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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00184
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: July 28, 1906
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00184
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text





pUSTRIAL



CORD


SVol. XIII





0 s'


yELhY NAVAhL ToREa.,
h AIsEKaR fGEIERA
ID\OnVTIJAl-B FnMG1CAIs
I ~5TEWSPAPE .3
I.'------*-----


Peonage Stories Exposed.
IN THIS ISSUE OF THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD WE PR
SENT TO OUR READERS A REVIEW OF THE DEVELOPMENTS
IN THE CHARGES OF PEONAGE LODGED AGAINST SOME OF
THOSE ENGAGED IN THE MANUFACTURE OF NAVAL S. RES
AND LUMBER, TOGETHER WITH SOME SENSATIONAL AND
SLANDEROUS STATEMENTS WHICH HAVE BEEN PUBLISHED
IN THE PRESS OF THE NORTH AND SOUTH.
THERE IS OCCASION FOR A STUDY OF THIS QUESTION IN
CONNECTION WITH AN EFFORT TO INDUCE IMMIGRANTS TO
COME THIS WAY. OPERATORS AND LUMBER MANUFACTU-
RERS OUGHT TO READ THIS ARTICLE CAREFULLY AND LOO
INTO EVERY FEATURE OF THE SITUATION.


51!


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


SAVANNAH, GA.


)O6
A~lSMlCr


o. 4


C


-- ~-- CC


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CONSOLIDATED NAVAL STORES COMPANY.
Home Office: JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Branches: Savannah. Ga., and Pensacola, Fla.
OFFICERS.
W. C. POWELL, President; B. F. BULLAKD, H. L. COVINGTON, J. A. CRANFORD, D. H. MeMILLAN, B. R. POWELL. C. M COVINGTON, JOHN H.
POWELL, Vice Presidents; C. P. DUSENBURY, Secretary and Treasurer.
& XECUTIVE COMMITTEE: W. C. Powell, C. B. Rogers, H. L. Covington, B. F. Bullard, J. A. Cranford.
DIL~fTORB: W. C. Powell, B. F. Bullard, C. B. Rogers, J. A. Cranford, W. J. Hillman, John H. Powell, W. F. Coachman, H.L. Covington, C. Downing, D. H.
MeMisla, R. B. Powell, C. M. Covington, S. A. Alford.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS

Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
The"Consolidated" Is purely a co-operative Company. Its Interests are identical with those
of the Producers. The patronage of turpentine operators everywhere Invited.
Two Million acres of land and Timber for sale on easy terms.
Producers are invited to call or correspond.

The Greaet Hand Hammered


R 0 X B 0 R 0
ROXBORO
Turpentine Box Axe. None Better can be Made.
The factory Is Small, Makes Nothing but Axes, and we control the entire output.
Place Yvr orders at Oncu AH A RLEY'S CO DAN Headquarters,
to sure Promt Delivery HA IRDWARE C Valdosta, Ga.
Turpentine Operators Supplies, Hacks, Pullers, Dippers, Batting, Glue Brass Cloth, Support Wire, Rivets, Hoop Iron, etc.


Commissaries and Retailers:
OUR HIGH GRADES OF
PEANUT and COCOANUT BRITTLE
Will increase your demand for Candies we Manufacture.
Stick Candy, Mixed Candy, Penny Goods Chocolate and Package Goods.
Sd for Pre list. THE E J. SMITH Co., 47-753 Adams stree
r.ttllr e I.., Jacksonville, Ifa.













WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

PUIISHED VERY SATURDAY. DEVOTED TO NAVAL STORES, LUMR AND MANUFACTURING INTERESTS

d~lq. SW. a. ". by ~. .. C....1 d Twuma 0As.. AmmN. i.i. G O sl. ..amdd ag A~L .... ... um .." as M ..= d s Am .. d A a Mqd s L 1W am
1y COisd Oa d rTwglm l Ops." Anmah Adqad ApS 27. I3S mfl Oer d as Cm, -G0w..s' Aomtim. b i by Gemall Sewm Ansenii. Oiom d ,Ssmes eGemwws Ammsilim.


Southern Industries are Being Damaged by Slanderous Stories of


Peonage Published Throughout the Country,


The remarkable story of peonage dis- contrary they were working at a sawmill, migrants to Florida and who are to do so winter months. There is everything in
played on this page gives to the turpen- where they were being paid more than the in the future. favor of the South, and the time is coming
tine interests of the South an idea of what average wages. That is all there is to Immigrants are wanted. They are want- when the immigrants will be familiar with
has been going the rounds of the press for the charge against Mr. O'Hara, and the ed badly. They are needed here for the these facts.
the past few weeks and ever since the Record is confident that he will be dis- farm, the mill, the phosphate camp, the But in the meantime the greatest cau-
charge of peonage was lodged against F. J. tion should be exercised by those who are
0'Hara, of Buffalo Bluff. The article here bringing these foreigners to the South.
reproduced was published in the New Or- FROM THE PEN OF A SLANDERER. It ought to be borne in mind that they
leans Picayune, and is considered the eli- are a class who are not familiar with the
max in the long list of newspaper fabri- New York, July 22.-The Times says: Mrs. Mary Grace Quackenbos, the customs prevailing in this country. They
nations which have been appearing in the woman lawyer of No. 3 Fifth Avenue, tells of forty or fifty immigrants in this come from countries where real serfdom
Northern and some of the careless Southern country who are living in Florida in a state of peonage, who have applied to exists in the worst form. The lower class
papers for the past year which refer to her for aid. Mrs. Quackenbos, in speaking of the case today, said: "These of Germans live where they are kept under
the treatment of labor here. unfortunates, having read advertisements that they could get employment in the iron heel of the worst kind of op-
The Record publishes this dispatch to- Florida that would pay them $1.25 a day, with all expenses for transportation pression. First, there is the military ex-
gether with what we know of this case to the scene of work paid by the employers, applied to the employment agency action law, which calls for a great part
more as a warning to the naval stores ope- mentioned in the advertisement, which received $4 a head for their engage- of their time when young. Next is the
rators and sawmill men than to place it meant. law of custom which compels those of
before our readers as a sample of gross "How many of these expeditions have been organized I do not know, but low birth to pay homage and deep respect
misrepresentation. 1 do know that at least forty men were shipped from here to Jacksonville, Fla., to those of higher standing, and espee-
This story from the pen of an indus- early in June. ially the officers of the army. The same
trious "penny-a-liner" had just a twinkling "They had been told that it was but one day's journey by water, and they Ipractically is true of the Italians, with the
of foundation. Mr. O'Har was arrested knew so little of our laws that they did not sign any contracts with their em- exception that there are a few variances of
on the charge of peonage lodged by two or players which would define their rights or specify the amount of their pay. custom, with the same principles in force.
three of the German immigrants, and de- "The weeks passed and nothing was heard of them. No mony came home These men come to America, where they
spite the fact that the testimony showed to their families. About two weeks ago the first news came from them, in the are told they will have perfect freedom.
that he had no connection with the al- person of one of the members of the June expedition, Joseph Wilensky, 53 They are told palpable and fabulous tales
leged attempts to keep the men at his years old. of the advantages existing here and have
camp against their will, was held to await "His back was seamed with the marks of the lash, and he was in a pitiable an idea that at last they have landed on a
the action of the next United States grand condition. When he left he was a strong man, capable of the hardest kind of soil where they will have the greatest
jury of the Southern circuit of Florida. work. He came back sadly broken. He is unfit for any kind of labor, and freedom and where work is only a slight di-
A review of the testimony in this case, will never be the man he was before he sought a living for his family in Florida. version from the pleasures of life. When
Which we published two weeks ago, went "He told a pathetic story of his experiences. In Jacksonville they were they come face to face with the character
to show that if there had bpen any hold- met by an agent of the concern which had hired them. He took them to the of work that is demanded of them, their
ing up of the Germans, it was of a mild little town of Palatka. There they were crowded into wagons and driven fifty fancied ideas of all play, absolute liberty
character, and a Geramn, one of the same miles to Buffalo Bluffs, where they were told that their work would begin in (which to them means license) fades away
class as those who were brought here, was three days. They arrived on a Friday and were sheltered in miserable huts. and they grow dissatisfied. The character
the fellow who had charge of the men. "There were no beds or chairs and they had to sleep on matting. of work demanded of them is hard. There
The several witnesses who lodged the "'Tey had no food, and when they asked for it they were told that they is no denying that fact. It is a character
complaints against Mr. O'Hara testified could buy it at the Company store and that this would be deducted from their of work which is the harder to them be-
on their oath that they only saw Mr. wages. Their protests were laughed at. cause they are not accustomed to it. The
O'Hara a few times and that the man who "They had to eat, so they paid 15 cents for a box of sardines, 10 cents for ways of the American are not theirs and
is alleged by them to have restrained crackers, 10 cents a pound for sugar, and even 5 cents for a glass of water, there is some excuse for the foreman to
them and a number of their class was him- "Monday they were told that their time to work had come. appear harsh at times in order to im-
self a German, a kind of "all-around-the- "They wre taken into the swamps and made to carry tubs there, where, press upon them that the work must be
world" sort of a fellow, who was supposed waist deep in foul water, they tapped the trees for turpentine, collecting it in done according to the American ideas and
to have had a great deal of good sound, the tubs. the American plan.
common sense, and who was not placed in "When they fainted from exhaustion, cold water was thrown over them. The foreigner grows restless. He has
charge of the men because he had any and if they did nbt immediately get back to work, they were flogged by the had his way paid to Florida, with the
tendencies toward practicing cruelty, but negroes. understanding that he is to pay it back.
because be was supposed to know the men "They were tormented with the innumerable insects and rapidly fell sick In the case at Buffalo Bluff it was appar-
better than any of the Americans around with fever. ent that the Germans were under the im-
the place, could speak their language and "There was talk of rebellion, but the negroes were armed and the sufferers pression themselves that they were to be
knew their customs and by this knowledge were weak and exhausted. On young man named Boldberg protested that he held virtually as slaves until their trans-
be in a better position to take charge of would rather die than continue the work, and he was beaten over the back portation expenses had been refunded. It
them. Mr. O'Hara is not a man who would until he was half dead. would have been so in their own country
Impress one as being in the slightest de- "Willensky said that one day he had managed to escape, but that he had and they were under the strong impression
gree disposed to treat any one harshly, not gone far when he was caught and brought back. He managed to get a let- that it was the same here. Instead of
much less those who had been brought to ter sent North to 'friends, who forwarded to him an order on the Western adopting the American plan of getting
Florida at a great expense to work at his Union for $30. The Superintendent took $20 of this money, asserting'that away under ordinary circumstances and
mill and on his turpentine farm. hr owed it to the company. He got to Jacksonville where Jews gave him beating the man out of what money he had
There is one feature in connection with enough money to get back to New York." advanced to bring them here, these Ger-
the statement from the dispatch to the mans thought that there was only one way
Picayune wh'ih stamps it as a fabrication. to get away and that was to steal away
The fellow who is supposed to be quoted charged when the grand pury hearts the lumber camp and the naval stores farm. in the night. This they did, despite the
states that he was working on the turpen- case. The wages paid in the South are as good fact that they had not been told that they
tine farm. The fact is, none of those who But in passing over this matter the if not better than those paid in the North were being detained against their will.
lodged the charge against Mr. O'Hara were Record is disposed to give a word or two and here there is work the year round There was nothing in their statements to
employed on his turpentine farm. To the of warning to those who are bringing im- without suspension of labor during the have indicated that they were warned by

*









4


THU W11n11LY INDUSTRIAL RUCORD.


mmI


the foreman or by Mr. 0'Hara or any of fabrications at so much per.
his agents against any effort to leave the The Record is aware that the charge of
place. But they were operating on the peonage is being carried too far. At the
Idea that the same customs prevailed here same time it behooves the interests who
as to debt as in their own country nad employ large numbers of laborers to be
they were sneaking away to beat their cautious.
employer out of what belonged to him. As to the effect the dispatch will have
The next morning when they saw an in the vicinity of New Orleans, it will be
agent of the company, as they were seated little, if any. People in that part of the
on the railway platform a few miles away, South are too sensible and know too much
they were under the impression that he about the conditions here to be fooled by
came for them and that he came prepared any such rot. The only regret is that there
to take them back against their will and is a paper in the South which will lend its
their protests. They had this idea and columns to such baseless charges, which
were badly scared. The testimony is to have the earmarks of falsehood plainly
the effect that they were asked to return printed on their face. But these same sto-
and to work out their transportation as rise are going the rounds of the Northern
men ought -to do. This is their own tes- press. In that section there is danger of
timony, with the addition that the man their doing harm by discouraging the tide
pulled out a big gun, which was not verified of immigration to the South.
by any of the witnesses who .happened A few months ago the same kind of rot
to be near the place when all this is al- was published about the treatment of la-
leged to have taken place, tI was simply borers by the East Coast Railway Com-
a case of imaginary fright on the part of pany. Northern papers took the matter
those who were violating a moral obliga- up and for weeks there were faming head-
tion and who were under the impression lines telling of the cruelties practiced upon
that tehy were violating the law, until men who were brought here to build the
made to understand differently. It was railroad from the mainland to Key West.
then they "got wise" and decided to heed The result was that some of the more
the advice of an agitator and tell their reputable papers of the country took the
tale to a United States court commissioner. matter up and sent men here to investi-
There is a great lesson involved for the gate Of course, the first reports were
naval stores operators and the sawmill and proven to be ridiculously false.


phosphate men in this one case. Here is
a case whereoa lack of understanding of
the laws of this country on the part of
the foreigners, together with their fancied
wrongs, got a good man into trouble.
The Record calls attention to this fea-
ture of the case in order to caution em-
ployers and to put them on their guard.
Those who are brought here ought to be
told at the start they are coming to work
and that work is to be expected of them.
In the presence of competent witnesses
they ought to be made to understand that
they will have to refund the money ad-
vanced for their transportation, but that
there are no laws in this country which
would justify their employer in holding
them for debt. Care should first be taken
in selecting those who are to be brought
here to work. There are a great many de-
sirable immigrants to be had and the
South is in need of them.
Another observation we would make is
that of all the laws which are being abused
and misused in the United States, that
in reference to peonage is the lead It is
a matter of common occurrence for those
who endeavor to shirk their just obliga-
tions to resort to this statute of the nat-
ional penal code to assit him in his ef-
forts. It is becoming to be a matter of
common occurrence to resort to this law
and there are a number of eases coming

up every term of court in some of the
United States judicial circuits. But this
is something which the employers of labor
must guard against. The law is there
and the employers ought to see to it that
there is never the chance given to resort
to it by any of those who are bent upon
leaving the debts behind them at the camp.
One feature of the New York dispatch
which is preposterous on its face, is that
negroes were put over the Germans and
that these negro brutes applied the lash.
That correspondent ought to come down
here and try any game of that character
just for the sake of informing himself.
The probabilities are that if he allowed
such a state of affairs to exist in any part
of any Southern State, he would hardly
get back to New York to continue his oc-
cupation of sending out such contemptible


D. T. GEROW HAS RESIGNED.


Severs Connection With the Standard Oil
Company.
D. T. Gerow has resigned as manager
of the Florida branch of the Standard Oil
Company. Regarding his resignation Mr.
Gerow is sending out the following official
announcement to sub-agents and patrons:
"On the last day of this month I will
have completed twenty-five years service
with the Standard Oil Company, Jackson-
ville, Fla. On account of increased du-
ties in connection with my personal affairs,
I find that I am not able to give the busi-
ness of the Standard Oil Company the at-
tention it requires, and for this reason I
decided some time ago that I would resign
my position with the company at the end
of the twenty-five years. I have accord-
ingly tendered my resignation as special
agent at Jacksonville, to take effect Aug-
ust 1st.
"Mr. W. W. Zachry, who has been my
assistant at Jacksonville for some time,
will succeed me, and I bespeak for him
a continuation of the good will and patron-
age of my friends and customers of the
company.
"I desire to thank you for the friendly
treatment extended me personally and as
a representative of the Standard (il Com-
pany. Trusting that the pleasant relations
heretofore existing will continue, I remain,
Very truly yours,
"D. T. GEROW."
In conversation with Mr. Gerow, he said
to a representative of The Metropolis that
he felt as if he had given the Standard
Oil Company a great many years of the
best part of his life, and with the increas-


Barnes & Jessup Company

J~ucksonville, Floridea.

Naval Stores Factors and Commission

Merchants.


OFFICERS.
C. H. Barn... President. J. C. Little, Vice-Prlderist.

DIRECTORSs C. H. Barnes. J. C. Little, Ralph Jesus.
J. R. Sounders. E. C. Long, W. E. Cummer. L. H. Paul. G. W.
Saxon, 0. W. Taylor.
{ %^%%%^^^%%%^%^^^^^^^^^ ^


W. J. L'ENGLE,
President.


J. W. WADZ,
Vlee-Preddont.


&. 0. HUGHES,
See'y and Treas


Union Naval Stores Co.
MOBILE, ALA. PENSACOLA, FLA. NEW ORLEANS, LA.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.


.........DEALERS IN..........

Supplies for Turpentine Operators:
Can ofer at presat quite a large nmbr f d eshale Isatims a West Flr-
Ida, Alabama and Miasiippi Liberal advances made asint nalgmemta. Cr-.
reapendence aulitad.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.




There is always a demand for good

tools--especially AXES

The Celebrated


RIXFORD AXE
| is the best money and skW can epr-
duce and has the greatest reputation
among mill, turpentine Md cross-tie
men of any tool ever nmde.
j If you want the best send your
orders to


W. H. Briggs Hardware Co.

Sole Southern Agents

VALDOSTA. GEORGIA

Jobbers of Mill and Turpentine Supp1ies.

^- --x-- - - - - - - - -


ing duties of the position, together with
that of postmaster, it Iecame necessary
for him to retire. In the future, he said,
that he would devote his time to the duties
of postmaster and his private interests in
Jacksonville.
When he took charge of the oil business
in 1882 he was agent, bookkeeper, cashier,
shipping clerk, warehouseman, salesman,
typewriter and office boy. WALyER P. COIETT.
400 w t mg.., ls


Successful Men

appreciate, use and advise Life Insu-
rance. The advice of successful men
is worth following. Insure in

THE PRUDENTIAL "o"r N SN
tr, JO"ON F. DRVTDEI, Pre.t
lOfe M. II-Me Ogns e. NMwerk, R









THE WIEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5-


Jf~Ic6>B%'la~aaa1>iSI.^^CPLC


McMillan Bros.


Southern Copper

Works


Manufacturers of Turpentine Stills

Complete Outfits and Extra Kettles, Caps, Arms, Worms, Fur-
nace Doors and Grates always on hand

Old Stills taken in part New Work and repairing done
payment for in the country

Heavy Coppersmithing, Steam Pipe and Special Copper Work

el _a SHEET COPPER, BRASS, LEAD AND IRON


SO Jacksonville, Fla.

LAjGu WORMS 0 AD H Y BOTTOMS Also Fayetteville, N. C. Savannah, Ga. Mobile, Ala.
I %i ice M l ~ ~ m w .... .............. xxsxi xxxx*


Record of Piogrcss Made in B dlding in the

Southern States,

Abbeville, 8. C.-School Building.-South ments are being completed for the erection
Carolina Presbytery is reported to erect of proposed high-school building, 66x95
high school building, feet; assembly hall to have a seating ca-
Anderson, S. C.--otton Warehouse.- pacity of 400; cost $12,000. Address The
W. M. Mulkey has contract at $17,800 for Mayor.
the erection of cotton warehouse for Far- Checotah, I. T.-Building.-An expendi-
mers' Union Warehouse Co., referred to ture of $18,000 is authorized for the erec-
June 14; two stories; brick with bravel tion of an addition to the I. O. O. F. Or-
roof; six fire-proof compartmnets, each phans' Home.
50x100 feet. Clarksville, Tenn.-School Building.-
Baltimore, Md.-Theater.-The Empire Board of education has adopted plans by
Circuit Co., which controls the Monumental J. W. Gettes, of Vincennes, Ind., for pro-


Theater, has awarded contract to Edward
D. Preston, Gunther Building, St. Paul and
Lafayette streets, for the remodeling of the
present building on East Baltimore street.
New galleries and boxes will be construct-
ed and building will be equipped through-
out with new electric fixtures; John D.
Allen Company, architects, Philadelphia,
Pa.
Baltimore, Md.-Pier.-The Baltimore &
Ohio Railroad Co. has awarded contracts
to the Baltimore Bridge Co. for the con-
struction of storagestruction of storage p
struction of storage pier two stories high
138x900 fet, at foot of Andre street, to
cost abotu $100,000. It will be constructed
of steel, concrete and wood; D. D. Caruth-
ers, chief engineer, Mt. Royal station.
Bishopville, S. C.-Church.-Bishopville
Presbyterian Church, Hugh R. Murchison,
pastor, will erect modern church building
and Sunday-school annex of ordinary con-
struction at a cost of $15,000 to $20,000.
Hot-air heating plant and electric fixtures
will be installed. Architect has not been
engaged and construction work will begin
about June, 1907.
Bluefield, W. Va--Store and Warehouse.
Bids will be received by C. B. Hancock for
the erection of a four-story brick store and
warehouse 50x135 feet for the Bluefield Dry
Goods and Notion Co. Bids for the work
will be received either as a whole or sep-
arately for the brick work and masonry,
wood work, painting, plumbing, tinning
and electric wiring. Plans and specifica-
tions can be obtained from Holmboe & Laf-
ferty, architects; usual rights reserved.
Boyce, La.-School Building.-Arrange-


posed school building; three stories; brick
and stone; cost $20,000; assembly hall to
have a seating capacity of 600.
Columbia, S. C.-Cotton Warehouse.-
Construction work will begin at once on
warehouse to be erected by the Standard
Warehouse Co., for which W. J. Bailey
has contract; capacity, 6.000 bales of cot-
ton; cost $40,000. Electric elevators built
on a trolley system will be installed by
Joseph E. Sirrine, of Greenville, S. C.
Cotter, Ark. -Dwelling.-Mrs. C. W.
Brown, of Poplar Bluff, Mo., has purchased
site on which to erect residence.
Cotter, Ark.-Telephone Exchange.-
Farris Telephone Co. is arranging for the
erection of a two-story concrete building
75 feet deep.
Covington, La.-Newspaper Building.-
W. P. Fussell and others have purchased
site 50x120 feet on which to erect a two-
story brick building for the News.
Covington, Texas-School Building.-J.
M. Rogers, secretary, will receive bids un-
til August 4 for remodeling high-school
building; plans and specifications on file at
the office of H. M. Rogers, also at office of
T. J. Galbreath, architect, Hillsboro, Texas.
Certified check for $100 must accompany
each hid. Committee reserves usual rights.
Greenville, Texas-School Building.-
Campbiell & Owen, of Paris, Texas, have
contract for the erection of proposed school
building; cost $16,893.
Greenwood, S. C.--Ctton Warehouse.-
Standard Warehouse Co. has let contract
for addition to cotton warehouse, increas-
ing capacity from 10.000 to 12,000 bales.
Haskell, I. T.-School Building.-Town


has voted affirmatively the proposed $10,-
000 bond issue for school purposes. Ad-
dress Town Clerk.
Knoxville, Tenn.-Freight Depot.-It is
reported that the Louisville & Knoxville
Railway is having plans made for a 250-
foot addition to freight depot. W. H.
Courtenay, Louisville, Ky., is chief engi-
neer.
Knoxville, Tenn.-Store Building.-J. S.
Hall & Sons will expend 11,000 in remodel-
ing store building, for which contract has
been let.
Louisville, Ky.-Dwelling.-Mrs. Jean-
nette D. Cowan has purchased residence
which will be remodeled at a cost of $10,-
000. Contract has been let.
Louisville, Ky.-Dwelling.-H. H. Bau-
meister has secured permit for the erection
of proposed $5,000 brick residence.
Madisonville, Ky.-Association Building.
-Contract has been let for the erection of
Young Men's Christian Association Build-
ing, previously reported; cost $30,000.
Nashville, Ark.-School Building.- E.
\V. Holt and E. K. Brown have contract at
$13,800 for erection of proposed two-story
school building.
Natchitoches, La.-School Building.-
Bids marked "Proposal for Building" and
addressed to B. C. Caldwell will. be re-
ceived until August 15th for the erection
of a two-story and basement wing to the
main building of the State Normal School,
accordingto the plans and specifications
which can be had at the office of Favrot &
Livaudais. Ltd., architects, 839 Gravier
street, New Orleans, La. Certified check
for $500, payable to the State Normal
School, must accompany each bid. Pay-
ments to be made as follows: $16,000 to
be paid by February 1, 1907, and the bal-
anc:' by February 1, 1908.
New Orleans, La.-Courtl*ouse.-Plans
and specifications have been submitted to
the courthouse commission by F. W.
Brown, A. T. E. Brown and P. T. Marye
for proposed $200,000 courthouse. Two
sets of plans have been submitted, one
calling for concrete and one for steel-frame
construction.
Norfolk. Va.-Hote.--Chartered: Poca-
hontal Hotel corporationn with n author-
ized capital stock of $25.000 by A. E.
Campe. E. W. Bray and Benjamin Lowen-
berg.


Norfolk, Va.-Warehouse.-E. L. Myers
has contract at $39,523 to erect warehouse
for Southern Bagging Co., B. & D. L. Mar-
golius, proprietors, after plans by Breese
& Mitchell; mill construction; brick; elec-
tric fixtures.
Orangeburg, S. C.-Ootton Warehouse.-
Standard Warehouse Co. is arranging for
enlarging cotton warehouse, increasing ca-
pacity from 2,000 to 5,00 bales.
Point Isabel (not a postofice), Texas-
Clubhouse.-J .H. Woolery, of Kingsville,
Texas, will supervise the construction of
clubhouse to be erected by the Point Isabel
Tarpon and Fishing Club, for which C. H.
Page, Jr.. Austin, Texas, prepared the
plans; 75x150 feet; fireproof; acetylene
gas fixtures; cost $10,000.
Ponchatoula, La.-Church. Methodist
congregation is considering the erection of
a $7.500 edifice. Address The pastor.
Roanoke, Va. Buisiness Building.-
Frank B. Thomas & Co. are arranging for
the erection of a five-story building 108x122
feet, to contain 50,000 square feet of floor
space and cost $35,000.
NSwell's Point, Va.-Building.-Hanley-
Casey Company, Atlantic Building, Nor-
folk, Va., has the contract for the erection
of building for the State of Rhode Island
on the Jamestown Exposition grounds;
Ceo. N. Kingsbury, executive commissioner,
107 Statehouse, Providence, R. I.
St. Mary's City, Md.-Building.-Joseph
L. Milburn, Leonardtown, Md., has contract
to erect hall for St. Mary's Female Semi-
nary. previously mentioned; one story, 39x
80 feet; brick with stone trimmings; slate
roof; plumbing; hot-air heating plant;
cost $8,000; N. R. Grimm, 627 F street, N.
W.. Washington, D. C., architect.
Thorndale. Texas.-Cotton Warehouse.-
Farmers' Union Warehouse Co. has been
incorporated with $5.000 capital stock by
W. N. Lipscomb, L. J. Huffman, M. B.
Sutton and others.
Virginia Beach, Va.-Hotel, etc.-It is
reported that Thompson & Dundy, of New
York. N. Y.. will erect $100,000 hotel and
install amusement enterprises at a cost of
*250.000.
Washington. D. C.-Prison Cells.-The
commissioners of the District of Columbia
have awarded contract to the Pauly Jail
Building Co.. St. Louis, Mo., for the con-
struction of 190 cells complete with sheet-


___ __ C ____ __ __


~ylc --- --








THN WIUULY INDUNTMIAL EUORD.


steel ceilings and concrete floors at its bid
of $58,908 for the new District workhouse.
Washington, D. C.-Offie Building.-The
Washington Savings Bank, 12th and G
streets, has engaged W. L. Turner, 41 Q
street, N. W., to construct on the percent-
age basis an addition to its office building;
six stories and basement, 33x67 feet; brick
with stone trimmings; steel-frame fire-
proof construction; slag roof; electric
wiring and fixtures; sanitary plumbing;
steam-heating system; elevator; B .F.
Meyers, architect, Bond Building, 14th
street and New York avenue, N. W.
Washington, D. C.-Dwelling.-Frank
Gilliam, 3150 Highland avenue N. W., will
erect dwelling at Cleveland Park; 2%8 sto-
ries, 35x50 feet; brick and stone with peb-
ble-dash exterior; red slate roof; hardwood
finish; electric wiring and fixtures; sani-
tary plumbing; hot-water heating system.
John Simpson & Sons and C. A. Warthen,
both of Kensington, Md.; Hazzel Bros., 627
H street, N. W., and Alfred & Appleby, 71
K street N. E., are estimating on construc-
tion; bids due August 1; A .M. Schneider,
architect, Bond Building, 14th street and
New York avenue N. W.
Washington, D. C.-Dwellings.--L A.
Newton has awarded contract to George P.
Newton, 1906 F street N. W., for the'con-
struction of two dwellings at Ontario and
Columbia roads; three stories, 20x70 feet;
brick with Indiana limestone and terra-
cotta trimmings; slate roofs; electric wir-
in gand fixtures; sanitary plumbing; hot-
water heating system. Sub-bids are now
being taken; N. T. Haller.Company, archi-
tects, Corcoran Building, 15th and F sts.
Washington, D. C.-Store Building.-B.
L Horner, 212 Oorcoran Building, 15th and
F streets N. W., representing J. G. Mc-
Crorey Company, has awarded contract to
McKay & Morris, 1331 G street, for general


remodeling of store building at 414 and 416
7th street N. W. Metal ceilings, prismatic
glass, structural iron and steel, electric
wiring and fixtures, sanitary plumbing and
heating system will be installed; cost
about $20,000; N. T. Haller Company, arch-
itects, Oorcoran Building.
Washington, D. C.-Stores and Apart-
ments.-Referring to store and apartment
building to be erected at northeast corner
14th and R street N. W., by J. Louls Loose,
13ti and F street N. W., the following con-
tractors are estimating on construction:
John H. Nolan, 1413 G street N. W.; New-
man & Smith, Colorado Building, 14th and
G streets N. W.; W. L. Timer, 41 Q street
N. W.; Burgess & Parsons, 627 F street
N. W.; George W. loeftfer, 803 Florida
avenue N. W.; Blundon & Simon, 30 Quin-
cy street, and J. A. Dowrick, 62 Florida
avenue, N. W.; one and two stories high;
brick with stucco exterior; structural iron
and steel; tile roofs; electric wiring and
fixtures; sanitary plumbing; steam-heating
system; Hunter & Bell, architects, 1010 F
street, N. W.
Washington, D. C.-Apartment houses.
-Thomas J. Fisher & Co., 1414 F street N.
W., have awarded contract to Burgess &
Parsons, 627 F street N .W., for the con-
struction of seven two-story and basement
brick and stone apartment houses on Mor-
gun street N. W.; Appleton P. Clark, Jr.,
architect, 605 F street, N. W.
Wsalington, D. C.-Store.--Charles D.
l'owler, 512 F street N. W., as trustee,
will erect three one-story and liasement
store buildings on 7th street between P
and Q streets N. W. Electric wiring and
hxtures, sanitary pluinbing and heating
system will be installed. Burgess & Par-
sons, 627 F street, N. W.; Piper & Ken-
yon, 729 15th street N. W., and Samuel J.
Prescott Company, 700 13th street N. W.,


are estimating on construction; Appleton Wsahington, D. C.-Dwellings.-F. D.
P. Clark, Jr., architect, 005 F street N. W. McAuliffe, builder, 500 D street 8. E.,.will
Washington, D .C.-Dwellings. I. & A. erect five two-story brick dwellings at 1317
Herman, 2421 18th street N. W., will erect and 1327 1st street N. W., to cost about
two dwellings on 16th street between U $9,000.
and V streets N. W.; three stories; brick Washington, D. C.-Store Building.--O-
with Indiana limestone trimmings; tile car C. Nauck, 7th street and Floridp ave-
roof; electric wiring and fixtures; sanitary nue N. W., has awarded contract to W.
plumbing; heating systems. W. E. Speir C. Goodwin, 738 Steuben avenue N. W., for
Company, 1342 New York avenue N. W.; addition and general alterations to store
Burgess & Parsons, 627 F street N. W.; and office buildings at 7th street and
Win. T. Keenan, 1920 K street N. W.; Florida avenue N. W.
Piper & Kenyon, 729 15th street N. W.; Washington, D .C.-Dwellings.-George
John H. Nolan 1413 G street N. W., and S. Fraser, 1004 B street S. W., has awarded
Samuel J. Prescott Company, 700 13th contract to W. L. Turner, 41 Q street N.
street N. W., are estimating on construc- W., for the construction of three three-
tion; Appleton P. Clark, Jr., architect, 605 story brick dwellings with hot-water heat-
F street, N. W. ing systems at 1004-1008 B street N. W.,
Washington, D. C.-Store Building.-N. to cost about $10,000; Frank H. Jackson,
W. Burchell, 1325 F street N. W., has architect, 1419 G street N. W.
awarded contract to W. E. Speir Company, Wiheita Falls, Texas--chool Building.-
1342 New York avenue, for general remod- Town has voted affirmatively the 6,500
eling of three-story store building 28x114 bond issue for the erection of school build-
feet at 1325 F street N. W. Electric wiring ing. Address Town Clerk.
and fixtures will be installed; cost about Wilmington, N. C.-Store and Office
$15,000; Arthur B Heaton, architect, 1319 Building.-Joe Schad has contract to erect
F street N. W. store and office building for James T.
Washington, D. C.--Office Building.-T. Woolvin, for which Leitner & Wilkins, 410
A. Wickersham, Colorado Building, 14th Southern Building were mentioned June 28
and G streets N. W., has awarded contract as preparing plans; three stories, 22x110
it V l...t....a 191il H. fd1 ..32 4 NT fl tf- --- ---.__-* a. ....._L --


LU 11. 5. nr*LIIIUIU, 1 '1 LivLt .. W r., lor
the construction of office building at 1321
and 1323 G street N. W.; three stories,
47.7x100 feet; brick with stone trimmings;
structural iron and steel; electric wiring
and fixtures; sanitary plumbing; heating
system; cost about $15,000; Sample & Mar-
shall Company, architects, 919 Colorado
Building.
Washington, D. C.-Dwellings.-Thomas
H. Melton, builder, 19 T street N. W., will
erect six 21/ story concrete block dwell-
ings. Hot-water heating systems will be
installed; cost about $17,000.


Iee; orunary ulcostruclio; ueniUre jri o
Indiana limestone; plastered with wood
fiber; cost $12500.
Winona, Miss.-School Building.-City
will vote August 16 on a $10,000 bond issue
for the erection of high-school building.
Address The Mayor.
Winona, Miss.-Church.-Baptist con-
gregation is arranging for the erection of
a $15,000 edifice. Address The Pastor.
Albany, Ga.-Office Building and Ware-
house.-T .W. Smith & Co., Columbus, Ga.,
are preparing plans for office building and
warehouse to be erected by F. F. Putney;


TURPENTINE


OPERATORS!!!


We Have a Proposition in Cattle a.nd Pecans

THAT IS A MONEY MAKER.


Use your


Grazing Land


For Pasturing


Hereford

and

Short-horn



CATTLE.


;-.


Your



Garden

end

Farming Lands



For Raising



PECAN

TREES.


Write Marion Fa rms, ocala. Fla.


We'll be Glad to Explain.








THE WWiKLY INDUSTRIAL BUCORD. I


three stories, 86x210 feet, with frontage of
119 feet; pressed brick and granite; three
electric elevators.
Alexandria, La.-Hotel.-Architect has
not been engaged to prepare plans for four
or five-story brick hotel mentioned last
week to be erected by J. A. Bentley; fire-
proof construction; electric fixtures; cost
$150,000.
Areadia, Fla.-Store Building.-E. T.
Smith Hardware & Furniture Co. will erect
three-story brick building, 60x148 feet, to
cost $35,000. Electric elevators will be in-
stalled. Architect has not been selected.
Baltimore, M.-Warehouses.- Frederick
Bergner, Paca and Cross streets, will-erect
two four-sory brick warehouses, 50x60
feet, at 117 and 119 South Paea street.
Baltimore, Md.-Dwellings.-M. G. Lati-
mer, 809 Calvert Building, St. Paul and
S Fayette streets, has awarded contract to
Richmond H. Ford & Co., Equitable Build-
ing, Fayette and Calvert streets, for the
construction of 40 frame dwellings at Mt.
Washington to cost about $250,000; George
Clothier, Jr., archiect, Lobe Building, 15
bouth Gay street.
Charleston, W. Va.-Hotel Improve-
ments.-George 0. Taylor has let contract
for the erection of two additional stories
and other improvements to the Hotel Ruff-
ner. Two addi ional electric elevators
will be installed.
oHt Springs, Ark.-Chureh.-Bids will be
received until August 1 for edifice mention-
ed last week to be erected by the First
Presbyterian Church; 110x60 feet; brick
an stone; hot-air or steam heating plant;
electric and gas fixtures; cost $30,000. C.
L Thompson, Little Rock, Ark., prepared
the plans.
*Hot Springs, Ark.-School Building.-
Architect has not been selected to prepare
plans for high-school building mentioned
last week to be erected at a cost of $100,-
000; fire-proof construction; steam heat;
Dr. W. H. Connell, president school board.
Huntington, W. Va.-Church.-Raben-
stein & Warne, Charleston, W. Va., are
preparing plans for edifice to be erected by
Institutional Baptist Church; C. E. Wren,
pastor; 90x152 feet; reinforced concrete,
steam heat; gas and electric fixtures; cost
$1000,000 to $150,000.
Huntsville, Ala.-Cotton Warehouse. -
Farmers' Warehouse Co., of Madison coun-
ty, is receiving bids for the construction
of addition to warehouse.
Little Rock, Ark.-City Hall.-Stanton
& Collamore have contract to erect $20,000
city hall, previously reported.
Louisville, Ky.-Warehouse.-John Gri-
ner has contract to erect warehouse for the
Goodwin Preserving Co., mentioned last
week; fve stories, 120x00 feet; mill con-
struction; steam heat; electric fixtures;
power elevators; cost $30,000 Boiler and
engine-houses will also be built. Hutch-
ings & Hawes prepared the plans.
Memi.his, Tenn.-Business Building.-
S Dallas Emmons has contract to remodel
building at corner of North Main and
Madison streets: cost $15,000.
Memphis, Tenn.-Theater. Fairyland
Park Co. has secured control of the Ger-
mania Hall property and will expend $50,-
000 in improving as theater with a seat-
ing capacity of 1,200.
Memphis, fenn.-Dwelling.-R. F. Cre-
son has contract to erect two-story double
brick residence for S. C. Toof; cost $10,
000. James B .Cook prepared the plans.
Memphis, Tenn.-oHtel Improvements.-
Arrangements are being made for building
an annex to the Peabody Hotel.
New Orleans. La.-Skating Rink.-Board
of commissioners of the New Orleans City


Park Improvement Association is consider-
ing the erection of a $25,000 skating rink
on the City Park property.
New Orleans, La.-Ban kand Office
Building.-Bids will be opened July 30 for
building to be erected by the Canal Bank
& Trust Co. after plans by Diboll & Owen,
Ltd.; nine stories; low pressure steam
heat; electric fixtures; cost $300,000.
'Roanoke, Va.-School Building.-Shock-
ley & Field is correct title of firm having
contract for the erection of school building
mentioned last week; two stories, 50x94
feet; brick with slate roofffi steam heat;
cost $13,000.
ltowletts, Ky.-Bank Building.-A new
bank, organized with C. R. Bunnell, presi-
dent, will erect building.
Statham, -Ga.--School Building.-Town
will shortly begin the erection of a brick
school building, for which $8,000 of bonds
were recently voted. Address Town Clerk.
St. Matthews, S. C.-Hotel.-F. C. Cain
will rebuild hotel mentioned July 5 as
burned; building to be 130 feet front, con-
taining 30 hotel rooms and offices, five
stores, opera-house, etc.; ordinary con-
struction; steam heat; electric fixtures;
cost $25,000 to $30,000. C .C. Wilson pre-
pared the plans. Mr. Cain will have charge
of construction.
Waycross, Ga.-Hotel and Office Build-
ing.-H. J. Klutho, Jacksonville, Fla., has
l en commissioned to prealre plans for
hotel and office building mentioned June 21
to be erected by the Wayeross Hotel Co.,
at a cost of $100,000; four stories, to have
100 rooms and 50 offices, with astres on the
first floor; brick, stone and terra cotta; tile
roof; two elevators; tile floors; steam
heat, etc.
Wlimnigton, N. C.-Hotel.-Plan.s and
specifications will be prepared at once for
hotel to be elected by W. A. Dick and
associates.

FROM ALABAMA.

another Ridiculous Story of Peonage
Comes From Alabama.
The following dispatch, sent out from
Pensacola, is another story, evidently hav-
ing its origin in the wild minds' of the
German immigrants who arrived there:
Pensacola, July 24.-Peonage is charged
against the Jackson Lumlwr ('onpany, of
Iicklhart, Ala.. hy a numbnlr of (ernmlan
workmen who reached here today from
that place.
For several days past Americans and
foreigners of the common laboring class
have been arriving in Pensacola from
Lockhart and relating tales of terrible suf-
fering and hardship, starving and beating,
that had been undergone at the lumber
camps, but so weird were these stories
that for some time no credence was placed
in them, but singularly each party or man
reaching here would tell almost the same
story, and relate the same incidents. The
mIost coherent of these stories was made
by Henry Rodenbeck, an American. who in
an interview said that he had seen the
I)soses in the wosos hold the foreigners
across a log and with a buggy whip beat
thenm uncercifully. This would le done be-
cause they. had either attempted to run
aray or else did not do their work satis-
factorily.
Rodenbeck's Story.
I'Plenbeck's story is as follows:
"I was in New York about four months
ago, when I met a labor agent and Supt.
Gallagher of the Jackson Lumber Company.


of loKk'tart, Ala. They wanted me to 0
co m e south and work, and said that I could
make from $1.50 to $2.50 per day, and ass


JOHN N. C. STOCKTON,

REAL ESTATE, STOCKS AND BONDS.

'CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED


ROOM 4. UEDEMAN BUILDING.


JACKSONVILLE. FLA


4 *************^ ********* ttffe-l ni -sy- -


J. A. Craig Dl Bro.
0 239 W. BIy Street EVERETT BLOCK.

SLeaders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-
ing and Up-to-Date Furnishing.

Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.







WHERE FORTUNES


AWAIT DEVELOPMENT


Thousands of acres of choice lands for Commercial
Pecan Groves and Peach Orchards are found along the
lines of the

Sesboerd Air Line Railway,
Especially it Georgia and Florida.


IN -THE LAND OF THE MANATEE,
Where killing frosts never come, we can offer you a circum-
scribed area of the most desirable lands for Citrus Fruits, Pine-
apples and Vegetables.
OUR TERRITORY is also noted for its Strawberry-pro-
ducing soil, from which large quantities of this luscious fruit is
annually shipped in mid winter and early spring to northern and
eastern markets-a season when they command the highest mar-
ket price.
Special interest taken in locating companies and
individuals.
For information on all subjects pertaining to Industrial


Development, address
HENRY CURTIS
Ass't Gen'l Indl Agt.
Jacksonville, Fla.


J. W. WHITE
Gen't Industrial Agt
Portsmouth, Va.


- Standard Clothing Company !


One Price


* ,i' OneS Price


FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
17 and 19 West Bay Street, Jacksovll Fonda.
Stetson and Hawes Hats. Special Attention Given to Mail Orers.


,...oeuea I **i@i****** sum wise use


Sll ll ll aI ss s


J


I
q
q








a 2M WrYINiDUSTEIAL ZRUORD.


I was out of work and a trip south at
this time looked good, I accepted. There
were twenty-four others and we left New
York for Lockhart, and all had been told
the same thing. Well, we arrived at our
destination and when we were ready to
start at our work we were told that we
would be paid only $1 per day. We also
found that the work expected of us was a
different class than represented, but we
nad to take it. None of us had a cent,
and we were in debt to the company for
transportation, so we had to make the
best of it. In the camp the food was very
poor, and the men were compelled to sleep
in railroad cars which were thickly pop-
ulated with lice.
Americans Treated Well.
"But we Americans were treated as an-
gels compared with the poor foreigners.
There were perhaps ninety or one hun-
dred of them who had been brought down
from New York about a month ahead of
us. I don't know what they were told
they were going to receive, but I do know
one thing, that if they had been dogs they
could not have been treated more inhu-
manely. The poor fellows did not under-
stand English, and therefore were slow to
do as they were told, frequently misun-
derstanding and doing the wrong thing,
and then they would get a lashing. They
were compelled to eat at the second table,


him. He was astonished, and with the
men we~tuo the United States authorities
where their stories of inhuman treatment
were repeated and sworn o, with the result
that warrants were issued for several of
tile parties named by the men. The Ger-
mans also stated that several other par-
ties of foreigners had made their escape,
going in other directions, and that all had
been treated alike. It is probable that
there will be further developments in the
case within the next two or three days, as
United States officers will leave here to-
night or tomorrow morning for Lockhart
to serve the warrants and the parties will
be brought here to give bond. The war-
rants charge peonage.
A Timely Observation.
In referring to the above dispatch, the
Live Oak Democrat makes the timely ob-
servation that the owners of sawmills and
the captains of industry in the South are
not men who would resort to or even
countenance such treatment of men. Very
truthfully the Democrat remianks that
fabrications of that character are doing
he South a great damage.



Miami's Great Growth
(From the Miami Daily Metropolis.)


or rather to take what we" left. Our In the year 1896, the Florida East Coast
food was poor enough, and what we left Railway was completed from West Palm
was unfit for any person to eat, but the Beach to this city-a distance of 66 miles.
poor fellows were glad to get it. I have Miami had long had its place on the map;
seen the bosses in the dining room catch for years there had been a postoflice and a
one of the poor devils by the neck and general store kept by Mr. Wm. B. Brick-
jerk him away from the table because ell. Just north of the now city limits were
the half-starved man was eating ravenous- the places of Michael Oxer and Captain
ly or attempting to reach across the table Samuel Filer.
for something else to eat. I have seen The whole territory now embraced in the
the bosses in the woods take one of the city of Miami was a wilderness, with the
foreigners and strip him and while two of exception of the few acres cultivated by
them held him across a log a third would the parties named.
ply a heavy leather strap across his back. Where now stand the unique and thriv-
I have also seen them shoot at a negro be- i cit of Miami then was the favorite
cause he was running away from the ing y
a The because knew he camping grounds of the Seminole Indians.
camp. The negro rn because he knew he Here they came from the fastnesses of the
was going to get a beating for riding on Everglades to exchange furs, alligator
one of the company's trains without per- skins and plumes for the necessities of life.
mission. No one dared enter a complaint Here they held their annual green corn
or say anything of the food or treatment, dance, and caught fish in the blue spark-
One night directly after supper about two ing waters of th e Bay. To de-
weeks ago one of the men who did not like sribe the country in and about Miami as
the supper we had been served, walked sr n
out grumbling and talkbeen sv, i. wke ti appeared then, to paint a pen picture of
out grumbling and talking about it. He tis tropical wilderness is an impossibility.
was overheard by one of the bosses, who ths tropical wilderness is an impossibility.
as overheard by one of the bosses, who Much of it was an impenetrable tropical
knocked him down and then fred a couple n f n p d e r 1
knocked him down and then fired a couple jungle of giant live-oaks, hard wood trees,
of shots over his head. He, then, with re-
of sot over hi, mad.He the mn gt on his vines and shrubs, the surface of the ground
volver in hand, made the man get on his covered with huge boulders and i
was covered with huge boulders and in
knees in front of the entire camp and beg many places the solid rock came to the
n rr er or e a. many places the solid rock came to the
his pardon and retract every word he said. surface. A less desirable place, as it then
Guards Armed. appeared, could not be found for the build-
"Every boss goes well armed, carrying ing of a great city, that in a few years
revolvers with them constantly, and they would become a great commercial center
are of such a character that they do not and one of the most important deep water
hesitate to shoot. Law, why there is none. ports in all the Southland.
They do as they please. They take the Mr. Henry M. Flagler, the great East
law in their own hands. It is slavery of Coast developer, entered into a contract
the worst kind, and something should be with the late Mrs. Julia D. Tuttle and
done to release these poor foreign immi- Mr. William B. Brickell, for the laying
grants who are there. out of a city of no small proportions, grad-
"As for myself, I was treated fairly ing and paving of the streets and side-
well. I had sense enough to keep quiet, walks, putting in waterworks, sewerage
but the first opportunity I had after sav- and electric lights and building of the Ho-
ing up enough money from that dollar tel Royal Palm, one of the finest and most
a day I took a quiet sneak and made for pretentious hostelries of the East Coast
Pensacola." Hotel System. The expenditure of a mil-
This statement of Rodenbecks' was veri- lion or more dollars by Mr. Flagler was the
fled this morning when the Germans ar- signal for an advanced movement that has
rived. It is charged that they made their never ceased. Tradesmen and artisans
escape after a long run, and a chase by from all portions of the United States
dogs. They went direct to the German flocked here in great numbers; the old
vice-consul, and laid their complaint before orange belt, which suffered so greatly


from the freeze of 1894-95, was the great-
est contributor, and soon Miami became
a city of shacks and tents, and her name
went abroad as the Magic City, the one
place in Florida where carpenters and ma-
sons could obtain work at good wages.
From the first day Mr. Flagler commenced
operations until the present there has been
one constant round of prosperity. In
July, 1896, Miami held her first election,
which made her a city, with mayor, alder-
men and marshal.
Artist and artisan combined their skill
to make a city beautiful. Hundreds of
thousands pouring forth to wage-earner
and manufacturer for residences, business
houses and general improvements.
Looking forward, not as an inspired
prophet, for the mind is guided into the
future by material things planned by the
hands of man, we are astounded by the
magic development of the Magic City.
Nothing has ever exceeded, or even ap-
proached among people, the impetus re-
cently given to the public and private
enterprise in the one-time Indian village
that has grown so amazingly. To this un-
precedented awakening of the highest civic
spirit, embracing the commercial activity,
is ascribed the certainty that Miami will
eventually and soon be more pleasing to
the eye than any habitat of the many,
seek where you may, and that wonderful
as it now is, surpassing in grandeur and
the prodigality of her achievements, com-
pleted and in prospect, marvels are to come
that today the mind only faintly grasps,
because of the bewildering promise.
Within the past two years over a mil-
lion and a half dollars have been spent in
homes and in business blocks alone, and
each year more and more of the men who
have made thousands in the West and
North come here to build their homes, and
live where life is at its fullest. Rocky
wastes, upon which only a few years ago
were scattered the shanties of the Semi-
nole, are now made into gardens of Eden,
and covered with monuments to men fa-
miliar to the world for their wealth and
works.
For proof of this feature of the city's
physical advancement one has only to con-
sult the following facts collected from
official sources, brought together to demon-
strate one element of Miami's astounding
greatness.
Miami is not dependent upon the great
influx of tourists who visit here each year.
While this clasc contributes largely to the
prosperity of the city, yet her main de-
pendence as a commercial center is from
the products of the soil Miami is located
in the center of the greatest vegetable-
growing portion of the State, and later
will become the greatest fruit producing
section of the United tSates. Thousands of
acres of pine land have been transformed
from pine forests to thrifty citrus and
tropical orchards, many of which have
come into bearing, proving beyond a reas-
onable doubt that the Biscayne Bay coun-
try is now the greatest fruit producing
section of Florida. The products from
field and orchard alone will insure a com-
mercial center of great importance. Dur-
ing the past year there have been two
powerful dredges plowing their way from
the great terminal wharf to the ocean.
Before another year rolls around Miami
will be connected with the Atlantic ocean
by eighteen feet of water, which will insure
commercial communication with the out-
side world. Steamship lines from New
York, Baltimore, Boston and other north-
ern points will be established; also from
South American points The islands of


the sea through this channel will con-
tribute to Miami's greatness as a commer-
cial center. Add these to the already
splendidly equipped Florida East Coast
Railway, and our greatness as the chief
commercial city of the South Atlantic
Coast is assured.
Already Miami has three lines of ocean
steamers; one to Nassau, one to Havana
and one to Key West, and a schooner line
to New York. The Miami route to Ha-
vana, being the shortest and most direct,
has become popular with the traveling
public.
Miami had, at the end of the last fiscal
year, fro twelve to fifteen miles of paved
streets. These pavements are constructed
of the natural rock which abounds in this
section. The streets are equal in every
way to the best paving in large cities. In
fact, Miami is known throughout the
length and breadth of the land as having
the finest paved streets of any city in the
South. During the past year many new
streets have been paved and the work is
being carried on as fast as possible. Not
only does the city of Miami boast of hav-
ing the best paved streets in Florida, but
the work of extending the same class of
roads through the country has been and
is being carried on at a rapid pace. Going
north there is a splendid hard-surface road
to West Palm Beach, a distance of seven-
ty-eight miles. This is one of the favor-
ite drives, both for carriages and automo-
biles. Going South, the hard-surface road
leads to Homestead, a distance of 30 miles,
passing the thrifty villages of Cocoanut
Grove, Larkin, Cutler and Perrine. To
the West there are several hard surface
roads that lead to the great vegetable
fields. During the past year many addi-

tions have been made and within a few
years this portion of Dade County will be
a complete network of hard-surface roads.
Manufacturing lterests.
The manufacturing interests in Miami
are beginning to develop and the weekly
pay from these establishments is an im-
portant factor in the building of Miami
on a permanent basis. Ritty Brothers
have a thoroughly up-to-date machine shop
and foundry and make all kinds of iron
and brass castings, doing all kinds of work
that is done in shops of like character in
the North.
In granting the charter to B. B. Tatum
and associates for a street railawy, pro-
vision was made for the establishment of
a large cigar factory employing not less
than 100 hands. It is probable that this
factory will be put in operation within
the next year.
Perhaps one of the most important man-
ufacturing plants that have been estab-
lished here during the year is the Miami
Sponge Mattress and Pillow Company.
This is practically a new industry and
one that bids fair to assume colossal pro-
portions within the next few years.
There is a good opening here for a fur-
niture factory, manufacturing only high-
class goods. Our hammocks abound with
the different varieties of woods which are
susceptible of the highest finish, equal in
every way to the real mahogany. There
are also good openings for saw and pla-
ing mills, sugar mills, palmetto fibre fac-
tories and other industries, all of which
would receive a cordial reception from the
citizens of Miami.
Miami is a cosmopolitan city, its in-
habitants have been gathered from all
portions of the United States and they
extend a hearty and cordial welcome to
all, regardless of religious or political af-
filiations.








TUB WUNKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


MARCUS CONANT
Funeral Director and Embalmer, .i", v'.f's,"ri


Florida Life Insurance Company

Jacksonville, Fla.
Capital Stock One Million Dollars.

Strictly Old Line, Legal Reserve Life Insurance. This company invites

all forms of non-participating Life and Endowment Insurance.


Nothing Estimated But Everything Guaranteed.

Live Agents Wanted.
1 \~E~fss~sEm


School.
Miami has the largest public school on
the East Coast of Florida, the pupils num-
bering something over 500. The school
building is large and well ventilated, but
has proven too small to accommodate the
present enrollment. Last year a large ad-
dition was erected; but it has proven in-
adequate for the needs of the school. The
School Board has advertised for bids for
the building of another large addition to
the present building.
The Miami Conservatory of Music, un-
..er the direction of Prof. Franklin Cole-
man Bush, is one of the growing institu-
tionstions of our city. It has a full corps
of teachers, both in the instrumental and
vocal departments.
The Roman Catholics during the past
year have completed a large convent school
building on Eleventh street. The building
will accommodate fifty or more boarding
pupils. It is in charge of the Sisters of
St. Joseph. The structure is a very hand-
some one and is an ornament to the city.
There are several private schools in the
city.
Banking Facilitie.
There is no city in the United States
that can boast of better banking facili-
ties than the city of Miami. The first
banking institution opened here was the
Bank of Bay Biscayne, which opened for
business in 1806, with a capital of $25,000.
Later it was found necessary to increase
the capital, and another $25,000 was added.
Too much cannot be said in praise of the
management of this baqk and its liberal
policy, extended to its depositors and oth-
ers. It opened in the "formation period,"
while there was a great demand for cash,
and it met all the emergencies of this
period and has been a great factor in the
permanent building of the city and sur-
rounding country. William M. Brown or-
ganized the bank and was elected its first
president and has held that office con-
tinuously.
In 1902, The First National Bank was
organized and commenced business, erect-
ing a modern banking house at the corner
of Twelfth street and Avenue C, the build-
ing and fittings costing $18,500.
In the anme year the Fort Dallas Nat-
ional Bank was organized with Mr. William
M.. Brown as president, with a capital of
(Continued on page 11.)


PEC AN S
Analyze the wrd.

permanent Profits
Economy of care
Cerainty of results

Annual crops
Noa-perlsable product
Superior to all nut.

THE OPPORTUNITY Of TODAY.
The first to plant a peaen srove
will be tie first to reap a
great iarvest.

For full Information apply to
THE 6RIFFIN8 BROS. Co.
Jacksonvlle. Florida.
0


O~O~seMI~oOQOOeo~~ooooo~e..o ooooorJ*O+o


j. v.


VEST.
Presde I


1010 1. HAMMS
V. J, KEUY.
Vk.-poet~i


FLL RICEsOI
sw, Ties.
M I VIIIA
A.' smey Ti.To.


WEST FLYNN & HARRIS CO.
GENERAL OFFICES GERMA B".DO Sewanh O
WEST BLDG. JhaeauklMe. I.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
NAVAL STORnS RECEIVED AT SATVANAH, GA., JACKEO VIL
FLA., AXD rsDwAwDmNA, FLA.

Wholesaic Grocers also Deale in Hay. C ain nd Heavy
Harnes,

SOLE tAGENTS lar the Um U Twf Axe%
MORE EINs WlEHO CSESil. Phladilh V9ns
NBRCHANWS WAREHOUSES


SAVANNAH, GA.


WILLIAM A. gOURS


i4 Wt Day Stret,
JACKSONVILLE, LA.

The CLOTHIERS
EVERYTHING THAT IS GOOD AND
SMART IN WEARING APPAREL FOR
MEN AND BOYS.

Sam'I P. Holmes & Co.
Stks Bonds, Cotton,
Grain an Provisions.

NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE
CHICAGO BOARD Of TRADE
Direct private wires to all exchanges.
local stocks and bonds a specialty.
Be PhOm 85 Baldwil Block


JACKSONaVLL, FLA.


TAMPA, JLA


-JAMES 0. DANY


WILLIAM A. BOURS & COMPANY
TiC 4MlD1T ESTAMHy GrAMI fee OE U THiE STATd.

Hay, Grain, Feed, Garden


Seeds, Poultry Suples, F Iur,
Grits, Meal and fertilizers.
OUR MOTTO: Prempt Shipment, Re1alM Geeds.


Catdego rr.e


206 EAST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

-- *


TIMBER!


TIMBER!


TIMBER!


We buy and sell Turpentine Locations and Saw Mill Tracts, and sell for
others. Also deal in all kinds of Florida lands. Call on or address,


Phone 195'.


FLORIDA REALTY CO.
23 Main St..
JackeinvllUe, Fla.


No 2240


------------- food


i










T"U WuIrC JNDLUBTU RUCOOUD.


INDUSTRIAL RECORD
JAMIESA. OLLOMOE. demr-..Ce.
J. 0. LrONfTIsU "Ahse.ae Eridar.
A. H. MAILU 5weIeaoe MIa ger.
Psulea ed venr *aaurday.
Dms..m. 45 Per Amnnas
"The Psan asnd E Predaet."
Agl m9mm nLostimm M bS beadi mie
The Induatrial ILecrd Conpany.
Jachkmvlfle. r11.
Bramo E 4te dal as mlNabse seOffie a
savannaJh. Ga.
-atered at tbh PaoMle at Jacksoville. Fla..
as Meeomil a mmattr.
Adtd by the xuti Committee of
the M ti Op to' AModtio
eptembr 12, IMe, a its eluiv ofi-
cial arau. Adopted in amual convention
September 11 as th organ also of the ge-
Weal amseatiom.
Adopted April 2th, 1 a the ofMal
organ of the ltentat O~e Growers As-
oeation. Adopted September 11, 190, a
the only oi organ of the T. 0. A.
Commemed to limber people by special
relation adopted by the Gorgia Sswill
Assotion.
THEK iCORItS OIICUB.
The publth ptnt a the m aa a-
a of the Id trial Record Company
are located at the intereetion of Bay and
Newnan Streets, Jackonvlle, Fla., in the
very heart of the great turpentine and
yellow pie indutrie.
trade of the entire 8outh.
The Savannah, Ga, office i ia the Board
of Trade Buildi. Savannah is the lead-
ing open naval stores market in the world.
NOTICE TO PATRON&
All payments for adyartiuig in the i-
dustrial aeorS -ail sub pti thereto
must be mde direct to the hmes aile in
Jackaebmvle. A4 t an t allowed to
ake Beetim uair y eiaumeta a
Bil for Adverising besrptises ane
- t .. r e es, when Se,
and an remittanes mast b madi direet
to thie co e


A LESSON TO THE OPERATORS.
Those operators who have been seeking
foreign labor during the time that the
labor conditions in this section have be-
come almost intolerable, ought to stop
and reflect before they bring foreigners to
the South.
The Record does not desire to discour-
age immigration this way. To the con-
trary, we would like to lead in an effort
to bring the tide this way. But if we are
to have laborers, let us have the best that
there are, and by all means guard against
the probabilities of the immigrants bring-
ing the charges of peonage against us.
This peonage law has been greatly abused
in the South. It is the wall of protec-
tion for the irresponsible laborer who
seeks to beat the manufacturer out of
what belongs to him. It has been an ex-
cellent dodge and unless the employers
of labor are careful it can be used against
them to great expense. From our obser-
vations it takes but little for the charge
to be lodged. As was the case here a few
days ago, there was just the bare suppo-
sition that a manufacturer was detaining
men against their will and still he was
held to answer to the grand jury, the
court commissioner ruling that the case
ought to be investigated by a higher au-
thority.
In dealing with foreigners the manufac-
turers ought to bear in mind that they
are dealing with a class who are not fa-
miliar with our customs and whose nat-
ural timidity leads them to believe that
if they owe their employer they are being
held by him until the debt is paid. When
they have been here for a few weeks and


leamriusf' little of our laws and enough
to know that they cannot be held for debt
here as they can in their own countries,
they are bent in many cases on making
their way from the camp. This being the
case, it behooves those employing this
class of labor to exercise the greatest
care in order that they are not to be
caught and brought into the courts at
great expense, to say nothing of what
they may lose by advances to these men.

E. P. THAGARD TALKS ABOUT THE
NAVAL STORES SITUATION.
Among the visitors to Jacksonville this
week was Mr. E. P. Thagard, formerly
secretary of the Naval Stores Export Com-
pany, who came on business connected with
his varied interests throughout the State.
Mr. Thagard stated to a representative
of the Industrial Record that he was
stoutly of the opinion that there would
have to be something done by the ope-
rators throughout the naval stores belt
to protect themselves against some of the
interests which are bent on forcing the
prices down. In referring to the matter
he said:
"The question is up to the operators.
While I am frank to state that it will be
a difficult matter to get them together, I
believe that unless this is done the price
of spirits is to go tumbling down and
the operators will find that they will be
working at a loss. There is a serious
problem confronting the operators. They
have got to do something, and I hope
that at the coming meeting of the opera-
tors there will be a successful effort made
to get together and work together for
mutual good. Every day that the pres-
ent state of affairs is permitted to exist
the interests who are working to the det-
riment of the operators are gaining ground
and are becoming strongly entrenched.
"I believe that it will be harder to get
the operators together now. We will miss
the late H. A. McEachern, who was the
great power in the conventions of the ope-
rators. It was his voice which had the
greatest weight and he was a man in whom
the operators had a great deal of confi-
dence. There are others who are out of
the business now, who were great powers
in the convention and who worked hard.
To take the places of these men, I do not
see who we can secure. Of course men
rise to meet the conditions, and while I am
a little pessimistic in reference to the
matter, I do hope that the operators will
take the only view that ought to be taken
in the matter and get together They are
losing money every day that they stand
apart. After the coming convention, I
hope that an effort will be made which
will result in more activity on the part of
the Association. We certainly need it."
Others: who were seen this week in ref-
erence to the approaching convention,
stated that they were of the opinion that
it would mean a great deal to the indus-
try. Factors here appears to see relief
from the present conditions in sight. They
state that there is a good foundation upon
which to work and claim that the opera-
tors will profit by their past experiences
and work together even more closely than
they did in the past.
From all parts of the naval stores belt
come letters of encouragement in connec-
tion with the approaching convention. The
drop in spirits below the fifty-seven cents
mark has had the effect, it is believed, to
arouse the operators and to give them a
realization of what the situation is and
what prevailing conditions mean to them
in the event that there is nothing done to


relieve them.
There is every indication that the com-
ing convention will be largely attended
and that there will be representatives
from all parts of the South here.

Cotton Crop Report.
Tallahassee, July 27.-The Florida de-
partment of agriculture, from reports re-
ceived from the cotton belt counties, today
sums up the condition of the cotton crop
in Florida as follows:
The comparative condition at present is
77 per cent. Grass is still troublesome,
scarcity of labor is marked and the far-
mers are still behind in cultivation of
crop. The crop has barely' held its own.
If the weather continues unfavorable, the
crop will fall at least 10 per cent below
last year. If the crop holds its own with
favorable season, it cannot possibly exceed
that of last year. If the weather should
continue unfavorable until the 10th or 15th
of August, much of the crop will be ruined
beyond recovery, and the yield will be much
less than last year.

IMMENSE CYPRESS MILLS.

Will Be Established in Lafayette County
by Wilson Cypress Co.
Mayo, July 27.-Messrs. A. E. and Her-
bert Wilson, of the Wilson Cypress Com-
pany, of Palatka, together with Messrs.
Rust and Owen, their engineers, have been
here since Wednesday. They are survey-
ing the location of the site of their im-
mense cypress mill, with the intention of
commencing work on the actual building
within a short time. Their location will be
on Half Moon lake, near the site of the
Georgia-Florida Mill Company's mill.
Mayo and Lafayette county are glad to
welcome such people as the Wilsons to the
community, for their reputation as "good
people" has preceded them.
Mr. W. E. Anderson, who has been with
the Georgia-Florida Mill Company for a
number of years, has given up his position
with them and has gone to Brunswiek.

Miners' Scale Signed.
Wheeling, W. Va., July 27.-The joint
convention of the miners and operators
of the eastern district signed a scale today
for two years, and operation will be re-
sumed within a week, giving employment
to 8,000 men who have been idle for
months.

Railway Rate Law.
Washington, July 27.-Chairman Martin
A. Knopp, of the interstate commerce
commission, on behalf of the commission
has directed a letter to all the railroad
companies and corporations of the United
States, directing their special attention to
section 6 of the recently enacted railroad
freight rate law.

Railroad Wreck.
Springfield, Mo., July 27.-Thirty per-
sons were injured, two of them fatally, in
the partial wreck of a westbound St. Louis
and San Francisco passenger train last
night. One coach turned over. It con-
tained about thirty passengers and none
of them escaped unhur.t

ead-On Collision.
Johnstown, Pa., July 27.-Four persons
were probably fatally injured and more
than two-score others were more or less
seriously injured in a head-on collision of
trolley cars on the Windber line of the
Johnston Passenger railway tonight.


EARTRQUA BE LOSSES.

Peoies in Pheix Royal Company Nul
and VoM.
San Francisco, July 24.-The Phoenix
Royal Insurance Company, of Vienna,
which carried about $2 00,000 insurance in
this city has decided not to pay any loss
growing out of the conflagration of last
April, it was announced today. The com;
pany's policies carried an earthquake
clause. In a notice issued by the delegates
sent from the home office, it is claimed
that all claims which have eben filed
against this company by reason of the
earthquake are invalid as all policies of
the company, it is asserted, became null
and void by said earthquake.

Steamboat Inspection
Washington, July 24.-Regulations of the
steamboat inspection service have been
amended in some particulars, most of the
amendments being purely administrative.
The regulations just promulgated provide,
however, that the masters of passenger
barges shall have to take out hereafter a
license from the government. Another of
the regulations provides for the nue in
life-saving work of a life-saving shoulder
gun, which will throw a line about 800
feet. This is to be used in some instances
in place of the cannon.



WANTED
AND

FOR SALE


SFOR SALE.-A desirable turpentine lo-
cation on railroad; 18 crops of virgin and
yearling boxes and about 8,000 acres of
round timber; also one with 13 crops of
boxes and about 2,000 acres round timber
on line of G., F. & A. Address Ginola,
care Industrial Record. tf

FOR SALB-Good turpentine place for
sale in Georgia. Good healthy location.
Box 17, R. F. D. No. 2, Sylveter, Ga. tf

FOR SALE-Half interest in fine tur-
pentine location; 29 erops being worked;
42 crops round, guaranteed. Friet on
spirits to Jacksonville and Fernandina,
cents per cwt. Will make 700 barrels pir-
its this year. Address Box L, Baldwin,
Fla.


FOR SALE.-The finest turpentine place
in Georgia, located five miles south of
Quitman, in Brooks County, Ga., on the
South Georgia and West Coast Railroad.
Low freight rates, healthy location, labor
plentiful. Several thousand acres. Ad-
dress D. T. Clyatt, Quitman, Ga. 4t


HICKS' GAS MOTOR COMPANY

We are pleasd to amoume to ea
Southern trade that oa n e modern weds
at Wycro, Ga., for the manufacturing of
the Hik Patent Tandem Gas and Ga
line engines is mlAd and-a d in uriL
building Stationry, ptm*e ad Maoid
Engines, from t to H. P, also GC
Producers, Pumps g n is Mdr
Street OCars. While the bicks Engine ae
far superior to the ol gle cylinder en-
ginse, our price are no igher.
Send for catalogues and lit posted.
Agents wanted.

ICKF GA M00TR COMPANY,
Works: Waw0s, GaL; Pwr#4t, Na.


I









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL EBCORD. 11



THE CHRISTIE-GROOVER DRUm 00


WHOLESALE
MI-k O- Ma60a01 10011 AT6 AM M110 .


DRU0GISTS.
&#A&wAr urV VL


(Continued from page 9.)
$100,000. In 1904 they completed the fin-
est banking house in the South at a cost
of $49,707.96. The building is located at
the corner of Twelfth street and Avenue
D. The individual deposits in these banks,
which are subject to check or draft, are
as follows:
Bank of Bay Biscayne .......... $340,000
First National ........... ..... 500,000
Fort Dallas ................... 566,468

Total .................... $1,406,94
S When it is taken itno consideration that
ten years ago this whole country was a
wilderness, it is an astounding fact that
such an amount of money is on deposit and
subjet tcd draft or check at any time.
Two'years ago when we made our annual
report there was a total amount of depos-
its in the three banks of $681,791.16, mak-
ing the increase in deposits during the
past two years the enormous sum of $726,-
154.84. This shows an extraordinary
healthful state of the financial condition
of the city and surrounding country.

Paper Maker Strike.
Buffalo. N. Y., July 24.-Papermakers
in the thirty-three mills of the Internat-
ional Paper Company in the United States
and Canada, have given notice that will
go on strike on August 6, unless their
working hours are reduced to 8 hours per
day. The paper makers' union will hold a
meeting in New York on Monday to form
a plan of action. The International Paper
Company has been preparing for such a
situation.

Filipino Labor.
Manila, July. 24.-The Phillippine com-
mission has adopted a resolution favoring
tne scheme of the Hawaiian planters' asso-
ciation to transport Filipino laborers and
their families to Hawaii to work in the
sugar plantations. The commission has
authorized an agreement with the planters
on condition that the laborers be given
good treatment.


The labor problem is a serious one, and
is being felt in all parts of the country,
and this is especially true in regard to
domestic help. In Wauchula it is almost
impossible to get domestic help and the
family washing has become a serious prob-
lem. A good many people believe that
this hardship is especially felt in Wan-
chula because negroes are not allowed to
live here. We doubt if they would help
matters much. A gentleman recently told
us that one reason that one reason that
prompted him to move from Wauchula to
Bowling Green was because there were ne-
groes there, but in this he was fooled, as
the negroes wgre so indolent that he had
to depend on white field labor, and a white
woman is doing his washing.-Wauchula
Advocate.

TOLD HIS STORY IN NEW YORK.

L.ahr Agent iWha Ro t Me WeT. Arrm.t-


REMOVAL OF DISABILITIES.
In the Circuit Court, Duval County, Flor-
ida. In Chancery.
In re Petition for Removal of Disabilities
of Lizzette G. Robinson.
This cause coming on to be heard upon
the report of the special master, and he
having submitted the same, and it ap-
pearing to the Court, from said report,
that the said Lizzette G. Robinson is a
married woman over the age of 21 years,
and a resident of Duval County, Florida,
and that she is capable and is competent
and qualified to take charge of and manage
her own estate and property and to be-
come a free dealer.
It is therefore ordered, adjudged and de-
creed by the Court, that the said Lizzette
G. Robinson be. and she is hereby granted
a license to take charge of and control
and manage her own estate and property,
and to become a free dealer in every re-
spect. To sue and be sued, and to bind
herself in all respects as fully as if she
were unmarried.
Done and ordered this 13th day of June,
A.D. 1906.


6-16-5t


R. M CALL,
Judge.


Cay & McCall

Losolidated Building. Phone 1955.

keeping of a human being in a condition
of practical slavery, because of alleged
debt. The accused is S. H. Schwartz, who

conducts an employment agency here, and
it is charged that he was responsible for
the peonage of Benjamin Wilenski, a Rus-
sian, 50 years old.
The tale told by Wilenski is one of
alleged hardship and cruelty in the tur-
pentine camps of Florida, where, guarded
by giant negroes, he says he was forced
to work knee deep in stagnant water,
beaten and half starved and finally de-
prived of all his earnings.
All of this the employment agent denied
so far as he is concerned, claiming that
his responsibility ended with his employ-
ment of the men and their shipment to
Florida.
When arraigned Schwartz produced
three orders for 150 men. The orders were
written on the letterheads of "The Italian-
American Agricultural Association," of
Fifth avenue. The orders called Italian
and German men, and promised wages of
$1.40 and $1.50 per day, payable fortnight-
ly, for work in lumber camps. The order
blanks of Schwartz give Bishop Bonaven-
ture F. Broderick, of Staatsburg-on-the-
Hudson, as the employer.
Schwartz was held in $3,000 bail for
further examination.

ALLEGED PEONAGE.


H. E. PRITCHETT, Press. P. L SUTHERLAND, Viea-Pre. A. D. OOVINGTON, See'y.
J. P. COUNCIL, Treas and Genl Mgr.

THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.,
General Offices: JACKSOWVILIE, FLA.
Factory: WANNANISH, N. C.

mamoaw-ram 0f High Orad Tee r
I NMawvl amsM *epowevm.


I,.'. 5533W55650551111511111 uuuuui*** uiii iiiIi.i
W. W. CaeM, Pre. W. C. Thomas, Manager. N. S. Camo, SeA. a Tress


Tampa Hardware Co.


Wholesale

Hardware

Turpentine. Mill and Phosphate Supplies.


TAMPA. FLORIDA.
SLeso lo 1 1 also **I* I Is so]**8 11 ***** **


B. B. TATUM, Pres.


J. L. WALLACE, Vice-Pre. H. G. STONE, Secy-Treas


Keeley Institute,


Ino.er ated U28.60 Catal Stek.
A branch of the original Leslie E. Keeley Institute of Dwight, II., has just be.m
opened tt coiner of Park and Stockton Streets in Riverside, where a splendid
building, equipped with all the comforts and conveniences of a modern home or
sanitarium has been secured and is ready for the reception of patients ia need of
treatment for-
WHISKEY, OPIUM, MORPHIHE, COCAINE, TOBACCO OR CIGARETTE HAITS.
Write for full information as to tret ment, term, ete.

REELEY INSTITUTE OF FLORIDA.


Telephone No. xs53.


Jacmemnas, Fl.


*U '1161111d 'NOS 1V 1AV '01 *5
www ;uJo; WwpAL *.4psri
peuss a~n eue wq vu ae8 7urnldwoo
V .4loqj. pun 'Wo '.o-I--l4 oepuox
-LMi t jqppq zo5 sidL(D Zuv'ipq
moq &r ea z nEriuso u p zs~ruD u
JeAOJMo psqmL1uwuO~qu~xnp wsuipuu
i3.sokw sp utu lmq sq. aq 0 4uDaozd
usq .Awq s9MJt ZOo uosipuo4 3 Bkq
"megap p"un prw esti soxs in PA


3OIA3S 80] INVI 3 Hl


F. Marion Preetwood Acquitted After Trial


in United States Court.
Montgomery, July 27.-F. Marion Prest-
wodl, of Coffee County, today was acquit-
ted after a trial in the United States dis-
trict court on the charge of peonage. He
was accused of keeping Bob English, a


ed in New York. wnite man and his son, Wiley, at work for
ed in New York.
him against their will to force them to
New York. July 27.-For the first time a t tr wl
work out a claim of $50 he had against
in h's long experience, United States Com-
missioner Shields was called on today to them for the alleged burning of part of
pass upon the crime of peonage, or the his turpentine woods.


SJ. P. WuLLLm, President.
T. A. JUrmais. 2nd Vice-President.
H. L. KAYTon, Secretary.


J. A. G. CAmon, 1st Vice-Preident
J. F. DusiNunYv 3d Vice-Preddent
H. F. E. Scaersa, Treasurer.


J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

UIII IIE 10 T FICM W EHLES NOlU. E
Main Office SrJVAn NM, OKOgrmen.
*ranch orffiree. Jc VI, FLm COLU MrU O7.

Naval Stores Producers are lavited to Correspod With Is.
a i all al it a llliii I aII III II i ai II milll ll l lllllai


11 1 1111 1 111 1 1 IIIII I LI Z111111111 1091111111


,~, ...








12 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



Jacksonville Grocery Comp'y

W6 J. Who le oerso- o and DIstiller' supplies.
Aams. m e ntis aned WaserswhoDo s A tme A. 0. L. By. -#A-Now as, oari.s


A. W. BARRS, Real Estate and
16 THoan Street. Insurance.

CITY PROPERTY A SPECIALTY.


TO ERADICATE A MINING EVIL.
For the protection of the minig inves-
tors of the United States, the American
Mining Congress has established a bureau
or inquiry, through which information can
be obtained as to the condition of the prop-
erty and the standing of the company that
has asked or is asking for the money of
the investor.
The American Mining Congress is a nat-
ional organization of mining men, the di-
rectors of which are men of the highest
standing in their own states,.whose only
interest is the up-lifting of the mining in-
dustry. To this end, and among other
things, the organization is working for the
creation of a department of Mines and
Mining as a separate department of the
national government, and for the enact-
ment of laws in the various states making
the concealment or misrepresentation of
nay material fact concerning a mine upon
which a fraudulent sale of stock is predi-
cated a criminal offense.
In order that its Board of Directors
may be kept in touch with the general
sentiment of the mining world an annual
session is held to which delegates are sent
by the President of the United States,
the mayors of cities, and the commercial
bodies of America. At its permanent
headquarters at Denver, Colorado, under
the direction of its secretary a regular
force is constantly employed in carrying
on its work, no small part of which will
be the protection of investors against
mining frauds, to the end that mining
may be placed more and more on an in-
vestment rather than a speculative basis.
This Bureau of Inquiry will be abso-
lutely impartial in its findings, its sole
purpose being to prevent ill-advised mining
investments and to save the West from
the disgrace which follows dishonest min-
ing promotion.
In order to thoroughly eradicate fake
promotion, the American Mining Congress
is pledged to give to inquiring members
information absolutely unbiased, collected
from unprejudiced sources, largely its own
trusted correspondents, and to have but
one nend in view-the protection of the
investor, its belief being that every dollar
improperly invested is a damage to all
legitimate mining, and that the highest
good of the mining industry may be serv-
ed by warning investors against improper
investments and furnishing such informa-
tion as will guide them into channels which
give promise of success.


GEORGIA SOUTHERN & FLORIDA RY.
INTERCHANGEABLE MILEAGE.
Effective July 15th, 1906, the Georgia
Southern & Florida Railway will issue and
accept two forms of interchangeable mile-
age. One ticket of 1,000 miles, to be sold
at rate of $25.00, will be good over the
Georgia Southern & Florida Railway, At-
lantic Coast Line, Atlanta, Birmingham
and Atlantic R. R., Central of Georgia Ry.,
Georgia B. R., Louisville & Nashville R.


R., Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Ry.,
Seaboard Air Line, Western & Atlantic
R. R., West Point Route and other lines.
Another ticket of 1,000 miles, to be sold
at rate of $25.00, will be good over the
Georgia Southern & Florida Ry., Central
of Georgia Ry., Southern Ry., Alabama
Great Southern By., Cincinnati, New Or-
leans & Texas Pacific Ry., Northern Ala-
bama Ry., Blue Ridge Ry., and other lines.
It will be seen that the two interchange-
able mileage tickets to be sold by the
Georgia Southern & Florida Ry. embrace
all of the important lines in the South,
and that with the neormous mileage cov-
ered by them, a passenger could reach prac-
tically every town of any size south of
the Ohio and Potomac and east of the Mis-
sissippi Rivers.
Interchangeable tickets, sold by any of
the lines above mentioned, will be good
over the Georgia Southern & Florida Ry.,
regardless of the date on which they are
sold, provided, the limit of the ticket has
not expired.
Mileage tickets sold by the Georgia
Southern & Florida Ry. prior to July 15th,
1906, are not interchangeable, and will not
be good on any other line.
The New Interchangeable Tickets will be
on sale at al regular stations on the Geor-
gia Southern & Florida Ry., commencing
with July 15th, 1906.
Purchasers of mileage tickets will find
it to their advantage to secure their tick-
ets from the agents of the Georgia South-
ern & Florida Ry.


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR DIS-
CHARGE.
On October 2, 1906, the undersigned will
make final returns of his accounts as ad-
ministrator of the estate of Henry C.
Strawn, and apply to the County Judge of
Duval County, Florida, at his office, for the
approval of same, and a discharge as such
administrator.
ARTHUR F. PERRY,
As Administrator of the Estate of Henry
C. Strawn, deceased.


WHISKIES

GINS AND RUMS


FROM


$1.50 $5.00 per Gallon
......AGENCY FOR ......
Lewis 1866 and Mount Vernon
Pure Rye Whiskies.
controllerss Blum's Monogram and Syl-
van Rye-Agents for Jungst Cincin-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.

CHAS. BLUM & CO.
17 nmid 519 WEST BAY STREET
JACESONVILLE FLA.


DIAMONDS AND WATCHES

We simply ak a cell. We can shw yw, t correct *ad mey
saving prices, many papers ot leese pre white, perfect
DIAMONDS. It Is ear desire te cetlnee being the largest
Diamond dealers in Jacksonville, and ear specialty Is flte reed-
cat gems and high-grade Waltham and Elgi Watches.

Diamoinds, Watches, Jewelry.
HESS SLAGER -13 % St., 33 l s. .AM mnifFes .I



M. A. Baker,
IMNVNTOM AND MANUFACTURER OF THE

Baker Improved

Seamless Turpen

tine Stills.
Write me for prices and eautf
F. 0. B. any point In Georgia. Flor-
ida. Alabama or Mississippi. All
stills sold under a guarantee.
JOB WORK
Thrsh thes Camty a Specdly.
The Largest and Oldest Copper i ,
Works in Gor. Brunswick, Ga.
OW My specialty is large worms and heavy bottom that do not leak.


Lombard Iron Works
and Supply Company
BUILDERS AND DEALERS IN


ENGINES. BOILERS.
Cotton, Saw, Frtilisr, Oil and lee a
ehinery, and Suppliim and Repairs
Capacity for 200 Hands.
Machine Tools, Wood-Working Machinery,
Shafting, Pulleys, Hanges, Ither ao
Rubber Belting and Hoae, Railroad and
Mill Supplies and Tools.
Plans and estimates furnished for Power
Plants and Steel Bridges.
Steam Pumps. Feed Water Heaters and
Hoisting Engines.
AVGVSTA. GEOILGIA.


oD Rulty al Ilmep t Co.

Large or small tracts of timber
lands, also cut over lands, suitable
for colonies, stock-raising and
game preserves in Florida and
Georgia.
Also Suburban Lots in Deen-
wood and some choice city lots in
Waycross. Write us for full par-
ticulars and information.

ha 1"fml *a Irme-ut kC


WAYCROSS. QA.


JOSEPH ZAPF & CO,


nOW'S TiIS ?
A fine 17 jewel adjusted ELGIN or Wal-
tham movement in a gold-lled, open face
case guaranteed for twenty years at $15,
orl5jewelsat tl. I willsend these watches
anywhere C. 0. D. subject to examination,
Dont suit. don't pay a cent.
E. W. IAmIS P. 9. .i k1. JACKSUIV L.. KA.-


NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR FINAL
DISCHARGE.
Notice is hereby given that the under-
signed, six months after date hereof, will
make final return of his accounts as Ad-
ministrator of the estate of John M. Flem-
ing, and apply to the County Judge of
Duval County, Florida, at his office, for
approval of same, and a discharge as such
Administrator. This 9th day of June, 19061
W. P. SMITH,
As Administrator of the estate of John
hM. Fleming, deceased.


Wholesale Dealers in and Bottles c


ANHEUSER.-BUSCH

St. Louis Lager Beer


Wholeile


Liquors, WiNe NMlnrl Waters

Write for Prices


AP=


I






THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 18


fw'--- -- - -- -- -3- --t-
W. W. ASHBURN, Moultrie, Ga. N. EMANUEL, Brunswick, Ga.
W. R. BOWEN, Fitzgerald, Ga. D. T. FURSE Savannah, Ga.
J. J. DOBMINY, Broxtom, B. G. KIRKLAND, Nichols, Ga.
O. T. McINTOSH, Savannah, Ga.

SSouthern States Naval Stores Co,
Savannah. Ga.
Factors and Commission Merchants
Ship to Savannah Get Competition Highest Prices Promptest Returns
|Correspond With Us


C C Be DRVGS. 53 d55 IET BAY.
C. C. B l3ettes, 20 t 26 SOUTH LAURA
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Mail Order Drug Store. Supplies Everything a Drug Store
Ever Kept. Write to Us.


TY- OLS-DT WHUKRY HOUaB aI
G8OIGIA. (=-utea-a-ed In las.)
OLD SHARP WILLIAMS-Pure Fine Old
Rye. B- the gallon Mt.W; four full quarts
8.k0, edev prepaid.
GEO. J. COLBEAN-Pure Pennsylvania
Rye; Rich and Mellow. By the gallon
St.7S; four full quarts $.W0, express prepaid.
ANVIL RTY-Pure Bubstantial Family
Whiskey. By the gallon a.50; four full
quarts 32.10. express prepaid.
CLIFFORD RYE-By the gallon $2.5;
four full quarts [2.6, express prepaid.
OLD KENTUCKY CORN-Direct from
Bonded Warehouse; fine and old. By the
gallon t.00; four full quarts .M5 express
prepaLd.
OLD POINTER CLUB CORN Rich
and Mellow. By the gallon 2.50; four full
quarts P.20, express prepaid.
We andle all the leading brands of Rye and Bourbon Whiskies In the market
and will save you from I to M per cent on your purchases. Send for price list and
eatmahe. Maled tree upon appeiation.
The Altmayer Qa Flatau Liquor Company
MACON. GEORGIA.


THE ARAGON
JACKaOMVILLu IA.
NOW OPEN
aly eUnder new management. Thoronghl
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
eluding new electric elevator and our
oown teotru light plant.
H. N. O'NEAL. Prop.




The M etropolls


Is the Paper you want. It is
published daily and is from 12
to 16 hours ahead of any other
daily newspaper in Florida .


$5.00 a Year $2.50 Six Months

Full Telegraphic and Stock
reports. If you want to keep
posted on the news, get the
Metropolis.

CARTER & RUSSELL PUB. CO.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
Cmm


The Cooperage


Company


Manufacturers of High Grade

Western White Oak Spirit Barrels


Capital $200,000.


JACKSONVILLE,


FLA.


Orders sent direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.
We are now prepared to furnish barrels from six shops advantageously located.


OPPICERS:


J. C. LITTLE, President.
E. H. MOTE, General Manager.


JOHN E. HARRIS, Vice-President.
C. H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasurer.


J. C. LITTLE,


JOHN E. HARRIS,
W. C. POWELL,


DIRECTORS:
C. H. BARNES,
W. F. COACHMAN.


J. W. WEST,
*E. H. MOTE.


W. J. KELLY


*Fhwlia


MIIII~Ih~MM~~-i~~YI~CU~II1~,h~hhMft__--_~~ -h~~


M~-~h~MIIMIIIY~M'CI~h~Mlllh-~Y~ -"----------h~-









14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.




Success for Our Customers


Is Success for Us.


COVINGTON


COMPANY,


SHOES. DRY GOODS, Wholesale
NOTIONS ....O

JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA.


A drop of one-fourth of a cent in spirits
on Thursday at Savannah was the feature
of the market for naval stores for the
week. On the same day here the market
registered the same old figure of 57 cents,
the Naval Stores Export Company buying
at that figure and holding the price up for
the day, despite the fact that the early
reports from Savannah on Thursday were


th


and determined to hold prices up.
As to rosins, there was a sharp incli-
nation to advance, until Friday of this
week, when there came a slight reaction.
Friday the Savannah market led Jackson-
ville for nearly all of the grades by a con-
siderable margin, though for the week
Jacksonville had been slightly ahead of
Savannah. The fact that there have been


COMPARATIVE MARKET REPORTS.

A feature of the comparison of lhe market reports of Jacksonville and
Savannah is that on Thursday the Savannah market on spirits dropped to
56% while Jacksonville still held to 57. The following day the Jacksonville
market was one-eighth of a cent ahead of Savannah.

SPIRITS OF TURPENTINE FOR THE WEEK HERE AND AT SAVANNAH.
Price. Sales Shipments Reeeipts Stocks
Jax. Sav. Jax. Say. Jax. Say. Jax. Say. Jax. Say.
Saturday ...... 57 57 518 17 1,611 4,232 573 891 5,777
Monday ........ 57 57 867 87 1,963 3551,242 921 4,75
Tuesday ........57 57 498 959 635 13 1,00 1.374 4,213
Wednesday .... 57 57 1 599 503 500 O 655 1,1021 4,585
Thursday ...... 57 56% 761 642 950 47 731 525 4,736
Friday ......... 56/s 56%1 556 1,314 975 241 701| 1,136 4,517
ROSIN FOR THE WEEK HERE AND AT SAVANNAH.
Saturday Monday Tuesday. Wednesday Thursday Friday


Jax. Say. Jax. Say. Jax. Sav. Jax.
WW ......5.10 5.005.10 5.105.10 5.105.00
WG .......4.90 5.004.90 4.904.90 5.004.95
N ......... 4.80 4.804.80 4.804.80 4.854.90
M ......... 4.70 4.704.70 4.704.70 4.754.80
K .........4.55 4.554.55 4.554.55 4.004.60
I .......... 4.35 4.304.40 4.354.40 4.354.40
H ......... 4.30 4.254.35 4.304.35 4.304.35
G ......... 4.25 4.204.30 4.254.30 4.304.30
F .......... 4.20 4.154.25 4.204.25 4.204.25
E ......... 4.15 4.104.15 4.154.15 4.154.20
D ........ 4.00 4.0014.00 4.054.00 4.074.05
CBA ......3.80 3.8 3.80 3.803.80 3.903.85


Say. Jax.
5.00
4.95
4.90
4.80
4.60
4.40
4.35
4.30
4.25
4.20
4.05
3.85


Sav. Jax.
5.105.00
5.05 4.95
4.904.85
4.804.77
4.604.57
4.404.25
4.354.20
4.304.15
4.254.10
4.204.05
4.053.90
3.853.70


REPORT OF ROSIN MOVEMENT HERE AND AT SAVANNAH.

Sales. Shipments. Receipts. Stocks.
Jax. Say. Jax. Say. Jax. Say. Jax. Sav.
Saturday ................ l,774 1,7951,130 3,7351,671 2,405155,947 62,212
Monday .................. 2,665 1,8931 582 2,637,055 1,00956,488 62,4
Tuesday ................. 1,223 2,133 152 2,0181,744 1,374158.961 65,650
Wednesday ............... 1,950 3,325 400 3501,621 229660,553 67,50W
Thursday .............. ..... 0 2,497 580 4,9491,429 2,973161.674 65,620
Friday .................... 1230 2,3621,142 33511,777 2,917162,523 68.2f02



at the market had dropped. Thle fol- two steamers loading at Fernandina and


lowing day there was a decline of one-
eighth of a cent here, with was one-eighth
of a cent above the Savannah market.
A general discussion of the conditions
this week led to the general opinion that
there was to be a further decline in the
price of spirits and that they would fall
until the operators again got together


that they have drawn heavily on Jackson-
ville for their cargoes led to the prices
remaining good here for the week.
There is a general opinion in trading
circles that rosin is to decline and that
it will follow spirits in this respect to a
limited degree at least.


Naval Stores for the Week.


IT MOVES WHEN YOU DO.


THE STATE FAIR.
The State Fair, which is to be held at
Tampa November 14th to 29th, will eclipse
in every feature the Fair of last year,
which proved superior to any State Fair
ever held in the South. President Brown,
in order to place all counties on an equal
basis as regards exhibits and awards, has
decided upon this excellent plan: The
State will be divided into four divisions-
West Florida. East Florida, Middle Flor-
ida and South Florida. The counties in
these sections will compete among them-
selves for the honor of becoming the ban-
ner county of their respective sections, for
which a handsome banner and a cash prize
of $500 will be given the winner. The four
winners will compete for the grand prize of
$1.000, and the winner will be designated
as the banner county of the State. This
plan is necessary by reason of the fact
that the vast area of Florida makes the
products so diversified that a county in
one section cannot well compete with a
county in another section. The counties
will be divided as follows::
West Florida-Escambia. Santa Rosa,
Walton. Holmes, Jackson, Washington,
('alhoun, Liberty. Franklin, Gadsden, Wa-
kulla. Leon, Jefferson, Madison, Taylor,
Hamilton, Suwannee, Lafayette, Columbia,
Baker. Middle Florida-Nassau. Duval.
(lay, Bradford, Alachua, Levy, Putnam,
Marion. Dade, Sumter. Citrus. East Flor-
ida-St. Johns, Brevard. St. Lucie, Dade,
Monroe. South Florida--Le;, DeSoto, Man-
atee, Polk Hernando, Pasco, Hillsborough,
Osceola, Orange.

NEARING COMPLETION.

The First American Built Vessel for Bue-
nos Ayrev, South America.
The Merrill-Stevens Shipbuilding COm-
pany will soon bear the distinction of
turning out the first American built boat
to be used in the harbor of Buenos Ayres,
Argentine Republic, South America.
This vessel, the Jose Padre, is nearing
completion in the shipyards. Her boilers
have been installed and the electric wiring
is now being completed.
It was announced yesterday that the
work on the Jose Padre would be com-
pleted in two weeks and she would be
ready to proceed to her foreign home
port. This vessel is being built for Wil-
liam E. Peck & Co.. of New York and
will be used in the cattle trade.
The Jose l'adre, when completed, will be
a first-class. sea-going steamer in every
particular. She is well constructed, has a
steel hull and every convenience known
to the maritime %world.


BOYD'S PORTABLE FIREPLACE.
Manufactured by Boyd & Presley, Vald-
ta, Ga. Shipping Points: Boyd & Prs-
ley, Valdosta, Ga., and Palatka, Fla.;
Marion Hardware Co., Orala, Fla.; 8aum-
ders Mill Company, Pensacola, Fla.




Coons & Golder

Turpentine Operators on


Pipe, Boilers and Pumps

EqWirt Mila Mn Mn
22 W. Adms Street JcksMuie, I
Phas 1147



WM. D. JONES

P3SCMIPTIOM SPECIALIST

...Rj...

FAMILY DRUGGIST
107 E. BAY ST.

'pa aIO sjaprO I!*J








THE WIWKLY INDUSTRIAL BROORD. U


JOSEPH D. WEED.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. KRENSON.


J. D. WEED I CO.,
SAVANNAH. GEOROGA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF

Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Etc.


Turpentine


Cups
If you expect to use the HERTY cup
next season, place your orders now for
future delivery. Prices sad all informa-
tion cheerfully furnished on
Cups. Gutters
end el. Tools
Sued in the Herty system of turpentinina

Chattanooga Pottery
.. . Company,
J*ecks vk, Florida.




Standard Naval Stores Co., J
JACKSONVILLE I


EXPORTERS

CARGO LOTS A SPECIALTY



Standard Naval Stores Co. JACKSONVILLE I


Atlantic Coast Line

Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Virginia, North
Carolina and South Carolina.
THE GREAT HIGHWAY OF TRAVEL FROM

Florida-East, West, North and South.
STO THE KAST, THE FAMOUS
FierWa aud West Indian Umited and New York Express.

Mentgomery Route and "Dixie
To the W est Flyer" via Atlanta.
PULLMAN CARS AND THROUGH COACHES ON ALL TRAINS.
Atlantic Coast Line Mileage Books, good to all points, via. all trains as far
East as Washington, and as far West as St. Louis, Cincinnati and New (rlean-,
rates $25.00.
CONSULT THE PURPLE FOLDER.
For detailed and full information regarding rates, Pullman reservations, schedules.
Call on your nearest ticket agent or write
FRANK C. BOYLSTON, W. D. STARK,


District Pas. Agent.
Jacksovile, Fla.
W. J. CRAIG, Traf. Manager.
Genral Offices, Wilmingto, C.


Trav. Pass. Agent.


T. C. WHITE, Geal Pass. Agent.


Clyde Steamship Company


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
The magnienat steamsips of this line are appointed to sil as follows, ealling at
Charleton, a a, botih wa^*


e a mew ur, .
(Per North River.) -


Tuesday,
Wednesday,
Friday,
Saturday,
Tuesday,
Friday,
Saturday,
Tuesday,
Wednesday,
Friday,
Saturday,
Tuesday,
Wednesday,
Friday,
Saturday,
Tuesday,
Wednesday,
Friday,
Saturday,
Tuesday,
Wednesday,
Friday,
Saturday,
Tuesday,
Wednesday,
Friday,


Frum Jachmerill far
8TAM C et and New York.


July 17, at 3:00pm.... .COMANCHE.... Sunday July 22, at 10:00am
July 18, at 3:00pm..... ALGONQUN .... Monday, July 23, at 10:00am
July 20, at 3:00pm...... .APACHE....... Wednesday, July 25, at 10:0tam
July 21, at 3:00pm..... *NAVAHOE .....Friday, July 27, at 10:00tm
July 24, at 3:00pm ..... ARAPAHOE .....Sunday, July 29, at 10:00am
July 27, at 3:00pm..... COMANCUE..... Wednesday, Aug. 1, at 10:00am
July 28, at 3:00pm ..... ALGONQUIN ... Friday, Aug. 3, at 10:00am
July 31, at 3:00pm.......APACHE....... Sunday, Aug. 5,at 10:00am
Aug. at3:00pm......IROQUOIS.....Monday, Aug. 6,at 10:00am
Aug. 3, at 3:00pm..... ARAPAHOE ..... Wednesday, Aug. 8,at10:00am
Aug. 4, at 3:00pm..... *NAVAHOE ..... Thursday, Aug. 9,at 10:00am
Aug. 7, at 3:00pm..... COMANCHE ..... Sunday, Aug. 12, at 10: 00am
Aug. 8,at 3:00pm.... ALGONQUIN.... Monday, Aug. 13, at 10:00am
Aug. 10, at 3:00pm....... APACHE....... Wednesday, Aug. 15, at 10:00am
Aug. 11, at 3:00pm...... IROQUOIS..... Friday, Aug. 17, at 10:00am
Aug. 14, at 3:00pm..... ARAPAHOE.....Sunday, Aug. 19, at 10:00am
Aug. 15, at 3:00pm..... *NAVAHOE.....Monday, Aug. 20, at 10: 0am
Aug. 17, at 3:00pm.... .COMANCHE..... Wednesday, Aug. 22, at 10:00am
Aug. 18, at 3:00pm..... ALGONQUIN.... Friday, Aug. 24, at 10:00am
Aug. 21, at 3:00pm.......APACHE........Sunday, Aug. 6, at 10:00am
Aug. 22, at 3:00pm...... IROQUOIS..... .Monday, Aug. 27, at 10:00am
Aug. 24, at 3:00pm .... ARAPAHOE.. .. Wednesday, Aug. 29, at 10:00am
Aug. 25, at 3:00pm..... *NAVAHOE..... Thursday, Aug. 30, at 10:00am
Aug. 28, at 3:00pm..... COMANCHE ..... Sunday, Sept. 2, at 10:00am
Aug. 29, at 3:00pm..... ALGONQUIN ... Monday, Sept. 3, at 10:00am
Aug.31, at 3:00pm. ..... .APACHE. ......Wednesday, Sept. 5, at 10:00am
*Intermediate passengers only.


CLYDE NBW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
Freight Service Between Jackonavil, oaton and Protiems, and anll Eamste PFanta
calin at Charleton Both Ways.
FREIGHT ONLY.


From Si
Lewis Wharf
Saturday,
Saturday,
Sat Arii.


ath Side
Boston


STEAMER


Frm Feet Cathedi Street,
Jahemvls.


July 14............... CHIPPEWA.............. Friday,
July 21.............. ONONDAGA..... ........Friday,
July 28.............. CHIPPEWA..............Saturday,


July 20
July 27
Aug. 4


CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER UINE
Between Jacksonville and sat si.
Stopping at Palatka, Astor, St. Francis, Bereeford (DeLad), and intermediate
landings on St. Johns River.
STEAMER "'CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
Is appointed to sail a follows: Leave Jacksonville, Sundays, Tuesdays and
Thursday, 3:30 p. m. Returning, leave Sanford, Mondays, Wednesday and Fridays,
9:30 a m.
SCHEDULE
SOUTHBOUND. NOerdo UND
Read down I Read ap.
Leave 3:30p.m. ..................... Jaksonville ...................Ame 2:00a.m.
Leave 8:45p.m.................... Palasta ....................j ve 8:00p.m.
Leave 3:00a. m................. ... Astor ...................... ve 3:30p.m.
............... ........... Bereeford (Deaad) .............. Iav 1:00 p. m.
Arrive 8:30a.m. ................. Sanford ................. av :a.m.
Arrive 10:00 .= ................. terpri ..................Leav 10:00a.m.
GENERAL PASSMGLER AND TICKET OFFICE, ss W. MAY ST, JACE'VILU .
F. M. IRONMONGER, Jr., Asst Genl Pass. Agent, 122 W. Bay St., Jacksonville, Fla.
W. G. COOPER, Jr., Frt. Agt. C. P. LOVELL Supt.
Foot of Hogan Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
A. C. HAGERTY, CLYDE MILNE,
Gen'l Eastern Pass. Agt., New York. Geni Frt. Agt, New York.
THEO. G. EGER, V. P. and G. M.
General Offices, Pier 36, North River.' Branch, 290 Broadway, New York.

J. W. CAIN. Pres J. H. O'BEBRY, See. & Tresu
CAIN-O'BERRY BOILER CO.
isturs m I;dm d Sbi Idsr
Sas, Eta., htl Il krir
ORLANDO FLORIDA


_ ___ __ I __i _


------- ay,










16 THU WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Buyers' Directory

If yu want anmythll l.k
threegh tis dasfied list and
write to the firm appearing
thereln. The Ree r d guaratees
prompt respo .

ACCOUNTANTS.
T. G. Hutchu son, Jacksonville, F.
BANKS
Commereia Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Florida Bank and Trult Co., Jackenvill e
Fla.
BOILER MAKERS.
Cin-'Berry Boiler Co., Orlando, Fla.
t OxzS AND CRATES.
Summer Lumber Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
BRICKI
Southern Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jack-
sonvilln, Fa.
CLOTHING.
Craig Bro., J. A, Jacksonville Fla.
standard Clothing Co., Jacksonvile la.
Stuart-Berstein Co., Jacksonvill Fla.
COOPERAGE.


DY00.-- HLSL
Cooperage Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla.
DREOS.
Wm. a Jones, Jacksonville. Fa.
C. C. Better, Jacksonville, Fa.
DRUGS-WHOLESALE.
Christie .Groover Drug Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla.
EMBALm"RS
Marcus Conant Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGINES.
Merrill-Steven Co, Jacksonville a
Sebofield's Sons Co, J. S, Macon, Ga.
Lombard Iron Works and Supply Co., Au-
gu-s, Goa.
FERTILIZERS.
Sours & Co., Wn. A., Jacksonville, Fa.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS.
Marcus Conant, Jacksonville, Fla.
FOUNDRIES.
soneld's Sons Co., J. 8., Mases, Ga.
FUEL.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co. The, Jack-
sonville, Fa.
GENTw FURNISHERS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksoville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksoanville, a.
Stuart-Bernstein C, Jacksonville, Fla.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
Consolidated Grocery Co, Jacksonville, Fa.
Jacksonville Grocery Co., Jacksonville, a.
Williams Co., J. P, Savannah, Ga.
Young Co, John R, Savannah, Ga.
GAS AND GASOLINE ENGINES.
Hicks Gas Motor Co., Waycross, Ga., and
Detroit, Mich.
HARDWARE.
Bond & Bours Co. The, Jacksonville, FIa.
Brigga, W. H., Hardware Co., Valdoota, sa.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weed Co., J. D., Savanna, Ua.
HAY AND 3RAIN.
Iiours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
IATS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville t a.
Standard Clothing Co., Jaeim oville, Fla.
Stuart-Bernstein Co., Jacksjanvile, Fla.
HOTE1.I
Travelers' Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
Aragon The, Jacksonvrie Fla.
Fifth Avenue Hotel, Neu York. N. Y.
verett Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
IRON WORKS.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Scbhodld'a Sow Co, J. S, Mama, Ga.


0


INSURANCE.
Prudential Life, Walter P. Corbett, Mgr.
Jaeksonville, Fa.
Cay, Shine & McCall, Jacksonville, Fla.
JEWELER&S.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hem & Sager. Jacksonville, Fla.
KELEuY IlSTITUTTS.
Keley Institute, Jaeksonvile, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Blun a Co., Chas., Jacksonville, Fla.
Altmayer & Flatau Liquor Co., Mason, Ga.
Joeph Zapf & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
MEDICINES.
Spener Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Ten.
MACHINE WORKS.
an-O'Bera Boiler Co., Orlando, Fla.
Sebhoeld' s Co., J. 8, Macon, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR I unPEaiML PRO-
CZSm
Seholeld's Sons Co., J. 8., Macon, Ga.
METAL WORKERS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
MeMillan Bros., Jacksonville, Fla.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Schofield's 8ons Co., J. 8., Maeon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weed Co., J. D, Savannah, Ga.
Malsby Machinery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
NAVAL STORKS.
Peninsular Naval Store Co., Tampa, Fla.
Barnes & Jessup Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
vile, Fla.
Standard Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
Williams C., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
Young Co, John .L, Savannah, Ga.
Southern States Naval Stores Co., Savan-
pa. GOa
PAINT&
Bond & Bous Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
PLUMB S.
Ooons & Golder, Jacksonville, Fla.
PUMPS.
Merrill-Stevens Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Sebofeld'e Sone Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
RAILROADS.
Atlantic Coast Line.
Seaboard Air Line Railway.
REAL ESTATE
Stoekton, J. C., Jacksonville, Fla.
Brobston, Fendig & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Livingston & Sons, J. H., Oala, Fla.
Dean Realty & Improvement Co., Way-
cros, Ga.
SEEDS.
Bours & Co., Wm. A, Jaksonville, Fla.
SHIP YARD&
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Merrill-Steven a Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
SHOS-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Joe. Roesihelm & Sons, Savannah, Ga.
STEAMSHIPS.
Clyde Steamship Co. The, New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Holmes & Co., Samuel P., Jacksoville,
Flak.
TANKS.
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
SehoAeld's Sons Co., J. S., Maeon, Ga.
TUEPraIlms APPARATUS.
Chattanooga Pottery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
TURP PrTIN STILLS.
HARm i* s .eat..
Baker, M. A., Brunawick, Ga.
McMillan Bro.. Jacksonville, Fla.
FOX ixrxWxKlRS.&
Owen Typewriter C., Tampan F.
A. Reed Warrock, Jacksonville, Fla.
F. D. Bruce, Pensaola, Fa.
TUEPE Iuiln STILL TUBS
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatk, Fla.
TURPENTINE VATS
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka. Fla
TURPENTINE TOOLS.
Harley Hardware Co., Valdosta, Ga.
Council Tool Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
UNDERTAKERS.
Marcus Conant, Jacksonville, Fla.
WATCHES.
Grenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla
Hes & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
YELLOW PIN] LUMBER.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville. Fla.
East Coast lumber Co., Watertown, Fla.


FIFTH A VENUE HOTEL
Madison Square, New York.

American Plan $5 per day. Eurepean Plan $2.00 per day
The moot famous repre-ntatie hot
in America. New a tnewet, Jaway
fresh and elea. The location t Madison
Square is the finest in the city.
HITCHCOCK. DARLING f COMPANY.
111*101Sqare11 istie ne $ ist ln te elty1 1


J. W. Motte,
President.


C. B. Parkel
Vioe-Pres.


Jame Mcatt.
vice-Pri.


W. W. Wler,
Bee. A Treas.


John R. Young Co.,


Commission

Merchants.


Naval Stores factors. Wholesale Grocers.


SavamInoh 4k Brunewick. Ga


'III lEIIegllllI s iaIlIIIIIIIuII1gus~I ------------- --"-
99
MSfXXSXXS6XXXXCSKKK~ttLttZtt


B. W. BLOUNT,
Preildet.


G. PTTEWAY,
Vic-Presient.


A. C. BACO,
Uy & Trssa.


PENINSULAR NAVAL STORES CO.
Capital, $500,000.00.
Successrs to TIMMONS-BLOUNT CO.
Naval Stores Factors and Commission Mercdhats.
DEALERS IN Turpentine Operators' Supplies

O* eVBeRY De CRTrlmN
Flat Savannah Prices paid for Rosin and Turpentine, lees
Customary Charges.
CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED.
Offices-American National Bank Bldg., Tampa, Fla.
Yards, Port Tampa City.





* J4
J. S. SchofleM's Sons Company,


neaduquarger rtor t
I-- Distiller's Pumpingf

No plant complete without one.
SHudred of them in e i ora,
*Florida, Alaaa Mimisippi and
SSouth Carolina. Write us or iu-
Slars and prices. We also manfaotre -
SEngines, Bokers aid Ilfh i
*B (Gradf MaMhmery,
as well as carry a full and counplete
-tockof-
H tMill Supplies PIpe,
** BSller Tubes, Et.
A Advise your wants.
; W Macon, - Georgia. t
AI teaUlcis t t
* ra of Ieok Wal 1w T-olll -terp Pruln *
************+ **********-


16


THE WFIEKLY INDUSTILIAL RBOORD.









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 17


NOVEL UTILIZATION OF FIRE-KILLED
TIMBH.L
Although it has been known for a num-
ber of years that fire-killed timber has a
considerable value in railroad and mining
operations in Colorado, it has been brought
out only recently by the forest service that
a wide number of uses are open for this
timber, and that in certain respects it has
actual advantages over green wood.
These facts are deducted from a study
of conditions on the Pike's Peak forest
reserve, where the ravages of fire have
been particularly widespread and destrue-
tive. In many instances the burned tim-
ber is the only kind available at a par-
ticular point, for example, in proximity to
a mine or a spur of railroad, so for tim-
bers and ties the dead material has been
used for many years-15 years at Palmer
* Lake, seven years at Florissant for rail-
road ties, and longer than this for mine
timbers. Three years ago it was first used
for box boards, and has proved excellent.
In May, 1905, there was a sale for tele-
phone poles.
The species used are red fir, yellow pine,
lodgepole pine, limber pine, range pine,
pinon, Engelmann spruce, and blue spruce.
Of these, the pines, red fir and Engelmann
spruce furnish the bulk of the material.
Time elapsed since burning seems to make
no great difference in the value of the
wood, except that when serious checking
results it loses its value for box purposes.
The timber used has been burned all the
way front three to fifty-five years.
The amount of this timber which has
been used is very considerable. There has
been one sale from the reserve for box
boards and one for telephone poles, but
the three main uses continue to be for
mine timbers, railroad ties and firewood.
Red fir is preferred for railroad ties,
then yellow pine, limber pine. and range
pine. White pine has been objected to be-
cause of its lack of durability, but it is
now taken in many places. At Rosemont,
Colo., burned timber of all kinds is made
into ties, some of the material having been
burned 50 years ago. It is asserted that
dry ties last as long as green ties and in
many cases longer. On the Cripple Creek
short line they were more satisfactory
than green pine ties from Texas. Dry ties
hold a spike well, and a tie platt does not
cut into the wood so seriously as it does in
the case of green wood. English spruce
is as good as other species as far as wear
is concerned, but it decays much quicker
and so should be given a preservative
treatment.
Burned timber was first used for boxes
by the Denver Crate and Box Co. in 1903,
the species used being Einglishman Spruce
and lodgepole pine, with some red fir and
limber pine. The material used had been
burned from one and one-half to four
years. The Engelmann spruce was excel-
lent, and the lodgepole pine also gave good
Results. The fire seasoning had driven the


odor out of the pine so that it could be
used for packing crackers and biscuits.
Also on account of the perfect seasoning
the boxes remained tight when put up and
therefore sold better than green boxes.
For mine timbers all species are used,
if of the requisite size. Dry timber is pre-
ferred because of its lightness, durability
and stiffness, all principally due to its bet-
ter seasoning.
For many purposes fire-killed timber
should be preferred to green timber be-
cause it is so well seasoned. This season-
ing makes it more durable than green tim-
ber, and also makes it lighter, so that its
cost of transportation is appreciably less.
and it is therefore available, not only for
numerous local uses, but for shipping long
distances. Actual experience with the fire-
killed timber proves that its utilization
should be a source of profit to the reserve.

A BIG TIMBER DEAL.

W. B. Phifer Prchases Fine Body of Land
on Lochloos Lake.
W. B. Phifer, the naval stores operator
of Rochelle and Grove Park, evidently in-
tends to extend his interests, as he has
purchased through a real estate firm in
this city a body of fine timber on Loch-
loosa lake, embracing 3,500 acres, for which
it is understood he paid $10,000.
Mr. Phifer has been quite successful in
the manufacture of naval stores. He own-
ed and operated for several years an ex-
tensive place at Abbott, South Florida, and
after disposing of same purchased the
places at Rochelle and Grove Park. He
has associated with him at Grove Park S.
F. Waits.

LANDS SOLD TO M'GEE.

One Hundred Thousand Dollar Deal Near
Seneca.
Seneca, July 26.-The greatest land deal
yet on record for Lake county has just
been effected here. The turpentine and
timber firm of D. R. Henderson & Co. have
just sold their holdings to a Mr. McGee
and his associates for $100,000.
The property consists of 27.500 acres
good turpentine lands, extending from
Unmatillar around Seneca to near Eustis
and Sorrento. There are two commissary
teams, and the whole in full operation.
In an interview with the Times-Union
correspondent Tuesday, Mr. Henderson
said that he was well satisfied with the
profits from the busiliess, and that the
sale was at a good advance over what he
paid only a year ago.
The purchasers are mill men, and will
stores and quarters for employees and
soon move their plant to their new pur-
chase.
Mr. Henderson is as yet undecided wheth-
er he will reinvest here or not.


e(1leulI~(11u**ll**l)~1111l* *enueauueeaueeuuui *uueauesa


JOS. ROSENHEIM SHOE CO.
NMANWACTURERS AND JOBUERS OF


SHOES

SAVANNAH, GEORGIA
"Best Shees Made for Cemmissary Trade."
80***ae asss149se0800s*****"o aa so e 8 *m 1 $ o


General Banking.


496 on Savings Deposits


. Executes trusts of all kinds.


C. E. GARNER, President.
C. B. ROGERS, Vice-President.
G. J. Avent, Ant. Cashier.


A. F. PERRY, Vice-Presidest.
W. A. REDDING, Cashier.
F. P. FLEMING, Jr., Trust Offew.


FLORIDA BAG MANUFACTURING COMPANY

429 East Bay Street, JACKSONVILLE. fLORIDA.
MANUFACTURERS

s 0for all
Burlap and Cotton Bags Prps

Small Cotton Bats for Commissaries.


Write for Prices.


florida Bag Manufacturing Company


*I 11 l~li ***I 1t1t|** *I I I *II 11|1>11111>

A Few Bargains

9,000 acres virgin timber. Lies in solid body immediately
upon transportation; estimated to cut 40 boxes, and 2,500 feet
: lumber per acre.
38,000 acres part virgin, part boxed, estimated to cut 3,500
Sfeet merchantable lumber per acre.
A number of desirable turpentine locations at right prices
* 25.900 acres virgin timber, lies in solid body, estimated to cut
S100 boxes and 7,000 feet of merchantable lumber per acre.


Brobston, Fendig & Company
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA 216 V. Forsyth Street
B 511| 81 8|01 S84III1064 8 868UUISIUSS *8 l0808
eauue10*umnimnsueee mmhubhu!4*asuuuaearmmeiea eh


MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


Boilermaking and Repairing

Still Boilers and Pumps.
SHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.
Jacksonville, Fla.


*004. aI M1811 8s I I-o4a:&# i I 1#$14a8Ia# 1#&a68 16 *



SUMMER LUMBER COMPANY

JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

Rough ssd Dessed Lumber

Long Laf Yellow Pine.
BOXES AD OR1TES


A


Malsby Machinery Company

of Jacksonville. Fla.

P table, Statinary EngilM aId ikern
Saw MIN and Wertlg Mladnr,.
Portable Otfits a Specialty.
Write for handsome iustrated 1906 cat.
Cor Ward and Jefferson
Streets.


FLORIDA BANK & TRUST COMPANY.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
CAPITAL-One IMMie cellars.








18 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


5he EVERETT HOTEL
325 WEST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE FLA.
Cmarally rqasted, thoroughly repaired and'renovated. Newly furnished. European plan.

G. H. MASON, Proprietor.


BILLION BUSHEL CROP OF WHEAT IS
PROMISED.
Chicago, July 24.-This is the period in
the crop year when the owner of wheat
is at a disadvantage and the prospective
buyer has things his own way. Plentiful
supplies of winter wheat are a reality,
and still more plentiful supplies of spring
wheat a dreaded anticipation. The mer-
chant, investor or speculator who can cor-
rectly analyze the possibilities of the sit-
uation has great opportunities before him.
The domestic merchandiser feels safe as
long as he can hedge by sales to specula-
tors against his cash grain purchases from
producers. Until recently he has been
content to put the bulk of the pressure on
the speculative buyer, and has not been
making bargain prices to the foreign buy-
er. The investor would like to find an
opportunity to take on wheat of the
fine quality of the present crop if he could
pick the time when the full force of all
the bearish conditions have been felt. The
speculator is willing to follow the market
drift in either direction and looks from
day to day for the influence that will be
moat immediately effective.
Milling interests in the country have
been content with recent prices, and as a
rule, have been buying in a more or less
liberal way. The greater number of win-
ter wheat millers have had plentiful sup-
plies. In addition to this supplying of mil-
lers, there has been a remarkably large
surplus left for the large centers of ac-
cumulation for home or foreign merchan-
ddising later in the crop year.
Wheat Yield is Abundant.
There is no question now that there will
be an abundant yield of wheat. The re-
ports of the prevalence of blac krust in
the Northwest, while true to a certain
extent, were exaggerated. An expert de-
clares that the Northwest wheat crop will
be safe in 10 days or two weeks at the
latest. The present promise is for an enor-
mous yield. Only a calamity can change
the result, and there are no unfavorable
conditions yet. If the crop matures the
railroads will be taxed to their utmost
capacity to handle the grain.
The United States and Canada have the
promise of nearly a billion bushels of
wheat. No such outlook has ever been in
prospect on the American continent. It
should be a great year for manufacturers,
railroaders, retailers and farmers. While
black rust has appeared, it is only in
spots, and is not spreading. The same
conditions existed last year when a big
crop was harvested. It is predicted that
South Dakota will break all records in
wheat and corn. Cutting the grain will be
general in the Jim River Valley by Aug.
1.
With the prospects for a tremendous
supply of wheat, millers are looking for-
ward to a big year in flour trade. The
wheat arriving at the mills from the win-
ter districts is conceded to be the finest
quality ever marketed and millers declare
it will take less of it to make a barrel
of flour than ever before. With such a
fine quality of grain, it is hoped to regain
some of the flour trade lost in the last
few years by the prevailing high prices.
In consequence of the extremely low price


of wheat and the excellent quality of flour,
there should be a big increase in the do-
mestic consumption.
Threshing returns from the hard winter
wheat crops of Kansas and Nebraska show
an unusually high average yield to the
acre, and an exceptionally heavy test
weight a bushel. Larger yields of wheat
than were harvested last year are indicated
in both States.
Foreign Crops Damaged.
Advices from Russia are still unsatis-
factory as regards wheat and the financial
condition. Heavy rains have done consid-
erable damage and it is reported that ow-
ing to the political situation, farmers are
likely to lose their entire crop because of
inability to harvest. Another thing which
will help the American trade is that the
crop in Argentina may be damaged, as
locusts have appeared in the northern dis-
tricts, eating the early plants, and there
is danger of the roots being attacked. The
supply is small and holders are unwilling
to sell.
A reason now advanced for the low price
of wheat is that considerable with is be-
ing placed in the opinion that should this
country sell a large amount of wheat for
export next year, which now seems possi-
ble, there will be a substantial advance in
values. This is doubted, however, unless
some of America's large competitors, like
Russia or Argentina, drop completely out
of the export business.
Conditions for corn in the WVest have
been excellent for the last week, and with
continued rains and hot weather, a hig
crop will surely result. There was a little
anxiety felt, for several weeks over the
conditions in Illinois, but farmers are now
in a more optimistic frame of mind. Lib-
eral purchases have been made in Nebras-
ka and it begins to look as if the move-
ment East had started. Western markets
are daily shipping more than they receive.
The Argentine supply for the week was 1,-
000,000 bushels short of last year.
A stronger market for oats is looked for,
as news comes from the northwest that
the yield will be from 40 to 60 bushels to
the acre. Illinois oats have reached this
market and average *29 pounds to the
bushel.

LABOR STATISTICIANS.
Boston, July 24.-Labor bureau statisti-
cians, headed by Charles P. Neill, chief of
the bureau of labor statistics of Washing-
ton, assembled today in the Senate cham-
ber of the Massachusetts state house for
their twenty-second annual convention.
Charles P. Neill, head of the bureau of
labor statistics, presided.
Gov. Guild, in an address of welcome,
said:
"The steady improvement in communica-
tion and transportation is making it more
and more imperative that legislation affect-
:ng industry should be uniform through-
out the country. It is of small avail to
stamp out stock watering in Massachu-
s tts if what is a crime in Massachusetts is
to continue in New Jersey. Healthy com-
petition between New York and Georgia
is impossible as long as textiles spun and
woven by adults in the North are forced
to compete with textiles spun and woven
by little children in the South."


THE BOND & BOURS CO.
WHOLIEALE 0 ILETAIL

HARDWARE

SASH, DOORS, BLINDS, PAINTS.

Oils, Glass, Stoves, Tinware, Country Holloware.


10 WEST BAY STREET.


JACKSONVILLE. LA.


East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED LON LEAP

Yellow Pine Lumber

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots
Stemer Slipments a Specalty.
WATERTOWN, FLOIDA



PLANTERS.


"Old Time" Remedies

THE JOY Of THE HOUSEHOLD.

Thbe four gWet remedies, nuian Tea, eaeLeta, Ca&= Mdaif
and Cuban 0i, a the joy of the household. With them near at hand, a
man is ready for any emere He has a safe, reliable and spedy relief 1
for wife, children, self or to. With them remedies you ea keep the
doctor's hands out of your pockets, and yet have a healthy, happy famny. a
Besides, you can cure your stock of any ailment that may befall the
NUBIAN TIA-In Liquid or Powder Fm -Is the great family medicine. It
will cure all forms of Liver and Kidey ComplaiMts, Prevet Chil and Malarial
Fever. Cures the common ailmats of hildrem; and as a laxative toaie it without
an equal-safe and reliable. In the liquid, it is extremely palatable-eve, children
like it--and it is READY FOR USE.
BENEDICTA is a woman's medicine. It will ern all the diseases common to
women, and elassed as Female Troubles. It will bring youth back to the zaded woman,
who has gone onsuffering beeuse she thought it woman b t. It will are for the
young girl just entering womanhood; and prepa the young woman roor the acred
duties of wife and mother.
CUBAN RELIXE-The instant Paint Killer, for either ma or beast. Relieves
instantly, Colic, Cramps, Cholera Morbus, Diarrhoea, Dystentery and Sick Headaehe.
For colie in horses it is an infallible remedy and is guaranteed to give relief in five
minutes.
CUBA" OIL-The Best ae and rve Liiment. Is atseptie for cute,
snagged or torn flesh, and will instantly relieve the pain. Cures insect bites and stings,
seald and burns, bruises and sores, chapped hand and face, or and tender feet.
Relieves rheumatic pains, lame bak, stf joints, and in stock eures wire faene cuts,
serathes, thrush, splint, collar moes, saddle gall, and diseased hoof.
Write for MPiM.

SPENCER MEDICINE CO.. Chattanooga. Ten.




You Want a Turpentine Leentln?
You Want a Sawmill Ltoatim?
You Want any Kind of Forida Lmad?
You Mea Business?
G.,M en wor Wrhe ft

J H. Livingston & Sons,
OCA A. FrLORLA.




FUEL AND MBULDIM. MATERIAL.



The Southern Fuel & Supply Co.

-so hl Err..Eg ahae an *r me d.l 080 r. ,
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C. B. ROGERS, President. W. A. G#LLAHER and E. A. CHAMPLAIN Vice-Presidents.
DIBOTOUS: C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Ch amplain, H. A. McEachern and J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonville;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $500,0oo.
Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches la Tampa, Pensacola, Pla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consol-lated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Conmany
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company of Pensacola; the grocery br& ch of th. West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Penmeola: the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything In Heavy and Light Groceries,


Grain,


visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.


Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Caists of me nAree-Story Balldlag, 70x200; ome two-story blildlag. 50s390; ome ose-story ulldlag, 0x250,
aklag the largest space of amy Company of the ki~d Is the South.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
Branches Tampa. Fla., Penswcols. Frl., and Savwnnah, Ga.
Masessessesi ian**************m nnnm***neni 11111 sessassseasse ess a


0


Pro-


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In buying
STERLING SILVER TABLEWARE
whether as a gift or for your own use,
one's desire is to get full value for your
money. We are heavy buyers of Silver-
ware, in fact have the largest stock in the
South, and can show you a variety of
patterns that upon comparison of quality
and price you will find very reasonable.


The illustration shows our


"NEW CAMBRIDGE,"
a handsome ornamental pattern of fine
execution, its soft grey finish brings out
the character of the design and enhances
its general attractiveness.
Teaspoons ... $9.00, $10.75 and $12.75 doz.
Dessert Spoons .... $18.75 and $19.25 "
Table Spoons .... $24.25 and $27.75 "
Table Forks ...... $24.25 and $27.75 "
Dessert Forks .... $16.75 and $19.25 "
Medium Knives ............. $21.00 "
Dessert Knives ..............$19.00 "


We sell only reputable goods.


SSilver Plate that Wears"
SUARAUT BY


When desired, we can fur-: I
nish cases or oak or mahogany
chests to hold any number of
pieces.
A very complete line of this reliable
brand in Tea-ware, Bake-dishes, Fruit
Bowls, etc, and also latest patterns in

Prices on sterling silverware "184 7 R rs Bros."
Knives, Forks. Spoons, etc.
subject to change with any ma- The pattern we illustrate
"THE VINTAGE,"
trial change in the price of in tir.i-h ,rd appearancee close r sembles
terl:ng .ilverware. Tl'his patt. rn is section
bullo. plate th 't i it ha& th e* t me.. the usual quar -
bullion. tity sf -ilver elKoited on the baeks of handles
and btwl. insurin. ear, of g od service
Tea Spol.s* - $4 d.z.
Dessert spAmns - f41
'Table Spoon. - 7;0
Table Folks 7 k e'
De-sert irk - 50 "5
Medium Knives - 'o
We guarantee satisfaction. u er t K sats ctoy rerence
Upow e will mail ith i tamp reerenc
we will mah samples


Greenleaf SL Crosby Company

Jewelers and Silversmiths


41 West Bay Street,


PROMPT ATTENTION TO MAIL ORDERS.
WRITE FOR CATALOGUE.


Jacksonville, Florida


ESTABLISHED THIRTY YEARS.


Half Tones-Zinc Etchings



Illustratina and Engraving Department


OF


THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.


Splendidly equipped foi business. Half ones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of Commercial Work, Pamohlets, etc


SI S t IT 11 131S1Il I IRTOUCII UD NIIHIIIW PIOIISIPI U PI FIDI.


IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED.
GooD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED.


A Florida Enterprise.


Try It.


) II -- ~----


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