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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00178
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: June 16, 1906
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00178
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text




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SAVANNAH, GA.







CONSOLIDATED NAVAL STORES COMPANY.
Home Office: JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Branches: Savannah. Ga., and Pensacola, Fla.
OFFICERS.
SVW. C. POWELL, Presbient; B. F. BULLAhD, H. L. COVINGTON, J. A. CRANFORD, D. H. MeMILLAN, B. R. POWELL, C. M COVINGTON, JOHN H.
POWELL, Vice Presidents; C. P. DUSENBURY, Secretary and Treasurer.
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: W. C. Powell, C. B. Rogers, H. L. Covington, B F. Bullard, J. A. Cranford.
Dhi'CTORS: W. C. Powell, B. F. Bullard, C. B. Rogers. J. A. Cranford, W. J. Hillman, John H. Powell, W. F. Coachman, H.L. Covington, C. Downing, D. H.
I lMcMi'lan, R. B. Powell. C. M. Covington, S. A. Alford.


i NAVAL STORES FACTORS
I
Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
The 'Consolidated" is purely a co-operative Company. Its Interests are Identical with those
of the Producers. The patronage of turpentine operators everywhere Invited.
Two Million acres of land and Timber for sale on easy terms.
Producers are invited to call or correspond.




McMillan




Southern Copper Works
Complete outfits, Extra Ket-
ties, Caps, Arms, Worms, Manufacturers of
Furnace Doors, Grate Bars,
always on hand. Turpertirixe Stills

Old stills taken in part payment for new work, and repairing done
in country. Heavy copper smithing, steam pipe and special
copper work.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
SAVANNAH, GA. MOBILe, ALA. FAYETTEVILLE, N. C.
A yyinwamd^% dyy'tmde*idew-jt.













WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL


RECORD.


UJSHD VERY FRIDAY. DEVOTED TO NAVAL STOIBS LUMBER AND MANUFACTURING INTRIBmT


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*


Great Work of Progress and Development in Suwannee, Taylor


and Lafayette Countieso


A better understanding of her resources,
natural advantages ad opportunities for
those of -mall ieman ha given to Florida
aa active demand for real estate and es-
peilal that part of her lands adapted
to emeral farming.
While a few years ago the growing of
early vegetables for the Northern mar-
kets sad the orange industry were con-
sidere paramount in this State, the sue-
ees of those who saw the opportunities
for general farming in Florida and accept-
ed them, is becoming understood in all
parts of the United Stated and to-day
there is more attention being paid to this
character of soll tilling than to those
special branches of agriculture and horti-


have always brought ready cash. While
depending on cotton for money, they have
raised nearly everything that their fami-
lies consumed and the cash from their cot-
ton crop has been banked.
BRcet Rapi Dvelopment.
Recently there has been a rapid devel-
opment of this section of the State. The
various railroads which operate in Florida
have been viewing with each other in the
extension of their lines through Suwan-
nee, Alachua, Taylor, Lafayette and Mad-
ion counties. The Seaboard Air Line,
the Atlantic Coast Line, the two great
railway systems, have built many miles
of road through the counties named and
new roads have been projected and built.


culture which for years have for Florida The Live Oak, Perry & Gulf has laid its
commanded the attention of the pros- rails through the most desirable of these


pective homeseker.
General farming has become more of
a factor in the development of this State
amd the farmers who plant and cultivate
with are the staple crops are among
the most prosperous residents of a
wealthy and thrifty State.
The demand for farming lands is grow-
ing, and those seetions of Florida which
an offer the bet inducements for general
crops are developing rapidly. While the
growing of fruits and vegetables has en-
riched certain sections, the two industries
have not thrived to a greater extent than
that of general farming and stock raising.
The general farmer has in Florida been
successful from year to year, gradually
and constantly accumulating wealth and
ehancing the value of his possessions,
building comfortable and valuable homes
and equipping his farm with the best of
modern implements, in the meantime di-
versifying his mrops so as to supply every-
thing he needs for his table, including
the choicest fruits and vegetables. His
money erop is cotton and the very best
quality of sea island cotton nets him a
comfortable profit for his labor and ex-
pensee. For his stock he grows corn, oats,
rye and several other varieties of grain.
He raies his own hogs, makes his own
syrup and sugar and leads a thoroughly
independent life, with a fair bank account
to insure himself against adversity.
While every county in Florida is well
adapted to general farming, that section
of the State lying north of the peninsular
division has recorded the greatest success.
This is, perhaps, in part due to the fact
that the farmers in the northern part of
Florida have devoted their energies to the
one industry, but the fact remains that
they have had the best land in the Slate
with which to operate.
In Suwannee, Columbia, the northern
part of Alachua, Madison, Jeffersn, Tay-
lor and Lafayette counties the farmers
have been exceedingly successful, making
and contributing a large part of the
wealth of the State. They have had the
beat farming lands, the most hiproved
means of marketing ag4 teir ottou crops


lands. With Live Oak, the largest and
most progressive city in the interior of
Florida, as a starting point, the Live Oak,
Perry & Gulf has built through Suwannee,
Taylor and Lafayette counties, tapping
the very best sections of each and extend-
ing its work of development to include
every industry-farming, manufacturing
and building-with a view of making that
part of Florida the wealthiest section of
the State.
Develop Their Lands.
Independent of its railroad this com-
pany, known as the Dowling Lumber and
Naval Stores Company, has acquired hun-
dreds of thousands of acres of the very
best and most productive lands in the
State. These lands are being reserved
for settlers, the plan of bringing home-
seekers to Florida being the main con-
sideration.
In that part of the State where Sea
Island cotton is grown, there is a reason
for the success and prosperity of the
farming element. Sea Island cotton
always sells for a big advance over
what is known as upland cotton
and the prices do not vary, nor are they
influenced by the speculations which con-
trol the cheaper and more common grades.
At Live Oak, the county seat of Suwan-
nee county, the farmers have built one of
the largest cities in the State with Sea
Island cotton. They market their cotton
there and always find a ready sale and
their progressiveness and wealth has been
the one potent factor in i", development
of their section of the State. In the fall
of the year, when the cotton crop is mar-
keted, it is nothing uncommon to see over
a hundred wagonloads of the fleecy staple
awaiting to be weighed and transferred
to the warehouses. All this cotton brings
ready cash. In fact, it is as good as gold
and silver. A farmer with a number of
bales of cotton in his warehouse has just
that much ready cash.
Suwannee's Magnifcent Farms.
Suwannee county is noted for its mag-
nificent farms. The farmers in that coun-
ty are prosperous to a greater degree than
those of any section of the State. Inde-


pendent of growing cotton, they raise
their own stock, grow sugarcane and man-
ufacture their own sugar and syrup, be-
sides making their own pork, rais-
enough corn for themselves and their
stock and in fact supplying everything
but flour for their household. As the
maxim is, "they live at home and board
at the same place."
Last year Suwannee county led all other
counties in the production of Sea Island
cotton and the indications are that the
record will be repeated this year and for
many years to come.
A Growing Tow.
Included in the proposition to dispose
of these lands is Dowling Park, one of
the new, but one of the most thriving
towns in the State. Here is an example
of what Florida can do, when the work of
development is actively under way. Four
months ago there was no sign of a town
there. Today there is a population of
about five hundred people and one of the
largest enterprises in the State for manu-
facturing lumber and with mercantile es-
tablishments doing a large business and
carrying large stocks of goods.
Dowling Park was established by the
men whose name it bears. The Dowlings
saw that the location was a most favor-
able one and when they located the largest
sawmill in that part of the State, they
laid the foundation for a town, the rapid
growth of which has really been a sur-
prise to even themselves.
On the Suwanme River.
The town is located on the banks of the
Suwannee river, on a bluff which extends
over the entire town site, and where the
best climate and health are assured. In
laying out the town the promoters had
in view every consideration for its future
growth, providing eighty-foot streets,
making a systematic survey and leaving
all of the shade trees standing. The
effect of their efforts have been surpris-
ing. The spirit which they displayed when
they decided to make a town of this lo-
cation has spread to include all the resi-
dents and those who have built their
homes there or built places in which they
are engaged in business, have had in view
substantial structures and town. is being
built welL All of the many residents, the
hotels, the places of business and the pub-
lic buildings have been erected with a view
of presenting a pretty appearance and ap-
pealing to the visitor. There are a great
many residences and all of them are a
credit to the place. Even the homes which
have been built by the Dowlings for their
laborers have been built of good lumber
and painted.
A Prmise of Growth.
Today the city has every promise of
being a city of 2,500 people with a few
years. There are a great many rea-
sons to be advanced for making this claim.
In the first place the saw and planing
mill which the Dowling Lumber and Na-


val Stores Company operates at that place
employs several hundred men. In addition
to this, the shops of the Live Oak, Perry
& Gulf railroad are to be located there
at once and will employ a great many
skilled laborers. A large cotton gin is in
course of building and will gin cotton for
several hundred large farmers who have
their farms in that part of Suwannee
and Lafayette counties. As a railroad
center, Dowling Park is already known.
Several trains meet there daily and con-
nect for various points in the State.
One of the largest wood-working estab-
lishments in the United State, and one
which will employ several hundred men,
is arranging to build a factory there
and will add materially to the population
of the place.
German Families There
Recently there arrived at Dowling Park
fifty German families, who come from the
old country to make this their home.
They have arrived at Dowling Park and
to all appearances are delighted with their
new home. The men are to be employed
at good wages at the mill and the Dowling
Lumber and Naval Stares Company is as-
sisting them in the building of their
homes.
A Large Schel uiaing,
The board of public instruction of Su-
wannee county has passed an order for the
erection of a large and handsome school
building and two teachers have already
been engaged to teach. There will be the
ordinary course of education and a high
school course in connection, giving to that
part of Suwannee county every facility
for schools.
Another movement which has been start-
ed and which is actively under way is
the building of a large church to accom-
modate several denominations and to act
as a kind of union place for worship.
This church edifice will be completed in
the course of a few weeks.
A amemma Asrrt.
One of the most favorable features in
connection with this delightful location
for a city is that it is right at the famous
resort, known throughout the country for
the past several years as Dowling Park.
This park is located just across the river
from the town and is one of the most
charming and ideal health and pleasure
resorts of the United States. The water
is strong sulphur with a boiling spring.
A magnificent park has been laid out
among the pretty cedars, oaks, pine and
hickory trees, along the bluff of the song-
famed Suwannee river, with an excellent
hotel, pavilion, bath houses, pool and bil-
liard rooms and other places for amuse-
ment. In the park there is everything
which nature could contribute for beauty,
recreation and pleasure and the owners
have added more. The bath houses have
been excellently arranged, the banks of
the river have been made attractive, sev-
eral deer have been brought there to at-


- -- ---


''


m








4 THII WEEKLY 1N1JtftSbIAL RNCOED.


tract the attention of the visitor and the
broad verandas of the large hotel of-
fer an ideal place for the lounger, where he
tea enjoy the magnificent climate both
winter aid summer, and where the mag-
nificent view of the old Suwannee and its
timbered banks ofer a rest from the city
life. This resort is patronized largely the
year around and is becoming known as
the most desirable resort of Florida. It
is easy of access to those who live in the
vicinity of Dowling Park. It lies just ae-
cross the river from the new and thriving
little city of Dowling Park and is connect-
ed by a large railroad bridge provided
with a good walk for pedestrians. Dur-
ing the summer trains bring hundreds of
people from all parts of Florida, Georgia
and Alabama to this place and excursions
are frequent. This admirable resort is
of incalculable benefit to the people of
Dowling Park, who visit there during the
evenings and who take special delight in
wandering over the place and taking a
plunge in the large bathing pooL
The Sportsamun Paradise.
Independent of the business and social
advantages of Dowling Park, game abounds
here as nowhere else in this state. If
the sportsman enjoys shooting small
game, he has every opportunity for doing
so without wandering far from home. If
his pleasures are found in angling, he
has the Suwannee river to attract him.
In fact there is everything to offer ad-
vantages of this character to those who
make that part of the state their home
or who spend their vacations there.
A naptha launch, livery teams, hunting
dogs, guns and bathing suits have been pro-
vided for the Suests at the Dowling Park
hotel. In adi ition to this a number of
cottages have been built for those who de-
sire to do light house-keeping, pleasantly
situated within a few rods of the hotel and
along the bank of the Suwannee river.

A PROGRESSIVE COUNTY.

General Farmi Ham Made Suwannee
Prospersus.
During the past few years the State of
Florida has experienced a general pros-
perity, extending to all of her varied in-
dustries and enterprises. In every sec-
toin of the State rich returns have follow-
ed the investment of capital and labor, and
today Florida is looked upon as the rich-
est State in the South, compared with her
population.
This prosperity has extended to every
section, but no county in Florida has en-
joyed that prosperity to such a degree as
has Suwannee county, in the northern
part of the State, and a county where gen-
eral farming is the main source of revenhe.
In that county the farmers have devoted
their energies to the iultivation of general
crops and have been making cotton their
great money crop. Their lands are pro-
ductive and they have farmed in a sys-
tematic and improved manner, taking ad-
vantage of the best and most improved
farming implements and making their soil
yield for all that it is capable.
All this is evident from a study of the
recent development and progress in all
lines of trade at Live Oak. That is the
one city of the county. It is the county
seat, the place of marketing, banking and
the center o fwealth. A few years ago
Live Oak was about the fifth town in the
interior of the State as to population.
Today she leads all of the interior cities
of the State by a margin of nearly two
htousand, according to the census of the


State which has just been published and
in manufacturing and buying of cotton she
is so far ahead of all of them as to be
beyond comparison.
This is attributable in large part to the
magnificent country from which she draws
her wealth. Nowhere in the State are the
farmers as prosperous as they are in Live
Oak. In no section of Florida are they
as enterprising and energetic They have
They have the most comfortable resi-
dences, the best outhouses and the most
improved farms and every year are adding
to their bank account.
The city of Live Oak has been making
a remarkable growth. While this may be
due in a measure to the fact that Live
Oak has been the natural distributing point
for a large section of the State, the fact
remains that it has been the farmers who
have contributed the large part of her
wealth. The city has recently voted bonds
to the extent of $250,000 for street im-
provements and for a sewerage system and
the county of Suwannee has appropriated
more than that amount for the building of
rock roads, the work of which is actively
under way and proceeding as fast as pos-
sible.
In no county in Florida has this prog-
ress and enterprise been manifested to a
greater degree than in Suwannee county.
The plan for the building of hard roads
includes roads leading from each extreme
point of Suwannee county and centering
at Live Oak, giving to the county within
the next yar or two sixty miles of the best
roads in the State.
No better evidence of prosperity and
enterprise can be cited than this. It
demonstrates not only Ithe wealth of the
county, but the fact that the county is
populated by a progressive and enterpris-
ing citizenship.
Live Oak has two of the most substan-
tial banks in the State, with another large
bank just organizing. All these banks
are necessary for the carrying on of the
large business of that county and sections
of other counties, the business of which
has been captured by that place.

NO INTERRUPTION.

Merchants & Miners Have Ample Facil-
ities.
Mr. Horace C. Avery, commercial agent
of the Merchants & Miners' Transporta-
tion Company, has received a telegram
from Mr. J. K. Whitney, second vice-presi-
dent and general manager of the company,
saying that there would be no interruption
to the service through the fire which did
such damage to their Savannah Line dock
in Baltimore early Wednesday morning.
The general manager advised that the
company's immense Boston and Providence
piers were ample to accommodate the busi-
ness until the other piers could be rebuilt.
The ships of the Merchants & Miners'
Transportation Conpany will continue to
ply between Savannah and Baltimore as
usual. Mr. Avery, the commercial agent,
reports that the business is exceptionally
good at present, and a large number of
people are taking advantage of the very
low rates offered by the Merchants and
Miners' Transportation Company for the
summer season.
The freight business of the company is
also holding up well. A large amount of
Florida products are shipped on the steam-
ers of this line, and shippers may rest
assured that the company is fully able
to take care of all business offered.


Barnes & Jessup Company i

Jacksonville. Florida.

SN vel Stores Factors and ComRission

Merchants.


orFICERs.
C. H. Barnes. President. J. C. Little, VlcePreswdet.
E. B..Well,. Secretary and Treasurer.

DIRECTORLS C. Barnes J. C. Little. &re Jeu
J. I.Seunde. E. C. Long, W. E. Cumuner, RL. f4. G. w.
Saxon. G. W. Taylor.
^ 5^^^^^51W^Ki^^^^^^ %^l%^5l%^^%WKSB^^^


W. J. LENGLE.
President.


J. W. WADE
Vios-Previdlssi


LE.. HUGHeS,
8".1 and Tress


Union Naval Stores Co.
MOBILE, ALA. PENSACOLA, FLA. NBW ORLBAN1 LA.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
..........DEALE S IN ..........

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can oier at prmsat qaite a nam ber af drlaMe Ii ti Wea t W mr-
id& AlabMai l MUmippL ULbe advrCans m aatst Cmmeg m e t CO*
rependene "edticd.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.

V - - - 10.-


CAPITAL STOCK $600,000.00



Jacksonville Naval Stores


Company

JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA


A NEW COMPANY

Will do a general naval stores commission business. We
guarantee Savannah prices upon day of arrival, and to make
prompt return.


A MUTUAL COMPANY

Each shipper invited to become a stockholder.
It is but fair and right that th.' operator should share in the
profits of the selling end of his product.
We have ample capital and facilities to take care of our
customers. Your business solicited.



Jacksonville Naval Stores Co

Rooms 307 to 312 Law Exchange Bldg Jacdkmilk. IFlor


D, C. ASHLEY, President.


J G. CRANFORD


W. P. BOB BT8. V. P. sI GS. Mgr.


J. F. FENDEB C. H. BROWN
VxcE-PBamIome
S. H. BE, Secretary sad Treasurer


J. N. BBAY









THE WUnKLY INDODUSTULJAL R0ED. 5


THE SUWAx RIVER.
The author of that pretty and famous
s1g, "Way Down Upon the Suwannee
Uie," whoever he may have been, had
appreciation for the beauty of nature.
That he had spent days of pleasure along
the banks of this far-famed stream is cer-
tain.
Te those who have stood on the bluff
basks of this river, or who have enjoyed a
trip in one of the steamers which ply the
Suwannee can appreciate the sentiment
which led to the writing of this pretty
song. There is not a stream in the coun-
try possessing greater beauty than the
Sawannee river. On either side of the
stream the banks are high and the rivet
winds its way through one of the pret-
tiest section of the United States. Its
waters ae clear and the stream deep for
Oe of its width. Being confined to a
marrow chanel, the Suwannee river is one
of the most rapidly lowing streams in the
United States and carries a tremendous
volume of water to the Gulf of Mexico.
Along its banks there abounds game,
and the fishing anywhere along the river
-is excellent, the best varieties of fresh
water fish abounding to almost a remark-
able extent.
The timber along the banks of the Su-
wannee river are mostly esdar, oak and
pine, though there are a great many other
varieties. Vast fortunes have been made
from the red cedar, which has been sold
to the big manufacturers of pencils, such
as the Eagle and Faber companies, and
lhas been sent to all parts of the world.
The lands along this stream are fertile
and the climate delightful.
At Dowling Park, the Suwannee makes
-one of its most graceful and one of its
prettiest bends. Gracefully it has select-
ed its way through the rolling country
there and as it winm its way for miles
through that section, making many curves
and beds, it gives every facility for pleas-
re aad recreation, as well as supplying
mnaa of transportation for vast interests.

CAN MAKE EaOUGV COTTON.

Uxbah Spanner Thinka Capital aid Laber
Only Needed.
London, June &8-In the course of an in-
terview published in the Daily Chronicle
this morning, Charles Wright Macara,
president of the International Federation
of Master Cotton Spinners, said that while
*e did not underestimate the importance
of cultivation of cotton in the colonies, he
regarded it absurd for statesmen to talk of
smothering speculators with British cotton.
Many years, Mr. Maeara said, must
elapse before any substantial supply can
be obtained from British asurces Much
is possible by the development of the
industry in India, but for the present
Great Britain is mainly dependent on the
Southern States of Amarica, where there
are immense probabilities.
The British commissisa which has just
returned from the Somthern States has
not reported, but Mr. UMeara said he be-
lieved its report wouid be a unanimous
declaration that there is virtually a legiti-
mate field for the e-steision of cotton cul-
tivation in the Ujuited States, the chief
difficulty being to get the requiste kind of
labor.
Mr. Macars tlhnks ti, growing of cotton
at 10 cents a pound ought to be remuner-
ative enough to attramt capital, and that
if labor and. empital won!' obtainable there
is little doA t that the Ul tited States might
add midllis of balies ( her present odt-


put. "Until then, it will be our duty,"
Mr. Macara said, "while encouraging the
British cotton growing movement, also to
do what we can to further the systematic
extension of cotton cultivation in the
Southern States, where I am convinced
our chief hope of an adequate supply of
the raw material at present lies."

NHW COURT HOUSE.

Architect's Plans Have Been Accepted at
St. Angstine.
St. Augustine, June 12.-The building
committee of the board of county commis-
sioners has held two busy sessions today
in consultation with A. E. McClure, of
the firm of McClure & Holmes, of Jack-
sonville, constructing architects for the
new county court home.

The committee, consisting of Chairman
Genovar and Commissioners Colee and
Mahr, met with Mr. McClure, who came
over from Jacksonville with the detailed
plans and specifications for the building.
The commissioners have gone over the
plans very carefully and have accepted
the same wiih a few minor alterations.
The architects, after amending the speci-
fications, will advertise for bids for the
construction of the new court house for
a period of fifteen days, after which the
contract will be awarded and building be-
gin at one.
The commissioners and architects have
used excellent judgment in planning the
new building. It will not only be orna-
mental, but it will be erected with a view
to the convenience of all county officers
for many years to come. It will be of the
Spanish style of architecture and will be
erected on the site occupied by the pres-
ent court house.
The structure will be of light brick, with
red brick and terra cotta trimmings. There
will be two entrances, the main one on
Charlotte street and a side door opening
from Treasury street. From the main
entrance there will be a wide corridor run-
ning through from east to west. The first
office on the left will be occupied by the
county clerk, with spacious vaults adjoin-
ing. The first office on the right will be
that of collector. Then will follow the
offices of judge, sheriff and assessor.
The greater part of the second floor
will be occupied by the court room to
be fifty feet square, to the rear of which
will be located the petit jury rooms. The
balance of the second floor will be used by
the county commissioners and the grand
jury rooms. The entire building will be
fitted out with all modern sanitary im-
provements and will be heated by steam.
It is expected that bids will be awarded
and the work of tearing down the present
structure will begin early in July and the
new court house will be erected and in
use before January 1st. The estimated
cost is between $35,000 and $40,000 not
including fixtures and furniture.
When the building is completed St.
Johns county will boast of one of the finest
court houses in the state and already has
one of the best jails, and these, too, with
little or no indebtedness.

MNelms Bring Good Prices.
Watermelon and cantaloupe buyers have
been plentiful in Oxford for the last few
days, and have purchased many carloads,
paying from $150 to $200 per car for wat-
ermelons. Mr. Nugent, the Ocala canta-
loupe man, has shipped several refrigera-
tor cars of cantaloupes during the last few
days, and will continue shipping this week.


There is always a demand for good

tools-especially AXES

The Celebrated

RIXFORD AXE

Is the best mey amd s aM a pro-
|due and Ias the freatet reMutatlo.
o u"Mi mill, turpeutie a"d eross-tie
men of any towl ever made.
If you waMt the best semd yur
orders to


W. H. Briggs Hardware Co.

SSole Sutherm Alets

VALDOSTA, GEORGIA

Jobbers of Mill and Turpentimne Spples







Atlantic Coast Line

-THROUGH SCHEDULE---
FLORIDA, GEORGIA, ALABAMA, VIRGINIA,
NORTH CAROLINA, SOUTH CAROLINA
The Great Highway of Travel betwes

FLORIDA, the EAST, WEST, NORTH and SOUTH
CONVENIENT SERVICE, ELEGANT PULLMAN ErUIMENT, MAAGWICENT MNIG CAR
NEW YORK AND FLORIDA SPECIAL
iRote of tf e -DIXIE FLYERk
Celebrated FLORIDA AND WEST INDIAN LIMITED
!TrIls MONTGOMERY. L. d N.
CHICAGO AND FLORIDA LIMITED
CONVENIENT METHOD OF TRAVELIWO
Atlanti Couat UsI onM tbouand mle tickets ood over ifteeo tbhousad mi of
lrod, embracig al porto of the Sout. at all priepal eMas. at rte of
n each. Limited to one rear from date of purchase. fult ooeomd etou d relnalte
btormatioa reading rate, schedule, Pullan service, e., caflo Atlsatl Coast ime
Tlket Agent, or write
FRANK C. EYLSThON W .L &T AK. Trasevs Parm A t.
rast Paum sL W. MJay Street. JAsMUMmVLLE.
W. J. CRIG, PFs. Traff.Mgr., WmiidtM C.






Standard Clothing Company



: One Price One Price


S FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHES,
y7 and 19 West Bay Street, JacksomvMle FPoIa,
S tets ud Nawe 1ats Speelda Attetiu Givet to Ml Oders.





P rinting Send your order to the Industrial
Record. Prompt and -atisfactory








* THU WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Georgia and Florida Bankers Had Interesting

Joint Session at Atlanta.


The joint session of the Georgia and
Florida Bankers at Atlanta the past week
was one of great importance, not only
to the banking interests of the two States
represented, but to all the interests of the
South, bringing about as it did an ex-
change of ideas and a study of the con-
ditions of the two States.
Everything indicated that Georgia and
Florida are enjoying great prosperity, the
bankers reporting plenty of money in the
till and every industry active and in good
shape.
There were various measures of impor-
tance considered, the most important of
which was in the request for a sub-treas-
ury at Atlanta or any other point in Geor-
gia that the government might select. The
bankers took up a number of important
questions which have or may come up
before the legislatures of the two States
or the National Congress.
New ideas were brought out and ques-
tions, with light thrown on them from all
sides, were settled in a manner that the.
bankers believe will be for the best inter-
ests of all concerned.
The address of the Hon. Charles H.
Treat, treasurer of the United States, was
spoken of as above the average. The ad-
dress touched on many questions of vital
interest, and the manner in which the
distinguished speaker handled them, show-
ed that in placing him in the front rank
of financiers no error has been made.
Social pleasures were many during the


visit of the Florida bankers, and these will
always be remembered with pleasure by
thoae so fortunate as to participate in
them. "It seemed," said one of the bank-
ers, "as though our hosts could not do
enough for us, and our visit to the Geor-
gia capital will always be remembered
with unalloyed pleasure."
Letter from Alabama.
The Florida Bankers' Association has re-
ceived a letter from the Alabama Bankers'
Association, asking them to meet with
the latter next year in Birmingham. No
action has as yet been taken on the invi-
tation, but, though the invitation is highly
appreciated, it is regarded as probable that
the Florida organization will meet alone
next year.
The joint sessions with the Georgia As-
sociation, the first at Atlantic Beach last
year and the second just completed, have
been productive of great go(l, but the
sentiment seems to be somewhat against
always holding joint sessions. Many be-
lieve that breaks in the joint sessions
from time to time, is for the best, and the
Florida Association will probably meet
alone next year.
The next meeting of the Association will
be held at Hotel Continental, Atlantic
Beach.
Who Were Present.
Among those present at the joint ses-
sion in Atlanta during the first two days
of this week, the following may be men-
tioned:


Edward W. Lane, president Atlantic Na-
tional Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Arthur F. Perry, vice-president Florida
Bank and Trust Company, Jacksonville.
H. H. Buckman, attorney Florida Bank-
ers' Association, Jacksonville.
T. E. Jordan, receiving teller Florida
Bank and Trust Company, Jacksonville.
H. Robinson, president of Commercial
Bank, Jacksonville.
G. R. DeSaussure, cashier National Bank,
Jacksonville.
W. D. Barnett, vice-president National
Bank, Jacksonville.
H. B. Carson, cashier State Bank of Kis-
simmee.
E. M. Martin, cashier Island City Na-
tional Bank, Key West.
J. M. Bryant, vice-president Citizens'
Bank, Lakeland.
A. H. Levin, director Live Oak Bank,
Live Oak.
F. F. Bardin, vice-president and cashier
State Exchange Bank, Lake City.
E. C. Ralph, cashier First National Bank,
Miami .
William H. Tompkins, assistant cashier
Bank of Biscayne, Miami.
W. H. Milton, vice-president and cashier


First National Bank, Marianna.
A. Simpson, Jr., cashier Citizens' Bank,
Madison.
T. Pictor Watlaw, vice-president State
Bank of Orlando, Orlando.
T. T. Munroe, president Central National
Bank, Ocala.
C. A. Oevner, cashier The Citizens Bank,
Perry.
W. L. Perry, cashier The First National
Bank, Perry.
W. L. Blount, Jr., director First Na-
tional Bank, Pensacola.


C. W. Lamon, prebidet American Na-
tional, Pensaeola.
John T. Dismukes, president first Na-
tional, St. Augustine.
8. E. Teagen, cashier Capital (Cty, Tl-
lahassee.
E. W. dLittyens, assistant cashier t-
change National, Tampa.
G. W. Saxon, president Capital City
Bank, Tallahassee.
Thomas Hopkins, cashier Orlando Bank
and Trust Company, Orlando.
Fred W. Hoyt, president Firm Natibel
Bank, Fernandina.
New Oers.
The officers elected for the ensuing yar
were as follows:
President, George D. Munroe, Quiney;
vice-presidents, F. W. Hoyt, of Fernandlua,
George E. Lewis of Tallahassee, Geo. W.
Allen of Key West, F. T. Moaes, of
Ocala, and John Trice of Tampa; eem-
tary-treasurer, George B. DeBaummar
Jacksonville (re-elected); executive comeR,
A. F. Perry of Jackonville, T. P. DmI -
ham, of Jacksonville, E. 8. rill of Palat-
ka, John Trice of Tampa, and John T.
Dismukes of St. Augustine.
F. W. Hoyt, Fernandina, read an inter-
esting paper on "The Man ia the Cage,"
and W. V. Knott, state treasurer of Flor-
ida, presented a paper on the policy of the
State in depositing State funds in baks
throughout the State.
Resolutions were adopted recommend-
ing the appointment of a special commit-
tee on legislation, with special referaea
to the examination of State banks by the
State government, and aho to deuitely
define and enumerate bak holidays ad
their observance when they fall on Sun-
day.


TURPENTINE


OPERATORS!!!


We Have a Proposition in Cattle and Pecans

THAT IS A MONEY MAKER.


Use your


Grazing Land


For Pasturing


Herefor'd

and

Short-horn



CATTLE.


I -


Your


Garden

snd

Farming Lands



For Raising


PECAN

TREES.


Write Marion Farms, ocala. Fla.

We'll be Glad to Explain.










THU WBIKLY INDUSTRIAL BRCORD. I


ALCOHOL AS FUEL.

Hery Ford Says Free Aeeel Will Re-
elatismse Irican lustri
Henry Ford, the well known automo-
bile builder, is authority for the statement
that the passage of the bill permitting the
free and unrestricted manufacture of veg-
etable alcohol will work a revolution in
the Amerinn industrial situation. The
most important point made by Mr. Ford,
who has all along been an enthusiastic
supporter and worker in the interests of
the measure, is that the benefits of the
bill will apply not alone to manufacturing
idustriese, but to rural communities as
well In fact, he states that it will prove
a greater boon to the farmer than to the
city industries.
Paradoxical as it appears, Mr. Ford is
S a even more enthusiastic farmer than he
is an automobile builder. He has a farm
about eight miles from Detroit, where he
has lived for twenty years. He owns sev-
eral hundred head of stock and engages in
agrniults onm a large Male. Here it is
that, surmrouded by cows and horses, be
egua out the moat difficult problems in
hordeas vehicle, and here, too, he retires
from business worries when they come too
fast.
During the past three years he has de-
voted an his leisure time, a great deal of
thought and research, not only to the in-
vention of motors which will use alcohol
as fuel, but to the study of the production
of alcohol itself. He now has in course of
preparation an exhaustive article which
will be ready for publication in a few days
in which he will teat of the various uses
to which alcohol can be put on the farm
an dthe many vegetables and grains from
which it may be made, and how.
Mr. Ford is now perfecting a motor-
tractor, which, using alcohol for fuel, may
be used for all manner of farm work, from
hauling the gag-plow, through all the
other operations now performed by horses,
to transporting the produce to market.
The tractor Mr. Ford believes to be the
most practical form of power application
to this kind of work. It will have a speed
of six mile per hournd, with 40 initial
horse-power, geared down to that speed,
will be capable of performing the heaviest
work on the farm.
Here are some interesting facts. Alco-
hol may be made from practically every
specie of vegetable and grain grown on a
farm. Not only this, but in all eases the
original product retains almost its full
market or food value after the alcohol has
been extracted. Corn and other fodder is
quite as valuable for feeding stock after
as before it has been deprived of its alco-
holie properties. Mr. Ford cites the case
of the Hiram Walker distilleries at Walk-
erville, aress the river from Detroit. Five
to six thousand head of stock are fat-
S tened on the corn mash which comes from
the distillery after the alcohol has been
extracted for making the famous Walker
whiskey. When potatoes, beets and simi-
lar vegetables are used for alcohol making,
the residue is as valuable as it originally
was for starch. It will be seen, therefore,
that the actual cost of the alcohol is the
mere cost of extracting it.
Nor is this latter item a serious one.
No immense plant is necessary---no costly
machinery. It is not even necessary to
manufacture it on a large scale. Every
farmer ean afford to make enough for his
own individual une, and no more. And he
can makes it as he does butter, cheaper,
considering his leisure at certain seasons,
thanthan can the factory competitor.


There can never be a monopoly of the al-
cohol industry.
So simple is the process of extracting
alcohol, it may be peridicted that every
farmer's silo will be become an alcohol
distillery-by the simple addition of steam
pipes to heat the fermented contents to a
sufficient temperature to give off the light
gas which, precipitated by passing through
cooling tubes, becomes alcohol.
The possibilities of industrial develop-
ment opened up by the passage of this bill
are, according to one authority, unlimited
and unrestricted to any class of people or
branch of industrial endeavor. More than
all others, however, will the farmer profit
by this measure. It will banish drudgery
from the farm and place within the reach
of the ruralite luxuries and mechanical
help never before possible or even dreamed
of.
"And, more than all else," says Mr.
Ford, "it will demonstrate that, despite
pessimistic 'muck rake' writers and politi-
cians, that the people do rule-that, once
show that a measure is for the public
good and no power on earth can prevent,
though it may stay, the ultimate passage
of that measure."

Operators in Florida have got next to
the Savannah bluff that Jacksonville
could not maintain an open market and
that prices here would drop perceptibly.
Prices have kept up to the standard quo-
tations and those who have shipped their
turpentine and rosin to this port have
saved the differential in freights. That
doesn't look like a loss to the operators.
And the best part of it is that the receipts
are continuing heavy at this port and in-
dications point to a steady growth of busi-
ness here.

Senator Mallory has followed the lead
of Congressman Clark. The Senator
wants the United States Government to
make a complete survey of the hEerglades
to ascertain whether or not the proposition
to drain this great swamp is feasible.
Senator Mallory may find on file at the
geological survey headquarters several re-
ports which express a doubt as to the
practicability of the scheme. These re-
ports are from competent engineers who
have made the survey.

Congressman Frank Clark appears to have
called the Governor's hand in the Ever-
glades drainage question. He has intro-
duced a bill asking the government to
spend $3,000,000 for draining the Ever-
glades. The bill states that this $3,000,-
000 is only to assist the State of Florida
in accomplishing this great undertaking.
With three million to help, the people of
Florida would like to inquire how much
would be necessary to complete the work.
if the Governor was to go it alone.

TO PUSH EXTENSION.
President Baldwin Promises Trains to
Athes by Sept. i.
Mr. George J. Balwin, says that trains
will be running from Gainesville to Athens
by Sept. 1.
Mr. Baldwin made the inspection of the
'work in company with General Manager
Douglas and Chief Engineer Epps. "We
mean to have the grading completed, the
track laid and large engines and coaches
running between Gainesville and Athens
by that time," said Mr. Baldwin.
The section through which the exten-
sion of the road is to pass is a rich farm-
ing country, and Mr. Baldwin says he is
better pleased with it every time lie visits
there. The farmers are progressive, use
tile most improved methods and are well
to do.


JOHN N. C. STOCKTON,

REAL ESTATE, STOCKS AND BONDS.

CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED


ROOM 4. UEDEMAN BUILDING.


JACKGONVILLE. FLA


SJ. A. Craig ( Bro.
S239 W. Bay Street EVERETT BLOCK.

Leaders in Men's and Bo7s' Fine Cloth-
ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.

Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.




Malsby Machinery Company

of Jacksonville. Fia.

Portable, StatisEary Eies and llm,
SSaw M u&l Workt HaicMr.
Prtable Outfits a Speialty.
Write for hamM ilostrated 196 cat.
Cor Ward and Jefferson

Streets.


)l!XXXXXXXXXXXXXSfX!CXXXXXXX^^^


WHERE FORTUNES


AWAIT DEVELOPMENT


Thousands of acres of choice lands for Comercial
Pecan Groves and Peach Orchards are found along the
lines of the

Seaboaerd Air Line ailwafy,
Especially in Georgia and Florida.


IN THE LAND OF THE MANATEE,
Where killing frosts never come, we can offer you k circum-
scribed area of the most desirable lands for Citrus Fruits, Pine-
apples and Vegetables.
OUR TERRITORY is also noted for its Strawberry-pro-
ducing soil, from which large quantities of this luscious fruit is
annually shipped in mid winter and early spring to northern and
eastern markets-a season when they command the highest mar-


ket price.

Sindi
individui


Ccial interest taken in locating companies and
Is.


For information on all subjects pertaining to Industrial
Development, address
HENRY CURTIS J. W. WHITE


Ass't Gen'l Indl Agt.
Jacksonville, Fla.


Gen'i lndtrial Agt
Forttmouth. Va


rr~~r~rrrrrrrr-- --------rc~ i;


I










2=IN W 1Y DIDUSTEAL ANUOORD.


Conditions in the Woods Wore than they

Have Been for Years,


Reports from some sections of the naval
stores belt brings the information that the
condition of the woods is something fear-
ful for this season of the year. Later in
the season this kind of a deluge was to
have been anticipated, but it was not ex-
pected tha it would come at this time.
The heavy rains have banked water in
the woods and the laborers refuse in many
eases to work. In the central part of the
State, and in fact from Jacksonville to
Tampa, there is a great deal of water, sad
it is with the greatest difficulty that the
operators are conducting their work. In
some eases the water stands several inches
deep, while in the low marshy sections
of the turpentine farms it is impossible
to work.


RAn.ROAD CHANoES

New Ofciale Have Bea mn ame for
Gainsvila and Gulf.
Official circulars from the office of First
Vice-Presiden A. P. Stuckey of the
Gaineaville and Gulf announce the appoint-
meat of C. N. Atkinson as general mana-
ger of this road, with headquarters in
Gaimesville. Mr. Atkinson is a man of
broad experience, being an extensive rail-
road builder and contractor who has been
making his home in Kansas City. He has
already arrived, and has assumed his du-
ties.
It is also announced that Julius Spanier
of Chicago has been appointed industrial
agent of the Gainesville and Gulf, effective
at oce. Mr. Spaier will likely make his
headquarters in Chicago or some other
large Western city.
With the proposed extension of the
Gainesville and Gulf from Fairfield south
to Tampa, the new management will exer-
cis every effort to induce immigration
along its line. The road will traverse one
of the richest and most fertile sections of
the State, and it is estimated that thous-
ands of homeseekers will be attracted here.
J. B. Cutler, superintendent of the
Gainesvile and Gulf, has returned from
an official visit to Fairfeld and other
points on the south end. He has made a
thorough investigation of the conditions,
and reports prospects of one of the best
melon erops that has been recorded in that
section of Alachua county for several
years
Mr. Cutler states that the movement of
cantaloupes has already begun, two or
three cars having already been moved in
crate lots. Watermelons are also begin-
ning to move, and altogether, with the
acreage and the indi ctions, the Gaines-
ville and Gulf will probably handle more
of this class of business in proportion to
mileage than any other road in the State.
E. B. Polk, of Lakeland, civil engineer
of the Gainesville and Gulf, was in Gaines-
ville on official business Friday. Mr. Polk
would say nothing in regard to the proposed
future movements of the Gainesville and
Gulf, but it is understood that it will not
be many weeks before the construction of
the road from Fairfield south to Tampa
will begin. It was also a current rumor
upon the streets of Gainesville a few days
ago that two capitalists from Chicago
were there, and that they came to investi-
gate the advantages which would be afford-
ed by the extension of the Gainesville and
Gulf.


So far as heard from, the conditions are
growing worse. The rains which fell the
latter part of last week and the first part
of the present week have served to make
the conditions worse than they were ever
known to be at this season of the year.
The reports received were from those
who wrote during the early part of the
week. It may be that the conditions have
improved to some extent, but this is hard-
ly probable. At any rate, if there has
been an improvement, it has not been a
great one and the operators are anticipat-
ing trouble for some time to come.
None of the stills have shut down, as a
matter of course, the owners working with
all of the men they can get to work under
the present conditions.


Strage Weather at Miami.
For the past several days Miami
has been visited with some very strange
weather for the month of June. On Fri-
day afternoon a heavy southeast wind, ac-
companied by rain, set in, and during Fri-
day night it was a constant gust of heavy
winds and rain. Old sailors, who have
been on the water for years, claimed that
at times the wiid blew at the rate of fifty
miles per hour. On Saturday a northeast
storm warning was received at the local
weather bureau, still the wind kept in-
creasing from the southeast, and remained
in that direction throughout Saturday and
Sunday. On Sunday another storm warn-
ing was received, for a southeast storm.
The tides were the heaviest for years, but
little or no damage was done to shipping.
The steamer Martinique, which was due
in port on Saturday from Key West, found
a safe anchorage in the vicinity of
Knight's Key, remaining there until the
storm abated. Capt. Dillon, of the Marti-
nique, who has sailed these Southern wa-
ters for many long years, says this was
the heaviest storm he ever experienced
during the month of June. Through the
country there was no damage done, with
the exception of breaking off some of the
new growth on the citrus trees. There are
several Miami boats that are still out,
and there is considerable anxiety felt for
their safety.

RAC & DODGE.

New Ineranc Firm Composed of Herbert
B. Race adt Eugne D. Dodge.
Mr. Herbert B. Race, who for a number
of years has been engaged in the fire in-
surance business, has entered into a part-
nership with Mr. Eugene D. Dodge to do
a fire and liability insurance business.
The young men are both well known
and identified with the interests of Jack-
sonville. Mr. Race has been in the busi-
ness for a number of years, and is an act-
ive, energetic, progressive business man.
Mr. Dodge is also well known, and has
scores of friends here. He has just fin-
ished a most remarkable race for the office
of sheriff, and has shown himself to be a
hustler.
The new firm is now located in the Mu-
tual Life Building, corner of Main and
Forsyth streets. After July 1st they will
have offices in the new Realty' building,
corner of Newnan and Forsyth streets.


Southern Marbinery & Supply Co,
NOOIIPORATED.
MNchinist and Eani_ .I
gLies, Bders, law, Sadn, Planing and Vee a r1 MMairy. omCrs k-
Sin., Water Tuba Boloer, Pumps ard naeie Oetfa. OCaeta
for Omplete Ouat a s ty. lty. s slPk d e t fur-
.. .. . a ai m.


Hee- 00, Jmemavto% Fla.


Successful Men

appreciate, use and advise Life Insu-
rance. The advice of successful men
is worth following. Insure in

THE PRUDENTIAL .NNIW


WALTe P. F.ET .Maner.
-a Wea Ur kst.Ve


JOBN F. DEYDU, Paes
iNeese.N I---- NJ


PLANTERS


"Old Time" Remedies

THE JOY OF THE HOUSEHOLD.
These four great remedes, nWaam To, amasse, Come sa
and Cubam 1O ae the Joy of the hoehold. With themsar at had, a
ma is ready for any *mer. H has a safe, reliable a d ay rttf
for wife, children, self or t With thes remedies you a s th
doeter's hands out of your pockets, and yet have a healthy, h famey. J
Besides, you ma ure your stoek of ay ailmet that may th em. 1
IUSJAN TA-Ja Liqud or Powder pom-a the gWnt mhry Medie. It
will all firms of Lier, and Kidney ompliateo, Prmeda (Chil and Maleri
Fever. Crms the common ailmnt of children; and as a lazathe teni it s without
an equal-afe and reliable. In the liquid, it il extrmely pa table-.ve children
like t--ud it is READY FOR USB.
BEMIDICTA is a womma'a mediie. It wil ll l the disease eo to
women, and ersed as Female Trouble. I will bring youth bMek to the sadel woman
who has m one sfferaig besaue she thought it wommnr lit. It wil ear for th
young gr jst nterMg womanhood; and pepare-s youg wema mr the ared
duties of we ad mother.
CUDBM ROE IP-The instant Paint Killer, for eher maa or hat. Relle
intantly, olic, Oamp, Chotera Morbus, Diarrhoea, Dyst-try and lk Headache.
For oa in horse it u infallibl remedy and is uankt to giverf i ve
minutes.
CUBAM OIL-The Bet san ast Mare Lim- at. Isoam for ets,
aed or tora mnah, and will isutantly relieve the paim. Cur le -s a adtiej.
s at bur-s, bruises at aore, ebpord hands ant fae, are a tender 1@s.
Reeves rhamati ptais, lame beak, ijot, and i. n teok ames wi r fnam so
erathes, thrsh, splt, collar aore, aaddle als, and dieaseed hen.e
Write us fa Pdrm.

SPENCER MEDICINE CO.. Chattanooga. Ton.
- - - -


You Want a TurphenUtn tcstlen?


Yaou Want any Kind of Fleur Lae-d?
You Mean Busness?
C.tU an er Write so

SJ. H. Livingston & Sons,
OCALA. FLOkILDA.






Standard Electric Co.,


JACKSONVILLE FLA.

IFEL ANID BUILDIIIN MATMAL.


The Southern Fuel & Supply Co.
- ,ru -. - -am. 4 .&m- _-, -..^ L- ^^-
Feet 9r ebd inl- FI


poomift Tam^ M






1


THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RBCORD.


MARCUS CONANT
'TePS Furveral Director and Embalmer, ",J .'k,,
No. 2240 ov, rw
- - -- -- - S- - --- s . . -- ------ -- -- -- -- -


Commissaries and


Retailers:


OUR HIGH GRADES OF

PEANUT and COCOANUT BRITTLE
Will increase rour demand for Candies we Manufacture.

Stick Candy, Mixed Candy, Penny Goods Chocolate and Package Goods.
-' "" THE E. J. SMITH Co., Jacksonville,,, a.
.. m. *


j~p ppg-g ---- ----------S SSS SS SSS SS SSS SS


swet by T ik Cycle.
Pa.ita-, Je 11.--A eycone of conid-
erabl violence visited this region late this
afternoon, tearing down houses, uproot-
ing tree ad doing great damage to grow-
ing crops. The wind was traveling from
the southwest toward the northwest.
Thus far no reports of fatalities have
been received.
NOTEK TO NON-3IZDNT.
Ia Cara Court, Fourth Judiial Circuit
o Florida, i ad for Duval Couty.
in Ch-eery.
Id Mort. Bak of Florida v. (th-
wrLh JL aradi% at al
To ChthimL r Caradeef and A J. Ford,.
mentor of the will of Mary Matte-
You a hereby required to appear to
the Bi of .o.plait led arein against
u tn e abore entitled eaae on or before
h 1th day July, A. D 1906.
The "Indutrial eo i h y de-
Igated as the nwpaper whi this
ader hall be pbled one a week for
idi eo-meative weeks.
t y hand amd seal of office this
21st day of Ma, A. D. 190.
P.D. CASIDBY, Clrk.
By E. J. CANDLE,
Dpty Claerk.
Owen Smith, Soloctor for Complainant.
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FO DIS-
CHARGIL
On October 1906, the undersigned will
make s al returns of him amounts as ad-
nmistrator of the estate of Henry C.
Straw, and apply to the Onty Judge of
Duval County, lorida, at his oefe, for the
pprT --Mem, and a discharge aa suh
ARTHUR F. PERRY,
As AdAinistrator of the Etate of Henry
CL Straw, doeeeed.


WHISKIES
GINS AND RUMS
FROM
$1.50 $5.00 per Gallon
...... AGNCY RO.......
Lewis 186 amd Mount Vernon
Pure ye W skies.
C trollers Blum's Monogram and Syl-
Tn Ry--Alento for Jungst Cineia-
ti and Pabet Milwaukee Beern.
Prices O application.
CHAS. BLUM 00C.
Ist ad 5J WEaT MAY STREET
JAC MgIOVLL f FLA.


PEC AN S
AMlyze te word.

permant Profst
Economy of care
Certaity of results
AMal crops
Nmoabl-p ue product
uperlor to all nut

THE OPPORTUNITY Of TODAY.
The first to plant a pecan grove
wil be the first to reap a
great harvest.
For full Iaformation apply to
THE 6RIFFIN6 BROS. Go.
Jacksonville, Florida.



Florida

Electric Co.

CGrtrtl Es incl Eulmrs
Sell and intaid complete Eeetric Light
and Power Pnts, Telephone Ex-
ehange. Wholesale Eletrie
Supple
Jackmvl e, la.


Sam'I P. Holmes& Co.
Stocks, Bas, Cotton.
Grand md Provisions.

NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE
Direct private wires to all exchanges.
local stocks and bonds a specialty.
lm Phe 81 Balwis Blck


Ell ill =!! :TTaeTTeoTTaoeTeoTovWToTT 77 _7 7


J. v.EST,
President.


D.~ M, I4AB.
V. J. muml.
Vwm.?mii,.


IL L mR2 n.
D. L VKIIAM
Am% S..Y ne Tnw&.


WEST FLYNN & HARRIS CO.
GENERAL OFFICES GEICMANIA BLDG a"vanI. Oe.
I WsT aBLnG. J.o.he-
NA NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
I AVAL STOanS a C IVo AT SAVAH e, JACKOVLLr.,
SFLA., ALaD FRNANDNA, FLA.
j Wholesale Grocers also Dealers in Hay, Grain and Heavy
Haernas.

I SOLE AGENTQS f.r t f cde.lated Union Tur,,tim Ann,
S0 X i and sVili U&Chiad Psassli. warV.,
MERCHANTS WAREHOUSES.
SAVAnAH, GA. JACKSONVILL, FLA. TAMPA, PLA


WILLIAM A. BOURS


JAMES 0. DARBY


WILLIAM A. BOURS & COMPANY
TUE OLDEST ESTA.BISED GRAIN AM SEE HOUSE U T STATE.
Hay, Grain, feed, Garden


Seeds, Poultry Supplies, flour,
Grits, Meal and Fertilizers.
OUR MOTTO: Prompt SimeEt, ReaMe ooaes.


catloes rree


206 EAST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


TIMBER!


TIMBER!


We buy and sell Turpentine Locations and Saw Mill Tracts, and sell for
others, Also deal in all kinds of Florida lands. Call on or address,
FLORIDA REALTY CO.
Phone 195. 23 Main St.,
Jacksonvill*, ria.


4
4
4
4
4
4
.4

4


TIMBER!


-- ---- ---- --- __ -- --- ------- ---?-~


- -


I


.ea .m.e. a...r










10 =WVsY I INDUSTNhL ZUnOD.


INDUSTRIAL IECORID
JANri A. dOLoOIL E- r--aM.. L
a 0.6 3e0em. a.iSA s l Emdis .

"Pueahso ess a 5s *Aurmv.


The Pl and, l" a ases.-
AN ommicatisbMhou be addremd
Tb* Induterlal Loord Cempnay.
Jek mvltlUo. F1n.
asmdb dimela eamd asnum OAmees as
sawantAh. .

w m. m.mater.
Adp by the xeaentiv Committee of
the Trana tor Amodia
-tamb e 1, 198, am ib eoierve om-

p ti orqa also of the -
eral a-m
At 1 7 ith, 1K as the sial
r~M a o thOreitto Ctma (Growes' As-
the Oly oa r of the T 0 A.
ro lmmonded to hmber people by soa
relation doptd by the GI Ha Swawi t
Amaistim.
TRE RECONsl OYNL
The &uMi a plant and the main ode-



ecr heart of the great taurpetie ar
yea ow pine iautriaa
trad the entire Soth
The STavaaah, Ga., omee i in the Board
of Trade Build vana i the lend-
ig open naval stres market oi the wr
NOTIC TO PATbOW.
AN puym for i h the n-
dstrs Dtacerd and a mri-pb tete
mut obe ae dies t he th ne in
Jacheer a g open marke set awoed to
ma ueollaectin a under any es.m a -m a

f muot wore the e oebe when d
and ae t mattneBa must he made d
to tis =e ed themes CId

In connetion with the last primary the
Record has one regret Our friend Jor-
dan down in DeSoto county, was defeated
for the legislature

The Jacksonville open market has proved
a success in its infany. Those who have
bee most interested in the movement de-
elare that the Board of Trade made no
mistake when it adopted the recommenda-
tions of the naval stores committee.

Already there is a tendency toward
Jackonville in the shipping of naval
stores. The fear that Savannah was to
take everything when Jare onville was
declared an open market has v nighed.
The operators of Florida have too muche
pride in their State and in the chief city
of Floarida to work in the interest of Sa-
vaonah.

Savannah voters turned things upside
down at the primary election for Cht-
ham county Tuesday. The league which
fought graft, gambling and corruption in
county and municipal affairs won a signal
victory. Thi day of the grafter and the
gambler is past in the Forest City.

The export docks of the Atlantic Coast
Line Railway have presented a scene of
activity during the past few weeks. As
many as eight schooners were loading
there at one time and there is a great deal
of stock on hand. The saw-tooth wharves
am a great convenience to shipping and
loading there is much easier than on any
of the other docks at this part.


THUs IMIORATION QUESTION.
Some of the papers which have always
manifested a keen interest in the matter
of immigration are beginning to suggest
measures for the consideration of thi
next legislature. While there is every rea-
son for the statement that all of these
recom--de-d*4~ by those who have made
a study of the question are to be turned
down by the legislators, the discussion
has had one good effect at least.
It has been brought to the attention of
the people of the State that every indus-
try in Fr is suffering for the want
of labor and that the future has nothing
in stoe in the shape of improvement. The
manufactures of naval stores, the manu-
facturers of- lumber and the miners of
phosphate have been experiencing trouble
during the past three years in supplying
labor and all of them have reported that
instead of becoming better, conditions are
rapidly growing worse. The negro is fast
departing dem the farm, the mill and the
mine, and is Lading his way to the city
to engage in other callings, or to join the
army of colored people who are today a
menace to law and order in the towns of
the South. What negroes remain in the
woods are becoming lazy and are not in-
clined to take any interest in bettering
their conditions there. On the contrary,
they are beginning to prove a most unde-
sirable class and those who employ them
are beginning to feel that the day is not
far distant when some other class of labor
will have to be used. In fact it is fast
becoming apparent that the South must
take this labor problem by the horns and
master it if our many industries are to be
maintained.
All this is being brought to the front by
those who are discussing the matter at
the present time and the mass of evidence
which the press of Florida has to offer as
an argument in favor of a large appropri-
ation for immigration ought to be con-
elusive and ought to convince fair-minded
men who have the best interests of their
State at heart that there is a necessity for
prompt action. The legislatures of the
various States ought to take this question
up. It is there where relief can be had
the most readily. With 'air appropria-
tions for the work and with those in charge
of it who could be depended upon to
handle the situation intelligently, there
ought to be some good accomplished.
There is mush to do. It is harder to se-
cure settlers for the South than for any
other part of the United States. This
fact was demonstrated by a committee
which recently made a study of the mat-
ter among the immigrants who come to
this country from Europe. Three-fourths
of them preferred the East or the middle
West. But a few of them desired to come
South.
But all this ought to spur the several
Southern states to renewed efforts. There
is a large class in the middle West who
ought to be induced to come South, and
there are a great many in European coun-
tries who would make desirable citizens.
Something must be done. Conditions de-
mand prompt action even now. What the
conditions will be two years hence on one
can &a b t unless something is done and
sonet. g accomplished, the indications
are that they are to continue to grow
worse

Between bad weather and poor prices,
the life of the naval stores operator is
somewhat of a burden just at this time.


THE OPEN MARKET RbkPuk v A SUCCESS.

At the meeting of the Board of Trade of JackMevll as Wednedlay,
There was a report from the naval store committee which s f great im-
portance and gratifying to the business interest of Jackrvle. Ths 1 prtp
submitted was to the eoect that the ope market for Jashlsaevb 1M
proved decided ccess.
S The report was submitted by Colonel W. M. Toe er, preimM t of th
Naval Store Export Cempaay, who i a member of that comittet, and who
Uha taken a active iateret in the movemet for an open mat for naval
stem in this city. Colonl Toomer was not at all dobtful as to the eo
of the plan and spoke positively. Colond Tooer reported verbally ad
stated at the outaet that the progress made in the mswommt to make Jack-
senvlle an open market had proved stisfactory and that the lnicatio-
were bright. Contiuing, he pointed oet varu s reseemu why there was prm-
ise of coatinued aucce and claimed that the movement iaugutai by the
Board of Trade at its last meeting was a wise e.
He called attention to the fact that ace the ope market was declared
there had been one cargo exported an that this was the hit veal which
ad ever called at this port for a cargo of naval steor for Turoa ports.
Other members of the committee, as wel as the Jacmmve factors are
encouraged at the program of the open market thu far.

V-----


NEWS FROM CARRABELLE.

Carrabelle, Fla., June 13, 1906.
Capt. and Mrs. John R. Blocker an-
nounce the marriage of their daughter,
Miss Janie Beatrice, to Mr. David Pies
Monroe Cooey, on the evening of Wed-
nesday, June 20th, 1906, at eight o'clock
at the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.
Mr. Cooey has lived in Carrabelle twice
in the past six years. Each time he held
the responsible position as operator for
the C. T. & G. R R. Co. Mr. Cooey is
now holding a position in Savannah, Ga.,
and it is said lie and his charming bride
will in future reside in that city.
Dr. W. L. Moore, of Tallahassee, was be-
fore the council Wednesday last asking for
a franchise for a telephone system, with
long distance connection with Tallahassee
by January 1, 1907. Mr. W. C. McKissack
and Dr. E. P. Webb were also before the
council asking for a franchise for a town
telephone system. The matter was post-
poned until the next regular meeting for
further consideration.
The Crescent City didn't make the trip
Tuesday, the heavy weather causing the
failure. Dredge Thos. H. Herndon lost one
of the mud scows during the blow. Capt.
John Shipkey's launch, "J. N. Coombs,"
started up the river to a place of safety,
one mile from the wharf the engine refused
duty and the vessel was blow ashore.
This is the majority of the damage that
Carrabelle suffered. 3,000 will cover en-
tire loss.
Mr. Mc. E. Rogerson, wife and baby, of
Pensacola, are visiting relatives here.
The second primary passed off quietly
yesterday, the only interest taken was for
Representative. Mr. 0. P. Rhoad led the
ticket here. He received 62 votes and J.
F. C. Grigg got 41 votes.
A car of horses will be in town Wed-
nesday for sale, and a livery stable is
talked of. It is much needed. Prospectors
come here wishing to go intothe country
to examine lands, but can't get suitable
conveyances. All the drays are busy and
the ones that own horses and buggies have
too much need for them to spare for such
trips.
Franklin County Lumber Company are
pushing the work on the dry kiln that is
to take the place of the burned one.
Senator A. J. Alford went up to Craw-
fordsville last week to get lumber for his
planing mill. Mills here are too far be-
hind with their orders.


Mr. A. F. Mahoney has bought Mr. H.
L. Mattair's interest in the Mattair Drug
Company, and in the future it will be eon-
ducted by Mr. Mahoney as "Maheay's
Pharmacy."

DEEPuMIG THE ST. JOHNI-

Chairmn Cummer of the Marher Commit-
te, gives His Views
Mr. W. W. Cummer, chairman of the
committee on rivers and harbors, was
asked at the meeting of the Board of
Trade Wednesday if his committee had
any information as to when the dredges
Jacksonville and St Johns were to re-
sume work on the river dredging. Mr.
Cummer stated that he had just returned
to the city and could not give any dedite
information.
He was confident that the work would
be resumed as soon as the appropriation of
$30,700, due on the continuing contract
and included in the present sundry civil
bill, shall be made available. The dredge
Atlantic was reported to be engaged on a
contract at Brunswick, although the com-
pany to which it belongs had secured a
contract to do some dredging, which is
badly needed, in the lower St. Johns.
Mr. W. A. Bours said that he had re-
cently talked with a St. Johns river pilot
and had been informed by the pilot that
there is at present twenty-seven feet of
water, at high tide, on the St. Johs bar,
and that while there is only nineteen and
one-half feet of water at the Trout creek
shoal, it is believed that the work of
dredging will be resumed very shortly
and that in a comparatively short time
the original project for twenty-four feet
of water will be completed.


Valuabe Peopprty SM.
Ocala, June 13.-Throug the instrumen-
tality of J. N. Strobbar, that beautiful or-
ange grove property on lake Paasoafkee,
belonging to James A. Harris, as been
sold to some wealthy parties who reside
at Atlanta, Ga., Boston, Mass., and To-
ronto, Canada.
The property will be converted into a
game preserve and elub house, and these
gentlemen will spend the winter moths
at Panasokee fishing and hunting. In
the meanwhile the orange trees will not
be neglected, but under the direction and
supervision of Capt. F. D. Pooser, of thi
city, will be put on a par with the best
orange groves in the State.


s6









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11



THE CHRISTIE-GROOVER 0u00

WHOLEbALE DRUGGISTS.


NOTICE TO AMED CHARTER. or until their successors shall be qualified. H. E PRTCHETT, Prs. P. L. UTERLAND, Vice-Pres. A. aL OVINTON, ee'y.
Notice is hereby given that the under- The following officers shall conduct the
sined will apply to the Honorable N. B. business of said corporation until the J. P. OOUNCIL Tres sad On'l Mr.
Browar, Governor of the State of Florida, next election of officers, to-wit: F. C.
on July 1h, 1906, for an amendment to Groover, president; M. W. Stewart, vice- T E CI TOOL
the charter of the Christie-Groover Drug president; H .E. Stewart, secretary and T CO UN CIL C
Company, which amendment was duly treasurer; and F. C. Groover, M. W. Stew-
adopted by resolution of three-fourths art, H. E. Stewart, C. E. Garner, Chas. General Oice: JACKSONVILLE, 7LA
vote of aid stockholders at a meeting duly P. Lovell, F. S. Hodges and E. E. Haskell, Factory: WAIINAISH, N. C.
called and held for that purpose on June directors.
12th, 196. Said amendment to be as Article 6 as amended shall be as follows: Ofaw -& ----- -d Teat& s_ m ^-
fellows: Article 6. The highest amount of in- wwwB
Article 1 as amended shall be as follows: debtedness or liability to which this cor-
Article 1. The name of this corporation portion can at any time subject itself isv n sa .
shal be The Groover-Stewart Drug Com- twice the amount of its capital stock.
pay, ad its principal place of business F .C. GROOVE'R, ss suuuuuasuuu,,mu g emm, emmuuu mh
be in the city of Jacksonville, Duval President.
O(ity, Florida, with branches in such Attest: H. E. STEWART, W W. W. Carse, Pes. W. C. Th1 a agsm'er. R. & Car e ad TreM
other points in this State and other states 6-16-5t Secretary. 4
of the United States and foreign countries
as the Board of Directors may determine. NOTICE TO AMEND CHARTER. *
Article 2 as amended shall be as follows: Notice is hereby given that the under- T am H ardw a e
Article L The general nature of the signed will apply to the Honorable N. B. *
buminbs to be transacted by this company Broward, Governor of the State of Florida, P
shall be to dal in, buy and sell, both at on the 16th day of July, A. D. 1906, to Wole l
wholesale ad retail, and to manufacture, amend the charter of the J. D. Horn Com- a
drugs, chemicals, patent medicines, phar- pany, which amendment was duly adopted
maeeutical products, perfumery, rubber by more than three-fourths vote of the aw
goods, 1druggst' sundries, glassware, and capital stock of said company, at a meet- H
all other products and articles usually ing called and held for that purpose on
umea in and appertaiimg to a wholesale June lIth, 1900, at the office of the com- Turpentine. Mill und Phosphate Supplies.
sad mstil drug business. pany in the city of Jacksonville, Florida, a
To act as broker, factor or agent in the said amendments being as follows, to-wit:
purchase or sale, both on commission and Article 5 as amended shall be as fol-
for its own account, any of the above lows: TAMPA, FLORIDA.
named articles. Article 5. The business of the corpora-
To operate, lese, hold, own and dispose tion shall be conducted by a Board of not s8 1 al 11111* 1111 1111111 I8 6 8 1 1 8 6 8 111180
of factories, warehouses necessary to the less than three, nor more than thirteen
conduct of its bainess. Directors, of which Board the President,
To'buy, sell and deal in syrups and ex- Vice-President, Secretary and Treasurer B. B. TATUM, Pres. J. L WALLACE, Vice-Prs. H. G. STONE, Seey-Tresa.
tracts of all kinds, soda water supplies shall be members. The Board of Directors
and equipment. shall be elected annually at the annual
To own, operate, lease, hire, buy and stockholders' meeting to be held on the
sell live stock and rolling stock necessary second Tuesday of August in each year, Ke e le y IA istit ute ,
for the operation of its business, and the president, vice-president, secre-
To subscribe for, purchase, receive, own tary and treasurer shall be elected annual- inorveraed $2.000C Stol .
ad hld for investment or otherwise, sell, ly by the Board of Directors chosen in
dispose of and make advances upon stocks, each year The offices of secretary and
ods, shares, securities or obligations of treasurer may be held by one person The A hrah of the original Lsli K ley Institut of Dwight, I hs just b
other corporations whatsoever, wherever date of the annual meeting of the said opened st coiner of Park anad Stockton Street& in Riverside, where a splendid
heated ororganiedn whatsoile the owner company may be changed by the stock- building, equipped with all the comfort and conveniees of a modern home or
or der of y such st bdsor oli- holders at any general or special meeting sanitarm has been secured and i ready for the reception of patient eed of
nations, to exercise all of the rights, pow- called for that purpose. treatment for-
es and privieges of ownership thereof Article 7 as amended shall be as follows: WHISKEY, OPIUM, MORPHINE, COCAI N, TOBACCO OR CIGARETTE HABIT
and to exercise all ad ay voting powers ArtTele 7. The highest amount of in- Write for full information as to treat ment, terms, ete.
thereof. To buy, sell, lease, mortgage or debtedness to which the corporation may
Acnvey real estate wherever situated or at any time subject itself shall be twice' R[rI ,t. 'Y INSTITUTE OF FLORIDA.
leated. To borrow money and secure the the amount of its authorized capital stock.
same ad moys otherwise owing, by Attt: AG. HAY, D. PresRident. TeJaa ep lL IS&$. Jami Fla.
mortgage, deeds notes or oth At t: erG. HAY, edent Teeph .
obligations therefore. To receive payment 6-16-5t Secretary.
for the capital stock suameribed for in
mroey, or in property, labor or services, at REMOVAL OF DISABILITIES. BEST TANKS
a just valuation therefore, in the discre- In the Circuit Court, Duval County. Flor- BEST TA N K
tion r judgment of the Board of Directors. ida. In Chancery.
To make contracts of any kind whatsoever In re Petition for Removal of Disabilities O N EA R T H
for the furtherance of its business and of Lizzette G. Robinson.
purposes. And to do and perform all This cause coming on to be heard upon
things, and to have the rights and privi- the report of the special master, and he Are made in Palatka, Fla., by G. M. Davis &
-ea of all corporations organized under having submitted the same, and it alp- Son. They use selected cypress wood. Work-
the general laws of Florida. hearing to the Court, from said report, manahip equal to the quality of the material.
SThe foregoing clauses shall be construed that the said Lizzette G. Robinson is a and the combination is aboltely unealled
as independent businesses, obejets and married woman over the age of 21 years, for durability. Write them for prices ad full
wers and the conduct of any specific and a resident of Duval County, Florida, information before you buy a tank.
or power shall not be held to and that she is capable and is competent
limit or restrict in any manner any other and qualified to take charge of and manage
Business or power of this corporation. her own estate and property and to be- 0. M. DAVIu & SON, Palata, Fla.
Article 5 as amended shall be as follows: come a free dealer.
Article 5. The business of this corpo- It is therefore ordered, adjudged and de-
ration shall be conducted by a Board of creed by the Court, that the said Lizzette
Directors consisting of not less than three, G. Robinson be, and she is hereby granted
nor more than eleven directors, and the fol- a license to take charge of and control
lowing offieers: A president, vice-president, and manage her own estate and property,
secretary and treasurer. The office of see- and to become a free dealer in every re- LEY DEN HAYNES dU 6,"
retary and treasurer may be held by the aspect. To sue and Ie sued, and to hind L E Y E N H AE S
same person. T1e Board of Directors shall herself in all respects as fully as if she
be elected by the stockholders at the an- were unmarried.
nual meeting to be held on the first Tues- Done and ordered this 13th day of June, BROKE RIS
day of August in each year, but this date A. D. 1906.
may be changed by the stockholders at R. M. CALL,
a annual meeting. 6-16-5t Judge. Stocks. Bonds, Cotton and Grain
The Board of Directors may appoint such
other oaeers and fx their duties, as in FOR SALE-Half interest in fine tur-
their discretion they may see At. pentine location; 25 crops being worked; Correspondent Private Wire to
The Board of Direetrs shall elect the 42 crops round, guaranteed. Frieght on M. J. SAGE & CO. New York. New Orleana
officers of the company and the president spirits to Jacksonville and Fernandina. 9
and vice-president shall be elected from cents per cwt. Will make 700 barrels spir- 42 Broadway, New York and Chicago.
among the members of the Board of Di- its this year. Address Box L, Baldwin, .
reters until the next annual election, Fla. Phone 121 est Building Bay and LAXra St.


-- -----^i~.










LZ THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL BRCORD.



Jacksonville Groce.ry Comp'y

... WhYee Be. *-ee arad Isllers Sgppls.
OfW~rer mod Wa Vkes Washet 0. O. A. I M 31seLgk s


A. W. BARRS, Real Estate and
I6 PIar street Insurance.

CITY PROPERTY A SPECIALTY.


EXPORT BUSINESS OF PENSACOLA IS
STEADILY INCREASING.
Pensacola, June 15.-Last week was
one of the best in the way of work for the
baymen that has been experienced in a
great many years.
The large number of steamers and sail-
ing vessels in port taking on cargoes of
lumber and timber, require a small army
of men, and there has not been a day that
the stevedores could secure a sufficient
number of skilled laborers and they were
compelled to take men who had no exper-
ience in storing timber or lumber.
Many million of feet were placed in
the holds of vessels and it is thought that
the coming week will see an equally large
amount of work. The men who do this
class of work receive $4, $6 and $8 per
day, but even at this salary not enough
could be secured, and stevedores were offer-
ing better pay to men who were skilled but
who were engaged in other work. The
large amount of timber taken on board
vessels during the week had reduced the
stocks considerably, and this had the effect
of steadying the timber market, which
had been on the decline for several weeks.
While the receipts were large both by
water and rail, the supply was quickly
taken. The quotations during the latter
portion of the week were 26 and 27 cents
per foot for timber of over thirty feet in
length, and from 21 to 22 cents for shorter
lengths. The lumber market is also firm
with a good demand.


NEW PLANING MILL.

Baker & Cremer to Build n Main Street-
sever Reances.
Baker & Cromer's new planing mill, to
be situated on the east side of Main street,
just south of the railroad crossing, will
soon be under way.
A permit was granted to the firm yes-
terday to erect the mill. The main build-
ing is to be 50 by 60 feet. The engine
room is to be 19 by 32 feet, the stable 19
by 44 feet, and the lumber shed is to be
20 by 20 feet.
W. S. Sumter was granted a permit to
erect two-story frame building for stores
and apartments, on the northwest corner
of Julia and North streets, and to erect
a one-story frame cottage on North street,
near Julia street.
C. D .Mills was granted a permit to
erect a handsome one and a half story
brick veneer residence at the corner of
Eighth and Hubbard streets. The size of
the residence will be 35 by 40 feet. The
roof will be of tile. When completed Mr.
Mills will have one of the handsomest
residences in North Springfield.


Claude L'Engle and A. K. Taylor, who
have published the Sun in Jacksonville
for several months, have purchased the
controlling interest in the Capital Pub-
lishing Company at Tallahassee and will


print the Sun from that city. The Capi-
tal Publishing Company has the contract
for the greater part of the State printing
and they will be the State printers.

They are still guessing at Gainesville
where the Gainesville and Gulf Railroad
is to terminate. The rumors of extension
to Tampa are again being circulated. Re-
cent changes in the management has only
served to strengthen the belief that there
is something of this kind contemplated.

The Naval Stores Review says that
there is good profit to be made by the ope-
rators with turpentine selling at 57 cents.
The Naval Stores Review does not keep
up with the conditions existing in the
woods, and is representing the views of the
Shotter element rather than those of the
operators and factors.


WANTED
AND

FOR SALE

Two cents per word for ist insertieo,
ne cent per word for following. No dver-
timant taken for les than 40 ceta firt
ierti ad so cents following.
Cas must accompany order.

FOR SALE CHEAP.
Two steam pumps in perfect order. One
is single action, %-inch suction and %5-inch
discharge. The other is duplex, 1%-iaeh
auction, 1 inch discharge. Write to Excel-
sior Machine Works, Tampa, Fla. 4t


FOR SALE-Turpentine lease on ten
thousand acres of long leaf pine. Will cut
forty boxes per acre. Address Walter Gra-
bam, Areada, Fla.
FOR SALE-6,000 acres cypress. Will
cut forty million feet. Price $90 per acre.
Easy terms. Address Walter Graham, Ar-
cadia, Fla.


14 Wet Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


The CLOTHIERS

EVERYTHING THAT IS GOOD AND
SMART IN WEARING APPAREL FOR
MEN AND BOYS.


DIAMONDS AND WATCHES,

We sImply a* a cU. We Ca Lelr yw o cwnrt -a" a y yr
-rvifag prices, many papers of ee ir. wme, pearflet
DIAMONDS. It Is Mr desire to contfine baf l f large s
Dimrond eraes ta Jcrnrvie, and ow sPeclty At am rid--
cat Sea A" Wig-cree deWaltham d Efwa Walftis.


UHESS SL Watebst Jedm,
HESS &il SLL 1111 -l IM l= V. ft m&


M. A. Baker,
INVMNTOr AM MANU mniaER Of T

Baker Improved

Seamless Turpen

tine Stills.
Write me form prcem ad eutate
Ida Alabama or MissiippI. All
tills mold under a guarantee.
JOB WORK
rmS fe Cary a specur.
The Larget and Oldoet Copper
Work. in G oro. Brunswlck, Ga.
or My specialty is laru worms and heay boime thIt do mt lik.


Lombard Iron Works

and Supply Company
BUILDERS AND DEALERS IN


ENGINES. BOILERS.
0otta., 8aw, FrtiMhr, Oil ad I 1US-
hinery, a"d Supple a"d Repe.
Capacity for 200 Hands.
Machine Tool, Wood-Workitg MaMuery,
Shafting, Pulleys, Hanges, Leather ms
Rubber Belting ad Hoe, Railro ad
Mill Supplie and Tools.
Plans and estimates furnished for Power
Plauta and Steel Bridges.
Steam Pumps. eed Water Heater and
Hoisting Eginea.
AUGVUTA. GEORGIA.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR FINAL
DISCHARGE.
Notice in hereby given that the under-
signed, six months after date hereof, will
make final return of his accounts as Ad-
ministrator of the estate of John M. Flem-
ing, and apply to the County Judge of
Duval County, Florida, at his office, for
approval of same, and a discharge as such
Administrator. This 9th day of June, 19061
W. P. SMITH,
As Administrator of the estate of John
M. Fleming, deceased.


Du Raln l nprigiml

Large or Mmall traet of timber
lands, also uet over lands, suitable
for colonies, stoek-raising ad
game preserves in lorida and
Georgia.
Also Suburban Lots in Deen-
wood and some choice city lots in
Wayerom. Write us for full par-
tieular and information.


WAYORO-m QA.



JOSEPH ZAPF & CO,


Wholesale Dele I aad BotUl=ra cf


AN H USEIL- BUSCH

St. Louis Lager Beer

410111


Cay, Shine & McCall Lilp, Wie Il ntl Wm


FIRE INSURANCE.
azs Dyal-Upchurch lBMd


Writl for r ien
.lame ImS JACKSONVILEE, FLORIDA


I


4FJ








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 13


W.W. ASDBURW, Moltole, Ga. N. EMANUEL, Brunswoek, Ga.
W. .n BOWar, itgeraMd, Ga D. T. FURSK Savannah. Ga.
J. J. DOPKMY, BrDoxto, Ga. BL G. lKIBK.AND, Nichols, Ga.
O. T. MeINTOSH, Savaaah, G.

Southern States Naval Stores Co.
Savannah. Ga.
Factors and Commission Merchants
Ship to Savanah Get Competition Highest Priees Promptest Returns
Correspond With VU
- kio:%Wal CN&IL"" i M%MW M


C. C. Bettes, DRUGI
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


S,53 W 55 V BEST AY.
vwabou"
20s of SOcum LAMIA


Mal Order Drug Store. Supples Everything a Drug Store
Ever Kpt. Write to Us.


1 OLDWW wrUIr Y HOUSIE EN
G11AOIU. e1 e1ahd in 1881.)
OLD BRARP WILLIAMB--Pure Fine Old
Rye. B the gallon .00; four full quarts
U.s ek-rvas prepald
GEO. J. COLEMAN-Pure Pennsylvania
Rye; Rich and Mellow. By the gallon
Pt.2; four full quarts P.o, express prepaid.
ANVIL RYE-Pure Substantial Family
Whiskey. By the gallon 3.O5; four full
quart $.1, express prepaid.
RCIFPORD RYB-By the gallon P.25;
four full quarts .45, express prepaid.
OLD K rITULCKI CORN-Direct from
Bonded Warehouse; fine and old. By the
\ allon .0;: four full quarts P. U express
prepald.
OLD POINTER CLUB CORN Rich
and Mellow. By the gallon 2.50; four full
quarts 2.9 express prepaid.
We hatdo an the leading brands of Rye and Bourbon WhLskies In the market
=a wnl save yFe from to per eeat oa your purcases. Send for price list and
eataloue. Mares tree uIpo applUtcat.
The Altnayer d Flatau Liquor Company
MACON. GEORGIA.


THE ARAGON

NOW OPEN
Under new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
cluding new eleetrie elevator and our
own eectric light plant.
A& 'H. N. O'NEAL. Prop.



eThe M etropolls


Is the Paper you want. It is
published daily and is from 12
to 16 hours ahead of any other
daily newspaper in Florida ..


$5.00 a Year $2.50 Six Months

Full Telegraphic and Stock
reports. If you want to keep
posted on the news, get the
Metropolis.

CARTER & RUSSELL PUB. CO.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.


The Cooperage Company


Manufacturers of High Grade

Western White Oak Spirit Barrels


Capital $200,000.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Orders sent direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.
We are now prepared to furnish barrels from six shops advantageously located.


OFFICERS:.


J. C. LITTLE, President.
E. H. MOTE, General Manager.


JOHN E. HARRIS, Vice-President.
C. H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasurer.


J. C. LITTLE,


JOHN E. HARRIS,
W. C. POWELL,


DIRECTORS:
C. H. BARNES,
W. F. COACHMAN.


J. W. WEST,
E. H. MOTE.


W. J. KELLY


PI'Iu


- _-- __------------"'~~~~-h~Hn r


r~h~-~~h~h~Vn~-~n~:Al~h~-~-~h~h~-~MIII'


L










1 .THBE WEEMKLY INDUSTRIAL REBOOID.




Success for Our Customers


Is Success for Us.


COVINGTON


COMPANY,


SHOES. DRY GOODS, Wholes
NOTIONS. . . ee


JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA.


Naval Stores for the Week.

There was more activity in the Jack- ROSMIS FOR THE WEEK AT JACK-


sonville naval stores market this week
than for any week since this has been
an open market. Sales wee large and
there was a disposition to let both spirits
and rosin go at the prices offered. During
the trading on Thursday and Friday it
was evident that the spirits market was
irmer, and that there was a slight dispo-
sition to advance. The only advance,
however, was one-fourth of a cent, but
this was kept up during Friday and the
prices for today (Saturday), at the open-
ing of trading was at that figure.
The receipts of naval stores, both spirits
and rosin continue large here and it is
evident that the Jacksonville open market
is growing in the confidence of the opera-
tors throughout the State. The fact that
goods shipped here are sold at prices com-
paring favorably with those of Savannah,
and that those who ship here save the
differential on freights from their stills to
Savannah, will serve to increase shipments
to this port and to Fernandina, where the
rate is practically the same.
There was a little incline in the rosin
market with heavy trading during the en-
tire week. Prices held their own well,
both high and low grades remaining prac-
tically stationary during the week. The
receipts and shipments were heavy.
There is a manifest feeling that the
spirits market has reached the level in
prices, though none of the factors will
venture a positive opinion in reference to
the matter. While all of them feel that
the present prices will prevail and incline
rather than decline, none of the Jackson-
ville factors would be surprised to see a
slight fall. During the week the Savan-
nah and Jacksonville markets have prac-
tically been the same.
The feature of the market for the week
both here and at Savannah was the steady
tone of the rosin market. Those who are
watching the situation and trading on the
Jacksonville market express a confidence
that the rosin market will retain its steady
tone for the coming week.
The unfavorable conditions existing in
the woods throughout the turpentine belt
have not affected the market to the ex-
tent that the factors here believe that it
should an there is still a strong indica-
tion that certain elements are working to
hold the market down to the present fig-
ure.


SPIRITS FOR THE WEEI
Price. Repts. Sis. Ship. St'k.
Monday .... 57% 221 10 150 1,7
Tuesday ... 57 44 10111,833
Wednesday 57/ 531 113 125 2,126
Thursday .. 57%1 483 176 2,32
Friday ..... 57% 387 672 30 2,39


SONVILLE.


WW ..



I
WG ...
N ....I
K .....
H .....
G .....
E
D .....
ABC ..


S ,

.80 .80 (4.85
4.60 4.60 4.60
4.40 40 440
4.20 4.25 4.2
4.15 4.15 4.15
4.00 4.05 4.05
3.90 4.00 4.00
3.85 3.95 3.95
3.80 3.90 3.90
3.75 3.80 3.80
3.70 3.70 3.70
3.50 3.50 3.50


3 S

$4.80 $4.85
4.60 4.00
4.40 4.40
4.20 4.25
4.10 4.15
4.05 4.05
4.00 4.00
3.95 3.95
3.90 3.90
3.85 3.85
3.70 3.70
3.50 3.50


Receipt, Sales ad Shipmenta
Repts. Sales. Ship.


Monday ........... 674 1,445
Tuesday ........... 1,073 .496
Wednesday ........ 1,329 1,436
Thursday ........... 1,050 472
Friday ...... .....915 3,030

Stock on Hand.
Monday ........................
Tuesday ........................
W wednesday .....................
Thursday ......................


Friday ....................... .
IN OTHER MARKETS.


2,1 8
1.008
101
448
1,740


27,080
25,574
40,639
41,867
42,409


The reports for the week of other mar-
kets follow:
Savannah, Ga., June 11.-Turpentine
firm, 5714@5714; sales, 620; receipts 702;
shipments, 157.
Rosin firm; sales, 1,649; receipts, 1,309;
shipments, 4,513; stock, 53,950. Quote:
ABC, $3.40@3.50; D $3.60@3.70; E $3.85@

3.90; F $3.95; G $4.00; H $4.05@4.20; I
$4.10@4.25; K $4.15@4.30; M $4.30@4.40;
N $4.40)4.65; WG $4.60@4.90; WW $4.80
@5.00.
Wilmington, N. C., June 11.-Spirits tur-
pentine steady, 56/,; receipts 91 casks.
Rosin, nothing doing; receipts 410. Tar
firm, $1.90; receipts 27. Crude turpentine
firm; hard, $2.90; dip, $4.40; receipts 223.
Savannah, Ga., June 12.-Turpentine
firm, 571/2; sales 773; receipts, 1,308; ship-
ments 204. Rosin firm, sales 2,934; re-
ceipts 4,153; shipments 766; stock 57,340.
Quote: ABC, $3.50; D $3.70; E $3.85@3.90;
F $3.95; G $4.00; H $4.05(4.10; I $4.10;
K $4.15; M $4.20; N $4.50; WG $4.75;
WW $4.85@4.90.
Wilmington, June 12.-Spirits turpen-
tine firm, 56%; receipts 64 casks. Rosin,
nothing doing; receipts 179. Tar firm,
$1.90; receipts 110. Crude turpentine firm,
hard, $2.90; dip, $4.40; virgin, $4.75; re-
ceipts 142.
Savannah, Ga., June 13.-Turpentine
firm, 571,; sales, 1,050; receipts 795; ship-
ments 83.
Rosin firm; sales 2,216; receipts 1,602;
shipments 102; stock, 58,930. Quote: ABC
$3.45@3.50; D $3.70; E $3.80; F $3.90; G
$3.95; H $4.00; I $4.05; K $4.15; M $4.25;
N $4.40; WG $4.60; WW $4.85.


Charleston, S. C., June 13.-Turpentine
and rosin, nothing doing.
Wilmington, June 13.-Spirits turpentine
firm, 56%; receipts 52 casks. Rosin, noth-
ing doing; receipts 39. Tar firm, $1.90; e-
ceipts 11. Crude turpentine firm, hard
$2.90; dip, $4.40; virgin, $4.75; receipts 40.
Savannah, June 14.-Turpentine frm,
57%; sales 456; receipts, 1,326; shipments
136. Rosin firm; sales 2,272; receipts 3,-
020; shipments 3,115; stock, 58,891. Quote
ABC, $3.90; D $3.70; E $3.90; F $3.95; G
$4.00; H $4.05; I $4.10; K $4.15; M $4.30;
N $4.50; WG $4.70; WW $4.90.
Wilmington, June 14.-Spirits turpentine
firm, 56%; receipts 44 casks. Rosin noth-
ing doing. Receipts 76. Tar firm, $1.90;
receipts 5. Crude turpentine firm, hard
$2.90; dip, $4.40; virgin $4.75; receipts 55.
Savannah, June 15.-Turpentine firm,
57%; sales 551; receipts 739; shipments
298. Rosin firm, sales 2,586; receipts 1,-
360; shipments 362; stock, 59,889. Quote:
ABC, $3.50 to $3.60; D $3.70 to 3.80; E
$3.85 to 3.90; F $3.90 to 4.00; G $3.95 to
$4.05; H $4.00 to $4 10; I $4.05 to $4.15;
K $4.10; $4.20; N $4.40; WG $4.70;
WW $5.00.
Wilmington, June 15.-Spirits turpen-
tine, nothing doing; receipts 41 casks.
Rosin, nothing doing; receipts 232; tar
*firm, $1.90; receipts 8. Crude turpentine
Arm; hard. $2.90; dip, $4.40; virgin $4.75;
receipts 72.


Groen arains ef Cestral ef egA. 'q
The gross earnings of the Central ao
Georgia for the Arst week in June wre
$207,900, as compared with $173,260 for the
same time last year, a gain of $34,A6
The earnings of the road from July to
June 7 were $10,71770.17; last year, $ ,-
557,34&22; gain, $1,211,41..
The builders of the great Pnmsylvania
Railroad tunnel under the Mst river,
New York, are enaountering mU diE-
culty in the work because of the tendemey
of the compressed air in the boring to
blow holes through the mud ad silt to
the river overhead. The engineers are w
going to free the mud through whish
they have to bore, with the idea that th
frozen mud will facilitate the work aNd
prevent the blow holes. Feeling the bot-
tom of a river by sections is a novel un-
dertaking.

SUMMER EXCURSIOM RAT3I VIA
ATLANTIC COAT LIMU
Summer Exeursion Rates to all summer
excursion points are now on sale via the
Atlantic acost Line. No trouble to an-
swer questions. For rates, resrvati
or any information, communicate with-
FRANK C BOYJLTOW,
District Passenger Agent, Jacksonville, la


We Make a Specialty of Printing all Forms Used
by Turpentine Operators,

Also Letter Heods. Bill Heas, Envolopes, Eto.
Prompt Service. High Grade Work. Reasonale
Prices.

INDUSTRIAL RECORD CO., Jacksonville, Fla.







THE WEEKLY JUDUUB IAL RECORD. 15


JOBPH D. WEED.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. KRENSON.


J. D. WEED E CO.,
SAVAmAer. GEO1.GIA.

Wholesale Hardware,
Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OP

Turpentie Tuls, Glie, Balings, Etc.


Turpentirve


If you expect to use the HERTY cup
next eason, place your orders now for
future delivery. Prices and all informa-
tiom cheerfully furnished o
Cups. Gutters
rf and a11 Tools
used in the Herty system of 'turentiitg.

Chattanooga Pottery
-i; Copauy,
Jacksmeaftw Itrida.



Standard Naval Stores Co.,
JACKSONVILLE


EXPORTERS

CARGO LOTS A SPECIALTY


Standard Naval Stores Co. JACKSONVILLE
AwasaLI 9Msmsu a


FIFTH AVENUE HOTEL
Madison Square, New York.
Amerlan Plan $5 per day. Europeam Plti $2.00 per day
The moet fmom re~nW tatir heotd
f in Ameriea. New. a "e a always
frmh ad ala. The seatim eMsr
Square is the aeet in the eity.
HITCHCOCK. DARLING a COMPANY.
- --S -


usI IIIIIIII mu() l(y'''' ugegsg u ue ueuge u u u mm uuumuuu


J. W. Mot e,
S rridt.


C. B. Park
VIoe-Pre.


Jesus MoelIt.
vloop~s


W. W.WAMr
Se. T


sea.'


John R. Young Co.,


Commission

Merchants.


: Naval Stores factors. Wholesale Grocers.
Sav'~nvah Q BrunswicK. Ge.
e..e mnum i ee he eeh eol imme I(
yxenaiLat~a~


B. W. BLOnrT,
PWMAE


0, A. PETTEWAY,
VbwPleidirnt.


A. RA=N
soft & 22mm


PENINSULAR NAVAL STORES CO.
Capital, *500,000.0
Successors to TIMMONS-BLOUNT CO.
Naval Stores Factors aad Commlsslio Merchasts.
u s"s Turpentine Operators' Supplies
*P BVBaY seawrnm
Flat Savannah Price paid for Bsin and Turpentiue, le
Ctomury Chargi
CORRESPONDENCE SOLCIGTD.
Offiea-American National Bank Bldg., Tampa, la.
Yards, Port Tampa City.


upm'uuusu'mmuusuum Iuumuusuumuuouu loe Muuuuselul loll


JOS. ROSENHEIM SHOE CO.


ANWruACTUVRE AMD JOSu =m 0F

SHOES


SAVANNAH. GEORGIA :
S"Bes Sies Made4 fCo Cesmssm r Trade.
Geee*ll ,***0 *>*,go I i i ii8 8 88 i i Ii' i i I*

There's Beauty in a Watch
if the selection of it is made from a stock that
has been properly bought and that is large
enough to allow wild play to individual tastes.
Sueh a stock we offer you from which to
"g choose-selected from the world's best makers
and embodying all that is newest and most
: fashionable as well as standard styles for the
AE 8s conservative.
Emy mht F-4- llad ln imoelisal cut
IL. J. ILaLES CO..
I Wfest .y slreeMet. JShmve. Fia.
----M ----- -- ^^ ^^^^ ^^ifl^


J. S. Schofield's Sons Lompuny,

flneadu.tars for
Distillers Pumping
Outfit.
'a n" pleteone
SHundredofthm inmin
Florida, Alabama, Mississippi
South Carolina.#rite u-
lari prcem. We ilmo maufu
? EnIues. seiers am WAt
Grak achlory,
a a well wan c a ful and cupiete *
Wsumppmes, PIMe
' BU0 Tub"$, Ms. *
Advise your wants.
- ----Macon, Georgla.
AS&& &SA e 60164 a s: :
*a~~aA*a.*s.Aeehas*O@SCCOCCOS Osge~ci: aen


I


t









16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Buyers' Directory

If you waut anytfng leek-
threU gh this deaelefd Iat and
write to te firm a ea
therela. The Ret rd gumr.tees
prmap respew .
ACCOUNTANTS.
T. G. Hutchineon, Jacksonville, Fla.
BANKS.
Commercial Bank, Jacksonville, Fla
National Bank of Jacksonville.
Florida Bank and Trust Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
BOILER MAKERS.
Cain-O'Berry Boiler Co., Orlando, Fla.
BOXES AND CRATES.
Cummer Lumber Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
BRICK.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jack-
sonville, Fia.
CLOTHmG.
Craig & Bra, J. A., Jacksounville, Fa.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Stuart-BerMntein Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furebgott & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
COOPERAGE.
Cooperage Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS.
Win. I. Jones, Jacksonville, Fla.
C. C. Bettes, Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS-WHOLESALE.
Christie Groover Drug Co., Jacksoville,
Fla.
DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co. The, Jacksonvlle, Fla.
Kohn, Furebgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
EWRAT.MiRS.
Marcus Conant, Jacksonville, Fla.
ELECTRIC SUPPLIES
Florida Electric Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Electrie Co. Jacksonville, Fla.
ZGIIUES.
Merrill-Steven Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
SehoSeld's Soa Co., J. ., Mason, Ga
Lombard Iron Works and Supply Co., Au-
gun* Ga.
FERTILIZERS.
Bours & Co., W A., Jacksonville, Fla.
FUNERAL DIRECTORS.
Marcus Conant, Jacksonville, Fla.
FOUNDRI&S.
Shofels Sons Co., J. S, Maco, Ca.
FUEL.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co. The, Jack-
sonvile, Fa.
GEMT' FURNISHERS.
Craig & Bro., J. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
Kohn, Furehgott & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Stuart-Berntein Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
Consolidated Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville Grocery Co., Jacksonville, F.
Williams Co., J. P, Savannah, Ga.
Young Co, John R., Savannah, G.
HATS-WHOLESALE.
Kohn Furehott & Co., Jaeksouvll, la.
HARDWARE.
Bond & Bourn Co The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Briggs, W. H., Hardware Co., Valdoeta, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Wod Co., J. DSah,B L Ga.
HAY AID .RAN.
Bours & Co., Wm. A.. Jacksonville, Fla.
HATS.
Craig & Br, J. A, Jaeksnvill Fa.
Standard Clothing Co, Jakcasovifl, Fla.
Stuart-Berntein Co, Jak ville, Fla.
HOTZL&
Travelers' Hotel, Jaeksonvll a.
I)uval Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
Aragon The, Jacksoavrlie Fla.
Fifth Avenue Hotel, New York, N. Y.
Everett Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
Windsor Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
IRON WORKS.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Scbofield's Son Co.. J. S.. Macon, Ga.
INSURANCE.
Prudential Life, Walter P. Oorbtt, Mgr.
Jacksonville, Fla.
Cay, Shine & MeCall Jacksoeville, Fa.
JEWELERS.
(reenleaf A Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hem & Slager, Jacksonville. Fla.
R. J. Riles & Co., Jacksonville Fa.
KEEELYT aIii Lu na.
Keeley Istitate, JakMavflle, la.


LIQUORS.
Bum & Co., Chas, Jakonville, F.
ltmayer Flatau Liquor Co., Macon, Ga.
Joseph Zapf & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
MEDICINES
Speneer Medicine Co., Chttanooga, Tenn.
MIACHIN WORKS.
Cin-O'Berry Boiler Co., Orlando, Fla.
Sehofeld's Sons Co, J. S, Macon, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR TURPENTINE PRO-
CESS.
Schoeld's Sona Co., J. 8., Macon, Ga.
METAL WORKERS.
Baker, M. A, Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros., Jacksonville, Fla.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Schofleld's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co., J. D., Savannah, Ga.
Malsby Machinery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
NAVAL STORES.
Peninsular Naval Stores Co., Tampa, Fla.
Barnes & Jessup Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
vinl, Fla.
Standard Naval Stores Co, Jacksonville,
Fla.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
West-Flynn-Harris Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
William Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
Young Co., John R., Savannah, Ga.
Jacksonville Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Southern States Naval Stores Co., Savan-
PAINTS.
Bond & Bours Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
PLUMBERS.
Coons & Golder, Jacksonville, Fla.
PUMPS.
Merrill-Stevns Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofeld's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
REAL ESTATE.
Stoekton, J. N. C, Jacksonville, Fla.
Brobston, Feadig & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Livingston & Sons, J. IH, Ocala, Fla.
SEEDS.
Bours & Co., Wm. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
SHIP YARDS.
Cummer Lumber Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Merrill-Steven a Co., Jacksonville, Fa.
SHOES--WHOLESAL.
Covington Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Joe. Rosenheim & Sons, Savannah, Ga.
STEAMSHIPS.
Clyde Steamahip Co. The, New York City.
STOCK BROKERS
Leyden Haynes & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Holmes & Co, Samuel P, Jackaeaville
Fla.
TANKS.
Davia & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
SehoAeld's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
XuRPEKBtlaK APPARATUS.
Chattanooga Pottery Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
TURPENTINE STILLS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswiek, Ga.
MeMillan Bros., Jacksonville, Fla.
FOX TrXswuxlERS.
Owen Typewriter Co., Tampa, Fa.
A Reed Warrok, Jacksonville, Fla.
F. D. Bruce, Penacola, Fla.
TUEPlmLamsI STILL TUB&
Davis & Sou, G. M, Palatka, Fla.
IUXPErITUl VATS.
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla
TURPENTINE TOOLS.
Council Tool Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
UNDERTAKERS.
Marcus Conant, Jacksonville, Fla.
WATCHES.
R. J. Riles, Jacksonville, Fla.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Heas Slager, Jacksonville, Fa.
YELLOW PINE LUMBER
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
East Coast Lumber Co., Watertown, Fla.


HICKS' GAS MOTOR COMPANY
We are pleased to announce to our
Southern trade that our new modern works
at Waycross, Ga., for the manufacturing of
the Hicks Patent Tandem Gas and Gaso-
line Engines is completed and in operation,
building Stationary, Portable and Marine
Engines, from 2 to 500 H. P., also Gas
Producers, Pumps and Gaaoline Motor
Street Cars. While the Hicks Engines are
far superior to the old single cylinder en-
gines, our prices are no higher.
Send for catalogues and get posted.
Agents wanted.
HICKS' GAS MOTOR COMPANY,
Works: Wayeros, Ga.; Detroit, Mich.


Clyde Steamship Company


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINE
The magnificent steamhipm of this lne ae appointed to sail follow, selling at
Cbarleatem, C., both ways.
Frem New York, rem JacksmEmv fo
(Pier 36 north River.) STEAML Cbstam a" New Yrk.


Saturday,
Tuesday,
Wednesday,
Friday,
Tuesday,
Wednesday,
Friday,
Saturday,
Tuesday,
Friday,
Saturday.


June 9, at 3:00 pm...... HURON..... Friday,
June 12, at 3:00 pm... .ARAPAHO. .... Sunday,
June 13, at 3:00 pm... .ALGONQUIN. .. Monday,
June 15, at 3:00 pm... .COMANG-H .... Wednesday,
June 10, at 3:00 pm...... APACHE ......Sunday,
June 20, at 3:00 pm.......HURON......Monday,
June 22, at 3:00 pm... .ARAPAHOE .... Wednesday,
June 23, at 3:00 pm....ALGONQUIN ... Friday,
June 26, at 3:00 pm....COMANCHE... Sunday,
June 29, at 3:00 pm.... APACHE...... Wednesday,
June 30, at 3:00 pm.......HURON...... Friday,


June 15, at 10:00 am
June 17, at 10:00 am
June 18,at 10:00am
June 20, at 10:00 am
June 24, at 10:00 am
June 26, at 10:0 am
June 27, at 10:00 am
June 20, at 10:00 am
July at 10:0am
July 4, at 10:00 am
July atle:00am


CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.

Freight Service Between Jacksoville, Boston and Premvieme, an all Kastern Painte
Caing at Charlesta Bth Way.
FREIGHT ONLY.
From South Side frm Fot Catmherin 8tzt,
Lewis Wharf, Boston STEAMKR Jacklavife.

Saturday, June 9...............ONONDAGA ...............aturday June1
Saturday, June 16................CHIPPEWA ..............Saturday, Junmm
Saturday, June 23 ............... ONONDAGA .............. Saturday Jun
Saturday, June 30..............CHIPPEWA............... Saturday, July 7

CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE

Between Jackaeville at SanfrL.
Stopping at Palatka, Astor, St. Francis, Beresford (Deand), and intermediate
landings on St. Johns River.

STEAMER "CITY OP JACKSONVILLE"

Is appointed to sail as follows: Leave Jacksonville, Sundays, Tuesday and
Thursday, 3:30 p. m. Returning, leave Sanford, Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays,
9:30 a. m.

SCHEDULE

SOUTHBOUND INORrmOUNu
Read down Bead up.
Leave 3:30p. m.................. Jacksonville ................ :iv :a.m.
Leave 8:46p.m................... Paltka .................. Lv 8:p.m.
Leave 3:00a.m ....................Astor..................Leave 3:30p.m.
................ ............. Ber ford ( a ) .............. 1:00 p. m
Arrive 8:30 a.m .................... Sanford ................... av :3a.
Arrive 10:00 a.m .....................tetprio .................. erpave 10:0 a.
GENERAL PASSENGER AND TICKET OFFICE, is W. BAY T., JACK'YILL.
F. M. IRONMONGER, Jr., Asst Gen'l Pass. Agent, 122 W. Bay St., Jacksonville,
W. G. COOPER, Jr., Frt. Agt. C. P. LOVELY L Supt.
Foot of Hogan Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
A. C. HAGERTY, CLYDE MILE,
Gen'1 Eastern Pass. Agt., New York. Genl Frt. Agt., New York.
THEO. G. EAGER, V. P. and G. M.
General Oflices, Pier 30, North River. Branch, 200 Broadway, New York.


J. H. O'BERY. Bee& Trea

CAII-O'BERRY BOILER CO.

ip E d UM' drs f Sltm lwt
SIbet Ebi., hl b kder
ORLANDO FLORIDA


1,







THB WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL BBCORD. 17


MEASURES TO REOVLATE THE

Wasangton June 8, 1906.
The probable program of Oongresm with
respect to the spoge fisheries of Florida
was fully developed in the House of Rep-
resentatives on Tuesday of this week when
Chairman Grosvenor, of the Committee on
the Merchant Marine and Fisheries, called
up the bill, 8. 480, "to regulate the land-
ing, delivery, cure and sale of sponges."
The House Committee last week re-
ported with a favorable recommendation
the two bills, 8 .4805 and 480, the former
measure being designated "to prohibit
aliens from taking or gathering sponges
in the waters of the United States." The
favorable report upon 8. 4805 was some
thing of a surprise to those who had fol-
lowed the progress of this proposed legis-
lation, for the hearings before the commit-
tee had demonstrated not only that no
great pressure was being exerted on be-
half of this measure, but that several of
the best lawyers on the committee were
doubtful as to the coatitutionality of the
proposition. Chairman Grosvenor has been
reluctant to express any opinion as to why
the committee reported 8. 4805, but there
was undoubtedly much significance in his
action when o Tuesday he called up 8.
4806 under suspension of the rules and
asked for its immediate consideration.
Representative Hinshaw, of the committee,
submitted the following statement:
"The necessity for the proposed legisla-
tion arises out of the fact that recently
and within a year and a half a great many
foreigners and aliens, mostly Greeks, have
been fishing for and gathering sponges in
the waters of the United States on the
coast of Florida, to the great injury of the
industry and to the Ameriean eitimsau en-
gaged in the same business
"In the United states sponges are only
found in Florida waters or waters of the
Gulf and southeast coast of that State.
The gathering of sponges in these waters
for commercial purposes has been going on
for half a century, and up to the advent
of the Greeks, principally by citizens of
Key West, where 5,000 or 10,000 people
are either interested in or depending upon
that business for a livelihood.
"The method adopted by these people in
fishing for sponges is of the simpler kind,
known as harpooning, or hooking. That
is, the sponges are gathered by the use of
a book on a long pole in the hands of the
fishermen. By this method the Key West-
ers have been able to supply the demand
for Florida sponges and support them-
selves and their families, but, as prev-
iously stated, large numbers of Greeks
with diving outfits, accustomed hereto-
fore to ply their vocation in the Mediter-
ranean Sea, but driven these by the coun-
tries bordering on that sea in the interest
of the sponge washing there, are in turn
driving our own itisens out of the busi-
ess.
"They practice exclusively the diving
methods. Each diver is fitted out with a
diving suit in which he can go down into
great depths, and, remaining on the bot-
tom for hours, is thus enabled to gather
a arger number of sponges in a given time
than his competitor, the hooker, who finds
himself at a great disadvantage in the
business.
"Furthermore, the sponge beds in the
Florida waters are being rapidly depleted,
furnishing an additional reason for some
restrictive legislation in the matter of
sponge fishing in the United States."
It was though that the amendment to S.
4806 added by the committee providing


that "no sponge shall be landed, delivered,
cured or offered for sale at any port or
place in the United States of a smaller
size than four inches in diameter" would
provoke some debate, as it is clear that
while it is intended to apply only to
sponges taken off the Florida coast, it will
be construed by the customs officials as
applicable also to imported sponges of
every kind. As heretofore pointed out in
this correspondence, large quantities of
sponges are annually imported of species
which rarely grow to four inches in diam-
eter and which are used for surgical and
toilet purposes, and it is believed that the
amendment of the committee will seriously
embarrass the trade. Nevertheless, the
House adopted it without a word of dis-
cussion. The bill as it will now be re-
turned to the Senate for concurrence in
the House amendment, reads as follows:
"Be it enacted, etc., That from and after
May 1, 1907, it shall be unlawful to land,
deliver, cure or offer for sale at any port
or place in the United States any sponges
taken by means of diving or diving appa-
ratus from the waters of the Gulf of
Mexico or Straits of Florida; Provided,
That sponges taken or gathered by such
process between October 1 and May 1 of
each year in a greater depth of water than
fifty feet shall be landed, delivered, cured
or offered for sale at any port or place in
the United States of a smaller size than
four inches in diameter.
"See. 2. That every person guilty of a
violation of this act shall for each offense
be liable to a fine of not less than $100 or
more than $500, which fine shall be a lien
against the vessel on which the offense
was committed. And every vessel used or
employed in violation of this act shall be
liable to a fine of not less than $100 or
more than $500 or forfeiture, and hall
be seized and proceeded against by pro-
cess of libel in any court having jurisdic-
tion of the offense.
"See. 3. That any violation of this act
shall be prosecuted in the district court
of the United States of the district where-
in the offense was committed."

ALL ARRANGEMENTS FOR POSTING
STOCKS HAVB BEEN PERFECTED.
Beginning with this week the Jackson-
ville Board of Trade, through the kindness
of some of those who are directly interest-
ed in making this an open market, will
post stocks as well as quotations and sales.
Heretofore the Board of Trade has been
prevented from doing this because of the
attitude of some of the transportation
companies who have refrained from giving
their shipments. This prevented the post-
ing of receipts. The Clyde Line has re-
fused to give its shipments, but the mat-
ter has been called to the attention of the
high officials and it is believed that the In-
formation will be secured.
The refusal on the part of the transpor-
tation companies was due to a carefully
followed policy not to divulge any of the
business of the company, but when the
matter has been taken up with the officials
at the headquarters of the roads, they
have willingly given the information
sought.
A large blackboard has been provided
and hereafter all the information neces-
sary for the trade will be given there.
The market is to be conducted on carefully
laid down principles and the trading is to
be conducted hereafter with more informa-
tion at hand than was given for the first
few weeks following the action of the
Board of Trade in declaring this an open
market.


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
JAOKSONVILLE. PLA.


CAPITAL 300000


SURPLUS and U4nIVIDE PROFM $41460.91


We e ise Time Certifates of Depoit. which draw otfermt at te mr t tUrse p ct per
anum it held ninety days or longer, Take atfrtatge of this m Art yorMrt
seut g lT ye. Partular attention paid to Out-of-Tow seeouas, m in; tdin i b ma



FLORIDA BANK & TRUST COMPANY.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

CAPITAL-O MMU- mserrs.


General B rnking.


49 on Savings Deposits


. Executes trusts of all kinds.


C. E. GARNER, President
C. B. ROGERS, Vice-President.
G. J. Avent, Ast. Cashier.


A. F. PERRY, Vice-PreMert.
W. A. REDDING, Cshier.
F. P. FLEMING, Jr., Trust Oier.


FLORIDA BAG MANUFACTURING COMPANY

429 East Bay Street, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.

MANUFACTURERS


Burlap and Cotton Bais r"

Sma I Cotton Bag s for Comusswarl


Write for Prices.


Florida Bai MaIufaCturlng Co many


Il(lll 111g1g ms ee a llllama lll i g


elosiuuuaou,


A Few Bargains


]" '::BK


9,000 acres virgin timber. Lies in solid body immediately
upon transportation; estimated to cut 40 boxes, and 2,00 feet
Slumber per acre.
38,000 acres part virgin, part hoxed, estimated to cut 3,500
* feet merchantable lumber per acre.
SA number of desirable turpentine locations at right prices.
o 25.900 acres virgin timber, lies in solid body, estimated to cut
S100 boxes and 7,000 feet of merchantable lumber per aere


SBrobston, Fenig & Company
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA 216 V. Foryth Street
*iumlm>ahuAilllII lSSiimrmulIIO
(*h*u.me h eeseeeooeer eeeeuir6r looio a mlioiSe l .

MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


SBoilermaking and Repairing

Still Boilers and Pumps.
SHIP BUILDING end REPAIRING.
I JclkonRvlle, Fla.
t iili i u I e i l smii e i *aloies$O sliii Isa ii



CUMEER LUMBER COMPANY

JACKSONVILLE. rLA.

Rough s-. Dresod Lumbere

Long Lef Yellow Pie.
EXS= AM A OMTM


______~


-- - ---- --






18 THB WEBKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


6he EVERETT HOTEL
32s WrST DAY ST., JACKSONVILLE FLA.
Ceatrally located, thoroughly repaired adremovated. Newly furniabed. European plan
G. H. MASON, Proprietor.
Illllllllllllllllllllllalllull asIlllIs llllllllliil I--


J. P. Wn UJ.A Prmiat.
T. A. JmUWzm. ad Vio-President.
H. L KAYwTO, Secretary.


J. . CA oN,. It Vicb-Predldent
J. DU. DOS~ Y, 3d Vice-Preedent
L. r. 8 caHrsm, Treasurer.


J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,
ll SMI a FW i U IU HEaLE CWis.
anla Omrribm SVAIMU. OOMOALa..
e olU WACOrieI. VL-. f ai. .h Orn Wese f, -
f = i JsACeSOvaeVILI o. CosC n WMItU, s. 7 -
Naval Stores Prodacers are Isvlted to Correspod With Us.
mat miatl llllllilllm l 1 lllll l Ill11111 111lIl lllll-


THE BOND & BOURS CO.
WHOLOALEI RTAIJUL
HARDWARE
SASH, DOORS, BLINDS, PAINTS.
Oils, Olass, Stoves, Tinware, Country Holloware.
10 WET BAY sTKrIT. JACFUOMVLuL. &LA.

Fst Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED LON LEAP
Yellow Pine I.umber
Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots
Steamer Shipenat a Specilty.
WATEKRTOWN. FLORIDA


Coons & Golder
Turpentine Operators on
Pipe, Boilers and Pumps
Eapt h"mia Ml nemmi


22 W. AMlm Street Jack ie F.
Prese 114


Kohn


= Furchgott = Company.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN


Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS OIVEN PROMPT ATTENTIOh
JAKSONVILLE. FLA.


The Palmer Manufacturing Co.

of Charleston, S. C.


Offers to the Turpentine Operators of Georgia.
Florida and Alabama one hundred thousand to
three hundred thousand spirits of turpentine bar-
rels during the present season as the demand
may require, at prices that defy competition.


First Class Guaranteed White Oak Spirits Barrels Com-
plying Strictly with rules B. of T. Savannah, Ga.
Operators should make no contracts or buy any barrels until they et our prices.
"REMEMBER WE SELL FOR LESS"

Address G. J. SCOVEL, Jacksonville, Fla.


NOW






WUUUUUUUUU'iiU~i 166 UIShII i9iiU1i56~ *eum~uueee1eeeuueeeus~e1eee~s**eti~sueuuaaeu


C. B. ROGERS, President. W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAMPLAIN Vice-Presidents.
DIRECTORS: C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Ch amplain, H. A. McEachern and J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonville;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $500,000.

Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches In Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consol lated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company of Pensacola; the grocery brL wh of thi West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannali.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-
visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.


Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Consist of one Three-Story Building, 70x200; one two-story building. 50x390; one one-story buildlag, 80x250,
making the largest space of any Company of the kind in the South.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
BrDnches Tampa. Fla., Pensacola. Fla., and Savannah. Ga.
0* Ns ts
os*snl aSil lS SlS IIOlIlas -asiliIIIIIIasIalIIaiSB&lel lllll AA~ell08 i*l I 8 88|O@8| OI48IIas.


015966564194 go's 551654 9496I) ~~I( I~~~








In buying
STERLING SILVER TABLEWARE
whether as a gift or for your own use,
one's desire is to get full value for your
money. We are heavy buyers of Silver-
ware, in fact have the largest stock in the
South, and can show you a variety of
patterns that upon comparison of quality,
and price you will find very reasonable.

The illustration,. hws our
"NEW CAMBRIDGE,"
a handsome ornamental pattern of fine
execution, its soft grey finish brings out
the character of the design and enhances
its general attractiveness.
Teaspoons ..49.00,.10.75 and $12.75 doz.
Dessert Spos .... .16.75 and $19.25 "'
Ta 'Spoons ..... 4.25 and $27.75 "'
Tale Forks .... $24.25 and $27.75 "
Dessert Forks ..: 416.75 and $19.25 "
Medium Knive, ... .........$19.00 "
Dessert Knives .............. $21.00 "


We sell only reputable goods.


"Sver Plate that Wears
IRA=,i AM
Illllllm8 V


When desired, we can fur-
nish cases or oak or mahogany
chests to hold any number of


pieces.


x


Prices on sterling silverware
subject to change with any ma-
terial change in the price of
bullion.


x


We guarantee satisfaction.


A very complete line of this reliable
brand in Tea-ware, Bake-dishes, Fruit
Bowls, etc, and also latest patterns in
"1847Rogers Bros.
Knives, Forks, Spoons, etc.
The pattern we illustrate
'THE VINTAGE,"
in finish and appearance closely resembles
sterling silverware. This pattern is section
plate that is it has three times the usual quan-
tity sf silver deposited on the backs of handles
and bowls insuring years of good service
Tea Spoons - 14 (i dos.
Dessert Spoons 50
Table Spoons - 7 50
Table Forks - 7 50"
Dessert Forks 6 50
Medium Knives II00
Dessert Knives 9 0 "
Upon request, with satisfactory reference,
we will mail samples


Greenleaf SL Crosby Company

Jewelers and Silvei.nliths
41 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Florida


PROMPT ATTENTION TO MAIL ORDERS.
WRITE FOR CATALOGUE.


ESTABLISHED THIRTY YEARS.


Half Tones-Zinc Etchings



Illustratina and Engraving Department


OF


THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.


Splendidly equipped foi business. Half ones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of Commercial Work, Pamphlets. etc


I EllMU IS iE If IMEK REOMlNM IND mEllNfII PIOTGRIS IN PllEB.


IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION CF WHAT IS WANTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED.


A Florida Enterprise.


Try It.


b I


MMENOW


W_1