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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00199
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: November 15, 1906
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00199
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text



SUSTRIAL
m 1


RECORD


fnlY (AVAL IToRES,
SVIstER (o LEEkALb
| lOVSTRIAbb FAthGIAIs
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JACKSONVILLE, FLA. SAVANNAH, GA.
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CONSOLIDATED NAVAL STORES COMPANY.
Home Office: JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Branches: Savannah. Ga., and Pensacola, Fla.
OFFICERS.
W. C. POWELL, Preudent; B. F. BULLAkD, H. L COVINGTON, J. A. CRANFORD, D. H. MeMILLAN, B. R. POWELL, C. N COVIOGTON, JOHN H.
POWELL, Vies President; C. P. DUBSBURY, Seeretary and Treasurer.
LIEUUTIVU COMMI'TEE: W. C. Powel, C. B. Rogers, H. L Coington, B. F. Bullard, J. A. Craford.
DIL VCTORS: W. C. owlU, B F. Bullard, C. B. Rogers, J. A. Chanford, W. J. Hillman, John H. Powell, W. F. Cosehman. H.L. Covingto, C. Dowsin, D. H.
MeMilan, R. B. Powell. C. M. ovington, 8. A. Alford.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS

Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
The 'Consolidated" Is purely a co-operative Company. Its Interests are Identical with those
of the Producers. The patronage of turpentine operators everywhere Invited.
Two Million acres of land and Timber for sale on easy terms.
Producers ere invited to cell or correspond.


Success for


Our


Customers


Is Success


C OVINGTON


for Us.


COMPANY,


NOTIONS. . . .
JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA.


McMillan Bros.


Southern Copper
Works
Manufacturers of TURPENTINE STILLS
Complete Outfits and Extra Kettles, Caps, Arms, Worms, Fur-
nace Doors and Grates always on hand
Old Stills taken in part New Work and repairing done
payment for Nin the country
Heavy Coppersmithing, Steam Pipe and Speelal Ceppe Wlrk
Jacksonville, Fla.
AUr Fayetteville, N. C. Savannah, Ga. Mobile, Ala.














WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL


RECORD.


PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY. DEVOTED TO NAVAL STORES, LUMBER AND MANUFACTURING IN I Klabl,


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S. P. Shotter Company [isolved and New Alabama Peonage Cases Are Now on Trial


The two largest exporters of naval
stores in the trade-the Patterson-Down-
ing Company and the S. P. Shotter Conm-
* pany, of Savannah-will retire from bust-
ness on the 30th of November and go into
voluntary liquidation.
The business of the two companies will
be taken over by the American Naval
Stores Company, recently incorporated
under the laws of West Virginia for the
purpose of doing a general naval stores
business. This company will purchase the
business and properties of the S. P. Shot-
ter Company and of the Paterson-Downing
Company, of Savannah.
The officers of the new company will be:
President, E. S. Nash; vice-president, J. F.
C. Myers; treasurer, George M. Boardman;
secretary, C. J. DeLoach. Mr. S. P. Shot-
ter will be chairman of the board of di-
rectors of the new company, and will thus
be actively identified with its interests.
The new company was organized with
a capital and surplus of $1,750,00.
Head Office in Savamah.
The head office of the new company
will be in Savannah, the main offices of
the Paterson-Downing Company having
been heretofore in New York.
For some time past there have been re-
ports in circulation to the effect that the
two export houses named would retire
from business, and interest was wide-
spread among the trade in the matter.
Yesterday Mr. E .Nash, the president
of the Paterson-Downing Company, and
the president of the new company, made
to a representative of the Savannah News
an authoritative statement an the sub-
ject.
Deal ea Same Timr.
Mr. Nash stated that the retirement of
the two companies and the taking over
of their affairs by the American Naval
Stores Company had been in process of ar-
rangement and development for several
months past and that on the 30th of No-
vember the two companies would retire
from business and go into liquidation.
In puruance of this plan, said Mr.
Nash, some weeks ago a charter was ob-
tained in West Virginia for the organiza-
tion of an exporting house under the name
0 f the American Naval Stores Company
for the purpose of doing a general naval
stores business. This company will pur-
chase the business and properties of the
S. P. Shotter Company and the Paterson-
Downing Company.
As already stated, the president of the
new company will be Mr. E. S. Nash, pres-
ident of the Paterson-Downing Company.
The vice-president. Mr. J. F. C. Myers, is
at present vice-president of the S. P. Shot-
ter Company. The treasurer, Mr. George
M. Boardman, is vice-president and treas-
urer of the Paterson-Downing Company.
The secretary, Mr. C. J. DeLoach, is secre-
tary and treasurer of the S. P. Shotter
Company.


The Paterson-Downing Company and the
S. P. Shotter Company have been in the
naval stores business for many years, and
are among the two most widely known
exporters in this country.

TIES FOR COLON.

Largest Cargo Ever Shipped from Jackson-
ville on a Single Steamer.
With the first cargo of crossties ever
shipped from Jacksonville to Colon, the
Norwegian steamship Hero will sail today.
The big tramp steamer is now moored at
the Talleyrand pier, where she has been
since last Friday, taking on 26,000 cypress
crossties from G. S. Baxter & Co.
Charles H. Howard, the stevedore, is
loading the ship and he stated yesterday
that she would be ready to clear for
Colon this morning. The master of the
vessel came to the city yesterday morn-
ing and ordered his stores aboard.
The Hero will carry the largest cargo
of crossties ever shipped on a single ves-
sel from this port and her careo will
greatly increase the export figures for the
month of November, which now promise
to excel the record-breaking month of Oc-
tober.

CENTRAL WILL USE ELECTRICITY.
The Central of Georgia Railway Com-
pany is having installed an electric plant
for driving the machinery of the machine
shops and car works at Savannah. These
will include the repair shops also.
The shops have been operated with
steam heretofore, but following the line
of progress and bending to the demands
of economy, the company is substituting
electricity for steam.
The foundations are being laid now and
the contract will be completed in January.
The work is being done by the manufac-
turing department of the Westinghouse
Company of Pittsburg.
Two generators, with a capacity of 200
kilowatts each will be installed, along with
two high-speed Westinghouse engines.
There will be a battery of three Babcock
& Wilcox boilers with a horse power of
150 each. Two of the boilers will be in
use all the while and the other will he
held in reserve for emergencies.
Steam will be necessary for the genera
tion of the power, of course, but as a di-
rect motive power, it will be abrogated.
The advantage in favor of electricity is
that there may be a number of motors
and that the machinery may he grouped
and any machine may be placed under
power when it is needed, and the wear
saved on other machines and shafting.
Under the operation of steam, the whole
outfit is placed in motion, whether needed
or not.
The approximate cost of the new plant
has not been made known, but ft will be
something less than $100,000.


Company Formed.


at Pensacola,

Pensacola, Nov. 14.-When the United ready by defense. Counsel for prosecution
States court convened this morning to asked that jury be recalled "to satisfy
again take up the indictments against the captious demands of the defense," and
S e enthis was done. Defense renewed objec-
twelve persons for alleged peonage and tions to any member of the jury sitting
conspiracy to commit peonage, Judge in the case on the ground that their names
Charles Swayne announced his decision had not been drawn from the box in the
on the demurrers to lie indictments which proper Imanner. The court overruled the
lie had taken under consideration the day objection. and defense noted an exception
previous. He overruled the objection of to the ruling. The various jurymen were
counsel for defense and as a result all of then examined and finally, just before
the peonage cases will be tried at this adjournment, the twelve men to hear the
term of the court. The objection and de- most important peonage case ever brought
nmurrers to the indictments principally before a court were accepted. They will
consisted of arguments that certain por- be under the constant care of bailiffs of
tions thereof relative to the treatment the the court. Tomorrow it is anticipated the
men are alleged to have received at the examination of witnesses will commence.
hands of the defendants should be strick-
en out, as they would have a tendency to
prejudice the jury against the defendants. Pensacola. Nov. 15.-Much testimony,
The court held, in substance, that if the some of whllch is considered very damag-
government could prove the allegation of ing to defendants, was hard in the United
ill treatment it was a very e-sential part States court today in the trial of W. L
of its case and came directly under the Harlan, manager of the Jackson Lumber
statute bearing upon the matter. Company; S. E. Huggins, J. E. S. Howell
When court convened at 10 o'clock tlie and C. C. Hilton, charged wltn conspiracy
court room was crowded and the deepest to commit peonage. It was the first day
silence reigned as Judge Swayne rendered of the trial following the selection yes-
his decision upon the various points he terday of a jury, and in the arguments to-
had taken under advisement at the close day over every inch of ground was stub-
of the preceding day's session. hornly contested by counsel for defense,
The defense was represented by an im- especially in relation to the admittance
posing array of legal talent and the gov- of testimony, and numerous motions and
ernment was assisted by Assistant Attor- objections were made and raised. The
ney General Charles W. Russell of Wash- court room was filled throughout the day,
ington, who had been specially retained many being interested in the proceedings.
upon the case. Important Witness.
After the decisions had been rendered The most important witness today was
a short conference of attorneys ensued, a Hungarian named Rudolph Lanigner,
after which it was announced that the who testified through an interpreter of
first case had been continued till 3 o'clock having reached this country in June of
to allow the attorneys to further prepare 1 190. and signing a contract with a labor
for triel, it being represented that such agency in New York to work for the Jack-
continupance would expedite the handling son Lumber Company, at Lockhart, Ala.,
of the case. his arrival there in July of this year with
The court convened promptly at thfee the twenty-eight others, his subsequent
o'clock. but considerable delay ensued, attempt to escape after two months' work,
owing to the absence of the attorneys for lapuIre, return to the camp, and final
the go vernment. The delay displeased deliverance by the Hungarian consul of
Judge Strayne. who rebuked the attorneys Mobile, %who responded to an appeal from
upon their apliarance. saying that had a his people and coming to the place carried
juror delayed the court, a fine would have away seventeen, including witness. Lan-
heen inflicted, igner stated that he became dissatisfied
The case against Messrs. W. S. Harlan, I:ecause lie was given work at which he
S. E. Huggins. W. S. Ilowell anid C. C. hod not contracted to do. but was afraid
Ililto. ,of the .lackoni Linther Company, to attempt to escape, as he saw two Ger-
for, conspiracy to conm it peonage. was mans endeavoring to leave and were
calledd and attorneys for defcn-e announ- brought l;ck. However, after working
ced Ithat the indictment h; only been re- two ninth, lie and two others made the
ttirlne.l during tihl mornin.ilg and they ihad attempt. Fearing capture they took to
lnt had ian opportunity to ixamine it. t!'e stain >. intending to come to Pensa-
Thliev a-kel, for a few iiinnti', to i*xaiiie soila. They walked for two days through
it. \hiicl wi granted. T"'ie government the wood,. and finally took a road which
announced really fori trial. Ihe defense they had traveled for some time, when
having pleaded o t guilty DIefen-. ,b-- they heard horse hoof beats upon the
ejected to the jury alreaIdy called acting in rlad. A few moments afterwards a horse-
the ca-e -n1 tlhe ground that the jury was iman galloped up, and his two companions
cal'il to the :ox before defense announced fled. but the horseman leve'ed his revolver
ready. The court overruled that objection upon witness and commanded him to halt.
stating that the jury had been called reg- He was then conmpelledto walk in front of
ularly previous to the announcement of the horse to a blacksmith shop, where he


I_ _? __ _~__~ __










4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


was held tow course, the blacksmith re-
ceiving a gun from the horseman, and
later hf was turned over tO C. 9. Huggins,
pii+,d upon a train and taken to foriidjl,
and there transferred to a wagon for Lock-
hart. Arriving there he was first taken to
the manager's office, and then to the
iitnpf. where he was locked in a house
for the night, and the following day
sent back to the work he had left.
Petitions were then sent to the Hun-
garian consul at Mobile, who came to Lock-
hart and took witness and sixteen others
away from the place.
Witness had no complaint to make of
th6 tfelifinbnt received while in the camp.
Stokes Teatifies.
H. M. Stokes, residing at Laurel Hill,
testified to seeing during June and July
foreigners pass through that place com-
ing in from the direction of the lumber
cSmps: On one occasion he saw three
men from the cnaiup pfii tiifough ii it
wagon and make inquiries about foreign-
ers. Two of these men were Woods Fore-
men Gallagher and Grace, while the third
he did not know. They had two blood-
hounds in the buggy, and followed in the
direction of the foreigners, one of whom
was strapped in the vehicle. 0. W. Hud-
ian; of Laurel Hill, stated that he had
heard iU C. Hilton, while in uiirel Hill
say that he went to Crestview after some
ien who had tried to escape, and had
'etred" them in a swamp.
Julius Rhodes, also of Laurel Hill, saw
Gallagher, Grace and another man in July
hunting for a foreigner. They had blood-
hounds, and later when they returned they
said they had caught up with the men,
but could not bring them back, as the
*APiiff had wir&t to let them alone
). G. Learly, residing four miles west of
Laurell Hill, testified to seeing Hilton
pass near his place inquiring for foreigners.
He was on horseback, and armed, and he
had also seen Gallagher and others with
foreigners in a buggy or wagon.
While considerable testimony was
brought out, the government has yet sev-
eral important witnesses in this case, while
the defense has an array of witnesses to
bs hard ,and who it is stated will show
that the men who were arrested had com-
mitted thefts at the camps, and were ar-
rested and held for this reason. Much of
the time of the court was consumed today
in hearing arguments upon objections to
certain portions of the testimony by coun-
Wel for the defense, especially that portion
relating to others than those on trial.
With one or two exceptions, all of these
objections were overruled by the court and
exceptions were noted. tl is probable that
the present case will occupy all of today
and tomorrow, and possibly go over into
next week. Upon its completion one of
the four indictments will be taken up,
and it is predicted that fully two weeks
will be consumed in hearing these impor-
tant eases.

STANDARD OIL STOCK.

Drop of Twenty-Three Points Recorded
Yesterday.
New York, Nov. 15.-After opening sev-
eral points up at 5~8 today, Standard Oil
stock broke 23 points on the curb market
to 545, a new low level record for several
years. Sales were fairly heavy, being
about 150 shares. All transactions in this
stock are fractional, and it is some years
since as many as 100 shares were sold in
a single lot. The decline was without
effect on the general market.


ACCOUNTANTS.
T. G. Hutchinson, Jaeksonville, Fla.
Walter Mucklow, Jacksonville, Fla.

Briggs Hardware Co., Valdosta, Ga.
BANKS.
Commercial Bank, Jacksonville, Fa.
Florida Bank and Trust Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Efid-wWHOLRSALI.
Chas. Blum & Co., Jacksonville, Fla~
..oseph Zapf & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
BOILERS.
l'oyd's Portable Fireplace, Valdoata, Ga.
BOE~ AND CRATES
Cummer Lumber Co., Jackso ltlle, Fla.
BRICK.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jack-
sonville, Fla.
CLOTHING.
CrLig Bro, J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
COPPER SMITHS.
Nieillin Brothers, Jacksonville SavaI-
nah and Mobll
COOPERAG3.
Coope*itg Co The, Jacksonville, F1a.

DRUGS.
Wm. D. Jones, Jacksonville, Fla.
C. C. Better, Jacksonville, Fl.
DRUGS--WHOLESALE.
Groover-Stewart firug Co., Jackesnville,
Fla.

DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co. The. Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGIHES.
Merrill-Stevelas Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. 8., Macon, Ga.
Lombard Iron Works and Supply Co., Au-
guts, a.
FIREPLACES
Boyd's Portable Fireplace, Valdosat, Ga.
FERTILIZERS.
Bours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
FOUNDRIES.
Smhofeld's Sons Co., J. 8., Macon, Ga.
FUEL
Southern Fuel & Supply Co. The, Jack-
sonville. Fla.

GENTS' FURNISHERS.
Craig & Bro., .. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
Consolidated Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
William Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
Young Co., John R., Savannah, Ga.

GAS AND GASOLINE ENGINES.
Hicks Gas Motor Co., Waycross, Ga., and
Detroit, Mich.


5-


- ----- ----- -------i


HOTY.8.
Travelers' Hotel, Jacksonville, la.
Aragon The, Jacksonvi!ie Fa.
Fifth Avenue Hotel, New York, N. Y.
Telford Hotel. White Springs, Fla.
IRO WORKS.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofrld's Son Co., J. 8., Macon, Ga.

INSURANCE.
Prudential Life, Walter P. Corbett, Mgr.
Jacksonville, Fla.
Cay & McCall, Jacksonville, Fla.

JEWELERS
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fa.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
KEELEY INSTITUTE.
Keeley Institute, Jacksonville, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Blum & Co., Chas., Jacksonville, Fa.
Altmayer & Flatan Liquor Co., Macon, Ga.
Joseph Zapf & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.


SHOiE-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co. The, Jacksonville FA.
JoB. Rosmabim & Sons, Savannah, Ga.
STEAMSHIPS.
Clyde Steamship Co. The, New York Cty.

TANKS.
Davia & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla
Schofeld's Sons Co., J. S., Maeo, Ga.

TumPsmiTzs STTILLS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga., and Pensa-
cola, Fla.
Moilan Drebhers .Co, .Jackavf
Savannah and MI..


TUPF axJmN STILL TBN.
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fl.

TURPENTI1E VATS
Davis & Son, G. M, Palatka, Fla.


MEDICINES. TurEsmTlaK TOOLS.
Spencer Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Team. Council Tool Co., Jacksonville, Fla.


MACHINE WORKS.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Maeon, Ga.
MATERIAL FOR TURPEZTINE PRO-

Schofeld's Sons Co.. J. 8., Macon, Ga.
METAL WORKERS.
McMllfi DrO. C., JackseaU, Sam-
nah and Mobile.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga., and Pnisa-
cola, Fla.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. 8., Maon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co., J. D., Savannah, Ga.
Malaby Machinery Co., Jacksonville, Fla
Briggs Hardware Co., Valdoest, Ga.
NAVAL STORES.
Peninsular Naval Stores Co., Tampa, Fla.
Barnes & J-esup Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
Standard Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
West-Flynn-Harris Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
Young Co., John R., Savannah, Ga.
Southern States Naval Stores Co., Savan-
nah, Ga.
PAIMTS.
Bond & Boura Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.

PLUMBERS.
Coons & Golder, Jacksonville, F
PUMPS.
Merrill-Stevens Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.

RAILROADS.
Atlantic Coast Line.


REAL ESTATE.
HARDWARE. Stockton, J. N. C., Jacksonvlle, Fl.
Bond & Bours Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla. Brobston, Fendig & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Briggs, W. H., Hardware Co., Valdosta, Ga. Livingston & Sons, J. H., Ocala, Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla. Deen Realty & Improvement Co., Way-
Weed & Co.. J. D., Savannah. Ga. heroes, Ga.
Florida Realty Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
HAY AND RAIN.
Bourn & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla, SEDS.
Bours & Co., Win. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
HATS. SHIP YARDS.
Craig Bro., J. A., Jacksonvills, Fla. Camper Lumber Co., Jacksonville, F.
studar Clothif Co., Jac&tyle, Il. Marl-Stevre a Co., Ja.dcksona Fla


VEHICIJl AND HARNKSB.
Vehicle and Harea Co., Jacksonille, Fts.

WATCHES
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacknevlle. TM.
Hes & 1Sa1ger, Jakonvflle, Fi.

YELLOW PINM LUMBuE
Cummer Lumber Co., Jackonvrille, Fl.
East Coast almber Co, Watertown. i




WHISKIES

GINS AND RUMS
FROM

$1.50 to$5.00 per Gallon
......AGENCY FOR......
Lewis 18s6 ain Meut Versem
Pure Rye WhIddes.
Controllers Blum's Monogram ad Syl-
van Rye-Agents for Jungn Cincin-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.

CHAS. BLUM & CO.
t17 and 519 WIET MAY STRET
JACKSONVILLC PLA.



Coons & Golder

Turpentine Operators on

Pipe, Boilers and Pumps

Exput skiln ui Pmrmbn
22 W. Adam Str Jackdssle, Fia


Frank 0. Miller & Co.
419 esat y t., JashseUl. Flra.
PMONE 1217
SOLE AGENT FOR
Now Hos*. White. Dometo aend
Standard
SEWING MACHINES
POPULAR uCES EASY PAYMENTS


BUYER'S DIRECTORY


S~ff~JFJFJ~cr~cSSCO---------- &9C &I &%,q -S~~El~nr,~:.~i









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Beautiful Homes of Jacksonville are

Referred to.


The Architects and Builders' Magazine amplitude as you enter."


for November contains a lengthy and pro-
fusely illustrated article entitled "The
Homes of Jacksonville."
The illustrations are all from the de-
signs of the leading architects, giving pho-
to reproductions of the exteriors, interiors,
plans and constructive details, so that
their appearance, design and planning can
be seen, as well as decorative treatment,
all of which is accompanied by full de-
scriptions.
Among the photo reproductions of hand-
some homes and buildings are the follow-
S ing:
Residence of J. E. Cohen, on the corner
of Laura and Ashley streets, J. IH W.
Hawkins. architect.
Residence of United States Senator
James P. Taliaferro, on the corner of
churchh and Julia streets. J. H. W. Haw-
kins, architect. The details of the front
entrance of Senator Taliaferro's residence
is also given and the descriptive article
says: Senator Taliaferro's house, which
is shown with floor plans, is a large, fine
house, suitable for any loeali:y north or
south. The grouping of the columns about
the veranda gives a very effective appear-
ance and lends to the whole structure an
air of solidity and strength.-
Referring to the house of Mr. J. E. Co-
hen, the text of the article says: "The
J. E. Cohen house is a massive colonial
structure, with a portico rounding out
from the veranda supported by lofty Cor-
inthian columns extending over two sto-
ries. A heavy balustrade surmounts this,
following around on the eaves of the roof.
The house is one of large proportions and
ample accommodations."
Continuing, the article refers to other
residences of the city of which illustra-
tions are given, as follows:
Dr. S. A. Morris' Hoeae.
"The house of Dr. 8. A. Morris, by the
same architect J. H. W. Hawkins), is a
stately colonial mansion, its front a lofty
Tonic portico. A study of the plans shows
it to he a house of large accommodation,
well suited to the use of a physician of
large practice. The arrangement of the
plan is such as to make the suit of rooms
for the doctor's use entirely independent
of the living rooms.
"The residence of R. V. Covington, de-
signed by MeClure & Holmes is a large
colonial structure. The four columns of
the portico make an imposing front, and
the ample verandas surrounding the house
speak much for comfort during warm
days. This house is also equipped with a
direct and indirect system of hot-water
heating for such cold days as may come
S during the winter. The interior trim is
white enamel, Ripolin being used. The
hath rooms have Opelite tile floors and
wainscoting, porcelain fixtures, open
plumbing; the conservatory, ceramic tile
floors and opelite wainscoting. The exte-
rior has a gray artificial stone base with
wood above painted white.
T. V. Porter's House.
"The T. V. Porter house, by H. J. Klu-
tho, architect, of which we show an exte-
rior as well as a view of the hall, is an
example of colonial treatment. The por-
tico with its lofty columns gives dignity
to the whole structure. The interior hall
and stairway follow the same style and
are of liberal proportions, giving an air of


The article upon Jacksonville and its
homes is, in part, as follows: "In taking
up Jacksonville, it has been our purpose
to give special prominence to her resi-
dences rather than to her business houses
or public building.
Jacksonville Leads.
"The fire of 1901, while at the time a
terrible blow to this city, has resulted in
the erection of the largest collection of
up-to-date residences to be found in any
city of its size. While a southern city,
it is by no means so continuously warm
as to escape the necessity of modern heat-
ing appliances and other features required
in a northern climate; at the same time
it enjoys so large a share of warm wea-
ther that the veranda and other outdoor
conveniences are very fully developed.
"By the courtesy of a number of her
prominent architects we are able to pre-
sent a large number of buildings recently
erected, showing in most cases not only
their exteriors by photographic reproduc-
tions. but also in most cases carefully
drawn floor plans. These houses embrace
not only moderate cost structures, but also
many that are palatial in character.
An Enterprising City.
"Jacksonville is not simply a winter
city. On the contrary it is an active busi-
ness place all the year round, and while it
may have many winter visitors, it has a
large population and is one of the most
active and enterprising cities of the south.
"It is to Florid what New York is to
the rest of the country, it is the metropo-
lis and business center of the State. and
has many prominent banks, large whole-
sale houses, big department stores and a
bookstore to compare well with similar es-
tablishments in New York and Philadel-
phia.
"The city is located on the St. Johns
river, is a port of entry, and has regular
lines of steamers to New York, Philadel-
phia and Boston. The water is sufficiently
deep for large sea-going vessels to come
to her docks, which are constantly crowd-
ed with vessels from all ports of the world.
She is amply equipped with shipyards and
machine shops for the repair and outfit-
ting of vessels.
Diversified Industries.
"Northern people are apt to think of
Florida as a winter resort and a region
of orange groves only. While the State
is filled with delightful winter homes and
commodiious hotels for her winter visitors,
this feature is but one of the sources from
which she derives her income. The lum-
her interests are large and there may be
found in this State some of the largest
sawmills in the country. Turpentine and
naval stores are also important products,
and employ many hands in their produc-
tion. Since the great freeze of 1894-5, the
agriculturalists of the State have turned
their attention to a variety of products
other than oranges, and truck-farming, as
it is called, has occupied thousands of acres
in the State. In one locality we saw in
March last a single piece of from one to
two hundred acres of Irish potatoes almost
ready to dig for the northern market. In
this one town several hundred thousand
dollars are received every year for this
crop.
"We refer to these industries of the
State of Florida for the reason that our


readers, when they come to go over the needed. Large halls running completely
many handsome residences we present, through the house are a feature ot tne
will ask how Jacksonville people can erect majority of the plans. These halls in some
so many handsome homes. As we have cases occupy, in part, two stories. The
said, Jacksonville is the metropolis and importance of the large hall for ventila-
business heart of the State and every dol- tion is easily seen, especially in a warn
lar entering into its circulation goes climate. It adds a very attractive feature
through it. Every great enterprise has its to the interior as well, ant wives an air of
headquarters here. All supplies come from dignity and hospitality to the dwellings
Jacksonville, whether they be groceries for harly otherwise obtainable."
the turpentine commissariat, or dresses for The article then contains the mention
their women, retorts for their stills, en- quoted regarding the homes of Messrs.
gines for their mills, all can be found in Cohen, Taliaferro, Morris, Covington and
this city, and, as a face, are supplied by its Porter, and continuing, contains the fol-
merchants and manufacturers, lowing:
Other Features. Building Mterial
The site on which the city is built is "As we have mentioned above, the town
a sandy plain, rolling slightly, but having is situated on a sandy plain, and in the
outskirts there are many sand dunes, the
no great elevations; so low, in fact, that sand being of fine quality suited for the
special provision has got to be made to manufacture of sand-lime brick and arti-
keep water out of the cellars. ficial stone.
"All the modern houses are fitted with "There are several large works engaged
furnaces and other heating appliances. in this class of work, pibduiing a very
The fire-place is to be found in most sit- finP lodluct. The brick produced is white
ting rooms, and the bathrooms are fitted or colored as desired. Some of the white
with the latest and best sanitary appli- ,brik bears a strong resemblance to blocks
ances. All the better-class houses are fin- f marble. tI is being very largely used,
ished in hard wood; there are mnay fine both in the exterior and interior of build-
examples of the use of oak, mahogany and ings. For store and loft buildings, it
cypress. makes an economical finish, and at the
"The architects of the city are young, same time appears well.
well-trained men, and appreciate the value "There is a large plant also for the
of good design, both in the exterior treat- manufacture of artificial stone and cement
Iment of their buildings and in the interior blocks, and this material is used very
decorations, and seem to have found a cli- largely in residence work. There are sev-
entage who are liberal-minded enough to eral methods of handling the cement
follow their lead. The result has been ex- blocks which deserve notice. First, of
eeptionally good in even the more mode- course, is the common system of building
rate-cost buildings. with the plain cast blocks, as with stone.
"As we have remarked previously, the The results produced by this method are
veranda is a special feature, and is fre- ,%ll exemplified by the residence of Mr.
quently supplemented by balconies above M. Sabel. This house employs two sizes
the first story. This last is especially true of the regular cast rock-face blocks run in
where houses are built for more than one courses. The trim, balustrades, cornices,
family. A few apartment houses are to pillars, etc., are also of artificial stone.
he found,l and in these cases almost inva- The residence is rather a city house than
riably ample veranda or balcony room is a suburban home. It has a solid, dignified
arranged for each apartment. appearance, and by reference to the plans
Colonial Design is Popular. will be found to offer large accommoda-
"llow popular the colonial designs are, tions.
is shown by the series of views that start Other Methods.
this article. The illustrations speak for "Another method of treatment is to tool
themselves, and very little description is (Continued on page 12.)






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Sole Southern Agents

VALDOSTA. GEORGIA

Jobbers of Mill and Turpentine Supplies.
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THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Industrial F


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THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Immigration Asso

Session and

Nashville, Nov. 13.-The Southern Quar-
antine and Immigration Convention, which
at noon today assumed its new title of
Southern Immigration and Industrial As-
sociation, concluded its business tonight.
The report of the committee on quaran-
tine which was adopted during the day,
advocated that the conference take no
action in advising transfers of maritime
quarantine to the federal government by
those States which have not already made
transfers, it being the sense of the com-
mittee that each State should be left at
liberty to act as it sees fit. The confer-
ence devoted its time almost entirely to a
discussion of the immigration problem.
S Under this head the race question early
took prominence, and did not receive its
quietus until the convention adjourned
tonight. The sentiment of the delegates
is largely in favor of welcoming any desir-
able class of white immigrants. without
regard to nationality, yet there appeared
at times some desire to keep the black
man with all his faults, where he is. The
convention recommended that the gover-
nors of all Southern States be requested to
recommend immediately the establishment
of bureaus of immigration.
An attempt was made this afternoon to
reconsider the decision to meet next eyar
at Birmingham, a spirit fight was put up
by the South Carolina delegation, which
sought to gain the convention for Charles-
ton, but the convention declined to reopen
the matter.
Officers Elected.
The Southern Immigration and Edu-
cational conference today effected a per-
manent organization to be known here-
after as the Southern Immigration and
Industrial Association, and elected the fol-
lowing officers:
President-Gov. D. C. Heyward, Colum-
bia, S. C.
Secretary-Treasurer-J. R. McMullen,
Gadsden, Ala.
The next annual convention will be held
in Birmingham, Ala., the second Tuesday
in November.
The committee on organization recom-
mended that the association be continued
as a permanent organization, its object
being to exercise an educational and sup-
ervisory influence over matters pertaining
to immigration, health, labor, technical
education and a general enforcement of
vagrancy laws, in order that a uniform
policy regarding these matters may pre-
vail throughout the South. Governors and
State commissioners of agriculture, rep-
resentatives from commercial, manufac-
turing and business organizations are made
honorary members of the association. The
active membership is to be composed of
railroads, corporations, firms, or individ-
uals. The appointment of a vice-president
from each State is recommended. The re-
port was adopted unanimously. The re-
port of the committee on education was
then adopted. It recommended the adop
:ion in Southern schools of the Louisiana
system of hygienic instruction; hearty co-
operation by the farmers with State ex-
periment farms; the founding of trade
schools and that the governors of all
Southern States call the attention of their
people to the great need of technical edu-
cation for the whole youth of the South.
Department of Immigration.
The report of the committee on immi-


ciation Concludes

SAdjourns.

gration recommended that the several
Southern States establish departments of
immigration. The report urges the fede-
ral government to "provide liberally for
the reception of immigrants at the South
Atlantic and gulf ports, and thus encour-
age the establishment of steamship lines
for direct importation of immigrants,
thereby relieving the crowded condition
of Ellis island and the congested eastern
cities." The report was adopted.
A letter was read from John Sharp Wil-
liams in which he expressed the belief that
the solution of the race question might
be found in a preconcerted effort to bring
white people of the right sort into the
South as servants, tenants and farmers.
He advocated the formation of a land
company with a capital of at least one
million dollars to buy lands throughout
the cotton states and sell them on time to
desirable immigrants. A hopeful sign,
Mr. Williams sait, is the fact that the
negro birth rate in the country is decreas-
ing very remarkal';., v;, ile the birth rate
of the white people in the gulf states is
the largest anywhere in the world. Mr.
Williams recommended the establishment
of a mounted rural police after the Cape
Colony and Canadian systems.
Negro Problem.
"The political phase ot the negro prob-
lem we have pretty well worked out to
an approximately satisfactory issue," he
went on to say, and recommended a lim-
itation of the franchise to the white race.
He prophesied that similar action would
be taken a generation hence in Illinois, In-
diana and Ohio. He favored the rigid en-
forcement of vagrancy laws and said that
if the negro would not work he must get
out of the field. The importation of de-
sirable white immigrants not only from
the foreign countries, but from the north
also, was suggtsed in the letter.
The report of the good rads committee
favored the adoption of the Latimer-
Brownlow bill, now pending in congress,
asking for national aid in the construction
of good rads, and that the States use
every effort to improve their highway s.
The government aid feature of the re-
port precipitated a debate which lasted
nearly two hours and in which about fif-
teen delegates were heard. This portion
of the report was finally stricken out.
At the afternoon session, N. F. Thomp-
son of Cattanooga advocated the strictest
enforcement of the vagrancy laws with a
su-lpension of sentence in case the negro
would go to the Panama canal. (ontin-
uing, he said:
"I would have the world know that this
race problem has its most fertile source of
perpetuity in the efforts of politicians who
find it a most efficient hobby on which
to ride in o place and power. When there
are no elections in the South we hear very
little alHut this rane matter.
"lave you ever consideredd that there
'lues not exist t1 the South any problem
that begins to compare in seriousness to
that which springs from the slums in New
York. the anarchists ni ( hicago, the race
1Ire.;ldice in San Francisco and the 'mob
spirit' found practically in all the lalor
center. of the north and east?
Vagrancy Laws.
"The enforcement of the vagrancy laws
uniformly all over the South will tend
largely to the elimination of the idle ne-


* .*44.4. >6** 6***fte* *t*-*4*6****4 66 ******I** t-t s--t


SJ. A. Craig ( Bro.

239 W. Bay Street EVERETT BLOCK.

Leaders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-
ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.

Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.




THE COMMERCIAL' BANK
JACKSONVILLE, FLA. Branches: Ocala and .ake City
The largest leading State Bank in Jacksonville. Is conducted in an old.
fashioned strictly conservative manner and is subject to regular examination
by the Comptroller.
&sIndividual and Savings Accounts solicited.
H. ROBINSON, W.B. OWEN, H. GAILLAnD,
President. Vice-President. Ca~





Standard Clothing Company




One Price One Price



FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
17 and 19 West Bay Street, Jckso-vml Fends,
S Stetsen and Hawes Hate. Special Attention Given to Mal Order


H. E. PRITCHETT, Pres. P. L. SUTHERLAND, Vice-Pre. A. D. COVINGTON, See'y
J. P. COUNCIL, Treas and Genl Mgr.


THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.,
General Offices: JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Factory: WANNANISH, N. C.

Manufeoturer9 Of High eral T reo
fep Mav mlses pfete^.
m* I 1isicuii*il a uir.i.sua ima i emli iii i iilmirOi*
WW. W.CarOn, Pr. W. C. Thoma, Mamager. R. S. Cara, Sc. aul Tutsa


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Wholesale

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Turpentine. Mill and Phosphate Supplies.


TAMPA. FLORIDA.
tt*4iS 1ii64 i8*t44144 it4* *414el e*l9titet#64oolI


i. B. TATUM, Pree.


J. L. WALLA CE, Vice-Pre. H. G. TONE, Seey-Treap


Keeley Institute.
Incerprated Sa2300 Cepitals tuok.
A branch of the original Leslie E. Keeley Institute of Dwight, IlI, has just been
opened it conmer of Park and Stockton Streets in Riverside, where a splendid
building, equipped with all the comforts and convenieaee of a modern home or
sanitarium has been secured and is ready for the reception of patients nl nmed of
treatment for-
WHISKEY, OPIUM, MORPHINE, COCAINE, TOBACCO OR CIGARkTTE HABITS.
Write for full information as to treatment, terms, ete.
KEELEY INSTITUTE OF FLORIDA.
Telephone No. 1553. Jauswma, kla.









8 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


gro.
"This brings me to a suggestion that I
made to President Roosevelt recently and
which appears to have been generally mis-
understood. In order to aid both races in
the south to get clear of these idle ne-
groes and aid in the speedy completion of
an enterprise in which the South is deep-
ly interested, I to14 him that I believed a
plan could be adopted that would take the
classes largely out of the South and send
them to dig the Yanama Canal. At his
request I went over the matter with Chair-
man Shouts of the Isthmian Canal Com-
mission and Secretary of War Taft. The
plan involves the placing of mte limit on
all vagrants and then suspending judgment
if they would voluntarily go to Panama."
W. J. Oliver, of Knoxville, Tenn., told
of the troubles of contractors at work on
construction works, but still, h said, he
preferred the negro to the Italian or the
Chinaman.
Dr. Stephen MI. AIewmian, of Washington,
D. C., representing the Liberal Immigra-
tion League, delivered an address dealing
with immigration from the time of Abra-
ham to the present day. Any conference
that seeks to deal with immigration, he
said, is not taking up an experiment but
is dealing with the solution not only of
the race problem, but of all problems.
Other addresses were made by L. J. Ellis
of New York and Dr. Reddeker of Mary-
land, the latter bearing word from Gov.
Warfield.

SHIPPING ASSOCIATIONS FOR FRUIT
GROWERS.


can buy through the organization; and if
they do not want to buy they have no
right to complain.
We do not believe that the fair-minded
men in the commission business obpect to
the growers forming organizations, pro-
vided the latter are formed along the
right lines. Here is what Mr. R. P. Loomis
of New York, one of the largest apple
handlers, says of one of the best shipping
associations in the world-the Hood River
Apple Growers' Union.
"The Hood River Apple Growers' Union,
which today controls 90 per cent of the
entire output of the valley, is one of the
strongest and ablest. bodies of men that
we have ever done business with. Their
board of directors are authorities on the
growing, packing and shipping of fruit,
and are as fairminded, straight business
men as one would ever wish to meet. They
realize that the reputation they enjoy all
over this country and also in England for
highest quality Spitzenbergs and New-
tons has been obtained first, by the care
and energy on the part of their members
i nthe cultivation of their orchards and
in the growing of perfect fruit, and, sec-
on, and what is just as important, by the
perfect grading and packing of their fruit.
They have done away with packing by in-
dividual growers, and all apples marketed
by the union's packers according to the
rigid rules, the grading being made as to
size and color and freedom from worms
and other blemishes. They have such a
complete system of picking, packing, grad-
ing and shipping that a box of their fruit,
on which is their label, and the contents


During the coming winter the Fruit of which are wrapped in their printed
Grower hopes to publish considerable mat- wrappers, is a practical guarantee to con-
ter pertaining to the organization and tain perfect fruit from top to bottom of
tile box.
management of shipping associations value of the union to the growers
among fruit growers. We believe that no of Hood River cannot be exaggerated.
more important matter confronts the grow- W\ithout the union the packing of each
ers than the effective, economical dispo- different orchard would differ as their
sition of their crops after they nave Deen owners differ. Competition between them
grown, would set in, and as no dealer likes to sell
Last month we presented a report of li.s fruit for less than his neighbors get,
the shipping association at Wathena, Kan- a buyer would have to have the price of
sas, which should be an inspiration to the the whole governed by the value of the
growers in every section, for what the poourest orchard and grade and pack. From
growers have accomplished there can be my own standpoint as a buyer, I believe
repeated by growers in any locality, pro- that I could buy cheaper if each individ-
vided these growers will only get together. ual grower had the selling of his own
In some localities where shipping asso- crop. When, however, I appreciate tne
ciations have been formed, they have been value of having one perfect pack, such as
vigorously assailed by cimmossion mer- only a union managed properly could put
chants, the latter claiming that the asso- out, I believe that the higher price which
ciations have for their object the elimina- the union is able to get by their conbina-
tion of the middle man. This is not the tion is more than offset by tile excellent
ease, exactly; the purpose of the associa- quality. Certainly, too much credit call-
tions is not so much to do away with the not hI given to the union for its influence
middle man as to provide a plan by which in en-ouraging the perfect growing of
the middle man does business with the Spitzenberg and Newtons."
growers through their organization, and LMr. Loomis sets forth good arguments
is not permitted to play one grower for tle association: That it secures the
against his neighbor in an effort to break growing of choice fruits an: guarantees
down prices, the packing and grading of the same. But
This much may be set down as a fact, there is no reason why other associations
however: should not do this, and we want to help
Wherever the eimmission merchants as- our readers to form many such associa-
sail an organization of growers and try tions during the coming winter. Tile time
to prevent its operation, then there is ali has e nic for this advance to be made, and
the more need for the growers getting to- tlih experience of the present season should
gether, and the association should be main- Iw emi ugh to convince even the most skep-
tained at all hazards. tical that such associations are absolutely
The commission merchants have their nece's:iry.--National Fruit Grower.
organizations, and there is no doubt in
the minds of tne growers that this season Destructive Flood.
they have had a hard and fast agreement Por:land. (he., Nov. 14.-The Oregonian
not only as to prices to be paid for apple-s, hIs ju-t received a telephone message from
but also as to the time when they should K.eattle that that city is cut off from the
begin buying, surrounding country by flood waters. The
Then, why should not the growers or- Iessage says three lives have been lost
ganize for their own protection? If the and that the damage will run into the
.-- Az-- n- .. a. A t .... --, hL. All


W. J. L'ENGLE.
President.


J. W. WADE,
Vice-President.


L G. HUGHES,
Seo'y and Trsr


Union Naval Stores Co.
MOBILE, ALA. PENSACOLA, FLA. NEW ORLEANS, LA.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
..........DEALER IN ..........

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at preset quite a large number of desiable locatite in West Flr-
ida, Alabama and Missiappi. Liberal ardances made Saaint em*elgueta. C-er
respondence solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.




I 3Main St FLORIDA REALlY CO. Phone 1959
20,000 acres Pine and Cypress. Pine will cut 100 crops of Turpentine (10,-
500 to crop) and 60,000,000 feet of lumber. Cypress will cut 50000,000 feet of
lumber.
22,000 acres Pine and Cypress. Will cut 90 crops Turpentine (10,00 to crop),
and 55,000,000 feet pine lumber and 45,000,000 of Cypress.
18,000 acres, estimated to cut 00 boxes turpentine and 3,500 feet pine lum-
bcr per acre. Tract also has about 8,000,000 feet of cypress.




BEST TANKS

ON EARTH

Are made in Palatka, Fla., by G. M. Davis &
Son. They ua e selected cypress wood. Work-
manahip equal to the quality of the material.
and the combination is absolutely unequalled
for durability. Write them for prices and full
information before you buy a tank.

a M. DAVIS & SON, Palatka, Fla.


Sii ii l1111111ll llll l 1 IIil I i Ill ll III 8IIII rllli iii ll 8 i--
- J. P. WILLIAMS, President. J. A. G. CASuM, Ist Vice-Prlsideat
- T. A. JaBINAS, 2nd VIce-President. J. F. DUSnBRuT,3d Vice-President
- H. L. KAYTOs, Secretary. H. F. E. Scr~UDm Treasurer.
i

: J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

: 11111 STORE-M i i!ITT i FII WLO Wl I LM E OCERS. -
~ lrMaim Office IAVxMNNUXM, OlOGOIAL.
Sarameb Offre:. 4NWICOLI, FLIX. I reh Orr ,
Iarekl Ofnfi: JJACALOIrVMLLU.l. lFL. ICOLUU, OT.".

SNaval Stores Producers are lrvited to Cormspond With Us.
SIIIIll 511 11111111IIl II 5 1Il III I I 1111111 III "


Barnes & Jessup Company

Jacksonville. Florida.

Naval Stores Factors and Commission

Merchaents.


OFFICERS.
C. H. Barnes. Preeldent. J. C. Little, Vice-Preident.
Sl E. B._Well. Secretary and Treasurer.

DIRLECTORLS C. H. Barne. J. C. Little, Ralph Jessup.
J. IL. S under. E. C. Long, W. E. Cummer, R. H. Paul. G. W.
Saxon. G. W. T-ylor.
^<<<

un re s o ousan s o s.


cournmisin men W&U16 L" "uy applem, Luey








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


COMPARATIVE MARKET REPORTS.

All records for pale rosins were broken last week and this both here and
at Savannah. Lower grades held up well during the week. The spirits market
has been firm with prices ranging higher than last week. At Savannah 68
cents was reached during the week, while here 67%/ was the highest for the
same period.
PIRITS OF TURPEZTINE FOR THE WEEK HERE AND AT SAVANNAH.
Price. Bales. Shipments. Receipt. Stocks.
Jax. Sr. Jan. ay. Jax. Sav. J. Jax. Sav.
Friday ............. 65% 6% 240 301 100 1,200 417 46123,687
Saturday ........... 66% 345 163 194 4,544 387 51723,984
Monday ............ 67 66% 614 534 33 1701 350 581 24,177
Tuesday ........... 671 68 2W0 680 25 303 459 928 24,489
Wednesday .........67 67% 45 158150 661314 582 24923
ROSIN FOR THE WEEK HERE AND AT SAVANNAH.
Friday. Saturday. Monday. Tuesday. Wed'sday.
Jax. Sa.J. Jay. Say. Jax. Sa. Jax. Jax. Say.
WW ................6.65 6.506.50 6.5 .50 6.56.90 6.90Noth-6.90
WG ................. 6.35 6.256.25 6.2525 6.256.50 6.50 ing 6.50
N ................... 5.80 5.756.00 5.7516.00 6.006.00 6.00 doing 6.00
M ................... 5.35 5.255.50 5.25.50 5.50.50 5.50 5.50
K ................... 4.90 4.755.00 5.755.00 4.755.00 5.10 5.00
I .................... 4.30 4.454.50 4.454.50 4.454.50 4.50 4.40
H ...................4.25 4.304.35 4.354.35 4.404.35 4.40 4.20
G ...................4.05 4.054.20 4 4.20 4.4.20 4.25 4.25
................... 4.00 4.004.15 4.1 4.15 4.25 44.15 4.20 4.17
E ...................3.95 3.954.05 4.054.05 4.154.06 4.151 4.10
D .................... 3.90 3.904.00 4.00j4.00 4.0514.00 4.051 4.00
CBA ................. 3.90 3.903.95 3.953.95 4.0013.95 4.001 3.75
REPORT OF ROSIN MOVEMENT HERE AND AT SAVANNAH.
Sales. Shipments. Receipts. Stocks.
Jaz. Say. Jax. Sav. Jax. Say. Jax. Sav.
Friday ................... 1,120 22081 898 440|1,168 1,807137,480 68,759
Saturday ................. 256 1,01818,038 9,55511,596 2,28037,650 61,484
Monday ....... ......... 614 1,48612,935 3,47011,877 1,986|31,208 60,000
Tuesday edd ............. ....4..0 10 9 ,5 16711,662 4,229130,150 64,062
Wednesday .............. 4,901 2,568!2,804 5,04711,990 1,262127,312 60,277


CHINESE LABOR IN SOUTH AFRICA.
London, Nov. 15.-Both houses of parlia-
ment tongiht debated the unpleasant sub-
ject arising from the recent unauthorized
publication of the "Bucknill" report, which
compounds there.
The subject was raised in the house of
lords by the archbishop of Canterbury, who
asked if the government had any infor-
mation thereon. Lord Elgin, the colonial
gives the results of an inquiry into the
conditions of Chinese labor in South Af-
rica and which reveals the systematic prac-
tice of unnatural vices in the Chinese
The government hitherto has declined to
publish this report on the ground that it
was confidential. Among the radicals the
hope seemingly pertains that this scandal
may be used in justification of the aboli-
tion of Chinese labor.
The motion that all strangers should
withdraw, having been rejected by 326
votes to 25, R. Lehmann, in a studious-
ly moderate speech declared the country
was in the presence of a great moral dis-
aster and asked the government what it
intended to do in the matter.
B Winston Spencer Churchill replied on be-
half of the government. He said it was
undoubtedly true that such vices existed in
many compounds, but the opponents of
Chinese labor always recognized that such
a state of affairs was almost inevitable,
and the responsibility rested largely, in the
first place, with Alfred Lyttleton, until
lately colonial minister. It was quite un-
true, however, as alleged that these prac-
tices amounted to an open public scandal
or were tolerated by the police or mine
managers.
The revelations of the "Bucknill" re-
port, although they did not bear out the


statements alleged, nevertheless disclosed
a condition of affairs sufficiently unhealthy
and unnatural to seal the fate of the la-
bor. It was a matter, however, that
should be left to South Africa.
Mr. Lyttleton declared that no spread of
evidence of this horrible and monstrous
system of vice had reached him while in
the colonial office.
Premier Campbell-Bannerman said the
government had every reason to believe
the evil would be diminished if not alto-
gether eradicated. The motion was event-
ually talked out.
secretary, said the evidence of the Buck-
nill report went to show that the prac-
tices prevail in nearly all the compounds
and in his opinion strengthens the view
that the permanent adoption of a system
of Chinese labor was impossible. The
grosser allegations, however, were not sub-
stantiated by the report. The subject was
then dropped.


Short m Accounts.
Memphis, Nov. 15.-After several


weeks


of detective surveillance, J. E. Hutchin-
son, second vice-president of the Delta
Cotton Company, has admitted to the
members of the firm, the police authori-
ties and friends that he is approximately
$70,000 short in his accounts. Mr. Hutch-
inson on the night of November 2 at-
tempted to commit suicide but has recov-
ered. The shortage is said to cover a
period ten years.

FOR SALE-A desirable turpentine
place. Well located, on railroad. In full
operation. Fifteen crops boxes. Timber to
cut five crops. Plenty of labor on place.
For full information, write L. P. Booth,
Adel, G(a. tf

Would sell good operator who could fur-
nish labor, interest in a ten-crop place, ten
thousand acres round timber. Real Estate
Co., Old Town, Fla. 4t


..eea: tat: a ,C


J. ,. WEST,
President.


D. AL FLYNN.
X)HN HARRIS.
V. J. KHI.HY
Vi=4md1mb


LL RK3WQ0.
S' and inTra.
D. L VILLLAI
AMv sucy Tram


WEST FLYNN & HARRIS CO.

GENERAL OFFICES GERMANIA DLDG Savarnnala Ga.
N WEST BLDG. JackaOnvile. RSa.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
NAVAL STORES RECEIVED AT SAVANNAH, GA., JACKSONVILLE
FLA, AD FERNANDINA, FLA.

Wholesale Grocers also Dealers in Hay. Greain and Heavy
Harnefs.


SOLE AGENTS for the Celratd Unio Turentin Axzes
S&ndWsibonr&Chil"dPhadclp ialOy 3;
MERCHANTS WAREHOUSES.
SAVANNAH, GA. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. TAMPA, 1J
>w*^w ^^^ ^^::www


WILLIAM A. BOURS


WILLIAM A. BOURS & COMPANY
THE OLEST ESTABULSNM RAIN A Ett MOUE I TM STATE.

Hay, Grain, Feed, Garden
Seeds, Poultry Supplies, Flour,

Grits, Meal and Fertilizers.


OUR MOTTO: fProt Sllmut, bMIr-M G-0.d


206 EAST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.



You Want a Turpentine Location?
You Want a Sawmill Location?
You Want any Kind of Florida-Land?



SJ. H. Livingston & Sons,
Yo OCALA. FLORIDA.





M. A. Baker,
INVENTOR AND IANUFACTUmRR OF TIE

Baker Improved

Seamless Turpen

tine Stills.
Write me for prices and outts
F. O. B any point in Oeorgia. Flor-
ida, Alabama or Mississippi. All
stills sold under a guarantee.
JOB WORK
ThIMag tile Cacery a Spec ty.
The Largest and Oldest Copper
Works in Gorgia. Brunswick, Ga.
OW My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do not leak.
Pensacola, Fla. and Brunswick, Oa.


JAMSg 0O, DANY


Catalog rr


7~ M-%19 L", M_ sw M-4









If THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL RECORD .s x\orking to the detriment of the inter-
JANM A. HOLLOMON. Editer.n-Chief. c.-~s of thtle who produced the material


J. O. LaONTISEEr. A oiUate Editor.
A. ,M MARLSH. Busiales Manoger.

Psul taed Every thursday.
anoaiarrnso (Domeole... .3.00 Per Annum
S(Worican).... 3.o60 "

-The Ps. ana Its Priuot. "

ABI .--acuttiw should be addressed
The Indstrial R.ecord Company.
Jacksonville. Fla.
armeon Eaterlal ead Business Offtoes at
savannu b. Ga.
EMtered at the Postoice at Jacksonvlle, Fla..
as secoE-class matter

Adopted by the Executive Committee of
the Turpentine Operators' Association
eptember 12, 1902 as its exclusive olh-
ealorga. Adopted in annual convention
September 11 as the organ also of the gen-
al aesoriation.
Adopted April 27th, 1903, as the official
organ of the Interstate Cane Growers' As-
sociation. Adopted September 11, 1U03, as
nhe only official organ of the T. U. A.
Comunnded to lumber people by apecal
resolution adopted by the Georgia Sawmill
A aociation.

THE RECORD'S OFFICES.
The publishing plant and the main of-
Aces of the Industrial Record Company
are located at the intersection of Bay and
Newman Streets, Jacksonvile, Fla., in the
veEy heart of the great turpentine and
yellow pine industries.
tradF of the entire South.
The ba-snnah, Ga., office is in the Board
of Trade Bulding. Savannah is the lead-
ing open naval stores market in the world.

NOTICE TO PATRONS.
All payments for advertising in the la-
dastrial Record and sabcriptions thereto
mmust be made direct to the home oice in
Jacksonville. Agents are not allowed to
make coilecdias unr any circumstances.
Biel fer advertising and subscriptions are
aet et frm the home office, when due,
and all remittances must be made direct
to this cmpey.
Indutrial Reseao Publsiing Co.

MR. SHOTTER DOWN AND OUT.

The most interesting development in the
naval stores field this week was the an-
nouncement from Savannah to the effect
that the S. P. Shotter Company would
liquidate its business and form a combina-
tion under another name with the Pater-
son-Downing Company of that city.
To factors as well as operators this was
the most interesting piece of news which
has flashed over the wires for several
months. It came as a surprise, but the
significance of the deal is great. What led
up to this discontinuance of business on
the part of the S. P. Shotter Company is
not announced. There is an apology for
a reason given in the dispatches, but it is r
evident that there is something behind
these recent developments which has not
yet been given to the public.
At any rate the fact that the S. P. Shot-
ter Company is no more is not calculated
to cause any uneasiness or unrest among
the naval stores operators and factors.
That company has had an important bear-
ing on the naval stores situation since first
it entered the field, which was many years t
ago. It grew to be the greatest export b
company dealing in naval stores in the
world, with European connections, which
gave to it an advantage. The S. P. Shot-
ter Company has never been classed as
the friend of the naval stores operator, u
and in fact it has always been looked upon a


used by -Mr. Shutter and his associates to
amass a loutune. Biut after all this has
been said, there are those who will admit
that this greaL export company has done
a great deal for the industry, through the
enterprise and good management abroad.
LI las created a market for American
ioaina anll .,rpeutine where a market had
not existed in the past, thus creating a
demand for the American product.
As a miatteir of course the same policy
which has been in force by the S. P. Shot-
ter Compan) will be adopted by the new
concern, though it is doubtful if the new
company wiit endeavor to carry on the
I.ilsiles auid restrain trade as the old one
nla- done. tIrlm the developments in con-
nection with Standard Oil, ice trusts and
otiler cmliniations, it is doubtful if any
comilla.iuion will again boldly endeavor to
regulate the prices of any commodity as
they ha\e done in the past.
While -ir. Shotter will not be at the
nead oi the new concern, he will be presi-
dent ol the board of directors and his
knotluldge and business ability will be one
oi the assets of the new combination. The
name ol ._h. tter will not figure as it has
.a tle past, but it will be a factor, never-
tieie-le, xwhelever naval stores are bought
and sold.

SCHOONER PUT INTO PORT.

Twenty-Five Days Out in Bad Weather,
with Short Provisions.
The American schooner Herald, Capt.
P. .; Sinunons, bound from Savanna-la-
Mar, Jamaica, for New York, put into
ip rt Wednesday tor provisions and to leave
i.e ship's cook, who is quite ill.
The Herald left Savanna-la-Mar, on the
south coast of Jamaica, twenty-five days
ago with a cargo of 612 tons of logwood
and twenty tons of fustic a dye). When
a few days out of port she ran into bad
weather, which lasted for several days,
compelling Capt. Simnmons to run for
fourteen days under furled sails.
All during this time the cook was quite
ill. Capt. Simmons has his wife aboard
and she is sick of sea life and desires to
leave the vessel here.
Capt. Simmons came up to the city yes-
terday morning, from Mayport, where his
vessel is anchored, reported the matter
to the custom house oilicials, ordered a
stock of provisions and made arrange-
inents with Capt. Wright, the United
States immigration inspector, to go to
Mayport last night to inspect the vessel.
Capt. Simmons stated yesterday that he
experienced very rough weather at sea
and that his craft ade but little head-
way on her course to -New York; that his
provisions commenced to run short and he
changed his course towards Jacksonville,
teaching the mouth of the river after mid-
night Monday.
The schooner herald left Jacksonville
\Agust 4th with a cargo of lumber for
larbadoes. She reached that island in
.afety and then proceeded to Jamaica,
\tchre she took on her present cargo. (
Mrs. Silumons will leave the vessel this
morning, cone to Jacksonville and then a
proceed to New York. rTle cook will be t
aken from tile ship this morning and
Brought to Jacksonville. where he will be
,laced in a hospital.

Labor in Cuba. t
Havana, Nov. 13. -The Agrarian League, a
vhicl is compollsed f prominent planters, i
accompanied by a number of steamship s


agents, held a conference with Gov. Ma-
good today on the question of the proba-
ble scarcity of labor in the handling of
the maturing crop. The planters urged
the necessity of making use of the $1,000,-
000 appropriated by the late Cuban con-
gress for the stimulation of immigration,
and pointed out that Cuba was suffering
severely by the competition of other na-
tions seeking immigration, especially the
republics of South America and the United
States, and the importation of labor to
Panama. The next sugar crop promises to
be very large and the planters expressed
grave fears that the present labor supply
would be insufficient to handle it. Gov.
Magoon listened with great interest to
the suggestions of hi visitors and ar-
ranged to hold further conferences with
the committees.

WATER MAY DETHRONE COAL.

Swiftly Flowing Rivers Can Be Turned
into Electric Producers.
There was a time in this country when
every mountain stream was harnessed to
mill wheels. These rushing brooks and
small creeks ground the flour, sawed the
lumber and turned the spindles. Water
power was the reliance of all manufactur-
ing. It was cheap, well distributed and
easily procured.
Then the reign of king coal began. T'ei
more or less picturesque waterwheel gave
way to the puffing little steam engine.
Dams and "tail" races disappeared from
the valleys. For some years now steam
has done everything that water used to do
and more besides, for it churns the but-
ter, threshes the crops and has been quite
generally the right hand of the busy peo-
ple.
But it now appears that water may do-
throne coal and return to its former place
of eminence as a producer of power. Not
only has the stupendous force of Niagara
been converted into electric lights or made
to become the hand that turns a thousand
wheels, but rivers are being hitched up in
a similar fashion. Only sixty miles from
Philadelphia there is being constructed a
work that will make the noble Susque-
hanna do the labor of 100,000 horses. An-
other plant just over the Maryland State
line will make the same river do nearly
as much more.
Why should not the "blue" Juniata, the
swiftly flowing Lehigh, the winding Alle-
gheny and even the mighty Delaware be
utilized to produce power? Coal has be-
come an expensive fuel and it will grow
more costly year by year. The rivers of
Pennsylvania could together furnish a very
large proportion of the electricity needed
to light the streets of every town and (
haul the trolley cars.
It is hard to realize today the former
extravagant waste of the fine timber that i
once clothed the hills of this common-
wealth. Fire and ax swept forests out of t
existence, which if standing today would I
be worth vastly more than the land upon
which they grew. The time will come a
when men will wonder at the extravagance t
>f the present time, when rivers are per- t
nitted to run unfettered to the sea, while b
It the same time exorbitant prices are
being paid for fuel.-Philadelphia Press. a

Florida Oranges Better. ii
New York, Nov. 8.-Florida oranges are t
becoming more plentiful and while it is a
rue that a good portion of the receipts
ire more orless green and sour, some of r
t is showing up better. At Thursday's


Brown variety which was very good and
ranged $2.60@3.05, averaging $2.96. This
car was not entirely ripe, but the fruit
cut good and was sweet.
A good share of the offerings are of
inferior quality and range $2@2.50. It is
expected that by next week the receipts
will be more liberal and the quality con-
siderably better.
Grapefruit is still in liberal supply. The
large sizes have the preference. As high
as 4.50 was realized, but the bulk of the
stock ranges $2.50@3.25. Ruhlman &
Company have had 15 cars. The fruit is
coming better colored. It runs, however,
heavily to 64s and smaller sizes. During
the week the trade has dragged a little.
The best fruit which has shown upon the
market this week has been that from the
celebrated Atwood farm at Mannista. This
grove will have 00,000 boxes.-Fruit and
Produce News.

LABOR IN ACTIVE POLITICS.

Minneapolis, Nov. 13.-The recent politi-
cal activity of the American Federation of
Labor occupied a prominent place in the
report of the executive council today in
session here.
While the report did not go into the de-
tails of the recent campaign for the de-
feat of Speaker Cannon, Congressman Lit-
tlefield of Maine and other congressional
candidates, it defined clearly the attitude
and disbursements of the campaign fund
subscribed by the affiliated union of the
American Federation of Labor. According
to the report the total sum received for
campaign purposes was $8,056.80, the total
expenditures $7,834.11, and the unexpended
remainder, $222.78.
The American Federation, the report
says, does not contemplate the formation
of a distinct political party. It does not
intend to dictate the party membership of
any union man. It does propose to sug-
gest from time to time legislative meas-
ures of advantage to labor and to secure
the nomination and election of representa-
tives and senators favorable to the enact-
ment of bills. The federation intends to
give full publicity to the action taken on
these bills, that all union men may know
who are labor's friends.
Preceding this declaration, the commit-
tee outlined the political declaration of the
American Federation of Labor made since
1894 to show that the federation's en-
trance into active campaigning in the late
election was not a sudden departure from
former policy, but a logical culmination of
a long period of evolution.

COTTON GROWERS' MEETING.
eorga and Florida Association Asked by
Jordan to Work for Better Prices.
Lake City, Nov. 13.-The following call
las been issued:
A called meeting of the Sea Island Cot-
on Association of Georgia and Florida, toB
e held at Lake City, November 23, 1906.
All county presidents of the association
Ire hereby authorized to call a meeting of
heir associations and elect delegates to
he annual meeting of the association to
e held at Lake City November 23, 1906.
All county presidents and officers of the
association are requested to attend the
recting. All farmers and business men
interested in the betterment of our coun-
ry and obtaining better prices for cotton,
re cordially invited to attend.
An effort will be made to get reduced
ates on all roads for the meeting.
HARVEY JORDAN, President.


ale there was one car of the Parson F. G. SCHELL, Secretary.











THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11


THE GROOVER-wSTEWART DWA RT0
FofULRat" t WESOMQr- AI .
WheMi.u Drug,~ Ohleaa., Dauggete SawoHdale dr OeInie~arj *Sds
Am&- 01 A iw 7 DEO MT. KL E. -O A"


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR FIMAL
DISCHARGE.
Notice ia hereby given that the under-
signed, six months after date hereof, will
make final return of his accounts as Ad-
ministrator of the estate of John M. Flem-
ing, and apply to the Oounty Judge of
Duval County, Florida, at his office, for
approval of same, and a discharge as such
Administrator. This 9th day of June, 19061
W. P. SMITH,
As Administrator of the estate of John
M. Fleming, deceased.



WANTED
AND


FOR SALE
Rate for this column is 2 cents per word
for first inseition and 1 cent per word for
following insertions. No advertisement
taken for less than 40 cents for first, and
wo cents for following insertion Cah
must accompany orders unless you have
an account with us.


WANTED.-Position as woodsman or
stiller by experienced turpentine man.
Can furnish good references. C, Box 46,
Stockton, Ga. 4t


WANTED-Workin interest in turpen-
tine business. Will do all wooding, stilling
and making barrels. Flat woods and un-
healthy places need not apply. Have life-
time experience. Can give good references
if needed. R. G. Orvin, Chubb, Fla. 4t

BRICK FOR SALK.-The very best brick
made of purest Georgia elay; E. N. Jelks,
the Georgia brick man ,has a good stock
on hand, and can supply you. Wire for
bottom delivered prices. K. N. Jelks,


Santed-By experienced woodsman, po-
sition as woodsman o commissary clerk
and bookkeeper for turpentine company.
address "W*oodaman," care of Industrial
itecord.

WANT D--Position as woodsman. Best
references. Good and experienced man. S.
L. Smith, Box 244, Orlando, la.

WANTED--Two tirt-class Turpentine
vt oodsmen. Must be sober and able to
coutral labor. Ad .rebs,
a. U. PATIEiSON,
Taylortown, Miss

i'ui\ oAl J.-ZleganL turpent.ne loca-
Luon, cons.stlig or about 14,OU0 acres to
runud timber, cuulpuoed of sauti-hills and
cat wouis, lease oin 0 crops of boxes, 10
I whulcu are virgin. All necessary equip-
...ent. oteUty-live wiles Iroum Jackson-
til.e. bpenutud freight rates. Price and
eruins reasonable. Address Exceptional,
ca.e industrial record.

\\-S Ia--Position as woodman. Long
c.,erience in turpentine burtmess. Can
.%te good references. Apply to P. U. Box
04, tIgg as, Miss. 4t

WANTEl-E-By a young married man,
aged zi, and not afraid to work, employ-
ment with some Naval storess Co. in the
states ot Georgia or i'orida for 1907.
iAelerence, present entiloyer. Address
.r. G., care Industrial RKeord.


A\ NTE--A large tract of elhow Pine
timber. If you hate a tract you wish to
edll and wil sell stumpage to be paid for
as sawn, you to be absolutely secure from
tart to nnish, kindly communicate with
ue at once. None but owners need apply,
no middle-man wanted. Address "A," in
ca e of this office.


manufacturer, Macon, Ga. %\ ._ lkA-4-Good position in turpentine.
A managerr new place preferred; satisfac-
ruon guaranteed; references exchanged.
OR SLE-WE H E TWO REMIN- Address M, care Industral Record.
TON TYPEWRITERS, ONE FAY-
SHOLES, ONE DE-SMORE, ONE FOX, t-oiK .ALE-New place; been worked
ALL IN GOOD CONDITION, WHICH WE one year; nine crops virgin, sixty crops
WILL SELL AT A GREAT SACRIFICE. round; long lease; enough timber in ter-
ALSCO A SMALL NUMBER OF RIBBONS ritory to cut thirty more. For price and
FOR ALL MAKES OF MACHINES AT tull information, write "Operator," 608
LESS THA COST. APPLY IDUS- Randnd Centrfal Avenue, Tampa, Fla.
TRIAL RECORD OFFICE.


WANTED-All commissaries to clean up
their barns of all kinds of seed sacks and
* burlaps. We buy everything in the way
of sacks. Write us. American Fibre Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.


FOR SALE-Good turpentine place for
sale in Georgia. Good healthy location.
3ox 17, R. F. D. No. 2, Sylvester, Ga. tf




HUTCHINSON AUDIT CO.

PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS & AUDITORS


Board of Trade Building.


Phsem 31.


Jaeckamvil. Fla.


FOR SALE--100 acres near Jacksonville,
$10,0000000. Will soon double. Fine in-


vestment. On three railroads. Good fac-
tory site. Address "Factory," care Indus-
trial Record. 4t

FOR SALE- (ood turpentine place for
-ale in Central Florida. Plenty of labor.
No flat woods. Address Owner, box 414,
(ainesville, Florida. 2t

FOR SALE-A good twelve-crop turpen-
tine place in Alabama. Timber to cut two
more crops lea-edl. and available timber
to cut fifteen more crops in reach of still.
Address A. Z., care Industrial Record.

WANTED-By a young married man,
aged 25, and not afraid to work, employ-
imen. with some naval stores company in
the States of Georgia or Florida, for the
year 1907. References, present employer.
Address E. G., care Industrial Record.


ECHOES OF THE ELECTION.
The time has come for the newspapers
to quit talking drainage and begin to
agitate the question of good roads and to
uegin making suggestions to the next leg-
islature. It wouldn't be a bad idea for
the press to give some attention to the
uniform school book proposition.-Plant
City Courier.

If Gov. Broward will take the advice of
friends he will not try to put through any
more constitutional amendments when the
same results may be accomplished by legit-
imate legislative action.-Tampa Tribune.

In a letter to the Pensacola Journal
thanking it for its service in behalf of the
drainage amendment, Gov. Broward refers
to the recent elections as "the first skir-
mish." But it seems to have been a skir-
mish on a large scale and a decisive one.
All the forces on both sides were brought
into action and the size of the majority
leaves no room to doubt the character of
the victory. The courage and hopefulness
of Gov. Broward deserve high praise and
he bore himself like a man in defeat, but
his notions of a skirmish are not in accord-
anre with the popular definition.-Live
Oak Democrat.

All this talk about the Everglades now
Ieing drained by taxation of the whole
people is mere "bluff." The legislature
only can levy taxes, and the next legis-
lature is no more likely to levy a tax to
drain the Everglades than it is to pass a
bill requiring whites and blacks to be
taught in the same school. Neither will
the next legislature pass any sort of a
drainage constitutional amendment. Drain-
age is dead so far as the next legislature
is concerned, and as Gov. Broward will not
occupy the executive chair after 1908, it
s quite safe to wager that drainage is
dead for several years to come.-Gaines-
ville Sun.

The people should demand of their mem-
bers in the legislature a strict account for
all their doings there. They should insist
that no more drainage amendments be sent
out to agitate the State and cause out-
siders to think the frafters have it all
their own way. Plainly, the legislature
should legislate, and never again even
,-how a willingness to delegate its powers
to others, no matter how good nor how
capable they may be.-St. Augustine Rec-
ord.

IHillsborough county's vote in the recent
general election has been canvassed and
the otlicial returns are printed in the Tam-
ipa Tribune of Tuesday. The vote on the
constitutional amendment for reclaiming
and draining the Everglades, which was
the most important measure voted upon
and which was actively canvassed before
the voters, was 1,426. It does seem that
-uch an important measure would have
called out a bigger vote. Presuming that
on account of the importance of the meas-
ure a full vote was polled, and averaging
tive inhabitants for every voter, the entire
population of Hillsborolugh including the
city of Tampa and adjacent additions, such
as Ybor City, is only 7,130. Either some-
thing was the matter with the voter, or


the population is much smaller than out-
siders have been led to believe.-Ocala
Banner.

SATILLA SAILED FOR BRUNSWICK.
Brunswick, Ga., Nov. 15.-A telegram
received today states that the Satilla, the
new steamship of the Brunswick Steamship
Company, left New York Wednesday af-
ternoon and is expected to reach this port
by Sunday. The initial trip is attracting
considerable attention all along the line
of the Atlanta, Birmingham and Atlantic
Railroad, as well as in Brunswick.
General Manager Dimon is on board.
Capt. William A. Smith, formerly of the
Holland line, is master.
The Satilla will dock at the new 600-
foot concrete piling pier, which will be
completed by Saturday. The finishing
touches are being put on the pier this af-
ternoon. In all, there have Deem driven
since Sept. 7, over 500 of the big sixteen-
inch square concrete piles which support
the pier. These are from thirty-five to
forty-five feet in length and average in
weight from six to eight tons. In the
handling of the piles a special steam aer-
rick is used.
The first warehouse of the terminals,
No. 6, is about completed and will receive
the first cargo, tI is covered with Ludo-
wici tiling and presents a handsome sight
as one comes on a steamer up the aoy.
This warehouse, 800 feet in length, is but
one of the nine warehouses to be built at
once.
Former Admiral Bowles, the head of the
Fore River Shipbuilding Company ,the
builders of the Satilla and the fleet of
the Bee line, is in the city to welcome the
ship on her arrival here. Admiral Bowles
is well pleased with the worK so tar com-
pleted.
The arrival of the ship will be the oc-
casion of a general rejoicing in this city
as marking another stage of the wonder-
ful development now going on in this city.

FIRE IN ARCADIA.

Two Fine Residences Destroyed There
Yesterday.
Arcadia, Nov. 13.-Fire today complete-
ly destroyed the fine residences of J. H.
Treadwell and W. E. Danuiel. Insurance
$3,700; total loss, $8,000. The fire started
from the fireplace in the Treadwell resi-
dence.

BIG TIE SHIPMENT.

By Baxter and Company to Colon, Panama,
Made Yesterday.
Just at the closing hour of the custom
house yesterday afternoon, G. S. Baxter &
Co.. cleared the Norwegian steamship He-
ro, Capt. Kars, for Colon, Panama, with a
solid cargo of 25,457 cypress crossties,
measuring 93,013 cubic feet.
The Hero is a vessel of 1,081 net tons
and this is her first cargo from Jackson-
ville for Colon. The cargo of ties goes
to the Panama Railroad Company and it
is the finest cargo of ties ever shipped
from Jacksonville to a foreign port.


~


THLE WFYKLYI INDUSTRIALI RECORD.


11









1I THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



Jacksonville Grocery Comp'y

W ,,,, W o re aiwo lnd D llaerd Suppli es.
a*- m fldwe mer Weaemedw VWaheet A. 0. A dt. f-t. ggS


(Oontinued from page 5.)
or chip the face of the rock-face block by
hand. This is most effective and produces
excellent results. Of course, it is more ex-
pensive, but the variety in the face of the
blocks causes the pleasing irregularity of
an ashlar wall and more than pays for it-
self in the improved effect.
"As for constructive methods, a system
of veneer construction is used in some
eases Our diagram shows this in detail.
The method is an excellent one and shows
the versatility of the cement block. All
considered, our illustrations show a degree
of skill in handling this new form of con-
struction which should be an object lesson
to other builders throughout the country.
More About the Homes.
"A good example is the residence of Mr.
William B. Drew (designed by J. E W.
Hawkins), two views of which are given.
The first story of this house is of arti-
ficial stone cast in blocks and then tooled,
giving the appearance of actual stone
work. The interior of this house is in
hardwood, the first story an antique quar-
tered oak, and the upper story cypress,
hardwood floors throughout.
"The Harold D. Weston bungalow, de-
signed by Mr. J. H. W. Hawkins, is inter-
esting as a type much favored in warm
climates. The plan merits attention as
showing how much accommodation can be
secured in a single story. Here again
artificial stone plas a prominent part, the
heavy piers are all of that material and
harmonize well with the heavy tile roof
they support.
"The residence of Mr. A. Sabel is also of
t M1 ---- k Th i.


weather house.
"'The C. H. Barnes house is a broad,
heavy structure, crowned by Spanish tiles,
the columns a trifle heavy, but perhaps in
keeping with the breadth of the veranda
and the massiveness of the whole struc-
ture. The interior of this house is very
elaborate in treatment, the trim and foors
in hardwood and the entrance hall of am-
ple proportions.
--The A. V. S. Smith house is a very
comfortable little home, and the arrange-
ment of the reception hall is of consider-
able interest. A good idea of it may be ob-
tained by comparing the interior view with
the floor plan of the first story.
"In addition to the houses referred to,
many others are shown, all of more or less
interest and worthy of careful study. The
designs presented, as remarked earlier in
this article, cover a broad field and were
built to meet the needs of a great variety
of people."
The above article will do much to at-
tract attention to Jacksonville and arouse
interest in a class of people that are anx-
ious to locate in a live and progressive
town, where the people own handsome
houses and pay attention to art and archi-
tecture.

SUB-AGENT FOR THE LLOYDS.

Mr. Walter Mucklow, the Well-Knowa Ac-
countant, Chosen as Representative.
The Record is pleased to state that Mr.
Walter Mucklow, certified public account-
ant, has been appointed as sub-agent at
Jacksonville, Fla., for Lloyd's Agency, of


The M etropolls


Is the Paper you want. It is
published daily and is from 12
to 16 hours ahead of any other
daily newspaper in Florida ..



$500 a Year $2.50 Six Months


Full Telegraphic and Stock
reports. If you want to keep
posted on the news, get the
Metropolis.



CARTER & RUSSELL PUB. CO.

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


concre e oc s. e veneer cons r
tion is used. Iandon. England.


Other Residences.
"Other houses of considerable interest
are mentioned below:
"The F. C. Blackmer house at Riverside
one of the choicest sections of Jacksonville,
is from designs by Mr. Hawkins. This is
a low spreading house surrounded by ve-
randas, and looks like a typical country
house.
"The Henry A. Hodges house, also by
the same architect, is a study in verandas,
and exemplifies the needs of the climate.
The plan has been well studied and the
large and commodious rooms and ample
hallway make it a very successful warm


Mr. Mucklow is one of the most promi-
nent accountants in the South and his
services are constantly in demand by big
corporations. It is a matter of keenu in-
terest to know that the Lloyds have a sub-
agent in Jacksonville, and of congratula-
tion that Mr. Mucklow has been chosen as
their representative.

Biggest Cargo of the Season.
Brunswick, Ga., Nov. 15.-One of the
largest cargoes from this port, this season
was cleared yesterday afternoon for Man-
chester. The British steamer Daltonhall,
Williams, master, cleared with cotton val-
ued at $480,308 from Strachan & Co.


Mc KOY PATENT


Turpentine Cup.

SThe best and simplest cup
on the market. Detachable
Greater Capacity, easier
dipped, more easily placed
on tree, stronger and prac-
tically indestructible. Will
not rust. For catalog and
price list write


'lOY PIlHIT RPENTINE CUP CO
S" O1015 Hiberia Building,
New Orleans, Louisana.


TUB OLDY1 WHKIly GOUXI Ui
EG1O LA. (astabUsed I 1 1.)
OLD SHARP WILLJAM-Pure Fine Old
Rye. B- the gallon I.S; four full quarts
53.1. ezress prepaid.
aEO. J. COLEMAN-Pure Pennsylvania
Rye; Rich and Mellow. By the gallon
5.75; four full quarts 1I.0. express prepaid.
ANVIL RYE-Pure Bubstantial Family
Whiskey. By the gallon I.4; four full
quarts U.9s, express prepaid.
CLZIFORD RYE-By the gallon 2.5;
four full quarts S.6, express prepaid.
OLD KENTUCKY CORN-Direct from
Bonded Warehouse; fine and old. By the
gallon $53.O; four full quarts I. express
prepaid.
OLD POINTER CLUB CORN Rich
and Mellow. By the gallon I.0; four ful
quarts 8I.. express prepaid.
We handle all the leading brands of Rye and Bourbon Whiskhes in the market
and will save you from 5 te M0 per cent on your purchase. Bend for price list and
catalogue. Mailed free upon application.

The Altmayer dL Flatau Liquor Company

MACON. GEORGIA.


C. C. Bettes,


DRUGS. "53 55v AY.
20 to 2 SOUH LAIRA


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Florida Mail Order Drug Store. Supplies Everything a Drug Store
Ever Kept. Write to Us.









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. U


JOSEPH D. WEED.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. KRENSON.


J. D. WEED I CO.,
SAVANNAH. GCOILGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF

Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Etc.



FLORIDA STATE INSTIlUTE

60 RIVERSIDE AVE., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
SSituated on the banks of the St. Johns River and Riverside Drive. Perfect Location.
Perfect Facilities.
Mrs. Schumacher's Private Sanatorium. The only private institution of its kind
in the South. Method of treatment for all forms of the drug habit and alcoholism
considered by the medical profession as th e most effective known. It differs dis-
tinctly from all others. Active treatment terminated in 48 hours or less. All crav-
ing and desire for alcohol or drugs aliminat ed. Practically no time lost from business.
Treatment complete in from five to seven days. At the termination of this period
the patient is fit for work. All medicines administered by the mouth. Neither pain
nor discomfort experienced by the patient. Every privacy observed. Each patient
has individual nurses and service. There is no co-mingling of cases. Physician in
charge. Write or call for detailed inform tion. References furnished.




Standard Naval Stores Co.,
JACKSONVILLE



EXPORTERS

CARGO LOTS A SPECIALTY



Standard Naval Stores Co. JACKSONVILLE





Atlantic Coast Line

Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Virginia, North

Carolina and South Carolina.
THE GPEAT HIGHWAY OF TRAVEL FROM

Florida--East, West, North aud South.
TO THE EAST, THE FAMOUS

* Florida aud West Indian Umited and New York Express.

T the Wet Montgomery Route and "Dixie
f the Wt lyer" via Atlanta.
PULLMAN CARS AND THROUGH COACHES ON ALL TRAINS.
Atlantic Coast Line Mileage Books, good to all points, via all trains as far
East as Washington, and as far West as St. Louis, Cincinnati and New Orleans,
rates $25.00
CONSULT THE PURPLE FOLDER.
For detailed and full information regarding rates, Pullman reservations, schedules.
Call on your nearest ticket agent or write
FRANK C. BOYLSTON, W- D. STARK,


District Pass. Agent.
Jackonville, Fla.
W. J. CRAIG, Traf. Manager.
General Offices Wilmington, N. C.


Trav. Pass. Agent.
T. C. WHITE, Geal Pass. Agent.


Board of Trade to Urge Extensions of Street

Railways.


There will be a special meeting of the
Jacksonville Board of Trade tomorrow,
Friday night, at 8 o'clock, for the purpose
ofof discussing and taking some action
relative to the street railway franchise
bills that are now pending before the city
council.
This was decided at the regular meeting
of the board of trade held Wednesday
afternoon when the matter came up and
brought forth considerable discussion as to
the merits of the demand of the city coun-
ci That a flat rate of five cents be given
from all points in the city to Phoenix
park, with universal transfers.
The city council has wrestled with the
street railway franchise for several months
and the matter is still hanging fire. The
council has backed down on several of its
propositions and company has receded
from its position also, on several propo-
sitions. But still, no agreement has been
reached.
The two points at issue is the city coun-
cil's demand that the company charge only
five cents for a single fare from any point
in the city to Phoenix park, with universal
transfers, and that the company shall pay
to the city from its gross earnings two
per cent for the first five years, three per
cent for the next ten years, and five per
cent for the next ten years. The com-
pany has flatly refused to accede to these
demands of the city council.
The matter was brought up yesterday
afternoon by the reading of the follow-
ing resolutions, which had been handed the
secretary of the board of trade:
Whereas, the progress and development
of the city of Jacksonville demand in-
creased equipment, extended trackage and
better service by the street car company,
and
Whereas, there is pending before the
city council an application from them ask-
ing for some additional privileges in con-
sideration, among other things, the city
w!ll get a monopoly of the electric light
and power business and the consolidation
of the North Jacksonville line with the
Jacksonville Electric Company's lines and
the operation of both as one system; and
Whereas, this board of trade is, like all
other citizens, in favor of the development
and building up of all parts of Duval
county including the contiguous territory
to the city, but it is not in favor of doing
tlhii at the expense of the city proper, es-
pecially where there is such need for im-
miediate improvement of the street car ser-
vice within the limits of the city. There-
fore be it
Reserved, That in behalf of the business
interests of Jacksonville and its citizens
the hoard of trade most respectfully urges
the council to, without further delay, pas-
surh ia bill as will secure these benefits to
its citizens, and that a copy of these reso-
lutions be sent to each member of the
city council and published in the naswpa-
wprs (~ f the city.
As soon as the resolutions had been
read, Mr. Telfair Stockton moved their
adoption by the board.
Mr. Stockton said that the matter was


would be in effect, the sum of $8,000 from
profits on the lighting plant and percent-
age on earnings. He declared that the
only real concession that the company
would get would be an extension of the
franchise of the Main street line for nine
years.
He took the position that the council
should look after the interests of the city
and its citizens before endeavoring to en-
act legislation for the benefit of people out-
side of the city, such as was sought to be
done by insisting on the five cent fare to
Phoenix park. He said that he is one of
the largest property owner in the vicinity
of Phoenix park, and while, of course, he
would like to see the fare afed at five
cents, he was satisfied that the company
could not make the reduction and con-
tinue to operate the Phoenix park line on
a paying basis. He expressed a deire for
the board of trade to adopt the resolu-
tion, which would indicate to the city
council that the members of the board
wanted something done as soon as possi-
ble towards having the street ear service
improved inside the city limits.
Mr. George C. Bedell was of the opin-
ion that the resolution was good as far
as it goes, but that it should be amended
so as to urge the council to insert in the
franchise bill a provision regulating the
schedule on which street ar are to be
operated, requiring that not les than a
certain number of cars be run per hour
over the respective lines.
Mr. Stockton was willing for an amend-
mont of this kind, but he insisted that
what is needed is the extension of the
lines to the outlying districts of the city.
He declared that the city is being retarded
in its growth by lack of transportation
facilities.
Mr. W. W. Cummer raised tme objection
that- there was too small a number of the
members of the board present to take ac-
tion upon such an important matter. He
said that the question was one that the
full membership of the board should pass
upon, and that at least 400 members
should be present to pass upon this mat-
ter and make recommendations to the
council.
Mr. Stockton then called attention to
the fact that the matter was to come
before the city council committee this
week and that action is necessary. He
said the question at issue is "shall the
city council legislate for Jacksonville or
for the outlying districts?"
The matter was discussed further by Mr.
Stock:on and Mr. Cummer, and Council-
man Pleasant A. Holt explained bnenly
the status of the matter in the city coun-
cil.
Mr. W. A. Bours favored a special meet-
:ng of the board for the discussion of the
matter so that all interests could have
an opportunity of expressing their views.
'ipon motion of Col. W. P. Corbett, is
was finally decided that a special meet-
ing of the board would be held Friday
night at 8 o'clock, and that every member
of the board of trade be urged to attend
this meeting.
In this connection it will be of interest


one of the utmbost important to the city to real the communication from the street
of Jacksonville. lie outlined briefly the railway people, which was submitted to
rffer of the company to retire from the the city council Tuesday night, and which
lighting business and pointed out that the is now in the hands of the special com-
city would receive from the company, dur- miitte, appointed by the council to in-
ing the time that the lighting franchise (Continued on page 17.)









14 THE WEEKLTY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Seaboard Special Representative

Writes of City,s Finances.


The industrial department of the Sea-
board Air Line railway has had its repre-
sentative here for the past six weeks com-
piling statistics relative to the growth and
development of Jacksonville, which it will
place before the public in book form. The
publication promises to be of much inter-
est and value to the city and county, in
that it gives a line of information that
has required a great deal of time and care-
ful work to get together. Herewith is
given a complete financial statement of the
city, showing receipts and disbursements,
as it will appear in the book, for the cur-
rent year:
Receipts.
January 1, 1906.
Cash on hand .............. $ 68,379.71
Received from taxes, licenses,
court fines, franchises, etc... 385,534.6!
From city electric light plant. 224,827.13
From water works .......... 92,115.25

$ 702,477.07
Sale of improvement bonds for
extension of waterworks,
sewerage, paving and parks. 442,257.76

Total cash receipts and cash
on hand .................$1,213,11454
Disbursements.
For police, city officials, etc...$ 125,930.15
Board of public works, parks,
paving, street cleaning, etc.. 227,942.)
Sewers and drains .......... 95,723.02
Fire department ........... 51,0l.24
Public library .............. 7,000.00
Interest on bonds ........... 78,400.00
Operation and extension of
waterworks plant ......... 106,202.93
Operation and extension of
electric light plant ........ 163,464.06

Total expenditures .......$ 855,745.20
Cash on hand Jan. 1, 1907.... 357,369.34

$1,213,114.54
Profits of electric light plant
for 1907 .................. 75,000.00
Profits of waterworks plant
for 1907 ................. 25,000.00
Assets and Liabilities
Assets:
Cash on hand, ordinary reve-
nues ..................... .$ 57,369.34
Cash on hand, unexpended
bond money ............... 300,000.00
Waterworks and electric light
plant, grounds and equipm't 988,574.84
Fire department and equipm't 100,157.00
Police department, buildings
and equipment ............ 61,352.00
City hall, jail, crematory and
other city property ....... 283,000.00
Parks and other real estate .. 350,000.00
Bridges, viaducts, sewers and
street pavements .......... 1,902,221.05

Total assets ..............$4,088,506.90


Liabilities.
Bond issue 1894, maturing
1924, 5 per cent ..........
Bond issue 1901, maturing
1924, 5 per cent ...........
Bond issue 1906, maturing
1936, 5 per cent ...........
Bond coupons due and not
presented ................


970,000.00

398,000.00

400,000.00

5,750.00


Total liabilities ........... $1,773,750.00
Excess assets over liabilities 2,414,756.90
These figures were furnished the indus-


trial department of the Seaboard Air Line
by Mayor W. H. Baker and City Treasu-
rer A. M. Ives.
The showing is a very commendable one,
and it is doubtful is there are three cities
in the United States that could do as well.
If the city cared to sell its waterworks
and electric light plants it could secure
enough, with the franchises that go with
them, to liquidate the entire indebtedness
of the city, and have all of its miprove-
ments as assets and clear of debt.
Facts of this character are what will in-
terest the man with money to invest, pic-
tures are all right in a way, but the bal-
ance on the proper side of the ledger is
what counts.
The compilation of this publication is in
charge of Mr. Thomas K. Bates, of Ports-
mouth, Va. He is stopping at 618 Cedar
street, and would be pleased to have any
information or suggestion that anyone
may have that would be of interest to
the stranger.

NEW STEAMER LINE FROM TAMPA
TO HEW ORLEANS.
Tampa, Nov. 15.-Scott McLanahan, a
prominent attorney and capitalist of New
York City, who has been in the city for
several days with R. C. Caples, traffic man-
ager of the National Steel and Wire Co.,
last night authorized the Tribune to state
that he had, acting for large ship owners
of New ork and Chicago, leased the Me-
Kay docks, on the Tampa river front, from
Robert Mugge, who recently purchased
the property from Capt. James McKay,
for a term of five years.
Mr. McLanahan said that the purpose
of the lease was tto use these valuable
docks for a line of passenger and freight
steamships, to be put on in a few months
between Tampa and New Orleans. "We
have already secured wharf facilities at
New Orleans, and all that now remains
to be done is to put the steamers into
operation."
Further than this, as to the definite
plane of the new company, Mr. McLana-
han would not talk. He said, however,
that excellent traffic arrangements had
been made between the new steamer line
and the big railroad systems of the North
and the West whereby Tampa and Florida
people would be given the best transpor-
tation service they had ever enjoyed.
Mr. Caples, who accompanied Mr. Me-
Lanahan on this trip, was here recently
with Mr. George L. Craig, a millionaire
owners of steamers on the Great Lakes,
and it was rumored at the time of their
visit that Mr. Craig's business here was
to look over the situation with a view to
putting on a line between Tampa and
New Orleans. tI is reported that Mr.
Craig will be one of the heaviest stock-
holders in the new line.
Messrs. McLanahan and Caples left last
night for New York. They are both inter-
ested, also, in the Tampa Bay andn West
Coast Navigation Co., operating the steam-
er Falcon. As a result of their visit, the
Falcon will begin, Monday, a regular sched-
ule of twice-daily trips between Tampa
and St. Petersburg.


Walter Mucklow,

CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


IT MOVES WHEN YOU DO.


BOYD'S PORTABLE FIREPLACE.
Manufactured by Boyd & Presley, Valdoa-
ta, Ga. Shipping Points: Boyd & Pres-
ley, Valdosta, Ga., and Palatka, Fla.;
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.; Sam,
der Mill Company, Pensacola, Fla.



Cay & McCall
FIRE INSURAnCE.


tonolidated Building.


Phone I955.


WM. D. JONES
RESCRIPTION SPECIALIST


FAMILY DRUGGIST
107 E. EAY ST.
Mail Orders Solicited.


HICKS' GAS MOTOR COMPANY
We an pleased to announce to our
Southern trade that or new modern works
at Waeroes Ga., for the n--nf-etirwg of
the Hicks Patent Tandem Gas ad Goeo-
line Engines i completed ad i option,
building Stationary, Portable and Marine
Engines, from 2 to 500 H. P., also Gas
Produced, Pumps and Gauoline Motor
Street Cars. While the Hicks Engines are
far superior to the old single eyler n-
gines, our prime ame no higher.
Send for eatalgues and get posted.
Agents wanted.
HICKS' GAS MOTOR COMPANY,


Doe Reany aidlmprovintl Co.
Large or small tracts of timber
lends, also cut over lands, suitable
tor colonies, stock-raising and
game preserves in Florida and a
Georgia. W
Also Suburban Lots in Deen-
wood and some choice city lots in
Waycross. Write us for full par-
ticulars and information.
I1m haily 1 m Inprmit C8.
W'AYCROSS, GA.



PEC AN S
Analiv the wrd.


permanent Profits

Economy of care
Certaty of reuits

Anual crops

Non-perishabe product
Superior to all nuts.

THE OPPORTUNITY OF TODAY.
The first to plant a pecam grove
wNi be tUe first to reap

great harvest.
For full nfermatkon apply to

THE 6RIFFIN6 BROS. Co.
JMaksonville. Flria.


DIAMONDS AND WATCHES

We simply ask a call. We cam show ye, a correct and meaey
sayvlg prices, many papers of lose pre white, perfect
DIAMONDS. It Is oar desire to condtne berng the largest
Dlmoamn dealers in JacksanvllIe, ad oar specialty Is Ine roamfd-
Sct gems and lhg-grade Waltham and Egllt Watches.

SHESDiamS Ss, Watches, Jewelry,
NESS & SLATER OI11-1)1h ., 3I1.k LA, J dImN, JI




MERRILL-STEVENS CO. ,


Boilermaking and Repairing

V Still Boilers and PumpS.
SHIP BUILDING end REPAIRING.
Jacksonville, Fla.
l eghlIIII$ 1 s #$ bi11esII $$16 -6 8* l 6i1 &t* ai sai


14


THE WR~RnP INDUST~I~L RECORD.











THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Hard Fight Instituted Against the Standard

Oil Comlpany.

Washington, Nov. 15.-Attorney-General nies alleged to be in the conspiracy is


Moody today, acting through the resident
United States district attorney, instituted
proceedings against the Standard Oil Com-
pany of New Jersey under the Sherman
anti-trust act by filing in the United
States circuit court at St. Louis a petition
in elu'ty against it and its seventy con-
stituent corporations and partnerships and
seven individual defendants, asking that
the combination be declared unlawful and
in the future enjoined from entering into
ny contract or combination in restraint
trade, etc.
This suit was instituted in the name of
the United States by direction of the At-
torney General, against John D. Rocke-
feller, William Rockefeller, Henry H.
Rogers, Henry M. Flagler, John D. Arch-
bold, Oliver H. Payne, Charles M. Pratt,
and seventy-one corporations and partner-
ships, charging them with having violated
sections 1 and 2 of the Sherman anti-
trust act.
Would Mean Dissolution.
The government asks for an injunction
against these defendants which, if granted,
will result in the dissolution of the al-
leged combination.
It is alleged in the petition that John
D. Rockefeller and his associates, the other
individual defendants, formed a conspir-
acy to monopolize the commerce in petro-
leum and its products at a very early
date-about the year 1870-and that the
same individuals have controlled the com-
bination during all these years, in all its
forms, and now control it.
A complete history of the Standard Oil
Company through its various phases is
given in the bill and a long list of compa-


GRACE DEBEING LOST IN HURRI-
CANE.
The ill-fated coal barge, Grace Deering,
now rests quietly at the bottom of the
Atlantic, she having been lost a few days
ago in a great hurricane off the lower
coast.
The Grace Deering, in command of Capt.
Moirhead, and with W. Murray, F. Harvey,
Eddy Patterson, Charles Sapol and Chris
Johnson as members of the crew, left Phil-
adelphia last month in tow of the Mexi-
can steamship El Presidente, bound for
Havana wtih a cargo of 800 tons of coal.
Everything went well until October 16,
when the hawser parted from the steamer
and the barge went adrift while the steam-
er proceeded on her course.
Three days later, after experiencing ter-
blle hardships, the barge came in sight
of Mayport and was picked up by the tug
Admiral Deney and towed into this por;.
Capt. Moirhead was seen by a Times-
Union representative soon after reaching
Jacksonville and gave a harrowing account
of the experience he and his crew had gone
through during the last three days at sea.
Vessel Libeled.
Soon after arriving in port the Jackson-
ville Towing and Wrecking Company,
owners of the tug Admiral Dewey, libeled
the large for salvage, in the United States
court, and a few days later things were
settled up, the company receiving $2,000
for saving the barge.
While lying at the Cummer mill docks,
the Grace Deering met with another acd-


presented.
It is alleged in the bill that the defend-
ants, through the Standard Oil Company
and the other corporations, are engaged
in producing, purchasing and transport-
ing petroleumi in :he various producing
districts in the United States, principally
situated in New York, Pennsylvania, West
Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, In-
diana. Illinois, Kansas, Indian Territory,
Oklahoma, Louisiana, Texas, Colorado and
California; that they are engaged in ship-
ping and transporting the said oil through
pipe lines, owned and controlled by said
companies, from the various oil-producing
districts to the various refineries, princi-
pally situated in and about New York
harbor, Olean and Rochester, N. Y.; Phila-
delphia. Franklin and Pittsburg, Pa.; Lima
and Cleveland, O.; Whiting, Ind.; Sugar
Creek, Mo.; Neodesha, Kan.; Point Rich-
mond. Cal.; Beaumont and Corsicana, Tax.,
and other places; and also engaged in
shipping the said oil into all the States
and territories of the United States and
into foreign countries, and selling and dis-
posing of the same.
Own and Control Pipe Lines.
That they own and control nearly all
of the pipe lines in said States, and other
pipe lines extending from Kansas to the
seaboard; also pipe lines in Texas and
California; that they own a large number
of tank cars and steamships engaged in
transporting oil; and that the said de-
fendants have, through the instrumental-
ity of the Standard Oil Company of New
Jersey-a holding corporation-eliminated
competition between all of the separate
corporations and monopolized the com-
merce in oil in the United States.


dent. A freight car was shoved off the
track and crashed into her bow, tearing a
great hole in it. There repairs were made
and the barge left port October 30 in tow
of the Norwegian steamship Nicaragua,
Capt. Sarenssen, bound for Havana with
her original cargo of coal.
Lost at Sea.
Nothing more was heard from the ves-
sel until a few days ago the agent of the
Nassau line steamer Nicaragua, received
a cable from the captain stating that he
reached Havana all right with the crew of
the Grace Deering.
Yesterday additional information was
received to the effect that the Nicaragua
ran into a severe hurricane on her trip to
Havana. in which the great coal hoisting
apparatus on the barge, Grace Deering,
was hurled overboard and the barge cap-
sized and went down at a rapid rate.
Crew Was Saved.
Capt. Moirhead and his crew were all
-aved, hut with great difficulty, and were
taken to Havana. It is not known posi-
tively, liut it is generally believed that the
crew of the ill-fated barge will be brought
to Jacksonville on the steamer Nicaragua
which said from Havana yesterday for
Nassau.
On account of the hurricane the Nica-
ragua was compelled to remain at Havana
several days.
The barge Grace Deering was owned by
:he Havana Coal Company, and had a
tonnage of 62. She was formerly a schoon-
er and had often visited this port for
cargo.


Clyde Steamship Company


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
The magnlicent steamshipe of this li are appointed to small a follows, calling at
Charleston, C, both ways.


mFrom Jac s vil ew fea
STEAMER Chsriste and New York


Friday, Oct. 26, at 3:00pm..... ARAPAHOE.... Wednesday, Oct. 31,at 10:00a
Tuesday, Oct. 30, at 3:00pm.... COMANCHE ... Sunday, Nov. 4, at 10:00m
Wednesday, Oct. 31, at 3:00pm...... IROQUOIS.... .Monday, Nov. 6,at 10:00a
Friday, Nov. 2, at 3:00pm ..... APACHE ..... Wednesday, Nov. 7, at 10:00am
Saturday, Nov. 3, at 3:00pm....ALGONQUIN..... Friday, Nov. 9,atl0:00am
Tuesday, Nov. 6, at 3:00pm... .ARAPAHOE ... Sunday, Nov. 11,at 10:00am
Wednesday, Nov. 7,at 3:00pm....... HURON....... Monday, Nov. 12, at 10:00am
Friday, Nov. 9, at 3:00pm..... COMANCHE.....Wednesday, Nov. 14,at 10:0am
Saturday, Nov. 10, at 3:00pm...... IROQUOIS......Friday, Nov. 16, at 10:00am
Tuesday, Nov. 13, at 3:00pm...... *APACH ......Sunday, Nov. 18, at 10:00am
Wednesday, Nov. 14, at 3:00pm..... ALGONQUIN.....Monday, Nov. 19, at 10:00am
Friday, Nov. 16, at 3:00pm.... ARAPAHOE.....Wednesday, Nov. 21, at 10:00am
Saturday, Nov. 17, at 3:00pm.......HURON.......Friday, Nov. 23,at 10:00am
Tuesday, Nov. 20, at 3:00pm.... .*COMANCHE..... Sunday, Nov. 26, at 10:00am
Wednesday, Nov. 21, at3:00pm...... IROQUOIS...... Monday, Nov. 2, at 10:00ams
Friday, Nov. 23, at 3:00pm......APACHE.......Wednesday, Nov. 28, at 10:0am
Saturday, Nov. 24, at 3:00pm. ... ALGONQUIN ..... Friday, Nov. 30, at 10:0m
Tuesday, Nov. 27, at 3:00pm.... .ARAPAHOE.... Sunday, Dec. 2,at10:00am
Wednesday, Nov. 28, at 3:00pm....... HURON.......Monday, Dee. 3, at 10:00a
Friday, Nov. 30, at 3:00pm..... COMANCHE.....Wednesday, Dec. 5,at10:00am
*Jacksonville to New York direct.
Friday, Oct. 19.............. *KATADIN .................Thursday, Oct. 25
Wednesday, Oct. 24...... ... *CHIPPEWA............... Tuesday, Oct. 30
Saturday, Oct. 27............... ONONDAGA ..............Saturday Nov. 3
Friday, Nov. 2............... KATAHDIN ...............Thursday, Nov. 8
Wednesday,. Nov. 7 ............... *CHIPPEWA ..............Tuesday, Nov. 13
Saturday, Nov. 10............... ONONDAGA ............Saturday, Nov. 17
*Via Brunswick and Charleston.

CLYDE NBW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
Freigt SMervi Betwee JackmaMv Bo mte and Providece, an ll A te Peaita
Canit R at Charlston Bth Way.
FLIGHT ONLY.


From South S0e
Lewis Whaf, Boston


STEAMER


From Fast Catherine aresa
Jackonilemv.


Saturday, Sept. 29 ................ONONDAGA ................. aturdy, Out. 6
Wednesday, Oct. 3.................. KATAHDIN.................................
Saturday, Oct. 6...................CHIPPEWA.................. turday, Ot. 13
*For Brunswick, via Charleston.
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
Between JackesMig l at Saafoe.
Stopping at Palatka, Astor, St. Frands, Beresford (DeLsad), sad aterm late
landings on St. Johns River.

STEAMER "CITY OP JACKSONVILLE"
Is appointed to uil as follows: Leave Jaeckonville, Sunday, Tesdays and
Thurdays, 3:30 p. m. Returning, leave Sanford, Mondays, Wednesday an Frida,
9:30 a. m.
SCHEDULE
SOUTHBOUND INO m UN
Read down Read up.
Leave 3:30 p. m................... Jacksonvill ................ rriv :00a.m.
Leave 8:46p.nm.................... Palatka ....................L 8:001p.m.
Leave 3:00.m. .................. Astor .................... v 3:30p.B-
............................. Beresford (De nd) .............. Lev 1:00 p. m.
Arrive 8:30am. ................... Sanford ................... Lrv 9: 3a.m.
Arrive 10:00 a.m................... Enterprise .................. Lav 10:008a.m
GENERAL PASSENGER AND TICXKT OFFICE, 12a W. BAY ST, JAC'VILL.
F. M. IRONMONGER. Jr., Asst. Gen'l Pass. Agent, 122 W. Bay St., Jacksoville, Fla.
W. G. COOPER, Jr., Frt. Agt. C. P. LOVELL, Spt.
Foot of Hogan Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
A. C. HAGERTY, CLYDE MILNE,
Genl Eastern Pass. Agt., New York. Genl Frt. Agt, New York.
THEO. G. EGER, V. P. and G. M.
General Offices, Pier 36, North River. Branch, 290 Broadway, New York.


FUEL AND RUILDIMII MATERIAL.



The Southern Fuel & Suply Cao
M F eo F mf mie --*****se 4, ALdu eif
FE m Stawgd, .Iakaeuve, F1.


From New York,
(Pier 4 Nrth River.)


--------






16 THB W jEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
*(,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,^,,, W,^^----------------


The


Cooperage


Company


Manufacturers of High Grade

Western White Oak Spirit Barrels


Capital $200.000.

JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

Orders sent direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.
We are now prepared to furnish barrels from six shops advantageously located.

OFFICERS:
J. C. LITTLE, President. JOHN E. HARRIS, Vice-President.
E. H. MOTE, General Manager. C H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasurer.


J. C. LITTLE,


JOHN E. HARRIS,
W. C. POWILL,


DIRECTORS:
C. H. BARNES,
W. F. COACHMAN.


J. W. WEST,
E. H. MOTE.


W. J. KELLY


'A%%II%%%%%%%%%W ~-~c~Mj h~ %%%%%%%* Sh %%%'~ ~%~% %%%h'S%-%-%%% AM%%%%


I 131 1111 llclrl met~ uiiiiiiieseem 5OllaaalarUU


J. W. Mottoe
Pruesment.


C. B. Parkel
Vioe-Pres.


Jams MeNatt,
Vice-PreT.


W. W. Wilder,
See. & Treas.


John R. Young Co.,

Commission
Merchants.

Naval Stores factors. Wholesale Grocers.
Savatnnah l BrunswiclL Ga
'aa s $l $ ag asi ia *ft @io m as$ I a o.-. I.I-I.


. W. OUT, 0. A.
E -


P


PZTTEWAY,
Vie.-Prdemt.


A. C. BACON,
seey & Tress.


ENINSULAR NAVAL STORES CO.
Capital, 500,00000.0
Successors to TIMMONS-BLOUNr CO.
Naval Stores Factors and Commission Merchants.
ALUS IN Turpentine Operators' Supplies
OF EVERY IESCR MTION
Flat Savannah Prices paid for Rosin and Turpentine, less
Customary Charge.
CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED.
Offies-American National Bank Bldg., Tampa, Fla.
Yards, Port Tampa City.


SFIF7H AVENUE HOTEL
SMadison Square, New York.
American Plan $5 per day. European Plan $2.00 per (ay
The most famous representative hotel
in America. New as the newest, always
fresh and elea. The location in Madison
Square is tl.e finest in the city.
SHITCHCOCK. DARLING 4M COMPANY.




SJ. S. Schofield's Sons Company,
**o*e*s***,*e*.*s*s#:*s*e*e*****.**** oe*e*e*e*.**
~* -aL.. Hmdmuwfters for
SDistiller's Pumping
Outfit.
Hundreds of them in use in Georgia,
* Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and *
* Sonth Carolina. Write us for particu-
"* -lars and prices. We also manufacture
SEngines. Belers and iih fi
Grmde Machlumry,
* | as well a carry a full and cunplete -
* *-stockof-
SMill Supplies, Pipe,
. Belier Tubes, Etc.
* Advise your wants.
0 Macon, - Georgia. ?
tA Lm6s lsdeI f A
m ws fTa f wam fw tirw stus*te P r.wmn
S*e-**eree*s**o*e*e*e* I .c*e*e*e** *eO-*e****-a


I_


~Y^"" "'~U~U'


EL








THE wEEKLY INDUSTELAL RECORD.


(Continued from page 13.) plans contemplated by our proposition
vestigate and report upon the street rail- will require the operation of not less than
way franchise matter. The communica- thirty-six regular cars, which will give
tion was as follows: more cars and more frequent schedules
Jacksonville, Fla., Nov. 12, 1906.-Spee- than a city of the size of Jacksonville
ial Committee, City Council of Jackson- usually receives.
ville, Jacksonville, Fla.-Dear Sirs: We We cannot believe that it is the inten-
have received from W. C. West, city re- tion of the council to obstruct so import-
corder, a copy of your report submitted to ant a matter by imposing conditions which,
the city council of Jacksonville, acting as while of minor importance as far as the
committee of the whole, and adopted by city of Jacksonvilel is concerned, are so
them October 16, 1906. burdensome to the Jacksonville Electric
We note that the council favors: Company as to make it impossible for us
1. That the Jacksonville Electric Com- to accept them.
pany give a flat fare of ive cents to During the discussion of this matter, we
Phoenix park, with universal transfers to have conceded one point after another,
and from all parts of the city. until at the present time our proposition
2. That the percentage of street car as it stands is really more burdensome to
receipts to be paid to the city shall be the company than its business will war-
two per cent for the first five years, three rant, and if we should consider this matter
per cent for ten years, and five per cent purely from a business standpoint, we feel
for ten years. that the company would be better off to


3. That in connection with the arbi-
tration clause the council shall have the
right to appoint one arbitrator, who shall
be a man of high standing, character and
ability in the community, and not himself
interested in the construction of the pro-
posed line; that the Jacksonville Electric
Company shall name on arbitrator, who
shall be a man of high standing, charac-
ter and ability, and not interested direct-
ly or indirectly in the company, or in its
employment; that the two shall select the
third arbitrator.
With these modifications we understand
that our proposition of October 10th is
acceptable to the council.
As far as the htird demand is concerned,
in reference to the arbitration matter, we
are willing to accept the same. The other
two demands are not new, and we have al-
ready clearly stated our position in regard
tb them in our communication to the
council of October 10th. It is, therefore,
unnecessary to make further comments
in regard to them, and inasmuch as these
demands would impose a greater burden
upon the company than its business would
warrant, we must again decline their ac-
ceptance, and submit for your further
consideration our proposition of October
10th, modified as above outlined in regard
to the arbitration clause.
In conclusion, we desire to call your
attention once more to the main facts con-
nected with this matter:
In consideration of the extension of the
Main street franchise for a limited period,
which is coceded to be a decided advantage
to the city, as well as to the company,
we give up our rights and privileges as
an electric lighting company, and thereby
place the city in a position to demand and
receive such extensions and improvements
in its street railway service as the present
conditions and growth of the city require,
a portion of the receipts of the Main street
railroad, from which the city derives no
income at the present time and an addi-
tional percentage of the receipts of the
Jacksonville Street Railway Company,
amounting in all during the life of the
present lighting franchise to $86,000 more
than the city receives now.
In addition to paying the city $86,000 in
cash, the company is further burdened by
the cost of constructing and operating
the proposed extensions, some of which
will not pay operating expenses for a con-
siderable time to come. In order that the
city may have some idea of what this
arrangement means from the standpoint
of street car service, we would say that
at the present time the Jacksonville Elec-
tric Company operates twenty-two regu-
lar cars, and that the carrying out of the


continue to do business under the present
franchises than to carry out the terms of
our proposition. In spite of this, however,
we are willing to abide by our proposition,
as we feel that the present conditions
under which the street car business of
Jacksonville is being conducted can never
be entirely satisfactory to either the city
or the company, and we believe it is for
the interest of all concerned that you fav-
orably consider our proposition as it now
stands. Yours very truly,
JACKSONVILLE ELECTRIC CO.
By H. H. HUNT, Distrist Manager.

Dividend Declared.
New York, Nov. 15.-The Sandard Oi
Company of New Jersey today declared a
quarterly dividend of $10 a share, or the
same amount as was declared at this time
last year. Shortly after the declaration
the stock sold off 20 points to 545.

ATLANTIC COAST LINE ROUND TRIP
EXCURSION RATES PROM JACK-
SONVILLB.
$38.40-Hot Springs, Ark.; on sale daily;
limit ninety days.
So35---Atlanta, Ga.; on sale Oct. 19, 20,
21 and 22; lift leaving Atlanta
Oct. 30; extension to Nov. 21.
$1.55--unlfport, Miss.; on sale Nov. 1,
13; limit Nov. 28.
Excursion rates to other points.
Limits, schedules, Pullman reservations
and all detailed information to above and
other points, cheerfully furnished on appli-
cation, either in person or by mail, to
Frank C. Boylaten. District Psse
Aut, 1N West Bay @L, JaishgWllr, a.


Lombard Iron Works
and Supply Company
BUILDERS AND DEALERS IN


ENGINES, BOILERS.
Cotton, Saw, ortidaer, Oil and Iee MU
chimry, and Supplies ad Repairs.
Capacity for 200 Hands.
Machine Tools, Wood-Working Machlnry,
shafting, PuUey, Hanger, IAather n
Rubber Blting ad Hoe, Railroad and
Mill supplies and Tools.
Plans and estimate, furnished for Power
Peats mad Steel Bridges.
Steam Pnmps. Feed Water Heaters sad
Hoastlsn Eaciaes.
AUGUVTA. GEORGIA.


General Banking.

C. E. GARNER, President
C. B. ROGBER, Vice-President.
0. J. Avent,


495 on Savings Deposits

A. F. PERRY, Vies-PreMest
W. A. BEDDING, Oashier.
Asat. Ouhir.


EJJJE CI. -C


YELLOW PINE TIMBER


Is Attracting Attention of the Entire COUNTRY

Our Information is Absolutely Reliable.

EVERY PROPOSITION

We offer you a good one. If you are in the market,
now is the time to buy. Write us your wants. Corres-
pondence with bona-fide buyers solicited.



Brobston, Fendig & Company
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA BRUNSWICK GAC
sx6 West Forsyth Street. z12 Newcastle Street.



Illse$ gaisa 6 wa488I0 64'I'J|8O*l|*O* I se I s0ltss s

JOS. ROSENHEIM SHOE CO.
NMAN FACTVUE AND JOBBERS OF
*
a

SHOES


SSAVANNAH. GEOR GIA A
"Bt Shoes Made for Commissary Trade."
sao mass& (a l aie 8s I e 6s s a s ass si s i lB@-@@


0MJ19Mi~~fjFISCFF


W. W. ASHBURN, Moultrie, Ga. N. EMANUEL, Brunswick, Ga.
W. R. BOWEN, Fitzerald, Ga. D. T. FURSE Savannah. Ga.
SJ. J. DORMINY, Broxton, Ga. R.G. KIRKLAND, Nichols, Ga.
0. T. McINTOSH, Savaunah, Ga.


Southern States Naval Stores Co.
Savannah. Ga.
SFrctors and Commission Merchants
Ship to Savannah Get Competition Highest Prices Promptest Returns
Correspond With Us



Malsby Mechinery Compeny
of Jacksonville, Fla.

SPrtable, Statiiary Eigls ad Beller
a MIII ll ail WrkiNg Mascklir.
Portable Outfits a Specialty.
Write for haudsom illustrated 1906 cat
Cor Ward and Jefferson
Streets.



THE FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK.

af Jacks onvile.








1 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


ARTILEK OF IWCORPORATION
OF THE
LUDDEN-CAMPBLL-SMITH COMPANY
Artles L
The name of the corporation shall be
the LUDDEN-CAMPBELL-SMJ TH COM-
PANY, and its principal place of business
shall be in the city of Jacksonville, Flr-
ida.
Article IL
The general nature of the business to be
transacted by this corporation shall be to
manufacture, buy, sell and deal in, pianos,
organ sad musical instruments of all de-
scriptions, phonographs, talking and re-
producing machines, musical publications,
other merchandise and to buy and own
stock in other corporations in similar busi-
naes*.
Article ILL
The capital stock of this corporation,
authorized, shall be sixty thousand dol-
lars, divided into six hundred share of the
par value of one hundred dollars each.
Four per cent of said capital stock shall
be paid for in lawful money of the United
States, and the balance of the stock may
be paid for in property at a just valuation
to be fixed by the directors at a meeting
called for that purpose.
Article IV.
This corporation shall exist for the term
of ninety-nine years.
Article V.
The officers of this corporation shall be
three directors ,one of whom shall be presi-
dent and one shall be secretary and treas-
urer. They shall be elected by the stock-
holders at a meeting to be held in the
"itv of Jacksonville, Florida, on the first
Monday in June, A. D. 1907, and annually
thereafter. The officers who shall conduct
the business of the corporation until those
elected at the first election are qualified,
shall be A. B. Campbell, president; Jasper-
sen Smith, secretary and treasurer, sad
William Ludden, director.
Article VL
The highest indebtedness or liability to
which this corporation can subject itself
shall be one hundred and fifty thousand
dollars.
Article VII.
The names and residence of the subseri-
bers are as follows, to-wit: A. B. Camp-
bell and Jasperen Smith, Jacksonvlle,
Florida, and William Ludden, Brooklyn,
New York .
Names. Number of shares of stoek.
Willim Ludden ......... Twenty shares.
A. B. Campbell .......... Twenty share.
Jaspersen Smith ......... Twenty shares.

State of Florida, Duval county:
I, a notary public in and for sid State
and county, do hereby certify that Jas-
persen Smith ,who is personally known to
me, appeared before me in mid county and
acknowledged that he subscribed the fore-
going articles of leorporation.
Witness my hand and ojcal seal this
the 14th day of September, A .D. 1906.
(Notarial Seal.) SIG. HE88,


Notary Public State of Florida.
My commission expires June 3, 190.

State of New York, Onondaga county:
I, a notary public in and for said State
and county, do hereby certify that A. B.
Campbell, who is personally known to me,
appeared before me in said county and ac-
knowledged that he subscribed the fore-
going articles of incorporation.
Witness my hand and official seal this
the 18th day of September, A. D. 1906.
(Notarial Seal.) MARTIN DANER.


State of New York, New York county:
I, a notary public in and for said State
and county, do hereby certify that William
Ludden, who is personally known to me,
appeared before me in said county and ac-
knowledged that he subscribed the fore-
going articles of incorporation.
Witness my hand and official seal this
the 19th day of September, A. D. 1906.
WILLIAM R. BRINCKERHOFF,
Notary Public New York County.
(Notarial Seal.)


NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that application
will be made to the Governor of the State
of Florida for letters patent on the fore-
going proposed charter thirty days after
date. This 27th day of September, A. D.
1906.
JASPERSEN SMITH,
A. B. CAMPBELL,
WILLIAM LUDDEN.

FLORIDA PROSPERITY.
Miami residences may rent fr fancy
prices in the winter, but they are worth
every dollar paid by those who seek the
finest climate, the best of health, bounti-
ful rest and abundant recreation in a sec-
tion that knows no superior or even an
equal in these blessings of nature.-Mi-
ani Metropolis.

Gravely discussing the present wave of
business and prosperity, an exchange re-
marks that "not even experts were pre-
pared for the present wave to mount on
top of all previous prosperity." We should
say not. The experts were all too busy
figuring that a reaction was about due,
too much occupied in hedging against a
periodic panic-whatever that is-to see
ahead into the good times coming. Even
this optimistic and hopeful and clearsight-
ed paper was so much influenced by this
expert opinion as to do no more than ven-
ture to figure out one year ahead at a
time. Our readers will remember our va-
rious summing-up of the commercial sit-
uation and prospect year after year, and
at the end we would solemnly declare that
there "is nothing in sight to indicate any
change. and the present condition of pros-
perity may be relied upon to continue
roughh next year."-Tampa Times.


THE BOND 4& BOURS CO.
WHOLESALE & ILETAIL

HARDWARE

SASH, DOORS, BLINDS, PAINTS.
Oils, Glass, Stoves, Tinware, Country Holloware.


10 WEST BAY STREET.


JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED LONG LEAF

Yellow Pine Lumber

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carl.ad Lots
Steamer Shipments a Specialty.
WATER TOWN, FLORIDA


PLANTERS


"Old Time" Remedies

THE JOY OF THE HOUSEHOLD.


Thee four great remedies, Nuhbia Tea, Be-eicta, Cuban Relief
and Cuban Oil, are the joy of the household. With them near at hand, a
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Besides, you can cure your stock of any ailment that may befall them. a
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will cure all forms of Liver and Kidney Complaints, Prevents Chills and Malarial
Fever. Cures the 'mmon ailments of children; and as a laxative toeic it is without
an equal-safe and reliable. In the liquid, it i extremely palatabl- es children
like it-and it is READY FOR USE.
BEJEDICTA is a woman's medicine. It will cure all the diseases common to
women, and lasted as Female Troubles. It will bring youth back to the laded woman.
who has gone one suffering because she thought it woman's lot. It will care for the
young girl just entering womanhood; and prepare the young woman for the seared
duties of wife and mother.
CUBAN RELIEF-The instant Paint Killer, for either man or beast. Relieves
instantly, Colic, Cramps, Cholera Morbus, Diarrhoea, Dyatentery and Sick Headache
For colic in horse it is an infallible remedy and is guaranteed to give relief in five
minutes.
CUBAN OIL-The Beat Be and Nerve Linimeat. Is antleptie for cuta,
snagged or torn flesh, and will instantly relieve the pain. Cures insect bites and stings.
scald and burns, bruises and sores, chapped hands and face, ore and tender feet.
Relieves rheumatic pains, lame back. stiff joints, and in stock cures wire fence uts.
seratehes, thrush, splint, collar sores, saddle gall, and diseased boofs.
Write u for Pres.

SPENCER MEDICINE CO., Chattanooga, Ten.


Successful Men

appreciate, use and advise Life Insu-
rance. The advice of successful men
is worth following. Insure in

THE PRUDENTIAL *O


WaLtIE P. CemICEca1= wvr.
0 West Bwld. le Fi.


JOBN F. LEIyrN. Pres.
Home Oflee. Nuue.srh,.J


ARAGON
JACKSONVILL.E. FLA.
NOW OPEN
SUnder new management. Thoroughly)
renovated and repaired throughout. in-
eluding new elect ie elevator aLd our
own electric light plant.
k H. N. O'NEAL, Prop.


SUMMER LUMBER COMPANY

JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

Rough Id Dressed Lumber

Long Leaf Yellow Pie.
BOXES AOORATYS.


THE





i .........------........i.. : u--------------..I


C. B. ROGR8, Pesident. W. A. GATAJAIrR and B. A. CHAMPLAIN Viee-President. OHI BALL, Soe'y aad Tr3 a .
DEnOTORa: C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain, D. H. McMillan and J. A. Cranford, of Jaksomlle;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Penacola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $5oo,ooo.

Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches In Tampa, Pasacola, fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consol-lated Grocery Company is succesor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval stores and Commirsion Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branmc
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company of Pensacola; the grocery brt ,ch of th. West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensaola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything In Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-
visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.


Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the

Consolidated Grocery Company

Have a Larger Capacity than any Company of Its kind In the South.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters 116 to 120 East Bay street, Jacksonville, Fla.
kBrnches Tamnp. FIL., Pensacola. F.la, and Savannah. Ga.

***M^"o""""sa sseesnsas asesesesssseasesesesssses s ssessee** *******


I


----------------------******-*--


- ,--s---.-~-rra;*~, I~-iSLTI







GREENLEAF (C CROSBY CO.
Jewelers and Importers,
41 W. BAY STREET. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

Diamonds Diansond
We Save You Middleman's We Save You Mldr..ecma's
Profit. w Profit.
Previous stones are of many degree of HAV B Comparatively few prea are ien mt
perfeeLo, or w might a7 ifto. DEALERS I DIAMONDS to jud1g the quality d vris of a di-
whic eS.las a wideti p OTHrI PBtCIOUS STOS inond, thus the oaly Ma w way w pr-
atoms of the sam e. TheT 0 M nmg i to reavs tesapeaeo0 Musli
buy o dimod may wha mr C THE .STABLISHMENT Or O e prm n to wOp to m a leA
Sof sevr deal ers, I S dealr, s whot mu Ay ya d AD DIMi.
.eo ma doear is muc lwer tin II AD DICT biaug in the TN
pries than othr. In reality, th lower IMPORTEB FOR ORR THA positive guaranty that you will reive fsr
6rm a ely possible by tLh TWrZTYq u- and honorable treaatment.
a the yt d a oYesrd. The islr. Mm SATISFACTIO We offer only atoBem of the buto qpm).
Haey,fitrer im 0 SdarA" dC GgVl^ ASSURXO /9/ i M _. r -- Irf. .
Usit]r ,qty or utiy determines and every sto o ld by ie b guaMead '
thel real va ehf eaM stems strictly a repre ted.

DIAMONDS DIAMONDS

Write Us-Mail Orders Receive Prompt Attention

s- OM ME



Half Tones-Zinc Etchings

Ilustratina and Engravina Department
OF

THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
Splendidly equipped foi business. Half fones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most unproved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of Commercial Work, Pamohlets. etc

I CIIIT I UW SI= 1111 CI( MIe Ill IIIG PFIOI PIl IV FIM.
kI WRImG OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
GOOD WOR. AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED.

A Florida Enterprise. Try It.


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