSBIP&
Clyde steamship Co. Tb, New York City.

TANKS.
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
Schofeld's Sons Co., J. 8., Mason, Ga.

TuPAuIIUma STILLS
Baker. M. A., Brunswick, Ga., and Pensa-
cola, Fla.
McMilla Brethers .C, .Jacksonvill,
Savannah sad Mobile.

TuiP uinlm STILL TUBK
Davis & Son, G. M, Palatka, FL

auuPEmTINK VATS
Davis & on, G. M, Palatks, Fl.

TUPEZUIhls TOOLS
Council Tool Co., Jacksotville, Fla.

VEHICLa AND HARNESS
Vehicle and Harness Co., Jacksonville, Fa

WATCHES.
Greenleaf & Chosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hen & Slager, Jacksonville, Fl.


YELLOW PINE LUMBER.
Cummer Lumber Co, Jaekonville, Fla.
East Coast lumber Co, Watertowa. F




WHISKIES

GINS AND RUMS
FROM

$1.50 to$5.00 per Gallon
......AGENCY FOR......
Lewis 1866 and Meont Verner
Pure Rye WkbUsls.
Controllers Blum's Monogram ae dSyl-
van Bye-Agents for Jungst Cincin-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Been.
Prices on application.

CHAS. BLUM & CO.
517 and 1S9 WEST BAY STREET
JACsSONV.ILL PL A.



Coons & Oolder

Turpentine Operators on

Pipe, Boilers and Pumps

EzWl kril ca MW -emr
22 W. Adam Str JacksevlMe, FlB


Frank 0. Miller & Co.
419 Weat may st., JackaeMlUl ila.
--- Po0.1cI 1217
SOLE AGENT FOR
Now Hom*, Whito. Domemtic Lnd
Standard
SEWING MACHINES
pOPyLU PmclC EASY PAYMENTS


r - -r-









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


Peonage Trial at Pensacola Makes Slow Pro'

gress but End is Near,


Pensacola, Nov. 16.-The United States
court room was crowded during today to
hear the second day's proceedings in the
famous peonage cases originating at the
Jackson Lumber Company, at Lockhart,
Ala.
The case on trial is that of Manager W.
8. Harlan, et al., charged with conspiracy
to commit peonage, and throughout the
proceeding counsel for defense made ob-
jection to admitting testimony, especially
to that portion occurring at Lockhart,
in Alabama, but these objections were in-
variably overruled.
Satterwhite Teteisa.
S The first witness of any importance to
testify was J. C. Satterwhite, a telegraph
operator, employed by the company at
Lockhart. He told of taking telegrams
over the wire during July from John At-
well, a deputy sheriff of Walton county,
Fla., addressed to W. 8. Harlan, and ask-
ing if the latter desired two foreigners
who were near Laurel Hill. H sent reply
signed by Harlan, in which the latter told
Atwell to hold the men and they would be
sent for.
Johin Atwell, the deputy, was then
placed on the stand and identified copy of
message received by him, stating that he
followed the two foreigners and overtook
them about seven miles from Laurel Hill.
He was talking to the two men on the
road when two men, one of whom he said
was Harlan, drove up in a buggy. Two
dogs were also in the buggy, and Callagher
got out and came to where thu were
standing. He remarked something about
not the right men, and proceeded to kick
one of the foreigners twice. The two for-
eigners then went with Gallagher to the
buggy and drove oc together back to the
camp. Witness admitted he told the for-
eigners that it would look better if they
owed the company anything to go back
and work it out. He also stated that Gal-
lagher had said something about a watch
being stolen, but no one had a warrant or
process to arrest the men. Said he got
five dollars for the service. He had been
requested before to stop men, but had
never done it.
Jorinam' Story.
Manuel Jordmans, a Bulgarian, told by
far the most harrowing tale. He had been
employed in New York with the under-
standing he was to work in a brickyard.
When he arrived at Lockhart he was
placed at work in building a railroad track.
He worked for two days at this, being
compelled to sleep on the ground at nights,
and procure his food from a car. He at-
tempted to run away, but ws caught and
brought back and Woods Foreman Gal-
Slagher took him in hand. He was taken
into the office, where Gallagher beat him
over the head and body and kicked him
about the limbs, all the while holding a
revolver pointed at his head. He could
not work, although told to do so, as the
beating was too severe. He exhibited to
the court and jury an ugly scar upon his
leg, which he claimed was the result of
.he kicks administered by Gallagher.
Charles Hads, an Austrian, was then
sworn and told of seeing the beating of
the Bulgarian. He, too, had been whipped
and kicked, he said, upon several occas-
ions, by the boaes, and had seen several
other men b atpe by the bosses. One man


particularly, he said, was beaten nearly
every day. He was known in the camp
as "square head."
John Foster, an employee, told of one
day seeing Gallagher beating the Bulgarian
as he was coming from dinner. Galla-
gher was walking behind the Bulgarian,
kicking and beating him, and he heard
him say at the time: "I will learn you
how to run away."
Other testimony was introduced during
the day which was almost as bad. Most
of the witnesses during the day were for-
eigners. who had formerly been employed
in the camps, and who had come down from
New York early in June, all being employ-
ed there by an employment bureau, and
promised different work from that which
they were given.
Pensacola. Nov. 17.-The trial of the
to commit peonage opened today with the
testimony of John Foster, his testimony
not being finished the day previous. He
added nothing to the testimony already
reported.
Other witnesses were John Davis, Ar-
thur Buckley and John Smith, all former
employes of the Jackson Lumber Company,
who testified to the treatment accorded
the men of the camp, to whippings and
other cases of abuse.
Justice of the Peace James .Tohnson,
who told of methods employed by the com-
pany to make the men sign contract to
work out alleged indebtedness, C. L, Mo-
nacky. whose testimony was along the
same lines as that of Justice Johnson, and
C. Frank Dunky. a former employee of the
company, who told of the whipping of
Minaly. to which he was a witness.
Judge Joseph Johnson, of Florala. near
Lockhart. proved an interesting witness,
relating that the men had been arrested
and brought before him charged with ob-
taining money by false pretenses or violat-
ing their contracts by not paying back
passage money. One man, Barsol. was ar-
rested upon the latter charge. He issued
the warrant, but the charge was with-
drawn by the boss when the man signed a
contract agreeing to work.
Another. C. Crum, was arrested upon
the same charge. and prosecution stopped'
when he signed a contract.
William Keller, of New York, one of tl,
men engaged at a labor agency in that
city. was then called. He left New York
in June in company with a number of
others for Lockhart, Ala. Witness con-
tracted to work for the Jackson Lumber
Company at $1.05 per day in a mill. The
party was met at Ravannah by Gallagher
and put on a train for Loekhart. At Fort
Valley. Ga.. he and several others attempt-
ed to escape. and got as far as the next
station below, nine miles away, where the
party was captured by a deputy sheriff and
brought back. The officers were armed
with Winchester rifles. The sheriff was at
Fort Valley when they were brought back
and gave the men the option of going to
Lockhart or on the chain gang. The sheriff
then turned the men over to Gallagher.
At the car Gallagher asked the sheriff if
"These are the five," and later said "Take
them to jail."
The sheriff then whispered to Gallagher,
and the latter told the men to get in the
car. Upon reaching Lockhart witness was
put to work at a lumber camp. Witness


We Have It!

Everything that tended to make your home comfortable and your
surroundings pleasant

Do You Need Housefurnishings?

We carry the most complete line of Furniture, Mattings, Rugs, etc., to be found
in the State, at very moderate prices. A visit will be appreciated.

The E. E. Cleveland Furniture Co.
Jackm ville, Florida


saw a Bulgarian at the camp with Galla-
gher. Gallagher had a gun in one hand,
and struck him with the other and kicked
him. Gallagher said to the Bulgarian, "I'll
fix you for running away." The Bulgarian,
when he came out of the car, could hardly
walk.
C. Frank Dunky, second foreman, testi-
fied to two Germans being brought back
to camp who had run away, and seeing
Gallagher strike one twice with a whip.
Dr. Grace had threatened to give others
a pair of blue eyes if he did not go to
work.

Pensacola, Nov. 19.-The most damaging
evidence yet to be adduced against the
defendant in the now famous peonage
cases yas brought out today, when the
government, still introducing witnesses,
put on the stand a Hungarian, and later
two ladies. One man had been captured
upon the highways of Florida, held at the
paint of a revolver and beaten with a
horsewhip, while the two ladies had wit-
nessed the horsewhipping.
It was the fourth day of the trial of
W. S .Harlan, et al., charged with con-
spiracy to commit peonage, and when
court opened for the morning session the
prosecution stated that there was no case
against Jeb. S. Howell, indicted jointly
with Harlan and others for conspiracy,
and requested the court to instruct the
jury at the proper time to return a ver-
dict.


Mrs. Paul, a lady residing by the road
near Laurel Hill, Fla., told the court of
seeing the men in a buggy overtake a
foreigner near her home last July. The
men were in a buggy, and two of them
got out, and while one pointed a revolver
at the foreigner the other beat hiln with
a whip. And later they went oc down
the road with one of the men holding the
foreigner. She asked one of the men when
they were whipping the foreigner what
they were doing it for, and he replied that
he had stolen something.
Mrs. Elizabeth Gibson, a lady residing
near Mrs. Paul, had also seen the beating
of the foreigner on the highway.
Dr. Craig, a physician of Larel Hill,
had met Gallagher and others on the day
they had whipped the foreigner, and Dr.
Craig had said: "Hello, Bob, who are you
looking for?" and Gallagher had replied:
"This thing," pointing to the foreigner.
Something of the bloodhounds kept by the
company was told by Alex Norman, a for-
mer employee, who said he knew Harlan.
Witness said that the bloodhounds were
kept in an enclosure in Harlan's yard, and
around the first enclosure was a second,
which was made of very high boards, and
inside of which were three small dogs,
which were kept there at al times. $t
was the understanding that the blood-
hounds were kept to trail men.

Pensacola, Nov. 20.-The model lumber
(Continued on page 8.


RIXFORD TURPENTINE AXES


Are the best, beware

of imitations or "the

just as good" kind. If

you want the best or-

der the genuine article

from


W. H. Briggs Hardware Co.

Sole Southern Agents


VALDOSTA, GEORGIA

Jobbers of Mill and Turpentine Supplies.


MR


~.;r;r;r;~;;~i;~,-~.~c~E~,arr~rrr;rrc


XKS^WMUUHUUK

A


I
mnnnau





6 THE W3 TKIiY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Industrial Record


Publishing Co.
I z


A4


A


PUBLISHERS


A:


PRINTERS


AM


Industrial Record Buildiag, corner Bay and Newnan Streets.


With one of the largest and best equipped
South and with a full complement of skilled
to execute high class work promptly and at


printing plants in the
labor, we are prepared
reasonable prices.


No Job too Large or too Small for our Careful Attention


A Section of the Record's Big Press Room. A Corner of the Composing Room.
V.N%'% % MM
tW00








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


PLAN AGRKED 0O BY THE BANKERS.

Washington, Nov. 15.-The plan of cur-
reney reform agreed upon by the commit-
tee of the American Bankers' Association
and the New York Chamber of Commerce,
upon which they have been at work for
four days, was made public today. The
conclusions reached were unanimous, and
will be submitted in the form of a report
to the members consisting of the American
Bankers' Association.
A committee was appoitned consisting
of Mr. Hepburn, James Forgan of Cbica-
go, and John L. Hamilton of Hoopstown,
l1., to whom was instructed the drafting
of a bill for presentation to Congress which
will embody the ideas expressed in the
statement made public by the committee
of bankers today.
The plan agreed upon by the two com-
mittees contemplates the issue under gov-
S ernment supervision of credit bank notes
by national banks equal to 40 per cent of
their bond-secured circulation, subject to
a tax of 21, per cent per annum; an au-
tomatic increase of credit notes under cer-
tain conditions, a further issue of credit
notes equal to 12% per cent of a bank's
capital at a tax of 5 per cent per annum;
the establishment of a guarantee fund fro
the redemption of credit notes of failed
banks; provision for active daily redemp-
tion of credit notes; repealing existing
law. limiting the retirement of bond-se-
cured notes to $3,000,000 per month and
the deposit of all public moneys above
reasonable working balances in national
banks without collateral security on which
the banks are to pay 2 per cent.
es of Change Imperative.
The statement is made in the report
agreed upon that there is unanimity of
opinion that changes in the existing bank
note system are imperatively required and
that the present volume of bank notes is
wholly unresponsive to the demands of
commerce.
The report sets out a series of princi-
ples which were agreed upon by the bank-
ers and which they believe underly a "cor-
rect solution" of the currency problem, so
far as it relates to the issue of a bank note
currency. The report says:
"We therefore unanimously recommend
the enactment into law of the following,
having the firm conviction that thereby
will be provided a bank note currency,
safe beyond peradventure, and automati-
cally varying in volume as needs of com-
merce vary.
May la- Credit otes.
First. Credit bank notes: Any national
bank having been actively doing business
for one year and having a surplus fund
equal to 20 per cent of its capital, shall
have authority to issue credit notes as
follows, subject to the rules and regula-
tions to be determined by the controller of
the currency:
,(a). An amount equal to 40 per cent
of its bond-secured circulation, subject to
a tax at the rate of 2% per cent per
apnum upon the average amount out-
standing. Provided that if at any time in
the future the present proportion of the
total outstanding unmatured United
States bonds to the total capitalization of
all going national banks shall diminish,
then the authorized issue of credit notes
shall be increased to a correspondingly
greater percentage of its bond-secured
notes.
(b). A further amount equal to 12%
per cent of its capital subject to a tax at
lbe rate of 5 per cent per annum upon the


average amount of outstanding in excess
of the amount first mentioned.
The total of credit notes and bond-se-
cured notes shall not exceed the capital.
The Carrying of Reserves.
Second. Reserve: The same reserves
shall be carried against credit notes as
are now required by law !to be carried
against deposits.
Third. Guaranty fund: The taxes pro-
vided upon credit notes shall be paid in
gold to the treasurer of the United States
and shall constitute a guaranty fund for.
the redemption of notes of failed banks
and for the payment of the expenses of
printing and the cost of redemption. In
order that the guaranty fund may be
ample fro mthe beginning, any bank mak-
ing application to take out credit ntes for
issue shall deposit with the treasurer of
the United States in gold an amount equal
to 5 per cent thereof. The unused portion
of this initial payment shall be an asset
of the contributing banks respectively, and
shall be refunded from time to time when
this may be done without reducing the
guaranty fund below an amount equal to
5 per cent of the credit notes taken out.
Sixth. All public money above a reason-
able working balance, from whatever
source derived, shall be currently deposited
from day to day in national banks with-
out requiring collateral security or spec-
ial guaranty thereof, but in no case shall
the balance carried with any bank exceed
50 per cent of the capital thereof. All
banks receiving such public moneys on
deposit shall pay into the United States
Treasury interest thereon at the rate of
2 per cent per annum."

Fire at Chumuckla.
News reached here this morning from
Chumuckla, about thirty miles from Pen-
sacola, of the destruction there by fire
yesterday of two fine turpentine stills, the
property of the Panona Naval Stores Com-
pany, a branch of the Escambia Land and
Manufacturing Company, of this city, to-
gether with about 100 barrels of crude
gum. One convict escaped from the stock-
ade during the confusion incident to the
fire. One of the employes fired up both of
the stills at the same time, and while lie
was attending to one the other became
too hot and the cap exploded. Both were
under the same shed and were burned, en-
tailing a los of about $7,000.









LIGHT SAW MILLS
SHINGLE AND LATH MACHINERY
AND SUPPLIES
Engm Bseero rittimls ard Repars
Try
LOMBARD WORKS
AUGUSTA. GEORIGIA.


^te4 \O I


J. A. Craig (< Bro.

239 W. Bay Street EVERETT BLOCK.

Leaders in Men'u and Boys' Fine Cloth-
Sin and Up-to-Date Furnishings.

Agents for Dunlap and Steteon Hats; largest stock in the City.




THE COMMERCIAL BANK
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. Branches: Ocala S a Lake City
The largest leading State Bank in Jacksonville. Is conducted in an old.
fashioned strictly conservative manner and is subject to regular examination

tu'Individual and "Savings Accounts solicited.
H. ROBINSON, W. B. OWEN, H. GAILLAD,
PresidMt. Vice-Premidbt. Ct a .





i Standard Clothing Company :


One Price


* 9
a
0 *.


One Price


" FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS, :
S17 amd 19 West Bay Street, JdkovMb, FPni
* Stteen and Hawes Hats. Special AtteAnte Gven to Mil Orders.
*iiitliilll I SiitlU i1i111111110Sll Slm llllllll

H. E. PRITCHETT, Pres. P. L UTHERLAND, Vie-Pres. A. D. OOVIGTON, See'y
J. P. COUNCIL. Treas sad Gm'I Mgr.

THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.,
General Office: JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Factory: WANNANISH, N. C.

Milafa tuers r mfHI araM Tr



W. W. Cane, Pno. W. C. Thooua, Manaer. S. Croa, USa. ao Tarm .


Tampa Hardware Co.

Wholesale

: Hardware

Turpentine. Mill aind Phosphate Supplies.


TAMPA. FLORIDA.
,.*. I o114toof***I I i aiN48iO9II816 Ii11lose II


B. B. TATUM, Pres.


J. L. WALLA CE, Vice-Pres. G. STONE, Seey-Trwe


Keeley Institute,
irnerpmr td 5.%500 GaSl tl .
A branch of the original Leslie RE Keeley Institute of Dwight, Ill, has just beem
opened 't coiner of Park and Stockton Streets in Riverside, where a splendid
building, equipped with all the comforts and conveniences of a modern home or
sanitarium has been secured And is ready for the reception of patients in need of
treatment for-
WHISKY, OPIUM, MORPHINE, COCAINE, TOBACCO OR CIGARETTE HABITS
Write for full Information as to treat ment, terms, ete.
KEELEY INSTITUTE OF FLORIDA.
Telephone No. 553. Janevu5, as.


---~








8 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


(Continued from page 5.)
manufacturing plant of the South, where
Americans and foreigners are treated alike,
can come and depart as they choose and
where the food and sleeping accommoda-
tions are above the average found where
so many men are employed. Such was
the testimony adduced in the case of W.
S. Harlan, et al., charged with conspiracy
to commit peonage.
It was the fifth day of taking testimony
in this celebrated case, and early in the
forenoon, the government rested its case.
District Attorney Sheppard reserving the
right to introduce secondary evidence to
prove a certain contract between the
Jackson Lumber Company and one of their
employes, who, it is alleged, was forced to
sign a contract to work out a debt.
The defense then introduced its first wit-
ness, Frank Hall, a man who had been in
the employ of the company for some
length of time, and who had always been
treated properly by the bosses and man-
agement and had no complaint whatever
to make. He had slept in the cars pro-
vided for some of the men, where the bed-
ding was good and cleaner than found at
any other mill, while the pay was satis-
factory.
Pat Murphy, a former employee of the
company, and one of the crowd to come
down from New York was a witness, and
when he decided to quit no one had at-
tempted to stop him or interfere with him
in the least. All during the period that
he was employed by the company he had
been perfect yfree to go as he pleased,
and to return to the camps whenever he
chose. He had never seen any foreigner or
anyone else, for that matter, beaten,
abused or mistreated, and no one had ever
gone about armed with revolvers, as claim-
ed, and only one time during his stay with
the company did he see a weapon, and that
was carried by a man named "Big Harry."
At one time, he stated, an extra watch-
man was placed on duty to watch a car
containing some laborers, but this was done
because there was some stealing going on
in the camp. The food was good and the
sleeping accommodations satisfactory.
John Collins Testiiea.
John Collins, who for two years had been
in the employ of the company, stated that
he had never seen any one beaten at the
camp, and that no distinction was made
bLeween the foreigners and Americans.
Their food was the same, the work the
same, and their sleeping accommodations
alike.
When questioned regarding the state-
ment of one Mihaly that the latter had
been brought back to the camp and beaten,
witness said that he was not at the camp
on that date, and consequently knew noth-
ing of it, but he had heard some workmen
talking of it afterwards.
John Holichan, a Hungarian, who came
south with the foreigners from New York,
said that he was satisfied with his treat-
ment. He reached Lockhart in July with
the others, and was placed at work build-
ing a railroad track; slept in cars with
others, and got his food at the dining
car. The sleeping accommodations were
clean and satisfactory, and the food plen-
tiful.
When questioned regarding the work-
man, Hass, being beaten, he knew nothing
of it, but said Hass did not: want to work
and as soon as he got a square meal want-
ed to go to sleep.
William Talbot's Tale.
William Talbot was from New York, bat
came down with a lot of workmen. He
had worked continuously at the camps of


the Jackson Lumber Company and thought
conditions, food, bedding, etc., were all
first-class. He knew a night watchman
was on duty all the time, but thought he
was there to attend to early morning du-
ties, such as feeding horses, firing engines,
etc., but never went armed. Absolute rfee-
dom was enjoyed by all, no restrictions at
all being placed on anyone. Witness said
lie knew McGinnis, a man who figured in
the prosecution, and said he was a ruffian,
being troublesome all the way from New
York. He would steal, also, witness de-
clared.
"McGinnis is the man alleged to have
been beaten by Gallagher. He was one
of the four who got away from the county
jail after being locked up there for steal-
ing."
Witness attributed any dissatisfaction
to fault of the crowd of men who would
get drunk, lounge around the car and re-
fuse to work.
Lewis Mayne, who was one of the watch-
men around the cars, and who, it was
sworn to by the prosecution, was an
"armed guard," was next called. Mayne
said he was ordered only to look after the
men in the cars, and that was to watch
for McGinnis, who was accused of having
stolen clothing, and who, for a long time
had been suspected of pilfering. Witness
gave accommodations the same good name
as had preceding witnesses, and said that
perfect satisfaction prevailed.
Twelve other witnesses were heard along
the same lines. They were either in the
employ of the company, or had formerly
been engaged in some capacity. So evi-
dence was introduced by defense to contro-
vert any of the specific allegations of the
government, the defense seemingly relying
solely upon character witnesses.
Among the strongest witnesses for the
defense to testify were Emil Lesser, presi-
dent of the German Immigration Society
of Alabama; Mayor W. C. McLaughlin, of
Florala and Rev. W. F. Martin, also of
that place. They had all visited the camps,
conversed with the men and found them
satisfied, with no evidences of any mis-
treatment or peonage. The visits to the
camp had been made immediately after
the papers had published articles regarding
the case of foreigners coming to Pensacola
and telling of treatment at the camp.
Mr. Lesser was a very strong witness.
His home is in Birmingham, where he also
publishes a German paper, and as soon as
he heard of the alleged peonage cases he
left there for Lockhart, and arriving there
found it to be one of the best, if not the
best, conducted lumber camps in the South.
He made a rigid investigation into the
charges of beating of the men, and said
that he brought out the fact that there
had been stealing in the camp by two men,
who had been brought back, and each given
a whipping, but this was done by their
fellow laborers as a punishment for the
thefts. He wa" present, he said, when the
men were served with dinner, and the food
was not onl plentiful, but wholesome.
He had spoken while at Lockhart to about
one hundred men, thirty-three of whom
speke the German language, and that no
one complained to him of being dissatisfied
or of any bad treatment, but on the con-
trary all seemed to be satisfied. He had
been taken through the camps by Dr.
Trammell, but in talking to the men the
doctor was not present. He hadl, upon the
completion of this investigation, placed
the results before the German ambassador
at Washington, the German consul at New
Orleans. the Governor of Alabama and
(Cintinued on page 9.


Barnes & Jessup Company

Jacksonville Florida.


Naval Stores Factors and Commission

Merchants.


OFFICERS.
C. H. Barne. President. J. C. Little, Vice-Preideat.
E. B. Wells. Secretary ind Treasurer.

DIRECTOIS: C. H. Barnes, J. C. Little, Ralph Jeesum
J. IL. Slunders, E. C. Long, W. E. Cuaamer H. Paul, G. W.
Saxon, G. W. Tayler.


W. J. LENGLE
President.


J. W. WADE,
Viee-Premdeat.


L G. HUGHES,
See'y and Tre


Union Naval Stores Co.
MOBILE, ALA. PENSACOLA, FLA. NEW ORLEANS, LA.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
..........DEALUr IN ..........

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Ca *er at prmet quite a arI amber of deimble locatIm i Wet lw-
a, Alabma ad Mihialtpp Liberal aIvance ml t Ml agai -t Cer-
re-pndece msitae.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.




23 Man St. FLORIDA REALLY CO. phe l I
20,000 acres Pine and Cypress. Pine will cut 100 crops of Turpentine (10,-
500 to crop) and 60,000,000 feet of lumber. Cypress will ut 60,000,000 feet of
lumber.
22,000 acres Pine and Cypress. Will cut 90 crops Turpente (10,00 to rop),
and 55,000,000 feet pine lumber and 45,000,000 of Cypress.
18,000 acres, estimated to cut 00 boxes turpentine and 3,500 feet pine hum-
ber per acre. Tract also has about 8,000,000 feet of cypress.





THE TANK FOR SEIVCE


provm to be tson aok =sg0e
oa cut a eterl, vie W" gm

n Best 1sblk Cytalgi "M


a. 0. DAVIS 4 SON, P kaflk Ra



- 1i11111111111111 1 1 Ii ll i 511111111111 8 IIi l 1 III
SJ. P. WILLIAAS President. J. A. O. CA msO, t Vce-President
-T. A. Jumxas. 2nd Vice-Preident. J. P. DUoarUnrT.3d Vi-Preidet
- H. L. KATON, Secretary. H. F. E. Scnram, Tresaur. ,


: J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

1 hllL STORES I i F.II 01U U Ul IN Uon
m Maim Of tirme UVJILMANK, O mBOA..
a- m n.*e Otri PE, PMWCOLI., PfLX. ra-net aros1nor weuli,
- e r JJmCraE o acrIacL, Ls-. j COLaU O, O -.

: Naval Stores Producers are lavited to Correspaid With Us
tosasiaafa asi issa11111111 111111111 Bilalaa isssiassass


rElrElrElrElrElrE1_T~


SFIE(nr_~IS?~SI~I11~_ri~F~I


--








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


(Continued from page 8.)
the consul at Pensacola.
Upon the completion of the testimony of
Mr. Lesser, a German named Charles Haas
was placed upon the stand by the prosecu-
tion in rebuttal. He remembered having
talked with Mr. Lesser, and of telling him
he was satisfied, but the reason he did so
was because Mr. Lesser was with one of
the bosses. Mayor W. C. McLaughlin, of
Florala, a short distance from Lockhart,
had made a personal investigation of con-
ditions obtaining at the Jackson Lumber
Company camps, and found that the camps
were above the average logging camps,
and he was in a position to judge, for he
had been in the timber business for about
forty years. He lived about eight miles
from Lockhart and the first he ever heard
of any of the men being mistreated was
when he read it in the papers.
Rev. W. F. Martin, pastor of one of the
churches at Florala, also testified along
the same lines as Mr. McLaughlin. He
said he had visited the camps upon several
occasions, especially after he had heard of
men being mistreated, and had made par-
ticular inquiries of the men regarding the
same, but had never found but one dissat-
isfied man, and that was one with whom
Gallagher had a dispute, and it amounted
practically to nothing. He had gone
through the camps upon request of Dr.
Trammell.
Other witnesses testified along the same
lines, and all gave the camps a good name,
and the bosses the reputation of having
treated the men fairly in every respect.

Pensacola, Nov. 22.-The last witness in
the famous peonage cases testified this
afternoon and the charge of conspiracy to
commit peonage against W. S. Harlan et
al., is now being presented to the jury by
counsel for the government. While con-
siderable evidence, more than was antici-
pated, was heard during today, it was all
in rebuttal, and the government presented
some of its strongest witnesses, while the
defense brought in employes of the com-
pany in rebuttal of this testimoony. When
these witnesses concluded the government
began the presentation of its case, R. Pope
Reese making the opening argument and
consuming several hours, during which he
stated that the government had clearly
proven that armed bodies of men with
bloodhounds had crossed the borders of
the State, and capturing foreigners, com-
pelled them to return to the plant of the
Jackson Lumber Company in a state of
peonage, and cited the case. of Mihaley,
who, he claimed, had been captured in
1lorida, beaten and compelled to return
to the camps of the company.
Argument to Begin.
Tomorrow W. A. Blount, Jr., of the de-
fense, will make the opening argument, to
be followed by J. G. Russell, assistant
United States attorney general. There
has been no limit placed upon the length
* of these arguments, the court announcing
that owing to the importance of the case,
the counsel could agree among themselves
as to how many should speak for each side,
which has been agreed upon as three.
fnurwilCin(rs,gkFh gitn9Olb chrekHlrzsfis

HOM1SEZBZES ARRIVE.

Sixteen Carloads Came Via Southern Rail-
way Wednesay.
The first homeseekers' excursion of the
season arrived in Jacksonville Wednesday
afternoon at 4:30 o'clock on the Southern's
belated train No. 13 from Cincinnati and
adjacent points.
This train was composed of sixteen


coaches, every one of 'hem being filled
with strangers who were induced to the
South by the low homeseekers' rates of-
fered by the Southern from points in and
about Cincinnati.
This was by far the largest excursion of
thi., kind to arrive in Florida in many
years and the homeseekers, as they piled
off the train, created much attention about
the station.
Women with their arms full of luggage,
women wth infan ts in their arms and lead-
ing a string of tots hardly able to walk,
men and boys with heavy sacks, grips and
bundles, filed in:o the waiting room where
they remained all during the afternoon
and until late last night when most of
them departed on trains bound south.
These strangers will locate in various
places throughout the southern portion of
Florida where they will try their hands in
making crops in Florida soil.
For the next few days there will be sev-
eral of these excursions reaching Jackson-
ville, coming on all roads from various sec-
tions in the west and northwest.
Every winter these rates are offered by
the railroads and many strangers come to
Florida to secure permanent homes where
they engage in truck farming and other
industries.

OYSTER BOAT PEONAGE.

Government Prosecutions Put Several
Boats Uut of Business.
Norfolk, Nov. 21.-The prosecutions now
being conducted by the government under
the new federal anti-shanghaiing laws to
bring about a stop to peonage aboard oys-
ter dredges in lower Chesapeake bay have
resulted in many of the extensive bay
dredges being compelled to quit business.
Deputy United States Marshall Miller re-
turned today from Tangier island, in the
Chesapeake, where he spent several days
summoning witnesses for the trial in the
United States court here tomorrow of
Capt. Andrew A. Crockett, indicted for
cruelties to his crew on the dredge James
A. Whiting, reported that the great ma-
jority of the oyster operators learning the
determined attitude of the government,
have paid off their crews who have left the
dredges, there being only eight vessels at
work at the present time out of fifty.

COMMERCIAL CONGRESS.

Wide Range of Subjects Discussed at Re-
cent Meeting.
Kansas (ity, Mo., Nov. 21.-Speeches
and resolutions covering a wide range of
subjects took up the time today of the
three sessions of the Trans-Mississippi
Commercial Congress. Improved water-
ways, insurance and currency reforms, the
value of the Panama canal as a means of
enlarging our trade relations with the
South American republics and the neces-
sity of closer relations between the United
States and those countries, the great value
to the South of improved levees and the
resources and needs of Alaska were some
of the topics touched upon.
At the afternoon session John Barrett,
United States minister to Colombia, spoke
on "Trade RPlations With the I'tirl-
American Republics."
Following Mr. Barrett, and speaking
alone the same lines, brief talks were made
,by Minister Calderon of Bolivia, Minister
Pardo of Peru, Minister Cortes of Colom-
H'ia and First Secretary of the Brazilian
Legation Amerel.
Former Gov. Brady delivered the chief
address tonight.


S J. v WEST D. u FLYN. H L RmICHm
IOHN E HARRISM Sc'y awd Trews
President. w. J. KELLEY. D. LI. VUJAMS, .
A".t Swy ow Tur.
ViSC.PrCsik



- WEST FLYNN & HARRIS CO. I
SOr GERMANI BLD5 Savannah, 1
SO IC WEST BLDG. Jlackenainv. ulL.


N NAVAL STORES FACTORS. ,
NAVAL STORES RZCIVLD AT SAVANNAH, GA, JACKSON VIJ,
PLA, AND FERANDINA, LA.

Wholesal Grocrs also Dealers in Hay, Grain and Heavy
Harncs, $


SOLE AGENTS Celerad Univo Turwptine Ax es
SOLE WsEr and V &o &Chil& Phladeljaia Wagin., o
MERCHANTS WAREHOUSES.
SAVANNAH, GA. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. TAMPA, tl.A
9 W r .r ^ ^ ^ I' ag


WILLIAM A. WOURN


JAMES 0. DARBY


WILLIAM A. BOURS & COMPANY
THE OLDEST ESTAUSiME GRAIN AND SEEU NOM TME STAT

lay, Grain, Feed, Garden

Seeds, Poultry Supplies, Flour,

Grits, Meal and fertilizers.


OUR MOTTO: Prompt Sbipment, Reliable Gods.


Catalelem re


206 EAST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


KW W% 3(XXXXXXXSX!^^1C^^


You Want a Turpentine Locatin?
You Want a Sawmill Location?
You Want any Kind of Florida Land?

You Men Business?
SCll on or Write to

J. H. Livingston & Sons,
OCA A. FLOMILA.
^XrfXXXXXSga ^3CgfXXXXXHCXC^^


-





5.


M. A. Baker,
INVENTOR AND MAtUrACTURIER or THE


Baker Improved

Seamless Turpen

tine Stills.
Write me for prices and outlrrl
F. 0. B any point in Georgia, Flor
ida. Alabama or Miissippi. AlI
stills sold under a guarantee.
JOB WORK
Thrlg the Cmty a Specdety.
The Largeet and Oldest Copper Brunsw ick, ea.
Works In (eiorlia. Brunswick, a.
W My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do not leak.
Pensacola, Fla. and Brunswick, Ga.


-- ------


-------





r


10 TUE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL RECORD
JAMSA. KOLLOMON Edit *- Chef.
J. 0. LarONTMEE. Assla e Editer.
A. A, MAR.GIBM. Bune Manal r.

PrJblihed Every Thurs dy.
S (DEmim ...340 Per Annum
n (Ferelgn) .... 3. "

-The Pae and It Pedaseu."

A cammrnlcatism ie1 hbe addressed
rhe Industrir l R.ocord Company,
Jolduaonvill. Fla.
&ramerb dhUlral A Buinem Offlot at
Savrnnb, Ga.
ntered at the Pestocee at Jacksonville. Fla..
SassecoLm-olass matter

Adopted by th Executive Committe of
the Turpentine Operators' Association
september 12i 1902, as is exclusive otii-
cial ran Adopted in annul convention
September 11 as the organ also of the gen-
eral asoeistio
Adopted April 27th, 1903, u the official
organ of the Intrtate Cane Growers' As-
ociation. Adopted September 11, 190, as
the only official organ of the T. O. A.
Commended to lumber people by special
resolutio adopted by the Georgia Sawmill
Asmocition.


THE RECORD'S OIICES.
The publishing plant and the main of-
SeM ol the Industrial Record Company
are located at the intersection of Bay and
Newnan Streets, Jacksonvile, Fla., in the
very heart of the great turpentine and
yelow pine industries.
orad ot the entire South.
The p-annah, Ga., office in in the Board
of Trade Bdding. Savannah i the lead-
ing open naval stores market in the world.


NOTICE TO PATRONS.
All payments for advertising in the Ian
dustrial Record ad subecriptieon th.ete
must be made direct to the ho om e8 in
Jacksonville. Agents ae t allowed to
maie collection nade any cicu atame.
Bile fo advettiasig ad ubceriptias are
mat Out from the home edie wheb du,
and all remittanme mut be imad direct
to t hi c y.g g



Mr. T. J. Laud Brown has made of the
Tampa State Fair a huge success. He
should be encouraged by the next session
of the Florida legislature in his efforts to
hold a big exposition at Tampa.


Last week did not look much as though
Shatter was down and out. There appear
to be just a few of the Shotter finger
prints in the dealings in rosin for the past
five days.

The lower grades of rosin have suffered
during the week. Operators have seen
how the market can be manipulated to
the advantage of the great exporters. Just
another argument why operators ought to
stick together for mutual protection.

The operators of the Lake City district
have organized along the proper lines.
They have perfected an organization and
have good men to lead them. As The
Record said in a previous issue, there is
much to be accomplished by this organizt-
tion of local association-. They can handle
matters in their immediate section and by
affiliation with the T. O. A. secure great
advantages for the entire naval stores belt.


THE LESSON OF PEONAGE.
As the Record goes to press this week,
the news is flashed to us over the wires
that a verdict of guilty of conspiracy
to commit peonage had been rendered by
the jury in the United States court at
Pensacola, which had tried W. S. Harlan,
C. C. Hilton and S. E. Huggins, of the
Jackson Lumber Company of Lockhart,
Ala.
As to the verdict itself, The Recol has
no commentto make. But there is a les-
son it conveys which ought to fall with
great weight and be seriously considered
by those who are engaged in any of the
industries in the South where a consider-
able number of laborers are employed.
The camp of the Jackson Lumber Company
at Lockhart has always been considered a
model one. It has been declared to be such
by special correspondents who have in-
vestigated the matter and by no less an
authority than the German vice-consul at
Birmingham, Ala. The gentlemen who have
been found guilty of the charge of conspir-
acy to commit peonage are victims of a
reckless lot of immigration agents in the
North. It has been repeatedly shown by
the occurrences of the past few months
that those who trust their chances and
their money to that class of labor re-
cruiters are taking a long shot at an
uncertain target. There has not been a
case where those who have risked their
money with these northern agencies have
secured that which they were after. Far
from it, they have been sent the riff-raff,
and after paying their fare and so much
per head, have found that after the men
have arrived here, they were worthless,
shiftless, dishonest and entirely unsatis-
factory.
In the first place it is taking a long
chancee to bring foreigners to the South
until they have been inspected, selected
and the bad ones weeded out from among
the number. There are good laborers ar-
riving at Hoffman's island from Europe
almost daily. But as a rule they are sent
to the West. The reason for this is easily
to be accounted for. The West has agents
in Europe, who are either paid by their
States or by the great transportation
companies, who have done so much toward
the building up of that part of the United
States. These agents move among the
people of Europe, know the localities where
the best class of immigrants are to be se-
cured, and know to what work they are
best fitted. These agents pick the best
class, send them over here and push them
right through to their destination in the
West before they can get into the hands
of sharks, who class themselves as immi-
gration or employment agents.
Until the Southern States take some
action of this kind, the naval stores ope-
rators and the sawmill men had better let
the foreigners alone, unless some of them
pool their issues and send a man to Europe
to select them. In this matter the South
has been exceedingly slow. It has done
practically nothing while the West has
reaped the advantages of a desirable class
of settlers, men and women who have en-
tered into the spirit of progress of that
great section and who have made it what
it is. The South can get just as good im-
migrants as the West, but it will never do
so while our officials are backward in mak-
ing the necessary appropriations, or spend-
ing the money of the people in such fake
schemes as the attempt to drain the ever-
glades.
There have been thousands of dollars
lost by naval stores men ana sawmill men
in bringing foreigners to this section. Few


of them have remained long enough to pay
half their railroad fare, and practically
none of them have proved satisfactory. Is
it not time that this effort to bring for-
eigners to this section without proper ad-
vance knowledge was discontinued?

FLORIDA AND GEORGIA GROWERS OF
SEA ISLAND COTTON MEET
AT LAKE CITY.
Lake City, Nov. 23.-The Sea Island Cot-
ton Association, composed of sixteen coun-
ties in Georgia and thirteen in Florida,
that grow the long staple, met in this city
today, and was called to order at 10:30
a. m. by President Harvie Jordan.
Prayer was offered by Rev. Walter T.
Cavell, of St. James Episcopal church of
this city.
An address of welcome was delivered by
Judge W. M. Ivs, of this city, who took
occasion to pay a very high compliment
to the organization, and to congratulate
it on the splendid things it had accomplish-
ed and its outlook for the future. He laid
special stress on the power of such organi-
zations, and admonished the members to
stand pat and they would win.
Col. W. W. Webb, of Hahira, Ga., re-
sponded in one of his typical and semi-
humorous speeches, and said he was ready
for any good things that the people of this
land could set before him; that previous
visits had given him somewhat of an idea
of what this fair Florida section was ca-
pable of. He congratulated the body on
its good attendance and was convinced it
would do good work and its proceedings be
harmonious.
President Harvie Jordan then delivered
an address full of cound encouragement
and wisdom. He told of the fight being
made against the organization, and that
thus far it had been victorious, although
attacked by foes within its ranks. He
predicted great things for the farmer, if
he would only stand together with his
brother in one solid body.
After Mr. Jordan's speech a recess was
taken until 2 p. mi., to allow the commit-
tee on price of cotton to formulate their
report.
At the afternoon session the committee
on minimum price submitted the following
report, which was adopted:
"Your committee on minimum price of
Sea Island cotton beg leave to report:
That the following be the minimum prices
of eSa Island cotton until otherwise order-
ed: East loridas, 31c; fancy Georgias and
Floridas, 30c; No. 1, 29'/,c; No. 2, 28%c;
No. 3, 27y1/e; No. 4, 26(c.
"Your committee further recommend that
every member of the association be urged
to store his cotton, borrow money on same
and pay off their indebtedness as rapidly
as possible, and thereby relieve the pres-
.ure among the business men.
(Signed). "JOHN W. HATCHER,
"Chairman."
The committee on a uniform plan of
warehousing cotton, and management and
sale of same, submitted the following re-
port:
"We recommend that two central ware-
houses be established-one in Georgia and
one in lorida; that we recommend that the
one in Florida be established at Lake City;
that the one in Georgia be established at
Valdosta, and indorse the previous selec-
tion of that place by the Georgia members.
We further recommend that at the annual
meeting to be held at Valdosta provision
be made for the appointment or election


The CttMers

OLE AGENTS FR KMOX HATS


Our Clothing

Crt
Right
Pits
RIS &
Made
Right
Looks
well

Well
Feels

Awfrl
Swell

Neff
Said

THE STUART-SERASTEIN CO.
14 WEST BAY ST. JAU KSmOVI V A.

of sales agents for the central warehouses.
%% e also recommend that economical man-
agement in county warehouses be urged, so
that expenses may be made as light as
possible. Where warehouses have not been
erected, we recommend that members store
at the one most convenient to them for
the present.
(Signed) "'W. D. ANDREWS,

The report was unanimously adopted.
The following resolution was adopted:
Resolved, By the Sea Island Cotton As-
sociation, that the Department of Oom-
merme and Labor, in making up their re-
port of the annual consumption of the cot-
ton crop, be requested to separate the Sea
Island crop from that of upland cotton.
The date of the annual meeting at Val-
dosta was fixed for January 8, 1907, and
county and precinct meetings be held on
December 15, to select delegates to the
same.
On the question of the advisability of
the Sea Island cotton growers withdraw-
ing from the Southern Cotton Growers'
Association, an able address was made
against it by Col. W. W. Webb, of Georgia.
No decisive action was taken in the mat-
ier, but a committee of five was appointed
to consider relations of Sea Island AAsocia-
tion to Southern Cotton Association.
The matter of a tariff on Egyptian cot-
ton was taken up, and discussed, as the
sentiment was in favor of it, as expressed
at Valdosta.
The last subject," "Incorporating the
Sea Island Cotton Association in a fund W
sufficient to buy the floating cotton and
keep it off the market so as to protect the
prices set by the association," was opened
up in discussion by Hon. F. P. Cane. A
motion was made that the committee be
appointed to report a plan to the annual
meeting at Valdosta. Committee, F. G.
Schell, J. W. Holeher, A. D. Townsend,
rank Arnold and R. R. Simmons.
Committee to consider relations of this
association to Southern Cotton Association
is E. MA. Goodbread, W. E. P. Owens, J. R.
Williams, H. T. Tillman and W. W. Webb.
Adjourned.


-I -








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11



THE GROOVER- STEWART lma co.,

Wlheamle Drwqe, Osleile, Da#- a, r and omomdary se
w-em msW Ar Am aMe- mUMs mm- diWMem4mSMa ,FLasP.


FOR SALE-A desirable turpentine
place. Well located, on railroad. In full
SD operation. Fifteen crops boxes. Timber to
cut five crops. Plenty of labor on place.
*W A NU For full information, write L. P. Booth,
AND Adel, Ga. t


FOR SALE
Rate for this column is 2 cent per word
for first insertion and 1 cent per word for
following insrtio. No advertisement
taken for les than 40 cents for nflt, aad
X0 cents for following inaertioNs. Cuh
must accompany orders unless you have
an account with us.


WANT'K1-Workin interest i turpen-
tine business. Will do all wooding, stilling
and making barrel Flat woods and un-
healthy places need not apply. Have life-
time experience. Can give good references
if needed. R. G. Orvin, Chubb, Fla. 4t


BRICK FOR SAL--The very best brick
made of purest Geogia clay; N. Jela,
the Georgia brick man Mas a god stock
on hand, and can supply you. Wire for
bottom delivered prices. N. Jelks,
manufacturer, Macon, Ga


FOR SALE-WE MAVZ TWO REMIG-
TON TYPEWRITERS, ONE FAY-
SHOLES, ONE DESMORE, ONW FOX,
ALL IN GOOD CONDITION, WHICH WE
WILL SELL AT A GREAT SACRIFICE.
ALSCO A SMALL NUMBER OF RIBBONS
FOR ALL MAKES OF MACHINES AT
LESS THAN COST. APPLY INDUS-
TRIAL RECORD OFFICE.


WANTED-All commiisaries to clean up
their barns of all kinds of seed sacks and
burlaps. We buy everything in the way
of sacks. Write us. Amerien Fibre Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

FOR SALE-Good turpentine place for
ale in Georgia. Good healthy location.
Box 17, R. D. No. 2, Sylvter, Ga. tf

kUR SALE-Elegant turpentine loca-
tion, consisting of about 14,000 acres of
round timber, composed of sand-hills and
fiat woods, lease on 30 crops of boxes, 10
of which are virgin. All necessary equip-
ment. Seventy-five miles from Jackson-
ville. Splendid freight rates. Price and
terms reasonable. Address Exceptional,
care Industrial Record.

WANTED-Good position in turpentine.
Manager new place preferred; satisfac-
tion guaranteed; references exchanged.
Address M, care Industrial Record.

FOR SALE-100 acres near Jacksonville,
$10,00000. Will soon double. Fine in-
vestment. On three railroads. Good fac-
tory site. Address "Factory," care Indus-
trial Record. 4t

FOR SALE-Good turpentine place for
sale in Central Florida. Plenty of labor.
No flat woods. Address Owner, box 414,
Gainesville, Florida. 2t

FOR SALE-A good twelve-crop turpen-
tine place in Alabama. Timber to cut two
more crops leased, and available timber
to cut fifteen more crops in reach of still.
Address A. Z., care Industrial Record.


Would sell good operator who could fur-
nish labor, interest in a ten-crop place, ten
thousand acres round timber. Real Estate
o., Old Town, Fla. 4t
FOR SALE-Six miles practically new
35-lb steel rail, delivery December 1st. on
A. C. L. Railway, five miles south of Way-
cross. Price, thirty-six dollars ton, with
spikes and switches included; plates and
tolts, thirty-five cents a pair. Terms, cash.
Address owner, IV. M. Toomer, Jackson-
ville, Fla.


HUTCHINSON AUDIT CO.

PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS & AUDITORS.

Board of Trade Balliag.
Phone 31x. Jacb hvllU M


- I


NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
All creditors, legatees, distributes and
persons having claims or demands against
tlie estate of Rudolph S. Schumacher, de-
ceased, are hereby notified and required to
present their said claims or demands
against the said estate to the undersigned
executor, at Jacksonville, Fla., within two
years from date Iereof, or the same will be
barred. JAMES S. SCHUMACHER,
As Executor of Will of Rudolph S. Schu-
macher.
Nov. 22, 1906.-8wks

NOTICE. OF APPLICATION FOR DIS-
CHARGE.
Notice is hereby given, in pursuance of
law, that the undersigned as Administra-
tor of the estate of Josephine C. S. Schu-
macher will make return of his final ac-
counts and apply for a final settlement and
discharge as such administrator to Hon. H.
B. Phillips. County Judge of Duval County,
Florida, on Monday, June 3d, A. D. 1907.
JAMES M. SCHUMACHE,
As Administrator Estate of Josephine
Schumacher.
Nov. 22, 1906.-mo.

VERDICT WAS GUILTY IN PEONAGE
CASES.
Pensacola, Nov. 23.-"Guilty of con-
spiracy to commit peonage," was the ver-
dict of the jury, brought in at 11 o'clock
tonight against W. S. Harlan, C. C. Hilton
and S. E. Huggins, of the Jackson Lumber
Company, of Lockhart, Ala.
Judge Swayne, who had gone to his
home, returned to the court room to re-
ceive the verdict. The jury was then dis-
charged, Harlan was placed under a bond
of $3,000, and Hilton and Huggins, $2,000,
I"nding the passing of sentence.
Chief Counsel Flournoy, of the defense,
stated immediately after the verdict that
an appeal would be taken.
The trial has attracted attention in all
sections of the country, and the verdict of
the jury was anxiously awaited.
Throughout the case the United States


court room was crowded with those eager day afternoon, W. A. Blount, Jr., opened
to hear the arguments of the eminent for the defense this morning in an argu-
ment of thirty minutes' duration, in which
counsel engaged on both sides. Not even he went deep into the case and showed the
standing room could be obtained, and early character of the government witnesses,
in the day the court gave instructions that "a few of whom," he said, "to whom even
no more be admitted. following Assistant a reference was an insult to an intelligent
Reese, who concluded his argument Thurs- juy."



FUEL AND DUILDII MATERIAL.


The Southern Fuel & Supply Co.
,,Lugqlosl, ,





COMPARATIVE MARKET RbPOK IS.

S The lower grades of rosins suffered a decline the early part of this week,
CBA going as low here as $3.60. The decline is attributed to the heavy receipts
of lower grades. On the other hand, the pale resins went glimmering upward
until the price of $7.00 was reached. Spirits have been about stationary, rang-
ing from 671/ to 66%.
SPIRITS OF TURPEZTIE FOR THE WEEK HERE AND AT 8VANXAH.L
Price. Sale. Rhipma- Hemlp~. Stohs.
Jax. Sav. Jan 8av. Jax. s. JJax. sv.
Friday ........ 67 67% 776 508 57 1731 297 8024,778
Monday 7, 94 1, 408
Saturday ...... ....67 .... 275 94 408 43925,017
Monday ....... % 66 1,02 919 775 15 371 25,1
Tuesday ....... 66 6% 286 814 361 1,135 773
SWednesday .... 66% 67 252 40 98 196 37125,
ROSIN FOR THE WEK HE m AHD AT SAVANNAH.
Friday. Saturday. Monday. Tuesday. Wed'eday.
Ja. Say. Jax. Sav. Jax. iv. J. I Sa. Jax. Say.
S............. .... 6.90.... 6.906.67 7.007.10 7.06.75 700
WG ................. .... 6.50 .... 6.506.65 6.506.55 6.506.50 650
M ................... .... 6.00.... 6.006.07 0.006.06 6.006.00 6.00
N. ......................... 5.50.... 5.505.50 5.505.56 5.505.50 5.50
K ........ ........... .... 5.00.... 5.005.15 5.005.10 5.0015.00 5.00
1 .................... .... 4.40.... 4.404.50 4.404.40 4.404.95 4.40
H ........................ 4.20.... 4.304.10 4.304.00 4.4.00 4.10
G ........................ 4.10.. 4.103.95 4.003.85 4.003.85 3.95
F .................... .... 4.00.... 4.003.90 3.963.80 4.00.3.80 3.90
E ...................... 3.95 .... 4.003.85 3.903. 3.03.75 3.86
D ........................ 3.85 .... 3.853.75 3.853.65 3.853.70 3.80
CBA ................. I.... 3.90 .... 3.8513.70 3.853.00 3.8 3.60 3.80
REPORT OF OSIN MOVEMENT HERZ AND AT 8AVAMNAH.
Sales. Shipmeas. BR ipts. Stofca.
Jaz. Say. Jaz. .a. Ja. Sav. Ja. Sav.
Friday ................... 0 1,835 1102,009 3,214 ,978 63,380
Saturday ................. .0 1,8943,390 9991 80 98324,242 63,364
Monday ................. ,030 1, 4,75 26551,490 2,77121,672 63,4
Tuesday ................. 1,53 2,4853,576 4202,164 2,78619,407 65,86
Wednesday ............... 256 2,2212,307 1,157 943 2,27818051 66,968


Turpentine Cups
IMPORTANT.
As our supply of cups is limited, we sug-
gest that intending purchasers send in
their orders promptly to insure delivery.
ForPasos 0on
Cups Gutters md aM Tools
Used Isenerty sastem
Addre-

Chattanooga Pottery

Company

-'i Jacksenville, Flkrda


Z77777-777= 7=~fi F1S%%


"- "








12 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



Jacksonville Grocery Comp'y

... Wol"esale Qrooers aMnd Distillers' 8upplles.
OlM mod Wareme Vlahet A. 0. L m l


STRONG RESOLUTIONS ADOPTED BY pointed out and emphasized.
THE SOUTHERN AGRICULTURAL Utilizing Waste Products.
CONVENTION. Dr. Tait Butler, state veterinarian Oi
The annual meeting of the Southern North Carolina, was the next speaker alonj
States Association of Commissioners of this line.
Agriculture, held in Jacksonville three days His subject was The Utilization of Wast4
this week, was marked by the adoption of Products in Cattle Feeding. In presenting
resolutions with reference to the immigra- this subject, Dr. Butler pointed out thai
tion problem, the presentation of papers all waste that was utilized was, in reality
on the extermination of the cattle tick, not waste. From this general principle
cattle diseases in Florida, the sale of he proceeded in a discussion of the special
adulterated foods and the utilization of subject that had been assigned to him.
waste products in cattle feeding. He pointed out that study and experi-
The first paper of the day was presented ment had proven that certain materialE
by Prof. P. H. Rolfs, of Lake City, Florida, that had heretofore been considered as
and dealt with.agricultural education. The waste only could be utilized to the highest
distinguished Florida educator pointed out advantage in feeding cattle. Certain thing.
the advantages that were certain to result that could be used for no other purpose
from a study of agricultural conditions, the were admirably adapted to cattle, and theii
teaching of the best ways of treating dif- effect was to make the meat of the cattle
ferent soils, the raising of crops, and the better in every way.
alternating of crops. By utilizing these the cattle raiser saved
He showed the progress that had been much and at the same time improved his
made along these lines and the good re- cattle, thereby increasing the market price.
suits that had sprung therefrom. His The address took up the matter in detail,
paper dealt, in a great measure, with what and was followed with the closest interest
had been done in Florida, though its bear- by all present at the convention, and es-
ing showed the advantages that would re- specially by those who are making a spec-
suit from intelligent study along agricul- lalty of cattle raising.
tural lines and the adoption of principles Question of Ticks.
that experiment had proven to be of the The question of the cattle tick, one of
highest value, the most vexing problems that confronts
Cotton Breeding Discussed. the cattle grower, was then taken up, and
Mr. R. L. Bennett, of the Texas experi- papers thereon were presented by J. G.
ment station, presented a paper on cotton Ferneyhough, state veterinarian of Vir-
breeding, having especial reference to the ginia, and by Dr. Tait Butler, of North
boll weevil and the methods of counteract- Carolina.
ing the ravages of this pest. Dr. Ferneyhough's paper dealt with the
He pointed out the result that had been progress that had been made along the line
obtained by a series of experiments in of tick extermination in Virginia. He
cotton breeding. Working on the princi- showed the experiments that had been
pie that the animal life was no more sus- made, the remedies that had been tried
ceptible of breeding than was the plant and pointed out the results that had been
life, a series of experiments had been tried attained therefrom.
in Texas, with results that the speaker Dr. Butler outlined the experiments that
believed would be most satisfying to the had been made in North Carolina, and the
cotton growers of the South. lessons to be learned therefrom. He dwelt
It was a known fact, he said, that the with especial emphasis on the fact that
boll weevil appeared principally during cer- within the last four years the tick had
tain months, comparatively late in the cot- been practically exterminated from twen-
ton season. By a series of experiments ty-five counties. The showing is consider-
a method had been hit upon that would e.l a remarkable one.
cause cotton to mature before the boll Both speakers poitned out how the re-
weevil got in its most deadly work. This suits obtained in Virginia and North Caro-
cotton could be promptly picked, and, with lina could be applied to cattle raising in
the cotton out of the way, the boll weevil Florida, and considered from the stand-
became insignificant, point of real value, these two addresses
This paper proved to be one of the feat- were among the most valuable of those
ures of the convention, delivered at both sessions of the conven-
Cattle and Cattle Growing. tion yesterday.
Cattle and cattle growing was the next Dr. Dawson Speaks.
general subject taken up and a number of Dr. Charles F. Dawson, state veterina-
papers of decided interest and importance rian of Florida, was the next speaker, his
to those engaged in this pursuit were pre- subject being "Cattle Diseases of Florida."
sented. Dr. Dawson has made special study along
Mr. S. H. Gaitskill, president of the these lines, and his extensive experiments
Southeastern Cattle Growers' Association, have caused him to be recognized as one
of McIntosh, Florida, was the first speaker of the best posted veterinarians in the
along this line. entire State. His entire address was
In a carefully prepared paper he pre- marked by earnestness and many sugges-
sented the progress that had been made in tions were thrown out as to means of re-
cattle growing in the southeast. He point- during cattle diseases to the minimum,
ed out the conditions most suitable to sue- and finally, through persistent efforts, wip-
cess along these lines, and discussed the ing them out practically altogether.
problems that the cattle grower is con- Concluding Addresses.
stantly meeting. Their solution and the The concluding addresses were delivered
methods of approaching them for study of by Mr. C. T. McCarthy, of Eldred, Fla., on
the best remedy were taken up and the Florida Pineapples, and by E. W. Magru-
results of experiments thus far made were (Continued on page 17.)


The Metropolis


Is the Paper you want. It is
published daily and is from 12
to 16 hours ahead of any other
daily newspaper in Florida ..


$500 a Year $2.50 Six Months


Full Telegraphic and Stock
reports. If you want to keep
posted on the news, get the
Metropolis.


CARTER & RUSSELL PUB. CO.

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


TIHB OLDmBT WHISxKyI HOUrn 1
GBOfGI (EIsmtaMblihed i t( o.)
OLD SHARP WILLIAMS-Pure line Old
Rye. B" the gallon 8.00; four full quarts
$3.50, express prepaid.
GEO. J. COLEMAN-Pure Pennsylvania
Rye; Rich and Mellow. By the gallon
$2.75; four full quarts $.00, express prepaid.
ANVIL RYE-Pure Substantial Family
Whiskey. By the gallon P.5; four full
quarts $2.0, express p epaid.
CLIFFORD RYE-By the gallon U.5.
four full quarts E.66. express (prepaid.
OLD KIcTUCKY CORN-Direct from
Bonded Warehouse; fine and old. By the
gallon 3.00: four full quarts $8.50 express
prepaid.
OLD POINTER CLUB CORN -- Rich
and Mellow. By the gallon 2.50; four full
quarts $2.0, express prepaid.
We handle all the leading brands of ye and Bourbon Whiskies in the market
and will save you from ~ to 60 per cent on your purchases. Send for price list and
catalogue. Mailed free upon application.

The Altmayer <& Flatau Liquor Company0

MACON. GEORGIA.


C. C. Bettes, DRUGS-


J53 a5 VEST BAY.
Vaheso
20 to 26 SOUTH LAURA


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Florida Mail Order Drug Store. Supplies Uverything a Drug Store
Ever Kept. Write to Us.




_ ____


JOSEPH D. WEED.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. KRENSON.


J. D. WEED I CO.,
SAVANIMAN GEORGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF

Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Etc.



FLORIDA STATE INSTITUTE
60 RIVERSIDE AVE., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
S Situate e the hbaks of the St. Johs River and Riverside Drive. Perfect Location.
Perfect Facilities.
Mrs. Schumacher's Private Sanatorium The only private institution of its kind
in the South. Method of treatment for all forms of the drug habit and alcoholism
considered by the medical profession as the most effective known. It differs dis-
tinctly from all others. Active treatment terminated in 48 hours or less. All crav-
ing and desire for alcohol or drugs aliminat ed. Practically no time lost from business.
Treatment complete in from five to seven days. At the termination of this period
the patient is ft for work. All medicines administered by the mouth. Neither pain
nor discomfort experienced by the patient. Every privacy observed. Each patient
has individual nurses and service. There is no co-mingling of cases. Physician in
charge. Write or call for detailed informs tion. References furnished.




Standard Naval Stores Co.,
JACKSONVILLE



EXPORTERS I

CARGO LOTS A SPECIALTY



L Standard Naval Stores Co. JACKSONVILLE




Atlantic Coast Line

Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Virginia, North

Carolina and South Carolina.
THE GREAT HIGHWAY OF TRAVEL FROM

Florida--East, West, North aud South.
TO THE EAST, THE FAMOUS
Florida and West Indian Limited and New York Express.
To the West Montmnery Route and "Dixie
Flyer" via Atlanta.
PULLMAN CARS AND THROUGH COACHES ON ALL TRAINS.
Atlantic Coast Line Mileage Books, good to all points, via all trains as far
East as Washington, and as far West as St. Louis, Cincinnati and New Orleans,
rates .M00


CONSULT THE PURPLE FOLDER.
For detailed and full information regarding rates, Pullman reservations,
Call on your nearest ticket agent or write
FRAEN C. BOYLSTON, W D. STARK,


District Pass Ant.
jackae vile, Fla.
W. J. CRAIG, Traf. Manager.
General Ofica, wi twagto, N. C.


schedules.


Tray. Pass. Aent.
T. C. WHITE, Geaol Pas Agent.


THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 18


A STATIONARY CAR STANCHION FOR Each stake is provided with a sleeve,
LUMBER CARS IS ATTRACTING adjacent to its upper end to which a chain
WmTwSPDKAn ATTENTION. is attached, said chain meeting the chain
Capt. A. S. Beville, of Jacksonville, n from the opposite stke nd thus
experienced railroad man, has had patented
an invention which is calculated to make as a strap to hold the stakes in pace. By
it an easy matter for the railroad m- a loop device these chains may be easily
panies to equip their flat cars with eta- released when the load settles and forces
tionary stanchions, something which has the stakes to spread.
long been demanded by the shippers of Straps are run alongside the body of the
,that class of freight which requires an cal ,but in such a manner as not to inter-
equipment for the purpose of retaining the fere with the stake pockets. The" straps
load. are of metal and to them are attached
Several years ago, the various sawmill the stawee by means of a chain and rings.
associations throughout the south took the hen the stakes are not in use they are
matter of stationary equipment for flat detached from the pockets and easily
cars up with the railroad companies and moved to a box provided at each end under-
insisted that the railroad companies pro- neath the cr. The ring fits over te metal
vide their own stakes, instead of having strap and holds the stake to it Every-
them supplied by the sawmill men and at thing is so constructed aa to make the
the expense of the shipper. But owing to task of moving the stakes comparatively
the lack of any device which would give to an easy matter. Any hand at a sawmill
the companies the opportunity for furnish- may do the work in less than ten minutes,
ing these stationary stanchions, -the rail- where it now requires a couple of hours,
road companies were practically prevented and about $2 worth of lumber to provide
Irom complying with the demands of the stakes for a car.
sawmill men. Later the matter was called GOd Feata
to the attention of the railroad commis- One of the most advantageous features
siona of several Southern States, and a in connection with this invention of Oapt.
ruling made that the railroad companies Beville's is that in the event of an accident
would be compelled to furnish stationary to the car there would be no trouble in re-
equipment. This ruling on the part of the loading and holding the load to the ear.
railroad commission was contested by the The wooden stakes may break, the device
transportation companies and the matter may be bent so as to make repair neoes-
s still awaiting a decision of the courts. sary, but if the car man be moved, all
l On Ehibit, that would be necessary would be to pro-
e ea B i d by vide new stakes and place them in the
in the mean ime Mr. Beville, inspired by pockets. This done the ear would proceed
the necessity for such an equipment and th its. load.
appreciating the advantages of having that But with the other devices which have
uuipient provided as cheaply as po-sible, . 1. __ .
equipment provided as cheaply as sible, been invented, where an accident occurs it
interested himself in an effort to devise is nessary for the car to return to its
some plan whereby the fat car stake home shop, sometimes 500 miles away to
could be made a permanent fixture to the repair it so as to retain its load. This
car, and at the same time arrange them feature was given earefnl study by Copt.
so that they could be removed easily when ft w g c s by kV
so that they could be removed eaily when Beville and it was by keeping this in mind
occasion required That he has been suc- that he was able to invent a system of
cessful his model, now on exhibition in rmanent stakes which is not only simple
Jacksonville proves beyond a doubt. He and cheap, but which in no wise ake fom
hIas provided a most practical method for the present equipment of a fat ar.
meeting all of the requirements and at the Capt. Beville has exhibited his model
same time have given to the railroads an to a number of railroad officials of the
appliance which can be added to any flat South and all of them have indicated to
car quickly and cheaply. him that it is the most serviceable of any
There have been a number of inventions of the several inventions on this line.
along this line, but all of them, with the The railroad companies have made every
exception of the one by Mr. Beville has effort to provide permanent stakes and
lacked simplicity and practicability. Some have submitted to the sawmill men several
of tile appliances provided by these in- arrangements, none of which have been
ventions were so expensive as to be prohib- accepted by them. If the railroads are
itive, but in the case of the invention of forced to apply permanent stakes and
Mr. Beville, a car can be equipped at a cannot have adopted one of the several
cost not exceeding $25, and the equipment lPtents, then the cost of moving lumber
will be permanent in every respect, will be several dollars per car to them in
Mr. Beville has, in giving this appliance excess of what it is at the present time.
to the transportation world, a proper con- But with the device of Capt. Beville at-
celtion of what has been demanded. In tacked to every flat ear, the expense would
fact lie has so well followed the rules of be nominal. Once equipped with this in-
simplicity of construction, that he has sue- vention a car could be used for years under
ceeded in inventing something which can ordinary circumstances without any ex-
be readily applied to any flat car, without wense for the stakes.
taking from the present equipment of the (apt. Beville has served in a great many
car as much as a nail. capacities as a transportation man. He
A Simple Device. has had eighteen years continuous service
As a matter of course all that has been as a brakeman, flagman, conductor, yard-
needed to provide a permanent equipment master and train master and is one of the
is a device by means of which the stakes Ibet posted railroad men on equipment in
would be locked to the car, and in such a tile South today. His friends and the
manner as could be easily fitted into their railroad men who have seen his model be-
pockets, or removed, but at the same time lieve that he has solved a difficult railroad
connected with the ear, preserving the problem by his recent invention.
stakes and keeping them intact.
Trhe stakes which have been provided by Box Cut will be mall.
Mr. Beville's invention are thle same as are The indications are that there is to be a
those which are at present in use. They s smaller box cut the coming season than
are adapted to fit the customary pockets in there was this. The operators claim that
any flat car, and are arranged in the ordi- the talk af there being an increase is
nary manner along the sides of the ear. only being made to effect the market.


I







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


SEABOARD TRAIN TO REMAIN ON.
Pensacola, Nov. 20.-Announcement was
made this morning by the local Louisville
and Nashville railroad that the accommo-
dation leaving here at 5 p. m., and return-
ing the following morning at 10, making
direct connection with the Jacksonville
train, will not be discontinued as an-
nounced. The service was inaugurated
upon the request of the chamber of com-
merce, and when the members of that body
learned that orders had gone forth from
the head officers of the company to dis-
continue the service on November 25, there
was an immediate protest, and it was cited
that the business of the division so far as
the passenger traffic is concerned, has al-
most doubled during the past year, and
that the train is a great source of con-
venience to merchants in small towns who
come here in the forenoon and can return
in the afternoon. Added to the protest of
the chamber of commerce was that of the
United Commercial Travelers, who entered
a most vigorous protest over the discontin-
uance of the service, and the protests had
the desired effect.

Winter Service of Atlantic Coast Line.
Effective Sunday, Nov. 18, the Atlantic
Coast Line will inaugurate night train
service between Jacksonville, St. Peters-
burg and intermediate points. This train
will have a sleeper leaving Jacksonville
at 9:20 p. m., making all evening connec-
tios, arriving in St. Petersburg at 8:30
the next morning. This sleeper will be
returned to Jacksonville, reaching Jack-
sonville at seven, first train arriving in
Jacksonville 20th.
Effective Nov. 12th, the Atlantic Coast
IAne will inaugurate sleeping car service
on trains 21 and 82. Tran 2il living
Jacksonville at 9:00 p. m., making all
evening connections, arriving at Ft. Myers
the next day at 12:40. This sleeper will
be returned to Jacksonville, first train
Nov. 14th.
With these changes the Atlantic Coast
Line has inaugurated the principal winter
schedule with Pullman car service on both
morning and night trains to all points
reached by their line between Jacksonville
and St. Petersburg, Jacksonville and Tam-
pa and Jacksonville and Ft. Myers.
FRANK C. BOYLSTON,
District Passenger Agent.

Southern Improvements.
Atlanta, Ga., Nov. 20.-A special to the
Constitution from Charlotte, N. C., says:
The Southern Railway has let a contract
to the Oliver Company, of Knoxville, Tenn.,
for double tracking the main line of that
road between Charlotte and Atlanta. The
work is to begin by the first of January.

ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION
OF THE
LUDDEN-CAMPBBLL-SMITH COMPANY
Article L
The name of the corporation shall be
the LUDDEN-CAMPBELL-8MITH CO(M-
PANY, and its principal place of business
shall be in the city of Jacksonville, Flor-
ida.
Article IL
The general nature of the business to be
transacted by this corporation shall be to
manufacture, buy, sell and deal in, pianos,
organs and musical instruments of all de-
scriptions, phonographs, talking and re-
producing machines, musical publications,
other merchandise and to buy and own
stock in other corporations in similar busd-

Article Im.
The capital stock of this corporation,
authorized, shall be sixty thousand dol-
lars, divided into six hundred shares of the
par value of one hundred dollars eah.


Four per cent of said capital stock shall
be paid for in lawful money of the United
States, and the balance of the stock may
be paid for in property at a just valuation
to be fixed by the directors at a meeting
called for that purpose.
Article IV.
This corporation shall exist for tne term
of ninety-nine years.
Article V.
The offers of this corporation shall be
three directors ,one of whom shall be presi-
dent and one shall be secretary and treas-
urer. They shall be elected by the stock-
holders at a meeting to be held in the
-ity of Jacksonville, Florida, on the first
Monday in June, A. D. 1907, and annually
thereafter. The officers who shall conduct
the business of the corporation until those
elected at the first election are qualified,
shall be A. B. Campbell, president; Jasper-
sen Smith, secretary and treasurer, and
William Ludden, director.
Article VL
The highest indebtedness or liability so
which this corporation ean subject itself
shall be one hundred and fifty thousand
dollars.
Article VII.
The names and residence of the subseri-
bers are as follows, to-wit: A. B. Camp-
bell and Jaspersen Smith, Jacksonvile,
Florida, and William Ludden, Brooklyn,
New York .
Names. Number of shares of stock.
William Ludden ......... Twenty shares.
A. B. Campbell .......... Tw ty sares.
Jaspersen Smith ......... Twenty share.

State of Florida, Duval eouady:
I, a notary public in and for said State
and county, do hereby certify that Jas-
persen Smith ,who is personally known to
me, appeared before me i aid county ad
acknowledged that he subscribed the fare-
gpaf articles of ianorporation.
Witness my hand and ojial seal this
the 14th day of September, A .D. 1906.
(Notarial Seal.) BIG. HES8,
I, a notary public in and for said State
and county, do hereby certify that A. B.
Campbell, who is personally known to me,
appeared before me in said county and ae-
knowledged that he subscribed the fore.
going articles of incorporation.
Witness my hand and official seal this
the 18th day of September, A. D. 1906
(Notarial Seal.) MARTIN DANER.

Notary Public State of Florida.
My commission expires June 3, 1908.

State of New York, Onondaga county:
State of New York, New York county:
I, a notary public in and for said State
and county, do hereby certify that William
Ludden, who is personally known to me,
appeared before me in said county and ac-
knowledged that he subscribed the fore-
going articles of incorporation.
Witness my hand and official seal this
the 19th day of September, A. D. 190.
WILLIAM R. BRINCKERHOFF,
Notary Public New York County.
(Notarial Seal.)

NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that application
will be made to the Governor of the State
of Florida for letters patent on the fore-
going proposed charter thirty days after
date. This 27th day of September, A. D.
1906.
JASPERSEN SMITH,
A. B. CAMPBELL,
WILLIAM LUDDEN.


IT MOVES WHEN YOU DO.


BOYD'S PORTABL MIRPLACE.
Manufactured by Boyd & Presley, Valdos-
ta, Ga. Shipping Points: Boyd & Pres-
ley, Valdosta, Ga., and Palatka, FlU
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.; Sam
des Mill Company, Pensasols, Fia.


Cay & McCall
FIR NSURANCK.


tLsolidated Bailding.


Phee 1".


WM. D. JONES
PRESCRIPTION SPECIALIST
... Md...
FAMILY DRUGGIST
107 E. BAY ST.
Mail Order Solicited.


HICKS' GAS MOTOR COMPANY
We ar pleaded to sanmuse to or
Souther trade that our aew modern works
at WTar, Ga for the s-ufw"-
U i Patet Tande Ge and Gao-
n Engins is completed sad in OMmtib,
ailing Btat ry, Portabe ad Mrie
egi-, from 2 to 10 H. P. also Gas
P Podur, PumM sad GalMdne Motor
Street ar Whie te THIks Egs are
fr superior to the old e eyldr n-
gie, os r prieM a reo mso .
Se4 for antlogu ad get posted.
Agnte wutd
mICa' GAS MOTOR COMPANY,


OmD Rutly Mil(oveuut Co.
Large or small tracts of timber
lands, also cut over lands, suitable
tor colonies, stock-raiing and
game preserves in Florida and
Georgi
Also Suburban Lots in Deen-
wood and some choice city lots in
Waycroes. Write us for full par-
tienlars and information.
Nm l"its ad "lrma t Co.
WAYORO88. QA.



PEC AN S
advze ts wrad.


pauMet Proftts
SoOmmy of care

Certaty of rets


Nopersuble product
Superior to all rutL

THE OPPORTUNITY Of TODAY.
The firt to plant pemn grove
wNi be the first to reap a

great harvest.
For full iaformatlun apply to

THE 6RIFFIN6 BROS. Co.
JacLksoumv e. fnlarli.


DIAMONDS AND WATCHES

We simply at a call. We can shew ye, at correct asd Money
saving prices, many papers of lease pre white, perfect
DIAMONDS. It Is w desire to car tao e efng tIe Isrgest
Dia eao dealers In Jacksnville, and er specialty Is flne reumd-
cat gems and high-grade Waltam and r igs Watches.


IHESS & SLAaER D1113 lt Watc.s, JeweFry,
J nLOO Oil OLJ6b~n 11-11 YI.<. m~lh, JnkuY, Fh.


SMERRILL-STEVENS CO.


Boilermaking and Repairing

Still Boilers and Pumps.
SHIP BUILDING end REPAIRING.
SJ1acLkonville. RFa.
IaeaalaumuauAsae e aueo s :ioo saheeeit eeasfeesssiI I


14


-Lc-


*









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


DOOM OF ATLANTIC SHAD.

Mr. John W. Titeomb of the United
States bureau of fisheries, in a recent in-
terview with a representative of the New
York Herald, said: "Shad fisheries of the
Atlantic coast are doomed unless the
States take immediate steps to protect
them from the rapacity of the fishermen."
The great demand for shad roe prevents
natural spawning and perpetuation of the
species. The bureau is now closing the
hatching and distribution of shad for this
year, and reports from various stations
give startling evidence that the supply of
shad on the Atlantic seaboard is rapidly
diminishing. Facilities of the bureau allow
the hatching and setting free in the
streams of the country of 300,000,000 shad
fry annually, but this year only about 45,-
K 000,000 have been handled. The output
was 65,493 in 1904, and last year it was be-
low 57,000,000.
Mr. Titcomb predicts that in ten years
without the intervention of State protec-
tive laws, shad will become so scarce in the
Atlantic rivers that they will be purchas-
able only by the stewards of big hotels
and those who supply the tables of the
very wealthy.
Habits of the shad lend themselves ad-
mirably to the extermination of the fish.
They approach the shores in immense
schools, actually crowding one another in
their efforts to reach the head of the fresh
water streams, where the spown is depos-
ited. The fishermen have learned how to
intercept the run by nets in the bays and
in the boad mouths of the rivers, and the
marketable shad are now nearly all caught
in this way.
Few roe shade escape the nets. The riv-
ear are thus much depleted, the natural
spawning of the fish interfered with and
the supply of eggs available for the hateh-
ing bureau cut off.
In pointing out a remedy, Mr. Titcomb
says it is incumbent on the States to en-
act restricting laws against the taking of
fish in the brackish waters of the bays and
at the mouths of the rivers. He believes


the fish should be allowed to ascend the
rivers unmolested, at least during one of
the annual runs, possibly that in May, and
during a considerable part of the shad sea-
son the catch should be limited to fresh
water.
Streams on the Pacific coast have been
stocked and the shad transplanted from its
native waters in the Atlantic ocean to the
Pacific with good results. Shad are in-
creasing in California and other western
rivers under the restrictive laws there en-
forced.-Fishing Gazette.

WEEVIL MOVES EASTWARD FAST.

Baton Rouge, La., Nov. 13.-At today's
session of the convention of official ento-
mologists of the Cotton Belt, J. B. Gar-
rett, assistant entomologist of the Louisi-
ana State Crop Pest Commission, said
thatthe migrating weevil had this year
made a record breaking migration to Lou-
isiana.
W. B. Pierce, agent of the Texas bu-
reau, said that in the migration of the
weevil from Mexico it had continually out-
stripped the movements of the parasites
which destroy the weevil, but wherever
the weevil went it found new parasites.
The percentage of parasites, compared wtih
the number of weevils, he said, was in-
finitely small.

ATLANTIC COAST LIN ROUND TRIP
EXCURSION RATES FROM JACK-
SONVILLE.
$L40-Hot Springs, Ark.; on ale daily;
limit ninety days.
Sxo.35-Atlanta, Ga.; on sale Oct. 19, 20,
21 and 22; limit leaving Atlanta
Oct. 30; extension to Nov. 21.
(17.55-Gulfport, Miss.; on sale Nov. 12,
13; limit Nov. 2.
Excursion rates to other points.
Limits, schedule, Pullman reservations
and all detailed information to above and
other points, cheerfully furnished on spli-
cation, either in person or by mail,to
Frank C. Boyletoo, Distrit Pasme
Agent, 138 Weit DBy s., JasHavfll, h


I

When You Come to White Springs

Register at the


TELFORD HOTEL
Mtden Cnveniences. The nearest HOTEL TO THE
SPRING. Rates furnished on appeation.
T. R. WOODSON, PROPRIETOR.



Mc KOY PATENT


Turpentine Cup.

'The best and simplest cup
on the market. Detachable
Greater Capacity, easier
dipped ,more easily placed
on tree, stronger and prac-
tically indestructible, Will
S) not rust. For catalog and
price list write


110 PITEIT IM CUP CO
S' // n Hiberia Buildun,
New Orleans. Louisana,


Clyde Steamship Company


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
The magilut steuships of this line are appointed to sail a follows, selling at
COurlmto, 8. C, both way.
Frem New YTrk, rem Jackhauv far
(Pier 6 ertkh Rer.) STLAMEIL ChadrstoY at New York.
Friday, Nov. 23, at 3:00pm ...... APACHE....... Wednesday, Nov. 28, at 10:00am
Saturday, Nov. 24, at 3:00pm..... ALGONQUIN ..... Friday, Nov. 30, at 10:00am
Tuesday, Nov. 27, at 3:00pm.... .ARAPAHOE ... Sunday, Dee. 2,at 10:&Oam
Wednesday, Nov. 28, at 3:00pm....... HURON....... Monday, Dee. 3, at 10:00am
Friday, Nov. 30, at 3:00pm.....COMANC'HE.....Wednesday, Dee. 5, at 10:00am
Saturday, Dec. l,at3:00pm...... IROQUOIS...... Friday Dec. 7,at 10:00am
Tuesday, Dec. 4, at 3:00pm...... *APACHE ...... Sunday, Dec. 9, at 10:00am
Wednesday, Dec. 5, at 3:00pm.... ALGONQUIN ... Monday, Dec. 10, at 10:00am
Friday, Dec. 7,at 3:00pm..... .ARAPAHOE... .Wednesday, Dec. 12, ta 10:00am
CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
reiht Service Between Jadasuvlle, Boston atn PrTiasnce, and all Eastar Pbatf,
Calling at Charlstea Beth Way.
FREIGHT ONLY.


From Sauth i8
Lewis Wharf, Bastes


From Aft CaUdthe Oblook
Jadwaeave.


Friday, Oct. 19.............. *KATAHDIN.................Thursday, Oct. 25
Wednesday, Oct. 24 ............... *CHIPPEWA ......... .Tuesday, Oct. 80
Saturday, Oct. 27............... ONONDAGA .............. Saturday Nov. 3
Friday, Nov. 2................ KATAHDIN ............... Thursday, Nov. 8
Wednesday, Nov. 7 ............... *CHIPPEWA .............. Tueday, Nov. 13
Saturday, Nov. 10............... ONONDAGA .............. Saturday, Nov. 17
*Via Brunswick and Charleston.
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
Between Jacrsemvuille m fer .
Stopping at Palatka, Astor, St. Franc, Beresford (Dalad), anld intermmedi
landings on St. Johns River.

STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
Is appointed to sail as follows: Leave Jaeksonville, Sunday, Tuday and
Thursday, 3:30 p. m. Returning, leave Sanford, Mondays, Wednesays e Fri
9:30 a. m.
SCMH0DUL
SOUTJTMOUNI NORiLmsUnu
Read down rBead u
Leave 3:30p...................... Jaksovl ................ i e 2:bSa.m.
save 8:6 4p.m.................... Palatka .................... 8:00p.m.
Leave 3:00&a.m .................... Astor ...................... 3:30p.m.
............. .... ..... Be ford (Delad) .............. a 1:00 p. m.
Arrive 8:30a................... Sanford ................... 9:30a.m.
Arrive 10:00a ................. .. terprie .................. Lvm 10: a.
GEmERAL PAS8MOGE AMD TICKET OFFICE, ias W. DAY T., JACK'VLLU.
F. M. IRONMONGER, Jr., Ast e. 'l Pass. Agent, 123 W. Bay St, Jaamonril, 1a.
W. G. 00OPER, Jr., Frt. Agt. P. I OVL oI4up
Foot of Hogan Street, Jaekmoville, Fl.
A. C. HAGERTY, CLYDE MLNE,
Genl Eastern Pas. Agt, New York. Gel rt. Agt, New York.
THEO. G. EGER, V. P. and G. M.
General Offices. Pier 36, North River. Branch, 200 Broadway, New York.









peee te be what it is recommen ded to be-.grapd ladles' and mothers'
medlelne, for bulding up, indge stion and bad blood, and- have uod
I bottles, moat of which was previous to and during the birth of our
fine baby, and its results have been worth more than $100 to me."
J. D. Rutledge, a Methodist minister of Blytheville, Ark., says: a1;
was in a critical condition, as my whole system was absorbed with
malaria, billiousness, bad Mood-all run down and appetite. bad, and
after the use of four bottles of Cactus Compound I gained about twenty
five pounds and I regained my p perfect health and firmly believe thil
remedy saved my life."
L. Rhone, Portland, Ore,, says: "I was troubled eight years wvi
syphilitic sores, rheumatism, bad blood and leet vitality, and after the
use qf nine bottles of Cactus Compound I an In robust health iM
every respect, and.this remedy rsvated my whole svata and I hev
inr'ased 24ys pounds In weight


r --- -------


1







1 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
NOWm WWWWWWWWWWWWWW^%%W

The


Cooperage


Company


Manufacturers of High Grade

Western White Oak Spirit Barrels


Capital $200,000.

JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
Orders sent direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.
We are now prepared to furnish barrels from six shops advantageously located.

OFFICERS:
J. C. LITTLE, President. JOHN E. HARRIS, Vice-President.
E. H. MOTE, General Manager. C H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasurer.


J. C. LITTLE,


JOHN E. HARRIS,
W. C. POWBLL,


DIRECTORS:
C. H. BARNES,
W. F. COACHMAN.


J. W. WEST,
E. H. MOTE.


W. J. KELLY


*'A~IYIY 'r rly -JIYN~I*~I-cr- ~M~~~~rMI Dl~%%%UPci' -Yw r _c-~J

roummhmemhh~u~ammam....iuuuusuu..urm~srsruI0 ~%%r rc~~~r ri,,..rr~


J. W. Motse.
Pruieldt


C. B Parkeu
vioe-Preo.


Jazi moNmIt
Vtoe-Pres.


W. W. Wilder.
See. & Treas.


John R. Young Co.,


Commission
Merchants.


Naval Stores factors. Wholesale Grocers.
Sav--%Anh L Brunswick. Ga


mmml mmmii mm mmsesemim wmumem ms miii mus:**


L. w. awonT,
P -


G6 A. P3TTKWAY,
Tce.-Presiinat.


I* *


A. BACON,
Sec*y & Tr"a.


PENINSULAR NAVAL STORES
Capital, 500,000.00.
Sacosos to TIMMONS-dB OUN CO.
Naval Stores Factors and Commission Merchants.


CO.


I m __L Turpentine Operators' Supplies
OP EVERY DESCRIPTION
Flat Savannah Prices paid for Rsin and Turpentine, lem
Customary Charges.
CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED.
Ofiees-Ameriean National Bank Bldg., Tampa, Fla.
Yards, Port Tampa City.
L - *rr >>i> > rT yir *


FIF7 H AVENUE HOTEL
Madison Square, New York.
American Plan $5 per day. European Pl n $2.00 per (y o
The most famous representative hotel
in America. New as the newest. always
fresh and elea.. The lotioa in Madiaon
Square i tl.c finest in the city.
HITCHCOCK. DARLING QO COMPANY.




SJ. S. Schofield's Sons Company.

n eaQdariers fbr
Distiller's Pumping
. i Outfit.
No plant complete without one.
SHundreds of them in me in Georgia,
Florida, Alabama, Mimsiippi and
S 8oth Carolina. Write us for prticu-
lar C anu prices. We also manufacture
Engines, Boilers aid ligh
BGradr M enairy,
' m~ -as well a, carry a full and oanplelu
S---estockof-
S. M Mill Supplies, Pipe,
;: Beller Tubes, Etc.
*I j Advise your wants.
; ". Macon, - Georgia.
A 011120 So-atr o'f a "
VimKta of Imag Wkt for Twommthaseg Porlleess


IPL


-e









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


(Continued from page 12.)
der, the state chemist of Virginia, on Con-
trol of the Sale of Human oFods and the
Need of Uniform Laws.
Mr. McCarthy, who is president of the
Florida Horticultural Society, presented a
strong paper, with deductions based on
practical experience. The paper was a
most admirable sequel to that presented
by Prof. Rolfe, and will be printed in full
later.
Mr. Magruder, of Virginia, addressed the
convention on the sale of adulterated foods.
He pointed out the almost limitless harm
that comes therefrom, showed what prog-
ress had been made in fighting this evil
and closed with an earnest plea for all to
unite in the effort to secure uniform leg-
islation, legislation that would put an end
to the sale of adulterated foods in every
State of the Union.
This was the last paper presented yes-
terday. Discussions followed every sub-
ject, and these were generally participated
in. After the last paper had been present-
ed, the resolutions were adopted and ad-
journment followed.

ALLEGED GRAIN REBATING.

James J. Hill Proves a Willing Witness
Before Commission.
Minneapolis, Nov. 21.-James J. Hill,
.president of the Great Northern, Northern
Pacific and Burlington roads, was the first
witness today when Commissioners Lane
and Prouty of the Interstate Commerce
Commission began their inquiry into the
relations which exist between the railroad
companies and the grain companies in the
northwest. The hearing is held pursuant
to the LaFollette resolution.
Mr. Hill proved to be a willing witness.
His answers were given to all questions
without hesitation. On the subject of
grain elevators, Mr. Hill said:
"It is our rule to permit anyone to erect
elevators at stations of our road on the
right of way. We now make our contracts
not transferable as we have found in-
stances where such applications were not
made in good faith and afterwards sold
at a good figure. When we have found
objectionable elevator combines we have
sometimes built elevators of our own and
placed some man in charge. In such in-
stances the combines have tried to freeze
our man out, but, that, gentlemen," said
Mr. Hill, with a smile, "was before the
passage of the interstate commerce law."

ACCUMULATED COTTON.
Augusta, Nov. 21.-In the testimony
given in the application before the railroad
commission to compel the Southern rail-
way to haul accumulated cotton from
Fayetteville, Ga., it yas developed today
. that there were over 31,000 bales there
waiting shipment of which 1,500 bales were
in mud and water six inches deep. Owing
to conditions in Fayetteville the insurance
companies are refusing to insure cotton.

MR. J. H. PATTEN SUGGESTS RE-
STRICTIONS TENDING TO BETTER
QUALITY OF IMMIGRANTS.
Owing to the high interest that is being
taken just at this time throughout the en-
tire South in the immigration question,
few, if any, of the subjects taken up at
the annual convention of the Southern


Mr. Patten is the secretary of the Immi-
gration Restriction League. He has been
for years engaged in the study of the im-
migration problem, and his paper, as pre-
sented Monday, showed careful prepara-
tion, thorough understanding of all the
phsaes of the problem, and brought out
clearly the work that is being done by the
society he represents to raise the standard
of quality of the immigrants to this coun-
try
At the very outset of his address, Mr.
Patten pointed out that the league, of
which lie was an officer, was not trying to
restrict the tide of immigrants, so far as
numbers were concerned, but was working
to so restrict it that the worthless, shift-
less, undesirable class could not enter.
Quality was the object of the league, and
w-hile every inducement will be extended
to the higher class of immigrants, the off-
s-ourings of Europe is what the league
Ieeks to prevent from getting into this
country.
The Dillingham Bill.
After briefly outlining the plan of work
that the league is following, Mr. Patten
called attention to "the Dillingham bill,"
formally known as Senate bill 4403, Re-
port No. 2186, a bill to amend the immigra-
tion act of March 3. 1903, and which passed
the Senate May 23, 1906.
He pointed out that the first section in-
creased the duty on alien passengers from
$2 to $5, and that added to the classes ex-
cluded were imbeciles, feeble-minded per-
sons, epileptics and "perosns not compre-
hended within any of the foregoing exclud-
ed classes, who are found to be and are
certified by the examining surgeon as be-
ing mentally or physically defectinve, such
mental or physical defect being of a na-
ture which may affect the ability of such
alien to earn a living."
In this connection, Mr. Patten pointed
out that this is what is usually called the
'pI or physique" clause, and argued force-
fully in favor of its adoption.
No Minor Immigrants.
The speaker next took up the question
of the immigration of minors, and argued
against this. This the Dillingham bill
would prohibit, as children under seventeen
years of age, unaccompanied by their pa-
rents, or unless coming to join parents or
relatives able and willing to support them,
are barred entrance.
The importation of minors, Mr. Patten
said, was one of the causes that lead to
the working of boys under the padrone
system, and the importation of girls for
immoral purposes, a practice generally re-
ferred to in the public prints as "the white
slave traffic."
This evil the Immigration Restriction
League is seeking to wipe out, and on be-
half of the league, the speaker asked the
co-operation of everyone interested in this
great problem, and especially those work-
ing along this particular line.
"Assisted to Come."
Then came the question of excluding
those "assisted to come." And here, the
speaker held, was a great question.
He pointed out that statistics showed
that just about one-half of all immigrants
do not pay their passage, or, in other
words, "are assisted to come." The Re-
striction League seeks to limit the privi-
lege of "assisting" to such relatives as are
Likely to show an interest in the immi-


States Association of Commissioners of grants and to be responsible for them and
Agriculture will attract such general at- their welcome after they arrive.
tension as did the paper on immigration "Restriction along this line," he said,
read Monday afternoon by Mr. J. H. Pat- "is provided in the Dillingham bill, and it
ten of Boston, Mass. is confidently believed that this provision


SDIrectrs,
W. W. ASHBUBN, Moultrie, Ga. N. EMANUEL, Brunswick, Ga.
W. B. BOWEN, Fitzgerald, Ga. D. T. FURSE Savannah. Ga.
J. J. DORMINY, Broxton, Ga. KIRKLAND, Nichols, Ga.
O. T. McINTOSH, Savannah, Ga.


Southern States Naval Stores Co.
Savannah. Ga.


Factors
Ship to Savannah


and Commission Merchants
Get Competition Highest Prices Promptest Returns
Correspond With Us


Malsby Machinery Company

of Jacksonville, Fla.

Portable, Staltlary EiglaM aid bller
Saw MIII ald Workbl MaklNry.
Portable Otfits a Specialty.
Write for haidseme idutrated 1906 cat
Cor Ward and Jefferson

Streets.



THE FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK.

of Jacks onville.


General Banking.


496 on Savings Deposits


C. E. GARNER, President. A. F. PERRY, Vice-PrMeat.
C. B. ROGERS, Vie--Preident. W. A. REDDING, (ushier.
G. J. Avent, Ast. Oshier.






YELLOW PINE TIMBER'


Is Attracting Attention of the Entire COUNTRY

Our Information is Absolutely Reliable.

EVERY PROPOSITION

We offer you a good one. If you are in the market,

now is the time to buy. Write us your wants. Corres-

pondence with bona-fide buyers solicited.



Brobston, Fendg & Company
JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA BRUNSWICK GA.
i26 West Foryth Street. 11 Newcastle Street.



euIsI0eII0IeIIIIIIeIII> |I u llI8 U (ll ***s 0sE**us*mIi

SJOS. ROSENHEIM SHOE CO.
SMANTVACTURERS AD JOBBERS OF


SHOES
4*


S SAVANNAH, GEORGIA
S" Best Shoes Made for Commissary Trade."
'a s a BA 8 i S a 1I I I 18 1 4im*8 I h 8 111 to


1








18 THB WUBKLY INInUSTRAL RECORD.


would do much to diminish the number of
those who become public charges.
"The bill further extends the time with-
in which those becoming public charges
may be deported, making it three years
instead of two, as at present, the same
as in cases of persons entering in violation
of law."
For Zdactimal Requirement.
Mr. Patten also dwelt at some length
on the fact that the Dillingham bill ex-
cluded all over sixteen physically capable
of reading who cannot read in the English
language or some other language. An ex-
ception is made in the case of children
coming to join their parents or in parents
or grandparents, more than fifty years of
age, coming to join their children, who have
preceded them.
"The statistics show," said Mr. Patten,
"that in general there is a ose correspond-
ence between ignorance of language and
ignorance of trade, poverty, tendency to
settle in the slums of large cities, failure
to settle permanently or to become natu-
ralized, and general difficulty of assimila-
tion
"I do not say that the ability to read
makes a man a good immigrant, but the
probabilities are that he is better than
the one who cannot read, that he has more
ambition, that he will work himself up,
and the chances for assimilation are inn-
itely better for him. I believe strongly in
this educational test, and believe that it
will go a great ways towards shutting out
the low, worthless, shiftless, trouble-mak-
ing class of immigrants "
Bureaus Europe.
Mr. Patten pointed out the desirability
of establishing immigration bureaus in
Europe, and having competent men, men
with the best interests of their particular
sections at heart, selecting the immigrnuts..
The high class of immigrants seemed by
Commissioner Watson, of South Carolina,
he cited as an example of what can be
accomplished by work alJng these lines.
He argued strongly against the Indis-
criminate bringing of immigrants here, and
against entrusting a work of such impor-
tance to the agents of steamship Hnes,
whose first object is always to fill the
steerage, regardless of quality. No coun-
try, he pointed out, wanted to lose the beat
class of its people, and unless broad-mind-
ed, hardworking men took up this work,
the foreign countries would keep their best
and give us their off-scourings.
"In the end, these restrictions will not
affect numbers," said Mr. Patten. "Deny
the steamship companies the right to bring
illiterates, and they will bring literates.
Deny them the right to bring men without
trades, and they will bring men with them.
Refuse to receive the worthless ones, and
they will bring the better ones. They will
do it, because they must do it."
He closed with a beautiful tribute to the
South. and to the home-life of the South,
and with a plea for sustaining it and hold-
ing it up as an example to newcomers and
to the entire country.


A GREAT FURNITURE STORB.

The E. E. Cleaveland Furiture Company
Has Grown and Prospered.
Among the many reputable enterprises
represented in Jacksonville that have stood
the test of time, none is more deserving of
honorable mention than the E. E. Cleave-
land Furniture Co.
Founded in 1880 by its present owners
upon the broad principles of fair dealings,
honest values and courteous treatment to
all, its growth and progress has been so
marked that it occupies today the enviable
position of Florida's leading and most
prominent furniture store.
Its present magnificent quarters excite
the admiration and comment of travelers
even from the great cities of the country,
who unhesitatingly pronounce it an em-
porium of which Florida may be justly
proud. Everything pertaining to the com-
plete furnishing of the home may be found
here in abundance from the most humble
and inexpensive article to the grander and
more pretentious commodities; this con-
cern has also just added a very extensive
carpet department which is replete with
the choicest productions of this country
and the orient, which they offer at very
moderate prices.
One of the most commendable features
of the E. E. Cleaveland Furniture Co. is
that they never indulge in misleading
newspaper quotations and misrepresenta-
tions of any nature are never permitted in
this establishment.
Enjoying, as it does, a very extensive
patronage throughout Georgia and Florida,
the out-of-town trade is earnestly solicited
and highly appreciated; very special atten-
tion being given to mail orders, which is
characterized through prompt shipments
and careful personal attention We cheer-
fully recommend this firm to everyone re-
quiring anything in this line and a visit
will doubtless prove remunerative to those
accepting their open invitation to eal.

Cotton Congress.
London, Nov. 15.-The committee of the
internationall cotton congress which was
entertained by King Edward at Windsor
yesterday held a meeting in London today
to discuss various matters operating to
its work and decided that the annual con-
gress for next year should be held in Vi-
enna. The invitations to send delegates to
the conference of the cotton growers and
planters of America in October of next
year was cordially accepted.

LEGAL NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that on, to-wit,
the 20th day of February, A. D. 1907, I
shall apply to the County Judge of Duval
County, Florida, for my final discharge as
administratrix of the estate of James S.
Coghlan, deceased, and ask that my final
accounts he audited and allowed.
Jacksonville, Florida, this 7th day of
July, 100B.
ALICE V. COGHLAN,
Administratrix of the Estate of James 8.
Coghlan.


THE ARAGON
JACIKSOIVIU.. VIrA.
NOW OPEN
Under new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
eluding new electric elevator and our
own e Oecrie H light plant.
H. N. O'NEAL, Prop.


THE BOND & BOURS CO.
WHOL ALE ILK TAIL.

HARDWARE

SASH, DOORS, BLINDS, PAINTS.
Oils, Glass, Stoves, Tinware, Country Holloware.


o WEST MAY STREET.


JACKSONVILLE. VLA.


East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED LONG LEAP

Yellow Pine Lumber

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots
Steamer Sbipments a Specialty.
WATERTOWN. FLORIDA


PLANTERS


"Old Time" Remedies


THE JOY OF THE HOUSEHOLD.


Thee four great remedies, Mbhias Te, eme- i, Caues rM
and Chban 0, are the joy of the houhold. With them mar at hal, a
man is ready for any emergency. He has a safe, reliable and speedy relief
for wife, ehildre, self or stock. With thee remedies you an keep the
doctor's hands out of your pockets, and yet have a healthy, happy famny.
Besides, you an cure your stock of any almet that may bell them.
UMIAR TEA-Ia Liai er Powder Per-Is the great family mediede. It
will eure all forms of Liver and Kidney Complaints, Prevents Cills an Malarial
Fever. Cures the common ailmeata of children; and as a native toale it ia without
a equal-safe and reliable. in the liquid, it la extremely paataie-re ehildren
like it-and it is READY FOR USE.
MBBEDICTA is a woman's medieie. tt will car all the diseames commm to
womes, and elaaed as Female Troubles. It will bring youth back to the Eaded woman.
who has gon oe suffering because she thought it wommar let. It will amr for the
young girl juat entering womaanood; and prepare the young woman r the sared
duti of wife and mother.
CUBA RELIXF-The instant Paint Killer, for either man or beat. Relieves
Insantly, Oolic, Cram, Choler Morbus, Diarrhoea, Dysteatery and Sek Headache
For ce in horse it is an infallible remedy and it guaranteed to give relief in Ave
minutes.
CUBAR OIL-The Beet Bea and MN ea Ialmsimt. s aattseptie for cuts,
saged or tora flesh, and will instantly relieve the pain. Cures iat bites and stings,
eds and burst, bruises and aoe, chapped had sad face, e and tender feet.
Relieves rheumatic pais, lame beck. stiff joints, and in stoek uare wire fme euat.
sratehes, thrums, splint, collar sore, saddle galk, and dieAlsed hefa.
Write a r Ps ri

SPENCER MEDICINE CO., Chattanooga, Ten.



Successful Men

appreciate, use and advise Life Insu-
rance. The advice of successful men
is worth following. Insure in

THE PRUDENTIAL '""SS"""

WALTER P. COR ETT, M I. JOHN F. DRYDEN, Pres.
400 West R d..Je-M Fla. emoe Oflfe. JewarC. NJ





CUMER LUMBER CoPANY
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

Rough .e Dresed Lumber

Long L99f relw Phn.
BOXES AA1A=rmS.





*8iIhh88 ,h hhh hh h ............um...m. .u--.. -------- -


0. B. BOGERS, President. W. A. GAITTAHRR and E. A. CHAMPLAIN Viee-Presidents JOHN BALL, See'y and Tress.
DI0UOTOU2 : C. B. Roger, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain, D. H.. McMillan and J. A. Cranford, of Jaeknnorve;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $500,000.

Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches in Tampa, Peasacola, Pla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Conloldlated Grocery Company is nucesor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Groeery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery brane
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company of Penseola; the grocery brt .uh of th. West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pemseola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries,


Grain, Pro-


visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.


Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Have a Larger Capacity than any Company of Its kind In the South.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters 116 to 120 East Bay street, Jacksonville, Fla.
ranches Tammpa. Fri., Penamscol. Fla., and Svtnneah, Ga.
6 a-------s&h a a.u a.a as h* esasaa.hhh.sss* *su...e.e ssess@euu *h.h. IgoII..*........


I II IL


------- ----------- & s-88


i-
r7




.~I-f


- -----------------------------------------------


II- i n n i n n L _____ -~L a~ w rm


U.'


E


Half Tones-Zinc Etchings


Ilustratina and Engravina Department


I


_ ~-N- IW l 46JN...

GREENLEAF .& CROSBY CO.
i Jewelers and Importers,
41 W. BAY STREET. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

i Diamonds Diamonds
We Save You Middleaan's We Save Ycu MIdc.esana's
Profit. w Profit.
Previous stone are of many degrees of HA Comparatively few prams are emrpetnt
perfetio, or we might as i*prios, y DEALERS IN DIAMONDS to judge the quality ad value of a di-
oe M Te variuo A OTH PrCIOUMS TOWS mnond, thus the only safe way we pr-
Io of di amns may when e1parg CE THE ESTABLISHMhT OF 0sain gems is to go to a strlay reliable
p of several dealeJ, be lniued to BUIM IN AND DICT dealer, one whoe many yar do reiab
b ome one dealer is muek lower in DSINT business standing in the eommmuny is a
rie than other. In reality the lower IMPORTE FOR MOE THA poitive guarantee that you will rsle fair
price oly opible by the lower q TWT T and honorabe treatment.
of the e' otffd. TAe cao tfi Hf- la41TIS-ACTION ol a- t* .
tHasey.rtederhoma wf hapeaai e tbie g AS8U We offer oly stores of teip be qafI.,
eitLr separately or eolleeively determine and y s by is suratee
| the rrel rae f mh stem /strictly a rerimted.

DIAMONDS DIAMONDS

S Write Us-Mail Orders Receive Prompt Attention.
W d. jMei V#&rs R ci h'.


THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.

Splendidly equipped foi business. Half fones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most unproved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapersland all kinds of Commercial Work, Pamohlets, etc


1 NdIlllT I F IM Is I ROfii III1 In Fllll3HIl PI IWFIS In NIICUm.


IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES. GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
GoOD WORk AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED.


A Florida


Enterprise.


Try It.


Um


-~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ -- ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ -- ~ ~~ ~~-~-~


m


m


m


L EMN


c~- --~--


--WTI f


OF-