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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00196
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: October 25, 1906
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00196
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text




pUSTRIAL K









A EfY IfAVAL IToE,

NflOV STIAha Fi4DAtalAlE

.,0,EWaPAPER)-



CAUSE FOR CONGRATULATIONS r.
The absolute failure of the Savannah com-
bination to beat down prices of naval stores
this week, is a most favorable indication for
operators. The incidents of the past week dem-
onstrate that the Savannah combination, while
exercising a gfeat deal of power in the way of
influencing mArket conditions, is unable to con-
trol the market at will, as it has been doing in
years past. The factors here, and some of them
at Savannah have determined that prices are to
S be as near the established rule of supply and de-
mand as it is possible to have them, and they ap-
Spear to be in a position to block any effort on
the part of the combine to beat prices down.



SJACKSONVILLE, FLA. SAVANNAH, GA.
r"=_ <
,. i -ii^ ^i- i ^ i^ ^ ^i^ -




HIIIII 11 *n- ini----ii- -,- ---- riii-ii-rrm-- nTN-i- i -T-r--- --- ---l----c--- -- ^~-"-----I-- -^^^^- i7.- --


CONSOLIDATED NAVAL STORES COMPANY.
Home Office: JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Branches: Savannah, Ga., and Pensacola, Fla.
OFFICERS.
W. POWELL, Pramde; B. F. BULLAKD, H. I- COVINGTON, J. A. CRANFORD, D. MMILAN, B. POWELL, C. M COVINGTON, JOHN HB
POWWLL. Vie Pre Mlts; C. P. DUIENBURY, Seeretary and Trasurer.
lEUCUTIVE COMMITTrE: W. C. Powel, C B. Rogers, H. L Covington, B. F. Bullard, J. A. Cranford.
DILWCTORB: W. C. well, B Bllard, C. B. Rogersord, W. J. illman, J. A. n.ohn H. Powell, W. F. Combhmaa, LHL COringtoa, C. Dewinag, D. H.
MeMilan, R B. Powell, C. M. Covington, 8. A. Alford.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS


IPaid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
The 'Consolidated" Is purely a co-operative Company. Its Interests are Identical with those
of the Producers. The patronage of turpentine operators everywhere Invited.
Two Million acres of land and Timber for sale on easy terms.
Producers are invited to call or correspond.
---- ---- ----- ----- i- - - -


Success for


Our Customers


Is Success for


COVINGTON


COMPANY,


SHOES. DRY GOODS, W wholesale
NOTIONS. . . leale
JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA.
_____________ jI


McMillan Bros.


Southern Copper
Works
Manufacturers of TURPENTINE STILLS
Complete Outfits and Extra Kettles, Caps, Arms, Worms, Fur-
nace Doors and Grates always on hand
d Stills taken in part and repairing done
Old Stills payment for Ne W rk inthe cotry
Heavy CeppersmthUnl. Steam Pipe and Spel C wper Work
Jacksonville, Fla.
As Fayetteville, N. C. Savannah, Ga. Mole, Ala.


Us.














WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL


RECORD.


PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY, DEVOTED TO NAVAL STORES, LUMBER AND MANUFACTURING M I tK l

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The Drainage Constitutional Amendment


Last Word to the Voters of Florida.


There are two ways to view this Ame.nd
ment:
First: As applied to the whole State
S Seond: As applied to the Everglades
only.
.AS APPLIED TO THE WHOLE STATE.

Reasons Why You Should Vote AGAINST
the Amendment.
z. BECAUSE IT GIVES THE DRAIN-
AGE COMMISSIONERS THE TREMEN-
DOUS, DANGEROUS AND UNPRECE-
DENTED POWER TO TAX ANY PART
OF THE STATE THEY PLEASE FOR SO-
CALLED DRAINAGE PURPOSES.
The amendment proposes to give to five
men the enormous power to create drain-
age districts "as in the judgment of said
Board of Drainage Commissioners, is deem-
ed advisable to drain and reclaim the
swamp and overflowed lands within the
State of Florida, or such parts or portions
thereof as is deemed best by said Board
of Drainage Commissioners, from time to
time."
This is a vast and most dangerous power,
and neither the Legislature nor the courts
can modify, limit or control it. Under
this Amendment the Drainage Commission-
ers have the right, to drain and reclaim
swamp and overflowed lands wherever in
Florida such lands exist or are claimed to
exist. TheDrainage Commissioners are the
sole judges of what kind of lands are
swamp and overtowed. No indiVidual
owner can object. The power of the Drain-
age Commissioners is supreme. Even the
courts are powerless. If your lands are
as dry as tinder, they can be included in
a drainage district and taxed ten cents an
acre to drain swamp lands miles away.
And you would certainly have to pay the
tax if the Amendment is adopted. The
Amendment gives the Drainage Commis-
sioners the power to create drainage dis-
triets all over the State. This power is
not coined to the Everglades or surround-
ing country. There is not a word about
the Everglades in the Amendment. The
Drainage Commissioners can create drain-
age districts wherever they please, and
tax farms, plantations, orange groves, tim-
her lands and any lands they select, to
Strain what they choose to call swamp or
overflowed lands. If your lands are taxed
ten cents an acre, the fact that they are
high and dry and miles from the lands to
he drained would make no difference. The
Amendment gives the power to fix the
.boundaries of the drainage districts, and
if ycur farm or timber lands are included
you -ill have to pay ten cents an acre to
help drain the other fellow's property. Is
this right?
BECAUSE THE DRAINAGE COM-
MISSIONERS ARE NOT MADE AC-


(possibly millions) of dollars annually;
but, unlike all our county officers, they are
not required to give bond, and they are not
required to make any reports or to render
accounts of the money spent either to the
Legislature or to the people. The money
collected by tle Drainage Commissioners
does not go into the hands of the State
Treasurer, who is under bond and who
has to keep and pay out the State's money
according to law. The money raised by the
Drainage Tax is outside of the law. The
Drainage Commissioners can keep it where
and as they please. They are superior to
all the laws that safeguard public moneys.
Would you give men working for you
such va.-t and dangerous powers? Don't
you think the opportunities for wrongdoing
or graft are appalling?
3. BECAUSE, ACCORDING TO GOV-
ERNOR BROWARD'S CONTENTION,
THERE ARE TWENTY-THREE MIL-
LION ACRES OF SWAMP AND OVER-
FLOWED LANDS N THE STATE THAT
WILL BE SUBJECT TO BE TAXED BY
THE DRAINAGE COMMISSIONERS.
This would produce $S,300,000 a year of

drainage taxes to be spent by a Board of
Politicians, who are not under bond, and
who don't have to report or account to
anyone for their actions or expenditures.
How would you like your farm in Alachua
county, or Eacambia county, or Leon
county, to be taxed for some wild-cat
drainage scheme that will give the Drain-
age Commissioners two million dollars a
year to spend in Chicago dredge boats and
ohtre things like that?
4. BECAUSE, IF YOU GIVE THE
DRAINAGE COMMISSIONERS THIS EX-
TRAORDINARY TAXING POWER, IT
WILL ENABLE THIS ADMINISTRA-
TION TO CREATE SUCH A STRONG PO-
LITICAL MACHINE THAT THEY WILL
HAVE NO DIFFICULTY IN PERPET-
UATING THEMSELVES IN OFFICE FOR
YEARS TO COME.
As a money-making scheme. it will beat
the dispensary and insurance schemes all
to pieces. Governor Broward has failed
heretofore to saddle ulun the State his
dispensary scheme and h:s insurance
scheme, but lie hopes to succeed l his time
with his drainage scheme. This is his last
chanir.. Are you going to walk innocently
into the Spider's larlorT
5. BECAUSE THE DRAINAGE COM-
MISSIONERS ARE NOT REQUIRED TO
MAKE ANY ESTIMATE OF THE COST
OF THE WORK BEFORE THEY LEVY
THE TAX.
This is altogether unjust and unfair. In
loving all other county and State taxes
an estimate is always first made to see


or your wild land is to be taxed- o cents
per acre annually for drainage without any
limit of time, wouldn't you like to know
what the drainage will cost, so that you
might know for how many years you will
have to pay the tax?
6. BECAUSE THE AMENDMENT
MAKES NO PROVISION FOR LOCAL OP-
TION.
The people of the drainage districts are
not to be consulted at all. They are ex-
pected to put up the cash for some wild-cat
drainage scheme, but they are not allowed
to say a word about it. Why should they
not be invited to vote upon it? We have
Local Option for Liquor. Why not for
Drainage? Especially when the people
themselves have to pay for it. Why won't
Governor Broward let the taxpayers of
each drainage district vote whether or not
they want to tax themselves for drainage?
We do it now in all sub-school districts.
Why not have Local Option for drainage?
Why not let the people themselves decide
whether they should be taxed instead of
five arbitrary officials in Tallahassee?
7. BECAUSE THE DRAINAGE TAX
IS UNEQUAL AND UNJUST.
It is not apportioned according to the
benefits to be received by the proposed
work. Every landowner will have to pay,
whether his lands are benefted or injured
by the drainage. Suppose you own a piece
of high ground, and your neighbor owns a
piece of muck land. He goes to Tallahas-
see and gets Governor Broward to start
a drainage district to drain his muck lands
at your expense. The drainage district is
established, and your high lands are in-
clhded. You will have to pay ten cents an
acre every year to help drain your neigh-
bor's lands, and there is no use in your
kicking, either. The Constitutional Amend-
ment will make it absolutely useless. This
is not an imaginary case. In the Ever-
glades Drainage District there are thous-
ands of acres of high sand-hills, which have
to pay this drainage tax.
8. BECAUSE WHEREVER A DRAIN-
AGE DISTRICT IS FORMED, IT WILL
PREVENT THE SALE OF LANDS AND
OBSTRUCT THE DEVELOPMENT OF
THE COUNTRY.
You can't sell lands when they are being
taxed ten cents an acre for an indefinite
time. No one will buy lands which are
subject to an annual tax of ten cents an
acre to drain somebody else's land No in-
vestor will put his money in lands that
have to Ira such a tax. when no one knows
what will be done with the taxes, or
whether it -ill not be wasted in impracti-
cal schemes and possibly worse. Would
you want to buy lands burdened with such


how much money it will le necessary to a tax? No; and nobody else would. As a
raise hb taxation. Anybody who builds a re-ult. the development of the State will


COUNTABLE TO ANY AUTHORITY house or stars a business of any kind, al-
WHATEVER. ways wants to know what it will cost be-
They will haale Wdreda of thousands fore le goes into the scheme. If your farm


be stopped, and all kinds of property will
lose value. Can't you see that this is in-
evitable if the Amendment is adopted?


AS APPLIED TO THE EVERGLADES
ONLY.

Reasons Why You Should Vote AGAINST
the Amendment.

m. BECAUSE NO RECLAMATION OF
THE EVERGLADES SHOULD BE AT-
TEMPTED UNTIL PROPER SURVEYS
HAVE BEEN MADE.
No complete survey of the Everglades
has ever been made. Negotiations are now
pending with Secretary Wilson to get help
from the United States Government for a
complete survey by United States engi-
neers. Secretary Wilson admits the ne-
cessity for a survey before any drainage
can be done and promises the State his
assistance. What would the American
people have said if Congress had blindly
plunged into the Panama Canal project
without proper preliminary surveys sat
estimates?
2. BECAUSE NO ESTIMATES OF THE
COST OF THE CONTEMPLATED DRAIN-
AGE HAVE YET BEEN OFFICIALLY
MADE.
The tax was levied without a shadow of
any estimate. The Drainage Commission-
ers can't possibly ten what it wil cost,
because there is no complete survey to
guide them, and they have no complete
plan. Whoever heard of a great public
work being undertaken without any pre-
vious estimate of the cost being first made?
The Disston engineers knew more about
the Everglades than anyone, and they esti-
mated the cost of properly reclaiming the
big sawgrass south of Lake Okeechobee
(only about one-sixth of the Everglades)
at Nine Million Dollars.
3. BECAUSE THE TITLE TO THE
EVERGLADES IS NOW IN LITIGATION.
Nominally the title rests in the Trustees
of the internal Improtement Fund, and
therefore belongs to the people of Florida,
but this title is now being attacked in the
United States Courts by various legisla-
tive grant claimants. Until these cases are
finally decided, the ownership of the Ever-
glades must remain in doubt. It will be
some years before this question can be
settled. Meanwhile the Thstees cannot
rive a good title to an acre of the Ever-
kiades, and they are running a grave risk
of losing every dollar they spend in drain-
age. They have no right to risk the peo-
ole's money before the title is settled.
Would a careful man in his own hus'ness
waste money like water on a doubtful
title l Would you build an expensive house
on lands that some one else was suing you
for? Wouldn't you let the court decide
first ? What possible harm can come from
waiting for thle courts to decide?
4. BECAUSE THERE IS NO LIMIT
TO THE TAX.
No one knows how much his tax is going
to be, or how long he will have to pay it.


-- -


L









4 THE WVNKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


The tax limit is 10 cents per acre. but
there is no limit to the time. It may be
levied for 5, zo, so or o5 years. There is no
check whatever upon the drainage Commis-
sioners. The reason for this is that the
Drainage Commissioners have made no es-
timates, and they can't make any esti-
mates because they haven't any complete
survey. If they could make an estimate
of the total cost, the taxpayer would be
able to figure out just how much his total
tax will be, and for how many years he
will have to pay it. As it is, he is in the
dark. The casequence is that lands in the
Everglades drainage district cannot be
bought or soM. No one wants to buy with
this blanket tax hanging over the land,
because there is no limit to it.
5. BECAUSE THE GREATER PART
Or THE EVERGLADES IS NOT WORTH
DRAINING.
More than half of the Everglades is
rocky, and worthless for agriculture. The
part worth reclaiming is a strip along the
East Coast, and the big sawgrass south of
Lake Okeechobee. The fall of.21 feet from
the lake to the ocean is not a gradual fall
evenly distributed the whole distance.
Within 24 miles of the lake there is a fall
of 12 feet, leaving only 9 feet for the bal-
ance of the way, a distance of 75 miles
south to the Gulf of Mexico. Only 9 feet
in 75 miles. The lower part of the South-
ern Glades is washed by sea tides.
6. BECAUSE THE VALUE OF THE
BEST PART OF THE EVERGLADES IS
VERY DOUBTFUL.
Theme muck land have not proved a nc-
ceas in other parts of the State. The drain-
ed muck lands of the Kissimmee Valley
were badly damaged by fire some years ago
in a dry time, and thousands of acres were.
destroyed by fire. These lands are now
used entirely for grazing and are worth
about $1.50 per acre. Today there are not
50 acres under cultication between Or-
lando and Lake Okeechobee.
7. BECAUSE NO DISCRIMINATION
HAS BEEN SHOWN BY THE DRAIN-
AGE COMMISSIONERS IN LEVYING
THE DRAINAGE TAX.
Lands of different classes, high or low,
dry or wet, good or bad, were all assessed
the same blanket acreage tax, no matter
what distance from the Everglades, or how
much or how little they would be benefited
by drainage. The high sand-hills of Avon
Park, covering hundreds of square miles,
were taxed exactly the same as the
marshes bordering Lake Okeechobee.
8. BECAUSE THE PEOPLE OF THE
DRAINAGE DISTRICT ARE OPPOSED
TO DRAINING THE EVERGLADES.
Except a few people living on the Ca-
looeahatchee River. This opposition was
shown at the May primary when Hon. J.
W. Watson from Dade county, Hon. Claude
Olmstead from St. Lucie, Hon. A. E. Done-
gan from Osceola, Hon. W. H. Hooker from
DeSoto, and Hon. J. F. Wilson from Lee
(all drainage district counties), were all
elected to the House against drainage; also
Hon. Hunt Harris to the Senate from Mon-
roe and Lee counties. In all these counties
those favoring drainage were defeated.

For these reasons, the voters of Florida
who believe in fair play, in eque Irights
for all, and in a just and impartial admin-
istration of the law will unquestionably
vote against this Drainage Constitutional
Amenmemt.
This Amendment is a proposed Amend-
ment to Article XVI of the Constitution.
It will appear on the official ballot sub-
stantially as follows:


ACCOUNTANTS.
r. G. Hutehinson, Jacksonville, Fla.
Walter Mucklow, Jacksonville, Fla.
AXES.
Briggs Hardware Co., Valdosta, Ga.
BANKS.
commerciall Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Florida Bank and Trust Co., Jacksoville
Fla.
BEER-WHOLESALE.
Chas. Blum & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
,oseph Zapf & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
BOILERS.
l'oyd's Portable Fireplace, Valdosta, Ga.
BOXES AND CRATES.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
BRICK.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jack-
sonville, Fla.
CLOTHING.
Craig & Bro, J. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
COPPER SMITHS.
McMUla Brothers, Jacksoville, Savan-
nah and Mobile.
COOPERAGE.
Cooperage Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla.

DRUGS.
Win. D. Jones, Jacksonville, Fla.
C. C. Bettes, Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS-WHOLESALE.
Groover-Stewart Drug Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.

DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGINES.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
SchoAleld's Sons Co., J. S., Maeon, Ga.
lmbard Iron Works and Supply Co., Au-
gusts, Ga.
FIREPLACES.
Boyd's Portable Fireplace, Valdosta, Ga.
FERTILIZERS.
Bours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksoroille, Fla.
FOUNDRIES.
S-hotleld's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
FUEL.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co. The, Jack-
sonville, Fla.

GENTS' FURNISHERS.
Craig & Bro., J. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
Consolidated Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
Young Co, John R., Savannah, Ga.

GAS AND GASOLINE ENGINES.
Hicks Gas Motor Co., Waycross, Ga., and
Detroit. Mich.
HARDWARE.
Bond & Bourn Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Briggs, W. H., Hardware Co., Valdosta, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co.. J. D.. Savannah. (a.

HAY AND GRAIN.
Boure & Co., Wm. A., Jackso.ville, Fla.
HATS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksrnvall. Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacmsonville, Fla.


HOTELS&
Traveler' Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
Aragon The, Jacksonvill Fla.
Fifth Avenue Hotel, New York, N. Y.
Telford Hotel, White Springs, Fla.
IRON WORKS.
Merril-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofeld's Son Co., J. 8, Maeon, Ga.
INSURANCE.
Prudential Life, Walter P. Corbett, Mgr.
Jacksonville, Fla.
Cay & McCall, Jacksonville, Fla.
JEWELERS.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hes & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
KrEELEY UIallsLUzS.
Keeley Institute, Jacksonvlle, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Blum & Co., Chas., Jacksonville, Fla.
Altmayer & Flatau Liquor Co., Maeon, Ga.
Joseph Zapf & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
MEDICINES.
Spencer Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tea.
MACHINE WORKS.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. 8, Maeon, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR 1uRPs aisa PRO-
CESS.
Schofeld's Sons Co., J. 8., Maeon, G.
METAL WORKERS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswiek, Ga.
McMillan Bros. Co, Jackmsovi, Savan-
nah and Mobile.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Sehofleld's Sons Co., J. 8., Macon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co., J. D., Savanna, Ga.
Malsby Machinery Co., Jadmoarville, Fla.
Briggs Hardware Co., Valdoeta, Ga.
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS.
Ludden-Campbell-Smith Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
NAVAL STORES.
Peninsular Naval Store Co, Tampa, Fla.
Barnes & Jesup Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
vill, Fla.
Standard Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Union Naval stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
West-Flynn-Harris Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
Young Co., John B., Savannah, Ga.
Southern States Naval Stores Co., Savan-
nah, GO.
PAINTS.
Bond & Bourn Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.

PLUMBERS.
Coons & Golder, Jacksonville, Fla.
PUMPS.
Merrill-Stevens Co, Jacksonville. Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
RAILROADS.
Atlantic Coast Line.
REAL ESTATE.
Stockton, J. N. C, Jacksonville, Fla.
Brobston, Fendig & Co., Jacksonville. Fla.
Livingston & Sons, J. H., Orala. Fla.
Deen Realty & Improvement Co., Way-
eros, Ga.
Florida Realty Co., Jacksonville, F!a.
SEEDS.
Bours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
SHIP YARDS.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fa.
Merrill-Steven s Co., Jacksonville, Fl.


8HOES-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co. Th, Jacksonville, Fla.
Jo. Roenbeim & Sona, Savannah, Ga.
STEAMSHIPS
Clyde Steamship Co. The, New York City.

STOCK BROKERS
Holmes & Co., Samuel P., Jacksenville,
Fle.

TANKS.
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
Schofleld's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ge.

TuEPNiUTLm STILLS.
Baker, M. A.. Brunswick, Ga.
McMilln Brothers .Co, .Jacksenvie,
Savannah and Mobile.


FOX TzPEWRITERS
Owen Typewriter C., Tampa, Fla.
A. Reed arrock, Jacksomvie, Fl.
F. D. Bruce, Penacola, Fla

TUziK' Lms STILL TUBs.
Davis & Son, G. M, Palatka, Fla.


IUPEitTU- VATS
Davis & Son, G. M, Palatka, Fla.


TuUPEu ans TOOLS.
Council Tool Co., JacksoMBle, Fla.

VEHICLs AIN HARNESS.
Vehicle and Harness Co., Jacksonville, Fla.

WATCHES
Greenleaf & Croeby Co., Jaeksonville, ms.
Hess & Slager, Jaksonville, Fla.


YELLOW PINt LUMBER.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
East Coast I umber C-. Watertown. la





WHISKIES

GINS AND RUMS
FROM

$1.50to$5.00 per Gallon
S ......AGENCY FOR......
Lewis 166 and Meunt Vernem
Pure Rye Whkud s.
controllers Blum's Monogram and Syl-
van Rye-Agents for Jungst Cinein-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.

CHAS. BLUM & CO.
S17 and SI5 WST MAY STErET .
JACKSONVILLE rLA.





Coons & Golder

Turpentine Operators on

Pipe, Boilers and Pumps

EWrt MHrtban iol rlmomrs
22 W. Adam Street Jacksevnr, pe
Pinel 14 -


BUYER'S DIRECTORY
MMxx xx xx-------xx---


~-=









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5



The VEHICLE and HARNESS CO.

CARRIAGES, WAGONS, HARNESS AND SADDLERY. TURPENTINE WAGONS AND HARNESS PARTS

COR. FORSYTH AND CEDAR STS. JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA.
W. F. STARK, Manager.


Constitutional Amendment. Article XVI.
YEB.
X. Cometitutional Amendment, Article
XVI NO.
(Be sure to put a cromsmark as indicated
above.)

TWO PLZNNSLVAiNIAS MAKE PLANS
FOR SAWMILL KEAR SAVANNAH.
Messr. Henry Shaefer sad J. W. Beech-
S er, representatives of the Pennsylvania
syndicate behind the big timber enterprise
that wUa announced in the Savannah
Morning News a few days ago have been
in Savannah this week getting ready to
begin work on the plant.
A sawmill designed along lines bigger
than anything of the kind in the South,
near the Four-Mile Hill For several weeks
agents of the syndicate have been in this
vicinity securing options on timber rights
on extensive pine lands, and buying some
property outright. Having finished these
preliminary matters the company is now
ready to get down to business.
Application for a charter was made in
the Superior Oourt yesterday morning by
the Georgia-Carolina Lumber Company,


which is the name of the concern that will
conduct the sawmills. The company will
begin with a paid-in capital of $100,000,
and it reserves the privilege of increasing
its stock to $1,000,000. Those who are
backing the enterprise are Pennsylvanians,
A. W. Shaefer, W. L. Shaefer, E. L Bul-
lock, J. W. Beecher and G. G. Barr. That
is, these are the incorporators. It is stated
that other moneyed interests are concern-


ed.
That the Georgia-Carolina Lumber Com-
pany proposes to operate on a large scale
is indicated by the way it has begun busi-
ness. Its first move here was to buy 4,047
acres from George W. Owens, Esq., paying
him $38,000. This was the only tract the
company purchased outright. The land
is covered with fine pine timber which will
be worked up b ythe sawmill.
Timber rights were purchased on the
large pine tract owned by Mr. Edward Lov-
ell. This was a five-year privilege with
the right to renew the privilege for five
more years, for which $18,000 was paid.
The Dean Forest tract is included in the
latter deal.
It is stated that the Georgia-Carolina


Lumber Company is backed by almost un-
limited financial interests. Perhaps the
largest and most modern sawmill plant
ever located in the South will be put up.
The machinery was ordered several weeks
ago and is now said to be on the road. It
is the purpose of the company to be run-
ning by January 1, when an immense force
of men will be employed, clearing the tim-
ber lands.
The plant will be a model for complete-
ness. Nothing will be lost, even the saw-
dust will be utilized for some marketable
purpose. A large outfit of tram cars and
engines have been ordered and the pine for-
ests will soon be a veritable network of
tram tracks.
In order that the laborers may be pro-
vided with dwellings convenient to their
work a score or more of cottages will be
built. Work will be started on these at
once, and the country round about Cen-
tral Junction will soon be a scene of bustle
and enterprise.
Mr. Shaefer and Mr. Beecher left Savan-
nah yesterday, but it is their purpose to
return shortly prepared to put a force of
men to work.


South's Greatst Fireworks Displays Will Be Seen

at Jacksonville Carnival


ON1 OF THE ESPECIALLY PREPARED AERIAL DISPLAY
FOR WELCOMING FIFTY THOUSAND PEOPLE IN
VILLE, MONDAY NIGHT, NOVEMBER FIF

Only the Very Best and Lots of It Has Been

Secured for the Carnival,

A study of the bookings for the Jackson- the other cities of the South and will im-
ville Carnival, which will begin on Novem- port direct from New Yorkfl some of the
her 5th and last until .the night of Novem- mammoth attractions which have been
berf 10th, shows that there is nothing but showing there during the summer. These
the very best secured and a great deal of attractions will come direct to Jackson-
it. ville, and will comprise shows which have
With a thorough knowledge of attrac- never before been seen here.
tions which have been offered and an ex- Reports from all parts of the State indi-
perience is handling them, the Jacksonville cate that the Carnival Association is to
Carnival Company has been remarkably receive the crowds that it has been antici-
succesfuf in getting the very best that pating ever since the Association started
there was to be had. out to have this Carnival on an elaborate
Some of the attractions which have been scale.
seeurvA are now showing in the South, but The coming Carnival in Jacksonville will
the IJarnival ASeoeation has gone beyond be the most elaborate enterprise of its kind


YS ARRANGED
JACKSON-
TH.
ever given in the Southern States.
President Brown of the Tampa Fair stat-
ed while in Jacksonville yesterday and af-
ter he had looked over the bookings of the
Jacksonville Carnival Association, that
"the Jacksonville Carnival is to be ahead
of anything the South has ever had."
For this carnival everything is complete,
so far as securing attractions is concerned.
It will require several days with a force
of over one hundred men to get things in
shape at the grounds, but when they are
ready the people of Florida will feel a pride
in the enterprise and the public spirit of
the citizens of Jacksonville, and especially
the business men of the place, who are
giving their support and assistance to this
public movement.
(Continued on page 17.)


Lombard Iron Works

and Supply Company
BUILDERS AND DEALS IN







ENGINES, BOILERS.
Cotton, Saw, Furtlimr, Oil and le Na-
chinery, and Supplis a Repairs.
Capacity for 200 Hands.
Machine Toolk, Wood-Working Maehins),
Shifting, Pulley, Haangr, Leather as
Rubber Belting and Hose, Railroad and
Mill Supplie and Tools.
Plan and etimats furnished for Power
Plant and Steel BrFdges
Steam Pmp.. ed Water Heaters and
Holstiin Engnaes.
AVUGUTA. GEOILO A.



Sam'l P. Holomes&Co
Steeks~ Beds, Cotten.
Grain and Previleom.

NEW YORK GOTTEN EXCHANGE
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE
Direct private wires to all exchanges.
Local itocks and bonds a specialty.
Bea Phbme 8sja li i Moak




Frank 0. Miller & Co.
4me West way at., JtakswUie, la.
PMONE 1217
SOLE AGENT OBR
New Homn, White, Donettee and
Standard
SEWING MACHINES
POPULAR PRICES EASY PAYMENTS


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR FIAL
DISCHARGE.
Notice is hereby given that the uader-
signed, six months after date hereof, will
make final return of his aceouts as Ad-
ministrator of the estate of John M. Flem-
ing, and apply to the County Judge of
Duval County, Florida, at his ofee, for
approval of same, and a discharge as su e
Administrator. This 9th day of June, 190
W. P. SMITH,
As Administrator of the estate of John
M. Fleming, deceased.



HUTCHINSON AUDIT CO.

PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS & AUDITORS.

BFard of Trade Mng.

l'bea 312. ldi lls-





6 THE WEEKLY TNT)USTrrr~rrrrrrrI EOD


Industrial


Record


Publishing Co.


PUBLISHERS


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PRINTERS


X


Industrial Record Building, corner Bay and Newnan Streets.
With one of the largest and best equipped printing plants in the
South and witd a full complement of skilled labor, we are prepared
to execute high class work promptly and at reasonable prices.
No Job too Large or too Small for our Careful Attention


A Section of the Record's Big Press Room.


A Corner of the Compoing Roon


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6


THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.





THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7

THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7


A Dignified and Strong Appeal to the

Voters of Florida,

Arcadia, Fla., October 20th.-The people part of DeSoto county follows:
residing in that part of DeSoto county The Reasons Given.
included in the drainage district, have pre- DeSoto county, Fla., Oct. 10,
Venus, DeSoto county, Fla., Oct. 10,1900.
pared a strong petition addressed to the To the Voters of Florida:
people in other parts of the State, protest- We, the undersigned citizens and tax-
ing against the passage of the proposed payers, living and holding property within
constitutional amendment, and appealing what is known as the Everglades Drain-
to voters in all parts of Florida to assist age District, desire to appeal to the peo-
them in defeating a measure which, they I pe of the State of Florida for their as-
elaim, will prove of great damage to their distance in defeating the proposed consti-
part of the State, besides fastening upon tutional amendment, known as "amend-
them a special tax for which the proposed ment to Article XVI," confident as we are
amendment provides. that the adoption of this amendment would
There are two strong petitions presented work a hardship on the undersigned and
and they are signed by practically all of feeling that the taxation feature is one of
* the resident tax payers in the Avon Park great injustice, designed as it is to levy
section and in what is known as the Fish- taxes upon a small territory of the State
Eating C'reek section of the Everglades for what the Board of Drainage Commis-
territory. The petition coming from the sioners at Tallahassee claim would be of
people residing at Avon Park is based great benefit to the people of the entire
largely upon the injustice of taxing a see- State, a claim which the undersigned posi-
tion of the State 150 to 225 feet above sea tively deny for reasons which are herein
level for drainage of the Everglades, many specifically set forth. At the same time
miles from where their lands are to be bur- we desire to carefully present our reasons


denied; by this special tax. The petition in
question is addressed to the people of the
State and is a most effective plan for
demonstrating to the voters in all parts
of Florida what may happen to them in
the event that the drainage commissioners
determine to accept the power this amena-
ment would vest in them and extend their
operations to other parts of Florida. There
are other good reasons given for requesting
the voters in all parts of Florida to reg-
is tre their disapproval of the scheme of
Governor Broward and members of his
cabinet to levy taxes and spend millions
of dollars in what the judgment of the
people in that section leads them to pro-
nounce an experiment only.
A Strong Petition.
The petition which comes from what
is known as the Fish-Eating Creek section
of this county is one of the strongest pre-
sentations of the case which has yet been
made by those who are opposed to drain-
ing the Everglades and especially to the
adoption of this constitutional amend-
ment. The people of the Fish-Eating Creek
section who have signed this petition have
been residents of that part of DeSoto coun-
ty for may years. Some of those whose
signatures are attached to the petition
have been residing there for thirty years
and their knowledge of the Everglades and
the conditions in that territory have been
acquired by years of careful study, forced
upon them by the character of their voca-
tions. Most of them have penetrated far
into the Everglades, hunting and trapping,
know every part of that vast territory and
are familiar wtih the extent of the water
and the effect the rainy season has on the
entire section. Nearly every resident of
* tie Fish-Eating Creek settlement has
signed the petition, and it is claimed that
there is not a property owner in that part
of the drainage district who is in favor of
the adoption of the proposed constitutional
.amendment.
Will Have Much Weight.
The appeal which the voters and tax-
payers of the Fish-Eating Creek settlement
-make tothe people in other parts of the
State ought to have considerable weight,
.coming as it does from those who are not
,only directly interested, but who have a
knowledge of the situation such as cannot
parts of Florida. The petition from that


1 for this appeal to the people of other parts
of Florida, so as they may be better ac-
Squainted with our views before voting to
burden others with a tax which we re-
spectfully present is unjust, unfair and a
great and perpetual hardship to those
whose lands are to be burdened with this
special tax. Our reasons for this appeal
we respectfully present as follows:
A Hardship to Taxpayers.
First. A special tax of five or ten cents
per acre, levied by the drainage commis-
sioners under the provisions of this pro-
posed amendment to the constitution would
be a great hardship to those in the drain-
age district, even were they to receive the
benefit claimed from draining the Ever-
glades. But the further injustice of taxing
lands so excessively when it would injure
rather than benefit the owners of same, is
strikingly apparent. We respectfully sub-
mit that this plan of Governor Broward
and the board of drainage commissioners
to tax lands which are high and dry for
draining or reclaiming other territory, is
at variance with all American precedents
and traditions. If the entire State is to be
benefited by drainage because of the prop-
erty which would accrue to the State as
one of the results of a successful draining
of the Everglades, why is it proposed to
tax only a few? The proposed amendment
to the constitution of Florida, when con-
sidered in connection with the boundaries
of the present drainage district, does tax
those whose lands are where they could
possibly receive no benefit, and to the con-
trary would be injured.
Would Damage, Not Improve.
Second: From our knowledge derived
from a residence ranging from thirty down
to ten years in this section, and by fre-
quent visits to nearly all of the Ever-
glades district, we contend that far from
hein a benefit and reclaiming land, drain-
age of the Everglades would damage those
lands which are now said to be overflowed,
for hundreds of thousands of acres of
marsh lands now used for grazing would
ie rendered valueless and the prairie lands
injured to a great extent. We can cite the
people of the State of Florida to many
thousands of acres of marsh lands, once
fertile and affording the very best grazing
Continued on lpage 14.)


JOHN N. C. STOCKTON,

REAL ESTATE. STOCKS AND BONDS.

'CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED


ROOM 4. UEDEMAN BUILDING.


JACKSONVILLE. FLA


Get the Best--That's






RED ROCK

The King of all Soft Drinks.


It's Clear, Sparkling and Pure

Put up in Clear Flint Bottles

RED ROCK is free from the trash and sediment
frequently found in cheap substitutes and
imitations occasionally offered as the--
"JUST AS GOOD" and "tL I I LK THAN" put
up in colored slass bottles to hide the visible
defects.


RETAIL TRADE SUPPLIED THROUGH ALL JOBBERS
Manufactured by The Rod Rock Co., JlcksomLvlle. nlr.




I J. A. Craig E Bro.
239 W. Bvy Street EVERETT BLOCK.

Leaders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-
S ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.

: Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.
*ww*w * -------------
ses t***otes a11 lstI I tllt t 8 1 i 8 l ** l il l ***-I 8 (

: Standard Clothing Company :


, .


One Price


: FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
t 7 and 19 West Bay Street, Jacksovillb, Fissa.
f Ntetson and Hawes Hats. Special Att(lenli Given to Mal Orders.
"I 4 LI ***1** I K I #@@114*> 11|Ir8 0i i1


THE COMMERCIAL BANK
JACKSONVILLE. FLA. BrancLhs: Ocala sad Lake City
The largest leading State Bank in Jacksonville. Is conducted in an old-
fashioned strictly conservative manner and is subject to regular examination
by the Comptroller.
r Individual and Savings Accounts solicited.
0 H. ROBINSON, W. B. OWEN, H. GAILLARD,
President. Vice-President. Ca hir.
-- -- - - - ^


One Price








5 ?HE fTEM W Y INDIIST1AL RPCOut.


COMPARATIVE MARKET REPORTS.

SPIRITS OF TURPENTIHI FOR THE WEIK HERE AND AT SAVANNAH.
Price. Sale. Bhipment. Receipt. Stocks.
Jax. Say. Jax. ay. Jax. Sav. Jax. Say. Jax. Sav.
Friday ... 66 66% J0 582 1,918 110 704 42623,141
Saturday ...... .... 66% 0 219 480 1,656 481 41821,927
Monday ....... .... 66 0 195 33 396 451 4001,919
Tuesday ...... .. ... .. ........ .... 385 .. 22,034
Wednesday .... 051/4 1,577 1, ..... 72 440 291 ,419
Thursday. ......65 66 493 479 200 27 223 62322,859

ROSIN FOR THE WEEK HERE AMD AT 8AVAMNAH.
Friday. NOTE-Nothing doing in Rosins in Jackson- Thursday.
Jax. Say. ville Monday., Tuesday and Wednesday. Jax. Sav.
WW ....... 5.80 5.80....... ......... .......... .... ..... 00 6.00
WG 5.50 5.50 .................. .......... ...... ....5.75 5.75
N ........ 5.10 5.10............................ ... 5.25 5.25
M ......... 4.85 4.75 .......... .................... ........ 4.75 4.75
K ......... 4.0 4.60 .......... .......... .................... 4.50 4.60
I .......... 4.30 4.35 .................... .................... 4.25 4.25
H ......... 4.25 4.25 ........................................ 4.15 4.15
G ......... 4.20 4.25 .................................... 4.10 4.20
D ......... 4.00 4.0 ...... .... ...... .......... .......... 3.90 3.90
F .......... 4.16t 4.20 .......... ......... ....... .. .......... 4.05 4.10
E ......... 4.07 4.10.......... .......... ................... 4.00 4.05
CBA ... .. 3.95 3.95 ................... ................ 3.80 3.92

REPORT OF ROSIN MOVEMENT HERE AND AT SAVANNAH.
Sales. Shipments. Receipts. Stocks.
Jax. Sav. Jax. Say. Jax. Sav. Jax. Say.
Friday ................... 2,466 2.294 1,970 1,592 1,493 1,94649,805 68,823
Saturday ................. 0 2,3741,665 7731,495 1,98749,328 69,447
Monday .................. 0 4421,793 5,4031,554 1,880149,158 65,124
Tuesday .................. 0 1,163 2,28048,919 67,474
Wednesday ............... 0 2,05 60 921,107 1,64048,882 68,152
Thursday ................ 7,337 2,2433.300 6041,635 2,59149,889 70,049



Appeal to the People of Florida to Vote

Against the Drainage Constitutional

Amendment.


To the People of Florida:
We, the undersigned Democratic officials
of Osceola county, desire, in justice to the
people of this county, to make the follow-
ing statement to the qualified electors of
the State:
It has been said in the press and on the
stump that the people of the Everglades
drainage district are all in favor of the
payment of the drainage tax.
We desire to say that at the May pri-
mary the race for the legislature was run
solely on the drainage issue, and the suc-
cessful nominee for the legislature, Hon.
Arthur E. Donegan, was overwhelmingly
elected on a clear-cut ANTI-DRAINAGE
platform.
Osceola county was the headquarters
of the Disston drainage canal system.
This county may, therefore, be styled THE
drainage county of the State. Our people
are particularly familiar with the effects
of drainage, and are particularly qualified
to express an opinion upon the merits of
the proposed drainage constitutional
amendment.
We repeat that the people of this coun-
ty have already passed upon this drainage
question, and in the race for the legisla-


ture the voted this drainage scheme down
and emphatically condemned it.
Bassinger, the nearest settlement of any
size to Lake Okeeehobee, voted almost to
a man against drainage.
Tue past action of the people of this
county in voting overwhelmingly AGAINST
this drainage scheme, is in itself an appeal-
to the voters of Florida not to fasten upon
our people this oppressive, arbitrary and
useless drainage tax.


This is an appeal to ou, the fair-minded
people of Florida, to give us your assist-
ance, and to vote AGAINST the drainage
constitutional amendment.


Respectfully submitted to your favora-
ble consideration.
R. T. BUTLER,
Chairman Board County Commissioners.
W. J. SEARS,
Superintendent Public Instruction.
J. L. OVERSTREET,
Tax Assessor.
T. W. ALDERHOOE,
Mayor Kissimmee.
E. L. LESLEY,
(lerk Circuit Court.
J. M. WALKER, Sheriff.
-1. R. GILBERT, SR., Treas.
W. R. JOHNSTON,
County Judge.
W. B. M'KUSON,
Tax Collector.
J. A. LANCASTER,
Supervisor of Registration.
T. M. MURPHY,
President Council Kissimmee and Chair-
man Democratic Executive Committee.

The Atlantic Coast Line will sell from


all iMints in Florida to Goinesville No-
vember 12th-13th, account Florida Divis-
ion of the Confederate Veterans' reun-
ion, tickets at the rate of one cent per
mile plus twenty-five cents; with limit
to return not later than midnight of the
16th. See your nearest railroad agent for
qeact rate or for any further information
write Frank C. Boylston, District Passen-
ger Agent, Atlantic Coast Line, Jackson-
ville, Fla.


Barnes & Jessup Company


Jactksonville. FIorlds,.


Naval Stores Factors and Commission

Merchants.


OFFICERS.
C. H. Barne, Preeldent. J. C. Little, Vice-Preitdeot.
E. B.'Wella. Secretary and Treauror.

DIRECTOILS: C. H. Barnes. J. C. Little, Ralph Jesup.
J. I. Saunders, E. C. Long, W. E. Cummner, R. HPal. O. W.
Saxon. G. W. Taylor.


W. J. L'ENLE,
Presidet.


J. W. WADE,
Vce-Presideat.


IL G. HUGHES
Sesy med Nes


Union Naval Stores Co.
MOBILE, ALA. PENSACOLA, FLA. NEW ORLEANS, LA.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
..........DEALE ll I ..........

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can *der at preset qut it rg ambe of as rae Iestim Wit Nr-
ida, Alabania sM 1ilp Liberal advances mae aais t C"r-

Principal Office: MOBILE. ALABAMA.



23 Main St. FLORIDA REALLY CO. HN195J
20,000 acres Pine and Cypress. Pine will cut 100 crops of Turpentine (10,-
500 to crop) and 60,000,000 feet of lumber. Cypress will cut 50,00,000 feet of
lumber.
22,000 acres Pine and Cypress. Will cut 90 crops Turpeatie (10,I8 to rop),
and 65,000,000 feet pine lumber and 45,000,000-of Cypress.
18,000 acres, estimated to cut 60 boxes turpentine and 3,500 feet pine lum-
ber per acre. Tract also has about 8,000,000 feet of cypress.


-513ll3 1IIII I IIiImIaI I I I A I Auu aaIa aaI I a AI a.a


J. P. WILLIAMr President.
T. JmENmii. 2nd VicePresident.
H. L. KAYTON, Secretary.


J. A. G. CAsm. I VisaPraeeast
J-P. DUmUa.MVies.PiddLm
H.F. S. EScE~in. Yrrin


J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

111 P SERIES 001 RNOTSO fICIW I Inl @alS.
amin Cirries WAVimAKm, 010001A.
Uranch Oiee.: PENBALCOLA, FLa. lr ] Iak r raed&O Mouse,
i JALCULONVNLLM, Lal. C01U6w asca
Naval Stores Producers we Invited to Cerread. WI& UL46
- aililIla m llmas.&a aaaaa aa aii ausi a iiama a a en


Aof~~ss~JsF~s







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


Peonage Case Against Stillwell Quashed, But

Defendant Revarrested


kre- A"&O


J. V. WEST,
President


D. AL FLYNN.
KION E HARRIS
V. J. XiEUY.
Vim9411ed.MA


KI L AX3940
D. 3. VI1JML
Ain' hS'y se Tom&.


At the preliminary hearing Thursday
before United States Commissioner White,
of Ocala, the peonage charge against Mr.
C. B. Stillwell, a turpentine operator, was
quashed.
Immediately, upon motion of Assistant
District Attorney Richard P. Marks, a
ne warrant, also charging peonage, was
sbrn out against Mlr. Stillwell, he was
rearrested and released on bond, the course
followed in the firs ease.
Witnesses necessary for the government,
including gthe alleged peons and one Mar-
ion county official, were not on hand, and
the case against Stillwell goes over until
November 17. The complainant in the
second case, as in the first, is Mr. A. J.
Hoyt, special agent of the department ot
justice, who is now in blorida investigat-
ing the labor conditions and the alleged
peonage cases.
The alleged peons, and there are several
of them, are negroes, the government
charging that they were held in involun-
tary servitude to work out a debt or ob-
ligation. Inasmuch as the prosecution has
put in no evidence whatever, as yet, noth-
ing. can be learned as to what are the
exact facts in the case brought against
Mr. Stillwell.
The second chareg brought against Still-
well is, in its essential details, practically
the same as was the one quashed, the
United States connmissioner quashing the
first one on technical grounds.
When Special Agent Hoyt swore out the
first warrant it was made returnable to
the United States commissioner at Ocala.
When Stillwell had been arrested, how-
ever, the Ocala commissioner could not
be reached, and the defendant was carried
to Orlando.
The United States commissioner at Or-
lando was absent on his vacation, and the
deputy marshal and the defendant then
journeyed to Tampa. Here they located
United States Commissioner Crane and
Stillwell was released on bond. Commis-
sioner Crane set the preliminary hearing
for Ocala, and, as stated above, it came
up there, before Commissioner Williams,
on Thursday.
The defendant was represented at the
preliminary hearing by Attorneys Hamp-
ton and Duval.
Assistant United tSates District Attor-
ney Marks returned to Jacksonville yes-
terday, but declined to discuss the Ocala
hearing at all save to state that the first
complaint had been quashed and a new
warrant sworn out at once, the prelimi-
nary hearing on which is to come up later.
Special Agent Hoyt who went to Ocala
with Mr. Marks, has again dropped out of
public. view, and no statement could be
secured as together or not he had return-
ej to Jacksonville, had left Florida, or
was s:;ll at work here.
It is known, however, that Mr. Hoyt
has been detailed to work with the dis-
trict attorney's office here. As his work
in Florl4a is practically that of a secret
serviee'man, or of a detective assigned to
investigation of peonage cases, the policy
of the government is naturally to have
as little publicity given to his movements
as possible.
Information from Oeala, however, is to


the effect that Hoyt is the complainant
in the case begun against Stillwell, and
the alleged peons appear merely as wit
nesses for the government.
Rumor has it that some of the witness,
have disappeared, and the mere fact that
such a thing is possible explains the at
tion of the government in detaining wit-
nesses in these cases One of the United
States officials here, in speaking ot tius
phase of the peonage prosecutions yester-
day, said, among other things:
"lmune after time the government has
made out a strong case before a commis-
sioner and then, when the grand jury was
in session and the witnesses were needed,
they had disappeared. Sometimes we
have been led to believe that the defense
had something to do with their disap-
pearance, and sometimes the nomadic char-
acter of the men themselves leads them
to strike out for other parts.
"As a rule the alleged peons are negroes
or some of the lower class of foreigners
brought to the South from New York.
Generally they are the complainants, and
their sole object in making complaint si to
secure their liberty, though sometimes
the desire to 'even-up' plays a part. If
the motive is as that first stated, as soon
as they are at liberty, they leave for parts
unknown, and even the desire to 'even-up'
wears off in time, and then away they go.
Therefore, it is that the policy of detain-
ing them had begun."
At present there are several alleged
peons, apparently German Jews, held at
the Duval county ail as government wit-
nesses. The men are regularly paid while
under detention, their food is furnished
them, and when they express a desire to
do so, they are escorted to and from
church b deputy marshals.
Many of the men are apparently whol-
ly satisfied with these conditions, even
though their liberty is practically as much
cut off as though they were actual pris-
oners. Some, however, are reported to be
growing restless and to be anxious to get
back north again, where they hope,
through the aid of others of the same race,
to find something to do that will keep
them in food and clothing.
The majority of the men detained here,
under orders from Judge Locke, are want-
ed by tlie government in the case against
Mr. F. J. O'Hara and against Mr. John P.
Lynch.
The United States grand jury will be
assembled early in December, and at that
tame the government will ask indictment
of the men charged with peonage. Trial
of the cases before Judge Locke will prob-
ably follow immediately, with District
Attorney Cheney, Assihtant Marks and
Assistant Attorney General Russell ap-
pearing for the United States.
All of the defendants, it is understood,
have retained attorneys and will contest
ever y move made by the prosecution
throughout the entire case.
Clerk E. O. Locke has received word
that Judge James W. Locke will sail from
New York for Jacksonville via the Clyde
Line, on either Tuesday or Wednesday of
next weak, reaching here the latter part
of the week Judge Locke, who returns
greatly improved in health, will at once
resume his court duties, hearing motions,
arguments, etc. The regular fall term,
however, does not open until December 3.


WEST FLYNN & HARRIS CO.

GENERAL OFFICES EMANIA BLDG. Sayanvah. GF.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
NAVAL STORKS RCXIV D AT SAVANNAHll GA, JACKSON VILL
FLA, AND FURNANDINA, FILA.

Wholesale Grocers also Dealers in Hay. rain and Heay
HwEne s.

SOLE AGErNTS fcn ,hiaFks z.
MERCHANTS WAREHOUSES.


SAVANNAH, GA.


JACESONVHL4, FLA.


WILLIAM A. BOURS


TAMPA, DrA


JAMES O. DANIY


WILLIAM A. BOURS& COMPANY
THE OLEST EAMU ORA MAND EED M T M STATIC

Hay, Grain, feed, Garden

Seeds, Poultry Supplies, Fler,
Grits, Meal and fertilizers.


OUR MOTTO: Prempt Shlpmat, Reiabl Oemfs.


CatOgam rr"a


206 EAST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.



You Want a Turpentine Location?
You Want a Sawmill Lcatkin?
You Want any Kind eo Flrid Lamnd?
You Mean Business?
i C el n or Write t

J. H. Livingston & Sons,
OCA A. FLORLIDA.





M. A. Baker,
IVwNTOR AND MANUFACTURER OF THE

Baker Improved

Seamless Turpen

tine Stills.
Write me for prices and outfis
F. 0. B. any point in Georgia. Flor-
Idl Alabama or Mississippi Ali
stills sold under a guarantee.
JOB WORK
Trsug te Cemiry a Specdily.
The Largest and Oldest Copper
Works in Georgia. Brunswick, Oa.
W My specialty is large worms and heavy bottom that do not lelk.


~3~tZrti~+O+i~i~0~,~i~;t+9~),~,+ih;,88~









10 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
In I- IY


INDUSTRIAL RECOILD
JANME A. HOLLONOn. EdAier-.a-Clai.
J. O. L.FONTISEl Ame-- UEdrm.
A. I. MAILRM, ekm nee Manager.

Published Every Thursday.
sucno I (Dmews)...3 .W Per Asemm
ama o f(reeo .... $3.2 m -

~The PAbse a lie Psredaoes."

All cm amnrcti sm h J M b a eadlm
'Tlh lndustriLl ILecord Company,
Jackuonville. Fla.
a.ramb E rdal end Mdu e Offbes at
Savannah. Ga.
tered at s s Ptoiec a& JaikaoWTle. Fna..
seoold-olaa ma tter.

Adopted by the Executive Committee of
the Turpentia Opeators' Association
september 12, 1908, s it excluMiv offi-
cial organ. Adopted in annual eonvntio
September 11 u the organ lso of the pm-
ranl uociatio&
Adopted April 27th, 19, the official
orga of the Intertate One Growrs As-
sociation. Adopted September 11 1900, a
the only official organ of the T. O. A.
Commended to lumber people by special
resolution adopted by the Georgia Sawmill
Association.


THE MRCORIYS OFFICES
The publishing plant and the main ot-
las of the Industrial Record Company
ar located at the intersection of Bay and
Newan Streets, JackonvilU, Pa., in tlh
very heart of the great turpstize and
yellow p- industries.
uade of the entire South.
The Savannah, Ga., office is in the Board
of Trade Building. Savannah is tLhe la-
ing ope naval stores market in the word.


NOTICE TO PATRONS.
All payments fer advertisig the In-
dustrial Record sat snaucripti tbh to
mut be Mdo direct to the hom eae e
Jacksonville. Agnts are st ulw to
make colluetioo ier any circumstans
5il far averti sun abcripties ae
et Gt fram the uefi when tas,
and all rEittance must be mae direct
t th eissawsy Pce


OFFICER 0F. TAI TURPZN-
TUIH OPZRATUJrS ASSO-
CIATION.
President-W. hl. Toomer.
Seeretary-J. A. ollomon.
Treasurer--Bi M. unett.
Executive Comuittee-W. M.
Toomer, A. Seasons, J. A. Hol-
Iomon, B. M. Saw .tt, J. B. Pad-
gett, R. S. Hall _. P. Mall"y,
F. J. 0'Hara, A. 0. Covington,
J. W. Ward, A. Tidgen.

THE DRAINAGE QUESTION.
The Record devotes considerable space
this week to a discussion of the drainage
constitutional amendment and to the pre-
sentation of petitions against the passage
of the amendment proposed.
To the readers of The Record this is an
important matter, affecting as it does the
timbered lands of South Florida and the
entire State. Turpentine men, who have
hopes for the future of their industry, will
vote against this amendment as a matter
of self protection. The same is true of
the sawmill men. But it behooves those
associated with these interests to go to
the polls on the day of the election, vote
against the amendment and see that their
friends do the same.
In the interest of the future of these
.two great industries this amendment must
be defeated. Go to the polls on election
day and vote against this absurd effort
to fasten upon the people of Florida -a
burden in the shape of taxation from
which they could never recover.


The Record's Answer to Governor

Broward.


Last week The Industrial Record gave
space to a letter from the Governor of
Florida, who accepted the opportunity
thus offered him of taking exceptions to
an editorial which appeared on this page
of The Record in the issue of October 11.
This letter from the Governor denies in
toto every statement contained in our
editorial discussion of the drainage
scheme in that issue. In all fairness we
accorded the Governor of our State the
privilege of occupying this space to pre-
sent his criticisms as well as his claims,
but we are inclined to question the fair-
ness of the Governor to the people of
Florida in this letter to us.
Governor Broward has been interested
in this drainage scheme for over two
years. He made it an issue in his cam-
paign for the Democratic nomination. He
went before the Legislature of the State
of Florida at the last session and today
he is actively engaged in campaigning the
State in the interest of the adoption of
his constitutional amendment. We take
it, therefore, that the Governor is thor-
oughly informed on the subject. At least
he ought to be. This being the case we
cannot excuse some of the statements
contained in his letter to the Industrial
Record and which appeared in our last
issue. Every position assumed by the
Governor of Florida in his effort to deny
the statements made by us is in direct
opposition to the facts in the case, as we
will plainly show (in this, our answer).
We call attention to the first conten-
tion of Governor Broward. In his letter
he says:
"You state among other things, first:
'Do not let anyone fool you into voting
for this amendment by telling you that
some other man's land is going to be taxed
to benefit yours; this is not true. When
you vote for this amendment, you vote to
burden your own lands with an unknown
tax, and for an unknown length of time.'
"A close study of the proposed amend-
ment will certainly convince you of the
error of this statement. No land can be
taxed except it is within the drainage
district, and of a designated character,
viz: swamp and overflowed.. The tax is
not unknown, for the reason it is limited
to ten cents per acre per annum; the first
assessment being five cents per acre, and
none of the others expected to be over
two cents per acre."
The people of any commonwealth are
naturally inclined to accept any state-
ment as authentic which has the sanction
of the Governor of their State and espe-
cially if the Governor is its author. It is
fortunate, therefore, that the letter from
the Governor came at a time when there
was through the same issue of tile Rec-
ord presented a petition from the people
living within the drainage district, deny-
ing in toto this first contention made by
Governor Broward.
Governor Broward knows that the con-
stitutional amendment proposed at his in-
st:gation by the last session of the Leg-
islature was practically only a copy of
the act of the Legislature under which he
and his board of drainage commissioners
proceeded to act in laying out the drain-
age district upon which taxes are levied,
payment of which would have been en-
forced had not the United States Court
declared the Legislative enactment uncon-
stitutional. In presenting this matter be-


fore the readers of The Record we are
justified, therefore, in assuming that in
the event of the passage of this amend-
ment the taxes levied upon the lands
within that drainage district will have to
be paid. We assume this by a reference
to the past actions of the Governor and
his drainage commissioners. But we have
better grounds than that. This amend-
ment plainly states that "said commis-
sioners shall have a lien superior to all
others upon the taxable lands in any
such drainage districts to be enforced by
tax levy, for the cost of any work done
under the provision hereof, or done, prior
to the adoption of this amendment, under
the provisions of an act of the Legisla-
ture, passed in 1!05i."
It is therefore plain that this constitu-
tional amendment will be retroactive, in-
sofar as the first assessment is concerned.
\e mean by that that all the taxes as-
sessed by the Governor and his board of
drainage commissioners by virtue of tlhe
act of the Legislature of 1905, will be col-
lected. This is, indeed, a self-evident
proposition.
This being so, we desire to call the at-
tention of tile readers of The Record to
the unfairness in the statement of Gov-
ernor Broward in this same connection.
He states with a great degree of posi-
tiveness that "No land can be taxed ex-
cept it is within the drainage district,
and of a designated character, viz: swamp
,and overflowed."
We are not making those statements
which follow without a knowledge of the
case. We have recently visited nearly
every section of the drainage district
which lies in DeSoto county, and we
state from our own knowledge that the
Governor and his board of drainage com-
missioners have assessed lands high and
dry, some of which is over 150 feet above
tile level of the sea and fifty miles from
the Everglades territory. The drainage
district of DeSoto county includes tens of
thousands of acres of land which was
never swamp and overflowed, and the tax
payers were told last fall that unless this
drainage tax was paid the tax collector
could not issue them a receipt for State
and county taxes. What stronger testi-
mony do the people of this State desire
than that presented by the petition from
the taxpayers of DeSoto county which
appeared in The Record of last week. Is
the Avon Park territory swamp and over-
flowed c To time contrary we found it
high and dry pine land. with timber
about the best standing in this State to-
day. As a matter of fact the residents
and tax payers in the Fish Eeating Creek
settlement acquired their lands, upon
which they are asked to vote to pay a
tax of ten cents an acre. by homestead
entry from the United States govern-
nent, proving that their lands were ex-
empted from that tract which was deed-
ed to the State under the swamp act of
1850. The government exempted tliat
land because it was high and dry. But
Governor Broward does not exempt it.
To the contrary lie proposes to tax it to
thle extent of ten cents per acre for drain-
age, a tax unwarranted by all the claims
to justice from the people of thit section,
and unwarrented from tile standpoint of
any proposed or imaginary benefit to ac-
crue from this drainage scheme.
If Governor Broward now seeks to hide


behind one of the provisions of limitation
contained in the proposed constitutional
amendment, it is too late for him to do
so. He has levied a tax on this land and
he will force its collection, even though
he was constrained to grant a year's
grace, in the event that the proposed con-
stitutional amendment carried. It may be
a case of the Irishman in jail when told
by a friend that he could not be held ae-
cording to the law in the case. The Irish-
man replied "It may be that they can't
do it, but I am here just the same." That
is the way to look at the arguments of
the Governor in this respect: "He may
not be able to do it under the law, but
he has done it." And he will do it again.
As a matter of fact the general charac-
ter of the proposed amendment clothes
the Governor and his board of drainage
commissioners with unlimited powers.
Here is another statement from the
Governor which we deny and which we
prove by the records of the United StiLtes
Court of this city:
"You are absolutely in error in this
statement, as the minutes of the court
will bear witness. The United States
Court, or any other court, has not declar-
ed the act of the Legislature of 1905-
known as the drainage law-unconstitu-
tional, and in all fairness to yourself and
your readers you should correct such an
erroneous statement."
The suit to prevent the payment of
taxes within the drainage district brought
by the Southern States Land and Timber
Company, was brought on the specific
ground that the act of the Legislature
was unconstitutional. Judge Locke, in
handing down his decision, stated plainly
that the act of the Legislature was un-
constitutional for several reasons, among
others because by that act the Legislat-
ure had delegated legislative functions to
another body of men, something not au-
thorized by the constitution of this State.
We leave it to the readers of The
Record if we have not successfully refut-
ed the statements contained in the letter
from Governor Broward.


EFFORT OF SAVANNAH COMBINE TO
BEAT PRICES DOWN FAILS.
There are more than figures to report
in the general run and character of the
market and the market conditions for the
week ending Thursday night.
With prices f"r both spirits and rosine
running at a ;atisfac tory figure the Savan-
nah combination ceased operations after
last Friday's trading ,evidently hoping to
beat prices down after declining to trade.
But contrary io hopes and expectations
the Savannah combination went up against
a stiffer proposition than it had counted
on andn when trading was again resumed
by them Thursday it was at prices which
gave an excellent opportunity for those
who held rosins and who were on the out-
side to unload. The result was sales of
rosin in this market alone for that day of
7.337. The prices were just a little ahead
of those bulletined at the close of trading
on last Friday, showing that the Savannah
combination had been unsuccessful in ma-
nipulating the market.
From the reports received here- the Sa-
vannah combination holds a great deal of
stock and those on the outside are in a
position to defeat any effort on the part of
the combination to manipulate the market
to any extent.
The general feeling here is that there
will not be another like effort made in the
near future.







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11

Tre GROOVER-STEWART Dm 0o.,

imEnIL MOE OsmYIEI EE-M OER am .
Whelma.e Dmgs, Ogmoledls, DrWggists Udrles aind Omeimamry Seed
-YN iAF Vm AT ~ InW Tl/IammY. J FL.


Roins at Savanah.
Savannah, Oct .20.-Quote: ABC, $4.00@
4.05; D, $4.10; E. $4.10@4.12'/2; F $4.20C
4.25; G, $4.25@4.30; H. $4.35; I, $4.37%1/
4.40; K $4.70; M, $4.85@4.90; N, 5.20;
WG, $5.80; VWWV $6.00.
Savannah, Oct. 22.--Quote: ABC, $4.05;
D, $4.10; E, $4.15; F $4.25; G $4.30; H,
$4.35; I, $4.40; K, $4.75; M, $4.90; N $5.30;
WG. $5.80; WW, $6.00.
Savannah, Oct. 23.-ABC, $4.05; D, $4.10;
E, $4.15; F, $4.20; G, $4.30; H, $4.35; I,
$4.40; K, $4.75; IM, $4.90; N, $5.30; WG(
$5.80; WW, $6.00.
SSavannah, Oct. 24.-Quote: ABC, $4.00;
D,$4.05@4.10; E, $4.10(a4.15; F $4.07 1/O(
4.20; G, $4.171/2CS4.25; H, $4.25@4.27!.:; I,
$4.25@i4.30; K, $4.60; M, $4.75; N, 85.30:
WG, $5.80; WW1, $5.95.



WANTED
AND

FOR SALE
Rate for this column is 2 cents per word
for first insertion and 1 cent per word for
following insertions. No advertisement
taken for less than 40 cents for first, and
20 cents for following insertions. Cash
must accompany orders unless you have
an account with us.


WANTED.-Position as woodsman or
stiller by experienced turpentine man.
Can furnish good references. C, Box 45,
Stockton, Ga. 4t


WANTED-Workin interest in turpen-
tine business. Will do all wooding, stilling
and making barrels. Flat woods and un-
healthy places need not apply. Have life-
time experience. Can give good references
if needed. R. G. Orvin, Chubb, Fla. 4t


BRICK FOR SALE.-The very best brick
made of purest Georgia clay; E. N. Jelks,
the Georgia brick man has a good stock
on hand, and can supply you. Wire for
bottom delivered prices. E. N. Jelks,
manufacturer, Macon, Ga.


FOR SALE-WE HAVE TWO REMING-
TON TyrEwkIIERS, ONE FAY-
SHOLES, ONE DENSMORZE ONE FOX,
ALL IN GOOD CONDITION, WHICH WE
WILL SELL AT A GREAT SACRIFICE.
* ALSO A SMALL HNUMBE OF RIBBONS
FOR ALL MAXES OF MACHINES AT
LESS THAN COST. APPLY INDUS-
TRIAL RECORD OFFICE.

WANTED-All commissaries to clean up
their barns of all kinds of seed sacks and
burlaps. We buy everything in the way
of sacks. Write us. American Fibre Co.,
Jacksonville, Fla.

FOR SALE-Good turpentine place for
ale in Georgia. Good healthy location.
Box 17, R. F. D. No. 2, Sylvester, Ga. tf


Wanted-By experienced woodsman, po-
sition as woodsman o commissary clerk
and bookkeeper for turpentine company.
Address "Woodsman," care of Industrial
Record.
WANTED-Position as woodsman. Best
references. Good and experienced man. S.
L. Smith, Box 244, Orlando, Fla.

WANTED-Two first-class Turpentine
Woodsmen. Must be sober and able to
central labor. Ad.iress.
S. G. PATfERSON,
Taylortown, Miss

FOR SALE-Elegant turpentine loca-
tion, consisting of about 14,0)0 acres of
round timber, composed of sand-hills and
flat woods, lease on 30 crops of boxes, 10
of which are virgin. All necessary equip-
ment. Seventy-five miles from .lackson-
ville. Splendid freight rates. Price and
terms reasonable. Address Exceptional,
care Industrial Record.

WANTED-Position as woodsman. Long
experience in turpentine business. Can
give good references. Apply to P. O. Box
94, Wiggins, Miss. 4t

WANTED-By a young married man,
aged 25, and not afraid to work, employ-
ment with some Naval Stores Co. in the
states of Georgia or Florida for 1907.
Reference, present employer. Address
E. G., care Industrial RE~ord.

WANTED-A large tract of Yellow Pine
Timber. If you have a tract you wish to
sell and will sell stumpage to be paid for
as sawn, you to be absolutely secure from
start to finish, kindly communicate with
me at once. None but owners need apply.
no middle-man wanted. Address "A," in
care of this office.

WANTEI-Good position as turpentine
manager; new place preferred: satisfac-
tion guaranteed; references exchanged.
Address Al, care Industrial Record.


ATLANTIC COAST LINE ROUND TRIP
EXCURSION RATES FROM JACK-
SONVILLE.
$38.40-Hot Springs, Ark.; on sale daily;
limit ninety days.
o10.35-Atlanta, Ga.; on sale Oct. 19, 20,
21 and 22; limit leaving Atlanta
Oct. 30; extension to Nov. 21.
S17.55-Gulfport, Miss.; on sale Nov. 12,
13; limit Nov. 28.
Excursion rates to other points.
Limits, schedules, Pullman reservations
and all detailed information to above and
other points, cheerfully furnished on appli-
cation, either in person or by mail, to
Frank C. Boylaton, District Passenger
Agent, 138 West Bay St., Jacksonville, Fla.



Walter Mucklow,

CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


H. E. PRITCHETT, Pres. P. L SUTHERLAND, Vice-PrmA.. D. OOVINGTON, Sec'y
J. P. COUNCIL, Treas and Gen Mgr.

THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.,
General Offices: JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Factory: WANNAnISH, N. C.

Mamtfaturers Of HiNig Orrat Thls
for avt sr-w *f-atems.
isis, u~esaee~sImsumsmea~usui~ea...sumemu
SW. W. Carnes, Prm. W. C. Thoma, Mnager. n. & Cuasm, Sa. aet Tes.


Tampa Hardware Co.


SWholesale

Hardware

Turpentine. Mill and Phosphate -S~pplies.


TAMPA. FLORIDA.
u(1e.,*fIIsefII seIllseII $ .III#1murmm)uM


B. B. TATUM, Pres.


J. L. WALLACE, Vice-Prea. H G. STONE es-y-Tra


Keeley Institute,

Ino rwat4d 523,000 Capil tek.
A branch of the original Leslie E. Keeley Institute of Dwight, I., ha just bea
opened it coiner of Park and Stockton Streets in Riverside, where a splemld
building, equipped with all the comforts and eonvenieueam of a modern home or
sanitarium has been secured and is ready for the reception of patieata in need of
treatment for-
WHISKEY, OPIUM, MORPHINE, COCAINE, TOBACCO OR CIGARETTE HABITS.
Write for full information as to treatment, terms, ete.

KEELEY INSTITUTE OF FLORIDA.


Telephone No. 1553.


Jacammesv, Vio.


RIXFORD TURPENTINE AXES J


Are the best, beware

of imitations or "the

just as good" kind. If

you want the best or-

der the genuine article

from


W. H. Briggs Hardware Co.

Sole Southern Agents

VALDOSTA. GEORGIA

Jobbers of Mill and Turpentine Supplies.
Jobbexrrxxxxxxxsfxxssxxxs(^ Ox3a











Jacksonville Grocery Comp'y

6 .,. Wheoeale Broeoers and DIstlre' Suppllr.
Ifle -e Wabe.M*e Waslt 4. e. O flyW. -n nde, ,


ViceePreslnent Ingraham on Damage Done

by Hurricane


St. Augustine, Oct. 24.-Mr. J. E. In-
graham, third vice-president of the Florida
East Coast railway, has just returned
from a trip to Miami, where he heard
much of the damage wrought by the re-
cent hurricane along the keys and rail-
way extension, and in the vicinity of Mi-
ami In an interview with Mr. Ingraham
this morning the Times-Union representa-
tive was enabled to get the first direct
account of the storm. Mr. Ingraham
stated that it is too soon to be able to
give out the exact damage suffered along
the coast, but from his statements it is
easy to be seen that the general accounts,
especially as to the loss of property, have
been very much overdrawn. The follow-
ing facts were gleaned from the inter-
view:
At the time of the storm, Chief Engi-
neer Meredith, in charge of the extension
work, was at Jewfish creek in his launch.
He returned to Miami and at once set out
and began the search for the survivors of
the steamer St. Lucie, and organizing as-
sistance and supplies for the people along
the route of the storm.
Mr. Krome, assistant engineer, said the
wind, as near as can be estimated, blew
at the rate of 120 miles an hour at Long
Key, which was the center of the storm,
and there was no resisting it. He had
been over the extension from Key West
to Jewfish creek, and reports the finished
work intact, the concrete work was not
damaged the roadbed had successfully
withstood the severe test. From this it
can be seen that the engineering plans for
the extension were thoroughly correct
Company's Loo Considerable.
The company has, however, suffered con-
siderable loss of its floating property, in
concrete mixers, launches and steamers.
The men, for the most part, were quar-
tered on houseboats, several of these were
wrecked and one was completely lost.
From some of the wrecked vessels there
will be a considerable amount of sal-
vage and a number of the dredges and
concrete mixers will be raised and put into
service again.
The exact number of lives lost off the
wrecked vessels cannot be ascertained at
this writing, as some of the survivors
picked up by passing ships, had not yet
reported. The total of lost and missing
will not exceed 120. Every possible effort
is being made by the officers of the com-
pany to take care of the men, many of
whom were injured and no one is suffer-
ing for want of proper attention.
Loyalty of the Men.
All of the men, even those who had the
most thrilling experience, are cheerful and
are ready to begin work again at once.
In fact, a large number of them started in
yesterday. This feeling shows a high
sense of loyalty on the part of the men
and speaks well for the people over them.
Capt. Bravo covered himself with glory
by the cool and calm way in which he did
everything possible to save the steamer
St. Lucie and passengers. In fact, the
gallant captain would have saved all, but


the wind changed suddenly at a critical
moment, causing terrific seas, which tore
the vessel to pieces. Capt. Bravo had
among the passengers twenty-six women,
all of whom were saved except one ne-
gress. Before the boat went to pieces the
captain saw that all of the passengers
were supplied with life preservers.
Hurricane Signals Too Late.
Capt. Bravo had received a northeast
storm warning, but there had been several
such warnings before with practically the
same barometric readings that then show-
ed. No hurricane signals were received
until the day after the storm, when they
came by mail, the wires being down. Be-
sides Capt. Bravo, the heroism displayed
by other officers was wonderful, among
the most conspicuous being Mr. Dusen-
berr, the resident engineer at Long Key,
who saved no less than forty lives by his
courage, endurance and pluck.
The native fishermen and spongers along
the keys suffered little or no loss. They
watch their barometer closely and always
seek a protected harbor on the first indi-
cations of a storm. This they did at the
time of the hurricane and consequently
suffered but little.
None of the hotels at the lower east
coast resorts suffered from the hurricane
in the least. In fact, the only place which
was struck is Miami, and here the loss is
found to be comparatively trifling and
confined to two churches and one or two
business houses, principally.

AN INTERESTING EXPERIMENT IN
WOOD PAVING.

Investigations Being Made to Determine
Best Materials and Methods.
Wood has long been used for street
pavements. Only within the past few
years. however, has it been satisfactorily
adopted in the cities of the United States.
Previous failures can be traced almost
entirely to improper construction or meth-
ods of preparation. In most cases round
blocks of cedar or other woods were used,
without precautions against decay and
without adequate foundation for the pave-
ment. The consequence was that, as a
paving material, wood fell into disfavor.
Recent use of rectangular wooden
blocks for street pavements has given ex-
cellent results. Many engineers believe
that these blocks, when properly creo-
soted and laid on a concrete foundation,
make a pavement which possesses high ex-
cellence in a greater number of essential
qualities than any other now in use.
Among these qualities are great smooth-
ness, low traction resistance, minimum
noise, and, considering its smoothness,
comparatively little slipperiness. Slip-
periness has sometimes proved objectiona-
ble, but is not greater for wood than for
sheet asphalt, all temperature conditions
considered; and wood is much less varia-
ble in this particular than is the asphalt.
It is probable that no other pavement
with equally slight traction resistance will
be found less slippery. oWod pavement is


The /etropolis



Is the Paper you want. It is
published daily and is from 12
to 16 hours ahead of any other
daily newspaper in Florida ..



$5oo a Year $2.50 Six Months


Full Telegraphic and Stock
reports. If you want to keep
posted on the news, get the
Metropolis.



CARTER & RUSSELL PUB. CO.

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


TOm eOLDmE War nIny NOvu= AI
GEOIGIA. (I l a-bean l1t.)
OLD SHARP WILL.A MB-Pure Fine Old
Rye. By the gallon .0; tour full quarts
3.50. eX-reem prepaid.
GEO. J. COLEMAN-Pure Penns> Ivania
Rye; Rich and Mellow. By the gallon
S.75; four full quarts 8e., exprea prepaid
ANVIL RYr-Pure Bubutantial Family
Whiskey. By the gallon L..M; four full
quarts .90, express prepaid.
CLIFFORD RYE-By the gallon 2.2;
four full quarts 2.5. express prepaid.
OLD KENTUCKY CORN-Direct from
Bonded Warehouae; fine and old. By the
gallon PS.0; four full quarts .50 express
prepaid.
OLD POINTER CLUB CORN Rich
and Mellow. By the gallon $.50; four full
quarts 3.m. express prepaid.
We handle all the leading brands of Rye and Bourbon Whikles in the market
and will save you from 2 to 50 per cent on your purchases. Bend for price list and
catalogue. Malled free upon application.

The Altmayer .& Flatau Liquor Company

MACON. GEORGIA.




wrch"M
C. C. Bettes. DRUGS. ::3asAy
S20 s 26 SOUH LAURA

JACKSONVILLE, FLA

Florida Mail Order Drug Store. Supplies Everything a Drug Store
Ever Kept. Write to Us.


is-$


THZ WEEKLY DMDUSTRIAt RECORD.







._ THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 18


JOBEPH D. WEED.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. KRENSON.


J. D. WEED & CO.,
AVANNAI. GZ0ORGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF


urpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Etc.



FLORIDA STATE INSI i UTE

60 RIVERSIDE AVE., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Situated es the banks of the St. Johs River and Riverside Drive. Perfect Location.
Perfect Facilities
Mrs. Schumacher's Private Sanatorium. The only private institution of its kind
in the South. Method of treatment for all forms of the drug habit and alcoholism
considered by the medical profession as the most effective known. It' differs dis-
tinctly from all others. Active treatment terminated in 48 hours or less. All crav-
ing and desire for alcohol or drugs eliminated. Practically no time lost from business.
Treatment complete in from five to seven days. At the termination of this period
the patient is fit for work. All medicines administered by the mouth. Neither pain
nor discomfort experienced by the patient. Every privacy observed. Each patient
has individual nurses and service. There is no co-mingling of cases. Physician in
charge. Write or call for detailed information. References furnished.





Standard Naval Stores Co.,
JACKSONVILLE



EXPORTERS I

CARGO LOTS A SPECIALTY



Standard Naval Stores Co. JACKSONVILLE





Atlantic Coast Line

Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Virginia, North

Carolina and South Carolina.
THE GRET HIGHWAY OF TRAVEL FROM

Florida--East, West, North aud South.
TO THE EAST, THE FAMOUS

florida and West Indian Limited and New York Express.


To the West Flyer"te and "DixieA
PULLMAN CARS AND THROUGH COACHES ON ALL TRAILS.
Atlantic c0t Line Mileage Books, good to all points, via all trains as far
East as Washington, and as far West as St. Louis, Cincinnati and New Orleans,
rates $25.00.
CONSULT THE PURPLE FOLDER.
For detailed and full information regarding rates, Pullman reservations, schedules.
Call on your nearest ticket agent or write
FRANK C. BOYLSTON, W- D. STARK,


District Pass. Aget.
Jackoevilln Fla.
W. J. CRAIG Tra Hinmag r.
Gonad b0S10 WRNlbgM, N. C.


Tray. Pass. Agent.
T. C. WHITE, Gena Pas. Aet.


also easy to clean and to maintain, and
when well laid gives promise of proving
more durable than any other except one
constructed of the hardest granite.
The cost of creosoted wood pavement is
at present comparatively high, averaging
about $3 per square yard, including con-
crete foundation. In several cities, how-
ever, the cost of the pavement has been
reduced materially below this figure, and
good results have been secured. In Min-
neapolis, Miiu., where the city itself lays
the pavement, the total cost per yard is
approximately $250. To attempt to
cheapen the price, however, at the expense
of thoroughness of treatment or careful
construction is, with creosoted wood pave-
nient, particularly dangerous economy.
Even at the prevailing price, the excellence
of this pavement causes many engineers
to regard it as the best general purpose
one now in use.
The five cities in which the largest
amounts of wood pavement are found are,
in order, Indianapolis, New York, Minne-
apolis, Toledo and Boston. Together,
these cities have more creosoted wood
pavement than all other cities in the
LUnited States combined. The total amount
of this pavement in use in this country
at tl;e end of the year 1906 was about
1,400,000 square yards, equivalent to near-
ly 80 miles of pavement on a street 30
feet wide.
Two main causes have militated against
a wider adoption of the creosoted block
pavement. One has been the prejudice
which was engendered by the former ex-
perience with wood, the other is the rise
in the price of longleaf or Georgia pine,
which is the wood non principally used.
The Forest Service is making investiga-
tions to find out what woods are most
suitable for use in paving, and whether
less expensive woods could not be used
to supplement the Georgia pine. The in-
vestigations have been upon three lines-
to learn the present situation, to make
tests of the suitability of various woods,
and to lay experimental pavements and
note their wear under actual traffic con-
ditions.
An experimental pavement has now
been laid in the city of Minneapolis, as
a cooperative undertaking between the
city government and the Forest Service.
Different woods were donated, in lots of
15,000 board feet, by a number of lumber
companies or lumber associations inter-
ested in extending the market for their
respective woods. Creosote and treatment
were contributed by two manufacturers of
wood pavement.
The woods used were longleaf pine, Nor-
way pine, tamarack, white birch, western
larch and Washington fir. All blocks
were laid with the grain vertical, and
were 4 inches in depth, 4 inches wide and
from 4 to 10 inches long. These blocks
were impregnated with creosote and laid
upon a foundation of Portland cement
concrete. Successive sections of the pave-
mluent were laid" in different woods. Also
the angles of the -ourses were varied, one
being at right angles to the traffic, another
at 45 degrees, and a third between the
two. or 67. degrees.
This experimental pavement was laid
on a street which carries the heaviest
traffic of the city, so that comparative
results can be obtained in as short a
time as possible. Traffic records will be
made twice a month, on different days of
tlie week, and from these records na ac-
curate knowledge of traffic conditions may
be obtained.


This investigation should furnish defi-
nite information on the following points:
The suitability of the various woods, the
relative value of heartwood and sapwood,
the best dimensions for the blocks, and
the most serviceable angle for the courses.

COTTON SALE AT ALACHUA.

Entire oLt of 850 Bale Ges at s5 cents
f. o. b. Alacu.
Gainesville, Oct 24.-There was a big
sale of cotton at the warehouse of the
Alachua Cotton Association Thursday af-
ternoon, when eight hundred and fifty
bales of sea island cotton were sold f. o.
b. Alachua at 26 cents a pound. The sale
had been advertised for several weeks,
and buyers representing various firms
were on hand to bid for the staple. Bids
began early in the morning at 20 cents,
and gradually increased until the time of
sale, when the entire lot was knroked
down in round numbers at 25 cents, f. o.
b. Alachua.
The cotton was distributed as follows:
J. D. Taylor, Charleston, 250 bales; G. C.
Haylward, Savannah, 400 bale; Henry
W. Foster & Co., Hamburg, Germany, 100
bales; Wyley & Co., Liverpool, England,
100 bales.
This cotton was sold through the Alach-
ua Cotton Association, of which J. R. Wil-
liams is president.

PORT RECEIPTS FOR SAVAmAH.
All previous records for weekly port re-
ceipts of cotton at Savannah were broken
Thursday, October 25, the fact having been
discovered by Supt. Gaudry ,of the Cotton
Exchange. The receipts at all ports for
the week ending Thursday were 467,5
bales, while the receipts for the week end-
ing Nov. 0, 1903, the next highest, were
451,116 bales. For the week ending Sept.
30, 1904, the receipts were 440,398 bales.
So far this season the port receipts have
been 2,174,785 bales, as compared with re-
ceipts of 2,241,066 bales for the same time
last season.
Of the record breaking receipts of the
week just closed, Galveston got 172,91
bales, New Orleans 91,703 bales and Sa-
vannah 88363 bales. So far this season
Galveston has received 09,206 bales, New
Orleans 365,65 bales and Savannah 467,-
983 bales, that city thus taking place as
the second largest cotton receiving port in
the United States.

DISASTROUS FIRE AT DOERUN, GA.
Doerun, Ga., Oct. 26.-Doerun was visited
by a destructive fire early yesterday morn-
ing. The Veal building, in which were sit-
nated the Masonic Lodge, Knights of Py-
thias and Woodmen, in the upper story,
and the store of J. B. Powers & Co. below,
Was destroyed. Fussell &Son's grocery
store, McGrawfs barber shop and J. D. Har-
rell's livery stables were also totally de-
storyed. Powers & Co.'s stock estimated
at $8,000 was totally destroyed, with sev-
eral hundred dollars in money. The stock
was insured for $6,000. Fussell's stock of
groceries was a total loss, with no insu-
rance.
The building was owned by Drs. C. B.
and D. B. Harrell and was insured for $00.
McGraw's barber shop, with insurance of
$200, was destroyed. The furniture was
saved. Harrell's livery stables were de-
stroyed; $600 insurance on the buildings.
The horses and vehicles were saved. The
total loss is estimated at $12,000, with
about $7,000 insurance.
The fire is supposed to be of incendiary
origin. A reward of $500 has been raised
by the citizens and the officers are working
on the case.


Y ---g,








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


A DIGNIFIED AND STRONG APPEAL
TO THE VOTERS OF FLORIDA.
(Continued from page 7.)
be acquired by those who reside in other
for our cattle, which are today barren
sand wastes and absoltuely valueless.
These marsh lands were rendered barren
by drouth, the muck wasting away, even
where it was not consumed by fire. These
marsh lands have never regained their
fertility. They are today absolutely of
no value. What is known as the Big Prai-
rie, covering an area of about forty town-
ships, would be seriously affected in this
manner, the many thousand acres of marsh
lands being destroyed. The loss to our
stock interests would be great, and one
of the greatest industries of the State of
Florida would be seriously impaired. Some
of the undersigned depend at certain sea-
sons of the year upon fishing for a living
and between the rainy seasons exhaust the
supply of fish in Fish-Eating Creek. This
supply is replenished during the rainy sea-
son by the overflow from Lake Okeechobee.
In fact, to briefly present this feature of
our petition to the people in other part#
of the State, we affirm emphatically that
it would destroy one of the sources of earn-
ing a living for some of the people in this
part of eDSoto county .
Would Be a Perpetual Tax.
Third: We desire to call the attention
of the people of Florida to the fact that
this would be a perpetual tax, by calling
their attention to that provision of the
proposed amendment which reads "and to
maintain such canals, drains, levees, dikes
and reservoirs." This would mean that this
lien would remain over property in the
drainage district for an indefinite length
of time.
Worthy of Consideration.
Fourth: All of us are familiar with
the conditions of the Everglades, have
traversed nearly all of this vast tract to
which we refer frequently, and through
necessity have been forced to carefully ob-
serve and watch every condition and every
part of the territory. We do not presume
to represent ourselves as engineers, but do
insist that the knowledge which conditions
have taught us for many years is worthy
of some consideration. We desire to give
it as our positive opinion that the cost of
draining or lowering the waters of Lake
Okeechobee and the Everglades would reach
far into the millions. In all there are
streams flowing into this great lake which
aggregate about twenty-six miles in width
and four feet in depth in the rainy sea-
son, and extending far up into the various
sections which are drained by these streams
and flats. It is the opinion of those of
us who have given this problem the most
careful study that to provide against this
great overflow of water in the rainy season
it would require a canal eight and two-
thirds miles wide and twelve feet deep
from Lake Okeechobee to the ocean, a dis-
tance of thirty miles by the shortest route.
In order to reclaim the lands south of the
lake this would be necessary.
All of us feel that the adoption of the
proposed amendment would not only prove
injurious to us, but would fasten a burden
upon the State which would be seriously
felt for many years to come.
Acres Number
of Land. of Cattle.
J. W. Bailey ........... 180...... 50
C. O. Bailey ........... 200 ...... 0
Mrs. Susan Robbins .... 100...... 50
Melvin Whidden ....... 160...... 50
John Harn ............ 240......


W. W. Harn .......... ......
J. H. Peeples .........2,960.......1,000
J. H. Worth ............ 80.....
Walter Preston ........ ...... 24
Alvia Farabee ......... 0...... 6
W. J. Farabee ....... ......
W. H. Ham ........... ......
R. 0. Brown ........... ......
Harris Daniel ......... 3......
N .S. Platt ........... ...... 50
N. F. Waldron ......... 40...... 300
Henry Summeralls, Sr... ...... 300
Henry Summeralls, Jr... ...... 20
Robert Summeralls .... ...... 50
David Summeralls ..... ...... 10
Lawrence Summeralls .. ..... 20
Jeff Summeralls ....... ......
J. M. Hogan .......... 25......
F. M. Brown .......... ......
G. H. Mansfield ........ 160......
H. C. Rimes ............. 80......
Thos. Crews ........... 120...... 5
W. E. Hidden ........ 80...... 110
L. J. Robbins ........ ..
The Avon Park Petition.
The petition from the taxpayers of the
Avon Park section is as follows:
To the Voters of the State of Florida:
We, the undersigned citizens of DeSoto
county and owners of land within the pro-
posed territory which Governor Broward is
now making an effort to drain, though un-
justly, as we are from 150 to 225 feet
above the sea level, and for which purpose
he is advocating an amendment to the con-
stitution of Florida, in order to forever
fasten upon the people of Florida an addi-
tional burden of taxation, wish to request
the right-thinking people of this county
and of the State of Florida to vote against
such constitutional amendment.
Four Strong Reaaona.
First: Because it fastens upon the peo-
ple an enormous additional burden of tax-
ation.
Second: Because if said amendment is
adopted by tl e people it will place an enor-
mous power in the hands of the Governor
and his drainage commission.
Third: Because the success of draining
the Everglades is uncertain and the effort
merely an experiment.
Fourth: We are informed that there is
in litigation now pending in the courts to
determine the rights of the State and cer-
tain railroads as to the title to this land,
and if it should be successfully drained
and the railroad companies should wir
the litigation, then the people will have
paid this enormous amount of money for
drainage purposes for the benefit of the
railroad companies only.
Acres of land
in Drainage
Name. District.
A. IV. Sargeant .............. 10
John Corduello ............... 2
W Krause ................... 21
Frank Thompson ............ 20
Charles Wilkerson ........... 6
J. T. W illiams ............... 40
E. L. Hall ................... 18
J. J. Burke .................. 20
E. R. Richardson ............. 21
0. R. Thatches ............... 47
E. L. Richardson ............. 5
A. R. Dodge, Agent ........... 1,500
W. S. Armstrong ........... 5
Mrs. F. A. Sloane ............ 1
G. F. Kellogg ................ 20
Mrs. W. H. Daugherty ........ 41/y
Fred Uhl .................. 55
Hy. Bossier .................. 13
Mrs. L. E. Wray ............. 40
Mrs. A. W. Sayeant ........... 5
Barney Blum ............... 5


IT MOVES WHEN YOU DO.


BOYD'S PORTABLE FIREPLACE.
Manufactured by Boyd & Presley, Valdos-
ta, Ga. Shipping Points: Boyd & Pres
ley, Valdosta, Ga., and Palatka, Fla.;
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.; Saui
ders Mill Company, Pensacola, Fla.



Cay & McCall

FIRE INSURANCE

consolidated Building. Phone z955.



WM. D. JONES
PRESCRIPTION SPECIALIST


HICKS' GAS MOTOR COMPANY
We are pleased to announce to our
Southern trade that our new modern works
at Wayeror, Ga., for the nwanuf-ctsrig of
the Hicks Patent Tandem Gs aned Gaso-
line Engines is completed mad in operate,
building Stationary, Portable mad arine
Engines, from 2 to 600 H. P., also Gas
Producers, Pumps and Gasoline Motor
Street Cars. While the Hicks Engines are
far superior to the old single cylinder en-
gines, our price are no higher.
Send for cataloguee and get posted.
Agents wanted.
HICKS' GAS MOTOR COMPANY,



DO Realty aidlnp[ovenet Co.
Large or small tracts of timber
lands, also cut over lands, suitable
for colonies, stock-raising and
game preserves in Florida and
Georgia.
Also Suburban Lots in Deen-
wood and some choice city lots in
Waycross. Write us for full par-
ticulars and information.
ke RIea iUl im mlrt .e,
WAYCR08, GA.



PEC AN 8
Analyze the wer.


permanent Profits

Economy of care

Certainty of results

Annual crops

Non-pershable product
Superior to all nuts.

THE OPPORTUNITY OF TODAY.
The first to plant a peean grve
will be the first to reap a


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FA M I L Y DR U GG ST fr full InfOrmaton apply to


107 ,E BAY ST.
Mail Orders Solicited.


THE 6RIFFIN6 BROS. CG.
JaeksnvMlle. Flotla.


DIAMONDS AND WATCHES

We simply ask a call. We can show yeu, at correct ad meaey
savlng prices, many papers of leaoose pare white, perfect
DIAMONDS. It Is oar desire to continue being the largest
Diamond dealers In Jacksonville, and oar specialty Is tfle roamd-
cat gems and higa-grade Waltham and Elgin Watches.

Diamonds, Watches. Je ,
HESS & SLAGER11-131 aSt., 333 W..1hy, Jucksadrl,uFl




MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


Boilermaking and Repairing

SI Still Boilers and Pumps.
SHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.

Jacksonville. Fla.
i *A**aIAAAAAA eLaaeIIrkAAAASimArAAAA rraBAA <


14


~








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Clyde Steamship Company


U Jacobs ................... 37 B. Hinkley .................. 20
R. T. Whithall ............... 10 R. P. Davidson ............... 700
D. H. Skipper ................ 120 L. R. Hebb, agent ............ 10
S. S. Skepper ................ 160 J. H. Randall, agent .......... 4
B. F. West ................... 3 J. P. Hoyt, agent ............ 21
W. King ..................... 11 F. T. Cullen, agent ........... 21
0. P. Wernicke ............... 70 E. E. Thompson .............. 13
Mrs. E. E. Thompson ......... 20 0. T. Love, agent ............ 20
G. F. Smith .................. 10 G. A. Matthews .............. 3
Mrs. O. E. Smith ............. 45 Irwin Rauleson, agent ........ 4
J. C. Bennett ................. 3 H. D. Myers ................. 5
D. L. Sessons ................ 22 F. S. Prior .................. 1
S. J. Townsend ............... 3 Aaron Bassett ............... 3
WV. B. Weyman .............. 4 C. J. Williams .............. 33
E. F. Weyman ................ 5 John Barker, agent ........... 91
John Lancashire .............. 11 .1. C. Davies, agent ........... 18
C. E. Hall ................... 1 S. D. Lee .................... 11
Mrs. J. Bennett .............. 2 t. A.Lee ..................... 1,228
J. Bruyiere .................. 3 E. M. Hyde .................. 147
W. R. Doolittle .............. 31 J. H. McCartney ............. 185


Work of Dredge is Quite Slow.

One result of the great storm that did was lying the cut had been made thir-
so much damage on the lower coast of teen feet deep, on account of a ridge that
Florida, has been to delay the work of was being cut through.
the dredge Everglades, which is engaged On the north side of the canal the
in cutting a canal from the south fork of earth. rock, stumps and trees are piled up
New river into the Everglades of Florida. that have been removed from tie canal.
The storm passed along the coast last From the appearance of these it can be
Thursday, and Friday a Times-Union rep -een that she has done some hard work,
resennative made a trip up New river in but at the same time it has taken her a
a launch to the dredge. The dredge was little more than three months to advance
not at work and will hardly be able to one-half a mile.
resume work for several days, on account Her Daily Average.
of the extreme high water. From the looks of the earth removed
Some time ago one of the large "spuds" for the first hundred fret or more it does
used to hold the dredge in place, was not appear that the dredge had to cut
broken. As it takes considerable time to anything like ten feet, but as she ad-
get a timber of the size needed for a spud, vanced and struck the more solid ground
a temporary one was placed in position all of that depth had to be removed, but
and the work proceeded until the high taking it on that basis, it is at once seen
water made it impossible for the tem- that she has only removed approximately
porary spud to reach the bottom. Conse- (5i2 cubic yards of material per day. This
quently, the work will be stopped until is easily seen when it is considered that
the water falls or a new spud can be set a half mile is 2,640 feet in length. A canal
in position. sixty feet wide and ten feet deep would
Along New River. contain 1,584,000 cubic feet. As there are
While in that vicinity the Times-Union equal 58,6i6 cubic yards. The dredge has
man made a personal inspection of what been ninety days (and a little more) cut-
has been done since the Everglade began ting this, consequently, the amount per
work more than three months ago. day has averaged 652 cubic yards.
He found that the work of dredging was Capt. Newman, tile engineer, is author-
begun on the south fork of New river, ity for the statement that there is still
about four and a half miles from Fort one-lalf a mile to be cut through tie
Lauderdale, or about six and a half miles dense swamp of cypress timber and un-
from the coast. The river, from Fort dergrowth before the edge of the Ever-
Lauderdale to the point where the dredg- glades is reached by the dredge. Tile
ing begins, is very crooked, many of the cutting is now in a layer of rock about
Lends being sharp. It is dotted with eight feet thick, and it is very hard cut-
truck farms and homes of the farmers :ing. The best work of the dredge since
who make a splendid living from the pro- -he started was done last Monday, Tues-
cee.s of their farms. When the reporter day and Wednesday. In those three days
made the trip up the river last Friday the the dredge advanced just about sixty
fa'ms, as a rule, were all under water, feet. Then came the big storm of Thurm-
Many acres that had been planted in to- day, anu, all work had to stop, and it can-
matoes were entirely under water, and not again begin until the water falls suffi-
the tomato plants ruined. A number of .ienll.y to allow that short spud to get
the houses had been badly twisted by i grip on the bottom of the canal.
the wind, and altogether, the storn did The Next Half Mile.
great damage. If it takes as long to cut the next half
One Half a Mile. mile. which will bring the dredge to the
From the point where the dredge began elde of the Everglades, as it has taken
operations last June. to where she now is to c-t tihe last half mile, it will be the(
is just about one-half of a mile. governorr middlel of January before that point is
B-oward said in hi- speech that the dredge reached.
had progressed 2.!0) lieneal feet. Mr. llut tile dredge may do better. for dur-
Newman, the engineer in charge of the ing lthe last three months since she began
dredge, said it was jrst half a mile that wo k there have been numerous delays,
had been cut. -n'ceh a. happen to all dredges, and the
When asked in regard to tie depth and 'ctlial working time has not exceeded
width of the canal, AMr. Newman, stand- forty-l-ve days of ten hours each.
ing on board the dredge, replied that it Only Six Men.
was ten feet deep and sixty feet wide, It wa" learned from Mr. Newman, the
but just at the point where the dredge (C'ontinued on page 17.)


;IIPMR


1


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
The magnificent steamships of this line are appointed to sail a follows, calling at
Charleston, 8. C., both ways.
From New York, From Jacksonville fox
(Pie 36 North River.) STEAMER. Charleston and New York.
Friday, Oct. 26, at 3:00pm..... ARAPAHOE..... Wednesday, Oct. 31, at 10:00am
Tuesday, Oct. 30, at 3:00pm..... COMANCHE..... Sunday, Nov. 4, at 10:00am
Wednesday, Oct. 31, at 3:00pm...... IROQUOIS......Monday, Nov. 5,at 10:00am
Friday, Nov. 2, at 3:00pm ...... APACHE ...... Wednesday, Nov. 7, at 10:00am
Saturday, Nov. 3.at 3:00pm... .ALGONQUIN .....Friday, Nov. 9,at10:00am
Tuesday. Nov. 6. at 3:00pm ... *ARAPAHOE .... Sunday, Nov. 11, at 10:00am
Wednesday. Nov. 7, at 3:00pmi ....... H'RON....... Monday, Nov. 12, at 10:00am
Friday. Nov. !. at 3:00pln.... .COMAX(HE ..... Wednesday. Nov. 14, at 10:00am
Saturday Nov. 10, at 3:00pni...... IROQUOIS ...... Friday, Nov. 16, at 10:00am
Tuesday, Nov. 13, at 3:00pm ..... *APACH..... Sunday, Nov. 18,at 10:00am
Wednesday y. Nov. 14, at 3:00pm...... ALGiONQUIN ..... onday, Nov. 19, at 10:00am
Friday. Nov. 16. at 3:00p1i..... ARAPAHOE.....Wednesday, Nov 21, at 10:00am
Saturday, Nov. 17, at 3:00pm ....... HURON ....... Friday. Nov. 23, at 10:00am
Tuesday. Nov. 20. at 3:00pm ... .*C(OMANCHE .... Sunday, Nov. 25, at 10:00an
Wednesday. Nov. 21, at3:00pu. ...... IROQUOIS ...... Monday, Nov. 26, at 10:00am
Friday, Nov. 23, at 3:00pmn ...... APACHE. ...... Wednesday, Nov. 28, at 10:00am
Saturday. Nov. 24. at 3:00pm. .... ALGONQUIN ..... Friday, Nov. 30, at 10:00am
Tuesday. Nov. 27.at 3:00pm... .*ARAPAHOE. .. .Sunday, Dec. 2, at 10:00am
Wednesday. Nov. 28. at 3:00pmn ....... HURON ..... _..onday, Dec. 3, at 10:00am
Friday, Nov. 30. at 3:00p. .... OMANCHE.....Wednesday, Dec. 5.at10:00am
*'Jacksonville to New York direct.
Friday, Oct. 19 .............. *KATAHDIN .................Thursday, Oct. 25
Wednesday, (k-t. 24 ................ *CH LPPEWA ............... Tuesday, Oct. 30
Saturday, Oct. 27 ............... ONONDAGA .............. Saturday Nov. 3
Friday. Nov. 2 ............... *KATAHDIN ............... Thursday, Nov. 8
Wednesday, Nov. 7............... CHIPPEWA ............. Tuesday, Nov. 13
Saturday,. Nov. 10 .............. ONONDAGA .............. Saturday, Nov. 17
*Via Brunswick and Charleston.

CLYDE NEW ENOLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
Freight Service Between Jackonville, Boston and Providence, and all Eastern Plita~
Calling at Charleston Both Ways.
FREIGHT ONLY.
From South Side From Foot Catherine Street,
Lewis Wharf, Boston STEAMER Jacksonville.
Saturday, Sept. 29.................. ONONDAGA ................. Saturday, Oct. 6
Wednesday, Oct. 3................. KATAHDIN...............................
Saturday, Oct. 6................... CHIPPEWA .................. Saturday, Oct. 13
*For Brunswick, via Charleston.
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
Between Jacksonville and Sanford.
Stopping at Palatka, Astor, St. Francis, Beresford (DeLand), and intermediate
landings on St. Johns River.

STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
Is appointed to sail as follows: Leave Jacksonville, Sundays, Tuesdays and
Thursday, 3:30 p. m. Returning, leave Sanford, Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays,
9:30 a. m.
SCHEDULE
SOUTHBOUND NORTHBOUND
Read down I Read up.
Leave 3:30p.m..................... Jacksonville ................ Arrive 2:00a.m.
Leave 8:45p. m........................ Palatka ....................Leave 8:00p.m.
Leave 3:00a. m. ................... Astor ..................... Lave 3:30p. m.
S............Beresford (DeLand) ............ eve 1:00 p. m.
Arrive 8:30a.m.............. ...... Sanford ................... Lve 9:30am.
Arrive 10:00 a.m ................... Enterprise ................. eave 10:00 a. m
GENERAL PASSENGER AND TICKET OFFICE, asa W. BAY ST., JACEKVILLE.
F. M. IRONMlONGER, Jr., Asst. Gen'l Pass. Agent, 122 W. Bay St., Jaeksonville, Fla.
W. G. COOPER, Jr., Frt. Agt. C. P. LOVELL, Supt.
Foot of Hogan Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
A. C. HAGERTY, CLYDE MILNE,
Gen'l Eastern Pass. Agt. New York. Gen'l Frt. Agt., New York.
ThEO. G. EGER, V. P. and G. M.
General Offices, Pier 36, North River. Branch, 290 Broadway, New York.

FUEL ANM BUILDING MATERIAL.



The Southern Fuel & Supply Co,
la W frn atd S6*0 1 e L- W. s-ser aW,
F..E Hgg a SYrg. Jasemvldw. F1ElE







TW1 'WKILMY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.
---------- ----------


The


Cooperage


Company


Manufacturers of High Grade

Western White Oak Spirit Barrels


Capital $200,000.

JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

Orders sent direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.
We are now prepared to furnish barrels from six shops advantageously located.


OFFICERS:


J. C. LITTLE, President.
E. H. MOTE, General Manager.


J. C. LITTLE,


JOHN E. HARRIS,
W. C. POWELL,


DIRE
C.
W.


JOHN E. HARRIS, Vice-President.
C. H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasurer.
CTORS:
H. BARNES, J. W. WEST, W.
F. COACHMAN. E. H. MOTE.


n ~-~-~IMIYI r%%~%%%~%%%%%%W~ %~%PI%%%MI %%i %OI-CI~IVICC %%Wd' b%%%-M %~%%%%%%%C v
p..~ll~ 11(l agmuusummuuuu1guusauuusasmumaassses 11~~)~~1 %~ii~~~il~~;~~Z~


J. W. Mtt.
PVONeNms


C. a Paruk
vile-Pres.


nme MoNatt.
Vie.Pres.


W. W. Wtder,
Sec. & Treas.


John R. Young Co.,

Commission
Merchants.

Naval Stores factors. Wholesale rockers .
SavAlalh d*L Brunsewick. Gle.
--- --888884888888n8* n8*8t88888888884ii,88a


B. w. LOUT,
-P at


Q A. IUTTEWAY,
Viue.Preiet.


A. C. ACON,
ey & Tres.


PENINSULAR NAVAL STORES CO.
Capital, $500,000.00.
Succesors to TIMMONS-BLOUNT O.
Naval Stores Factors and Commissk Merchants.
muIs .I Turpentine Operators' Supplies
O* EVBRY DESCRIPTON
Flat Savannah Prices paid for Rsin and Turpentine, lew
Customary Charges.
CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED.
OffiM--American National Bank Bldg., Tampa, Fla.
Yarud, Port Tampa City.


FIFTH A VENUE HOTEL
Madison Square, New York.
American Plan $5 per day. Eurpean Plan $2.00 per cay
The most famous representative hotel
in Ameria. New as the newest, always
fresh and clear. The location in Madisax
Square is t e finestinn the city.
HITCHCOCK. DARLING 4L COMPANY.


*-

J. S. Schofield's Sons Conpany, z
***e+****5***e*C*e*** *es*OeOOer**-.ee* *- *- ***
neadqhuwartffta
Distiller's Pumping
: I ..Outfit.
No plant complete without one.
H ui Hundreds of them in se in Geor
0Florida, Alabama, 1Misippia
^ / I Snath Carolina. Write us for prtUcu-
Slrs anma prices. We also manufacture
SEngines, Belers aid Hlgh
S1Grade MaeMcnery,
-*s a well as carry a full and oruiplert
S i ---stockof-
I 1 ; Mll Supplies, Pipe,
-l Beller Tubes, Etc.
m I Advise your wants.
+, Macon, - Georgia.
KOi + of T wadM fr aTsnlsinstrl Per0
*-oo+s *** o*-****+*+. *+**o*o*o******- ** *l


J. KELLY


__









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


WORK OF DREDGE IS QUITE SLOW.'
(Continued from page 15.)
engineer, that the dredge is operated with
six men. This includes the men to attend
to the dipper, the engineer in charge of
the machinery, a fireman, the commander
of the dredge and a man or boy for all
kinds of work. Cord wood is used for
fuel, and it was stated on board the
dredge that about eight cords of wood
are used per week. It will be seen from
this that even $1,200 per month (much
less $2,000 per month), there must be
some very large salaries paid to the men,
or there is a big amount being paid out
every month for repairs.
A floating machine shop accompanies
the dredge so that all necessary repairs
can be made without the dredge leaving
Sthe canal.
The dredge is a powerful piece of ma-
chinery, as can be seen from observing
the huge rocks and tree stumps that have
been taken out and placed on the bank
of the canal. The writer did not see the
dredge at work, but saw the results that
have been accomplished.
Pleas Are Changed
When asked if the original plan of hav-
ing the second dredge, now in course of
construction, follow the present dredge
and widen the canal to a total width of
100 feet, Mr. Newman said:
"No, I have changed that plan. This
dredge will continue to cut a 60-foot
channel into the Everglades. After en-
tering the glades the course will be much
more to the north. I will then cut in that
direction for about five miles, when I
think we will get through with the hard-
est rock. The rock grows considerably
softer ii the glades until it finally dis-
appears at the depth we are cutting."
Mr. Newman said that when the sec-
ond dredge is completed it will be started
to work up the north branch of New
river. This branch comes from a north-
erly direction, and why the south branch
of the river should have been selected
for the first canal, is more than the aver-
age person can understand, for the dredge
will have to turn north and work its way
beyond the headwaters of the north
branch of the river.
The dredge that is to cut a canal from
the north branch of the river will cut
through to the canal that the dredge Ev-
erglades is euttin. The second dredge will
then cut a lateral canal or two before it
proceeds on toward the great lake Okee-
chobee, which lies sixty miles northwest
from Fort, Lauderdale.
If the dredge Everglades should make
twice as rapid progress as it has made
and cut a mile in three months, instead
of half a mile, it would take it about 180
months, or fifteen years, to reach Lake
Okeechobee. But that is a matter for
the Governor and his drainage engineer
. to figure out.
The Second Drede.
On the banks of New river, directly in
the rear of the hotel of which Mr .Bryan
is proprietor, the second dredge to be
known as the Okeechobee, is now under
course of construction. Capt. Cassidey,
of Jacksonville is in charge of the work.
The hull of the dredge has been complet-
ed and the framework for the deckhouse
and foe' the machinery is now being put
in place. The deck has not yet been put
on the dredge, but workmen are appar-
ently pushing the work.
Lying between the depot building and
the Bryan hotel is a large quantity of
machinery to be placed on .this dredge.


The large boiler and all of the dredging
machinery is lying out there in the
weather and looks as though it had been
lying there for several months. None of
it is under shelter. The day the writer
was at Fort Lauderdale, all of this ma-
chinery was in water from one to two
feet deep. It is true that the occasion
was an extraordinary one, for the tides
were higher than they have been known
for a number of years, but still, the ma-
chinery was in the water and there is no
denying that. Under a shed on the bank
of the river was two or three boxes of
machinery and a number of kegs of wire
nails marked "Int. Imp. Trustees, Ft.
Lauderdale, Fla." The machinery and
nails were not marked to the board of
drainage commissioners, but to the other
board which is composed of the same gen.
tlemen who form the drainage board.
Three Months Longer.
From Capt. Cassidey it was learned
that it will probably take three months
to get the second drainage dredge complet-
ed and ready for work. By that time the
first dredge will have completed another
half mile of canal, if she does not encount-
er any more serious delays than at pres-
ent.
In speaking with a gentleman at Fort
Lauderdale about the drainage proposi-
tion he made a most significant remark.
It was this: The Everglades may truth
fully be compared to a great sponge. If
you cut a canal through a sponge you
only take out what water the pieces of
sponge contains that you have removed.
To dry the sponge you must squeeze it.
How are you going to squeeze the Ever-
glades?"
Give it up. Ask Governor Broward; he
probably know.

ONLY THE VERY BEST AND LOTS OF
IT HAS BEEN SECURED FOR
THE CARNIVAL.
(Continued from page 5.)


Those who come to the Jacksonville Car-
nival this year will see great attractions.
There is to be nothing cheap nor shoddy,
but the very best will be here and a great
deal of that.
The Midway, or "Wonderway," as it is
known as Jacksonville this year, will con-
tain not less than twenty-five of the very
best tented attractions that can be secured
in this country. And in all of that vast
number of special attractions, there is not
more than one electric show, all of the
others being of high-class action, employ-
ing from six o went performers of the
highest merit. Among these various at-
tractions are such well known exhibitions
as Ferrari's Wild Animal Show; Buckskin
Ben's Wild West Show; Mysteries of the
Orient, with its camels and dancing; Fil-
ipino Midgets, direct from the Philippine
Lslands; Village of Apache Indians; Live
Fox Chase; Sorcho's Deep Sea Divers; Div-
ing Children; Vaudeville Shows, Educated
Horse, and several others of equal merit.
Such an aggregation of midway shows has
never before been brought together under
one management in the Southern States,
with the possible exception of the Atlanta
Exposition of 1903.

Turpentine at London.
1906 1905 1904 1903
Stock 6th Oet..21,427a 25.343 23,469
Del'd this wk 2,136b 1,820 2562
Since .Tan. 1 61,13 61,416 71,fi586
Price Oct. 6 48-9 49-9 39- 42-8
Tan.-April ... 49- 50-9 40- 43-6
Savannah .... 64jc 68je 52rc 57c
(a) includes 1,788 French; (b) includes
126 French.
Reported by James Watt & Son.


IM ot" M
W. W. ASHBURN, Moultrie, Ga. N. EMANUEL, Brnswick, Ga.
W. R. BOWEN, Fitzgerald, Ga. D. T. FURSE Savannah, Ga.
J. J. DORMINY, Broxton, Ga. .G. KIRKLAND, Nichol, Ga.
0. T. McINTOSH, Savannah, Ga.


Southern States Naval Stores Co.
Savannah, Ga.


Factors
Ship to Savannah


and Commission Merchants
Get Competition Highest Prices Promptest Returns
Correspond With Us


Malsby Machinery Company

of Jacksonville, F&a.

SPrtable, Statleary EglsM ad kler
Sa MIII W1 Wuoklo MadlUM.
Portable Outfits a Spedaty.
Write for handsome illustrated 1906 cat
Cor Ward and Jefferson

Streets.



THE FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK.

of Jac onville. -


General Benking.

C. E. GARNER, President.
C. B. ROGERS, Vice-President.
G. J. Avent,


4 on Savings Deposits

A. F. PERRY, Vies-Presidat.
W. A. REDING, Chaddr.
Asat. Odader.


YELLOW PINE TIMBER


Is Attracting Attention of the Entire COUNTRY

Our Information is Absolutely Reliable.

EVERY PROPOSITION

We offer you a good one. If you are in the market,

now is the time to buy. Write us your want. Corres-

pondence with bona-fide buyers solicited.



Brobston, Fendig & Company
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA BRUNSWICK. GA.
ax6 West Forsyth Street. ax Newcastle Street.


IIIS*ISt*11iiS 11*1 nII uIIIIIII IIIII *IIIII I >.
a-


JOS. ROSENHEIM SHOE CO.
0 ANMWACTVURERS AND JO3BEUS OF


SHOES


S AVAN NAH GEORGIA

"et Shoes M1e for Cm... ilsMry Tra.e.".
$alleges 80IH 11 HIIH HI I II II I I 111sses@


ac~;~i;~,~,~i~i~,~;c~i;~c~i~;~F%%%%iFi








18 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


ARTICLE OF INCORPORATION
OF THE
LUDDEN-CANPBELL-8MITH COMPANY
Article I.
The name of the corporation shall be
the LUDDEN-CAMPBELL-SMrTH COM-
PANY, and its principal place of business
shall be in the city of Jacksonville, Flor-
ida.
Article II.
The general nature of the business to be
transacted by this corporation shall be to
manufacture, buy, sell and deal in, pianos,
organs and musical instruments of all de-
scriptions, phonographs, talking and re-
producing machines, musical publications,
other merchandise and to buy and own
stock in other corporations in similar busi-
ness.
Article II.
The capital stock of this corporation,
authorized, shall be sixty thousand dol-
lars, divided into six hundred shares of the
par value of one hundred dollars each.
Four per cent of said capital stock shall
be paid for in lawful money of the United
States, and the balance of the stock may
be paid for in property at a just valuation
to be fixed by the directors at a meeting
called for that purpose.
Article IV.
This corporation shall exist for the term
of ninety-nine years.
Article V.
The officers of this corporation shall be
three directors ,one of whom shall be presi-
dent and one shall be secretary and treas-
urer. They shall be elected by the stock-
holders at a meeting to be held in the
city of Jacksonville, Florida, on the first
Monday in June, A. D. 1907, and annually
thereafter. The officers who shall conduct
the business of the corporation until those
elected at the first election are qualified,
shall be A. B. Campbell, president; Jasper-
sen Smith, secretary and treasurer, and
William Ludden, director.
Article VL
The highest indebtedness or liability to
which this corporation can subject itself
shall be one hundred and fifty thousand
dollars.
Article VII.
The names and residence of the subscri-
bers are as follows, to-wit: A. B. Camp-
bell and Jaspersen Smith, Jacksonville,
Florida, and William Ludden, Brooklyn,
New York .
Names. Number of shares of stock.
William Ludden ......... Twenty shares.
A. B. Campbell .......... Twenty shares.
Jaspersen Smith ......... Twenty shares.

State of Florida, Duval county:
I, a notary public in and for said State
and county, do hereby certify that Jas-
persen Smith ,who is personally known to
me, appeared before me in said county and
acknowledged that he subscribed the fore-
going articles of incorporation.
Witness my hand and ojeial seal this
the 14th day of September, A .D. 1906.
(Notarial Seal.) SIG. HESS,


Notary Public State of Florida.
My commission expires June 3, 1908.

State of New York, Onondaga county:
I, a notary public in and for said State
and county, do hereby certify that A. B.
Campbell, who is personally known to me,
appeared before me in said county and ac-
knowledged that he subscribed the fore-
going articles of incorporation.
Witness my hand and official seal this
the 18th day of September, A. D. 1906.
(Notarial Seal.) MARTIN DANER.


State of New York, New York county:
I, a notary public in and for said State
and county, do hereby certify that William
Ludden, who is personally known to me,
appeared before me in said county and ac-
knowledged that he subscribed the fore-
going articles of incorporation.
Witness my hand and official seal this
the 19th day of September, A. D. 1900.
WILLIAM R. BRINCKERHOFF,
Notary Public New York County.
(Notarial Seal.)

NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that application
will be made to the Governor of the State
of Florida for letters patent on the fore-
going proposed charter thirty days after
date. This 27th day of September, A. D.
1906.
JASPERSEN SMITH,
A. B. CAMPBELL,
WILLIAM LUDDEN.


HOTEL ALBERT


The only absolutely fireproof transient
hotel below 23d street; 200 airy, well-fur-
nished rooms at from $1.00 per day up;
100 rooms with private bath at from $2.00
per day up. All modern improvements in-
cluding telephone in each room. Prices
of rooms, combined with our Club Break-
fasts and meals at fixed prices, make the
NEW HOTEL ALBERT the best hotel"
value in New York City.


THE ARAGON
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
NOW OPEN
Under new management. ThorongIhl
renovated and repaired throughout. in-
eluding new electric elevator aid our
own electric light plant.
H. N. O'NEAL, Prop.


THE BOND & BOURS CO.
WHOLEHAL R TAIL

HARDWARE

SASH, DOORS, BLINDS, PAINTS.
Oils, Glass, Stoves, Tinware, Country Holloware.


10 WEST BAY STREET.


JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED LONO LEAF

Yellow Pine Lumber

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots *
Steamer Shipments a Specialty.
WATERTOWN, FLORIDA


PLANTERS


"Old Time" Remedies

THE JOY Of THE HOUSEHOLD.


Thee four great remedies, WRblea Te, em--icta, Cuban ADli
man is ready for any emergency. He has a safe, reliable and speedy relief msa
for wife, children, self or stock. With these remedies you can keep the
doctor's hands out of your pockets, and yet have a healthy, happy famny. s '
Besides, you can cure your stock of any ailment that may befa them.
NUBIAN TEA-In Liquid or Powdr Perm-Is the great family medicine. It
will cure all forms of Liver and Kidney Complaints, Prevents Chil and Malarial
Fever. Cures the common ailments of ehaldrme; and a" a laxative tonic it is without
an equal-safe and reliable. In the liquid, it is extremely palatabl-rew children
like it-and it is READY FOR USE.
BEZNDICTA is a woman's medicine. It will enre all the diseases common to
women, and classed as Female Troubles. It will bring youth beek to the laded woman,
who has gone one suffering because she thought it woman% lot. It will care for the
young girl just entering womanhood; and prepare the young woman tor the sacred
duties of wife and mother.
CUBAJ BELIEF-The instant Paint Killer, for either man or beast. Relieves
instantly, Colic, Cramps, Cholera Morbus, Diarrhoea, Dystentery and Sick Headache.
For colic in horses it is an infallible remedy and is guaranteed to give relief in five
minutes.
CUBAN OIL-The Bet Beae man Nerve Liniment. Is antseptie for cuts,
snagged or torn flesh, and will instantly relieve the pain. Curs inmset bites and stings,
scalds and burns, bruises and sores, chapped hands and face, ore and tender feet.
Relieves rheumatic pains, lame back, stiff joints, and in stock cures wire fence euts,
scratches, thrush, splint, collar sores, saddle galk, and diseasd hoofs.
Write w for Prices

SPENCER MEDICINE CO.. Chattanooga, Ten.



Successful Men
appreciate, use and advise Life Insu-
rance. The advice of successful men
is worth following. Insure in

THE PRUDENTIAL """ CO"P
WALTER F. CORBETI. Mass cr. JOBN F. BRTIFN, Pres.
409 West BlM. e Fla. emes Ofnee. Newsark. J




SUMMER LUMBER COMPANY

JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
Rough n Dressed Lumbr

Long Loaf Yellow Plnu.
AND*= "Moma~uras





U~uuiuu~suuui~g*SuS55iui ,ususaheaaasesuseeussmuhbssu)esas1msIIIUIIIIUISU~


C. B. ROGERS, President. W. A. GAIAAHRRI and E. A. CHAMPLAIN Viee-Preidents. JOHN BALL, See'y and Trea .
DI UOTOU: C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain, D. H. McMillan and J. A. Cranford, of Jaeskonvill;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensaeola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


4








I
4
4
4


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Have a Larger Capacity than any Company of Its kind In the South.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters 116 to 120 East Bay street, Jacksonville, Fla.
ranchce Tempa. nl.., Pensm.ols. rFl, nad Savsnnash. GCa.

1s)111111111h1111>1> ucIu*I4^ mt:|lIM >tuppa llllh llmu>Mlll ------- -----


PAID UP CAPITAL $5oo,ooo.

Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Pla., with Branches In Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consol lated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Groeery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company of Pensaeola; the grocery br ich of thL West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensaeola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything In Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-
visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.


Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


---.-, ------- ----- ----- --rr- ---- --


----------- a as as 8ll*********a al aIII II II I


I I I









GREENLEAF tL CROSBY CO.

Jewelers arnd Importers,


41 W. BAY STREET.


Diamonds
We Save You Middleaan's


Profit.
Phreiom d ton are of may drm of
pmrfeato or wt might as imp rfeq t
whi& uasa a wide varlatMi im prie* em
a of mveral dMaer, sbe aInd to
bedo M dea.lerw s mh lowr ia
pri- tan ther. In rmUy, e ower
ri aeo ~y e mblo br tel leoMr qMla
of thu rto oferd. ol eor, th rU-
th separately or colletivly determine
th real value of ese e i


UAVX BsK
D/ALR IR DIAMOND
1//X OTHM PrcOUa STOUr=
m C TH 8TAfrinJSrT or
BUSINEIs I xS, A= D DIRECT ,
INKPORTEM FI= KOM TIANU
TWETY AN.>-
"nWA=;;Nw


JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Diamonds


We Save You Mldc.eman's
Profit.
CompeftireIy few p.rm W= irstrt
to judge th gqility al val of a df
mond, thul tly omry -m way wIhm p-
chrsing ge is to p to raMkly rnstIe
deale, am whoMe may yn 01 xelif
business utag in the smIm il ab
positive FaIta that yn wil rneee fair
and homanihh tmMtnnL
We ofa omly atoms so the bk qMM".
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strictly as represmte.


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F DIAMONDS


Write Us-Mail Orders Receive Prompt Attention.
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Half Tones-Zinc Etchings


Ilustratina and Engravina Department


THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.

Splendidly equipped foi business. Half fones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most unproved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of Commercial Work, Pamohlets, etc


I ISPIIlTY IMl OF H1131I1. ltII10Il lIID f1llflllG FPIIlFiS Ib PMiW l.


IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE rHE MOST' EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT 5 WANTED
Goou WORk AND PROMPT DEIVERIES PROMISED.


A Florida


En erprise.


Try It.


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