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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00172
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 5, 1906
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00172
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text









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I JACKSONVILLE, FLA. SAVANNAH, GA.
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CONSOLIDATED


NAVAL STORES COMPANY.


Home Office: JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Branches: Savannah, Ga., and Pensacola, Fla.
OFFICERS.
W. C. POWELL, President; B. F. BULLAhD, H. L. COVINGTON, J. A. CRANFORD, D. H. McMILLAN, B. R. POWELL, C. M COVINGTON, JOHN H.
POWELL, Vice Presidents; C. P. DUSENBURY, Secretary and Treasurer.
hXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: W. C. Powell, C. B. Rogers, H. L. Covington, B. F. Bullard. J. A. Cranford.
DIL'CTORS: W. C. Powell, B. F. Bullard, C. B. Rogers, J. A. Cranford, W. J. Hillman, John H. Powell, W. F. Coachman, H.L. Covington, C. Downing, D. H.
McMillan, R. B. Powell, C. M. Covington, S. A. Alford.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS


Paid in Capital


Stock, $2,500,000


Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
The "Consolidated" is purely a co-operative Company. Its interests are identical with those
of the Producers. The patronage of turpentine operators everywhere Invited.
Two Million acres of land and Timber for sale on easy terms.
Producers are invited to call or correspond.


TURPENTINE


OPERATORS!!!


We Have a Proposition in Cattle a.nd Pecans
THAT IS A MONEY MAKER.


Use your


Grazing Land
For Pasturing
Hereford
and
Short-horn

CATTLE.


Your

Garden
and
Farming Lands

For Raising

PECAN
TREES.


Write Marion Farm.s, Ocala. Fla.
We'll be Glad to Explain.


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WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL


RECORD.


PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY. DEVOTED TO NAVAL STORES, LUMBER AND MANUFACTURING INTERESTS.

dUted Sept. 12. 1902. by the Exeutirv Commitee of the Turpentine Operators' Assoiton a its Exi Ocial Organ d adopted Sept I. 1902 in Annual Convention as an Oicial Organ also o the General Association. Adopted Sept IL 103
nly OEcial Org.n o f Turpentine Operatorson' Aociation. Adopted April 27, 1903. a OBicial Organ of the Inter-State Cant Grwers' Association. Endorsed by Georgia Sawmill Associatian. Official Organ o Southeastern Stock Growers Assdaian.


Hon, R. E, Rose Tells Florida Horticulturists


The Need of Immigration,


During the meeting of the Florida State
Horticultural Society, Hon. K. E. Rose,
State Chemist, delivered an address on
'"Florida Inmtigration-What Shall It be ?"
The address in full was as follows:
Mr. President, Ladies and Gentlemen:
* The subject assigned me, "Florida Immi-
gration, What Shall It Be ?" is one that is
now commanding much attention, not only
in Florida, but throughout the entire South.
We have recently had several conventions
of representative men on the subject; sel-
dom do we have a gathering or convention
of any kind, agricultural commissioners,
cane growers, turpentine producers, timber
men, saw mill men, railroad men, ticket
agents, traffic managers, farmers, cattle
growers, agriculturists, or horticulturists,
but the subject of immigration "crops out"
in one shape or another.
In fact, the Southern States have agi-
tate this question of immigration-foreign
immigration-to a very considerable ex-
tent during the past few years, much has
been said upon the subject, numerous plans
have been proposed to turn the tide of
foreign immigration from the West to the
South. The establishment of direct lines
of immigrant ships, from Southern ports
to Europe, with agents of the Southern
States established in foreign countries, to
secure immigrants, is probably the most
popular plan suggested. To avoid the con-
tract labor laws, the States are asked to
do what the citizen (or corporation) is pro-
hibited from doing, and also to tax the
people of the State to secure cheaper labor
to compete with the working men of the
State.
Requires Consideration.
Florida, I am glad to say, has not be-
come hysterical or anxious in this matter.
She has displayed no great haste to re-
ceive the influx of foreign immigrants-
Japanese, Italians or Chinamen, so ar-
dently desired and earnestly advocated by
some of our sister States-urged on by
land syndicates-mining and manufactur-
ing corporations, desiring to secure cheaper
and more servile labor, than is now obtain-
able in the South outside the cities.
While the phenomenal development of
the South during the past decade, along all
lines of industry, agriculture, mining, man-
ufacture and transportation, has created
a large demand for labor, and has largely
increased the wages of our working people,
it is questionable if it be for the best in-
terests of the South, and particularly of
Florida ,to encourage foreign immigration.
The South is now the only distinctly
American section of the Union, where the
traditions, habits, prejudices, virtues and
vices, courage chivalry, independence and
love of freedom, so characteristic of the
early settler or pioneer, can he found in its
purity; where the true American charac-
ter, begat by the "pioneer," "Puritan" and
"cavalier" can still be found. The des-
cendants of those adventurous men and
women, who at their own cost of depriva-
tion and hardship, established the original
thirteen colonies on the Atlantic seaboard:
who first occupied the land, drove back the
Indian. threw off the yoke of the old coun-
try, with its limitations, political and relig-
ions. to establish a republic of free men,
where liberty in its truest sense should
prevail.
True American Type.
The true American type-we certainly
have such a type-is now found principally
south of "Mason and Dixon's line," in
the South Atlantic and Gulf States, andI
is most strongly marked in tlhe rural dis-
tricts of the cotton growing States. par-
ticularly in Florida, where most of our
people can trace their lineage directly to
the founders of the Republic, with little,


if any, admixture of foreign blood-de-
scendants of those grand old pioneers--
rugged, capable, stubborn, courageous and
honest, who, lone handed and by mere
force of character, conquered the wilder-
ness as an heritage for their children and
their children's children.
The descendants of whom fought the
bloodiest war of modern times, to pre-
serve the constitutional liberties of the Re
public founded by their fathers. Those
fathers, who by their sacrifices, made it
possible for the foreign immigrants to flock
to thle States--tle North and West-af-
ter thle establishment of religious and po-
litical liberty by our revolutionary ances-
tors.
Florida lias had a large increase of popu-
lation during the past fifteen years; she
Ihas increased from 391,000 to 620,000-a
little more than 58 per cent-from 1890 to
1900 she increased 35 per cent (391,000 to
528,000). TIle State's census, taken last
year, now being completed, will show a
greater proportionate increase.
Florida's Great Gain.
Florida gained a larger percentage of
population than any other Atlantic State
during the last United States census period,
namely, 35 per cent. She exceeded the
average of all the groups of States. That
is, the North Atlantic group, 20.90 per
cent.; the South Atlantic, 17.90 per cent.;
the North Central, 17.50 per cent.; the
South Central, 26.10 per cent., and the
Western division, 31.90 per cent.
Her percentage of increase in popula-
tion was exceeded only Iby Arizona, Ida-
hoI, Indian Territory, Montana, North Da-
kota, Oklahoma, Texas, Washington and
Wyoming, from 1890 to 1900, while the in-
dications are that her increase for the
present decade will be far greater in pro-
portion.
The census of 1900 shaws Florida's total
population as 528,542; of native born, 504,-
710; foreign born, 23,823; percentage of
native Iorn, 95.5; per centage of foreign
born, 4.5. Our State census of 1905 will
show a total of 620,000 approximately.
Where They Came From.
The most remarkable feature of Florida's
population is the very large percentage
of native born Americans; particularly
natives of the Southeastern States-no-
tably from the States of Georgia, South
Carolina. Alabama and North Carolina.
In 1900, we find Florida born inhabitants
342,818; born in Georgia, 57,692; born in
South Carolina, 26.798; born in Alabama,
24,721; born in North Carolina, 23,339;
born in New York, 4,465; born in Virginia
3.754; born in Ohio, 2,721; born in Ten-
nessee, 2.445; born in Illinois. 2,176; born
in Mississippi. 2,102; lorn in Pennsylvania.
1,8S43; born in Massachusetts, 1,402; born
in Louisiana, 1,357.
All tihe other States and Territories are
represented in Florida's population, though
the above list embraces all States that
have 1.000 or more representatives in our
lmpulat ion.
Greatest Proportionate Increase.
Wlh:t I desire particularly to empha-
size is that Florida has had a greater pro-
portionate increase in population than any
,tholir State. except the few Northwestern
States tmenttitotld previously, that have
b)etn filled uip iby foreign emigrants, ex-
loiteid iby thle railroads and immigrant
slips. for simply !!l bsincss reasons." The
"foreign iontiigrant"' is exploited by the
";'nli.iigrant slhip" and railroad like any
other colnllmoditv: lumber, merchandise.
Ieef tor lIpik. cattle or hogs. And were it
not for tli. laws t ptrohlibiting individuals
ir t',rltoroations itilporting contract labor.
thle question of foreign immigration would
be solved at once by the importation of


millions of coolies-not Chinamen, Japa-
nese or Malays necessarily, but millions
of "Hedemptioners," from all parts of Eu-
rope, who would be sold for a term of
years to those desiring labor, miners, man-
ufacturers, planters, sawmills and turpen-
tine operators, for simply enough to pay
their passage and a profit to the trans-
portation lines, as was done in the early
days of the last century.
Another remarkable feature of Florida's
population-not only the great preponder-
ance of American born citizens, is the great
number of native born children; a popu-
lation of 5-28,000 in 1900 shows 270,293
children, or youths less than twenty; 197,-
600 of school :age, and 72,693 less tlian
four years old, more than half of our
population. Such facts are potent argu-
ments against foreign immigrants, par-
ticularly when we know that thousands of
our best American citizens are now seek-
ing lhomtes in tlie State. That this domes-
tic immigration is rapidly increasing is
patent to any one who is noting tite
rapidly filling up of the whole State. I
think the State census of 1905 will sur-
prise manlly of our people, when the in-
crease in population is noted, particularly
the natural increase. Race suicide can by
no means be charged against Florida, where
over one-half the population are school
children, or younger.
That Florida needs, or can comfortably
care for more people, is true; that she is
obtaining tlhem more rapidly than any
otlhre Atlantic State is also true; that by
naturla increase, anld Iby American immi-
gration-men and women from the South-
eastern States particularly, she is rapidly
filling up tlie vacant places is also true.
Little Vacant Land.
Speaking of vacalint lands, United States
and State lands, 1 desire to call your at-
tention to tihe fact that there is compara-
t;vely little vacant land, State or United
States, remaining. The Sate has little
left, no homestead lands at all, and has
claims against what remains unallotted
of some four millions of acres more than
site has to meet the claims with.
United States liomesleads are being rap-
idly exhausted. Most of the desirable
homesteads are now occupied. The recent
"stone and timber acts" are rapidly ab-
sorling thle remainder of the United States
lands Ninety per cent of the public do-
mnain has passed into the possession of in-
dividuals, syndicates and corporations dur-
ing tite past twenty years. Not only in
this. but in other States.
Though Florida hlad probably a greater
acreage of State lands titan any other
State, except Texas, some twenty-seven
million acres, more or less, practically five
sevenths of all thle Innd in the State--
less tha:in twenty-live years ago, she today
is practic-ally Iankrlupt in Iher landed pos-
sessions. anld has claims against her for
millions of acres more than slie has to
imeet thle claims with.
Homesteads are Scarce.
tA a recent convention held in tite south-
ern part of the State. the statement was
made by several gentlemen, men well in-
formed and familiar with conditions, that
one of the Iprincipal reasons why young
men were fhocking to thle cities, was that
lands for hlonmes could not be purchased.
Thlis was not denied. t hough repeated by
several imembelrs. and in tIhe presence of
several representatives of the larger land
syndicates.
O Par public doiemtin- oilce thle boast of our
St-tfe anI Natioin has dwindlId until no \
it is dllicelit fr a young man to find 160
a-sre-. (1i lhotiieslh;a>l. We have paroled ivitli
our heritage, our vast doiinaiti of prodtt-
ti\e soiil: minir chlilldre., tf say nothing of,
the ft-rtig iiwtimi graii-tt ;are Itft without
hitimites-. to hriitiit.- flit' "ltoni servants" or
"lena nt fariuti''er" of tlie iail ai.Isndiatiies.
cilipor;latl ins. tor Illlt magnates.
lD. we ineel Iiiiiiit.iants ? es. American
immtiigriantls: pairtticularly fromi the Soutlh-
eastern States-men who will own their


own lomes; maintain the true American
spirit, a love of liberty and personal in-
dependence.
American Immigrants Wanted.
Such men as were recently alluded to
by .Judge Emory Speer-in charging a jury
in a noted criminal case, that has com-
imanded international attention during the
past seven years. In charging, the Judge
said. "I am told that it has been cynically
said by a famous New Yorker that no man
t he lhas a million dollars can be convicted
of -rine in America. The verdict of this
jury of plain, clear-sighted, honest Ameri-
cans., Ios falsified such pessimism. Of that
jury it may be said, that there is perhaps
not a man who cannot trace his ancestry
to a patriot of the Revolution which es-
tablished American Independence. It is
true. as I have often declared, that to the
honmio genous Americanism of these South-
erIn States, when they are plainly shown
their duty. our country may ever look
with confidence for the enforcement of its
laws. and for the maintenance of its in-
stitutions."
True they will have to purchase their
lands-and pay several thousand per cent
prolit to tihe present owners, and in a few
years, tind it difficult, if not impossible,
to obtain a freehold, by purchase or other-
wise.
Doubtless, some of my auditors will con-
sider me an alarmist, and believe my
picture overdrawn; let me assure them
such is not the case. When but a few
years ago-less than twenty-the foreign
emigrant. the native born young American
-had tens of thousands of homesteads
from which to select his one hundred and
sixty acres; he has today but a few to
clho,.e front. and they are remote, scat-
tered and not desirable, having but little
agricultural value.
Restrict Foreign Immigration.
While our public domain has to a large
ext:.nt disappeared, foreign immigration
lthas increased until it has attracted the
serious attention of thoughtful Americans.
I iquote a recent editorial from the Miami
Metropolis, one of the most conservative
,of our Florida newspapers:
"Foreign immigrants are pouring into
Eas-tern ports in such large numbers the
Department of Labor and Commerce has
become apprehensive and has determined
to more strictly enforce the regulations for
the restriction of immigration.
"This is a country of vast territory, and
its assimilative powers are very great, but
there should lie some limit to the influx of
foreigners and the crowding of our cities
with a population which seriously adds to
the gravity of problems that are pressing
more and more for solution. The stream
otf foreigners is not sulliciently distributed.
Too few beconmi soil tillers and producers.
It can be easily understood why this
country is so. attractive to the poor of over-
crowded Europe, and quick and cheap
tr-ansportation makes it comparatively
easy for them to seek homes. In 1900
there wvre 10.4GO.000 people of foreign
Ibirth in this country, and over 21,000,000
born iof foreign parentage. About thirty-
five per cetnt of the total population is
wholly or partially of foreign parentage.
"O(f tlie foreign -horn population ninety
four per cent is resitlent in tlhie North, and
-'x per cent in the South. In 1900 the
tl.tal foreign-horn population of Allegheny,
I'ai.. w\K. in rondl numbers. 30,000; in At-
lainta. it w as 2.500: in ('harleston. S. C.,
it \IS 2.500 an nil 12.000 in Columblus. Ohio.
In Loisvillc it was 21.000 and in Lowell,
40.000: i M'llemphis it was 5,000 and in
Mitineap fti ti1l.100. In \\Worcester, Mass.,
;1 was :37.000: in It,'ltester, N. Y., it was
,4o. ulot: iii l'rvideune. 1;. I.. it was 55.000
aiitil 41i.0(1 in St. I'it:tl. In New tYork City
tlhenr- sere 78i.00 iersons of German pa-
erilt;ilc. 715.000 of Irish parentage, 245,-
0001) of Ilii-,ian. 2IS.000 of Italian, 53.000 of
I',,lislt itl : 53.000 of Ilun arian. A con-
sillthll per (.iint of the total population
is German and Irish.


_ ___ __


_ ____ Y








4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Barnes & Jessup Company

Jacksonville. Floridaa.

Naval Stores Factors and Commission
Merchants.

OFFICERS.
C. H. Barnes. President. J. C. Little, Vice-President.
E. B. Wells. Secretary and Treasurer.

DIRECTORS: C. H. B rnes. J. C. Little, Ralph Jessup.
J. 1R. Saunders. E. C. Long, W. E. Cummer, R. H. Paul. G. W.
Saxon. G. W. Taylor.
Savannah Prices on day of receipt. Prompt Return,

NEW OFFICERS ELECTED. MAGNIFICENT AND HANDSOME CAT-
Florida State Horticultural Society in a ALOGUE OF J. A. CUNNINGHAM
Most Flourishing Condition. PRINTED BY THE RECORD.
The Florida State Horticultural Society
adjourned here Thursday, after one of the .Ilhn A. Cunningham. Jacksonville's well
most successful conventions of the nineteen known furniture man, is mailing to cus-
which have been held since the organization towers and prospective customers through-
out the South one of the largest, and
of the society. cc(rtainl the handsomest catalogue ever
At this convention there were a great sent outi by a business house in the South-
many important matters discussed and it eastern States The catalogue contains
was evident from the nature and the gen- eighty-eight pages, each page 9x12 inches,
eral character of the proceedings that hor- printed on seventy-pound enameled book
ticultural interests of the State were in a pallar, profusely illustrated with over two
better condition than they have been for hundred half tone cuts and zinc etchings,
years and that the members of the society, | with a cover striking in neatness, the
which number into the hundreds, are using wIhole making a book as creditable as any
their best efforts to advance this great ever mailed out by the great mail order
industry in this State. houses of New York and Chicago, and
Previous to adjournment, the following worthy a place in the reference library of
officers were elected: every home in the large territory supplied
President C. T. McCarty, who has done frotu Jacksonville.
such excellent work for the Society during iMr. Cunningham is one of Jacksonville's
his administration, was again the unani- most progressive and successful merchants;
mous choice of the members for President. he Ielieves in the liberal use of printer's
The office of president is one that requires ink and is following it up with satisfactory
a good deal of work, especially just pre- relations with customers, thereby holding
vious to the assembling of the society for a customer when once made, by honest
its annual meeting. But so well has Mr. dealing, and by a personal interest in
McCarty done his work that the Society conserving his customer's interests.
insisted upon his again filling the execu- lIe believes in patronizing home indus-
tive chair and his election was hearty and try when practicable, and it is a credit to
unanimous. .Jacksonville that such a book as that just
There were two changes made in the issued by Mr. Cunningham is the product
list of vice-presidents, the new vice-presi- of a local publishing house. The following
dents chosen yesterday being as follows: letter from Mr. Cunningham to his pub-
P. H .Rolfs of Lake City, F. D. Sampson, lishers shows his appreciation of the work:
of Boardman, and F. D. Waite of Palmetto.
Secretary E. O. Painter of Jacksonville, "Jacksonville, Fla., May 4, 1906.
and Treasurer W. S. Hart of Hawks Park, "Industrial Record Publishing Co., city.
were unanimously re-elected. "'Gentlemen-We are in receipt of first
The following is the new executive coin- lot of catalogues from your bindery and
mittee as chosen yesterday: E. S. Hub- wish to express our appreciation of the
bard of Federal Point, George L. Taber of very high class of work you have given us
Glen St. Mary, and W. G. Connor of Tan- in this book.
gerine. Rev. Lyman Phelps of Sanford, a "Your house certainly deserves credit
member of last year's executive committee, for getting up such a nice piece of goods,
was compelled to decline re-election, owing and we shall take great pleasure at all
to failing health, and the loss of his ser- times in referring to you any of our friends
vices is keenly felt by every member of who may need similar work done.
the Society. "\\e wish to thank you for the personal
Following the election of officers, came interest you have taken to make the cata-
the selection of a place for holding the logue such a grand success.
next annual meeting of the Society, and "Very respectfully,
this turned out to be the most spirited "JNO. A. CUNNINGHAM."
contest of the entire day More than two
hours were required to settle the ques- It has taken an issue of over ten thou-
tion, and even then it was not finally ended ..Ind copies of this book to supply the
until nearly every member of the Society demands of the consuming trade in the
had spoken in favor of his choice of places. trritorv reached by Mr. Cunningham's
Four places were put in nomination, St. umiinonthl stores, and it is needless to say
Petersburg, Miami, Gainesville and At- that tlhe have been issued at an enor-
lantic Beach, and each one of them had ni.,u expense.
their supporters. Speeches calling atten- It has been left to John A. Cunningham
tion to the merits of each were made. and t1,, e tlhe pace in the mail order trade in
many there were in favor of each of the Florida. Hlis catalogue is a credit to hlimi
towns and cities named. and to the vitv of Jacksonville as a trad-
When the final vote was taken, St. Pe- ing and distributing point.
tersburg won out by a comfortable major-
ity, though the other cities 1plled a gof l
vote. The date will be practically the FRIDAY.
same as this year. Turpentine was firm at 1,4zc: sales 745:
nXhen the election had been concluded. rev.ilts 9!41; shipments, 500. Rosin firm,
a motion was made that hereafter, in the sales 1.529: rrceipts 2.165; shipments 1,605;
election of either officers or the place of stock. 5.7.(iS7. Quote: ABC. $3.70; D $3.80;
meeting, no proxies be allowed. This mo- E. $..!.90: F $3.95: G $4.05; H $4.25; I $4.35;
tion. after considerable discussion, was K $4.80: IM $4.90; N $4.95; WG, $5.00;
carried. WW $5.10.


SSCSESCSC~CSCCSiSC3C~mESC3CSCSCSCSC3CSC


W. J. L'ENGLE,
President.


J. W. WADE,
Vice-President.


EL G. HUGHES,
See'y and Tress


Union Naval Stores Co.
MOBILE, ALA. PENSACOLA, FLA. NEW ORLEANS, LA.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
..........DEALERS IN..........

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large n umber of desirable locations in West Flr-
ida, Alabama and Mississippi Liberal ad vances made against consignments Cor-
respondence solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.



CAPITAL STOCK $300,000.00-


I Jacksonville Naval Stores.


Company

SJACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


A NEW COMPANY
Will do a general naval stores commission business. We
guarantee Savannah prices upon day of arrival, and to make
prompt return.


A MUTUAL COMPANY
Each shipper invited to become a stockholder.
It is but fair and right that th,. operator should share in the
profits of the selling end of his product.
We have ample capital and facilities to take care of our
customers. Your business solicited.



Jacksonville Naval Stores Co.

Blum Building, Rooms 21-23 Jacksonville, Florida

D. C. ASHLEY, President. W. P. ROBERTS. V. P. and Gen. Mgr.
J. G. CRANFORD J. F. FENDER C. H. BROWN J. N. BRAY
VICa-PRBSIDENTS
SS. H. BERG, Secretary and Treasurer
- ------ -


TJ)l"*_


5IC 1 ruII r T I I I IIIiii 4 II IIII IT riWTII eIIIgi1 a IIIlia IVI v

* MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


Boilermaking and Repairing I

Still Boilers and Pumps.
SSHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.
Jacksonville, Fla.
EHI t4ist111tl II 4t*I t 3IIt a#1 1111019,t4 l|l|OElt Ieg



SUMMER LUMBER COMPANY

JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

Rough and Dressed Lumber s

Long Leaf Yellow Pine.
BOXES AND ORA TES.


~L~I~~U~r~ ~UJL;U;U;UIU~UUUJ*U33








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


NAVAL STORES REPORTS FOR THE WEEK FROM SAVANNAH


MONDAY. TUESDAY. WEDNESDAY.
Higher grades of rosins were freely scalp- T1h spirits turpentine market Tuesday Mlore ldemand:l for spirits turpentine was
ed in the late trading Monday afternoon,; openedd firm at 04 cents, the same as for evident \\'Welnensday, and as result there
and this added to the raid made during the I lie previous day.. with sales of 581 casks. ,wa; a split price at closing. After tie close
late trading Saturday made a wide margin Th'e v'!o' i ols fir1 and unchanged with the outside price was bid for all offerings.
Itwecen tie iluotations for that day and aldlitional sales of 80 casks. In the late thIi, c.onlirniing the tendency of the drug
the quiotiations this morning. For in- trading. practically all offerings were taken io iadvaiinc permanently. The market
stance. the grade of \V\V which sold for, l qiutatlions. The receipts for the day opel.ned (i.ii :1in, uncllanged, with sales of
$.5..4) last weekk,. wenit 3lMondnay afternoon e\\re n in' ccasks aind the shipments 194, all, 111o ca:ks. 'lhe close was firm at (4 to
for $5. Along with the depression of the' .const\\i-s. 'ThIl New York market was i;4,i ,,,,(en. \ith :ales of 308 additional
higher grades there was a bidding up of ',uoted st'ea;ldy at (171/ cents and the Lon- .ask... a niajority of which went at the
the lower iloes. wThie inarkt oined grill n n market at 4-. ini'dc igure. In the late trading all spirits
:it prices Isl,\\. wlihl wa- a decline of 25
crnts ont Kand alive. a decline oif 10 cents in Iin' iins market tihe changes fore- ,on the iinlark t rl .e tl taken at (I4 cents.
on (;. II. and I. and 5 cents oil on F and s-lhanloned liy Mondlay's late trading were The recilpts for the day \were 312 casks
below. The sales were 3,883 barrels, the inadle in the price list. The opening was and the slhinpmieints 100. all coastwise. T.he
total for thle session. Tile close was firm ;firm at prices below, which were at a llindon nmirke was quoted at 44--9. No
and unchanged In the late trading all 1 h,'li (of 25 cents in nN'W. 30 cents off on
offerings were taken at a decline of 25 cents 'in Vv 30 nts off ron epot wa;s received from New York.
cents on WW, 30 cents off on K, M, N and K. Al. N. anoIt \W(,. 10 cents off on I, 5 cents \An ilp\\iurd tendency ,was also noticeable
\V(, 10 cents off on I. 5 cents off on IT, 10 off oil 11. 10 cents up on I), '. F and G, and in tIhe ioinis imiirket, especially in tlhe
cents up on D. E. F and (. and 5 cents up 5 cents utp on ('1. The sales were 2.147
on CB. About 1.500 barrels were sold at barrels, the total for tie session. The higher .raidles. which have been poiundedl
the prices named, a sufficient quantity to close was firm and unchanged. In the late recently. llie opening was firm at prices
make the market. The receipts for the day I trading hour all offerings were taken, below, which were at an advance of 5 cents
were 1.743 barrels and the shipments 155, though there was a considerable variation fr lthe outside price of WV, 5 cents up on
all domestic. The New York market was in the bids which were accepted by the I. 1
quoted steady at $4.05. factors. Two factors, with comparatively 1 1 and sals were ,356 bar-
Spirits turpentine continued firm and sinall hohlings. sold out at quotations, an- rcl'. tile total for the session. The close
in good demand. The opening was quoted other sold at an advance of 6 cents on K wais tirn and unchanged. In the laft trad-
finn at (4 cent*, tile same as for the and ailove atind three others at an advance ing hour. all offerings \were taken at anl
previous close, with sales of 404 casks. The of 5 cents on K. 1. H. E and 1). More :iadlance of 5 centi, on the outside price of
close was firn and unchanged with sales of strengtli wias shown by the market than! \ WV. 10 cents n1p1 on K. ,1. N and WVI. 5
198 additional casks. In the late trading has been exhibited for the past few days. c-n'ots ilp iion F anil (;. andm 5 cents off ion
all offerings were taken at quotations. The thounigh split prices will probably be as I). II. andl I. In W\ and other grades.
receipts for the day were 817 casks, and large ain advance as will be made at the! tihe sales were heavy. The receipts for the
the -liipments 394, all for coastwise trade. opening this morning. The receipts for their iday were :82 Iliarrels andi the shipmlennts
The New York market w-as quoted quiet at day iere 1.8)99 barrels and the shipments 300. all dollmeltic. 'ThI stock on hand was
671y, cents. oN report was received from 1.231. all domestic. The New York market 52.9!8i barrels, as compared with 18,514 at
London. was iquoted quite steady at $4.05. I the anie time last vear.


THURSDAY.
Only for one brief session, Thursday, did
-pirits turlpentine maintain its seat on the
pinnacle of (1,1 cents per gallon, for when
lhe time cmeInn for the late trading Thurs-
day. buyers were unwilling to pay over 64
cenls. 'The market opened firm at 6414
e llts. which was the outside for the close
ol the previous day. The sales were 111
Sasks. the total for the session. The close
itwas firin and unchanged. In the late trad-
ing huir the weakness which showed it-
self duringg the session ecanme more pro-
nounced and bids of i64 cents took all
offerings. The reeip)ts for the day were
)!M4) casks andl thle shipment's 286, all do-
niestic. Sales of 80 casks of futures for
Maly-A.ugust delivery at 60 cents were re-
Iort.il. Tlie New York market was quoted
qliict at i 671; cents. The London market
uwas iliintcd at 47-3.
Many of the signs which precede a fall
for Iroins were evident in the late trading
hour ITlIniisday. Olly one bid was received
andu that liby only one factor who held only
a small hot. The other factors carried
over. The market opened firm at prices
below. which were at an advance from the
Ireviou.s close of 5 cents on the outside
price of WV\W, 10 cents up on K, M, N and
\\I(. 5 cents off on D. G, H and I, and 5
cents ulp on F. The sales were 1.732 bar-
rels. the total for the session. The close
\\tas firm and unchanged. After the close
only one factor was lucky enough to secure
a iidl, which was 5 cents up on G. Re-
ceipts for the day were 1.810 barrels and
the shipments 3.:178. of which 300 barrels
were for export. The New York market
\was quoted steady at $4.05.


~;;;i ~ -tT:rr~-;--- rrrr


here is always a demand for good I Atlantic Coast Line

tools--especially AXES O SCHEDLE
-THROUGH SCHEDULE-

The Celebrated FLORIDA, GEORGIA. ALABAMA, VIRGINIA,
rh c .NORTH CAROLINA, SOUTH CAROLINA
isRIXF ORD AX E The G great Highway of Travel between
the FLORIDA, the EAST, WEST, NORTH and SOUTH
,,.i is the best money and skill can pro-
duce and has the greatest reputation CONVENIENT SERVICE. ELEGANT PULLMAN EQUIPMENT, MAGNIFICENT DINING CAR
among mill, turpentine and cross-tie NEW YORK AND FLORIDA SPECIAL
.. Wmen *f any iool ever maoute of the DIXIE FLYE"
Sany ever made Celebrated FLORIDA AND WEST INDIAN LIMITED
f If you want the best send your Trains MONTGOMERY. L. ia N.
S rders to CHICAGO AND FLORIDA LIMITED
CONVENIENT METHOD OF TRAVELING
B ig s dar o IAtlantic Coast Iine one thousand mile tickets good over Ifteen thousand milesof
W railroad, embracing, all portions of the South. on sale at all principal agrenees. at rate of
SBrS s hardware '- each Limited to one year from date of purchase. For full. complete and reliable
information reimgarding rates, schedules. 'Pullman service, etc., callon Atlantic Coast Line
e t Ticket Anent, or write
Sole Southern Agents FRANK C. BOYLSTON, W D. STARK, TrveMliI Pass. Ait.
VALDOSTA, GEOKRGIA Dist. Pass. Att., 138 W. Bay Street. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

rs of Mill and Turpentine Supplies.
bbers of Mill and Turpentine Supplies.


FLORIDA BAG MANUFACTURING COMPANY

429 East Bay Street, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.

MANUFACTURERS


Burlap and Cotton Bags Purposes

Sma I Cotton Bags for Commissaries.
Write for Prices. Florida Bag Manufacturing Company


I llItttt r I t l lo til li tt4 I I I mtpinl Ietitirt mp ra

SStandard Clothing Company


. One Price


I


One Price


0 FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
* 17 and 19 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Florada. :
* Stetson and Hawes Hats. Special Attention Given to Mal Orders.
:1t 19t4Ul 4**144I I :Itle**ll11** I I I* II** I I 4 11 III II


TI


v


I Jo


_~


___YYYY_____^_^___^-_-____~_~~~_~~~~~~








6 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


MARCUS CONANT

lNo. 2240 Furerl Director and mbamer Jacksonville, lorida
---- vooooooooooo v v SSo-o-ooo

PEAN
Wi

Stick Candy, M
Send for Price
Mention th Record
KISSSSSSOOOOO


list.


Retailers


Goods.


747--753 Adams street
Jacksonville, Fla.


y~ss~szessYeI~sss..ps'sssses'Lssse~sep ***o***.


Experienced Growers Say that Pecan Culture itjuirc as ilatdeihalee of care and dpo n
Is G^ Co in ty ing that do oranges and other fruits. This
Is a Great Com ing Industry, being tie ca-se, we ought to be careful to
see that we get the best trees and that
we have trees which yild well and yield
During the Nineteenth Annual Conven- for your soil. the very best varieties. They do not re-
tion of the Florida State Horticultural "1 see nothing but success ahead. Of lquire any more room and after once they
Society, held in this city this week, there course there are to be some who will be have been grown, they do not require any
were a number of excellent papers read disappointed, because they may go into more care than the inferior tree."
union the growing pecans, the most con- the growing of pecans without tile study The representative of the Industrial
cise and most careful, perhaps, having been and with the view that anything called Record asked Dr. Curtis how he would go
offered by Prof. Miller, of Monticello, who a pecan tree will sulticie. I have great about setting out a grove to-day:
has devoted several years to the study of faith in the industry. This part of the "1 would go to the nearest nurseryman
the nut. South ought to go into it with all its that I know of, and one who had estab-
The fact that the pecan industry is Imight, for it oilers more than anything I listed a reputation. I would get the best
growing in popularity was evinced by the can name." lie had and would study long enough to
attention padi to it at this session of the Another gentlemen who has been a prom- know that 1 had it. There is where the
Florida Horticulturalists. Every phase of nent member of the Horticultural Con- tii"t mistakes are made. You can't be
the industry was discussed and it was vention is Dr. J. B. Curtis of Orange i too careful about selecting trees to set out.
given as the unanimous opinion that this Heights, the authority for this state on Ge(t the best that you have and they will
was to be the one great industry in this the pecan, and agcntleman who has spent le wNrth your time and care." ,
StAte and that the time when it would be upwards of twenty years growing nuts and Several others who are members of the
considered as the leading one in horticul- selling grafts and buds for improving tile Florida State Horticultural Society were
ture is but a few years away. stock. Dr. Curtis is one of the best known s.en l), the Record in reference to the
In the general discussion which took authorities on pecans in the South, and a pecan industry. and all of them were con-
place, there was the greatest care observed lirominicnt member of the Southern Nut lident that it is to be a great industry and
to give to the records of this society, which Growers' Association. imni which ought to be more generally ac-
are annually published and distributed Dr. Curtis predicts a great future for the ceplted. All those seen were men of ex-
throughout the State, the most careful pecan industry, and in referring to the perieince whole have been devoting their
statements and not to exaggerate the pos- future supply and demand, said: tiln nil capital to pcan growing.
sibilities of the industry. Every statement "So far as exhausting the demand for
made by one who was qualified to talk pecans by planting trees, I do not think
was to the effect that while the industry that this can be done. I believe that there i the 'l'pple of Florida realize the fact
was to be one of the greatest in the South, will be as good demand for pecans a hun- that in the Constitutional Amendment for
there must be the greatest care observed dred years from today as now, despite the the adoption of which the are now being
in the making of a grove to the end that fact that there are to be a great many "lurged to vote by) the advocates of the
the best varieties have been planted and trees planted in the near future. It is a drainagee scheme, there is absolutely noth-
grafted. demand which grows faster than the sup- ing t) plreIent the drainage board to be
Prof. Miller has had a great many years' piy and there are so nany uses for the ire"vocalyl established by said amendment
experience in the industry and in a con- nuts in so many parts of the world, that from hclating other "drainage districts"
versation with a representative of the In- I apprehend no danger of glutting the mar- !n any section or county in the State and
lustrial Record, said: ket." ,imposing upon all of the lands therein be-
"I think that the future for the pecan The representative of the Record asked gin, private i ndiviuls t which were
industry is a great one. It seems to be Ir. ('rltij how the iecan trees compared ..swam and oerlo 1ed act" of 1850 (ag-
receiving a great deal of attention just at with tle orange trees as producers of atin or than twenty million acres)
this time and I am convinced that in a wealth and ho wthe two industries as a -an acreage tax as high as ten cents per
few years we will hear a great deal more of hliole eoimparedl. Dr. Curtis said: ar: the preeds of such tax to be ex-
tie pecan than we do now. True it is, "\\'lien oi1 have a pecan grove, you upended l y such 1bard. without statutory
that if we do, this section of the South have son(,thing which is not to be hurt or olier aclcountallilitv of any kind, in tte
will be in a much better condition than yvthe cold. ou have trees which are not drainage of the E.verglades? And can it
it is today and those who have taken the ,)othlered Iby the white fly, which we have Irw possible tfat t llp( ieolle will be induced
most prominent part in the industry will been lhearig so much from during this to, ollfer. by voting to adopt this Amend-
find that they have accepted the most convention. The fact is, if is a safe tree ient. ill tie li.ht of tle recent acts of
profitable and the least worrying of all of and, if you have a good one at the start the percent drainage board. such extra-
the many horticultural products. There 'voil have a tree that will produce for you ordinalv danger os powers ulon snch offi-
is the greatest opportunities imaginable to the end. There is nothing in the climate cial i'l lrlietruitv.' Iesburgp Commercial.
in the cultivation of the pecan. It is a to interfere with the pecan.
most advantageous industry, if it is pur- "()Onl one year out of twenty have I
sued properly. But there is tine thing that seen nii\ crop of nuts out down by weather On(' "f th ei funny things in life is to
must be done. We must exercise the or other conditions. That was several n""ice omne few newspapers in this State
greatest care in the selection of the va- years ago. The trees were in bloom and a making a tight for Governor Broward.
rieties to the end that we have the best cloudburst struck us. This cloudhlirst \\liien it is explained that these papers
and that this section is to have the repu- \iashled a great many of the blohins from lhaIve until recently been avowed anti-
tation in the market to lead to a ready ti(i out-i,. of the trees and reduced the I:roward. the it luatiion is more ludicrous.
disposition of our goods. yield fil that yar considerably. But that 'I'le iie-_rr, in tllt- \t,,,l pile is this. There
n the select of varieties in grafting a\\; one tinm in twenty and I do not look i ;i ee taii I 'niteil Slates Senator whose
amnd bhuding. the greatest care must be for a. .l hulndurt every decade, either. impaired hiea lth will It permit him to run
observed. Those who are to plant pecans "'I i _eg'dl the industry as a good oneI. for re-lectiiin. In fact. his condition is
oughlt to go into the industry with can- Ilut it uilhit t, lie started with the great- -i pIrecariiiiio that ihe worst may be ex-
tion. a- to what they are placing in tile if care. Wlhn one you have a good pecan I peithd at an tlimen. This leing a fact, the
ground. for a lpecan trees is a tree which -rove. you have something which will pro- 1po liticianus w\ho control these papers want
lmay live for centuriess. ro see the point. dlmce a money crop. There is no gluttin!r tio, :e in position to press their claims for
A good tree will cost no more than an in- if the market. and I have always gotten 4he ;li interill appointment and the papers
ferior one, and if you have a good tree you nmy price for imy output. It is the surest ;ae likewise pouring taffy into the Gover-
have an exceedingly profitable occupation money crop grown and pecans are not nor's ears.-Tampa Tribune.


PECAN S
Analyze the word.

permanent Profits
Economy of care
Certainty of results
Annual crops
Non-perishable product
Superior to all nuts.

THE OPPORTUNITY OF TODAY.
The first to plant a pecan grove
will be the first to reap a
great harvest.

for full Information apply to
THE GRIFFIN BROS. Co.
Jacksonville. Florida.



JOSEPH ZAPF & CO.


Wholesale Dealers in and Bottlers of
ANHEUSER.-BUSCH
St. Louis Lager Beer
Wholesale
Liquors, Wines, Mineral Waters
Write for Prices
JACKSONVILEE, FLORIDA

NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO APPLY
FOR REMOVAL OF DISABILITIES.
Notice is hereby given that Lizzette G.
Robinson, of Duval County, Florida, in-
tends to apply to the Honorable R. M.
Call. judge of the Circuit Court of Duval
County, Florida, on May 8th, 1906, for a
license to manage, take charge of and
control her property and separate estate,
and become a free dealer in every respect.
5t LIZZETTE G. ROBINSON.


Commissaries and


OUR HIGH GRADES OF

UT ard COCOANUT BRITTLE
11 increase your demand for Candies we Manufacture.

lixed Candy, Penny Goods Chocolate and Package


THE E. J. SMITH Co.,


__








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7


JOHN N. C. STOCKTON,

REAL ESTATE, STOCKS AND BONDS.

CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


CAPITAL $300,000


SURPLUS and UNDIVIDED PROFITS $414,760.91


JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


THE EVERGLADES DRAINAGE. powers of the Drainage Commission by
bestowing upon them constitutional powers
The constitutional amendment in refer- instead of the legislative uowers that they
ence to the drainage of the Everglades, are now wielding so unwisely and so op-
and upon which the people of Florida are pressively.
to pass at the next general election, is If the people of Florida are satisfied with
to pass at general eetion i the record of the present Everglades
the most dangerous piece of legislation Drainage District, if they think the tax
ever attempted to be incorporated in the a fair and just one, then let them incor-
Constitution of any State in the Union. porate the Drainage Commission, hair and
It will place in the hands of the adminis- hide. into the Constitution. Let them give
rallahas-ee the power to select any part
tration a weapon of tremendous power for of Florida they please and tax it to death
unscrupulous use against their political for an unlimited period of time.
enemies. If adopted, it will enable them to If. on the other hand, they believe that
strike a mortal blow at any locality in the it is dangerous to entrust sue enormous
State that may be politically opposed to and despotic powers to the political man-
the administration. Under its provisions il,platin of tile administration, and if they
they can establish drainage districts of any believe that the present Drainage District
size, anywhere in the State. They can is being mismanaged, and the public funds
make a drainage district of the entire wasted, then let them kill the Constitu-
State or of any particularr county or pre- tional Amendment to a finish at the polls
cinet, or any city or town. They can, if next November.
they please, take the city of Pensacola and It them also vote for members of the
declare it a drainage district. They can Legislature who will pledge themselves to
take an island and make a drainage dis- wipe out the whole extravagant scheme
trict out of it, or a group of islands. Un- at the next session of the Legislature:
der its provisions, they can levy an an- or at least so amend the present law as
nual tax of ten cents per acre upon all the nil properly protect the innocent private
lands within any District that came to the land owners, and curb the arbitrary pow-
State half a century ago under the Act of er, of the Drainage Commission.
Congress, for one, five, ten, twenty or fifty
years; there is no limit to the time. Under among g the appreciated visitors to .Tack-
its provisions they are not required to sonville this week was Mr. P. L. Suthrr-
state what work they intend to do or how nndl. of St. Augustine. Mr. Sutherland
much they intend to spend. They can de- is now a citizen of St. Johns county and
cide that after they have got the money that county and the city of St. Augustine
out of the pockets of the tax payers. is feeling the influence of his good citizen-
Neither are they required to keep or pub- ship. lie is taking an active part in the
lish any accounts of the money spent. The building up of that section of the State.
Amendment fails to provide an opportun-
ity for the property owners toh vae a hear- .acksonville entertained the horticultur-
ing before the Drainage Commissioners. isis this week. They came in large num-
and to prove, if he can, that their lands hers from all parts of the State and the
will not be benefited by the proposed tax. convention was a body composed of pro-
This Amendment is nothing more nor less gresive and earnest men and women. The
than an iron-clad scheme to permit un- details of the various meetings indicate
just discrimination between the property that tlhe horticultural interests of the
owners of the State. Under our regular State are in good condition.
system of taxation the property j vners
have a chance to be heard and to- value Lake Builer is backed hv as fine a farm-
their property. Every safeguard is thrown ing section as can be fou nd in the State.
around a property owner, but under this North .east. south and west stretch fields
Amendment. he has no protection; he is of numerous acres yielding up their yearly
under the knife. No more arbitrary, des- output of corn. cotton and other ,money
potic, harsh and oppressive legislation was producing erops. In the past five years
ever attempted in any State in the Union. Lake Butler made more advancement than
The entire State will be at the mercy of in any ten years Iwfore that time. We
a vindictive administration and the Amend- have lately landed a bank. twenty-five
meant. if adopted, will open the back door of thousand dollar turpentine retort. an eight
the Capitol to unlimited opportunities for or ten thousand dollar school house an ]
graft and corruption. Imagine the chance we are now fishing for electric lirhts and
that any unscrupulous administration will telephones. Watch for the cork to go
haie to oppress or punish any citizen who under this summnir.-Lake Butler Star.
may own a block of land, by threatening
to put him into a drainage district! Engineer D. D. Rogers. of Davtona. had
As long as there is only the present started out to survey the route of the new
law to fight, the injured property owners railroad between Davlona. DeLand and the
can seek relief in the State O(urts. but the St. Johns river. This work will consume
minute the law becomes a part of the the better part of three weeks, or longer.
Constitution, they will be barred from and much of the work will have to Iwe gone
the State Courts and will be forced into over the second or third time before it is
the Federal Court for relief, accepted by the owners of the new pro-
Judge Locke declared the present law iect. The management of the road hayv
unconstitutional upon several grounds: decided on the Davtona. DeLand and St.
Because the power given the Drainage Com- Johns River Railway as tile permanent
missioners to establish drainage districts name of the new line. and promise that
wherever thev pleased was' a legislative as soon as the lDaytona Council grants tih
power. and the Legislature had no right nece ,v peruli-i: the ordering of sup
to delegate its legislative powers to an ad- ,lies and nimterial Nill commence immed-
ministrative bodv: because the law failed iately. St. Au.\lguine Record.
to provide that the property owner should -
have a hearing before the Drainage Com- THE EVERGADES DRAINAGE.
missioners. to prove, if he could, that his There is a panpr in Polk County defedl-
lands would not be benefited; and on other ing Governor Bro ward with hass drum and
grounds. evn balls. This paler must appear to th'<
The question for the people of Florida governor like a greatt rock in a weary land
to decide is whether they will enlarge the Ocala Banner.

C. C BETTS DRVGS. ""55 FST BAY
C. C.I i E G. 20 to -2 SOUTH LAURA
JAOKSONVILLE, FLA.
Florida Mail Order Drug Store. 'Supplies Everything a Drug Store
Ever Kept. Write to Us.


ROOM 4. UEDEMAN BUILDING.


415414 u~5uxIaaa4u 33.4.uq.-wvmqwww. U


IV WWI 04 111 6 llll ww0


FLORIDA BANK &. TRUST COMPANY.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
CAPITAL-One Million Dollars.
General Banking. 4% on Savings Deposits
Executes trusts of all kinds.


(. E. GARNIER President.
(. B. IOGERNS, Vice-President.
C. J. Avent, Asst. Cashier.


A. F. PERRY. Vice-President.
\. A. REDDING, Cashier.
F. P. FLEMING, Jr., Trust Officer.


* *

JOS. ROSENHEIM SHOE CO.
MANUFACTURERS AND JOBBERS OF


" SHOES


SSAVANNAH. GZORIGIA
S" "Best Shoes Made for Commissary Trade."
*1tI Il 1 I *t 114ttitt1 I t 1i I II I 1 1 I I 1111s II I I 1t




4 J. A. Craig Bro.

(k 239 W. Bay Street EVERETT BLOCK.

1 Leaders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-
ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.

Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats: largest stock in the City.
__o__i_____ a99n w-


We issue Time Certificates of Deposit, which draw Interest at the rate ofthree per ceunt
annum, if held ninety days or longer. Take advantage of this and let your sarlnss be earihut
something for you. Particular attention paid to Out-of-Town accounts, sending deposits by mal



St. George Hotel

EUROPEAN PLAN.
r Rooms: 75c, $1.00 and $1.50 EH.
PHONE 317.

MRS. GEO. W. BROCK
PROPRIETRESS.

1ti'1 III I I ti I *Il>ill lll l>ttlIIItII1I I llll *II l

A Few Bargains

S. 9,000 acres virgin timber. Lies in solid body immediately
upon transportation; estimated to cut 40 boxes, and 2,500 feet
Slumber per acre.
S 38,000 acres part virgin, part boxed, estimated to cut 3,500
* feet merchantable lumber per acre.
S A number of desirable turpentine locations at right prices.
* 25.900 acres virgin timber, lies in solid body, estimated to cut
4 100 boxes and 7,000 feet of merchantable lumber per acre.
*
pe

I Brobston, Fendig & Company
_ JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA 216 W. Forsyth Street









8 THE WElKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


DE PROJECIN' SON.
(Contributed.)
Dat projectin' son wuz de beatenist chap,
Dat eler lived on de face oh de map,
He wouldn't do nuffin' but lazy around,
While de grass wuz a spiling' de craps in de
ground'
An' his onliest brudder wuz plowin and
boein'
An' bossin' de niggers to keep de craps
growing .
Some says dat his paw wuz de one dat's
to blame,
Fur de way dey wuz raised and fetched
'em to shame,
An' some say dat his maw wuz de one dat
had spiled him,
But Scriptures don't say nuffin 'bout what
dey's done,
An' I lays it all on de projecin' son.
He wuz all de time projecin' dis way an' dat
An' pullin' de dog's tail an' teasin' de cat.
An' frownin" at lsoys dat would come by de
gate,
An' raslin' round in a turible rate,
An' tellin' his paw it wuzn't his fault,
An' when he growed up, .aih. he wuzn't
wurf his salt.
Now mostly when chillmns is raised sorter
rough,
An' fed sorter scanty and walloped enough,
An' spanked %wid a bedl-slat an' pulled by
de ha'r
An' pray'd wid and sung wid at family
pra'r,
Dey muscles git stout and dey intellec"
broad,
An' dey grows gKod an' strong in de grace
oh de Lawd.
But when you sees chilluns dat's petted an'
spiled,
An' washed ehery time dat dey fingers is
siled,
An' always a-eatin' on candy an' stuff,
An' cryin' fur mo' when dey's done got
enough,
When dat chile is growed up an' his chil-
hood is done,
You can bet yo' las' dime he's a projecin'
"s.
Dat projecin' son in de Bible you know,
Wuz so lazy an' triflin' dat he wanted to go
To de lan' whar he thought he could hab
milk and honey,
An' cut a hol' dash on his sheer ob de
money,
But. Lawd! He wuz soon at de end ob his
ribbin,
Wid spelnin' his money in riachous lihbin'.
He soon quit his bragging' an' prancin' about
When his money wuz spent an' his britches
wore out,
He didn't hah nowhar to sleep or to eat
An' he looked like a tramp when he went
down de street.
An' he couldn't git work in de shops or de
mines,
An' he wuz so hungry lie et wid de swines.
It evored 'im, you bet! lie struck out a-
walkin'
An' went to his paw where he done some
tall talking .
He lowed dat de niggers what lived wid
his paw,
Had fine grub to eat and good 'backer to
chaw,
An' dat he wuz sleeping' wid varmints an'
frogs,
An' eatin' de grub dat wuz fixed fur de
hogs.
His paw wuz so glad when he saw him a
cummin'
He nelrer did finish de ehune he wuz hum-
min'.
He jumped off de poach, "ah. an' run down
to meet him,
An' wep' on his nek like he wanted to eat
'im,
An' he called up de niggers an' told 'em to
run.
An' kill a whole beef fur de projecin' son.
Now. dat's what's de matter wid de chil-
luns to-day.
When dey paw let's 'em grow up an' have
dey own way.
Dey's so lazy and higity when dey gits
grown.
Dey wants to run off. sah. an' try it alone.
An' spend all dey money in riaehous fun.
An' fuss thing you know. dey's a projecin'
son.


IMPROVEMENTS AT MIAMI.


Tiii-es-Union Bureau, Miami, May 1.-
The' Florida East Coast Hotel System,
which for the past several months has had
a large force of mien at work on its new
water system, will complete the work in
the next few weeks. This will give Miami
one of tlte most complete water systems
of any city in the State. Four large artes-
iin wells were sunk at the old golf grounds
which give a daily tlow of 5,000,000 gallons
of pure water. These wells empty, or will
as soon at completed, into a large reser-
voir, which is now under construction. The
water is conveyed to Miami by gravity
thioiugh a twenty-seven inch pipe, where
it empties into another storage reservoir
and is taken from there by powerful pumps
to standpile, or in case of fire, by direct
iprssure. The' supply is ample for a much
larger city than Miami, but the company
lhaI learned the lesson that Miami is mak-
ing a most rapid growth and they are mak-
ing ample preparations to meet the in-
creasing demand. Recently the water ser-
vice has been extended to the south side
of ihe Mliami river at a very heavy ex-
pense. They are also extending their pipe
lines through Riverside and colored town
has also been piped. Wherever there is a
lemandl for water, the Hotel Company
stand ready to furnish it, regardless of
cost. as they have the highest interest of
tli' citv at heart. Ini this connection it
van also lie said, that wherever in the city
theIre is a demand for electric lights, the
Ilotel company y stand ready to furnish the
lights Recently they have put in lights
ion thie sotli iidef of the river, so that part
,f tlie city is now well supplied, not only
with water and lights, but the city has
extended its sewer system there. The Ho-
tel company y has also arranged to extend
its electric light wires a distance of two
a:nd one-half miles north of the city, fol-
lowing the line of the rock road. This
will lie a great convenience to the people
living in that suburb. During the next
vyear there are several fine residences to
Ise built along the bay front and the ques-
tion of lights has given them no little
trouble. This extension will solve the prob-
len very satisfactorily. The steady march
(if progress is to be noted in every portion
of tlhe city and surrounding country, new
liino, are hiin'g huilt, the pine forest is
being cleared for planting orange trees
anI pineapples. The farmers are now busy
with their crop., tile whole atmosphere is
iI charged wilhi prosperity.
Il',ssier and Son recently sold for Joseph
\. Mcloaldl. two lots fronting on Twelfth
anil [Tliirti'inth streets to a Mr. Rowe for
the -uin of $15.O000. Properties in all por-
tionsi of tile city are changing hands at
Ipr,'es that show a marked advance in val
ui-. and each year there is a further ad-
vance. Since it is a sure thing that the
street railwav is to be built at an early
tlate. havin i, ne of its terminals in River-
sile. there has Ieen ant increase in the de-
ltiand for resident lots in that portion of
theI city. The south side of the river is
making. rapid advances and many new
homes are being built and planned for.
I'he HIltel companyy is ready to meet any
reasonable demand for either lights or
water.

The Vehicle & Harness Co.
Among the new firms of Jacksonville,
none e ir more progressive than The Vehicle
:and llarne'.,s Co., at the corner of Forsyth
;and Ceidar streets. The business, stock
andl charter of this concern were recently
puirchllasil I,y the Savannah Buggy Co., and
Mr. W. F. Stark has already taken charge
as manager.
The company will make a specialty of
-uiipilving the sawmill and turpentine trade
with wagons and harness. More than four
carlloads of lock will soon arrive here.
The li -ri hlas a large supply of harness on
lihand lisidle- that on the road. Both lots
were lmughllt Ib.fore the advance in the
price of Iides. and will Ie sold about 20 per
cenlt ehli.:iper in order to give the consumer
1 llh 1l-nelfit of the foresight of the company
in lIbluing large quantities.
Tl'hei comrii y carries at all times a com-
plete line otf carriages. wagons. harness and
salllherv and everything in carriage and
wagon material.


Southern Machinery & Supply Co,
(INCORPORATED.
Machinists and Engineers.
Engines, Boilers, Saw, Shingle, Planing and Veneer Mill Machinery. Corliss En-
gines, Water Tube Boilers, Pumps and Electric Outfits. Contracts
for Complete Outfits a Specialty. Plans and estimates fur-
nished on application.


nome umce, Jacksonville, FIa.


Branch: .Tampa, Fla.


Successful Men

appreciate, use and advise Life Insu-
rance. The advice of successful men
is worth following. Insure in

Of AMERICA.
WALTER P. CORBETT, Manager, JOHN F. DRYDEN, Pres.
409 West Bldg.. Jacksonville Fla. Hme Office Newark. NJ


PLANTERS


"Old Time" Remedies

THE JOY OF THE HOUSEHOLD.
These four great remedies, Nubian Tea, Benedicta, Cuban Relief
and Cuban Oil, are the joy of the household With them near at hand, a Nubi
man is ready for any emergency. He has a safe, reliable and speedy relief Beueacta
for wife, children, self or stock. With these remedies you can keep the Cuban
doctor's hands out of your pockets, and yet have a healthy, happy famny. CReief
Besides, you can cure your stock of any ailment that may befall them. u O
NUBIAN TEA-In Liquid or Powder Form-Is the great family medicine. It
will cure all forms of Liver and Kidney Complaints, Prevents Chills and Malarial
Fever. Cures the common ailments of children; and as a laxative tonic it is without
an equal-safe and reliable. In the liquid, it is extremely palatable-even children
like it-and it is READY FOR USE.
BENEDICTA is a woman's medicine. It will cure all the diseases common to
women, and classed as Female Troubles. It will bring youth back to the iaded woman,
who has gone one suffering because she thought it woman's lot. It will care for the
young girl just entering womanhood; and prepare the young woman for the sacred
duties of wife and mother.
CUBAN RELIEF-The instant Paint Killer, for either man or beast. Relieves
instantly, Colic, Cramps, Cholera Morbus, Diarrhoea, Dystentery and Sick Headache.
For colic in horses it is an infallible remedy and is guaranteed to give relief in five
minutes.
CUBAN OIL-The Best Bone and Nerve Liniment. Is antiseptic for cuts,
snagged or torn flesh, and will instantly relieve the pain. Cures insect bites and stings,
scalds and burns, bruises and sores, chapped hands and face, ore and tender feet.
Relieves rheumatic pains, lame back, stiff joints, and in stock cures wire fence cuts,
scratches, thrush, splint, collar sores, saddle galls, and diseased hoofs.
Write us for Prices.

SPENCER MEDICINE CO., Chattanooga, Ten.




You Want a Turpentine Location?
You Want a Sawmill Location?

You Want any Kind of Florida Land?
You Mean Business?
F Call on or Write to

J. H. Livingston & Sons,
OCALA. FLORIDA.







Standard Electric Co.,


JACKSONVILLE


-FLA.


FUEL AND BUILDING MATERIAL.



The Southern Fuel & Supply Co.
Ahpa e 4, ream aird BFAo&o=afC:, L-ne, *0,f, BLMk, Pa/ .
Fooel Halan Street, Jacksonville, Trhwhta,









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


NOTICE OF INTENTION TO APPLY FOR
LETTERS PATENT.
Notice is hereby given that the under-
signed will apply to the Honorable Na-
poleon B. Broward, Governor of the State
of Florida, at Tallahassee, Fla., on the 6th
day of June, A. D. 1906, for Letters Patent,
incorporating THE FLORIDA PECAN AND
PONY FARM COMPANY, under the fol-
lowing proposed Charter:
PROPOSED CHARTER OF THE
FLORIDA PECAN AND PONY FARM
COMPANY.
The undersigned hereby associate them-
selves together for the purpose of becom-
ing incorporated and form a corporation
under and by virtue of the laws of the
State of Florida, with and under the fol-
lowing proposed Charter:
Article x.
The name of this corporation shall be
THE FLORIDA PECAN AND PONY
FARM COMPANY, and its business shall
be conducted in the State of Florida and
other States of the United States of
* America and foreign countries, whenever
necessary or convenient.
The principal office of said corporation
shall be in the city of Jacksonville, Duval
County, Florida.
Article a.
The general nature of the business to be
transacted by said Corporation shall be as
follows: To buy, sell and deal in, both
for itself and for others, real estate, farm-
ing lands and timber lands; to buy, sell and
deal in groceries, dry goods, hardware and
all kinds of merchandise; to cut, fell, work,
manufacture, produce, buy, sell and deal in
lumber, timber, cross-ties, shingles and all
articles, products and by-products manu-
factured or derived from timber.
To lease, hire, own and operate lands
and timber for naval stores purposes, lum-
ber or farming purposes. To hold, buy,
own, hire, operate, work, develop, sell, con-
vey, lease, mortgage, pledge, exchange, im-
prove and otherwise deal in and dispose of
real estate, real property, timber lands and
standing timber and any right, interest or
estate therein or in them without limit
as to the amount thereof.
To advance and loan monies upon secur-
ities of land, crops of all kinds, personal
property and other commercial paper. To
own. buy, sell, lease and operate tram-
ways, railways and equipment, except as
a common carrier. To erect and maintain
warehouses for the storage of cotton, tur-
pentine, rosin and other products, and to
issue storage or warehouse receipts against
the same. To farm, produce, buy, sell, ex-
change and deal in corn, cotton and all
other kinds and character of farm prod-
ucts. To own, operate, buy, sell and lease
orange groves, pecan groves and all other
kinds of fruits and vegetables and planta-
tions and farms for the raising thereof.
To own. operate, buy, sell, lease, or hire
gins. cotton compresses and factories and
to manufacture all kinds and character of
cotton and woolen goods.
To grow, buy and sell all kinds of nur-
sery stock, including pecan, orange, roses
and all other kinds of shrubbery and fruits,
and to conduct general nurseries. To buy
and sell, both at wholesale and retail, on
its own account and for others, cotton.
corn and all other kinds and character of
farm products, fruits and nuts. To sell,
mortgage, sub-let, pledge, hire, lease or
convey the crops of said corporation, or
any part thereof at will, and to invest the
proceeds of same at pleasure in such man-
ner as may be determined by the by-laws.
To buy, sell, raise, breed and deal in all
kinds of live stock.
To borrow money and secure the same,
and monies otherwise owing, by mortgage
deeds, bonds, notes or other obligations
therefore.
To receive payment for the capital stock
subscribed for in money or in property, la-
Ior or services, at a just valuation there-
for in the discretion or judgment of the
Board of Directors.
To make contracts of any kind whatso-
ever for the furtherance of its purposes and
businesses, including agreements or con-
tracts between the said corporation, indi-
viduals or other corporations in any of the
lines of business of this corporation. To
have a lien upon the shares of any stock-
holder who becomes indebted to this cor-
poration either individually or as a co-part-
ner. surety or otherwise, with the right to
sell and dispose of such stock, or such
portion thereof as may be necessary to pay


such indebtedness, at either public or pri-
vate sale, and upon such notice and terms
as the Board of Directors may prescribe,
and with the further right to refuse to
transfer such stock until the full payment
of all such indebtedness, and to make such
by-laws in furtherance thereof as may be
deemed best. And to have and exercise
all such powers as may be necessary or
convenient to the several businesses of
said corporation under the laws of the
State of Florida.
The foregoing clause shall be construed
as independent businesses, objects and
powers, and the enumeration of any spe-
efiic business or power shall not be held
to limit or restrict in any manner any
other business, object or power of this
corporation.
Article 3.
The amount of the capital stock of said
corporation shall li Sixty Thousand Dol-
lars. to be divided into six thousand shares
of the par value of Ten Dollars ($10.00)
each. All or any part of the capital stock
of said corporation may be payable in when
issued. or used for cash or for the pur-
chase of property, lalsor or servicess at a
just valuation therefore to be fixed by the
Board of Directors at a meeting to be
called for that purpose.
Article 4.
The term for which said corporation
shall exist shall lIe ninet y-nine (99) years.
Article 5.
The business of said corporation shall be
conducted by the following officers: A
President. Viee-President and General Man-
ager, a Secretary and Treasurer, and a
Board of not less than three nor more
than Thirteen Directors. The office of
Secretary and Treasurer may be held by
the same person.
The Board of Directors by a resolution
passed by a majority of the whole Board
may designate five directors to constitute
an executive committee, which committee,
to the extent and in the manner provided
in said resolutions, or in the by-laws of
said Corporation. shall have, and may
exercise the Ipoweir of the Board of Di-
rectors in the management of the business
affairs of this corporation and shall have
the power to authorize the seal of the cor-
poration to be affixed to all papers which
may reiupire it. The Board of Directors
may appoint other officers of this corpo-
ration including an Assistant Secretary
and Assistant Treasurer and all other
officers. having such powers, duties and
terms of ollie as may Ie prescribed by the
Iy laws or hv their applsintment.
The Directors shall lie elected by the
stockholders at it's annual meeting and all
(other ollicers of this corlporation shall be
elected annually biv the Directors.
Thle annual meeting of this corporation
shall he lh el on tie second Tuesday in
iJune of each year. The date of the annual
ineeting inmy be changed by the by-laws.
The stiokhohlers shall meet on the 12th
lay of .June. A. A). 1906i. being the first an-
Inual meeting, at the office of this corpora-
tion in the city of Jacksonville. Florida, at
eleven o'chlck a. in., for the purpose of
adopting Iby-laws. holding tile first elec-
tion of officers and completing the organi-
zation of this corporation.
I'ntil the officers elected at the first
election hiall be qualified. the business of
this corporation shall hse conducted by the
following officers: W. B. Conolev. Presi-
dent: .1. A. Hollomon, Vice-President and
General Manager; S. C'. Littlefiehl, Jr..
Secretary and Treasurer; and W\. B. Con-
oleyv. .. A. llolloinon. Edwin Brobston, S.
C. Littlefield. Jr.. W. B. Owen and Roland Woodward, Directors.
Article 6.
Thle highest amount of indebtedness or
lia;lility to which this corporation at any
time inay subject itself. shall Ile twice the
an-ount of its authorized capital stock.
Article 7.
The names and re'ilcdnees of the sub-
scribing incrorr ators of said corporation.
together with tlie amount of capital stock
suilscrieild lb, each, are as follows:
Na ne. Residence. No. of Shares.
\. . Cotnoey. Valdosta. CGa........ .2.000
J. A. Ifollomion. Jacksonville. Flan... 1.998
Edwin Brosltoni. Jacksonville. Fla...l.1.99
S. C. Littlefield. .Jr.. Jacksonville Fla.. 1
\V. B. Owen. Jacksonville, Fla........ 1
W. P. Smith. Jacksonville, Fla....... 1
Roland \Wo\,lward. Jacksonville. Fla.. I

State of Florida, County of Duval. ss.
Before me personally appeared W. B.


Conoley. .. A. Hollomon, Edwin Brobston.
S. C. Littlefield, .Jr., W. B. Owen, W. P.
Smith and Roland Woodward, who are well
known to me and known to me to be the
individuals described in and who executed
tile foregoing Charter, and severally ac-
knowledlged that they executed the same
for the purposes therein expressed.
Witness my hand and official seal this
28th day of April, A. D. 1906.
JAMES ROYAL.
Notary Public State of Florida.
(Seal.)
My commission expires Dec. 2, 1909.

HESTER'S COTTON REPORT.

World's Visible Supply and Statement of
Cotton Movement.
New Orleans. May 4.-Secretary Heater's
-tate;t en t of the world's visible supply of
cotton, is-uedl today. shows the total visi-
ble to lie 4.241.729. against, 4.359.494 last
week. and 4.077.824 last year. Of this
the total of American cotton is 2.654.729.
against 2.769.494 last week. and 2.823.824
last year. Of the world's visible supply of
cotton there is now afloat and held in Great
Britain and Continental Europe, 2.121.000
hales, .against 1.963:.000 last year: in Egypt
126.000 against 195.000 last year. andi in
Inlia 1.0Oi;.000 against 817.000 last year,
iand in the United States 932.000 against
1.103.000 last year.
Secretary ilester's weekly cotton state-
nent. issued toldav. shows for the 246 davs
of tie season that have elapsed, the aggre-
gate is behind the same days of last year


1.660,000, and ahead the same days year
before last 470.000.
The amount brought into sight during
the past week has been 118,108 bales,
against 159,824 for the same days last
year. The movement since September 1
shows receipts at all United States ports
has been 7,195,085, against 8,658,555 last
year.
The total movement since September 1
is 9.981.839 against 11,641.676 last year.
Exports for the week have been 125,857
against 193.261 last year, making the total
thls far for the season 5,686,778, against
7.059.146 last year.
Including stocks left over at ports and
interior towns from the last crop and the
mniiiiur of bales brought into sight thus
far fro nithe new crop. the supply to date
is 10.426.:370 against 11.,80,643 for the same
period last year.

GRAND PARK IMPROVEMENTS.

Streets are Being Laid out and Workmen
Are Making Place Attractive.
The work of improving Grand Park, the
subh-diiision of .acksonville which was
placed on the market by the Jacksonville
Development Company and which was sold
in a mintli. is progressing favorably.
There is a considerable force of men
at work there and they are pushing the
work to completion as rapidly as possible.
Streets are being graded and trees set out.
Those who have purchased lots in many in-
mlances are beginning to improve their
property.


?5he EVERETT HOTEL
325 WEST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
Centrally located, thoroughly repaired and renovated. Newly furnished. European plan.

G. H. MASON, Proprietor.


*M***M*6***ft*446-f***6*tjk*


I J. W.'


TEST,
President.


H L. RIaIM9OND.
Swcy wid Tre.
D. R, WILLIAMS.
AssN Sec'v Wo Trel.


WEST FLYNN & HARRIS CO.

GENERAL OFFICES GERMANIA BLDG. Savannah. Ga.
WEST BLDG. Jacksonvlle. Fla.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
NAVAL STORES RECEIVED AT SAVANNAH, GA., JACKSONVILLE,
FLA., AND FERNANDINA, FLA.

Wholesale Grocers also Dealers in Hay. Grain and Heavy
Harness

SOLE AGENTS or the Celebrated Union Turpentine Axes
and Wilson &Childs Philadelphia Wagons.


SAVANNAH, GA.


TAMPA, IrLA


rsi~ri*~nrrr- .11 lID IIV VS ISV -)~


WILLIAM A. BOURS


JAMES C. DARBY


WILLIAM A. BOURS & COMPANY
THE OLDEST ESTABLISHED GRAIN AND SEED HOUSE IN THE STATE.

Hay, Grain, feed, Garden

Seeds, Poultry Supplies, Flour,

Grits, Meal and fertilizers.


OUR MOTTO: Prompt Shipment, Reliable Goods.


Catatloge rre


D. M. FLYNN.
"OHN E HARRIS.
V. I. KELLEY.
Vicc-Presidenfm.


MERCHANTS WAREHOUSES.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


206 EAST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


IV


______________


=MEN










10 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL RECORD
JAMES A. HOLLOMON. Editor-lin-Chief.
J. 0. LeFONTISEE. Associate Editor.
A. H. MAR.SH. Business Marnwter.
Published Every aturday.
Siscuapioi i (Domestic) .3.00 Per Annum
Bnscnrron ((Foreign).... $3.50
.3
"The Pire and Its Products."
All communications should be addressed
Tho Industrial Record Company.
Jacksonville. Fla.

branch Editorial and Business Offices at
Savarnavh.. Ga.
Entered at the Postoffice at Jacksonville, Fla..
as second-class matter.
Adopted by the Executive Committee of
the Turpentine Operators' Association
September 12, 1902, as its exclusive olli-
cia organ. Adopted in annual convention
September 11 as the organ also of tile gen-
eral association.
Adopted April 27th, 1903, as the official
organ of the Interstate Cane Growers' As-
sociation. Adopted September 11, 1903, as
the only official organ of tile T. 0. A.
Commended to lumber people by special
resolution adopted by the Georgia Sawmill
Association.

THE RECORD'S OFFICES.
The publishing plant and the main of-
fices of the Industrial Itecord Company
are located at the intersection of Bay and
Newnan Streets, Jacksonville, Fla., in the
very heart of the great turpentine and
yellow pine industries.
trade of the entire South.
The Savannah. Ga., ollice is in the Board
of Trade Building. Savannah is the lead-
ing open naval stores market in the world.
NOTICE TO PATRONS.
All payments for advertising in the In-
dustrial Record and subscriptions thereto
must be made direct to the home office in
Jacksonville. Agents are not allowed to
make collections under any circumstances.
Bills for advertising and subscriptions are
sent out from the home office, when due,
and all remittances must be made direct
to this company.
Industrial Record Publishing Co.

Spirits and rosin are keeping up the
pace.

The price of the colored man and the
mule is going up constantly.

The political campaign in Florida is a
tame affair this year. There is but little
doing and the lid is securely nailed to the
boodle barrel.

The phrase "Draning the Everglades"
has been amended to read "Draining the
State Treasury." The amendment has
been brought about by tlhe developments
in the case.

It is reported that the Italian labor re-
cently imported to the State is not prov-
ing satisfactory. thIugh there have been
no complaints in reference to the C. W.
Chase Chinese colony at Paradise.

The new home of the Consolidated Naval
Stores Company is a gen. It is located
tin the seventh flior of tile magnificent
new ('nsolidatild Building. The company
hlas the highest offices of any in the city
of Jacksonville.

It was reported in Washington last week
that tlie1 United States (Government was
to take steps to prosecute those who have
been illegally securing lands in \Vest Flor-
ida under the State and Timber Act. If
this is the case, there will be some most
interesting developments in that part of
the State in the near future.

The Colourman's Journal of London is
still crying against tlhe prices of spirits
and rosin and threatening for all of Eu-
rope to bring about the use of sulbstitutes.
The ('oloirmian's .Journal, however, does not
represent the producer. It represents the
fellow who uses spirits for mixing paints
and for other purposes and there is but
little surprise at the course it has pursued
-ever since the prodlicers commenced to ,el
what their product is worth.


INSPECTION LEGISLATION.

The naval stores inspection bill, which
\\as introduced in the Mississippi legisla-
ture at its recent session, did not pass
that body, owing to the lateness of its
introduction, and to the fact that the
Legislature was rushed with work up to
the last moment and did not get the time
to reach that bill. Mr. C. B. Townsend
will introduce the same bill, with some
modifications, in the Louisiana Legislature
at its approaching session, and thinks the
chances are excellent for its passage in
Ioui,'alna. Mr. Townsend is acting for
the Turpentine Operators' Association in
handling this legislative matter The bill
is similar in many respects to the bill
ipa.ed in Florida and Georgia, with some
rather radical differences, put in mainly
to conform with the different conditions in
that section. Record readers are familiar
wit l tie hill as introduced in Mississippi,
ais we puilislisl a full summary at the
time.

NAVAL STORES SEASON.

.\ friend of the Record, writing from
N'ew Orleans. speaking of naval stores con-
diitions west of the Alabama river, has the
following to say:
'Tlie naval stores season is very back-
ward. between two and three weeks at
hIast. The labor conditions are worse than
last year. and, from what I can learn,
there is no hope of an increase in the crop
of 190) over that of 1905. Probabilities
are for small decrease. Consumptive de-
innil seems to ie excellent for both tur-
pentine and rosin and it would be strange
:f we do not have satisfactory prices for
the season."

PROTECTION OF INTERESTS.

At every session of the legislature are
those. who in order to strengthen them-
selves at home. play to the grand stand
:and antfnek some of the largest interests of
the State. claiming that whatever legisla-
tion they propose is not only in the in-
terest of ihe farmer. but absolutely es-
seinial to his existence. We have heard a
great ealn from the Florida demagogues
%who butt into the legislature along these
lines. Fortunately there is always a curb
put on their efforts and the legislature is
called upon to kill a great many bills of
this character.
In lhe first place there is but little protec-
tion in thel chlrnater of the legislation pro-
osedl. and the farmer is hut little influ-
enced by the reports which reach him of
the erlidiuct tof the man he hast sent to
T:llahliss.e to represent him. The Flor-
ida farmer is not a heggar and does not
ank ianilinug that is unfair. He does
in-ist ,In fair play. and while he does not
:ilwNv \s ret it. he has the blame to place
;it the dolor of the very demagogue who
is ever switching his tactics and diverting
tlie nttfntion of the farming classes from
lhe inain issues. This legislative stumb-
ling block was in evidence at Tallahaasee
-it tIe la't session and he is sure to be
there a-Iin at the session of 1907. But
the people of Florida are becoming posted
andl have been looking beyond the mere
outward nets of such men to see concealed
some if lthe imot eorrlpt schemes he uses
to pToll the top off snme of the money bar-
rels whicl are rolled to Tallahassee just
nrrevionu to the time that the Florida leg-
isla tore convenes. This same demagogue
:11 o, lIefore te people for re-election and
r':al hill after bill whlichl he has intro-
.Ilneel il the interest of the farmer and
the lalorin, classes. But few. if any of
'Ihem. haive lieonie Inws. They have been
killed or pigeon-holed in some of the com-
niiffee ioomRs. Biut he thinks that it makes
",oi.d eamllpa ian timber with which to pull
the wol over the eyes of the average
voter.
It is tfHe that this practice should cease.
It is w-rk-inR a greater injury to the farm-
iii" classes than it is to the interests
whliilh :'ire ttancked. for it places the farm-
or in tlie ridiculous attitude of being the
p-n,-sir for the various measures which
aire thifl introduced.

D. C. Strieklin. of Indian Springs. came
ui, to TJaeks-nville this week to make an-
-ther pi-chase. This time it was not an
;iitoniobile. but a $1.500 horse.


Annual Address of President McCarty to the


Florida State Horticultural Society,


The annual address of President C. T.
McCarty, of the Florida State Horticul-
tural Society, was a careful review of the
horticultural interests of Florida for the
past year and some excellent advice for
the future. The address follows:

What was easily the principal feature
of the opening program of the nineteenth
annual meeting of the Florida State Hor-
ticultural Society, was the annual report
and address of the president, Mr. C, T. Mc-
Carty. of Eldred.
President McCarty briefly reviewed the
history of the society, paying eloquent
tribute to the magnificent work that had
been done by his predecessors in office.
Then he ook up the work of the present
and the future, pointing out the new prob-
lems that are constantly arising, and
dwelling upon the necessity of carefully
considering them and approaching their
solution as an organized body. The ad-
dress. which is filled with valuable thoughts
anl suggestions, is herewith printed in
full:
Members of the Florida State Horticul-
tural Society, Ladies and Gentlemen:
This audience will forgive me while T
indulge in some retrospection. It is worth
while sometimes to lift the veil of the pi;st
and behold the achievements of the then
actors. That picture reveals to us lessons
which suggest progress, hope and advance-
ment. At th" outset of this address, it is
well for m. to take my bearings and to see
what is the duty I have assigned myself;
to see and to study the standards that
have been set for me in he similar efforts
of the past; to study the men and the
times that have produced the annual ad-
dresses of the past eighteen years.
"thur society came forth almost full-
fledged from its birth. In response to tihe
demands of the times, it immediately took
its place among the great horticultural so-
cieties of he age. Fortunately, it had as
its first president one of those rugged, fear-
less and intrepid characters that were
transplanted decades ago, from the great
prairies of the Northwest to the tropical
and sub-tropical conditions of our State.
With the accumulated wisdom and ex-
perience of a life time, he led the van in
the early years of the society's history,
and led it with unvarying satisfaction and
success.
"In its first decade it had become so
prominent that it received and entertained
with success some of the foremost scien-
tists of this and other lands. The energy
and persistence. the skill and faith, the
merit and the accomplishment of its first
president. Dudley W. Adams. are now
matters of history. After all it is acts,
not words. that count in the life impres-
sion one leaves upon his age and genera-
tion. Judged by this standard, what a
splendid life was his.
"It is my duty as well as my pleasure,
to put on record the high appreciation this
society feels tolay for its first president
after he has for well nigh a decade felt
upon his face the breath of the eternal
morning.
Good Foundations Endure.
"Cood foundations, like good principles
and good practices. never fail to bequeath
to siltsehiqent generations their manifld
I blessings.
"In studying the history of our society
luring this period of eighteen years. I
find impressed upon this latter half the
lareh-hearteil good-natured, genial person-
alitv and nnflural ability of its last presi-
dlent. C(eorge L Tnher. How fortune our
society was when called upon to hear a
sudden vacancy in its chief executive, that
one so able. so willing to bear and forbear.
should be ready trained at hand.
"The annual addresses of President Ta-
her always contained a message of impor-
tance to the society. In times of prog-
resannd prosperity, it brought congratu-
lation and good cheer Tn time of adver-
sit it brought hope. courage and man-
liool. and faith in skill and science to
overcome difficulties or adverse climatic
conditions. His cheery tones were ever on
the side of optimism. were ever turning
towards the bright side of the picture of


horticultural struggle and endeavor in this
State, were ever pointing to new means
of combating the elements, of overcoming
the natural enemies of our chosen indus-
tries, and bolstering up those of less faith
and courage.
"Through all these annual addresses runs
the constant tone of enlargement and im-
provement. Constantly increasing in pow-
er, thought and literary finish, his last
annual address becomes a fitting climax to
a long series of addresses with which he
has enriched the literature of our society."
I can well imagine his feelings when pre-
paring his 'Message from the Woods,' like
that felt by Bryant when he wrote his
Thanatopsis, when he gave to his age,
in poetry, his conception of a proper ap-
preciation of nature and natural surround-
ings.
"Like him feels John Burroughs, the na-
ture-lover, the poet and admirer of the
brook, the field, the orchard and the for-
est. How much of beauty and poetic feel-
ing and love of nature and nature's God
are embodied in the president's last annual
address, only future generations shall fully
appreciate.
Present and Future.
"'f retrospection this is sufficient. The
past, at least, is secure. Our society, hav-
intg passed safely the rapids of its upper
course and glided successfully along its
middle course, now moves forward in the
direction of its lower and broader course.
It has met the questions of the past. It
lhas accumulated wisdom by experience. It
should be, and doubtless it is today, well
eiluipped to meet the questions of the pres-
ent. to maintain the reputation of the past
and to lay broad and deep foundations for
the achievements of the future.
"The problems of today are not more
difficult than in the past, but they are
more complex and diverse. There are in
them a greater number of factors, even
if each factor is of less vitality. What
message does the present bring to us?
"What duty do we owe the today?
\What accomplishments can the tomorrow
claim logically founded upon today? Are
there messages that the horticultural con-
ditions of the State at this moment require
bringing to your attention? Fortunately
we stand in the presence of no clamity.:
We do not surround, as we have sometimes
done in the past, those conditions that
Iuried the hojes of thousands of our
people But even these clouds had their
silver lining. unseen then, but plainly vis-
ible now. We are in the midst of pros-
perity long continued and pronounced.
-(hir industries have been enlarged both
in number and in volume. Our output is
greatly increased in every department of
horticulture. Our sources of knowledge,
)our ability to handle the drawbacks, the
1pess anil the evils of our diversified in-
dustries.have been largely increased. What
then. is there to consider? It frequently
happens that the most dangerous periods
are th-se of greatest prosperity. It has
been well said that 'Security is mortals'
cliefest enemy.'
New Field of Battle.
"In tile line of thought I shall take to-
night I may le straying from the beaten
path. may I leading the way into battle-
lields xlihere the valiant, the sagacious and
ite steadfast of purpose alone can be
found at the front. The commercial bat-
tlI's of the present dwarf into insignificance
the battles with insects, with climatic
condlitions, witl all our other obstacles
combined. The struggle for new markets,
ftor cheaper production, for fairer treat-
ioiwnt by our agents in the markets, for
fair lrai Is a.nd rapid transit. do not these
dmlanil our attention and challenge the
hest brains among us?
"()f \ilhat avail is it that we devote our
time and capital to the problems of pro-
duction if the other and more complex
,prblemsl of econ my, distribution, trans-
portation. receive not their proper atten-
tion'' These things are as much a part of
our legitimate huiiness as the cultivation
of the soil. the fertilizer we shall use, or
thie various matters of every day occur-
rence.
"What nman is there before me who has
not felt like this? The season has been a


__









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11



THE CHRISTIE-GROOVER oDRI co..


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DRUGGISTS.


JIAONIOVIIr. fraL ll._


H. E. PRITCHETT, Pres. P. L. SUTHERLAND. Vice-Pres. A. D. COVINGTON, Sec'y.
J. P. COUNCIL, Treas and Gen'l Mgr.

THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.,
General Offices: JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Factory: WANNANISH, N. C.

Manufacturers of HWig Grade Tools
Ier INrvl t-. Of.et.


good one. I have fertilized judiciously and
wisely I have cultivated, I have sprayed,
I have spared no pains to produce a fine
crop? lHow shall I market it to the best
advantage? Have you not realized that
you were then confronted with harder
conditions than those of production and
ones less within your control or manage-
ment?
Society Has Wider Scope.
"The original scope of our society being
much narrower than its present one cur-
tailed the range of topics considered at our
meetings to a very narrow margin. The
original thought of the founders of this
society was to make it apply almost ex-
clusively to orange growing, to citrus fruits
and their allied subjects.
"As the years have come and gone, its
scope has been widened, so that it now
covers not only semi-tropical but also
tropical fruits, vegetables and many of the
fruits of our temperate zone. This enlarge-
ment of its sphere has injected into it new
relations and new problems for annual
consideration Let us briefly discuss a
few of the important items worthy of
thought.
Age of Organization.
"This is an age of organization, co-ope-
ration and consolidation.. It is not suffici-
ent that the horticulturist of today knows
how to produce the fruits and the prod-
nects of the soil. but that he knows as well
how to successfully transport, distribute
and market them.
"Perhaps the largest field for present and
future investigation is the one covering the
problem of marketing. This problem in-
volves the element of business experience
and study of the relations of the cost of
productoi nand transportation to the mar-
ket valeu of our products: the study of
the laws of supply and demand as ap-
plied to each particular product: a study
of the value of organization in the secur-
ing of reasonable and satisfactory rates
of transportation: of the proper commis-
sions to be paid our selling agents, and the
proper distribution of the crop so as to
prevent a surplus in one portion of the
country and deficiency in another.
"Were there no such thing as organized
effort among those whose financial inter-
ests are opposed to ours. there should be
no necessity for organization on our part.
The value of farmers' nad fruit growers'
organizations is in direct proportion to the
tenacity with which they adhere to them
and the vigor .with which they enforce the
principles involved. I do not deem it nec-
essary to go into arguments Supporting
the needs for compactly united organiza-
tions in each of our principal industries.
Need of Organization.
"The need for organization must he ap-
parent to all. For greatest efficiency. con-
"olilation of all for thle handling of prob-
hems collnnon to all. i' only common sense.
Questions like transportation, tariffs for
protection, rates of commissions, and kin-
dred broad matters can only be handled
powerfully and conclusively in the hands
of one central organization. The methods
and direction taken by each *interest must
Ie dictated by themselves.
"t can dlo no harm to chrystallize amone
them. into some definite form. the best
ideas of the most intelligent and energetic
of the arrowers nor ne,'d it be believed that
the only value in horticultural organiza-
tion is that of the maintenance of the price
or cheapening the cost of the production


Ii II ItiI
and the proper regulation of the matter of WC
transportation. In numerous other-ways 4 W.W. Ca
organized effort is superior to individual t
effort. -
"'Tle tendency of the times is to the en- *T a
large costs of the materials used for the =
packing ald package purposes, the costs of 4
living and. indeed, increased cost in every-
thing that the horticulturist purchases. *
The only fair method of safeguarding the 4
grower's anIl producers 'interests to see .
that increased revenue accrues to him suf-
ficientlv to meet the increased costs of 4
production as well as the cost of living and
lthe necessaries and luxuries of life. TurpE
"('oncurrent with this comes the thought 4
of the reduced cost of production by by bet-
ter management, more intensive cultiva-
tion, decreased cost of fertilizing by taking
advantage of cheaper sources of nitrogen
and other kindred economics. All of these I ItgIa
are well and should never be forgotten.
Thle opening up of new fields of production
have helped swell the volume of matreial B. B. TATUM!
in our markets and should set us to think-
ing of how to overcome this new competi-
tion.
Calls for Best Thought.
"The solution of these problems will call
for the best thought, the most persistent \
effort and the most constant watchfulness
of the thoughtful classes in our midst.
Among the hopeful signs of the present A branch
are the cordial relations existing between opened t ce
the country and the city; between the building, equ
producer and the carrier; between the pro- I sanitarium hi
ducer and the consumer. treatment for
'In these better understandings of each WHISKEY, (
other's relations we see the future solu- Write foi
tion of these problems. So long as the
different classes understand and appre-
cinate each other, realize their mutual in- K l ]
ter- dependence on each other, maintain
their mutual respect for each other, that Telephone No
long will hIarmony and material pros-
perity exist. In passing, it might he said -- -
that the accentuation of the self-interests
of the horticultural classes does not nee-
essarily mean war upon or antagonism of
any other interest.
The Enormous Resources.
"'The recent report of the United States
Department of Agriculture calls attention
to the enormous resources of American
agriculture and hlorticulture, I
"In comparison. all other interests com-
iineld sink into insiguificance. The sums
are so stupendous that we can scarcely
realize their magnitude. Of this grand
tital we are a considerable part. It is
iust caulcse for congratulation that the im-
nortance. vitality and dignity of the hor-
ticultiu-al classes is being recognized.
"Do our horticultural classes sufficiently
appreciate the value of and the necessity
for diversification? Do we realize the full
meaning of living at home? Is it not a
fact that too great a proportion of the
income from our pro, lucts goes for that L E
which can and should e g,. rown in our lr
own State and possibly in our own neigh-
iorhood? We hear it discussed on all
hands, hut have not acted on it vigorously. I
While this thought is trie I risk once more
calling the attention of our people to its
vital importance.
The Great Questions.
"I have felt strongly impelled at this Correspond
mnecting to press upon your attention these I
important matters. To give vent to the .
thought that has been growing in my 42 1
mind for some years. that the most vital
and far-reaching questions now calling Phone 11
(Continued to page 14.)


II *Itll: I It ttI i t < tiulIuI tII .t It.l 5 1titIS
rnes, Pres. W. C. Thomas, Manager. R. S. Carnes, Sec. and Treas.


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Hardware

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TAMPA. FLORID A.
ItttitI UIEIII III3III l t*igiitC*I iSIIlIII tt


I, Pres.


J. L. WALLA CE, Vice-Pres. H. G. STONE, Secy-Treas.


Keeley Institute,

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II


I -


_________


___ __~__ ____


__ Y









12 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.




Jacksonville Grocery Comp'y

W. 4. M Wholesale Grooers and Distillers' Supplies.
mmW.H OOftIe ad Warolemseoe Vidlot A. 0. L. Ry. JacksoneWlle, Fl .eb


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CITY PROPERTY A SPECIALTY.


SNAILS AS A REMEDY FOR WHITE
FLY.
What promises to rank among the most
valuable points brought out during tlhe
nineteenth annual meeting of the Florida
State Horticultural Society was the dem-
onstration by Mr. F. D. Waite, of Manatee,
that nature has provided a remedy for the
ravages of the dreaded white fly.
The white fly and its effects are so well
known to the growers of citrus fruits
that there is no need for discussing it,
especially in Florida. As a pest, it is one
of the most dreaded by horticulturists,
and the knowledge that patient research
and almost limitless experiment has at last
apparently found a remedy that is, to all
appearances, wholly reliable and absolutely
certain, means much to the orange-growers
not only of Florida, but of other orange-
producing States as well.
And that such a remedy has been discox-
ered, there seems to be little, if any, doubt.
The demonstration of Mr. Waite was very
close to being complete and convincing, and
the fact that he is fighting the pest with
a remedy that has apparently been express-
ly provided for this purpose by nature it-
self, adds to its value.
The question of the white fly and the
means of fighting it was brought up by
the report of the standing committee on
citrus fruits, a committee composed of
Messrs. L. B. Skinner of Dunedin; E. L.
Brady of Titusville, and L. B .Knox, of
Bulow.
The greater portion of the report was
devoted to the discussion of the White Fly,
not only because of the grave importance
of this subject to every Florida horticultor.
but because, since the last meeting of the
Society, there have been innumerable re-
quests made for literature on the subject
and for advices concerning the best method
of treating the insect and its ravages.
The committee went into the matter in
detail, reviewing the history of the fight
waged against this pest, and summing up
ably and forcefully the present status of
the contest, telling of the experiences of
orange-growers in different parts of the
State, with the different remedies that
have been suggested.
Following the detailed report came one
of the most interesting and timely dis-
cussions that has been heard at a meet-
ing of the Society in some time, Mr. F. D.
Waite, of Manatee, Mr. Arthur H. Brown
of Buena-Vista and Mr. F. G. Sampson of
Boardman, being among the leaders in the
discussion.
It was during the discussion that Mr.
Waite demonstrated that he had seemingly
discovered a remedy for the ravages of
this pest. but in order to understand the
full effect of it. some brief idea must be
given of the white fly and the nature of
the damage it does.
The name of this insect pest was chosen
because it so fitly described its appearance
and thus served to instantly call to mind
the pest itself, when it was desired to refer
to it.
It attacks all citrus fruits, crawling over
the leaves and over the fruit as well. The
dalmate done, however, is not by eating
of c'ther the leaf or the fruit, but because
the insect deposits, as it crawls along, a
thick, heavy, black mould, eventually cov-
eriiig looth leaf and plant.
The effect is readily discernible. This
heavy,. lack mould shuts up the pores of
Ibth fruit and leaf and the effect on the
pIlant is exaetly similar to what would
ui-1-r should a heavy. impenetrable coat-
ing lhe smearied over the lungs of a human
loI'nu. The growth is stunted and almost
infinite labor is necessary to remove the
evil effects.
Then, too. even if no actual damage is


done, the market valeu of the orange is
lowered, as the ugly black blotches de-
stroy the attractiveness of its appearance
and dealers do not find as ready a retail
sale as if the effects were not there.
This means that the orange-grower be-
fore shipping the product of his groves
to the market must, at additional cost and
lalor and time, wash the fruit, and even
then his labors, in many, many, instances
are not entirely successful, and some
blotches will remain. Every cent added
to the cost of preparing the fruit for mar-
ket. deducts from the profits, and, if the
actual statistics were obtained, the cost
of the pest would probably be astonishing-
ly high.
For a long time horticulturists have
been waging a relentless war against this
insect pest, but their efforts heretofore
have. in too many instances, met with
only indifferent success. tl is for this rea-
son that the white fly is so dreaded by
horticulturists and it is for this cause
that it is generally referred to as one of
the worst, if not the very worst, of the
orange growers' troubles.
But Mr. Waite has finally discovered a
rem*dly. His demonstration was complete
in every particular and convinced every
one in the large audience of its great
merits. Then, too, it is the first time that
it lha been presented to any similar or-
ganization and though the first credit goes
to Mr. Waite, great credit is also reflected
upon the Florida State Horticultural So-
ciety.
Mr. Waitz. is an extensive orange grower,
living in Manatee, and while at work about
his orange groves lie one (lay noticed that
a certain variety of snail. quite common on
the lianiunck in his home county, was fol-
lowing the track of the white fly and de-
vouring this black mould that the former
insect had deposited on the oranges and the
leaves of the orange tree.
This at once led him to make further
investigation and experiments. More snails
of the same variety were secured and
placed on trees where the ravages of the
l- were most in evidence. The cffct was
always thi same. the snails thoroughly
cleaning both the leaves and the fruit and
leaving no trace either of the black, heavy
mouldl. or of the small eggs that later
hatch out into White Flies that, in turn,
continuee the ravages of the parent fly.
Mr. Waite. in order to completely show-
to all the work of which these snails are
capable, brought with him to the meet-
ing a large box. in which he had placed a
numblsr of the snails, and in another box
lie carried many orange leaves thickly cov-
ered with the black mould.
l)Drin gthe morning the snails had been
industriously at work upon the mould and
several of thle leaves had been thoroughly
cleaned, not one little trace of either the
mould or th small yellow eggs remaining.
O(n other leaves the snails were still at
work and the members of the Society
c(,,ld watch them crawling through the
nmould. devouring it rapaciously, and leav-
ing Ielhind them the bright, natural green
color of the leaf.
It created probably more interest than
any other single fact brought out in the
ineet;ng and there were very many present
who believed that this discovery is going
to ultimately solve the problem. It is
nature's own remedy for preserving her
species. and hears. as demonstrated. every
evidence of being the solution of the prob-
lem.
The snail is a comparatively small one.
carrying a small Ihell. pearl-like in its
ereneral coloring. though thickly marked
with small brown spots. When the snails
have finished their repast. they draw them-
selves into their shells and remain clinging


DIAMONDS AND WATCHES-


We simply ask a call. We can show you, at correct and money
saving prices, many papers of loose pare white, perfect
DIAMONDS. It Is our desire to continue being the largest
Diamond dealers In Jacksonville, and oar specialty Is fine round-
cut gems and high-grade Waltham and Elgin Watches.


to tllt leaf for a little lime, when they
again iegin tlhe r work on tie mould.

Shipments at Pensacola.
The total reports from tile phort of Plen-
saceola for the month of April. 1!.;. aggre-
$1'ate $l.i.110.). (f thIis amount England
received $5:3 .781. Flraine $3;77.303. Italy
$179.428. andl Scotland $126.119. The bal-
ance was divided between fifteen countries.

Big Money from Celery.
'The Iroinlctiveness of haIinmock land in
Manatee county on ilthe west conts of Flor-
ida is illustrated by thlie success of William
Iichmani. f< rniierly of Daretown. N. .1. Last
situnimner he luIghlit ,olne of tliel virgin soil
and had it cleared of the dense growth
which covers that kind of ground. le put
it in cel.er andl a nareful account of thle
results from one acre was kept. He ship-
ped to New York eight hundred and two
crates which sold for $3.140.50. The ex-
pen.ses were: F'reight and commission.
$86>i.4;: cost of crates. $104.26:; cost of
fertil;U.r. $110: labor. $-115: total expense.
$1.38-5.72. This left Mr. Richman net from
one acre $1.754.78. IHe has one and three-
qullarter acres yet to cut. Some of his
slhipnents brought as high as $4.50 and $5
a cate.- Eler (N. .1.) Times.

FIRST PINEAPPLE SHIPMENT.
Two Hundred and Seventy-five Crates
Marketed in Miami Wednesday.
The first shipment of pineapples for this
se-Tson. numbering 275 crates of the Ited
Spanish variety y wAere marketed in Miami
WVedlneda.y for shipment to the Western
markets.
This fruit wNas from tlhe grove of Capt.
Thomnas Sweeting. of Elliott Key. Now
that the first shipment has been made. it
will be safe to say that the fruit will soon
commence to pou t through Jacksonville ill
carload lots Iond for the Northern mar-
kets.

JOINT SESSION OF BANKERS.
Florida and eorgia Banking Associations
to Meet in Atlanta.
At the last meeting in Atlanta of Group
No. 3. of the Georgia Bankers' Association.


the coming joint session of the Georgia and
Florida Banking Associations was discussed
and the bankers in attendance were pleased
to learn that the Floridians would meet
with them in iJun.
In regard to the meeting, the Atlanta
('iintitution. of recent date, contained the
following:
"A tele-gami was read by Mr. Orme from
Edlward Wood La ne. president of the Flor-
ida l:inkers' Association, accepting for the
Floriln liankers. the invitation of the At-
lanta learningg House Association to meet
here in .Iune. The Georgia Bankers' Asso-
ciation in accepting the same invitation
for tlie same time. June 11 and 12, will, in
their joint session with the Florida bank-
er-. carry out the principle of interstate
annual meetings. which, in their co-opera-
tive spirit, are in line with the advanced
movements in the banking organizations
of the time.
"'The first day the two associations will
iniet separately, and on the second day
there will lb a joint session. bringing the
two aiq'si;ations together for the discus-
sionii of their mutual interests.
"**Tlihe IIinIIer of the Atlanta Clearing
House Association will be the hosts of the
visiting hankers. and the president of the
as-ociation. Mr. McCord. will appoint com-
miittees to arrange for the convention."


she


BUDWEISER SALOON



48 West Bay St.


Everything the Very Best and



Just as Represented.


HI S LA ED Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry,
ILHESS & SLAERL 11-13 Main St., 339 W..l, Jacksenille, Fla.



MN. A. Baker,
INVENTOR AND MANUFACTURER OF THE

Baker Improved

Seamless Turpen

tine Stills.
Write me for prices and outfltb
F. O. B. any point in Georgia. Flor-
Ida. Alabama or Mississippi. All
stills sold under a guarantee.
JOB WORK
Through the Colatry a Specialty.
The Largest and Oldest Copper
Work. in Georgia. Brunswick, Ua.
ir My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do not leak.


A





I


"Florida's Greatest Carpet Store" "A Home Furnished By Us Is Up-to-date"
Complete Stock of Carpets, Mattings. Rugs. Shades, Etc

Savage 8 Whitford Carpet Company
131 West Bay Street, Jacksonville


SE~3C)EC~a%* SESS UiSS23 EaE


ARAGON
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
NOW OPEN
SUnder new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
cluding new electric elevator and our
own electric light plant.
kP H. N. O'NEAL, Prop.


THE OLDEST WHISKEY HOUSE IN
GEORGIA. (Established I 1881.)
OLD SHARP WILLIAMS-Pure Fine Old
Rye. B" the gallon $3.00; four full quarts
$3.50, express prepaid.
GEO. J. COLEMAN-Pure Pennsylvania
Rye; Rich and Mellow. By the gallon
$2.75; four full quarts $3.00, express prepaid.
ANVIL RYE-Pure Substantial Family
Whiskey. By the gallon $2.50; four full
quarts $2.90, express prepaid.
CLIFFORD RYE-By the gallon $2.25;
four full quarts $2.65, express prepaid.
OLD KENTUCKY CORN-Direct from
Bonded Warehouse; fine and old. By the
gallon $3.00; four full quarts $3.50 express
prepaid.
S OLD POINTER CLUB CORN Rich
and Mellow. By the gallon $2.50; four full
quarts $2.90. express prepaid.
We handle all the leading brands of Rye and Bourbon Whiskies in the market
and will save you from 25 to 50 per cent on your purchases. Send for price list and
catalogue. Mailed free upon application.
The Altmayer &L Flatau Liquor Company
MACON. GEORGIA.


The Metropolis

Is the Paper you want. It is
published daily and is from 12
to 16 hours ahead of any other
daily newspaper in Florida..

$5.00 a Year $2.50 Six Months

Full Telegraphic and Stock
reports. If you want to keep
9 posted on the news, get the
9 Metropolis.

CARTER & RUSSELL PUB. CO. ,
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
U I4iMS3rs axiss avav


- - --------- -------------------r - - - - - - -


The


Cooperage


Company


Manufacturers of High Grade

Western White Oak Spirit Barrels


,Capital $200,000.

JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Orders sent
We are now


direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.
prepared to furnish barrels from six shops advantageously located.


OFFICERS:.
J. C. LITTLE, President. JOHN E. HARRIS, Vice-President.
E. H. MOTE, General Manager. C. H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasurer.


J. C. LITTLE,


JOHN E. HARRIS,
W. C. POWELL,


DIRECTORS:
C. H. BARNES,
W. F. COACHMAN.


J. W. WEST,
E. H. MOTE.


W. J. KELLY


-7 7 7 7 7 7 - - - 1


THE


r


v


I~C~hhrrrrrrrrrlrrrrrr rL~~LI1C~~rrl-rrr ~~~ hMe~CC~UHA


I


THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 13
icr ^tggtgcgtrc--<-^`^







14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD


Success for Our Customers


Is Success for Us.


COVINGTON


COMPANY,


SHOES, DRY GOODS,Wholes
NOTIONS. . . .oles le


JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA.


(Continued from page 11.)
for.solution by Florida producers were not
cultural questions, but commercial ones;
not planting but marketing; not fertiliz-
ing, but transportation. Let us think
about these things, talk about them, study
them, conquer them. If this thought, talk
and study take not the form of action,
then have we labored in vain.
"During the past few months I ad-
dressed a circular letter to every member
of the society in which I asked for an ex-
pression of opinion on many matters of im-
portance and asked for suggestions. The
replies have been numerous and my reward
ample for the trouble I took. Much to
enlighten and cheer the society has come
to me. Encouragement for the future and
splendid appreciation for the past of the
society has breathed from many of the
much valued letters received.
I desire thanq you most sincerely for
these expressions of your better selves. In
the quiet of your homes you have said
things that you would not say on the floor
of this house. You have my promise to
use the good suggestions in so far as I
shall be able. These heart-to-heart let-
ters shall bear fruit.
Question State Aid.
"Among the weighty subjects discussed
in those letters was that of "State Aid" in
the printing of our annual reports. A care-
ful tabulation of the replies show about an
equal number favoring and opposing the
acceptance of such aid. Among those fav-
oring are some of our oldest and most
thoughtful and experienced members. On
the other side can be found those of equal
experience and wisdom.
"Some have cited other States in which
aid is supposed to be the cause of their
ruin as a Society, while others point out
other States in which it has had the op-
posite effect. The array of arguments pro
and con. is formidable and shows the abil-
ity and reasoning resources of our mem-
bers. It is not my province or wish to
discuss the question or to express an opin-
ion on it. If the matter comes up, all the
reasoning on all its sides and phases, will
he developed and the society can then pass
upon it intelligently.
"Without taking the time to discuss
them here, I will say that many of the sug-
gestions made by members will be carried
out during the progress of the meeting,
as they shall fit into our work.
The Time of Work
"We are to be favored by a number of
eminent persons with addresses and papers
during the progress of the meeting, as a
glance at the program will show. Will
these friends of the society allow me to
express if ever so feebly, our sincere thanks
for their kindness and our high apprecia-
tion of their valued efforts.
"But. what of the wor? We have six
-esuions before us. occupying two full days.
We shall have seven formal addresses and
papers. We shall listen to the reports of
sixfeen committees and these reports will
1-e ably and exhaustively discussed. In
the course of these discussions will come
,ot much of the real value of our gather-
in"_. Don't hesitate to stuff our "Question
Bx." Show by your patronage of this
Box that yon appreciate a chance to ask
questions.
"-Work. fast and furious, is our portion
for the next few days. At the close of the
meeting we may feel that we never had
a better one. Amidst the friends of many


years, in the city of hustle and progress, : m9l P. H lmes CO.
with words of welcome to inspire our ef-
forts. uith the social feasts before us, our]
tasks shall be light and their accomplish-1 Stocks, Bonds, Cotton,
nleiit assured."
ent assured." Grain and Provisions.

MEMBERS
Windsor Hotel NEW YORK GOTTEN EXCHANGE
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE
Direct private wires to all exchanges.
S. ... i Local stocks and bonds a specialty.
SBell Phone 853 Baldwin Block


WHISKIES
GINS AND RUMS
FROM
$1.50 $5.00 per Gallon


Jacksonville's Finest
and Florida's Largest
and Best Year-Round
Hotel
DODGE & CULLENS
Owners and Proprietors.



Florida


Electric Co.

Contracting Electrical Engineers
Sell and Install Complete Electric Light
and Power Plants, Telephone Ex-
changes. Wholesale Electric
Supplies.
Jacksonville, Fl.


122,000.00 Resources


12 Years Faithful
vice.


Ser


...... AGENCY FOR......
Lewis 1866 and Mount Vernon
Pure Rye Whiskies.
controllers Blum's Monogram and Syl-
van Rye-Agents for Jungst Cincin-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.

CHAS. BLUM & CO.
517 eand 519 WEST BAY STREET
JACKSONVILLE FLA.
NOTICE TO NON-RESIDENTS.
In Circuit Court, Fourth Judicial Circuit of
Florida, in and for Duval County. In
Chancery.
Rosa Burnly vs. David Burnly to David
Burnly.
S NOTICE TO NON-RESIDENT.
You are hereby required to appear to the
Bill of Complaint filed herein against you
in the above entitled cause on or before
the 14th day of May, A. D. 1906.
"The I.dustrial Record" is hereby desig-
nated as the newspaper in which this order
shall be published one a week for four con-
secutive weeks.
Witness my hand and seal of office this
11th (lay of April, A. D. 1906.
(Seal.) P. D. CASSIDEY,
By E. J. CANDEE. Clerk.
Deputy Clerk.
Complainant
M. M. SCARBOROUGII, JR.,
Solicitor for Complainant.
H IOBINSON. Press H. GAILLARDC cashier
W. II. OWFN. Vice-Pres.
Commercial Bank,
State Depository.


pRAN NCFS: Ocala, Fla Lake City. Pla
Jacksonville, - - Florida PhOne 312


J. W. (AIN PrNrs


Union Saving Bank
City of Jacksonville
Depository


Cay, Shine & McCaIP


FIRE INSURANCE.
212 Dyal-Upchurch Bldg


:ome 1955


THE NEW TRAVELERS HOTEL

H. W. HANCOCK, Prop.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Shis hotel has been newly decorated, re-
modeled and returnlshed. Convenlent aad
most desirable rooms In the city. Excellent
Table and reasonable rates.



WM. D. JONES


PRESCRIPT1O0 SPECIAUST


FAMILY DRUGGIST
107 E. BAY ST.
Mail Orders Solicited.


s4 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


The CLOTHIERS

EVERYTHING THAT IS GOOD AID
SMART IN WEARING APPAREL FOR
MEN AND BOYS.


HUTCHINSON AUDIT CO

Public Accountants & Auditors


Board of Trade Bulid g


Jackswv.le, Fla.


J. H. O'BERRY, Sec. & Treas.

CAIN-O'BERRY BOILER CO.
Designers and Bui:ders of Steam Bielers
Stacks, Etc Buil to Order
ORLANDO FLORIDA


- ---- - --







THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 15


JOSEPH D. WEED.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. KRENSON.


J. D. WEED & CO.,
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,
Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF

Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Etc.


FIFTH A VENUE HOTEL
Madison Square, New York.
American Plan $5 per day. European Plan $2.00 per day
The most famous representative hotel
in America. New as the newest, always
fresh and clear. The location in Madison
Square is the finest in the city.
HITCHCOCK, DARLING "L COMPANY.

Am'rl lI aBAIAAAA AaII AAAaII IAAaleBia AA aeli A. ae* aII


Turpentirne

Cups
If you expect to use the HERTY cup
next season, place your orders now for
future delivery. Prices and all informa
tion cheerfully furnished on
Cups. Gutters
and all Tools
ired in the Herty system of turoentining
Address
SChattanooga Pottery
Company,
Jacksonville, Florida.


J. W. Motte.
President.


C. B Parket
Vice-Pres.


James McNatt,
Vice-Pres.


W. W. Wilder,
See. & Tress.


John R. Young Co.,


Commission

Merchants.


Naval Stores factors. Wholesale Grocers.


Savmnanh m t Brunswick. Ga.


geuauI4uuuauolusuuu uu1114w111u60154 11 uoala tooaeusAul


IStandard Naval Stores Co.,
I JACKSONVILLE I


EXPORTERS

CARGO LOTS A SPECIALTY


SStandard Naval Stores Co. JACKSONVILLE
X666X3BEaEofxst %%%Otsrs c %xss%%% X


Printing


Send your order to the Industrial
Record. Prompt and satisfactory


The Duva.l
Cor. Forsyth and Hogan Streets.
Best Located Hotel in the city. Steam Heat
and Electric Lights throughout the house,
Cuisine and Service unsurpassed in the State,
Regular Rates. $2.50 and Up.
FRANK M. TURPIN, Prop., Jacksonville, Fla.


VICTOR


Records and Machines the
BEST, and CHEAPEST


7-inch, 35c. 10-inch, 60c. 12-inch, $1.00
METROPOLITAN TALKING MACHINE CO.
AGENTS WANTED e 323 Main Street. Jacksonville. Fla..


B. W. BLOUNT,
President.


G. A. PETTEWAY,
Vice-President.


A. C. BACON,
Sec'y & Tmr.


PENINSULAR NAVAL STORES CO.
Capital, $500,000.00.
Successors to TIMMONS-BLOUNT CO.
Naval Stores Factors and Commission Merchants.
DEALERSIN Turpentine Operators' Supplies
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION
Flat Savannah Prices paid for Rosin and Turpentine, less
Customary Charges.
CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED.
Offices-American National Bank Bldg., Tampa, Fla.
Yards, Port Tampa City.


******@o 4e* *e********O*6****e**0*****************

i J. S. Schofield's Sons Company,
**.******.*.*O*****'**4*******e****** ************
S- Headquarters for
* Distiller's Pumping
0Outfit.
SNo plant complete without one.
Hundreds of them in use in Georgia,
* ^^Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and
SSouth Carolina. Write us for particu-
Slars and prices. We also manufacture
SH Engines, Boilers and High
S Grade Machinery,
S as well as carry a full and complete
--stockof-
SB Mill Supplies, Pipe,
* Boiler Tubes, Etc. ;
f. Advise your wants.
? Macon, - Georgia.
A LeaUd. Sweaty *of A
o HIds f aIk Work for TlrwIetleStorage PIoes 4
******** ** ,6 ** *** ****** **** f o* t ** as*


I~F~E~C


C~fi3~ff~mC~CSE~E~C~ESiSCSESaC~C3aESCSaC~


S~Jfs~Escss~Esacs~Esaacrr~ac~csacscxxsja









16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Buyers' Directory

If you want anything look
through this classified list and
write to the firm appearing
therein. The Record guarantees
prompt response.

ACCOUNTANTS.
T. G. Hutchinson. Jacksonville, Fla.
BANKS.
Commercial Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
National Bank of Jacksonville.
Florida Bank and Trust Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
BOXES AND CRATES.
Cunimer Lumber Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.
BRICK.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jack-
sonville, Fla.
CARPETS AND MATTINGS.
Savage & Whitford, Jacksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Stuart-Bernstein Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
COOPERAGE.
Cooperage Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS.
Wim. D. Jones. Jacksonville. Fla.
DRUGS-WHOLESALE.
Christie.Groover Drug Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.
ELECTRIC SUPPLIES.
Florida Electric Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Electric Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGINES.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co.. J. S., Macon, Ga.
FERTILIZERS.
Bourn & Co., Wm. A.. Jacksonville, Fla.
FOUNDRIES.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
FUEL.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co. The, Jack-
sonville. Fla.
GENTS' FURNISHERS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Kohn. Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, la.
Standard Clothing Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.
Stuart-Bernstein Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
Consolidated Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
*Williams Co.. J. P., Savannah. Ga.
Young Co John R.. Savsnnah. Ga.
1HAS-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & n.. .Tacksonville, Fla.
HARDWARE.
Bond & Pours Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Rrigs. W. H.. Hardware Co., Valdosta, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co.. Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co.. .T. D.. Savannah. Ga.
HAY AND GRAIN.
Bours & Co.. Wm. A.. Jacksonville, Fla.
HATS.
Craig & Bro.. .. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothine Co.. Jacksonville. Fla.
Stuart-Bernstein Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.
HOTELS.
Travelers' Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
Duval Hotel. Jacksonville, Fla.
Arnron The, Jacksonville. Fla.
Fifth Avenue Hotel. New York, N. Y.
St. George. Jacksonville. Fla.
Everett Hotel. Jacksonville, Fla.
Windsor Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
Windle Hotel. Jacksonville. Fa.
IRON WORKS.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co.. J. S.. Macon, Ga.
INSURANCE.
Prudential Life, Walter P. Corbett, Mgr.
Jacksonville. Fla.
Cay, Shine & McCall, Jacksonville, Fla.
JEWELERS.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
R. J. Riles & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
KEELEY INSTITUTES.
Keeley Institute. Jacksonville, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Blum & Co., Chas., Jacksonville, Fla.
Altmayer & Flatau Liquor Co., Macon, Ga.
Joseph Zapf & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
MEDICINES.
Spencer Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tenn.
MACHINE WORKS.


Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR TURPENTINE PRO-
CESS.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
METAL WORKERS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick. Ga.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co., J. D., Savannah, Ga.
NAVAL STORES.
Peninsular Naval Stores Co., Tampa, FHa.
Barnes & Jessup Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
ville, fla.
Standard Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
West-Flynn-Harris Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
Young Co., John R., Savannah, Ga.
Jacksonville Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville.
Fla.
PAINTS.
Bond & Bourn Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
PLUMBERS.
Coons & Golder, Jacksonville, Fla.
PUMPS.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
REAL ESTATE.
Stockton, J. N. C., Jacksonville, Fla.
lirouston, Fendig & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Livingston & Sons, J. H., Ocala, Fla.
SEEDS.
Bours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
SHIP YARDS.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Alerrill-Steven s Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
SHOES-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Jos. Rosenheim & Sons, Savannah, Ga.
STEAMSHIPS.
Clyde Steamship Co. The, New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Leyden Haynes & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Holmes & Co., Samuel P., Jacksonville,
Fla.
TALKING MACHINES.
Metropolitan Talking Machine Co., Jack-
sonville, Fla.
TANKS.
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
TURPENTINE APPARATUS.
Chattanooga Pottery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
TURPENTINE STILLS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
W. K. Wilson, New Orleans, La.
FOX TYPEWRITERS.
Owen Typewriter Co., Tampa, Fla.
A. Reed Warrock, Jacksonville, Fla.
F. D. Bruce, Pensacola, Fla.
TURPENTINE STILL TUBS.
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
TURPENTINE VATS.
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
TURPENTINE TOOLS.
Council Tool Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
WATCHES.
R. J. Riles, Jacksonville, Fla.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
YELLOW PINE LUMBER.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
East Coast Lumber Co., Watertown, Fla.
DUN'S REVIEW.

Conditions of Business Compared With
Same Time Last Year.
New York, May 4.-R. G. Dun & Co.'s
Weekly lReview of Trade tomorrow will
say: The violent decline in prices of se-
ecurities is no criterion of business condi-
tions. Railway earnings have continued to
surpass those of the corresponding period
in any previous year, the gain of April be-
ing 9.3 per cent. over the same month of
190l. ainl other standards of measurement
make Iqually gratifying exhibits. Liabil-
itie, of failures last month showed a de-
(l'ei.se If overcrease of over 40 per cent. in
Iiiinufaiturinig and 12 per cent in trading
branches of business as compared with
the previous year. The only drawbacks re-
garding the future are the labor contro-
versies and the stringency in the money
market, neither of which may prove of
nmire tlhan temporary duration. Manufac-
turing Iplats report little idle machinery.
and trade in seasonable merchandise feels


The Clyde Steamship Company


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES

The magnificent steamships of this line are appointed to sail as follows, calling go
Charleston, S. C., both ways.
From New York, From Jacksonville for
(Pier 36 North River.) STEAMER. Charleston and New York.


Tuesday,
Thursday,
Saturday,
Tuesday,
Wednesday,
Saturday,
Tuesday.
Wednesday,
Friday,
Saturday,
Tuesday.
Wednesday,
Friday,
Saturday,
Tuesday,
Wednesday,


May l,at3:00pm
May 3, at 3:00pm
May 5,at3:00pin
May 8,at3:00pm
May 9, at3:00pmn
May 12, at 3:00pni
May 15,at 3:00pnm
May 16, at 3:00pmi
May 18, at 3:00p1m
May 19. at 3:00pm
May 22, at 3:00pm
May 23, at 3:00pm
May 4. at 12:30pm
May 26, at 3:00pm
May 29, at 3:00pm
May 30, at 3:00pm


..ARAPAHOE...
.. ALGONQUIN
.. IROQUOIS...
..APACHE......
..HURON......
..ARAPAI1OE..
..COMANCIIH..
.. IROQUOIS....
..APACHE.....
. HURON ......
..ARAPAHOE..
. .ALGONQUIN.
..COMANCHE..
.. IROQUOIS...
..APACHE.....
..*HURON......


Sunday,
Tuesday,
Thursday,
Sunday,


Sunday,
Monday,
Wednesday,
Friday,
Sunday,
Monday,
Wednesday.
Friday.
Sunday,
Monday.


May 6,at 1:00pm
May 8,at 6:00am
May 10,at 7:00am
May 13,at 9:00am
May 14, at 9:30am
May 17, at l:30am
May 20,at 1:00pm
May 21, at 1:00pm
May23, at 6:00am
May 25. at 7:00am
May 27, at 8:00am
May 28, at 8:30am
May 30, at 10:00am
June 1,atll:00am
June 3,at12:30pm
June 4,at 1:00pm


**-Boston via Brunswick and Charleston. xFreight only. *-Bosto via
Charleston. ***-Boston via Charleston and New York. !-To New York direct.

THE CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
Direct Service Between Jacksonville, Boston and Providence and all Eastern Points,
Calling at Charleston both Ways.
SEMI-WEEKLY SAILINGS.
Southbound.. ............ ............. From Lewis Wharf, Boston.
Northbound .. .................. From foot of Oatherine Street, Jacksonville.

CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE

Between Jacksonville and Sanford.
Stopping at Palatka, Astor, St. Francis, Beresford (DeLand) and intermediate
landings on St. Johns River.

STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
and "FRED'K DeBARY"
Are appointed to sail as follows: Leave Jacksonville daily, except
Saturday, at 3:30 p. m. Returning, leave Sanford daily, except Sun-
days, at 9:30 a. m.


Read down I


SRead up.


Leave 3:30p. m. ................... Jacksonville ................ Arrive 2:00a.m.
Leave 8:45 p. m.................... Palatka ....................... Leave 8:00 p.m.
Leave 3:30a.m..................... Astor ............... Leave 2:30p.m.
Leave 4:30a.m................... St. Francis .................. Leave 1:00p.m.
............................. Beresford (DeLand) .............. Leave 12:00noon
Arrive 8:30a.m................... Sanford ................... Leave 9:30a.m.
Arrive 10:00 a.m .................. Enterprise .................. Leave 10:00a. m.
GENERAL PASSENGER AND TICKET OFFICE, 122 W. BAY ST, JACK'VILLE.
F. M. IRON-MONGER, JR., Asst. Gen. Pass. Agent. 122 W. Bay St. Jackson -lie, Fla.
W. (f. COOPER, JR., Frt. Agt., Jack'ville. C. P. LOVELL, Superintendent, Jack'ille.
Foot Hogan Street, Jacksonville.
I. C. HAGGERTY, G. E P. A., New York. CLYDE MILNE, G. F. A., New York.
THEO. G. EGER, WM. P. CLYDE & CO,
General Manager. General Agents.
Cbenebrough Building, 19 State Street, New York-


the impetus of settled weather. Foreign
comn(ntere for the last week shows gains
of $1.!H1).!72 in exports and $2.943,729 in
imports as compared with the same week
last year. Commodit prices are well main-
taineil by a good demand the crop outlook
is fully aus bright as usual at this date.
while in many departments an increased
acreage is under cultivation.
Of greatest importance to the iron and
steel imnlu-try of all the events of the past
week was tie strike of longshoremen on
the lake water front. If this struggle is
not promptly settled it will soon Ibecome
impossible to maintain pig iron production


at tlie highest point on record. Otherwise
the strikes of May I were not of sufficient
Imagnitlude to aftrtet the progress of the
-teel business. Textile mills maintain ac-
tivity. alt though new business comes for-
wuard lowly.
T'anners evince i a disposition to operate
more lti iervat lively. which has checked
the uuln\\rdi tendiencv of hides. Leather
Iha developed snie irregularity.
Failures this week in the United States
Swere 212 a iainst 215 last week, 199 the pre-
ceding week. and 212 the corresponding
week last year.


L1 I-r~U1)~~1 r~LTT\I










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 17


TRADE IS REPORTED GOOD.

Wholesalers State that it is Ahead of Last
Year for April.
The wholesalers of Jacksonville state
that their trade this spring is better than
it was last year and that the trade for the
month of April was ahead of the trade for
the corresponding month last year.
The indications are good for the summer,
since reports from all sections of the State
are to the effect that this is to be a most
successful year for the growers of vege-
tables.

Growing Tobacco in Gadsden County.
Gadsden county farmers are just begin-
ning to plant that crop of tobacco which
for the past several months they have been
busy selling to the packers. All is now
sold, and there appears no good reason for
delaying the planting longer. When the
excellent quality of this tobacco is taken
into consideration, as well as the ready
foreign market for it, the packers figure
they are taking very few chances. The
farmers figure they are taking none.-
Quincy Times .

This Was Banner Strawberry Year.
The experienced strawberry growers of
the county will plant the same acreage
this year as they did last, notwithstand-
ing the fact that the season just past has
been one of the most successful in the
history of the county. The growers who
have planted strawberries for years, plant
the same number of acres each season.
They never overdo the thing on the
strengthof a very flattering season. \\'
trust that our farmers will give straw-
berry growing a trial and will find it profit-
able enough to continue.-Lake Butler
Star.

Some Big Onions for St. Johns.
Mr. J. C'. Appler brought to the Record
office this morning a sample of the Ber-
muda onions grown on his place at Mill
Creek. Four onions weigh six and one-half
pounds. Two of the bunch are the brown
Bermuda and the other two are crystal
wax variety. They are as fine specimens
as have ever been shown here.-St. Augus-
tine Record.

The Blackberry Entices the Negro.
The blackberry season is coming on apace
and for the time being the farmers are
living insuspense, wondering if it will be
possible to hold the laboring class over
until after nature's great commissary has
been exhausted. aWtermelons and black-
berries work great disadvantages to the
farmers. It means free rations, and free
rations generally mean no work.-Quincy
Times.

Will Now Eat Key Largo Cabbage.
As a change from the tin-can diet which
the extension laborers have been subsist-
ing on for some time, a cargo of Key Largo
cabbages has been loaded on an extension
transport to be distributed among the
camps on the keys.-Miami Record.

Coal Strike at Live Oak.
It is not often that a coal strige reaches
Live Oak, for there is no coal to mine, but
yesterday the two negroes who pass coal
at the Seaboard's chute in the western part
of the city, went out on a strike for more
pay, less hours, less work, more sleep, bet-
ter grub, and numerous things, and they
are still out. It is not thought, however
that traffic on the line will be suspended
on account of the strike, or that troops
will be called out to quiet the strikers, o0
that the matter will be referred to a board
of arbitrators for adustment.-Live Oak
Democrat.

AMONG THE FLORIDA FARMS.
The Florida farmer who has a good field
of corn on hammock land this season i
going to be in big luck when he comes ti
gather the crop. C'on is practically madi
in this section, if it was planted early, an(
it will be the biggest crop per acre fo
many years.-Tampa Times.

The Reporter-Star a few days ago mad,
mention of Mrs. C. W. Jacocks shipping
sixty odd boxes of her famous velve
grapefruit in a refrigerator car to Miltol
Roberts & Co., New York. The return
received were most satisfactory, the frui
bringing $8 per box. Mrs. Jacocks says


this variety of fruit hangs well on the trees
and is as plump and uicy in July as it is
during tlie winter. She has a large nur-
sery of fine budded trees ready for June
transplanting. Orlando Reporter-Star.

Dollars will continue to roll into this
State from the Northern markets for many
mointlis to come. The potato shipments are
already increasing thle cash receipts of the
growers an l tese will soon le augmented
iv the pinealIpple crop.-St. Augustine Rec-
ord.

(Ge. Mlcares brought to this office Mon-
day a branlc of grapefruit bloom from the

Looks Good in Manatee.
The present season, since the rains let
iup. Ilas I'en one of the most perfect for
;a iuniiir of years, and it is said that
vegetable crops are looking unusually fine.
--lllantee Ircord.
grove of .-oe Strassi. near Lealman. Mr.
Strauss wasi in the city yesterday and
sa vs tliat his grove has hundreds of trees
loaded with blloom. The trees blossomed
full and set fruit in February, which is
the regular season and now have fruit as
large. as pigeon eggs and will probably set
a large c rop from bloom now on. This is
on ex\cedingly rare occurrence especially
fronl the fact that the blossom is not on
the new growth hut from the latent buds
on old woodl. This crop of fruit will ma-
ture fully two months later than the regu-
lar season aii will bring correspondingly
high prices.

Mr..1. (. (CColi. tlhe capable manager of
tli Mitarion Inrs. Ibrouight to the Star
ollice to-day a cabbage that was grown on
tlhe Marion Farms that we believe is the
largest ever grown in the county, if not
in thli State. Tlie cabbage weighs thirty
lHiunls and will starcely go inside of a flour
harrel. If there has ever been a larger
one grown in the country, we would like
to know when and where.-Ocala Star,
;thli.

Now is the time to put out your straw-
Isrry plants to make your plants for fall
planting. Several are going into the berry
business this year, but there is no reason
why more should not do so, and put out
over fifty acres. That there is money in
raising them. there can be no doubt, it has
bieen very clearly proven. They are not
as risky a crop as potatoes and are easier
and neater to handle and best of all you
can g.t nore money out of them.-Mac-
cle.nny Standard.

HALE LEAVES SEABOARD.
Captain A. O. MacDonell May Be Honor-
ably Retired.
Walter Hale. superintendent of the
fourth division of the Seaboard Air Line
Railway. with headquarters in Jackson-
ville. has resigned his position to take effect
May i 15;. at which time he leaves this city
for Durlhaml N. (., to accept a position
Sas general manager of the Durham &
Southern Railwayv. with headquarters in
Iuirhana. N. (C.'.
Tlihe reason for Mr. Hale's resignation is
said to lie on account of his health, which
l he believes will IS- greatly benefited in
I North Caroilina. The )Durham & Southern
HRailway is sixty miles long, and is owned
Sby )uke. the tobacco man.
fIn connection with this change, it is
r rumored that Captain A. O. MacDonell, as-
s, instant general passenger agent of the
i Sehaliard. is to Ie retired with honorary
s title of general agent of the passenger de-
r partnenlt. and that Passenger Agent S
S'C. Ikoylston. Jr.. assistant to Captain Mac
SItionll. will take his place.

CRACKER FACTORY HERE.

d Backed by Big Captital-It Will Be Read]
s Some Time in July.
o It is reliortedl by those interested that
c cracker factory. with a capital of $.iO00(
1 will Ibe in olperation here by July.
r Th1e ocer of this new enterprise ar
Ellis ( renshaw. of icehmond. Va.. C. H
iarnes. of .IJacksonville and William Stan


recently purchased by the parties inter-
ested, which is 105x140 feet.
On this lot a three-story brick well
constructed factory will be erected which
will be up-to-date in every respect, and
will cost about $15,000. The factory will
be convenient to all railway facilities and
to all obbing houses and steamship lines.
It is the intention of the Jacksonville
Cracker Works to manufacture a class of
goods of a quality inferior to none. Tlhe
latest model machinery will be installed
in the new building.
Work on the new factory will be com-
menced on or before June 15, and it is
expected by parties interested that the
factory will be in operation within three
months or as soon thereafter as possible.
The goods to be manufactured at the
Jacksonville Cracker Works will be various
kinds from the cheapest to the very best,
to be packed in packages, boxes and tins.
The factory will employ between sixty
and eighty men, women and boys, and the
pay-roll each week will be very large.
Several members of the \\1rolesale Gro-
cers' Association are interested in this fac-
tory together with H. S. McCallum, presi-
dent of the Suwannee Bank of White
Springs, Fla., and the following gentlemen
from Riclhmond, Va.: Carlton McCarthy,
Mayor of Richmond; O. A. Hawkins, com-
ilissioner of revenue, of Richmond; W. S.
Rhodes. of the firm of Rhodes & Miller;
W. C. Montgomery, a prominent contrac-
tor; A. Trevett. of the Virginia Hot Springs
Co.: A. A. Booth. of the C. & O. Railway;
I. I). Walford, of the Virginia Passenger
& Power Co.
This factory to be operated in Jackson-
ville. means much for the city, not only
fro mtlhe fact that it brings money to the
city. but it will advertise Jacksonville ex-
tensively from one end of the United
States to the other. It will give employ-
ment to a large force of laborers and to
a large clerical force.
The output of money by this factory
will greatly benefit nearly every citizen
and business man of Jacksonville.

NOTICE OF STOCKHOLDERS' MEETING
OF THE AMERICAN OAK LEATHER
TANNING COMPANY.
Notice is hereby given that there will
be a meeting of the stockholders of the
American Oak Leather Tanning Company
to be held at the office of the company in
the city of Jacksonville, Florida, on the
twenty-third day of April, A. D. 1906, at
eleven o'clock A. M. for the purpose of
voting to increase the capital stock of said
company from thirty thousand dollars to
one hundred thousand dollars.
C. E. GARNER, President.
ARTHUR F. PERRY, Secretary.
Jacksonville, Fla., March 23, 1906.
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO APPLY FOR
LETTERS PATENT.
Notice is hereby given that the under-
signed will apply on the 7th day of May,
A. D. 1906, to the Honorable Napoleon B.
SBroward, Governor of the State of Florida,
or his successors in office, for the issuance
of Letters Patent incorporating the Grivot
Typewriter and Office Appliance Company,
I upon the terms and conditions of the fol-
lowing proposed charter:
W. C. GRIVOT,
ADOLPHE GRIVOT,
M. H. PRESSLEY,
W. D. MILLER,
FRANK E. JENNINGS.


PROPOSED CHARTER OF
GRIVOT TYPEWRITER AND OFFICE
APPLIANCE COMPANY.

The undersigned hereby associate them-
selves together for the purpose of become
a ing incorporated and forming a corporation
t under the laws of the State of Florida, for
the transaction of business under the fol-
e lowing proposed charter:


Article L


ducted in said State and in other States of
the United States, through branch age&-
cies, offices or otherwise, as may be con-
venient.
Article IL
The general nature of the business to be
transacted by said company shall be the
dealing in typewriters and office supplies.
The buying, selling, exchanging and rent-
ing of typewriters, and such other office
supplies and appliances as may be neces-
sary or convenient in connection with the
conduct of such business, and to establish
and maintain a well equipped typewriter
and repair shop with metal plating plant
and appliances, and with all tools and
machinery necessary for repairing type-
writers, and divers other small machinery.
Article IIL
The amount of the capital stock of said
corporation shall be the sum of Five Thou-
sand Dollars ($5,000.00), to be divided into
Five Hundred shares of the par value of
Ten Dollars each. Said stock may be paid
for in full in cash or in installments, or
in merchandise or services rendered at a
reasonable valuation, to be determined by
the Board of Directors.
Article IV.
The time for which this corporation shall
exist shall be ninety-nine years (99).
Article V.
The business of this corporation shall
be conducted by a President, Vice-Presi-
ment, a Secretary and Treasurer, Manager
and a Board of not less than three or more
than seven Directors. The regular stock-
holders' meeting shall be held on the fourth
Monday in December of each year. Said
stockholders' meeting shall elect the Di-
rectors and the Directors shall as soon as
possible thereafter, meet and elect the
officers. Said Directors and Officers shall
have such powers and duties as shall be ex-
pressed in the by-laws. The offices of
president and manager and of secretary
and treasurer may be held by one and the
same person. Until the election and qual-
ification of the directors and officers as
above set forth, the business of the com-
pany shall be conducted by the following
persons:
W. C. Grivot as President and Manager,
Adolphe Grivot as Vice-President, M. H.
Pressley, Secretary, W. D. Miller, Treasu-
rer, and the foregoing and Frank E. Jen-
nings, as directors.
Article VL
The highest amount of indebtedness or
liability to which the corporation can at
any time subject itself shall be twice the
amount of its capital stock.
Article VIL
The names, residences and amount of
stock subscribed for by each incorporator
are:
W. C. Grivot, Jacksonville, Fla., one
hundred and fifty shares.
M. H. Pressley, Jacksonville, Fla., two
shares.
W. D. Miller, Jacksonville, Fla., ten
shares.
Frank E. Jennings, Jacksonville, Fla.,
five shares.
Adolphe Grivot, New Orleans, La., ten
shares.
W. C. GRIVOT,
ADOLPHE GRIVOT,
M. H. PRESSLEY,
W. D. MILLER,
FRANK E. JENNINGS.
State of Louisiana, Parish of Orleans:
Personally appeared before me, the un-
dersigned, on this'31st day of March, A. D.
1906, Adolphe Grivot, to me well known,
who on his oath acknowledged his signa-
ture to the foregoing, and that he executed
the same for the uses and purposes therein
expressed.
Witness my hand and official seal the
day and year last aforesaid.
EDOUARD F. HENRIQUES,
(Notarial Seal). Notary Public.

- State of Florida, County of Duval:
S Personally this day appeared before me,
W. C. Grivot. M. H. Pressley, W. D. Miller
Sand Frank E. Jennings, each to me well
known, who each on his oath acknowledged
his signature to the foregoing, and that
he executed the same for the uses and nur-


ley of White Springs. Mr .Crenshaw is poses therein set forth.
president. AMr. hrnes vice-president and Name. Witness my hand and official seal this
Mr. Stanley is secretary and treasurer, 4th day of April, A. D. 1906.
and these geiitlemlen and L. G. Crenshaw. The name of the corporation shall be GEO. A. DECOTTES,
form tlie larid of directors. the GRIVOT TYPEWRITER AND OF- (Notarial Seal.)
AMr. (Crenshaw slates that the new fac- FICE APPLIANCE COMPANY, and its Notary Public State of Florida.
tory will ie located on the northeast corner principal office shall be in the city of Jack- My commission expires March 3, 1909.
of Forsyth and Catherine streets, on a lot sonville, Florida. Its business shall be con- 5t


y

0




E






18 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


HOTEL WINDLE,
15, 17, xg East Forsyth St,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
American plan, $2.50 to $3.00 pr day. European plan, $1.00 per day up.
Center of city. First-class in all appointments.
C. B. SMITH, Proprietor.
U III ?1I-I-I I I I I -I-I!I I 1 I I r I I I- II I I I II I I I- II I I I1 w? II U 1- TZ1l ll-- .I-
SJ. P. WILLIAMS. President. J. A. G. CARSON. 1st Vice-President
. T. A. JENNINGS. 2nd Vice-President. J F. DUSUNBUnB.3d Vice-President
- H. L KAYTON, Secretary. H. F. E. ScHuwTR. Treasurer.
SJ. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,
= VIL STORES 11O IOTTON FIATORS IND WHOLESILE GROWERS.
Main Office SAVANNAH, GEORGIA.
S ranh Offic: PE1NSACOLA. FLx. I Branch Oroccry Houme,
Brranch Oricfes: JACKSONVILLE. FLL. ( COLUMBUS, GA.
SNaval Stores Producers are Invited to Correspond With Us.
St l it I 1 1 1r 1I1 T-I- 1 1 1 111 I I I t I 1T I T I I tI I-II I 11 1 1 1 1- 1 1 -


THE BOND & BOURS CO.
WHOLESALE a RETAIL
HARDWARE
SASH, DOORS, BLINDS, PAINTS.
Oils, Glass, Stoves, Tinware, Country Holloware.
10 WEST BAY STREET. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED LONG LEAF
Yellow Pine Lumber
Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots
Steamer Shipments a Specialty.
WATERTOWN. FLORIDA


Coons & Golder
Turpentine Operators on
Pipe, Boilers and Pumps
Expert Mechanics and Plbners
22 W. Adams Street Jacksonville, Fla.
Phone 1147


Kohn


Furchgott = Company.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN


Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JAKSONVILLE. FLA.


The Palmer Manufac

of Charleston, S. C


Offers to the Turpentine Operato
Florida and Alabama one hundrec
three hundred thousand spirits of ti
rels during the present season as
may require, at prices that defy cc


First Class Guaranteed White Oak Sl
plying Strictly with rules B. of T
Operators should make no contracts or buy any barrels m
"REMEMBER WE SELL FOR LESS"

Address G. J. SCOVEL. Ja<


turning Co.


.


rs of Georgia,
I thousand to
urpentine bar-
Sthe demand
petition.


iirits Barrels Com-
Savannah, Ga.
intil they get our prices.


cksonville, Fla.


r)\\~ ; ~ rJ~ -u u u u;; *~* - --------------~ I-,-', -


~c~c~c~c~c~c~c~E~ ~CTrrTTrrYrrrT~Clcrr~;rrr~c~c~rcr~c~crrr UC~E1~.EC~C~C~Ec~C~C


~





umauuaaauuuuaaaaauumuuuuuauuuuuuuu tll...lilil l1l lii 611 SllElIE I IU


C. B. ROGERS, President. W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAMPLAIN, Vice-Presidents.
DlK VA rOS: C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Ch amplain, H. A. McEachern and J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonville;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $500,000.

Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches in Tampa, Pensacola, Pla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consol-lated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company of Pensacola; the grocery brs .ch of th, West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-
visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.


Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Consist of one Three-Story Building, 70x200; one two-story building. 50x390; one one-story building, 80x250,
making the largest space of any Company of the kind in the South.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
Branches Tampa. FFla., Pensacola.' Fl., and-.Savannah. Ga.


tllllllllllllllll~ll111~111+111111~1111~


i-IIIIIIIIIIIIIIII-I 1~15~t~1~1~31C IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII ICIIII1II, IICII+I:ls)l+ ++IICI






When in Jacksonville, Remember that

GREENLEAF CROSBYCO.
41 W. BAY STREET
SHAVE THE LARGEST STOCK IN THIS SECTION OF

Diamonds, Precious Stones Watches
Jewelry, Clocks, Silverware, Bronzes, Fine China, Objects of Art 4
As they are the largest buyers they get the
BEST PRICE and are accordingly able to sell the
lowest, They invite a comparison of prices,

They Give Ma.il Orders Prompt Attention.
WRITE NOW FORI A CATALOGUE.



Half Tones-Zinc Etchings

Illustratina and Engraving Department
OF
THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
Splendidly equipped foi business. Half ones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion.- Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds ofkCommercial Work, Pamphlets, etc
1 alllly IE OF KM 11111. IIHOICi IB ElllIllIG P10IIIP13 ID PITEI.
IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
GooD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED.
A Florida Enterprise. Try It.