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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00168
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: April 6, 1906
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00168
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text

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1F|h^Y NAVAL STo(rES,
LVpiMERx W GENERAL
i IlOD\STRIAI% FiNA8IA A
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ACKSONVILLE, FLA.


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SAVANNAH, GA.


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CONSOLIDATED


Home Office:
Branches: Sav


NAVAL STORES COMPANY.


JACKSONVILLE,


FLA.


annah, Ga., and Pensacola, Fla.


OFFICERS.
W. C. POWELL. President; B. F. BULLAID, II. L. COVINGTON. .. A. CRANFORD, D. II. McMILLAN. B. R. POWELL, C. M. COVINGTON, JOHN H.
POWELL, Vice Presidents; C. P. DUSE'NBURY, Secretary and Treasurer.
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: W. C. Powell, C. B. Rogers. H. L. Covington. B. F. Bullard.. J. A. Cranford.
DIRECTORS: W. C. Powell, B. F. Bullard. C. B. Rogers. J A. (ranford. W. J. Ilillman. .lolin I. Powell.. W. F. Coachman, H.L. Covington, C. Downing, D. H.
McMiflan, R. B. Powell. C. M. Covington, S. A. Alford.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS


Paid in Capital


Stock, $2,500,000


I


I

OPERATORS

Bear in Mind That During Your

Busy Season


Stock
Complete
Ontftl
New and
Second-
hand.
Extra
Kettles,
Worms.
Caps, Arms,
Turnace
Doon,
Grate Bas,
and an
other at-
P*Jn9*E
to-
Turpoitlie
Stills aid
Fixtiris.


YOU MEET WITH A MISHAP


YOU BREAK


DOWN


YOU BURN OUT
YOU NEED US


Over in


the Left- Hand


Corner Will Interest You.

McMILLAN BROS.,


Southern Copper Works.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Savanna, as
Mobile Ala.
Fayettevm, N. 0.


Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
The"Consolidated" is purely a co-operative Company. Its interests are identical with those
of the Producers. The patronage of turpentine operators everywhere Invited.
Two Million acres of land and Timber for sale on easy terms.
Producers ere invited to call or correspond.

















WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL


RECORD.


PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY. DEVOTED TO NAVAL STORES, LUMBER AND MANUFACTURING INTERESTS.

dlpd SepL 12.1902. by the xcutive CornitIee dthe Turpenine Operators' Associaton as its Excusie Ocial Organ and adopted Sept. L 1902. in Annual Convention a an Oicial Orga so a e General Assocation. Adopted Sept. I B 903 th
nly Ociel Organ Turpentine Operaon' Anocation Adopted April 27. 1903. as Official Organ the Inter-State Cane Growers' Asocation. Endorsed by Georgia Sawmill Associion. OcalOrgan Sutheasern StockGrowers Association.
4


Have you ever taken into consideration
the growing of high-class pecan nuts
from a profitable standpoint? Did you
know that pecan trees six or seven years
from planting in grove could be made to
bring in an income of $2.00 or more per
tree, increasing the income to from $15.00
to $25.00 per tree in ten or twelve years t
Take one acre, or twenty-seven trees, at
seven years from planting bringing an
average income of $2.00 per tree, means
$54.00 in proceeds. If these trees are cared
for, and presuming that at ten years, they
yield as much as $10.00 per tree, which is
a low estimate, that means over $250.00
per acre. It is no infrequent thing for a
ten year planted tree to yield a crop of
from fifty to seventy-five pounds of a
high class, large Paper shell nut, that sell
on the large markets for 25e and upwards
per pound, and the demand cannot be sup-
plied and will not within the next fifty
years, from the fact that consumption is
so much more steadily increasing and that
pecans are being used for so many differ-
ent purposes, even to making the most ex-
pensive of salad oils on the market, also
cooking oils; aside from being the fovor-
ite nut for table use, candies desserts, etc.
The American nut crop falls so far short
that we are importing into the United
States upwards of ten million dollars
worth of nuts a year.
The basis of yield from pecan trees by
the most prominent and conservative ad-
vocates of the industry, place first crop at
five pounds sixth year, ten pounds seventh
year, twenty pounds eighth year, forty
pounds ninth year, and an increase of
about fifteen pounds each year thereafter
up to fifteen years, after planting of good
sized grafted or budded trees, giving 130
pounds the fifteenth year, and after the fif-
teenth year the yield still continues to in-
crease. The parent Stuart tree bore 140
pounds of nuts at fifteen years from seed,
and at eighteen years of age, bore 350
pounds of nuts.
The price on inferior seedling pecans
has advanced from three or five cents per
pounds in the last few years, to ten and
twelve and one-half cents per pound, and
this latter is the price today of the small-
est and most inferior grades in thousand
pound lots, while the selected paper
shell nuts of large size are selling at
from twentyfive cents to seventy-five
cents per pound on the large markets.
The pecan industry is still in its infancy
and promises to equal or exceed the valu-


The following bill has been introduced in
the Mississippi legislature and will be
urged for passage before adjournment.
The measure is favored by THE TUR-
PENTINE OPERATORS ASSOCIATION
which originated and secured the passage
of similar legislation in Georgia and Flor-
ida. The legislation has worked well and
proven very beneficial to Turpentine Pro-
ducers and honest dealers in those states.
It appears that there are no laws in Mis-
sissippi regulating naval stores inspection
or preventing adulteration of turpentine.
Therefore some of the evils regulated in
Georgia and Florida have crossed the Al-
abama river and are flourishing in the wes-
tern territory. The Record urges that its


ation of both the orange and the peach en care of, would have an established
crops in the entire south within the next grove showing for itself that your lands
few years. The profits for the amounts are productive in that line. How much
invested will overreach net of the two would the valuation of your lands be en-
crops named by 100 per cent. hanced?
The life of the pecan tree is not today Northern capitalists are taking as much
estimated on, and we know of trees up- if not more interest in pecan growing in
wards of 100 years old that are healthy the south today than they did in thegrow-
and strong, bearing the small seedling ing of oranges and peaches in the past and
nuts, some of them as high as 600 pounds today. This is because pecan growing is
each, it taking from 150 to 200 of these safe and sure, invariably yielding crops
nuts to weigh one pound, while good av- and not being effected by the freezes and
erage paper shell nuts will only run 35 scale insects, therefore promising some-
to 60 to the pound. Laing permanent.
There is little or no expense in careing What was the price of your land ten
for the pecan grove. It is not infested y s a What i h
with scale insects like the peach and or- years ago What is it worth today
and, requiring little care or attention What will it be worth to your business
ange, requiring little care or attention when the timber is off? What is it go-
and less fertilizer. In fact, after a few ing to be worth since it is an establish
years it will practically take care of it- fat that these lands are going to be more
self in any of our southern soils, and has table for aiult egng oe
more adaptability to our various soils profitable for agriutural purposes than
...an has any other propogated or native they have ever been for any other uses?
known atree.s n ther r t The pecan is the best and surest thing you
n atew re. an demonstrate this with.
In from ten to twenty years, when the Twelve years ago it was thought that
present industries are pretty well worked the sply wod eagcee the demand of out
out, the only value of a greater part of the supply would exceed the demand of our
these lands will be to sell to home-seekers Florida oranges, and all this time Califor
and farmers and it is easy to see how nia has been increasing her groves, and
much more per acre they will be worth this year with a crop of probably 160,000,
in the hands of real estate men, if there is 000 boxes, which is many more times more
only a few hundred large fine pecan trees oranges than Florida ever produced in the
on some part of your property, dem- heighth of her glory, and with Florida the
onstrating the productiveness of the soil past season producing the best crop since
to prospective purchasers. the freeze, her oranges were more in de-
Operators also have the advantage of mand than ever before.
most farmers in the fertilizer they can The territory for successful pecan grow-
give a few hundred trees, with all the man- ing is confined to the immediate Gulf
ure from their mule lots, making it easy States and twenty-five per cent of the
for them to get the maximum results in available acreage of this territory would
quick growth and early bearing. After not over supply the demand in the next
two or three years fences can be taken twenty-five years.
down and cattle allowed to run among If you had bought Florida lands twenty
the trees, they keeping down weeds and years ago, you could have bought at what
grass and continuing the fertilization as price? You did not see far enough ahead
they seek the shade and shelter, to do it. There is the same future for you
Farmers should plant pecans for the in investing in pecans today as there was
profit in the nuts, to beautify their places for the man who invested in lands then,
and for shade trees. The large land own- and is holding the same even tdoay, after
ers engaged in operating stills, sawmills probably having realized 500 per cent pro-
and phosphate mines should plant pecans fit in the sale of the timber or turpentine
for the same reasons that the farmers privileges and is still holding the dirt.
should, but the greatest advantage to them You can figure a better percentage of pro-
is the demonstration that their land is fits in pecans for the same length of time
valuable for horticultural and agricultural for your own use as a grove or to put on
purposes. the market. It is the man who looks to
Northern capitalists are becoming in- the future and keeps it in view that has
terested in the production of pecans, see- profits materialize in his favor.
ing the great future for the industry. THE GRIFFING BROS. CO,
You with five hundred trees you have tak- Jacksonville, Fla.


Mississipi subscribers read this bill care-
fully; read it over twice. It is radical in
character, but it will protect the produc-
ers against imposition, it will eradicate
crookedness from this important indus-
try, and will not injure nor inconvenience
any honest operator, or buyer, or dealer.
It must be recalled that conditions in
Mississippi are different from what they
are in Georgia and Florida. Here a great
majority of the product is handled at the
ports, while in the Mississippi territory
the bulk of the product is handled in the
interior.
If you are a member of the Mississippi
legislature VOTE FOR IT. If you are a
producer, WRITE OR WIRE YOUR REP-


RESENTATIVE OR SENATOR TO SUP-
PORT IT.
Salient features of the bill follow:
Section 2. Be it enacted that after the
passage of this act it shall be the duty of
the Governor to appoint a competent per-
son who shall be a resident and citizen of
the state of Mississippi, as supervising in-
spector of naval stores for the state of
Mississipi, and who shall be familiar with
and skilled in the inspection of naval
stores, turpentine and rosin, and compe-
tent to detect adulteration of turpentine
and fraudulent tampering with the grades
or weights of rosin, and who shall hold his
office for four years from date of appoint-
ment.


Griffing Bros, Company Give Sound Reasons Why


South Should Grow Pecans,


Tie supervising inspector of naval
stores to execute a good and sufficient
bond to the state of Mississippi in the
sum of $5,000 conditional for the faithful
discharge of all the duties of his office, said
bond to be approved by the Governor and
filed in the office of the Secretary of State
No person shall be appointed supervis-
ing inspector of naval stores who is a
producer, factor or buyer of naval stores.
The supervising inspector of naval
stores shall have his office in the port of
this state receiving the largest amount of
naval stores for sale or shipment.
He shall have general supervision of all
sub-inspectors of the state and it shall be
his duty to see that they fairly and hon-
esuy perform all duties imposed upon
tnem, and in the manner provided by law,
and to report to the Governor any delin-
quency or irregularity of any such inspec-
tor and to investigate complaints made by
producers or others of the conduct of any
such inspector in the discharge of his du-
ties.
The supervising inspector of naval
stores for the state of Mississippi shall
have general supervision of all naval stores
plants, yards,warehouses and other places
where turpentine and rosin is made,kept,
handled or stored, and it shall be his duty
to see that no adulturation of turpentine
and no "horning" or changing the grades
or weights of rosin is committed in this
state, and to collect evidence of any adul-
turation of turpentine or tampering
with the grades or weights or grades of
rosin which may come to his knowledge
or be reported to him wherever the same
may occur in the state, and to prosecute
or cause to be prosecuted any person or
persons violating the laws of the state
in regard to adulteration of turpentine
or classing, marking and branding rosin.
The supervising inspector shall also
perform such other duties as may be con-
ferred upon him by law, but he shall not
perform the duties of an inspector of na-
val stores except when necessary to deter-
mine the correctness of any inspection by
a sub-inspector.
The supervising inspector of naval
stores shall receive for his services the sum
of $2,000 annually from the state of Mis-
sissippi, and shall not enter or engage in
any other business or employment dur-
ing the term of his office, and shall be sub-
ject to removal at any time by the Gov-
ernor for malfeasance in office.
Section 3. That after the passage and
approval of this act it shall not be lawful
for any person other than a licensed in-
spector to gauge or measure spirits of
turpentine, or class grade and inspect
rosin offered for sale in the state of Mis-
sissippi.
It shall be the duty of the governor to
appoint-in addition to the supervising in-
spector already provided for in this act-
a sufficient number of naval stores in-
spectors, to be known as "sub-inspectors,"
who shall class, gauge, grade and inspect
all naval stores, turpentine and rosin sold
in the state.
Any corporation or firm, or individual
engaged in buying or selling or handling
naval stores in Msisissippi shall have the
right to employ at their expense an in-
spector to handle turpentine and rosin
bought or sold by them in the State, but
said inspector must be one duly licensed
by the Governor.
Said sub-inspectors must be of good
character, etc.
The sub-inspectors, while appointed by
the Governor and while ipso facto State
officials, are not to be salaried by the State
of Mississippi, but are in all cases to be
paid by the corporation, firm or individual
using their services.
Section 4. Any person not a licensed in-


Important Naval Stores Measure Before Mississippi Legialature,


N,










4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

4ii > -I tii Ia11 t lt t t t 1t4 tII Ia: zz1 tz z I Pa iti- 1:11 I tt4 111 11- t-I-111-1-


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10




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spector in accordance with the provisions both, at the discretion of the court.
of this Act who shall perform the duties Section 7. Be it further enacted that if
of an inspector of naval stores, turpentine inspector shall fraudu-
and rosin in Mississippi, shall be guilty of any naval stores inspector shall fraud
a misdemeanor and upon conviction there- lently place any other than the true grade
of shall be fined $100 for each offense, or or quality upon a barrel of rosin in this
imprisoned three months in a county jail, State, or fraudulently place any other
or both, at the discretion of the court. than the true and correct guage upon a
It is hereby expressly provided that no barrel of turpentine, he shall be guilty of
inspection shall be required by the State a misdemeanor, and upon conviction there-
of Mississippi on naval stores, turpentine of shall be punished by a fine of not more
and rosin shipped out of the State by pro- than $a00 (one-half to go to the informer),
ducers on consignment to be handled by or or by imprisonment in the county jail for
sold to other parties in another State, the not more than six months, at the discre-
provisions of this Act only applying to tion of the court.
naval stores, turpentine and rosin sold Section 8. It shall be unlawful for any
within the State of Mississippi. factor, commission merchant, or other con-
Section 5. It shall be the duty of all cern engaged in handling naval stores on
naval stores inspectors in Mississippi to consignment at any port in Mississippi to
carefully and correctly gauge and measure impose a greater charge than six cents a
turpentine, and to grade, class and inspect barrel for inspecting rosin or 9 cents per
rosin, and to put on each package or barrel barrel for inspecting turpentine.
of such naval stores, turpentine and rosin Any violation of this section shall be
a brand or mark certifying such gauge or punishable by a forfeiture of such inspec-
grade, and to furnish to the buyer and tion charges to any producer against whom
seller duplicate certificates showing the made on proper showing to any court of
true and correct inspection of such turpen- proper jurisdiction.
tine and rosin. Section 9. Be it further enacted that
Section 6. Be it further enacted that for the purpose of this Act the term "Spir-
when a licensed and bonded inspector of its of Turpentine" shall be taken to mean
this State shall place his brand or mark tae pure spirits of turpentine distilled
upon a barrel of rosin designating the true from resin, gum or scrape of pine trees,
grade or quality of said rosin, or shall unmixed and unadulterated with oil or
place upon a barrel of turpentine his brand any other substance of any kind what-
or mark certifying the number of gallons ever.
contained in said barrel, it shall be un- That the term "Wood Spirits" or "Wood
lawful for any person, excepting the Su- Turpentine" shall be taken to mean the
pervising Inspector of the State, to change, turpentine product extracted from pine
alter, remove, erase or interfere or tamper knots, light-wood, pine wood or saw dust,
with said brand or marks, or to cause said and is thus to be distinguished from the
brand or brands or marks to be changed, pure spirits of turpentine distilled from
altered, removed, erased or interfered with, the resin, gum and scrape of pine 'trees.
and any person violating this section shall That after the passage and approval of
be guilty of a misdemeanor, and for each this Act it shall be unlawful for any per-
offense, upon conviction thereof, shall be son in the State of Mississippi to adul-
fined not less than $100 (one-half to go to terate or mix witn pure spirits of turpen-
the informer), or be imprisoned in the tine (distilled from 'the resin, gum or
county jail not more than six months, or scrape of pine trees) any kerosene oil or


gasoline or other product of petroleum, or
to mix with pure spirits of turpentine any
wood turpentine (extracted from pine
knots or pine wood or saw dust as afore-
said), or any chemicals or any foreign
substance whatever.
All spirits of turpentine sold or offered
for sale in this State, or shipped or con-
signed to any point out of the State, must
be pure spirits of turpentine and free of
adulteration. And it is hereby provided
that all packages, barrels, tanks or other
receptacles in which spirits of turpentine
shall be placed for sale or shipment must
be branded in plain letters "Pure Spirits
of Turpentine."
That all wood turpentine or wood spirits
shall be branded as such plainly on the
barrel, tank or receptacle in which it is
placed for sale or shipment at the place of
manufacture.
Be it further enacted that any person
or persons adulterating pure spirits of
turpentine, intended for shipment, whether
for themselves or for others, with kerosene
oil, gasoline, or other products of petro-
leum, or with wood spirits, or any liquid
chemicals or any foreign substance what-
ever with intent to defraud shall be guilty
of a misdemeanor (prescribed by the Code
of Mississippi.) Any person or persons
failing to.brand or cause to be branded the
barrel, tank or other receptacles in which
either pure spirits of turpentine or wood
spirits shall be placed for sale or shipment,
shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon
conviction thereof shall be punished by
fine or imprisonment, or by both at, the
discretion of the court.
Section 10. Be it further enacted that
any corporation, firm, person or persons
in the State of Mississippi who may be
found with adulterated spirits of turpen-
tine in their possession shall forfeit the
same to the State of Mississippi. Upon
sworn information thereof from any per-
son it shall be the duty of the Supervis-


ing Inspector of the State to investigate
every such case, and if any fraud or adul-
teration is found he shall then turn over
the same to the State's Attorney for the
judicial circuit in which such adulterated
turpentine, subject -to the forfeiture under
this section, may be found, to proceed
forthwith to have the same forfeited and
sold in the following manner:
He shall file with the Circuit Court of
the jurisdiction in which said property is
found, information in the name of the
State of Mississippi, setting forth the
property whereof forfeiture is claimed, the
owner thereof, or the person in whose pos-
session the same is found, and the grounds
of forfeiture. Upon filing of such informa-
tion (a copy of which with process at-
tached), a writ of attachment with a
copy of said information attached, shall be
thereupon issued without bond or affida-
vit, returnable to the next term of the Cir-
cuit Court where such information is filed,
but if such Circuit Court shall sit within
fifteen days next after issuing such at-
tachment, it shall be made returnable to
the next term of the Circuit Court there-
atter, etc.
Section 11. Be it further enacted by the
authority aforesaid, that the supervising
inspector of naval stores, or any other in-
spector of naval stores, in Missippi, if he
shall have reason to believe that any
spirits of turpentine has been or is adul-
terated in any manner, shall have the right
to enter the place where the same is stored,
or kept. and to open any barrel or barrels
in which the same may be, and to take
therefrom a sufficient quantity, not ex-
ceeding a pint, from every barrel, as a
sample for analysis and inspection. Fach
such sample shall be sealed by the super-
vising inspector of naval stores taking the
same, who shall at the time, write, mark
or label the same in such manner as to
indicate the time and place of taking the
same and the ownership of the barrel or


A LOOK INTO THE FUTURE.



Opportunity Knocks at least once at every man's door.

It is Knocking at your door today.



GROWING PECANS IS A MOST PROMISING INDUSTRY IN THE SOUTH TODAY.

It is the most assurab'e thing with which to utilize our vast acreage of surplus lands.


"If its cultivation is pushed with the usual skill and energy of our American enterprise
there is no reason to believe that it will not be many years before the pecan will become
not only an abundant nut in our market, but also an important article of export."-
Extract from "Nat Culture In the U. S.," Issued by the Department of Agriculture.



ONCE ESTABLISHED, A PECAN GROVE IS A FIXTURE, A HERITAGE,


Which will bring an unfailing income to successive generations.


THE GRIFFIN BROTHERS CO, Nursurymen,
Incorporated.


General Office, Jacksonville, Florida.

Catalogues and information furnished on application.


4.






41














SI
*16










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


tank from which it is taken, as well a
any other facts necessary to identify the
sample so taken with the original. The
owner, claimant or custodian of such spir-
its of turpentine shall have the right to be
present, if he desires, in person or by agent,
at such sampling, and to demand and re-
ceive of such supervising inspector of na-
val stores a sample in all respects like that
taken by such supervising inspector of
naval stores. The analysis of any such
sample so -taken by such inspector or sup-
ervising inspector, sworn to by witnesses
competent to make such analysis, shall be
admissible in evidence in any action where-
in th e grade or quality of the original from
which the sample shall have been taken
shall be an issue. A certificate of the re-
sult of the analysis made and certified to
by the State chemist or assistant chemist
shall be prima facie evidence of the na-
ture, composition and character of the con-
tents of the barrel from which such sample
was taken, and of the correctness of such
analysis, and for such purpose admissible
in evidence in any court of this State.
That upon receipt of reports from the
sub-inspectors the state supervising in-
spector of naval stores shall proceed to
collect from the producers and manufac-
turers for whom the work is done a State
tax or fee of one cent per barrel for each
barrel of turpentine guaged or measured,
whether in barrels, or tanks, and one-
half (y,) cent per barrel for each barrel
of rosin graded or inspected under the pro-
visions of this Act. The term "barrel," as
applied to spirits of turpentine, shall be
understood -to cover a quantity not ex-
ceeding fifty gallons average, and the term
"barrel," as applied to rosin, shall be con-
strued to mean "round barrels," and not
the "gauge barrel" or "market barrel" of
280 pounds.
The inspection fee or tax of one cent
per barrel on turpentine and one-half cent
per barrel on Rosin hereby provided for
shall be collectible the same as other taxes
imposed by the State of Mississippi and
the same penalties are hereby imposed
on producers evading or failing to pay
said tax as are provided for evasion or
non-payment of other taxes required by
law in this State.
Section 14. Be it further enacted that
after the passage and approval of this
Act a license or occupation tax of $250 per
year shall be imposed on each and every
corporation, firm or individual engaged in
buying naval stores, turpentine and rosin
wholesale (or in large quantities) in the
State of Mississippi, such license or tax
to be payable direct to the treasurer of
the State. And should dany corporation,
firm or individual owing and liable for
such license or tax fail to pay same or be
in default for more than sixty days, then
a fine of $100 shall be imposed by the
treasurer for such delinquency for each
month said corporation, firm or individual,
if any, shall continue in default.
Section 16. That after the passage and
approval of this Act, all inspection, grading
and classing of Rosin, and branding or
marking the quality of rosin in this State
shall be according to Standard Rosin Types
recognized under present conditions in the
naval stores trade as New York Standard
Rosin Types.
Upon complaint from any producer of
naval stores in the State that the rosin
types in use by any sub-inspector are un-
fair, improper and unsatisfactory, the
State supervising inspector shall investi-
gate promptly the nature of such com-
plaint and examine the samples complained
of, and if said complaint, if any, is ascer-
tained to be well founded and the samples
are discovered to be improper and irregu-
lar, then the State Inspector shall require
the sub-inspector to use proper samples,
as provided for in this section of the Act,
and shall furthermore caution and warn
tle sub-inspector to use at all times the
right and correct rosin types.
Section 18. It is further enacted that
any violation of any of the provisions of
this Act by any naval stores producers,
or buyer or dealer or inspector, shall con-
stitute a misdemeanor, except where, under
the terms of any particular section of the
Act, special penalties or punishments are
specifically set forth.
Section 19. That this Act shall go into
effect immediately after its approval by
the Governor.


CELERY BRINGS BIG RETURNS.
Half Million Dollars from a Hundred Acres
at Sanford.
Sufficient progress has been made in the
marketing of the vegetable crop grown at
Sanford to enable those who are handling
the same to a large extent to estimate the
volume of the production, and also its
value. It is judged that about one-half
of the celery crop has gone to the North-
ern markets; other crops of less import-
ance will continue to move until the first
of June. Those who have reason to know
say that the entire crop from first to last
will amount to over two hundred car loads,
and that the total value will reach a quar-
ter of a million dollars, and this, too, pro-
duced on less than one hundred acres.
This includes in many instances three
crops per annum. Undoubtedly no similar
results can be shown from a like area
from any portion of the United States.
Mr. Stenstrom, a perfectly reliable gen-
tleman, gives the information that he cut
and sold 1,400 crates of celery from one
acre of ground, receiving therefore about
$3,000.
T. J. Miller estimates that he will cut
about two hundred crates of celery from
less than one-quarter of an acre, in fact,
only a little over an eighth of an acre,
which he has sold for $420. Many other
instances might be mentioned of these
wonderful and unparalleled crops, and a
remarkable fact is, that is worthy of note,
that no failures are known or have been
reported. The prospects are that at least
fifty per cent more ground will be opened
up this coming season.

BROWARD'S DREDGE LAUNCHED.
At Fort Lauderdale. It Will Soon Be
Ready for Beginning Work.
The dredge under construction at Fort
Lauderdale for the State, and to be used
in digging a canal to drain the Everglades,
as proposed by Governor Broward and the
State Drainage Commission, was success-
fully launched on Monday, and will at
once be fitted with the machinery, all of
which is on hand, and the craft made ready
to begin dredging operations within a
month.
Governor Broward and State Chemist
Rose were present at the launching which
occurred about noon, and was successful
in every respect.
The hull of the dredge is 50x112 feet
in size, and it is said the machinery to be
installed will have a greater capacity than
any similar dredge ever constructed in the
State. Governor Broward will come down
again and be present when the craft is put
to work on the project which is just now
agitating and interesting the State.

WILL TRY ITALIAN LABOR.
The Dowling Mill, at East Park, Imported
Two Carloads this Week.
Tuesday two carloads of Italian labor-
ers, numbering 54, arrived at Live Oak
over the Coast Line and immediately left
for East Park, where they will be employed
in Dowling's mill.
The unreliability of colored help seems
to have demanded the importation of for-
eign labor, not only there, but elsewhere
in the State, and it will not be long before
colored help will be eternally done away
with on public work unless the negroes
change their methods. This is to be re-
gretted, of course, but it cannot be helped.
White men will meet with the same fate
when they refuse to work or show no
disposition to work in the interests of their
employers.
NOTICE OF STOCKHOLDERS' MEETING
OF THE AMERICAN OAK LEATHER
TANNING COMPANY.
Notice is hereby given that there will
be a meeting of the stockholders of the
American Oak Leather Tanning Company
to be held at the office of the company in
the city of Jacksonville, Florida, on the
twenty-third day of April, A. D. 1906, at
eleven o'clock A. M. .for the purpose of
voting to increase the capital stock of said
company from thirty thousand dollars to
one hundred thousand dollars.
C. E. GARNER, President.
ARTHUR F. PERRY, Secretary.
Jacksonville, Fla., March 23, 1906.


JOSEPH D. WEED.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. KRENSON.


Barnes & Jessup Company


Jecksonville, Florida..


Naval Stores Factors and Commission

Merchants.

OFFICERS.
C. H. Barnes. Preeldent. J. C. Little, Vice-Preeident.
E. B.iWells. Secretary and Treasurer.

DIRECTORS: C.H. Barnee. J. C. Little, Ralph Jessup.
J. R.. Sunders. E. C. Long, W. E. Cummer, R. H. Paul. G. W.
Saxon G. W. Taylor.
Savannah Prices on day of receipt. Prompt Returns.
MXSXXSS S6XXXXXX9pXXXmX)eu ns.


J. D. WEED l CO.,
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Ind Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF


Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Etc,



i Turpentine


S;Q Cups

If you expect to use the HERTY up
next season, place your orders now for
future delivery. Prices and all informa-
Stion cheerfully furnished on
Cups, Gutters
snd ell Tools
S f used in the Herty system of turpentining.
Address

li Chattanooa Pottery
.:.- i- .;- Company,
Jadrmsil, Rwida





j Standard Naval Stores Co.,
I SJACKSONVILLE


Standard Naval Stores Co. JACKSONVILLE





P rin tin g Send your order to the Industrial
Record. Prompt and satisfactory


EXPORTERS

CARGO LOTS A SPECIALTY


~C1Es~Flc~~s-~?EjC~sjs;i~ij;f;3~%%


-- ------- --- -iE








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


To Regulate Gathering of Turpentine.
Washington, March 23, 1906.
Representative Lacey, of Iowa, has in-
troduced a bill "to punish the cutting,
cetpping or boxing of trees on the public
lands." The measure is designed to pre-
vent the gathering of turpentine or other
gums from trees or. the public domain and
is a more comprehensive measure than
that which has been pending for several
past Congresses. The bill originally intro-
duced in the lty-seventh Congress and
referred to from time to time in this cor-
respondence, was limited in its prohibition
to lands set apart by the government be-
cause of the timber thereon available for
shipbuilding purposes. Mr. Lacey's bill,
however, covers all the public domain and
is a specific prohibition in the following
terms:
"Be it enacted, etc., That every person
who shall cut, chip, chop or box any tree
on any lands belonging to the United
States or on any lands covered by or em-
braced in any unperfected settlement, ap-
plication, filing, entry, selection or loca-
tion, made under any law of the United
States, for the purpose of obtaining from
such tree any pitch, turpentine or other
substance; and every person who shall
knowingly encourage, cause, procure or aid
any such tree to be so cut, or who shall
buy, trade for or in any manner acquire
any pitch, turpentine or other substance,
or any article or commodity made from
any pitch, turpentine or other substance,
when he has knowledge that the same has
been so unlawfully obtained from such
trees, shall upon conviction thereof, be
punished by a fine of not more than five
hundred dollars or by imprisonment not
exceeding twelve months, or by bpth such
fine and imprisonment."
It is understood that the Committee on
Public Lands will give a hearing on this
measure, as at least one of its features
seems likely to cause embarrassment to the
legitimate turpentine trade. It will be
noted that the bill provides penalties, in-
eluding both fine and imprisonment, for


any person buying pitch, turpentine or
other substance "when he has knowledge
that the same has been so unlawfully ob-
tained from such trees, etc."
The trade does not object to the punish-
ment of any person guilty of purchasing
what might be called stolen property, but
it seems to be generally desired that this
feature of the bill shall be rendered more
specific with respect to the knowledge of
the purchaser as to the origin of the tur-
pentine. It is conceivable, it is contended,
that a purchaser might know that the
turpentine bought by him had been taken
on government land, but at the same time
might assume that the party gathering it
had permission to do so. In such a case
it might be held that the purchaser knew
the source of the turpentine and therefore
must have known that it was "unlawfully
obtained." Mr. Lacey is inclined to think
that the bill is sufficiently specific in its 4
present form, and it is understood that it
has the approval of the General Land Of- *
fice. It is possible, however, that it may
eI modified before being reported.-Oil,
Paint and Drug Reporter, New York.
Ocoee is quite an orange and trucking
Ocoee a Prosperous Section. I
section and there are some fine groves and
gardens here. Among the largest groves
are these: Fifty acres, belonging to B. M.
Sims; 30 acres, belonging to W. J. Minor;
25 acres belonging to D. O. Maguire, and
9 acres belonging to Wm. P. Blankelee.
The shipments of oranges from this place
have been heavy, and there is much fruit
yet in the groves. Gardening here is late,
and very little stuff is going to market.-
New York Packer.
I will pay $25.00 for the arrest and de-
livery to me of T. A. Williams, colored,
height about five feet six inches, weight
175 Ibs; prominent scar on nose. Williams
is a dark brown negro and wears a small
mustache. WM. E. HUTSON,
Deputy Sheriff,
tf Ocala, Marion County, Fla.


There's Beauty in a Watch
if the selection of it is made from a stock that
enough to allow wild play to individual tastes.
Such a stock we offer you from which to
1". choose-selected from the world's best makers
and embodying all that is newest and most
fashionable as well as standard styles for the
A9 3 conservative.
8 Every mvtch wek sells ll is Abse'suly taratmi N kt lwsmud a
RK J. RILES CO.
15 WestBay Street, Jeaksonvtllo. Fla.




J. A. Craig ( Bro.
239 W. Bay Street EVERETT BLOCK.


Leaders in
ing and


Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-
Up-to-Date Furnishings.


Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.



STO R Records and Machines the
V O BEST, and CHEAPEST


7-Inch, 35c.


10-inch, 60c.


12-Inch, LOO


METROPOLITAN TALKING MACHINE CO.
AGENTS WANTED c 323 Main Street. Jaclmonville. Fla.


TURPENTINE


OPERATORS!!!


We Have a Proposition in Cattle and Pecans

THAT IS A MONEY MAKER.


I Your


Grazing Land


For Pasturing


Hereford

and

Short-horn


CATTLE.


Garden


and

Farming Lands


For Raeising


PECAN

TREES.


THREE OF OUR HEREFORD SIRES.


Write Marion Fa.rms, ocala Fla.

We'll be Glad to Explain.


Use your









THN WzJMKbY INDUSTRIAL R.OORD. 7


JOHN N. C. STOCKTON,

REAL ESTATE, STOCKS AND BONDS.
CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


CAPITAL 5300,000


SURPLUS and UNDIVIDED PROFITS 414,760.91


JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


John H. Price, Candidate for County


Comr


missioner Makes Ringing Announcement

of His Platform,

The fact that there are two candidates the office of justice of the peace for four
having the name of Price running for office years, with utmost satisfaction to his con-
may create some confusion in the coming stituency. Two years ago he was a can-
Sb t c didate for county commissioner and was
primaries, but the candidate for county defeated by only a few votes by the irre-
commissioner is John H. Price, not J. S. sistable Fred Puckhaber. Mr. Price now
Price or John Price, who is a .candidate enters the race because he has been urged
for sheriff. The people of Jacksonville and by some of the best business men of Jack-
Dval county will recognize Mr. John IH. I sonville and his friends to do so. If chosen,
val county will recognize Mr. John he will prove not only faithful, but diligent,
Price as one of the leading citizens of this enterprising and a friend of every interest
county and State and one who has had a and of every section of his county.
conspicuous part in the development of
this county. They know he is an enterpris- The indications are that the Governor
ing, industrious and public-spirited citizen, is to make a hard fight at the next eas-
for John H. Price possesses all of these son of the legislature to have some ac-
qualities to a remarkable degree. tion which will enable him to continue the
John. H. Price was born and reared in drainage of the state treasury in an ef-
Duval county. He is now forty-seven years fort to dig ditenes in the swamps of Flor-
of age and well equipped for representing 'ua.
his county on the most important board.
He acquired his education in the private
and public schools of Duval county and
during his entire life has been identified
with everything which has been of public
interest to Duval county. He is a son ofW HISKIES
the late John Price, Sr., who was among GINS AND RUMS
the first settlers of Duval county, moving
here from Scriven, Ga., in 1825. His father FROM
lived in this county until his death and 15 00 per
was one of the most highly respected citi- $1.50 $5.00 per Gallon
zens of this section of the State. The
father fought through the Indian wars and ...... AGENCY FOE......
was always responsive to the calls of his
country, State and county. Both father Lewis 1866 and Mount Vernon
and son were tried and true democrats Pure Rye Whiskies.
during the time that it required the most! Controllers Blum's Monogram and Syl-
faithful and persistent work to rid this van Rye-Agents for Jungst Cincin-
State of the carpetbag regime and John nati and Pabst ilwaukee Beers
H. Price is to-day regarded as one of the Price on application.
most earnest, faithful and conscientious
democrats of this State. If elected to the CHAS. BLU M & O.
board of county commissioners of Duval LU .
county, Mr. John H. Price will prove that 517 and 519 WEST BAY STREET
what is here said of him is not only true
but falls short of expressing the true qual- JACKSONVILLE FLA.
ities of his character and the extent of his
public service and service to his party. He
a a business man, and a successful farmer
dve miles from this city. He has been in
the business of logging and cross-ties and
has also merchandised. He is now en-
gaged in the manufacture of naval stores
and with his indomitable will and perse- o
verance he is making a success of this
business. Mr. Price has been successful
in business, careful in watching the affairs
of the county and is in every way equipped
for the office to which he aspires.
Solidly and frankly, without quibbling
or making excuses, he says that he is for
good roads, and those who know the man,
know that if elected, he will live up to that 122,000.00 Resources
*platform to the letter.
0 John H. Price regards the office of county 12 Years IFaitful Ser-
commissioner as one of the most important
in the county, since the board of county vice.
commissioners have the expending of the
county's money. He believes that where
public officials have the money of the tax- Union Saving Bank
payers in trust that they should exercise
the greatest care and caution, commensu- City of Jacksonville
rate with good service. Mr. Price has held Depository

HOTEL WINDLE.
15, 17, 9a Eaut Fory St.,
JACKSOnVILLM, FLA.
American plan, 2.50 to $3.00 per day. European plan, $1.00 per day up.
Center of city. First-elas in all appointments.
C. B. SMITH, Proprietor.


ROOM 4. UEDEMAN BUILDING.


We issue Time Certificates of Deposit, which draw interest at the rate ofthree per cent per
annum, if held ninety days or longer. Take advantage of this mnd let your sarrfus be earnrln
sonmethg lor you. Particular attention paid to Odt-of-Town accounts sending deposits by man



St. George Hotel

7'tE EUROPEAN PLAN.
Rooms: 75c, $1.00 and $1.50 PsN.
PHONE 317.
MRS. GEO. W. BROOK
PROPRIETRESS.

MI Ii I I Ul I 14iI Il*tIItItIiI I I III Iliiii ImiI l

JOS. ROSENHEIM SHOE CO.
MANVFACTVRERS AND JOBBERS OF


SHOES

SAVANNAH, GZORGIA
"Best Shoes Made for Commnissary Trade."
I Is I It# I a go I I I a t I I i 1 o I I I I # 1 #18 5 1 of


FUEL A DO BUILD ING MATERIAL.


The Southern Fuel & Supply Co.
t& O 81, .i d W& seawdft DoW Llinu m ent, RIhaikr, PAbaft.
Foot Hogan Strete Jaksorwnvlle, Flr a.



ARE YOU INTERESTED IN


TURPENTINE AXES


The R ford Axehas on merit
The Ri xford Axe alone establish-
ed the greatest reputation of any edge
S tool ever sold. If you want something to
keep hands on your place

THE RIXFORD AXE

Is IT

If you expect to use them order now for
the DEMAND is greater than the supply.


W. H. Briggs Hardware Co.
Sole Southern Agents
VALDOSTA. GEORGIA
^

C-











8 IT= WNUPaRY MDIUOMiA LOORD.
No A --


TAMPA'S CIGAR OUTPUT.
An Ieeaa of Over 12a,0000 Over Same
Period Last Year.
Tampa's cigar shipments, up to March
24, showed an increase over the same pe-
riod of last year of over 12,000,000 cigars.
One-fourth of the year has passed. At
the same rate of increase for the remain-
ing three-quarters, the increase for the
entire year will be 48,000,000, which will
make the total output of clear Havana
cigars for this year reach a grand and
inspiring total of 273,00,000. It is reas-
onable to suppose, however, that the in-
crease will be larger than that estimated
above, which takes the increase for the
first three months of the year as a basis
of calculation. The increase is always
much larger during the last three months
of the year than in any other quarter,
that being marked by the great and con-
stantly increasing holiday demand. It is
not an extravagant prediction to estimate
the output of Tampaa cigars this year at
close to 3000,000,000-which will make the
output of Tampa alone far in excess of
that of the entire island of Cuba. Last
year, Tampa's cigar product exceeded that
of Havana. This year, it should exceed
the product of all of Cuba, the native home
of the clear Havana eigar.-Tampa Trib-
une.
RAILROAD RUMORS AT DAYTONA.
Road to DeLand Is Almost Assured for the
Near ture.
Daytona, April 6.-Railroad rumors of
all kinds are floating in the air, and spec-
ulation on the subject is making much talk
on the street corners, in the hotel lobbies
or wherever occasion offers opportunity for
two or three men to gather discussion.
C. S. Rieman's plan, submitted by peti-
tion to the Board of County Commission-
ers at their last monthly meeting in De-
Land, to build a line to operate between
Daytona and DeLand, and offering to de-
posit a good and sufficient bond guarantee-
ing commencement of the work within
fifteen days from the time such privilege
was granted, came as a surprise to many
in our city. Gasoline propelled cars will
furnish the motive power of the new line,
should Mr. Rieman secure the desired grant
from the Board of County Commissioners.
In the meantime, the projectors of the
Central East Coast road have obtained
their charter and are steadily pushing their
interests with such corporations as they
may be concerned; so, even the "doubting
Thomases" concede that Daytona will have
another railroad in a matter of two years
or less, and it is well with us.

NOTICE OF INTENTION TO APPLY FOR
LETTERS PATENT.
Notice is hereby given that the under-
signed will apply on the 7th day of May,
A. D. 1906, to the Honorable Napoleon B.
Broward, Governor of the State of Florida,
or his successors in office, for the issuance
of Letters Patent incorporating the Grivot
Typewriter and Office Appliance Company,
upon the terms and conditions of the fol-
lowing proposed charter:
W. C. GRIVOT,
ADOLPHE GRIVOT,
M. H. PRESSLEY,
W. D. MILLER,
FRANK E. JENNINGS.

PROPOSED CHARTER OF
GRIVOT izrzwxllER AND OFFICE
APPLIANCE COMPANY.
The undersigned hereby associate them-
selves together for the purpose of becom-
ing incorporated and forming a corporation
under the laws of the State of Florida, for
the transaction of business under the fol-
lowing proposed charter:
Article I.
Name.
The name of the corporation shall Ix
the GRIVOT TYPEWRITER AND OF
FICE APPLIANCE COMPANY, and itf
principal office shall be in the city of Jack
seavile, Florida. Its business shall be con.
deted in said State and in other States ol


the United States, through branch agen-
cies, offices or otherwise, as may be con-
venient.
Article IL
The general nature of the business to be
transacted by said company shall be the
dealing in typewriters and office supplies.
The buying, selling, exchanging and rent-
ing of typewriters, and such other office
supplies and appliances as may be neces-
sary or convenient in connection with the
conduct of such business, and to establish
and maintain a well equipped typewriter
and repair shop with metal plating plant
and appliances, and with all tools and
machinery necessary for repairing type-
writers, and divers other small machinery.
Article II.
The amount of the capital stock of said
corporation shall be the sum of Five Thou-
sand Dollars ($5,000.00), to be divided into
Five Hundred shares of the par value of
Ten Dollars each. Said stock may be paid
for in full in cash or in installments, or
in merchandise or services rendered at a
reasonable valuation, to be determined by
the Board of Directors.
Article IV.
The time for which this corporation shall
exist shall be ninety-nine years (99).
Article V.
The business of this corporation shall
he conducted by a President, Vice-Presi-
ment, a Secretary and Treasurer, Manager
and a Board of not less than three or more
than seven Directors. The regular stock-
holders' meeting shall be held on the fourth
Monday in December of each year. Said
stockholders' meeting shall elect the Di-
rectors and the Directors shall as soon as
possible thereafter, meet and elect the
officers. Said Directors and Officers shall
have such powers and duties as shall be ex-
pressed in the by-laws. The offices of
president and manager and of secretary
and treasurer may be held by one and the
same person. Until the election and qual-
ification of the directors and officers as
above set forth, the business of the com-
pany shall be conducted by the following
persons:
W. C. Grivot as President and Manager,
Adolphe Grivot as Vice-President, M. H.
Pressley, Secretary, W. D. Miller, Treasu-
rer, and the foregoing and Frank E. Jen-
nings, as directors.
Article VI.
The highest amount of indebtedness or
liability to which the corporation can at
any time subject itself shall be twice the
amount of its capital stock.
Article VIL
The names, residences and amount of
stock subscribed for by each incorporator
are:
W. C. Grivot, Jacksonville, Fla., one
hundred and fifty shares.
M. H. Pressley, Jacksonville, Fla., two
shares.
W. D. Miller, Jacksonville, Fla., ten
shares.
Frank E. Jennings, Jacksonville, Fla.,
five shares.
Adolphe Grivot, New Orleans, La., ten
shares.
W. C. GRIVOT,
ADOLPHE GRIVOT,
M. H. PRESSLEY,
W. D. MILLER,
FRANK E. JENNINGS.
.,State of Louisiana, Parish of Orleans:
. Personally appeared before me, the un-
. lereigned, on this 31st day of March, A. D.
1906, Adolphe Grivot, to me well known,
who on his oath acknowledged his signa-
ture to the foregoing, and that he executed
the same for the uses and purposes therein
expressed.
Witness my hand and official seal the
day and year last aforesaid.
EDOUARD F. HENRIQUES,
(Notarial Seal). Notary Public.
State of Florida, County of Duval:
Personally this day appeared before me,
SW. C. Grivot, M. H. Pressley, W. D. Miller
and Frank E. Jennings, each to me well
known, who each on his oath acknowledged
his signature to the foregoing, and that
he executed the same for the uses and pur-
poses therein set forth.
Witness my hand and official seal this
t 4th day of April, A. D. 1906.
SGEO. A. DEOOTTES,
S(Notarial Seal.)
Notary Public Sttel of Florida.
- My commission expires Marhn-i.- 1909.
f 5t


MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


SBoilermaking and Repairing

Still Boilers and Pumps.
SHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.
Jacksonville. Fla.
; III Is Is3t3 4aII 1 1I4I11 l3l3 t:IaIs3los111II UI 1 e lllll


SUMMER LUMBER COMPANY

JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

Rough as Dressed Lumber

Long Leaf Yellow Piew.
BOXES AM ORATES.


W. J. L'ENGLE.
President.


J. W. WADE,
Vie-Preddent.


IL 0. E=!=~
6607 ami Teem


Union Naval Stores Co.
MOBILE, ALA. PENSACOLA, FLA. NEW ORLEANS, LA.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
...... DW4* T s 11 ..........

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at preset quite a large a uber of durable leatis te wt l-
ida, Alabama and Mixiniippl. Liberal ad vances made agaiat e.a--e"l_ Owa-
respondence solcited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.


I




I








I


CAPITAL STOCK S300.000.00-


Jacksonville Naval Stores


Company

JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA


A NEW COMPANY


Will do a general naval stores commission business. We
guarantee Savannah prices upon day of arrival, and to make
prompt return.


A MUTUAL COMPANY


Each shipper invited to become a stockholder.
It is but fair and right that th.' operator should share in the
profits of the selling end of his product.
We have ample capital and facilities to take care of our
customers. Your business solicited.



Jacksonville Naval Stores Ca


Blum Building, Rooms 21-23


J. .


Jacksonville. Florida


D. C. ASHLEY, President. W. P. ROBERTS. V. P.
CRANFORD J. F. FENDER C. H. BROWN
VIca-PsamlDnrT
S. H. BERG, Secretary and Treasurer


and Gen. Mgr.
J. N. BRAY


;SgixSc


----------







null WYKLT INDUMUTBJL UMOORD.


CHINES VERSUS NEGRO. The coolies can be secured for a much
So T i smaller price than any other class of labor,
Nae Eneri nt Ned w ITwl rn Flofil but more of them will have to be employed
WatelX- with lntert.
.to do the same amount of work, and the
The fact that some of the large turpen- financial end will be about the same. But
tine operators have begun to make prepa- the fact that more will be employed on the
rations for the use of Chinese coolie labor, same amount of work will tend to incon-
to supply the deieny in colored labor, venience the conduct of the work, and for
has provoked a great deal of discussion as this reason I do not think many will keep
to whether it would be practicable or profit- the coolies after they have tried the ex-
able.oolies after they have tried the ex-
able. perimenrt."
Some of the Florida operators have al- Another Instance Cited.
ready secured small numbers of coolies a Another gentleman who has some
an experiment, and sixty of them are at knowledge of this class of labor, cited
work at Paradise, Fla. They were brought as an illustration a magazine article which
from Portland, Ore. A number of those
most intimately acquainted with the con- appeared several months ago in which the
editions of labor affairs believe that 4the habits and laboring ability of the coolie
effort to supplant the negro with the coolie were discussed at length. Illustrative of
will prove successful and will be profitable, the article, he said, was a picture taken
but those who know the coolie are in- of seven coolies handling one common gar-
elined to believe that the experiment will den shovel. The implement was fitted
result in a failure. with a long handle and radiating from the
r Negroe Wat too Much. blade were six small cables. One coolie
There are few negroes now that can be operated the handle and after the blade
miered to go to the turpentine farms, had been driven into the ground, the six
and those who are willing to isolate them- coolies drew it out by the ealble i
sees dem d pri that are a but pro- The writer of the article stated the il-
meftive. The Chinest coolie labor isal- lustration was not an exaggeration, and
ways obtainable at price which men of any could be en wherever coolies are em-
other rac would nd it hard to subsist ployed. The shovel in question, he said,
A citizen of Savannah, who has, in an could have been operated by any child.
offehal apcty, cme in direct contact It is moe than probable that the ma-
wfth the Cimes according the 8avu- j of those who contemplate employing.
nab P be le that the poject labor will postpone any definite action
meet with success, but that it will pmoe until those who have already begun experi-
tey inconvenient to those who employ m ting have demonstrated whether it will
it. be profitable.
ThiMka a crfes peter.
He said that one negro would do theW M. D. JOS
work that fre coolies could be made to *W W
perform. PIRSCIiPTION SPECIAunST
"The oolies are not exactly indolent,"
he said, "but they do not believe they can -~"
do any great work and are unwilling to FAMILY DRU I T
attempt it. I have seen three, and some-
times five, coolies moving some object that 107 E. BAY ST.
one n ould with ease pclk up and Man Orders Sfcllted.
walk o0 wgt!


5he EVERETT HOTEL
325 WEST BAY ST, JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
Centrally located, thoroughly repaired and:renovated. Newly furnished. European plan.
G. H. MASON, Proprietor.

*******ft*******6*6**ft* 060666!@**


J V. WEST, D 6. FLRYNFm
JOHN s. HARMS.
President. V. KEURLY.
VikcPidei.


H L MCHMOR
Secy asa Trie.
D. LR VWASH.
AnN Sscy and Ti.


WEST FLYNN & HARRIS CO.
GENERAL GERMANIA BLDG. Savannah. Ga.
WEST BLDG. JacksonvUll. La.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
NAVAL STORES RCEIVD AT AVANAH, GA, G JACKSO VILL,
FLA., AND FEMrADnA, FLA.

Wholesal Grocers ao Deao lers in Hay. Crain man Heavy
HwrncbS,


SOLE AGENTS Ci t" C le Union Tm'min Aes.
,Oand vWla., a.Chd Phddin Mapa VMs.


SAVANNAH, GA.


MERCHANTS WAREHOUSES
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


TAMPA, .LA


i 9 ;-----; -----


WILLIAM A. SOUaR


JAMES 0. DARNY


IIIIllIlItilll IIi ttI I III Iit I IlltI tl I 11 I TIII l I -
- J. P. WULIAma President. J. A. G. CAsoN. 1st Vice-President .
- A. JnrNmN. Iad VsPresident. J. P. DusuwfaT. 3d Vice-Presdent
H. Lr KATMo. Secretary. H. P. E. ScamunT, Treamnrer. -

- J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

I I 1 II Wi ICIR1 II HIrESILE GROA R.
Masm Office AnVaiMmX, GEORGIA.
m- ..n or- t P XSACO&LA, L. (L Brmae0 GOroery Uol ,
JACKOrVIILm, FLX. COLUMN BU, Ot.
: Naval Stores Producers are lAited to Correspond With Us. -
sItlllIIllllUhll ,III llIIIIIlI33 I III! hIIII trt trt"


WILLIAM A. BOURS & COMPANY
THE OLDEST ESTABLISHES GERAIN M SEED OUS IN TIE STATE.

flay, Grain, Feed, Garden
Seeds, Poultry Supplies, Flour,
Grits, Meal and Fertilizers.
OUR MOTTO: Premt ShlmeaM, Retsle Beads. CataleMi Fre

206 EAST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


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10 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL RECORD Export Company's Meeting Next Tuesday.


JAME A. HOLLOMON. Edlfer-t-Chi".
J. 0. LarONTISEE. Assoate Editor.
A. H. MARSH. Business Manager.
Published Every Friday.
S(Domestic) ...-3.O0 Per Annum
Soiacnislon } (Foreign) .... 3.50 ..

Thq Pine and Its Products."

All communications should be addressed
The Industrial Record Company,
Jacksonville. Fla.
ranch Editorial and Business Offices at
Savannah. Ga.

Entered at the Postofie at Jacksonville, Fla..
as secocd-class matter.
Adopted by the Executive Committee of
the Turpentine Operators' Association
September 12, 1902, as its exclusive offi-
l organ. Adopted in annual convention
September 11 as the organ also of the gen-
eral association.
Adopted April 27th, 190, as the offwial
organ of the Interstate Cmne Growers' As-
sociation. Adopted September 11, 1903, as
the only omfiil organ of the T. 0. A.
Commended to lumber people by pei
resolution adopted by the Georgia 8wmill
Amociation.
^~ "
THE RECORD'S OFFICES
The publishing plant and the main of-
ee of the Industrial Record Company
are located at the intersection of Bay and
Newnan Streets, Jacuesnville, I, in the
ry heart of the great turpentine and
yellow pine indutrie
ade of the entire South.
The Savannah, Ga., office is in the Board
of Trade Building Savannah is the lead-
ing open naval stores market in the world.

NOTICE TO PATRONS.
All payments for advertising in the In-
dtstrial Record ad sbacriptioem theeto
must be mdo direct to the home office in
JasisMl. Ar t ae noset alowd t
m colletios ulder my cintm eemms
Bila for advertising ad subscription are
mt out from the hbem offer% wb hds
ad all rmittacesm e t e made direct
to this company.
dustr9ital R1M PBsls igB C4.

WANT TO RETARD PROGRESS.
Just as the attention of the whole of
Florida had been attracted to Live Oak
ad Columbia county, when the press of
the state was pointing with pride to the
accomplishments of that section, there
comes to the chain of those who believe
in progress the report that there are those
in that county who re bent on nothing
less than a blocking of what the enterpris-
ing men at the head of the affair of Su-
wannee had set out to do. The building of
good roads in that county had offered a
great deal of promise in the way of de-
velopment. The people were beginning to
see the great advantage of this project
which the men of enterprise had put forth.
But just at this time when there are those
who want to butt into politics and when
they are looking about for the chances of
making grand stand plays, it was hardly
to be expected that this commendable and
approved scheme should be the object of
attack. But the attack has come and it
spears to have been cleverly planned by
a little fellow who is evidently awaiting
to be fed at the public crib.
But there is little to be apprehended at
this late day by the friends of enterprise
and progress in Suwannee. The building
of public roads will go right on in that
county, and those who are at the head of
the great work will see the good results
they have achieved long after the knock-
ers and demagogues have been forgotten.
Suwannee county and Live Oak are going
to grow, and some of the stumbling and
moss-covered blocks will have to stand
by and watch the good work proceed.
Have you sent around your advertise-
ment for the Realestate issue of The In-
dustrial Record? You ought to get in
this number.


The first annual meeting of the stock- prices below the low water mark of the
holders of the Naval Stores Export Co. Savannah market. Suppose spirits had
will be held in Jacksonville next Tuesday. sold in June-August, 1905, for 50 cents.
The history of this company is probably \\ would the Naval Stores Export Co., as a
well known to every reader of the Record corporation call upon the producers for the
and at this writing it is not necessary to one dollar a barrel excess over flat Savan-
review it in any sense. We shall do so nah? Isn't it a fact that futures are sold
possibly in the next issue, adding an for the purpose of steadying and maintain-
occasional bit of information that all Rec- ing a summer market, and isn't it a fact
ord readers are possibly not acquainted that the Naval Stores Export Co. kept the
with. At the present time it is sufficient to prices of spirits and rosins up last sum-
say there will be two factions in the stock- mer, to a large extent, by reason of the
holders' meeting next week: one, and we contracts it had for one-half of the prod-
believe, the larger faction, favoring the ucts of a large number of producers at
liquidation of the company and the pay- fixed prices? What are contracts made
ment to each stockholder his pro rata share for? To be broken? Not between honest
of the company's assets, whether that men in legitimate businesses.
amount shall be forty per cent of the origi- The Naval Stores Export Company was
nal investment in capital stock, or less, or doing a great work when it was asassi-
more. The other faction will contend that nated. In the few months of its active
the company pay to those producers who existence, it made millions of dollars for
contracted last summer spirits to the the producing interests of the naval stores
company at 52 cents the differential be- belt, as a whole. Had the company lived
tween the contract price and the Savan- through the dark days of December with
nah market during the contract months, the undivided co-operation of all of those
The latter course. would mean the wiping who should have been its friends, it would
out of the available assets of the Naval to-day have a surplus of a million dollars
Stores Export Company, in paying these heaped upon its capital stock. The exeeu-
differentials, and the stock itself would tive head of the company made as brave
become as worthless, practically, as the a fight as conditions and environments
paper upon which the certificates are writ- would permit. It is useless now to discuss
ten. "ifs" or "explanations". It would take five
The first course named Is the only resa- millions of dollars today to accomplish
able one to take. There is no sense in what a couple of hundred thousand could
keeping the assets of the company tied have accomplished on the sixth day of
up for the next four years as a stick over last December. And no man knows this
Mr. Shotterb head. It will do no good; better than Mr. S. P. Shotter himself.
it can serve no purpose. We shall probably As it is today the situation is not so
explain the reasons for this statement in a bad New export companies have eome
subsequent issue of the Record. Keeping into the field with.experience and capital.
the organization intact in the meantime Mr. Shotter is no longer lord and master
will cost something and avail nothing. of the territory west of the Alabama.
Liquidate and pro-rate the money back to There is competition in the field. Produ-
the stockholder. cers will continue to get good prices and
This talk of paying the differentials to if they will exercise conservatism aad
those who sold futures is wild-cat. It isn't Ijudgment in their trading as well as in
the first time producers sold futures; nor their operations, the situation is by no
is it the first time futures were sold at means a gloomy one.

GROWING OF PECANS. I promising crop. They have certainly be-
G OF P come familiar with the great results to
There are several industries which are attend the efforts of some of those who
commanding the attention of the people of have been devoting some of their time to
the South at this time. The fact that it raising pecans and it is a fact that there
is only a question of a few years when have been no failure to divert attention
those who are engaged in at least two of and slacken interest.
the great industries of the South must be- The time is coming when the h ers of
the.. great induse ohe- .vast acres of Florida land will be conm-
gin to look about them for some method of?
utilizing the great many ares of land polled to look about them for a means of
which are being accumulated in order to disposing of them. When the timber has
carry on these great industries, makes it been cut away; when there is nothing left
necessary as well as commendable for those the so, th wil se hat
interested to manifest the spirit which is have been negligent of their own oppor-
being manifested today. On e sp t w big tunities and have failed to take advantage
industries which is attacting the atentionf what nature has had to offer. Then a
of the manufacturers of naval stores and few an trees would man a great dl
of lumber, is that of raising blooded t r n ests ey would nanee
lie to in order to utili the vast acr greatly the vale of t e lands ad a
age of Florida's waste lands. This indus- means o offering inducement to the
tr i ak a rrk growth lo home seeker would prove of great value.
try is making remarks growr esIt is the man who tes advantage of th e
the very best and the most improved lines the
and the indications are that it is to grow gapportuti es oa the oay who are the
for the very best men in this and other of greatest ueess and thae who are the
the southern states a behind the enter- first to plant pecan groves will be the first
Southern to reap a great harvest of wealth.
.pr.se.. There is to be a well directed effort to
The growing of blooded stock has been The i t efort t
referred to repeatedly during the past few push this industry. It is an effort in
weeks and we are gratified to be able to sucess that the Record merits for ith
say that those who feel the greatest in- at the star for it.
terest in this industry are applauding the at t
efforts of The Record and are appreciat-
ing the work that we are doing along this OUR REAL ESTATE EDITION.
line. Next week the Record will publish its
But this week The Record is calling at- large and comprehensive realestate edi-
tention in a most prominent manner to tion which was promised some time ago
an industry which must be more exten- and which met with a ready interest at
sively established in the South if the peo- tue first mention of the enterprise.
pie of the South are to take advantage of This edition is to be just what the word
what the soil and the climate afford' in realestate used in this connection implies
the way of advantages for an industry,the -a paper dealing with the great realestate
product of which is so constantly growing interests of a rapidly developing section of
in demand. There is not an industry in a great and promising country. In the
any way having the great future before it various departments it will deal with all
as the growing of pecans for the mar- the various realestate interests. It is)
ket. It has been demonstrated fully that to refer to realestate from the standpoint
pecans can be grown with a big and a of the progressive realestate agent, the
steady profit, and what is better still it owner of vast acres, the prospective pur-
has been demonstrated that pecans can chaser for speculative purposes and the
be grown without the great outlay of mon- people who are interested in realestate in
ey which some of the other horticultural a small way. Appreciating the fact that
interests require. There is every reason there is a great demand in this State to-
why the people of the South should be- day for lands suited to farming and the
gin to devote more of their time to this growing of fruits, the Record is making


a special effort to present the advan-
tages of this section of the South to the
prospective settler in n honest andcom-
Iprehensive manner, believing that in do-
ing so it is favoring not only the owner
of land, but those who are contemplating
coming this way to cast their lots and to
take a hand in the development of -a fa-
vored section of the United States.
This edition has been extensively and
successfully advertised throughout the
United States. We have announced the
coming of this edition through some of
the most widely read publications of the
country and responsive to these adver-
tisements we have received orders for the
paper from many people, who represent.
every section of the country and who in
their letters express the interest they feel
in this section of the United States. We
feel assured that those who have contract-
ed for advertising space in this issue or
who are to do so before the day of its pub-
lication, will find it by far the best adver-
tising medium which they have ever tried
in any of their experiences in the South-
There is more interest in Florida real es-
tate today than there ever has been and
it is an interest which is growing rid
and constantly. Lands are being s at
rates which would have been considered
fabulous a few years ago and the tendeesy
is to advance. Some of these sales have
been remarkable onea sad there is going
to be a number of very interesting stories
in this special number of The Record.
Replies to the advertisements which we
have placed in the magazines of tl
country indicate a greater interest in real-
estate in the South thea has ever been
manifested in the past sad this paper is
to go to those who are thinking of either
coming to the South, or who are learn
that there are better opportunities
in this section than in any other part of
the United States.
At the present time the indications ar
that we are to issue at least five theom-
and extra copies of this paper, but the. n-
creasing demand for this number may per-
ceptibly swell the number. An advertise-
ment in the REAL ESTATE NUMBER of
the Record will bring the very best results.

HOW TO HANDLI CsHINZS

Modern Macinery Gives Advice to Im-
porters of Chinese CooHes.
Labor questions in China are solved for
the laborer by the government, and there
are neither strikes nor lockouts, nor have
there been any for more than o20 years.
The bricklayers, carpenters, plasterers
and mechanics of every description are
lined up on each side of the public squar
and wait with amazing patience until they
are wanted.
The master builder comes along and
places a chalk mark upon those whose ser-
vices he requires. They follow him and
go to work; no fuse about work or hours;
the least sign of discontent and the head
of the kicker drop into a basket.
The master builder does not, however,
have things his own way. There is a fixed
rate of wages for each trade, which be
must pay, and a certain number of homr
defined, above which the employer must
not go only by a special permit from the
government, which permit will arrange for
all overtime being paid for. Once a mae
is engaged on a piece of work he reeelves
his pay whether he works or not, so long
as the work he is engaged upon is not com-
pleted. Loss of time by ram or any other
unavoidable reason is borne by the owner,
not the contractor. Failure to conform to
the contract or to pay the workmen ren-
ders the contractor liable to be beheaded.
The owner, too, is liable to the workmen
and to the men who furnish material equal-
ly with the contractor. This is certainly
a lien law with a vengeance, for in case
of failure to pay, the government pays the
debts, confiscates the property and chops
off the heads of the owner and contractor
with no unnecessary delay.
The Chinaman has been taught so many
thousand years to feel that death is noth-
ing that the ceremony of decapitation is
not regarded with any fear by the victim
nor with special horror by the friends.
They have no time for the long drawn out
proceedings of the courts of justice in
Christian countries, since their numbers
are millions and court proceedings would
increase crime and leave no time for work.







THE WEEKLY INIUVTWraAL HUCORD. U



THE CHRISTIE-GROOVER W C.,


WHOLESALE
-a1. *IWr VWMY ASr nTONAE ANM Sagw TIME AIn MaNwEr.


DRUGGISTS.
JA@KNVUlUJE, FLORmDA.


During the last year a new industry has
been introduced into China. They are ex-
porting coolies to the Transvaal as laborers
in the gold mines. For many reasons it
became necessary to recruit from some
outside source, and the Chinese are quiet,
sober, hard workers, not given to dissipa-
tion, economical and anxious to save their
wages), always with a hope of returning to
China. As competitors in the labor mar-
kets of the world they are feared for their
virtues as laborers far more than for their
vices.
The profit to the South African Mining
Company in employing Chinese labor will
consist in the greater capacity for work in
the individual and the increased security
of the mine owner against unexpected
shortage. The business of collecting cool-
S ies for the Traasvaal is conducted by con-
tractors, who pay al cost of collecting
them, suppling food and transportation
to the plase c delivery, and for each
coolie dird to the place of. embarkation
the contrster resolves a fixed -m Each
coolie igs a easo act and special C -ms,
clerks aroja - by the government d
explain to-as man every clause 4( C*
contract s- b knows where heisa oiS
The .kiu h is slow, s whi.
the 'eho i for the 11rt me
sla. i Mie s ia all he w~902 -'p
er .a h ai B t no Aft or Cliu e spirits, am3 t'

loo-= bw eo k oit b. b'. *
The day befoe -thy ar shipped
Tramaal they are taken in lots o te
prOtetr and estioed: Where are you
gong? How mbg will you be at sea
What will happen when you arrive at the
Transvaal At what will you work? At
what wages? (Cn you leave money in
China for your family? and a hundred
other questions When the catechism is
completed the protector makes them under-
stand that there is no punishment and no
money to pay if they desire to go home.
It is most difficult for the idea to be given
them that they can have any mind of heir
own without some awful pihment, and
the most difficult part of the protetorates
job i to make them see that they are re-
laed if they regret the attempt to de-
part Only about one in two hundred leave
at this point. After the protetorate is
through with them they are put into a
tank, washed and dressed in new, clan


clothes, shoes, belts, socks, straw hats and
they reappear in dar kblue uniforms, and
the only vestige of Chinese in their make-
up is the Chinese characters on their coats:
"Nan Fei Li Kung" (tagged, washed and
paid.) He is paid $38 (Mexican), two
months' pay and $8 bonus. Few of them
ever possessed a dollar before. Another
chance is given him to retreat, but no one
has ever been known to go back at this
stage. There is no pathos in the scene
when he says good-bye to the home folks.
Before going on the steamer he is given a
bag containing a full winter out of cloth-
ing, a blanket, a tin cup, a small bamboo
pillow, with folding legs, to serve as a
seat by day.
The number allowed on the transports is
prescribed.
The number shipped from all part of
China it about 50,000, and the proceeding
is attended with no small expense in fol-
lowing the detail required by the Chinese
government. No provision is made for the
importation of Chinese clerLs and interpre-
;ia, and the eonsul-general's report, from
whiei some of these notes are taken, leaves
the coolie on the transport. ao one fol-
jp jitbhe poor fellow to the mines where
the South African mining companies get
bekAheir money. Their wagS range from
_1 qiaing 6 pence to 2 shillings, 6 pence,
per .sy, exclusive of subsistence. What-
ei" the conditions to be met by the laborer
i n'~t mines, the coolie is better adapted
toieet them with his nerve and patience
,t# any other nationality on earth. At
l be is paid $8 a year for farm work,
with food,clothing, head-shaving and to-
bacco, and those who work by the day are
paid 10 cents, with a noon meaL
The American may well look with fear
upon the emigration of the coolie, who
leaves behind him conditions that would
not be tolerated in any other country, and
who is liable to perform cheerfully any
service in this country at any price offered
him.
It seems probable that China is to take
her place among the nations of the world,
entering by the same avenue that other
nations have. China is organizing an
army of a million men or more, whose
leaders are under the direction of English
and American officers, and they hold prom-
ise of being taught to go into active ser-
vice without an umbrella over their heads,
which in the conflict with the Japs they
insisted upon doing.-Modern Machinery.


Review of Naval Stores for a Week.


SPIRITS ON THE DECLINE.
Thba spirits re on the decline was ap-
parent st week, but the decline is still in
program, thou it is slow, price appar-
ently fighting hard for the top round.
Receipts at Savannah and other ports
have been heavier, though the sales and
shipments appear to even things up. There
is everything to indicate further light
declines, though there is nothing alarming
in the situation up to the present time.

Spirit for the Week at Savanah.
Price Repts Sales Exp
Monday, April 2...67 216 172 1,388
Tuesday, April 3...66 1 986[ 1721 391
Wednesday, April 4. .665% 7711 452| 212
Thursday, April 5. .65%1 1561 4401 313

Turpentine at Londen.
1906 1906 1901 1903
Stock Mar. 17. .22,976& 10,681 19,665 30,136
Del'd this wk.. 1l,55b 1,547 1,381 1,011
Sinct Jan. 1..17,058 16,973 20,264 16,537
s. d. s. d. s. d. s.d.
Price Mar. 19.. 47 3 38 3 41 9 44 3
July December 44 6 35 9 40 36 9
Savannah ...... 60e 521 57c. 65c.


S(a) includes 728 French; (b) includes 50
IFrench.
Reported by James Watt & Son.
Rosin for the Week at Savannah.
Monday, April 2.-Rosin-Nothing doing,
receipts 340; shipments 1388; stock, 4,-
269. Quotations: A, B, C, D, E, F, $3.85;
G $3.90; H $4.20; I $4.45; K $g70; M
$5.25; N $5.30; WG $5.45; WW $5.60.


Tuesday, April 3.-Rosin firm; ales 1,-
860; receipts 1,682; shipments 107; stock,
43,844. Quote: A, B, C, D, F, $3.85;
G $3.90; H $4.20; I $4.35; K $4.56; M
$5.10; N $5.15; WG $5.30; WW $5.45.


Wednesday, April 4.-Rosin, steady; no
sales; receipts, 1,179; shipments 473;
stock, 44,550. Quotations: A, B, C, D, E,
F, $3.85; G $3.90; H $4.20; I $4.35; K
$4.55; M $5.10; N $5.15; WG $5.30; WW
$5.45.
Thursday, April 5.-Rosin dull; sales
175; receipts 572; shipments, 745; stock,
44,377. Quote: A, B, C, D, E, F, $3.85;
G $3.90; H $4.20; I $4.35; K $4.55; M
$5.10; N $5.15; WG $5.30; WW $5.45.


H. E. PRITCHETT, Pres. P. L. SUTHERLAND, Vice-Pres. A. D. OOVINGTON, See'y.
J. P. COUNCIL, Treas and Gen'l Mgr.

THE OOUNOIL TOOL 00O.
General Offices: JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Factory: WANNANISH, N. C.

Manufacturers of High Graie Tools
fee Nawalrw O ae ai..



VIRGIN TIMBER.
Several tracts of 8,000 acres to 35,000 acre and
several good turpentine places already open

OFFERED FOR SAIL
HEDRICK'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY.


112 West rrsyth Street.


JACKSOuVKLIE IFLOMO


S CARN, Prm- *W._C. THtwMiaagse. '


ITampa 1 hardware o.


Wholesale

Hardware

* Turpentine, Mill end Phosphate Supplies.


TAMPA. FLORIDA.
eI l 8812 gu( t l oe l Io e o8 eu u|il o Os3s OO I* o o o144


B. B. TATUM, Pre.


J. L WALLA CE, Vice-PreA. H. G. T801M Seey-Tras.


Keeley Irvstitute,
Itow--a WIs 2S.000 CaptaJ stoh.
A branch of the original Leslie E. Keeley Institute of Dwi" t, II, ba just bael
opened at corner of Park and Stockton Streets in Rivrside, ws b a saplir
building, equipped with all the comforts and conveienees of a moder bia or
sanitarium has been secured and is ready for the reception of pati*b ia Used i
treatment for-
WHISKEY, OPIUM, MORPHINE, COCAINE, TOBACCO OR CIGAR TTZ HABITS
Write for full information as to treat meant, terms, etc.

KEELEY INSTITUTE OF FLORIDA.


Telephone No. 1553-


jm 1Mh


The Wilson Still Ahead of All ers
The Wilson Still Ahead of All Others


1101112EMs. ^ AM SEVERAL
. NORTH OTHERS
LUMBER CO.

WOLF RIVER
COMPANY.
Cutvs Miss,
POWELL, DUR, I LSO N)
HAM & CO., 10 to 30bbl cap
Fenton, Miss. always on had
PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN ORDERS FOR REPAIR.
W K. WILSON, 827 Tchoupitoulas Street,
SWN NEW ORLEANS, LA.





Sl TB3 WUMTLY IDWBERIAL WOOPD.


Jacksonville Grocery Comp'y
W. ...- WlhoAlle flesw and Distiller"' Supplies.
.. Ofase m wrOeaf f"w Vae&ot A IA. 0 K. L Bme e.k
mA


Standard Electric Co.,


JACKSONVILLE,


- FLA.


THE ARAGON
%* JACKSONVILLE. FIA.
NOW OPEN
Under new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
eluding new electric elevator and our
own electric light plant.
H. N. O'NEAL. Prop.


The White Steam-Car

IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN
AUTOMOBILES
Call on us and allow us to demonstrate the WHITE
It is the car for service, will run in the sand or on any
kind of road. You dent wait to get up steam.


Pillsbury & Batchelder,


NEXT FIRE STATION,
RIVERSIDE.


TM OLDonWr wNVHSIlr OUI s a I
EOImGIA. (IMtablimhed i 1a81.)
OLD SHARP WILLIAMS-Pure Fine Old
Rye. B the allon $.; tour full quarts
$. -e. exre prep.id
GEO. J. COLEMAN-Pure Pennsylvanta
Rye; Rich and Mellow. By the gallon
-.7S; four full quarts 3.6, express prepaid.
ANVIL RYB-Pure Substantial Family
Whiskey. By the gallon .60:; four full
quarts 0.90. express prepaid.
CLIePORD RTE-By the gallon 2.X5;
four full quarts I.S, express prepaid.
OLD KENTUCKY CORN-Direct from
Bonded Warehouse; fine and old. By the
atllon 3.00; four full quarts 3$.s0 exprem
prepaid.
OLD POINTER CLUB CORN Rich
and Mellow. By the gallon .50; tour funl
quarts 3..0. express prepaid
We handle all the leading brands of Rye and Bourbon Whke In the market
and will ave you from a to Us per cent on your purchases. Send for price list and
aetalogue. Mailed free upon application.
The Altmayer a Flatau Liquor Company
MACON. GEORGIA.



L R. PEETE & CO.
BROKERS


Stocks, Bonds, Cotton, Grain and


Now oft. "aY MWi ocea


Provisions


Orders executed for cash a carried as mrg,
Cerrespudests-M. J. Sage & Co., ec., 42 Broadway, N. Y.
nDRZCT PRIVA! WRlES.
PhCe 01. JacK
Refresce rmerlr Bank.


DIAMONDS AND WATCHES 1
We simply ask a call. We can show yoe, at correct a- moey
saving prices, many papers of loose pare white, perfect
DIAMONDS. it Is oor desire to costlne bel the largest
Diamond dealers in Jacksieville, and ar specialty Is fine romd-
cot gems and ligh-grade Waltham and Elgin Watches.
Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry,
HESS & SLAGER "11"13" W. c 3U. Je^ .1R


NM. A. Baker,
MVTOR AND MAMrACTUMRC Or TEW
Baker Improved
Seamless Turpen
tine Stills.
Write me fo pries ad ourt1S
P. .any ~ o eia. Flio-
I. Alabama or Missisippi. All
tills mold under a smacnee.
JOB WORK
The as me Centy a Specy.
The Lar. ad Oldest C pprO Brunswicp, per
Works in GMy e la. ciBr nsw k i ea
Or My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do om leak.
1-B I61 G 88I*BBIS88 8 881994111 **********lrrr


Standard Clothing Company


One Price -,e One Price


FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
17 mad #9 West Bay Street, Jacksouvile, Faie
Stetson and Hawes Hat. Special Attention Given to Mail Ordes.
m mm mmm s mmm m m ..... .... ...


Atlantic Coast Line
-THROUGH SCHEDULE--
FLORIDA, GEORGIA. ALABAMA, VIRGINIA,
NORTH CAROLINA, SOUTH CAROIJNA
The Great Highway of Travel between
FLORIDA, the EAST, WEST, NORTH and SOUTH
CONVENIENT SERVICE ELEGANT PULLMAN EQUIPMENT, MAGNIFICENT DINING CAR
NEW YORK AND FLORIDA SPECIAL
Route of the .DIXIE FLYER."
Celebrated FLORIDA AND WEST INDIAN LIMITED
Traains MONTGOMERY. L. a N.
CHICAGO AND FLORIDA LIMITED
CONVENIENT NEXTOD OF TRAVELING
Atlantic Coast Line one thousand me tets good over teen tImnmiles of
railroad, embracing al portions of Soth on sale t all prinpal agen3. at te of
5 each. Limited to one ear from date of purchase. Fo full. complete ad relible
information regarding rates, schedules Pullman service, etc., calion Atlantle Coat Line
Ticket Agent, or write
FRANK C. sOYLSTON., W 0. STAM. Trawts Pass. aSt
Dist Pass. AS. 13 t, Iy Street. JACClKNWILLE, A.
K. M. EMERSON. Gen 'l Traf fi Mgr.


1


R







THE WEBKLY INDUITPATL RUKCOD. M

"PFlorida's Greatest Carpet Store" "A Home Furnished By Us Is Up-to-date"
Complete Stock of Carpets, Mattings, Rugs. Shades. Etc

Savage 8. Whitford Carpet Company
131 West Bay Street, Jacksonville

ACTIVITY IN GAINESVILLE. would be completed in ample time for the
--- opening of the university here.
University Bailding S& ertAe System- The contract specifies that both build-
Shorthorn Cattle-New Notes. ings must be completed on or before Sep-
Gainesville, April 6.-Every day brings tember 1 of the present year. Mr. Had-
a new turn in the real estate development low states that the contract will be carried
of Gainesville, a deal of some kindn being out if it becomes necessary to put on a 1
made which involves the transfer of prop- force both night and day.
erty, and in many instances considerable Sewerage System.
money is involved.
among they is involved.latest tran tons is the F. H. Beemann, of Louisville, Ky., who
purhas te f east half of the Seagle has the ontract for the system of sewes- Is the Paper you want. It is
block on North Universit street between age here, has arrived in the city and will
East Court and Ent C by B. be here until the system is completed, published daily and is from 12
Hampton, the consideration being $4,000, which will require about eight months.
ow the dee i i eoe in Mr. Beeman states that he will personally to 16 hours ahead of any other
sthe clerk's ohce dat the court houe, superintend the work, and that he will be-
the clerk's office at the court house. daily newspaper g Florida .. I
Mr. Hampton, who is already one of the gin soon as he can get his men and Florida
largest individual property owner in t material together, which will be about a
c iy, is utladipo t wners to th week. The contract provides for twelve
siams, hav ing within the past week made miles of sewerage, and the contract price
several valuable urches. He has faith will bea Year $25 Six M months
in Gainesville and its future, and is prow- Jackson, who recently purchased onths
gts t y e e n r tJackson, who recently purchased
Sthis fait by liberal expendites to from the Palmetto Stock Farm at Ocala
wards its deveopment a herd of registered Shorthorn cattle for
J. B. Gerald, who recently sold his fine a herd of registered Shorthorn cattle for
e East M n reet v, his farm near this city, received yesterday Full Telegraphic and Stock
home puc Easdt street to s. M. rvis, he first individual of the new herd, in the
strt, direct east of S twatr h shape of a young bu hl, s d rep If you want to keep
stand proposetlys to erec t another breanh, some an animal as has ever been seen here. reports. If you want to keep
modern dwelling. Mr. erld stated Thur Mr. Jackson has now eight head of regis- posted on the news, get the
mod dweling.horthorn stock, and proposes Metropolis.
ing as soon as the contractors could get raise some fine cattle.Metropos.
the material together.
Univerity Bailings. I will pay $25.00 for the arrest and de-
W. T. Hadlow, president of the W. T. livery to me of T. Williams, colored,
Hadlow Company, contractors, Jackson- height about five feet six inches, weight
ville, who is here temporarily superintd- 175 lbs; prominent sear on nse. Williams C AER & RL P. C *
ing the work of erecting the university is a dark brown negro and wears a small
buildings, states that progress on the bild- mustache. WM. E. HUTSON, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
ings is very encouraging, and that the Deputy Sheriff,
two buildings specified in the contract t Ocala, Marion County, Fla. i .C6Som.%"~m .C6m6.m ..B.6..
A ^t ^------------------ --------- -----------...


The


Cooperage


Company


Manufacturers of High Grade

Western White Oak Spirit Barrels


Capital $200,000.

JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Orders sent
We are now


direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.
prepared to furnish barrels from six shops advantageously located.


OFFICERS:,


J. C. LITTLE, Preeident.
E. H. MOTE, general Manager.



JOHN E. HARRIS, Vice-President.
C. H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasurer.


J. C. LITTLE,


JOHN E. HARRIS,
W. C. POWELL,


DIRECTORS:
C. H. BARNES,
W. F. COACHMAN.


J. W. WEST,
E. H. MOTE.


I ---- - - -- - --- I - -%


W. J. KELLY









1t THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

Sf
Success'for Our Customers


Is Success


COVINGTON


for Us.


COMPANY,


SHOES. DRY GOODS, W holes le
NOTIONS. Wholesal


JACKSONVILLE.


FLORIDA.


WILL DEEPEN CANAL.
The F. E. C. Railway Digging From Indian
River to the Prairies.
The Fort Pierce News in its issue of
last Friday, contains the following:
"The people of this section have been
anxiously awaiting some movement on the
part of the land departments of the rail-
road and canl, toward the deepening and
proper completion of the drainage canal,
trom the Indian River to the prairie coun-
try west of town. When this work was
begun over a year ago, it was hoped it
would be successful in disposing of the
superfluous water in the back country and
would enable the owners of property in
that section to proceed with its develop-
ment.
"The work was not done satisfactorily,
as the fall was not sufficient to carry off
the water with any degree of rapidity,
and it was not deep enough to drain the
vast prairie, which is very fertile, and
would produce the finest kind of vegeta-
bles, potatoes, etc., if properly drained.
The land department of the Florida East
Coast Railway Company now proposes to
increase the depth of the canal several
feet, so the bottom will be at least three
feet below the level of the prairie, and
make a gradual fall, all the way down to
the edge of town, where there is a dis-
tinct drop and at present a decided rapids
in the little stream.
"To those who have watched the effect
of the work already don there is no doubt
but that this canal can be made to do the
work of draining the country west of Fort
Pierce, provided the remainder of the work
is properly dome. Civil Engineer New-
lander has run the levels twice and made
a profile of the canal, and he says there
is ample fall to carry off any amount of
water, except occasionally when there is
a big continued rain, and then it will only
remain for a few days. On his visit here
last week he was anxious to let the con-
tract for deepening the canal to some local
parties and it i likely that this ill be
done. Mule teams, with plows and scrap-
ers, could possibly be used with good effect,
the dirt being taken out every ten rods.
It cannot be done by hand, as before, as
the dirt will have to be thrown too high.
A small dredge was proposed, but the
width at the bottom would almost preclude
this, as the dredge would be too small to
sustain an arm long enough to swing the
dirt over the present high banks.
"It is to be hoped that some method
will be devised and that the work will be-
gin soon and be completed before mid-sum-
mer. Nothing will do this section more
good than the completion of this drainage
canal, in a manner that will satisfactorily
accomplish what it was originally designed
to do."
To Erect Fertilizer Plant.
The Jefferson Fertilizer Co., of Birming-
ham, Ala., reported last week as incorpo-
rating with a capital stock of $250,000,
will erect a fertilizer plant to cost $150,-
000. The plant will include an acid plant
and fertilizer buildings for the manufac-
ture of sulphuric acid, acid phosphate and
complete fertilizers. It will be furnished
and erected by the N. P. Pratt laboratory
of Atlatna, Ga. Officers of the Jefferson
Fertilizer Co. are Messrs. J. G. Whitfeld,
resident; J. W. Donnelly, vice-president;
Henry B. Gray, secretary and treasurer.


THE HEW TRAVELERS HOTEL
H. W. HANCOCK, Prop.
JACKSON VILLE, FLA.
Ibis aetel Ias been newly decorated. re-
modeled and retfrmlsked. Convenient and
most desirable rooms s the city. Excellent
Table asd reasonable rates.


Trade Checks
FOR THE

COMMISSARY BUSINESS.
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD man-
factures more of them than all the print-
ing and office supply houses in the South
combined.
Industrial Record Go.


Kohn


THE BOND & BOURS CO.
WHOLESALE & RI TAIL

H HARDWARE
SASH, DOORS, BLINDS, PAINTS.
Oils, Glass, Stoves, Tinware, Country Holloware.


0 WES DAY STREET.


JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED LONG LEAF


Yellow Pine Lumber

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload
Steamer Shipments a Specialty.
WATERTOWN. FLORIDA


Lots


= Company.


= Furchgott


WHOLESALE DEALERS IN

Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS OVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JAKSONVILLE, FLA.








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 15


FIFTH AVENUE HOTEL
Madison Square, New York.
American Plan $5 per day. European Plan $2.00 per day
The most famous representative hotel
in America. New as the newest, always
fresh and elear. The location in Madison
Square is the finest in the city.
HITCHCOCK. DARLING f COMPANY.
---- -------jkEtaS3B1U3t^^^


*,*uluIluOUWuiu EuuIu~uu*WuuUmumU Uii uwmm i usew'


J. W. Motte
President.


C. B. Parkel
Vice-Pres.


James McNatt.
Vice-Pres.


W. W. Wilder,
Sec. & Treas.


John R. Young Co.,


Commission

Merchants.


Lombard Iron Works
and Supply Company
BUILDERS AND DEALERS IN


ENGINES, BOILERS.
Cotton, Saw, Fertilizer, Oil and lee Ma-
chinery, and Supplies and Repairs.
Capacity for 200 Hands.
Machine Tools. Wood-Working Machinery,
Shafting, Pulleys, Hangers, Leather and
Rubber Belting and Hoe, Railroad and
Mill Supplies and Tools.
Plans and estimates furnished for Power
Plants and Steel Bridges.
Steam Pumps. Feed Water Heaters and
Hoisting Engines.
AUGUSTA. GEORGIA.

JOSEPH ZAPF & CO.


Sam'IP.Holmes&Co.
Stocks, Bends, Cotten,
Grain and Provisions

NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE
Direct private wires to all exchanges.
Local stocks and bonds a specialty.


BeU Phone 853


Baldwin Bock


Windsor Hotel


Naval Stores factors. Wholesale Grocers.


Savmauunah dX Brunswick. Ga.


UUooosiUlr ui5UldUUUUOriiUrruiui i*Ulu'UuuUU5IUUUUl ui5.


B. W. BLOUNT,
President.


G. A. PETTEWAY,
Vice-Presdent.


A. C. BACON,
Secy & Treas.


PENINSULAR NAVAL STORES CO.
Capital, $500,000.00.
Successors to TIMMONS-BLOUNT CO.
Naval Stores Factors and Commission Merchants.
SDALERS I Turpentine Operators' Supplies
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION
Flat Savannah Prices paid for Rosin and Turpentine, lesa
Customary Charges.
CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED.
Offices-American National Bank Bldg., Tampa, Fla.
Yards, Port Tampa City.
yuywyu3fwyyw XX9ayw X3wywsy0 yg *90^^55UyIc5**SY *


J. S. Schofield's Sons Company,
*********** OeO****e **.-**********,**********
SHeadquarters for
.f Distiller's Pumping
I Outfit. ?
No plant complete without one.
t Hundreds of them in use in Georgia,
SFlorida, Alabama, Mississippi and *
S* South Carolina. Write us for p4rticu-
4 lars and prices. We also manufacture
+ f Engines, Boilers and High
S Grade Machinery,
Sas well as carry a full and complete 4
--stockof--
SMill Supplies, Pipe,
*i 4 Boiler Tubes, Etc..
rK* Advise your wants.
4 44i Macon, Georgia.
SA Leaim Specidty f sa
10. of Tks Wwk for TerpatkSeterse Pwpses
*.e~o*e.~ee.*O..e.O.*e~s@4mOeO.*s~eeO.O.*.O. O.~OsOe@


4
4


*


Jacksorvlle's Finest
and Florida' LargUet
and Best Year-Round
Hotel.
DODGE & CULLENS
Owners and Proprietors

H. ROBINSON, Pres H. GAILLARDCashier
W. B. OWEN. Vice-Pres.

Commercial Bank,
State Depository.
BRANCHns: Ocala. Fla., Lake City, Fla
Jacksonville, - - Florida


FOR SALE
Lease on 125 thousand acres virgin
TURPENTINE TIMBER
Best tract is the Republic of Mexic
Address Apartado Postal No. 8 MWreCIa
Mic., Mexico

EVERYTHING IN
SEALS, RUBBER STAMPS AND STENCILS
Made to Order Six to Twelve Hour.
Florida Rubber Stamp Works


224 Main Street.


z4 Wet Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


The CLOTHIERS

EVERYTHING THAT IS GOOD AND
SMART IN WEARING APPAREL FOR
WEN AND BOYS.

HUTCHINSON AUDIT CO.

Public Accountants & Auditors


Board of Trade Building


Jacksonville, rl.


Coons & Golder

Turpentine Operators on

Pipe, Boilers and Pumps
Expert Mechanics and Plubers


22 W. Adams Street


Jacksosville, Fla.


Phone 1147


Cay, Shine & McCall
FIRE INSURANCE.


Jacksuw.l, FI. 212 Dyal-Upchurek BldZ


Wholesale Dealers in and Bottlers of
ANHEUSER-BUSCH
St. Louis Lager Beer
Wholesal
Liquors, Wines, Mineral Waters
Write for Prices
JACKSONVILEE, FLORIDA



Florida


Electric Co.

Contracting Electrical Engineers
Sell and Install Complete Electric Light
and Power Plants, Telephone Ex-
changes. Wholesale Electric
Supplies.
Jacksonville, Fla.


0


Plme 312


PhIme g55











16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Buyers' Directory

If you want anything loos
through this classified list ank
write to the firm appearing
therein. The Record guaranteed
a prompt response.


AUTOMOBILES.
Pillsbury & Batehelder, Jacksonville, Fl.
ACCOUNTANTS.
T. G. Hutchinson, Jacksonville, Fa.
BANKS.
Commercial Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
National Bank of Jacksonville.
Florida Bank and Trust Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
BOXES AND CRATES.
Cummer Lumber Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
BRICK.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jack-
sonville, Fla.
CARPETS AMD MATTING
Savage & Whitford, Jacksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING.
Craig & Bro, J. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Stuart-Bernstein Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furehgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
COOPERAGE.
Cooperage Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS.
Wm. D. Jones, Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS-WHOLESALE.
Christie; Groover Drug Co., Jacksonville,
Fla
DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
ELECTRIC SUPPLIES.
Florida Electric Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Electric Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGINES.
Lombard Iron Works and Supply C.,
Augusta, Ga.
Merill-Stevena Co, Jacksonville, Fl.
Schoeld's Sons Co., J. 8, Macon, Ga.
FERTILIZERS.
Bours & Co, Wm. A. Jacksonville, F.
FOUNDRIES.
Schofield' Sons Co, J. 8, Macon, Ga.
FUEL
Southern Fuel & Supply Co. The, Jack-
sonville, Fla.
FURNITURE.
Fetting Furniture Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
GENTS' FURNISHERS.
Craig & Bro., J. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Stuart-Bernstein Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
Consolidated Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fa.
Jacksonville Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fa.
Williams Co., J. P, Savannah, Ga.
Young Co., John R, Savannah, Ga.
HATS-WHOLESALLE
Kohn, Furchgott & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
HARDWARE.
Bond & Bours Co. The, Jacksonville, Fl.
Briggs, W. H., Hardware Co., Valdosta, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa. Fla.
Weed & Co., J. D., Savannah, Ga.
HAY AND GRAIN.
Bours & Co, Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fl.
HATS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Stuart-Bernstein Co., Jacksonville, Fla.


HOTELS.
Travelers' Hotel, Jacksonville, Fig.
Duval Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
Aragon The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Fifth Avenue Hotel, New York, N. Y.
St. George, Jacksonville, Fla.
Everett Hotel, Jacksonville, Fa.
Windsor Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
Windle Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla
IRON WORKS.
Lombard Iron Work & Supply Co, Au-
gusta, Ga.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
INSURANCE.
Prudential Life, Walter P. Corbett, Mgr.
Jacksonville, Fla.
Cay, Shine & McCall, Jacksonville, Fla.
JEWELERS.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
R. J. Riles & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
KEELEY INSTITUTES.
Keeley Institute, Jacksonville, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Blum & Co., Chas., Jacksonville, Fla.
Altmayer & Flatau Liquor Co., Macon, Ga.
Joseph Zapf & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Greater New York Sample Room, Jackson-
ville, Fla.
MEDICINES.
Spencer Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tenn.
Southern Drug Manufacturing Co., Jack-
sonville, Fla.
MACHINE WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR TURPENTINE PRO-
CESS.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
METAL WORKERS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick. Ga.
McMillan Bros., Jacksonville, Fla.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Sehofleld's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co, J. D, Savannah, Ga.
NAVAL STORES.
Peninsular Naval Stores Co., Tampa, Fla.
Barnes & Jessup Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Consolidated Naval Store Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
Standard Naval Stores Co, Jacksonville,
Fla.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
West-Flynn-Harris Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
Young Co., John R, Savannah, Ga.
Jacksonville Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville.
Fil.
PAINTS.
Bond & Bours Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
PLUMBERS.
Coons & Golder, Jacksonville, Fla.
PUMPS.
Merrill-Stevens Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
REAL ESTATE.
Stockton, J. N. C., Jacksonville, Fla.
Brobeton, Fendig & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Livingston & Sons, J. H., Ocala, Fla.
Hedrick Real Estate Agency, Jacksonville,
Fla.
SEEDS.
Bours & Co., Win. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
SHIP YARDS.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Merrill-Steven s Co., Jacksonville, Fl.
SHOES-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Joe. Rosenheim & Sons, Savannah, Ga.
STEAMSHIPS.
Clyde Steamship Co. The, New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Holmes & Co., Samuel P, Jacksonville,


Fla.
Miller & Company, Jackonvle, Fla.
L. R. Peete & Co., Jacksonville. Fla.
TALKING MACHINES.
Metropolitan Talking Machine Co., Jack-
sonville, Fla.
TANKS.
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
TURPENTINE APPARATUS.
Chattanooga Pottery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
TURPENTINE STILLS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
W. K. Wilson, New Orleans, La.


TuRPEal Jm STILL TUBS.
Davis & Son, G. M, Palatka, Fla.
TURPENTINE VATS
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka. Fla.
TURPENTINE TOOLS.
Council Tool Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
WATCHES.
R. J. Riles, Jacksonville, Fla.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
YELLOW PINE LUMBER.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
East Coast Lumber Co., Watertown, Fla.


The Clyde Steamship Company


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
The magnificent steamships of this line are appointed to sail aa follows, calling at
Charleston, 8 C., both ways.


From New York,
(Pier 36 North River.)


Saturday,
Tuesday,
Wednesday,
Friday,
Saturday,
Tuesday,
Wednesday,
Friday,
Saturday,
Tuesday,
Wednesday,
Friday,
Saturday,
Tuesday,
Wednesday,
Friday,


From Jn andevie fork
STEAMER. Charleston and New Yort


Friday March 30, at 9:30am
Sunday, April 1, at 10:30am
Monday, April 2, at 11:00am
Wednesday, April 4, at 12:00n'
Friday, April 6,at 1:00pm
Sunday, April 8, at 6:00am
Monday, April 9, at 6:00am
Wednesday, April ll, at 7:30am
Friday, April 13,at 9:30am
Sunday, April 15, at 10:30am
Monday, April 16, at 11:30am
Wednesday, April 18, at 12:30pm
Friday, April20, at 1:00pm
Sunday, April 22, at 6:00am
Monday, April 23, at 6:30am
Wednesday, April 25,at 7:30am


March 24, at 3:00pm .IROQUOIS...
March 27, at3:00pm ..APACHE......
March 28, at 3:00pm ..HURON. .....
March 30, at 3:00pm ..ARAPAHOE...
March 31, at 3:00pm ..*ALGONQUIN.
April 3,at3:00pm ..COMANCHE..
April 4,at3:00pm IROQUOIS....
April 6,at3:00pm ..APACHE .....
April 7, at 3:00pm ..*HURON......
April 10, at 3:00pm ..ARAPAHOE..
April 11, at 3:00pm .. ALGONQUIN.
April 13, at 3:00pm .COMANCHE..
April 14, at 3:00pm *IROQUOIS...
April 17, at 3:00pm ..APACHE.....
April 18, at 3:00pm .. HURON......
April 20, at 3:00pm ..ARAPAHOE..


"-Boston via Brunwick and Charleston. xFreight only. *-Bestem via
Charleston. "*-Boston via Charleston and New York. I-To New York direct.

THE CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
Direct Service Between Jacksonville, Boston and Providence and al Eastern Points,
Calling at Charleston both Way.
SEMI-WEEKLY SAILINGS.
Southbound.. ............................ From Lewis Wharf, Boston.
Northbound .................. .. From foot of Catherine Street, Jacksonville.

CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
Between Jacksonville and Sanford.
Stopping at Palatka, Astor, St. Francis, Beresford (DeLand) and intermediate
landings on St. Johns River.

STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
and "FRED'K DeBAR Y"
Are appointed to sail as follows: Leave Jacksonville daily, except
Saturday, at 3:30 p. m. Returning, leave Sanford daily, except Sun-
days, at 9:30 a. m.
OIJUm y IL,. DvUJ..J. DD.m1r


Read down


I Read up.


a 30 "... i e 2


Leave 3:30p. m .................... Jacksonville ................ Arrive 2:00a.m.
Leave 8:45p.m. ................... Palatka .................. Leave 8:00p. m.
Leave 3:30a.m .................... Astor .................. Leave 2:30 p. m.
Leave 4:30a.m................... St. Francis .................. Leave 1:00p. m.
................ ............. Beresford (DeLand) .............. Leave 12:00noon
Arrive 8:30 a.m.................... Sanford ................... Leave 9:30a.m.
Arrive 10:00 a.m .................. Enterprise ................. Leave 10:00 a. m
GENERAL PASSENGER AND TICKET OFFICE, 122 W. BAY ST, JACK'VILLE.
F. M. IRONMONGER, JR., Asst. Gen. Pass. Agent. 122 W. Bay St. Jackson- .le. Fla.
W. G. COOPER, JR., Frt. Agt., Jack'ville. C. P. LOVELL, Superintendent, Jack'vffle.
Foot Hogan Street, Jacksonville.
L C. HAGGERTY, G. E. P. A, New York. CLYDE MILNE, G. F. A., New York.
THEO. G. EGER, WM. P. CLYDE & CO,
General Manager. Gemnral Acnta,
Chesebrough Building, 19 State Street, New York.









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 1'


Jacksonville Will Have Another Important

Street Car Line.


Jacksonville is to have a new street car
line and when the County Commissioners
at their regular monthly meeting this
week granted the right of way, the first
ntep towards the building of the line was
taken.
Mr. George W. Clark, the owner of Pan-
ama Park, and other prominent business
men who have associated themselves with
him, will build the road. The new line
will extend from the intersection of Main
street and the city limits, run along Main
street to Lawton avenue at Panama Park,
then east on Lawton avenue to Buffalo
avenue, to Virginia street, then to Cum-
mer's road and thence south along this
road to Talleyrand avenue, to the city
limits.
The value of such a road, both for pleas-
ure and convenience, can hardly be over-
estimated. This the County Commission-
era realized, and, after the formal petition
for the right of way had been presented,
granted the request of Mr. Clark, after
only a short discussion.
Mr. Clark thanked the Board for its ac-
tion and announced later that work on the
line would be started as soon as certain
details had been rounded out.
Mr. Clark's Petition.
The petition of Mr. Clark for the right
of way as presented to the Commissioners,
reads as follows:
"To the Board of County Commissioners:
"Gentlemen-Your petitioner, George W.
Clark, for himself and associates, respect-
fully represents to your honorable body
that they are desirous of forming a com-
pany for the purpose of erecting, operat-
ing and maintaining a car line, to be pro-
pelled by electricity, steam or other motive
power, for the carrying of freight, or pas-
sengers, or both, along, over, and upon
the following roads or highways within
the limits of Duval county:
"Extending from the intersection of the
city limits and Main Street, thence along


Main Street to Lawton avenue, at Panama
Park, thence easterly on Lawton avenue
to Buffalo avenue, to Virginia street, to the
county road, commonly known as the Cum-
mer road, and thence south along the said
road to Talleyrand avenue, to the city
limits.
The Right of Way.
'That the said car line should be of
great service, convenience and accomoda-
tion to all the residents lying along the
proposed road. or contiguous thereto, and
your petitioner respectfully requests your
honorable Ibdy to grant him a and his asso-
ciates a right of way over the above county
roads, or highways, and to use them for
the construction, operation and mainte-
nance of the said car line.
"And the right of way and the privilege
to place poles along the said highway, on
either side thereof, for the purpose of
springing wires and such other appliances
as may be necessary for the operation of
the said road.
"Respectfully, George W. Clark."
The petition was granted on the condi-
tions that nothing was done to obstruct
the said roads, or highways, or to inter-
fere with their use by the public. The
car line must be placed on one side of the
road only, as is the present car line to
phoenix Park.
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO APPLY
FOR REMOVAL OF DISABILITIES.
Notice is hereby given that Lizzette G.
Robinson, of Duval County, Florida, in-
tends to apply to the Honorable R. M.
Call, judge of the Circuit Court of Duval
County, Florida, on May 8th, 1906, for a
license to manage, take charge of and
control her property and separate estate,
and become a free dealer in every respect.
5t LIZZETTE G. ROBINSON.


C Y CYPRESS TANKS
Are Best by Every Test


Cypress withstads the effects of beat and moisture
better than any other wood, shrink and swells less
than other woods, is impervious to acids, ho'd paint
well and lasts for ages without decaying. Located
as we are, right in the great cypress forests, we are
able to secure the best selection of the wood and at
very low prices. We have been building tanks for
more than a quarter of a century and boldly assert
that no tanks are better built or will last longer.
Send for catalog and prices.
G. M. DAVIS ft SON
PALA T A, FLO RIDA


w


The Duvyal

Cor. Forsyth and Hogan Streets.
Best Located, Hotel in the city. Steam Heat
and Electric Lights throughout the house,
Cuisine and Service unsurpassed in the State.
Regular Rates, $2.50 and Up.


* FRANK M. TURPIN, Prop., Jacksonville, Fla.


I You Want a Turpentine Location?
You Want a Sawmill Location?
You Want any Kind of Florida Land?
You Mean Business?
IF Coll on or Wrte to

J. H. Livingston & Sons,
OCALA. FLORIDA.
SLSK~iS6XX;33SiSS36XS6X3(XXXX9(X^^J


eff


Southern Machinery & Supply Co,
INCORPORATED.
Machinists and Engineers.
Engines, Boilers, Saw, Shingle, Planing a nd Veneer Mill Machinery. Corliss n-
gines, Water Tube Boilers, Pump s and Electric Outfits. Contract
for Complete Outfits a Special ty. Plans and estimates fur-
nished on application.


Home Office, Jacksonville, Fla.


Branch: .Tampa, Na.


Successful Men
appreciate, use and advise Life Insu-
rance. The advice of successful men
is worth following. Insure in


THE PRUDENTIAL


WALTER P. CORBETT, Manager.
409 West sBIe.. Jacksonvilne, Fla.


INSURANCE COMPANY
01F AMERICA.


JOHN F. DRYDEN, Pres.
neme Office Newark, NJ


PLANTERS


"Old Time" Remedies

THE JOY Of THE HOUSEHOLD.
These four great remedies, HNbian Tea, Benedicta, Cuban relief
and Cuban Oil, are the joy of the household. With them near at hand, a IlfmM
Tea
man is ready for any emergency. He ha a safe, reliable and speedy relief miaasta
for wife, children, self or stock. With these remedies you can keep the Cubn
doctor's hands out of your pockets, and yet have a healthy, happy famiy. Itr
Besides, you can cure your stock of any ailment that may befall them. ______
MUBIAN TEA-In Liquid or Powder Form-Is the great family medicine. It
will cure all forms of Liver and Kidney Complaints, Prevents Chills and Malarial
Fever. Cures the common ailments of children; and as a laxative tonic it is without
an equal-safe and reliable. In the liquid, it i extremely palatable-even children
like it-and it is READY FOR USE.
BENEDICTA is a woman's medicine. It will cure all the diseases common to
women, and classed as Female Troubles. It will bring youth back to the laded woman,
who has gone one suffering because she thought it woman' lot. It will eare for the
young girl just entering womanhood; and prepare the young woman ror the sacred
duties of wife and mother.
CUBAN RELIEF-The instant Paint Killer, for either man or beast. Relieves
instantly, Colic, Cramps, Cholera Morbus, Diarrhoea, Dystentery and Sick Headache.
For colic in horse it is an infallible remedy and is guaranteed to give relief in five
minutes.
CUBAN OIL-The Best Bone and Nerve Liniment. Is antiseptic for eats,
snagged or torn flesh, and will instantly relieve the pain. Cures insect bites and stings,
scalds and burns, bruises and sores, chapped hands and face, ore and tender feet.
Relieves rheumatic pains, lame back, stiff joints, and in stock cures wire fence cuts,
scratches, thrush, splint, collar sores, saddle galls, and diseased hoofs.
Write us for Prices.
SPENCER MEDICINE CO., Chattanooga, Ten.



SA Few Bargains

9,000 acres virgin timber. Lies in solid body immediately :
Supon transportation; estimated to cut 40 boxes, and 2,500 feet
lumber per acre.
S 38,000 acres part virgin, part boxed, estimated to cut 3,500
: feet merchantable lumber per acre.
S A number of desirable turpentine locations at right prices.
25,900 acres virgin timber, lies in solid body, estimated to cut
100 boxes and 7,000 feet of merchantable lumber per acre.


SBrobston, Fendig & Company
SJACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA 216 W. Forsyth Street


1 glles 11tlrtl e I IIr weiTrireeeii IT *eeeaewwl uvl el

FLORIDA BANK & TRUST COMPANY.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
CAPITAL-One Millito Dellars.


General Banking.


49 on Savings Deposits.


Executes trusts of all kinds.


C. E. GARNER, President.
C. B. ROGERS, Vice-President.
G. J. Avent, Asst. Cashier.


A. F. PERRY, Vice-President.
W. A. REDDING, Cashier.
F. P. FLEMING, Jr., Trust Officer.


I- Y


- -- -- --









18 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


ATTRACTING ATTENTION ABROAD.
Flrida Sponge Situation Referred to by
New York Paper.
The Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter, of
New York, comments as follows on the
Florida sponge situation:
The Turkish government's action in
closing the Mediterranean beds has caused
a large number of the Greek fishermen
to invade our Florida waters, where they
have succeeded in making some very large
catches. The Florida State Legislature
has been appealed to in the matter, and it
is hoped that this may result in the clos-
ing of the Florida fisheries for a season,
as it is believed that the beds there will
soon be depleted if unrestricted gather-
ing of sponge by the Greek fishermen con-
tinues, and largely destroyed, as has been
the case in Mediterranean waters, unless
prompt action is taken by the government.
A drop in the Florida market has taken
place since the arrival of the Greeks, some
500 in number, who are intent on exploit-
ing the deeper waters of the Gulf in quest
of the Valuable Rock Island sheepswool
sponge. The Greeks continue the old
world method of diving in regulation div-
ing suits, as accustomed to do in the Med-
iterranean Sea, and have met with remark-
able success so far in Florida waters.
One craft on a twenty-one days' trip gath-
ered twelve hundred bunches, or about six
thousand dollars' worth of sponge. The
old Florida sponge hookers are naturally
very much alarmed over the influx of so
many Greek fishermen, and some express
tue opinion that a serious clash will occur
thi summer if these conditions continue,
as the vocation of the Florida fishermen
is in jeopardy. Should new beds of sheeps-
wool sponge be discovered by the Greek
deep-water divers, it will doubtless cause
an easier tone to the market and lower
prices, while the closing of the Mediter-
ranean beds will tend to stiffen the market


________c ~ ~ ~rW1I~~;~T,~~ ~af~i ~ C~3j~~


The


Palmer Manufacturing Co.


of Charleston, S. C.


Offers to the Turpentine Operators of Georgia.

Florida and Alabama one hundred thousand to

three hundred thousand spirits of turpentine bar-

rels during the present season as the demand

may require, at prices that defy competition.


First Class Guaranteed White Oak Spirits Barrels Com- ;


plying Strictly with rules B. of T. Savannah, Ga.


Sl Ijr.-10perators should make no contracts or buy any barrels until they get our prices.
"REMEMBER WE SELL FOR LESS"


"Address G. J. SCOVEL, Jacksonville, Fla.


abroad. Under these conditions the sponge feeding year, because a proportion of the Fish Fertilier Factry.
market is at present in a very uncertain fertilizer employed goes ito the soil and
position. stays. The sub-soiling of green stuff, the The Manufacturers' Record advised
constant accretion of commercial and barn- that the Gulf Coast Fisheries Co., of Biloxi,
Farming in Florida. yard fertilizers, will raise the value of the Miss., recently incorporated with a capital
It is becoming generally recognized that soil. On the other hand, the naturally fer- stock of $20,000, will establish a plant for
tile soil of certain other sections will be
Florida is about the only State in the handled in a way to cause it to steadily the manufacture of fish scrap and fish oils,
country that has any really cheap land for deteriorate. It will be washed away by etc., to have a capacity of 50 tons per
farming purposes. This state of things is the storms, sapped of its itality by con- 10 hours. William Gorenflo is president;
due to two facts. One is that Florida has stant cropping without restoring the plant J. A. Broadus, secretary-treasurer, and the
never been regarded as a suitable region growing powerand eventually a balance
for profitable farming along those sub- will be established. Florida land will be American Process Co., of New York, engi-
stantial lines with which the farmers of always growing better and other land neer in charge.
the country generally are familiar. The growing poorer. The selling prices will at
other is that the balance of the land has some juncture be the same. The ensuingI A Typewriter Story.
been so assiduously sought and taken years will see the balance turn in favor
that there is none left that may be con- of Florida. and it will thereafter always A short time ago the idea was conceived
sidered cheap. It is gradually coming to continue that way. Our land will pro- by a few prominent men that the day
be known that staple farming can be con- duce two or three crops a year, while of the high-priced typewriter was a thing
ducted in Florida with more comfort and other land can be made to produce but one. of the past and like the bicycle met its
more profit than in those sections which -Tampa Times. Waterloo when the Postal Typewriter Co.
have herAtofore been regarded as superior, put out a $25.00 machine complete in ev-
People are learning that here may be Pineapple Lands. ery detail, universal keyboard, with 87
raised cattle, horses and hogs with as characters, the writing in sight all the
much or more facility than elsewhere. The spruce pine lands, regarded at one time; powerful manifolder and weighs
They are coming here in numbers to em- time as valueless, as far as agriculture 10% pounds. Agents wanted in every
bark in the production of live stock. The and horticulture are concerned, have town in Florida. $25.00 cash or $30.00
success of these will bring others, and proven their adaptabilityddress Postal Typewriter
so population will accumulate and the p o the isablit n e Agency, 21 Duval Bldg., Jacksonville,
prices of land will go higher-though not apples of the fist quality, and hundreds Fla.
for a long time to the extreme now pre- of acres are now yielding their owners sub- Wanted-Position as stiller. Can fur-
vailing in the more fertile States. The stantial annual incomes. Each year larger nish best of references. Write R. L. Dab
far mof the future in Florida will be a acreages are being utilized, and more per- ney, Prosperity, Fla. tf
large one, and the land is never very high manent improvements being made. To
in price until it is thickly occupied. When give a few specific examples, which are To the Stockholders of The Naval Stores
lands of Florida are covered with people always more convincing than general state- Export Company:
in the proportion that they will support, ments, one man in Orange Glade netted You are hereby notified that in accord-
when the cultivating people are fully oc- $2,200 for six acres of tomatoes. Another ance with the by-laws of The Naval
cupied, when the science of farming is ap- in Alapattah cleared $800 on one acre of Stores Export Company, the annual meet-
plied, when every acre is used for all there cucumbers. A well known Florida farmer ing of the stockholders of that Company
is in it, -when fertilizing and intense cul- received $2,176 for 473 crates of egg plants will be held in Jacksonville, Florida, on
tivation are the rule, then the price of and peppers. A man in Delray sold ninety- April 10th, 1906, at ten o'clock A. L, in
Florida land will go to a higher figure five crates of pineapples (taken from one- the Auditorium of the Board of Trade.
than anywhere else in the country. There fifth of an acre of land), for $118.56. A Your personal attendance at this meet-
is another point to be considered. Prop- fruit grower in Ancona netted $6,250 from ing is very much desired.
early handled, the land of Florndia becomes twelve acres of pineapples. Florida East X. P. THAGARD,
richer and more valuable with every sue- Coast has a brilliant future. Secretary.







U 111111 IIm a mm~liii maa ailim ama aammm... m


C. B. ROGERS, President. W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAMPLAIN, Vice-Presidents.
DIRECTORS: C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain, H. A. McEachern and J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonville;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $50o,ooo.


Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches in Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,

and Savannah, Ga.



The Consol-lated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company of Pensacola: the grocery br& wch of thK West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola: the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.





Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-

visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.




Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


q
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CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.

t
Branches Tampa. Fl.., Pensecolae. Flu., end Seveanneh. Ge.

... ... ...... ... .^ ... ... ... ... ... .. ... ... ... ... . aj * m i * r n


Consist of one Three-Story Building, 70x200; one two-story building. 50x390; one one-story building, 80x250,
making the largest space of any Company of the kind nl the South.


1111111~1111+111~~+)+1)1)111111+~++511~+






When in Jacksonville, Remember that

REENLEAF& CROSBY CO.
41 W. BAY STREET
HAVE THE LARGEST STOCK IN THIS SECTION OF

Diamonds, Precious Stones, Watches
Jewelry, Clocks, Silverware, Bronzes, Fine China, Objects ofArt
As they are the largest buyers they get the
BEST PRICE and are accordingly able to sell the
lowest. They invite a comparison of prices, I

They Give Mail Orders Prompt Attention.
WRITE NOW FORP A CATALOGUE.



Half Tones-Zinc Etchings

Illustrating and Engraving Department
OF
THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
Splendidly equipped foi business. Half Iones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of Commercial Work, Pamphlets. a
I SPEC111IY IS MDE OF D0SIG]il. REHOUCHIKG l1K EI1LISilKG PHOITGRItHS K1D PICTURES.
IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
GooD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED.

A Florida Enterprise. Try It.