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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00152
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: December 15, 1905
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00152
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text




UL


CORD


ESLY fAVAL VhToREs,

f OJVDTTRIAIS FiAMIAh
SGj rEWPAPER6)


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4


24


We are Getting Scores of Letters
Like the Following:
BRASWELL & BISHOP,
MANUFACTURERS OF NAVAL STOIREM.
LLOYD, FLA.. Dec. 12, 1905
Mr. Jas. A. Hollomon,
Editor Industrial Record.
Jacksonville, Fla.
Dear Sir--Enclosed please find draft for
$3.00, one year's subscription to the Industrial
Record.
We like your paper and we are satisfied
that it is doing lots of good.
Yours very truly,
BRASWELL & BISHOP.


Y-.-Zj





President, W. C. POWELL; Vice-Presidents, who with the President, constitute the Directors and Board of Managers, W. F. COACHMAN, B. F. BUL
LARD, H. L. COVINGTON, H. A. McEACHERN, JOHN R. YOUNG, J. A. CRANFORD, D.H. McMILLAN, C. DOWN-
ING. J. R. SAUNDERS, C. B. ROGERS; Auditor, JOHN HENDERSON.


CONSOLIDATED

NAVAL STORES

.. COMPANY.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

SAVANNAH, GA.

PENSACOLA, FLA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS


Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
Small Amount of Stock Yet in Reserve
to Sell to Operators Who Can Arrange to Buy.

The Consolidated is Purely a Cooperative Company. Its
Interests are identical with those of the Producers The
Patronage of Turpentine Operators everywhere Invited.
Plenty of Money and Plenty of Timber for Everybody.

Yards at Jacksonville, Savannah, Fernandina, Pensacola and Port Tampa

All Producers are Invited to Call or Correspond.











WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL


RECORD.


PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY. DEVOTED TO NAVAL STORES, LUMBER AND MANUFACTURING INTERESTS.

4dopi Sept 12902. by tie Etai ConmitBrie dt Th Turpine Operors' Acaiaion i Exclusive MSial Orga and adped SepL. 5.902. in Anua Convasmuwtio, n Osc Organ aso d the Gnraml Asoiaion. Ad d Sept. .O1903 the
oani Ocial Organ of Turpentine Operor' Asociation. Adopted April 27.1903. a Ofcial Orgm of the Inter-Stiae Cane Growmer' Aocatimon. Endorsed by Georgia Sawmill Assocdion. OffcialOrgan o Southeinern Stock Grwer Aocifon.


MEN WHO ARE MAKING THE SOUTH

Portrait Number one-A. D. Covington, of Jacksonville, Fla.,
President of the Turpentine Operators' Association, President of
the Hillman-Sutherland Co., Director of the Florida Bank and
Trust Co., and largely interested in various naval stores prow
during companies and other enterprises.


A. D. COVINGTON.
Mr. A. D. Covington, the subject of this sketch, was born in North Carolina and is
one of eight brothers, all of whom have been prominent in the development of their
adopted State. He is yet a young man, 36 years of age, and has. in the few yrars that
have elapsed since his majority made as rapid progress as a develollPr as any man in
Florida. For years he has been a power in the industrial and c.nimercial progress of
this State. Before lie was thirty years of age lie was one of the largest naval stores
producers in the Southern pine belt. At the first meeting of the Turpentine Operators'
Association, held in Jacksonville on the 10th of SepteibLer, 1901, lie was elected presi-
dent and has held that office without interruption since. For the fourth time Mr.
(,vington was re-elected at the convention in this city only last week. He urged that
he be relieved of the position, but several hundred operators in the meeting would not
listen 'to any change in the executive head of that great organization. Mr. Covington
is president of the Hillman-Sutherland Co., which corporation is the largest naval
stores producing company in the world. He has other naval stores producing interests
and is a director of a number of the largest financial institutions in Florida, notably
the Florida Bank & Trust Co., of Jacksonville, which bank has a capital stock of one
million dollars. Mr. Covington is as popular socially as he is in the business world.
He is broad-minded, liberal and progressive, and his public spirit is always manifested
toward the upbuilding of every worthy interest in his city and State.


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4 THE WEEKLY INDTTSTRTAL RECORD.


Tree planting as a means of providing
for future timber requirements is a mat-
ter of rapidly increasing public interest
The tremendous rate at which the forests
of the country are being depleted to meet
the ever broadening demands of the saw
milling, stave making and railroad inter-
ests especially, is advancing the costs of
all wood products to such an extent as to
compel the giving of a larger and larger
measure of attention to not only scientific
methods of lumbering, but as well to sug-
gestions for increasing outright the tim-
ber supply. To this fact, and to this alone,
must be attributed the widespread awak-
ening to the importance of scientific for-
estry as now taught by numbers of State
colleges, at the Yale Forest School and
elsewhere, and as practiced by the Forest
Service, by many specially trained experts
and by State forest commissioners.
Even the farmers in the treeless regions
of the West are beginningto recognize the
necessity, or at least the advantage, of cul-
tivating timber as a means of providing
for certain of their wood wants-as for
instance, fence posts and firewood. True
it cannot be said that they have undertak-
en tree planting as yet on any very con-
siderable scale, for the reason that, aside
from localities but poorly served with rail-
way facilities and unblessed with coal de-
posits, prices of in-shipped lumber and
other forms of wood are not so high as
to justify the diversion of valuable grain
and pasture land to the growing of timber.
Only in those cases in which the soil is
unsuited for agricultural produce is there
warrant for the planting of even the more
rapidly growing species of timber.
But the exceptions are important. In
the great majority of such instances there
are the most compelling reasons why the
ground should be planted to timber, seeing
that in that way only can it likely be
made a source of profit. And it can be
made quite an income producer when given
over to that purpose-and that, too, with
no cost and scarcely any labor after tlhe
seedlings have been planted. The investi-
gations of the Forest Service in Nebraska
have shown that a farmer in the south-
eastern part of the State who planted
twenty-five years ago an acre and a quar-
'ter of ravine land in hardy catalpa, sold
during the last two years timber from
the grove amounting to $77 per acre, andi
had $200 worth per acre left. Another man
who, 18 years ago, planted fifteen acres
to catalpa, sold last year $150 worth ot
fence posts per acre. In that particular
locality, it might be added, 3-inch catalpa
posts sell at 8c each and 4-inch josts at
12 1-2c each. At this rate the s.st part
of the grove would yield $196 worth lo
timber per acre.
But among all the large consumers ot
wood, the railroads are tlhe leaders in tree
planting. Nearly all of the great Eastern
and Western railway companies have been
experimenting in greater or less degree
along lines looking to the ultimate drawing
of their tie supply from their own lands.
Several of them have so far committed
themselves to the work that they have
acquired large areas of land and are plant-
ing it. where barren, with catalpa. locust..
yellow pine or other woods, and where
already clothed with timber are protecting
the tree growth.
Touching on this matter. William E.
Curtis contributed a very interesting art-
icle to the Chicago Record-llerald. from
which we make the following extract:
"Joseph T. Richards, chief engineer of
the maintenance of way of the Pennsyl-
vania railroad system, who has been mak-
ing a careful study of the situation, told
me that, the number of cross-ties in use on
the railroads of the United States is about
620,000.000 and the numler required an-
nually for repairs, replacements and ex-
tensions is enormous. To meet. this de-
mand it is necessary 'to strip 200,0100 acres
of tilber every year.
"'Each year the base of supplies is re-
moved farther and farther away.' said Mlr.
Richards. 'The railroads of Pennsylvania
now have to go to (ieorgia and A lahamai
for yellow pine and to Virginia and West
Virginia for white mok ties. and the de-
mand is so great that another decade


will problihly close these sources of sup-
ply.
The Pennsylvania Railroad Company.
east of Pittsburg and Erie, will require
almut :;.5t0I.I;00 new ties this year, and
they will cost us an average of 75 ccnt.s
each. IThree millions are needed to replacee
those that are worn out and 500,000 for
new wo.rk. If we add 10 per cent as t;ie
natural increase needed next year will Ihe
3.S50.;00, for 1!907 the total will be 4,235,-
000. for 190S it will be 4,65;,000), and so
they will go on, piling up to enormous tig-
ures. I estimate that it will require about
1,300.IN00 trees to supply the ties we will
need next year, and that number must be
increased hv 10 per cent every year. So
you can easily calculate what an enormous
area of timl'r must be annually stripped
to supply the Pennsylvania road alone. antl
I am considering in this estimate only the
lines east of Pittslurg. Other railroads
need as many tics as we in proportion to
their mileage. and, considering the total
mileage of the Inited States at 250,000
miles, you can calculate for yourself how
large an area of timber land will be re-
quired every year to furnish ties alone,
without including the timber needed for
bridges, stations, machine shops and other
buildings, and construction work.'
"'How long will a tie live?'" I asked.
"'The average life of a railroad tie is
ten years, if well taken care of,' answered
Mr. Richards, 'but it can be shortened by
carelessness in construction.'
" 'What proportion does the cost of the
tie hear to the expense of railway build-
ing?'
"'The ties cost twice as much as the
rails.' lie replied. 'Nearly every tie in our
tracks represents a dollar. The original
cost of the wood is 75 cents delivered. ant(
it costs us 25 cents in most cases to put
a tie into a track. In railway building
and maintenance the labor represents about
50 per cent of the entire cost, the ties
represent 14 per cent, the rails 7 per cent.
the ballast 3 per cent and the roadbed 24
per cent.'"
The enormous costs to the Pennsylvania
road of the tie renewals herein indicated
caused its officials some four years ago
to imiake up their minds to undertake tree
growing. To this end some very consid-
erable areas of lands were purchased nota-
bly near huntington, Conewago, Pomeroy,
Altgen, New]port, Vintage and other places
on the Juniata and Susquehanna rivers,
and within the past two years about S00.-
000 trees have been planted on these tracts
-mostly locust-averaging about 400 to
the acre, in rows ten feet apart. The
trees thus planted are seedlings, two or
three years old, and have cost an average
of 8c apiece put in 'the ground. These are
to Ie suppllemented with alxout 600.000
more this fall; and thereafter from 300.-
000 to 500,000 locust, chestnut, white oak
and yellow pine seedlings will be planted
every year until the entire available area
belonging to the road ha s been covered.
The company does not exlwHct, of course.
to raise ill tile ties it will ne(ed; but it is
pretty confident that, its example will iin-
duce private owners of waste all(d along
the road to also engage in tile culti\ationl
of timlber for railroad pur1i"t.-s and tlilha
in this way its future source of supply.
will I:e made sure.

CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY RATES.
The Atlantic Coast Line, to give every
onc an opportunity to visit their hontes
ianda friends. will sell tickets on account of
the ('hristmas Holidavs ti'tween all i)oints
at one anil one-thirdl fares, plus twenty-
five (25) cents for the round trip. These
tickets will be on sale Deccinllmc 22. 23.
24. 25. 30 and 31. and .January 1. tinal limit
of same January 4.
Fo)r students and tieaclhecrs these sai ml
rates will apply with thle exception that
they will lie on sale )iecemilwr 17 to 24.
inclusive. These tickets will only lhe sold
to student s uilln presentation of ; certili-
caln. signed by the principals and pre-i-
dent's of the various institutions.n
Al1l of li.ose who have daughters coming
houe ('hr;st nns should call on Atlanti -
'Coast ,inte Age.nts or write
FRANK ('. BOVLSTON.
District Passengecr Agent, .acksonville. Fla.


Southern Machinery & Supply Co,
(INCORPORATED.
Machinists and Engineers.
Engines, Boilers, Saw, Shingle, Planing and Veneer Mill Machinery. Corliss En-
gines, Water Tube Boilers, Pumps and Electric Outfits. Contracts
for Complete Outfits a Specialty. Plans and estimates fur-
nished on application.


Home Office, Jacks la.


Branch: .Tampa, Fla.


Successful Men

appreciate, use and advise Life Insu-
rance. The advice of successful men
is worth following. Insure in

INSURANCE COMPANY
rTHE PRUDENTIAL 'OFAEIA
WALTER P. CORBETT, Manager. JOHN F. DRYDEN, Pres.
409 West Bldg.. Jaksemvlle. Fla. Home Office Newark..NJ


PLANTERS


"Old Time" Remedies

THE JOY OF THE HOUSEHOLD.
These four great remedies, Nubian Tea, Benedicta, Cuban Relief I
and Cuban Oil, are the joy of the household. With them near at hand, a HuMaM
man is ready for any emergency. He has a safe, reliable and speedy relief i e eta
for wife, children, self or stock. With these remedies you can keep the Cuban
doctor's hands out of your pockets, and yet have a healthy, happy fam.y. Relief
Besides, you can cure your stock of any ailment that may befall them. I
NUBIAN TEA-In Liquid or Powder Form-Is the great family medicine. It
will cure all forms of Liver and Kidney Complaints, Prevents Chills and Malarial
Fever. Cures the common ailments of children; and as a laxative tonic it is without
an equal-safe and reliable. In the liquid, it is extremely palatable-even children
like it-and it is READY FOR USE.
BENEDICTA is a woman's medicine. It will cure all the diseases common to
women, and classed as Female Troubles. It will bring youth back to the iaded woman,
who has gone one suffering because she thought it woman's lot. It will care for the
young girl just entering womanhood; and prepare the young woman ror the sacred
duties of wife and mother.
CUBAN RELIEF-The instant Paint Killer, for either man or beast. Relieves
instantly, Colic, Cramps, Cholera Morbus, Diarrhoea, Dystentery and Sick Headache.
For colic in horses it is an infallible remedy and is guaranteed to give relief in five
minutes.
CUBAN OIL-The Best Bone and Nerve Liniment. Is antiseptic for cuts,
snagged or torn flesh, and will instantly relieve the pain. Cures insect bites and stings,
scalds and burns, bruises and sores, chapped hands and face, ore and tender feet.
Relieves rheumatic pains, lame back, stiff joints, and in stock cures wire fence cuts,
scratches, thrush, splint, collar sores, saddle galls, and diseased hoofs.
Write us for Prices.

SPENCER MEDICINE CO.. Chattanooga, Ten.

1*14 tittl itIIt ttI itIU*ItI E I3 1 i thIh IIIDIUl SII tIP


SPropositions That Cannot Last

Great activity in Turpentine and Sawmill Propositions. The good ones
S are becoming scarce. But here are two rare ones.
28,000 acres, Hillsborough County, estimated to cut 50 boxes; 3,500 feet
)f mill timber to the acre. Will make 50 barrels of spirits per crop. $4.00 per
f, acre. 4
* 20,000 acres saw mill timber in Hernando County. Timber will cut 4,000
feet per acre. Four railroads through the tract. $3.15 per acre. Complete *
saw mill, capacity 40,000 feet daily, included.
Operators, ask to be put on our mailing list and keep posted on all prop-
ositions which are put upon the market.



I Brobston, Fendig & Company

3 JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA BRUNSWICK. GEORGIA


303-1331133311 *iii1iii lllt 313313391


ww Ce E EUEll Ell| 1s


Ben F. Johnson, Prop. Phone 279.

SGreater New York Sample Room.
Jacksonville's New and attractive Bar and Cafe. Choice Wines.
Liquors and Cigars. Pool and Billiard Parlors Attached.
234 W. Bay Street. on Transportation
Row and Opposite Everett Hotel.
Mail orders a. speci Ity. Jacksonville, Fla
*90600906 #a 0 off9 offygg-- --


Tree Planting as an Investment,









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


New York Market and Trade Conditions

(By the Record's Regular New York Correspondent.)


New York, Dec. 13.-In response to an
absence of demand lower prices at Savan-
nah toward the latter part of the week,
the local market weakened and quotations
for the week declined from 651/, to 641/2
cents for supplies of machine-made bbls.,
and 1/2 less for oil bbls., in yard here.
Trading in first hand parcels continued to
lack animation and sales for the week
were decidedly light and estimated at 600
to 800 barrels, over docks and through
yards, at prices ranging from C5c down to
(641/,c with the undertone closing barely
steady. The demand from consumers for
small lots has been confined to supplies
to cover regular urgent wants. The trade
in general is starting into the usual an-
nual stock-taking, which extends into the
latter part of January and this in part
served to check business during the week
to a great extent. A sale of about 1,200
barrels was made in Savannah for account
of local buyers here and the price paid,
as near as could be learned, was 611/ c.
The general opinion in the trade here
is that prices have about touched bottom
and that the market will gradually work
up during the winter months. It is also
intimated that owing to the recent devel-
opments in naval stores and the rapid
change in prices,, particularly for rosin,
the size of the next season's crop may be
reduced. Notwithstanding the high prices
obtained for spirits and rosin this season.
it has not been, according to reports, very
profitable, as timber has advanced from
40 to 50 per cent and labor has been scarce
and wages paid have been the highest on
record in the turpentine belt. Added to
this are the increased carrying charges to
shipping ports, as a result of the seats of
of production of naval stores having grad-
nally gone further South, due to enor-
mous tracts of pine lands, which have been
worked out. These are points with which
a great number of consumers in the North-
ern markets are not cognizant of, and a-s
the above stated causes for the higher
prices are based on facts, indications are
that the low prices for naval stores some
years ago bid well never to return again.
Conditions governing the market for
rosins show a decided improvement, which
have been influenced by the stronger ad-
vices from Savannah, noting recent ad-
vances in prices on all grades from 15
to 25c per 280 lbs., due to the excellent
export demand there, which cleared the
market of all offerings during the week.
Late advices noted that offers at Savan-
nah were being refused by sellers, who
are anticipating higher prices. On the
strength of the alove reports the demand
locally became active and large sales at
60 to 85e per 280 lbs. over the Savannah
market quotations for all grades have been
made here. It is difficult to form an esti-
mate regarding the amount of sales which
have been made for the week. We hear of
transactions through yards and over docks
embracing some 3.500 to 4,000 barrels, in-
cluding mostly common and strained.
equivalent to yard prices, at $3.20 to $3.30
and an odd lot of 350 barrels at $3.10. The
market was cleaned up of all Georgetown
rosin and irregular grading in small bar-
rels at various prices, rargin from 25 to
30e per 280 Ibs. below the prices for large
iron hound barrels, 100 per cent guaran-
teed grading, New York gauges, less the
usual I per cent discount. Of the pale
and medium grades in yard here, alout
(iOO bbls. changed hands during the week
at irregular prices, including mostly small
aIrrels of E at $3.35, M at $4.75: WC at
$5.40: WW at $5.70; I at $3.95 and K at
$4.50, 4.55. The close was stronger with
sellers indifferent. asking substantial ad-
vances, owing to moderate available slot
supplies and prospects for higher prices.
The market for tar shows no improve-
ment and dullness pervaded the tradt'
throughout the week. Few first hand saie.
could li traced and holders continued tc
quote round lots on the spot at $5.40. but
a lower bid would have led to business
Small second hand sales. embracing sonuf
200 oil barrels, -augning 50 gallons. at price
ranging from .$5.50(< 5.f60 have Iwbn made
Prices for pitch have stiffened in symv
path with the upward tendency of tlh
market for rosin Early in the week 1l(
barrels on the spot brought $2.90, but fol


lowing this sale, holders named $3.00 as
IH"itively lowest. This stimulated active
Ibuying and additional first hand sales of
300: Iarrels. at $3.00, were made, while
jolbbing sales embraced aliout :3)0 to 400
barrels at prices ranging from $3.05 to
S3l.10 per Im*rrel on the spot.
The market for rosin oil lacks interest
but prices nevertheless have been advanced
Ic to 22c iper gallon for first run of oil, in
sympathy w ith the firmer market for the
low grades of rosin. Few carload lots
changed hands and only small hand-to-
mouth orders at 23c: ler gallon for first run
and 25e per gallon for second run of oil,
f. o. b. New York, have been booked. De-
liveries on contracts are steadily increas-
ing.
A fair business in tar oil, genuine dis-
tilled, at 25c per gallon, has been booked.
Sales of pine oil at 26c per gallon have
Ieen moderate. For large lots, the above
prices are Iwing shaded lc per gallon.
New York Naval Stores Quotations.
(Parcels in Yard.)
Spirits turpentine, per gallon, 64%/,c
steady. Rosin, large iron bound barrels,
100 per cent guaranteed grading, per 280
lbs.: A, I. C, $3.35; D $3.50; E $3.55; F
$3.641; G $3.65; H $4.00; I $4.10; K $475;
M $500; N $5.50; WVG 6i.05; WW $6.20.
Small Ibrrels, irregular grading, 20 to 35c
Ier 280 lbs. lower; tirm but irregular. Tar,
in oil barrels. gauging 50 gallons Per bar-
rel. $5.40o( 5.45, dull. Pitch, per barrel,
$3.00(a 3.05; firm. Rosin oil, per gallon,
first run, 22c; second run, 24c; third run
2ick; fourth run. 2c8; firm. Tar oil, in
barrels, genuine distilled, per gallon, 25c.
Pine oil, in barrels, per gallon, 25c.
The approximate statistical position of
naval stores in New York for the past
week was as follows:
Spirits. Rosin. Tar.
bbls. bbls. bbls.
Stock Dec. 2 ... 2.409 24,666 1,293
Receipts for week ..... 1,910 393
L)el'd for week... 919 3,521 326i
Stock Dec. 9 .... 1.490 23,055 1.360
The statistical position of spirits of tur-
pentine in liondon, as compiled by James
Watt & Son. was as follows:


,- Barrels
1905 19(4 1903 1902
Stock Nov. 25..22.013a .... 20,456 27,869
Del'd this wk.. 1.508b .... 1,125 953
Since Jan. 1st..71.038 .... 82,543 82,253
s. d. s. d. s. d. s. d.
Price Nov. 25.. 44 6 37 3 44 6 38 6
Jan. April .... 45 3 37 9 44 3 39 3
Savannah ..... 60c. 48'/c 56Oc. 504c.
(a) includes 1,56(8 barrels French.
(b) includes 61 barrel French.
The market for paints and colors pre-
sents the usual quiet incident to the sea-
son but developments regarding the future
ani the placing of orders for mixed paints
and other finished products for forward de-
livery are of a most interesting character.
This, as we have been alluding to in our
former reports to the Record, is attributed
to the unalited upward movement in
prices for pig lead and the material gain
in values of all of the other raw materials
with one wr two exceptions. Manufactu-
rers as a rule are at sea regarding the
probable course of prices for the raw ma-
terials and marked conservatism, and in
many cases indifference, to Iook orders
i)r make contracts for sulplpes for deliv-
ery diulring next year is ieing adhered to,
iiuless at a reasonable advance over the
present 1iuotations, which buyers appear
to lie unwilling to meet. As was forecast-
ed in the recent i.'sues of the Record. prices
for mixed paints and other paints have
heen advanced five cents all around by the
heading Western grinders, as well as by
ii numinlwr of grinders in the East. who
have sent out announcements to tlhe trade
that thie new prices are to go into effect
at once and will remain in force during the
next year. There are still a number of
paint manufacturers in the East who have
,not joined in the general movement by
'-ising their prices., but it is intimated
that the', will fall in line in the near fu-
ture. or will liw forced to do so. owing to
he in;interrulptCd upward tendency of
-,rices for the chief raw materials. At the
recent niteting and convention held by the
Paint (Grinders' Association at Chicago, it


THE DUVAL


Frank M. Turpin
Preprieter.


JACKSONVILE, FLA.
Open the Year Round. Opposite Government Building. Most Centrally and Conven-
iently Located. Thoroughly Repaired and Renovated. Newly Furnished and Equipped
Liberally Conducted at Popular Prices


OB8PH D. WEED.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. KRENSON


J. D. WEED & CO.,
sAVANNAH. GEOR.GIA.


Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.

MAKE A SPECIALTY OF


Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Etc.



5 Turpentixe


... .'Cups

If you expect to use the HERTY cup
next season, place your orders now for
future delivery. Prices and all informa-
S tion cheerfully furnished on

Cups, Gutters
and all Tools
: used in the Herty system of turpentining.
Address

SChattanooga Pottery
s":'. ,;l Company,

Jacksonville. Florida.


B. B. TATUM, Pres.


J. L. WALLACE, Vice-Pres. H. 0. STONE, Secy-Treas.


Keeley Institute,
Incorporated $25,000 Capital Stock.
A branch of the original Leslie E. Keeley Institute of Dwight, Ill., has just been
opened at corner of Park and Stockton Streets in Riverside, where a splendid
building, equipped with all the comforts and conveniences of a modern home or
sanitarium has been secured and is ready for the reception of patients in need of
treatment for-
WHISKEY, OPIUM, MORPHINE, COCAINE, TOBACCO OR CIGARETTE HABITS.
Write for full information as to treatment, terms, etc.

KEELEY INSTITUTE OF FLORIDA.


Telephone No. 1553.


Jacksonville, Fla.


HOTEL WINDLE,

15, '7, 19 East Forsyth St.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
American plan, $2.50 to $3.00 per day. European plan, $1.00 per day up.
Center of city. First-class in all appointments.
C. B. SMITH, Proprietor.


A DIAMOND

for CHRISTMAS
is the GIFT of GIFTS. The wisest to give because the
most gladdening to receive: the most beautifying; the
the most impressive; the most endearing. Yet there is
nothing in the purchase of which so many people ate so
nearly at the mercy of the seller. Unless vou have wide
Technical Diamond Knowledge. your wisdom would bet-
ter concern inself solely with selec!int the House from
S which to urchasUe. "Wise at the start, safe at the end."
We Invite Your Inspection.
R.. J. RILES CO.,
15 West Bay Street, Jacksonville. FIa.
SECX3E 3X33 C-X 3(SX3 S6








6 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


appears that some were in favor of while
other manufacturers of paints were against
an advance. The outcome, as stated above,
is the individual raising of prices by each
firm, in order to protect themselves against
prolbale losses on future sales.
Although prices of dry colors have not
shared in the advance, the market is some-
what firmer in tone, but aside from only
small sales the usual dullness incident
to the season is being experienced. The
latter also applies to all paints, due to a
great extent to the trade being busily en-
gaged in its annual stock-taking, which
is curtailing the deliveries on outstanding
unexpired contracts.
The market for white lead presents de-
cided firmness and an advance in prices
at any moment may be looked for. The
uncertainty surrounding the market for
pig is holding business in parcels for fu-
ture delivery in check. At some western
points congested freight is still delaying
parcels in transit. The demand for white
lead il oil has been slow hut jobbing lots
met with fair sales. Offerings continue
light at (i /4 71/ic for domestic lead in oil
and nmlerate quantiti( s of dry white lead
for prompt and later delivery at 5%a(n 614c.
at which prices only moderate orders have
been lrioked. For the latter, corroders
are naming generally ic lowest; according
to size of order. etc. The available sup-
ply of white domestic lead is very light
and there has been a marked inclination
biv bhuers to order lquanti:ies for forward
delivery, but corroders continue to hold
aloof for the present. for reason as cited
above. The above conditions cited for
white lead also apply to red lead and the
deUlveries on orders have decreased as is
usual at this time of the year. Under light
offerings. prices show decided strength at
i6% 7c for domestic, according to terms
of sale. Imported red lead remains firm.
in sympathy with strong foreign markets
and jobbing sales embraced German at
63/ ( '/c. and English at 8/4(n 8:%c, all ac-
cording to size of order and terms of sale.
The demand for orange mineral continues
to he seasonable and jobbing sales included
domestic of which supplies are meager.
at 89/41ic: G(erman at %/4i101/4c and
English at 11 /4r 11 /,c for supplies of spe-
cial brands in casks: in kegs at 121/,(n
12/%c. and lower qualiities at Ore and up-
ward. all according to make. size of order
and terms of sale. Business in parcels
of litharge for future delivery is being held
in check owing to the unsettled market
for pig lead and trade otherwise has been
durll. but prices are firm at 61/2(0 71/4c. ac-
cording to size of order, grade and seller.
The feature in the market for pig lead
was the further advance in prices, due
to light offerings, owing to the continued
.carcity of supply. and a good demand.
Spot lots have I.wen advanced to 6.10(
ti6/c which quotation is nominal and bids
of 5.S.0( 5.S.5c for parcels to arrive would
have been accepted. The Smelting Co. are
offering a limited numll r of parcels fir
delivery during January at prices prevail-
ing on the day of shipment. The St. TIlis
market w's advanevI to 5.6i5c for spot
par'els. 1lAudon shows a gain of 1 poinllld
since our last report to 17 pounds. 2 shil-
lings and 6 pence. sterling. Early in the
iweek sales of 300 tons for importation lo-
cally at about 57/ c cost. freight and insu-
rance. were made.
Additional large contract sales of New
Jersey zincs for delivery during next year
at 4/%(n 5 for various grades have been
Isked and single carload lots were sold
at 5( 051/. The withdrawals on orders
continue on a good scale. but good's in
transit are still suffering delays on ac-
count of the congested freight. Parcels of
French process makes for delivery next
year have been in active request at the
recent new established prices. Indications
still point to a rise in values of German
and French zincs.
The market for varnishes is firm and
under a seasonable demand fair orders
have lbeen Ihooked. Manufacturers are now
busily engaged in their usual annual stock-
taking. which serves to restrict business
to a great extent.

The weakness and unsettled tendency
to the market for lins.eed oil terminated in
a drop of 2c per gallon to 36(r 37c for State
and Western raw oil and to 380(639c for
city raw oil. Boiled oil was also reduced
to conform with the prices of raw oil to


390(40c for city boiled. This stimulated
the demand for parcels for prompt deliv-
ery and increased sales at quotations are
being made. Crushers are very firm and
refuse to shade quotations on parcels for
prompt and nearby delivery. Futures are
attracting little or no attention and par-
cels for delivery during the first five
months of 19H0 are being held at 36(W361/,.
but buyers' views are 2c per gallon lower.
Bids of 34e were turned won .but 35c, sea-
board delivery, would have probably re-
sulted in business.

_Z
t^ RE a A E t

PIANOS- ORGANS
*125 Upward *35t* Upward

/We Sel at Lowest factory Prices
( % EASY TERMS. #-)
(We PaFrtight And Guarantee Satisfaction.)
) Otl INSTRUMENTS TAKE I EXCHANGE
(WrnAft 0nce Ff n Particulars And Catalojue
OF EITHER T
PIANOS OR ORGANS. )
) NO AGENTS' d!L~n m(,
e- ridunsra /. bM. f TVmra BrZee \



Lease on 125 Thousand Acres

Virgin Turpentine Timber
For particulars address, Apartado Postal
No. HO. Morelia, Michoacan, Mexico.

WIULIAM G. POWEI,
Attorney at Law,
County Court House
Jacksonville, Fla.
Real Property Law a Specialtly
Searches Abstracts and Reports.


EVERYTHING IN
SEALS, RUBBER STAMPS AND STENCILS
Made to Order Six to Twelve Hours.

Florida Rubber Stamp Co.


224 Main Street.


Jacksonville, Fla.


Coons & Golder
Turpentine Operators on

Pipe, Boilers and Pumps

Expert Meckiaics aid Plumbers


38 W. Adams Street


Jacksonville, Fla.


Phone 1147



Bank Accounts
We are prepared to carry your account
in one, two or three different ways. First,
a non-interest-bearing account, against
which you may write your check. Second,
you may open a savings account upon
which we pay 4 per cent. interest; inter-
est on this account is reckoned twice year-
ly, and is added to the principal, thus
compounding. Third, we issue an inter-
est-bearing certificate of deposit, which
will draw interest at the rate of 4 per
cent. if left with us for six months.

Union Saving Bank
City of Jacksonville
Depository


E11411 1UI *1#11#eU111 I *1441 *I I4St 1 11 i4 It11*1,'u I 1t
*
4
Clarke Automobile and Launch Co.
*
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
*
Dealers In

Automobiles, Stationary and Marine

Engines and Automobile and.

Launch Supplies.

SAnd manufacturers of launches and all styles of plei.ure,

SHunting and Fishing Boats


State Agent for the famous Cadillac and
Franklin Motor Cars--the best on earth.

We also sell GASOLINE PUMPING OUTFITS- the very thing for turpen-
Stine plants. Also small stationary electric light plants for factories, h, mes
Sanl business houses.

+ Clarke Automobile and Launch Co.
Mail orders solicited. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

441til t1 #4 I I 1`41D'42, 3 1 *4 I#4E t o0+I1 1 4 I 1I 141 t 1114i 11 $ g



P. O. SEBRIN6 J. R. SLONE


SSE RING d SLONE

RJoom 202 Duval Building Telephone 731


310 thousand arres of virgin pine.
4 large turpentine places in operation, strictly first-class.
2 sawmills, complete, with plenty of timber.
I good planing mill and novelty works, will pay 25 per cent on investment,
located in one of the best towns of Floridna.
A good paying livery business, in hustling town of 7,000 inhabitants.
If you want to buy or sell, call on or write to us.





S You Want a Turpentine Location?
You Want a Sawmill Location?
You Want any Kind of florida Land?
You Mean Business?
IF Call on or Writ, to

J. H. Livingston & Sons,
OCAI A. FLOR.IDA.
L'.% % %%% % %%% ---.------.-. --.---- 1


J. P. WILLIAMS. President. J. A. G. CAEsow, Ist Vlce-Presidet
ST. A. JBNNINGs, rnd Vice-President. J F. DUSNBURY.3d Vice-PresidenL
. L KATTON. Secretary. D. G. White. Treasurer.


J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

S1101 STORES LID COTTON IaTORS D WIIHOLEILE GROCMS.
- Main Office bAVANNXIH, GEORGIA.
"Branh Offlice: ) KEONPSACOLA. FLM. I Branch Orocery Kon.u,
Brnch O .ACKSONVI.EFLA. ( COLUMBUS, GA.
Naval Stores Producers are Invited to Correspond With Us.
f. .'" "*" . ... ... ... ...


4611111 II 11111111111 111111111111111111111 sliz









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7


BANKS AND THEIR RELATIONS TO
FARMERS.
The following excerpts are taken from
a recent address delivered by Lucius P.
Hillyer, vice-president of the American
National of Macon, deorgia, before the
Georgia Agricultural Society:
The people of America will never know
the far-reaching effect produced by that
simple little resolution unanimously passed
by the Southern bankers at New Orleans
last spring, which pledged to the Southern
farmers $10,000 to aid them in their organ-
ization. At that time, it was known all
over the world that the largest crop of
cotton ever made was ready for the mar-
ket. Demand had fallen a helpless vic-
tim to supply, and the horrible night-mare
of five-cent cotton made the judicious
grieve. The bears were making their mer-
ciless attack. They declared that the
bankers of the South were not only unable
but unwilling to assist the growers of cdt-
ton. They ridiculed the possibility of a
successful organization, and denounced the
looked for aid of the Southern banker as
an Utopian dream. But when the words
of that little resolution flashed around the
world thee bears realized that the farmers
of the South were surely organizing, and
the Southern bankers were not only able
willing, but eager to help them. For a
brief desperate moment, they pressed down
the price of cotton, but the echo of Harvie
Jordan's gavel, adjourning that conven-
tion, had hardly died away before that
price commenced its upward climb. I do
not claim that the present price is due
to Ithe action of the Southern bankers, nor
to the united efforts of the farmers to re-
duce the cotton acreage, for all wise obser-
vers know that Providence did that for
thousands of faithless farmers, which, in
their selfish greed and blind stupidity,
they refused to do for themselves. But 1
do claim that long before the acreage and
condition of the crop could be estimated,
it was the belief that the cotton growers
might perfect their organization which
kept the price of cotton up, and nothing
strengthened this belief more than the
promised help and unanimous support ot
the Southern bankers. Of the $10,000
pledged by them, $1,975 has been paid by
the bankers of Georgia, almost all the rest
being collected from banks in the other
Southern states by that patriot banker,
John D. Walker, of Sparta, Ga. Now, the
question may be asked, why did the
Southern bankers interest themselves in
having the cotton growers of the South
perfect an organization? Because they
knew that if another bumper crop of cot-
ton was made, the price would fall below
the cost of production and financial chaos
would reign. They knew that a bumper
crop was possible unless the cotton acre-
age was reduced. They knew that to re-
duce the acreage, an organized effort must
be made. Knowing all this, it was naitu-
ral fpr the bankers to interest themselves.
I mention this to show that the banker is
very much interested in the farmer. So
much that his very existence depends upon
the farmer's success. In fadt, the interests
of the banker and the farmer are so in-
terwoven that you cannot injure one with-
out hurting the other. You cannot enrich
one without helping the other. And in
either event, be it remembered that the
farmer is the more independent -of the
two.
'Did you ever stop and think what it
means to the people of the South to turn
loose ten million bales of cotton upon the
markets of the world at ten cents per
pound? It means one-half billion of dol-
lars of new money put in circulation in
the South by the sale of one year's crop.
This is more money than all the banks of
the United States of America had on
deposit in 1860. The South was never
more prosperous than she is to-day, and it
is the Southern farmer who has made her
so. Did you know that. 75 per cent of the
bank stocks of this State is owned by
farmers ?
1 congratulate the farmers of the South
on their effort 'to organize. They have
made a splendid Ieginning. and it would
be the wildest folly for them to grow
lukewarm and give up the fight.
"The victories of peace are as essential
as the victories of war. In order to gain
them, intelligent effort must be used.
The farmers of Georgia made the first


great movement forward when they or-
ganized the Georgia State Agricultural
Society, and another important step was
made when tle Southern Cotton Growers'
Association was organized. You now have
the machinery, and success is yours if you
run it properly.
"But to my mind, the most important
work of all is the technical education of
the farmers of the State. Every effort of
your organization should be to have your
farmer boys properly educated in the sci-
ence of farming. It is my opinion that it
requires more practical experience, more
brains and more technical education to
become an expert farmer Utan to become
:an expert in many of the other profes-
sions. Leave not a stone unturned until
you secure a genuine, up-to-date school
of farming. Have it sufficiently furnished
and amply endowed. Place at its head
some strong and capable man. Prepare
your boys with the technical knowledge
that will make two blades of grass grow
where one grew before, teach them to be
loyal to both your society and to tlhe
Southern Cotton Growers' Association, and
I make no vain prophecy when I say that
.he next generation of Georgia farmers
will be the most independent set since the
even years of plenty in Pharaoh's time!
taxable property will advance not thirty-
ieven millions a year, but one hundred
millions, and the deposits in our banks
sill increase in like proportion. As secre-
.ary of the Georgia Bankers' Association,
I know I have the approval of all of our
officers and members, when I pledge your
society our sympathy and support. When
questions of great moment arise which
he people must decide, this society, the
-Southern Cotton Growers' Association, and
.he Georgia Bankers' Association should
unite their forces in fighting for the gen-
'ral good. I declare that the farmers,
unitedd with the bankers, can whip a dozen
worlds! Let our three associations get
togetherr and remain faithful to each
ether throughout the coming years, re-
membering that the line which separates
-he interests of the farmer and the banker
is, like the equator, an imaginary line!
\nd should combinations vast and multi-
'orm threaten this dear Southland with
disaster, let these three associations lock
heir armors in one solid phalanx, and,
ike the three unconquerable Guardsmen,
Porthos, Athos and Aramis, charge upon
)ur enemies shouting the battle cry: 'One
For all-All for one!' "

A POPULAR HOTEL.
Centrally located, neat and inviting in
appearance, setting a good table, and
inder the able management of Mrs. George
Brock. the St. George Hotel, corner of
Forsyth and Julia Streets has become one
,f the most popular little hotels in the
'ity. Mrs. Brock is an ideal hotel mana-
,er and her house is well patronized the
vear round. She numbers among her pat-
rons many of the well known turpentine
nen in this territory.


Windsor Hotel


Jacksonville's Finest
and Florida's Largest
and Best Year-Round
Hotel

DODGE & CULLENS
Owners and Proprietors.


JOHN W. DODGE,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
ROOMS 4 AND E, 91 WEST ADAMS ST
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
GENERAL PRACTICE AND OPINIONS ON TITLES.


Florida Bank and Trust Company
Capital $1.000.000.00. Jacksonville. Fla.
DEPOSITARY OF STATE. COUNTY AND CITY FUNDS
W. F. COACHMAN. President. W. S. JENNINGS. Vice President.
W. A. REDDING, Cashier. ARTHUR F. PERRY, Vice President.
F. P. FLEMING. Jr., Trust Ofncer
Receives deposit accounts of individuals, firms. corporations and banks. Pays 4 per
cent on saving deposits. Rents safe deposit boxes. Buys and sells foreign exchange and
issues letters of credit
Acts as trustee, transfer agent. registrar and fiscal agent for corporations and
municipalities. Executes all trusts such as executor, trustee under will or appointment
ef court and receiver.
Unequaled Facilities. Accounts Solicited. Correspondence Invite


Let Santa Claus bring you a Victor Talking Machine
Records are now reduced to 35 cents, 60 cents and $1, for 7 inch,
10 inch and 12 inch respectively. This rate went into effect
December Ist. We are the only wholesalers in this section for
the Victor people, and are pleased to answer all letters of inquiry
and mail catalogues free.
METROPOLITAN TALKING MACHINE CO.
323 Main Street. Jacksonville. Fla.




J. A. Crai ( Bro.

a 239 W. Bay Street EVERETT BLOCK.
*

Leaders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-

0 inBg and Up-to-Date Furnishings.


Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.




THE BOND & BOURS CO.
WHOLESALE a RETAIL


H HARDWARE

SASH, DOORS, BLINDS, PAINTS.
Oils, Glass, Stoves, Tinware, Country Holloware.


10 WEST BAY STILEET.


JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


SESCC3CE3C~CSCE1(S3CSSOE3 SC~ C-- I-- S3S32CCCS~3SCCiCN3 J


l *ItDeIueI3443#e3I5 1II IuleetII OeeuII3 I ,uuI I tIItu
4 4-

J. W. Motte. C. B Parker, James McNatt, W. W. Wilder,
S President. Vice-Pres. Vice-Pres. Sec. & Treas.



* O4
iJohn R. Young Co.,


Commission

: Merchants.


SNaval Stores factors. Wholesale Grocers.
annah BrunswickG
Savannah SL Brunswick. Gb,

1ttes i O| .r$iieuiii**>i44Iles 4amesee* less btt


STEWART -& HUNTER-
505 West Building. Telephone 2063.
Round and Saw MI Timber Lands, and Turpentine Farms.

SMostly from the Owners direct. Estimates carefully
and correctly made. Properties ready for
examination. Inquiries promptly answered.

aesa(StmtKKsttltKKX3SMSSSS-t -


aOESSaaa~3ESEsaaaaC3acs~Es~Esaacsacxssao )


lf -_------ - __


d


9









8 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


UnAmerican Peculiarities of the Italian

Laborer in the South,

New Orleans. La.-Next to the problem few recent immigrants have been from
of future health protection and quarantine Campagna.
regulation, no issue raised by the recent Italians in New Orleans are scatte
yellow fever infection in New Orleans and generally through the city, there be
points in Louisiana and Missippi has n average of one Italian to every three
been brought so forcefully to the attention four blocks throughout the city outs
of the public here and in the adjoining "Little Italy." In the latter section ab
states, as that of immigration and its bear- 10 pe recent of the Italian population in
ing on the general welfare of the commi- city lives: and in that section the Itali,
nities of the two commonwealths. compose about 80 per cent of the to
This question has been emphasized by population. These Italians are packed i
the efforts now being made by the sugar about fifty-four squares, chiefly old r
planters of this state to import the 6.000 dences once homes of wealth. The labor
to 10.000 outside laborers without whom work on the river front, handling the fr
a considerable percentage of the sugar crop ships. They are market workmen, dr
for this season will go to waste. It is wagons to and from the truck garden
said on gmH l authority that about 6.' and above ao ll else keep corner grocel
Italians have already been contracted for and low groggeries, fruit stands, etc.
with various labor agencies in the cities In the country districts the sugar pI
of the north. east. and middle west, and shes have the vast majority of the Ital
the health and other authorities are now population. These are in the section wi
endeavoring to arrange with the various in easy reach of New Orleans, and con!
quarantine boards of the parishes to per- of Plaquemine. St. Johns, St. James,
mit these laborers to be omported. Charles, Ascension, Iberville, Lafour<
This much has been effected on the po- Terrebonne, St. Mary, Iberia, St. Mar
pular mind by the present infection of West Baton Rogue and sections of
fever: sumption and East Baton Rouge. In a<
In the parishes where small colonies of tion there are Italians in Jefferson,
newly arrived immigrants have developed Bernard and some few in Calcascieu
yellow fever or given it to others, a hitter Cameron.
antagonism has developed and in some (ht of the sugar district there are
parishes the populance has practically re- ton growers at Sunnyside, La., and mar
fused admission to any more Italians. gardeners and cotton growers in Ca
In some of the large sugar parishes, parish, near Shreveport.
where the need for labor is imperative, the The parishes where the Italians h
planters. despite theirspreponderating in- progressed to the tenant and lease-h
fluence. have had difficulty in persuading or free-hold position, are chiefly in Jef
the disinterested element that the Italians son, the Carroll, (addo. St. Bernard, ps
can he safely brought in. or tnat they are of Plaquemine. and scattered settlement
desirable. in St. John. St. James, St. Charles,
Tn other sugar parishes, where the Itali- WEst Baton Rouge.
ans have become in a degree assimilated The Italian coming to New Orleans
into the life of the communities, where usually violating the spirit or the let
they have lived long enough to learn some of the contract labor law. Padronage
American way.s there is little or no anti- practiced. but with the worst features t
pathy. and little or no fear. characterize the northern cities left
In New Orleans the first wave of am- The big sugar planters get their la
mosity which followed the outbreak and through agents who are practically p
spread of the fever, charged largely to the rones. Thle families here send back of
secretiveness. suspicion and non-sanitary No Italian family comes out now that
ways of life of the Italians, has now not either acquaintances or relatives
almost faded away. Louisiana. The small section in and ab
This. of course, leaves entirely out of Palermo. Sicily, has furnished all or
consideration the general opinion among most all the immigrants here. The
nearly all persons of Teutonic stock, he r'val of an immigrant shop is marked
they Germans. English. North French. the congregation of thousands of Itali
Scotch or Irish. that the Italian can only at the wharves, where the new-comers
with difficulty he transformed into an Am- greeted. wept upon, and snatched away
erican citizen with the same ideals and their relatives, friends, or the padre
standards as those possessed by the other who often pose as both. The records sl
peoples mentioned. that few Italians coming here have b
In New Orleans and in Louisiana, 'the rejected. This was due to the laxness t
Italian and h's relation to the sugar in- formerly characterized the inspection,
dustry sums up the entire Italian situa- also to the fact that the Italians who ce
tion. The sugar industry's present depen- were admittedly the best in Sicily.
dence on Italian labor governs sentiment. This is the first and best superfi
New Orleans feeds the Italians into the view.
country after receiving them from Italy Yellow fever, and the consequence c
directl-. or indirectly via the cities of the investigation of the condition of the I
eastern seaboard, inns in New Orleans, has revealed a ni
The planter views these potent facts: her of things that show the less attract
First: the importation of Italian labor side of tile Italian.
saved the sugar industry from ruin. In this city tlere were, in 1900, 8
Second: the Italian was the only work- residents German born. There were 5
man available who wouldd fit into the eco- residents of Irish born. There are to
nomie system of sugar planting and do the no Irish slums in New Orleans, altho
work required as cheaply and as effectively there is an Trish quarter. There are
as would the negro. German slums, although there is a Ger
Third: the sugar industry is fast de- quarter. However. neither the Geri
manding more labor--this caused by fur- quarter nor the Irish quarter is differ
tler efflux of the negroes from the sugar ated from any other part of the city,
district. the stranger passing through would
Fourth: Italian labor is better than no know where they were. As the Trish
lahor, and no other lanor has been avail- Germans' prosper they scatter to the p
able for the sugar plantations. perous parts of the city, and are lost
It should lie mentioned in connection the population.
with this. that the great sugar estates are Tn "Little Italy" during the past s
largely worked liv the wage system, and mer. fully two thousand workmen h
that the course of the Italian in Louisiana been 'thrown out of employment by
is: first to New Orleans-thence to the diversion of the fruit shops, the cessa
sugar plantations and the railroad section of construction work on the railroads h
eannts- thence to the scattering districts in- out of New Orleans. and from ot
where old plantations are bein_ sold or incidental causes all due in want as
leased to tenants for truck gardens, ten- as seriously ill.
ant corn. cotton, or sugar farms. The Italian societies, headed by the
Studied byv the individuals interested in tornos. the Oferis. and several others. h
The number in the state is estimated now financed these poor people, and are
at approximately 35.(000. This includes seeking through the aid of the si
the children lorn in America to parents planters. to get them out on the su
from Italy. The proportion of Sicilians plantations. There has been no Ita
applies throughout the state, although a mendicancy on the streets. An Ita


the

red
ing
or
ide
out
the
ans
>tal
nto
esi-
ers
ruit
-ive
ens,
ries

ari-
ian
ith-
sist
St.
che,
tin,
As-
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cot-
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ddo

ave
hold
fer-
irts
ents
and

is
tter
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,bor
ad-
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has
in
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are
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low
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ame

cial
lose
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,700
.398
day
ugh
no
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and
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and
ros-
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um-
iave
the
tion
ead-
ther
well

Pa-
ave
now
igar
ngar
lian
lian


q


6,500 Acres Round Timber, just south of Stuart.
Fronts Indian and St. Lucy Rivers; choice Pineapple
lands. Must be sold as a whole, $3.50 per acre.
C. BU KMAN 22 Hogan St.
SA JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


4I1111 I I3I II tl$ I I 4#1S IO|tt@ | i s4e sIIs 9 s11 1tei 11

SStandard Clothing Company




. One Price One Price
*


FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
* 17 and 19 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Florida.
S Ntetsoe and Hawes Hats. Speieal Attention Giren to Mall Orders.
d I I Si*I tui SsOIttItibetitli.i iiiiiiI IleS*44 4


W. J. L'ENGLE.
President.


J. W. WADE.
Vice-President.


E. G. HUGHES,
Sec'y and Tress


Union Naval Stores Co.


MOBILE, ALA.


PENSACOLA, FLA.


NEW ORLEANS, LA.


15353U11 5 a 31 EWE 0awwWICsen l MIEt Me% Earn11 son 35 won3 asw r


PEARL WIGHT,
President.


T. H. McCARTHY,
Vice-President.


MAURICE STERN,
Treasurer.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


SOUTHERN STATES LAND & TIMBER COMPANY,

IRVING H. WELCH Manager.



Florida Timber, Grazing &


Agricultural Lands.


: 401-404 LAW EXCHANGE.


Is I in ammmmaemaaI aamaaeammaaoaaeeimI Naasm2ma&&SSmm


MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


Boilermaking and Repairing

Still Boilers and Pumps.
SSHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.
*
Jacksonville. Fla.
* *I4It 44stl l 15449 t414lIItll3 tl9I5t41llltltl* lllltll *


FOR SALE.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
..........DEALERS IN.........

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable locations in West Flor-
ida, Alabama and Mississippi Liberal advances made against consignments. Cor-
respondence solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE. ALABAMA.



VIRGIN TIMBER.
Several tracts of 8,000 acres to 35,000 acres and
several good turpentine places already open

OFFERED FOR SALE
HEDRICK'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY,
112 West Fersyth Street. JACKSONVILLE FLORIDA.









TIlE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


beggar is unknown, as Irish and German
beggars are practically unknown. The cNew
Orleans beggar is usually the genuine
genus hobo. American born and of Ameri-
can descent.
However, the life within the Italian
quarter has been shown in its full power
by the searching inlve-stigations through
the Italian quarter. For years it has gone
on here unknown to the people of the city.
save when the Mafia slew Chief Hennes-
sey. and at periodic times since. when
bloody murders and-shootlng affrays have
broken out in the alleys andi courtyards
of the Iquarter. The feuds, the delbachery
of the naturalization laws. the prostitu-
tion of the privilege to vote-these come
to the surface, as the muddy water from
tihe eddies boils hthrougi the clear water
at the top of a swiftly running stream.
In tenements in the Italian quarter, even
where there is plenty of room. three and
four families have lben found crowded in
to thie space where one shllild have lived.
In (allatin street and one or tyo others.
once the hot le.d of the Mafia. recently the
hot bed of fever infection, the courtyards
were found piled one. two. three feet in a
decayed and putrid nma-s of stalled manure.
human filth, garbafe, old clothes, etc.. in
tnem. Rain barrels stood alout on the
manure heaps. Men slept in stalls next
door to horse in the stables. (oats and
chickens werefound. accordinily to official
report. (in the upper floors where they had
been raised. It was told about the city
early in the fever fight. and never demned
-ave by one newspaper editor, a director
of the Assoc'ated Press, in a banquet in
New York. where he was defending the
Associated Press from the onslaughts of
the special correspondents-that a yearling
cow was found up three flights of stairs.
where she had been taken when a calf. and.
because thle stairs hail broken down. hald
been kept there until maturity.
Absolutely the nearest approach to the
slum conditions of New York. to be found
anywhere in tle south, were found in
restricted "Little Italy." Aid in fighting
the fever, there was none. The Italians
waited for leath-and refused to screen,
to wash. to keep out of infected localities.
By the exercises of more strenuous police
power than the law actually gave. but not
quite as much as public sentiment would
have justified-the United States Marine
Hospital Service finally cleared "Little It-
aly" of yellow fever. It was (lone by
house-to-house search by the prompt tak-
ing of patients to the emergency hospital.
hv the forcible fumigation and sanitation
of houses. The people were argued with.
cajoled with-to no effect. Their own pri-
ests anil nuns went among them-they
remained oblurate. They were warned not
to venture into infected sections elsewhere.
not to visit their friends elsewhere through
tlhe city where sickness nlight lie. "lit-
tle Italy" was cleared. It remained clear-
ed for seven days. Then a nest of eases
was di-covered-and traced to a point of
concealed sickness on the outskirts of the
city.
One half the deatl that have occurre.l
among the Italians have been dlue. so the
physicians say. to obstinate and continu-
ed refusal to heed directions, or to waten
diet.
In consequence there has been a deal of
suffering among the poor Italians that has
never been written or told of in New Or-
leans or elsewhere. Of the women of
"Little Ttaliy" one-half are wearing mourn-
ing. Not all of these spell death. Mourn-
ing lhas become the fashion down there.
and the women wear black beceau'e it aids
entreaty from the relief committees.
Miany. f thie little shops are closed. The
fruit wlharves are idle. and the idle work-
men stand aliout in sullen groups. eve the
Marine Hospital officers, and conceal cases
of sickness.
That the fellow fever gained tihe
streilgthI it (didl. hIeft.*e tlie authorities
found it ot., or Iefore, it was aniiolnci.
is known to have been ldne to the fact tlat
tlie dli.eas gained foothold and headway
in a )unllation alno,,t impossible to pro;-
perly inspect. The point. right now. where-
on the mien who are quietly working to
frame new quarantine regulations and new
health system for New Orleans-is that
of properly inspecting and policing the It-
alian population of New Orleans.
"Little Italy" is the most congested spot
in New Orleans. perhaps the most congest-
ed spot in the south.


Just why the Italians concentrate in
New Orle:ans. live from hand to mouth, and
subject themselves to padronage and Mafia
bIlack mail instead of going out to tlhe
sugar plantations that are crying for labor.
is a question the people of the state are
-triving now to explain.
In New Orleans of the 13:.000 Italians
here, approximately 5.000 are dependent
on meagrre day wages earned at unorganiz-
ed day labor on the docks ani wharves
and in the streets. The fruit they nono-
polize on tlie ships. The organized dock
labor has ceased endeavoring to organize
the imeni who handle the bananas. In the
streets tlh Italians are the only white
laborers who will work in the unorganized
ranks with the negiroes.
outsidee New O(rleans there is room for
ten thousand lielil hands. wlio wihll get
houses, garden room. past lre for gioatts and
cattle. sind day pay at from 75 cents to
1 l dum-inI lIthe siuineir, and from $1 to $1.50
and $2 during the autumn, wvitli tenantage
and purcha-e in prospect.
In New I)rleans are the padrones iwho
ship the day laborers out on the construc-
tion gangL-. \whlio collect money ftr .teannlr
fare. who e--;t back money to Italy. charg-
ing a percentage tlerefor. But, in New.
Orleans there are the Italian societies, the
hievenolent andi thle malevolent. There are
tie churches tlere aIr tl!e sights anti
-omunds, anil mells if Italy. The gregari-
ous instinct seems to grow rampant when
the Italian arrives in America.
His suspicion throws him into the arms
of his own countrymen. whom his feelings
fell him mist le his best frienlds-and the
treatment he receives there makes him
Believe that the Americans must li very
devils.
The longer the foreign born Italian lives
in thel town a ini, his fellows the more
secretive anil suspicions he becomes. Only
the second generation loses this, through
tlie three or four years the youngsters
.attend school.
Those who have studied tile Italian de-
.*lares that the gregarious instinct. is his
rrcatcst fault. ldue chieflv to the tradition
of Sicily. whence lie comes, and to the hold
possessed over the greater number of those
who come. hy the padrones. and the chief
men. The 'taliani criminal societies have
their effect here showing themselves in
occasional niurders- hut it needs a Vanden-
burg to dig them out. In two wards in
New Orleans. ends of which lie in "Little
Italy." the Italians at the two last city
elections have been voted like sheep by the
ward leader. They have been supplied
with registration papers. given out through
certain leading men. and voted in gangs
and umnches. filing through the voting
booths without question.
The thefts and nmrders, the rapes, the
ille to tlie attention of the ant iorities. They
.ire lpnilsed. if punished at all. hy the
laiws of private iwronmz.
In the country this is different. There
the Italian. still keeping his thieving, his
murdering. etc.. to himself. saves his
mone-y is frugal. thrifty hard working--
and in addition leaves other people alone.
All this ihe is n thte city--ut in the
conntr. lie is frel I frim padrona e. In
five or six years Iit( either owns or leases
a small farm- or halis drifted back to tillc
city and into the ranks of the criminals or
the corner rocerynmen. In the tniuntiry tlhe
Italian. still not a part of tle American
lopulat ion. is out of policitcs-and is an
excellent farm machine. Ie makes money
for his employer and hls landlord--and for
himself.
ll this consideration. of course, are not
to lie considered of clahssed the ,professional
imen of thic hetfer typi e who colle over;
the young r sons of inerchants: the agent
si-nt hv steamship men. There are many
splendid citizens of Italian descent or
hirth in Nw rleans hut few of them are
Sic-ilians.


B. R. POWELL. CHAS.. HARRIS, HENRY ASHLEY,
President. Vice-President and Treasurer. Secretary.

DIRECTORS:
B. R. Powell Chas. 6. Harris, D. f. McMillan, P. L. Sutherland. R. V. Covlnaton.

THN

Southern Drug Manufacturing

Company
Corner of Forsythland Jefferson St.

Jacksonville, Florida.




Wholesale Drugs & Commissary Supplies
We solicit the Turpentine and Mill Trade and will be glad to quote prices on
anything in the drug line. We make packed drugs a specialty and can save you
money. Mail orders are given prompt attention.





Standard Naval Stores Co.,
JACKSONVILLE




| EXPORTERS

CARGO LOTS A SPECIALTY




Standard Naval Stores Co. JACKSONVILLE





CAPITAL STOCK $300,000.00



Jacksonville Naval Stores


Company

JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA


A NEW COMPANY

Will do a general naval stores commission business. We
guarantee Savannah prices upon day of arrival, and to make
prompt return.


Eac
It i
Profit!
We
custom




IJac


The best view of the Italians is in tlie
-e-ivenl coI.mninuitisi where the most pros-
e:eroois have plircha ei land. There they
have maidle the production two or three
ime-s more than it was. They have made
money where negroes have starved. They J. C
hanve taken abandoned conoa-grass cotton
phlantimiis in Nortl eastern ouiisiana and
have turned tlheii into gardens.
\lout Kenner. TLa.. they have done
n^.__-.^.-.-. ..- -.' ini> IXK41


A MUTUAL COMPANY

h shipper invited to become a stockholder.
s but fair and right that the operator should share in the
s of the selling end of his product.
have ample capital and facilities to take care of our
ners. Your business solicited.



ksonville Naval Stores Co,


Blum Building, Rooms 21-23


D. C. ASHLEY, President.


RANFORD


Jacksonville, Florida


W. P. ROBERTS. V. P. and Gen. Mgr.


J. F. FENDER C. H. BROWN
VICE-PRESIDENTS
S. H. BERG, Secretary and Treasurer


J. N. BRAY


(Con nue on page )


~mV


% %% *%% *%%*% 11 %IN. % *%.*% %% ----- -----










10 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

JAMES A. HOLLOMON.
Editor and Manaogr.
Published Every Friday.
ncu'ro ((Domestic)...83.00 Per Annum
seca rrI (Forein) .... 3.50 "

"The Pine and Its Products."

All communications should be addressed
The Industrial R-ecord Company.
Jecksonville, Fla.

Breneb Editorial and Bu oses Office at
Atlant. Ga. a Savannrh. Ga.

Entered at the Postoffice at Jacksonville, Fla..
as second-class matter.

Adopted by the Executive Committee
of the Turpentine Operators' Association,
September 12, 1902, as its exclusive offi-
ciaL organ. Adopted in annual conven-
tion September 11 as the organ also of
the general association.
Adopted April 27th, 1908, as the offi-
cial organ of the Interstate Cane Grow-
ers' Association. Adopted September
11, 1903, as the only official organ of the
T. O. A.
Commended to lumber people by spe-
cial resolution adopted by the Georgia
Sawmill Association.

The R.eeord's Offices.
The publishing plant and the main offi-
ces of the Industrial Record Company
are located at the intersection of Bay
and Newnan streets, Jacksonville, Fla.
in the very heart of the great turpentine
and yellow pine industries.
The Atlanta, Ga., office is located in the
Equitable Building, No. 723. Atlanta is
the.center of the great manufacturing
trade of the entire South.
The Savannah, Ga., office is in the
Board of Trade Building. Savannah is
the leading open naval stores market in
the .world.

Notice to Patrons.
All payments for advertising in the In-
dustrial Record and subscriptions thereto
must be made direct to the home office in
Jacksonville. Agents are not allowed to
make collections under any circumstances.
Bills for advertising and subcriptonare
sent out from the home office, when due,
and all remittances must be made direct
to this company.
Industrial Record Publishing Co.

THE RECORD FOR x9o6.
The Industrial Record, always progres-
sive and always looking for some oppor-
tunity to improve its columns and
strengthen its usefulness, will be a larger
and a better edited and a more aggres-
sive trade paper in 1906 than it has ever
been before. It will cover every branch
of industrial development in the South,
and will carry a number of new features
each week, including a portrait gallery of
leading Southern developers, the views of
a staff correspondent traveling among the
various industries of the Southeast, spec-
ial correspondence from all the leading in-
dustrial centers in its territory, etc. E'v-
ery reader of this paper should keep his
eye on the Record during 1906.

CHRISTMAS GREETING.
Before another issue of the Record will
be read by its subscribers that day of all
days when we should feel at peace with
the world will have passed and gone, for
the present year. Christmas is a day of
gladness and a day of sadness. It carries
us back to our childhood days, when with
all the happiness of expectancy we watched
for Santa Claus, and then enjoyed the re-
membrances that lie brought us. It car-
ries us forward to the Great Divide when
it makes us realize the flight of time, and
that each Yule Tide sees us neare6 the
end. But with it all it is a day that we
should lay aside our cares anl our ani-
mosities. We should be the inspiration for
happiness in our homes and among our
friends. What is happiness, but the joy
of making others happy? We wish all of
the Record's friends a merry Christmas an.l
a happy New Year!


Operators Must Keep Their Production Down


The Record is daily in receipt of letters
front operators expressing the highest sat-
isfaction at the general prospects for
1906. Through the Naval Stores Export
Company satisfactory minimums for both
turpentine and rosin have been guaran-
teed, not only for 1906 but for the next
live years. and if operators will now hold
the production down to where the consum-
ing world will take the supply, without
carrying over a surplus, prices next year
will be around figures that will mean good
profits to the producing interests. It is
a fact that a great many operators have
done some wild trading the past year. As
a general proposition unreasonable prices
have been asked and paid for round tim-
her. A great many operators accordingly
start the box cutting season heavily in
debt. These operators must produce at a
very appreciable profit or they will be
bankrupt. Thle course of wisdom, there-
fore, will be to keep the axe out of all
the timler they cannot work profitably.
and to conserve all of their operations to
the one determination to curtail their out-
put. If each operator in the territory east
of the Alabama river today would cut just
seventy-five per cent of the boxes he has


already figured upon and planned to cut,
the producing interests, collectively, in the
territory in question will ie five million
dollars better off the Ist day of next De-
cember. Some operator may think that he
is absolutely protected by the very sat-
isfactory minimums brought about by the
good work of the Naval Stores Export
Company, and that the burden of overpro-
duction, if any, must rest upon the ex-
porters. If the consumers of the world
will not take the supply; if there is a
heavy surplus carried over this year, as
there will ie; if the paint shops and the
soap factories continue using substitutes
for turpentine and rosin, to a marked de-
gree. then it is a fact that no combination
under heaven can maintain the nminimnums.
The operator must do his part. Alinimums
can le broken. If the production is less
than the consumptive demands, the mini-
mums can go any way. They will not be
needed. Prices will lie established on a
natural trading basis .away above these
figures anyway. Let the naval stores pro-
ducers take the situation in hand before
it is too late, keep their timber intact
and make less stuff at a profitable price,
than too much stuff at a losing price.


Let There Be Harmony In Every Branch,


The closing days of 1905 find the naval
stores prospects for 1906 brighter than
they have ever been before. There is now
complete harmony in the distributing
branch of the trade, and this harmony is
based on absolute protection for the pro-
ducing interests. The conditions as a
result are necessarily encouraging. With
the operators and factors united for their
mutual interests and the exporters united
to sustain these interests, certainly no man
can doubt the wisdom of such a combina-
tion of -forces. We approach the New
Year, therefore, with good records behind
us and promising conditions ahead of us.
Tlhe Naval Stores Export Company, which
company was organized by producers and
factors at the beginning of the present
naval stores season, accomplished in six


lars in money, from June to December, by
establishing high minimums and maintain-
ing prices above such minimums, but it
has brought about an agreement between
all the exporters by which satisfactory
minimums can be maintained for the next
five years. Nor is this all. By eliminat-
ing friction the consuming world will set-
tle itself down to a firm trading basis,
contented to pay good prices so long as
they know that the market is natural and
not vacillating to the whims and schemes
of fighting interests. For Jacksonville an
open market will be of great advantage.
This city will soon have deep water, and
then it can command the foreign ship-
ments that it is entitled to by reason of
its proximity to the pine tree. The pro-
ducers through their export company have


months what years of friction could not won a great victory and it now behooves


have accomplished. Not only did it save
the naval stores producers of the yellow
pine belt something over five million dol-


RAILWAY INCOMES DURING 9go5.
Washington, Dec. 14.-One of the publi-
:ations annually issued by the Interstate
Commerce Commission is a brief report on
the income accounts of operating roads.
which is intended to show, at the earliest
practicable date, the principal items in-
*luded in railway income accounts. The
preliminary report for the last fiscal year
includes returns for 752 companies, repre-
senting an operated mileage of 214,477.82
miles, which is presumably about 99 per
cent of the mileage that will subsequently
te covered by returns in the final report
for the same year. The gross earnings
of the railways for the year ending June
30. 1905, on the mileage just stated were
$2,073,177;325. This total comprised earn-
ings from the passenger service, $572,109,-
:366; earnings from the freight service. $1,-
449.182,702. and miscellaneous earnings,
i51,885,257.

BROWN SELLS TO BYRD.
Live Oak, Fla., Dec. 14.-Charles H.
Brown, president of the First National
Bank and interested in several large tracts
af turpentine land throughout the State.
has sold his turpentine interests near Live
Oak to Lee Byrdl, also of this city. Mr.
Byrd also purchased from Mr. Brown at
the same time his interest in the Ethel
Hotel, which makes th's property belong
in toto to Mr. Byrd.


every interest, all along the line, to join
in and strengthen the position on which it
is won.


CUBA RAISES QUARANTINE.
Dr. J. L. Romero, of this city, the con-
sular representative of the republic of Cu-
ba, yesterday received a cablegram from
the Cuban Government officially announc-
ing the raising of the quarantine which
Cuba has maintained since last July
against all ;Gulf and South Atlantic ports.
The cablegram stated that the quaran-
tine was formally raised yesterday and
that all vessels proceeding from Gulf ports
should Iefore starting on their first voy-
age to Cuban ports ie thoroughly disin-
fected and be certified by the health au-
thorities as "clean." to insure their ad-
mission to ('Cublan ports.
Tlie raising of the quarantine maintain-
ed by (' Cuba will be appreciated, now that
the tourist travel to the island has begun.
For a month or more there has been no
restriction on through travel from the
North. but all persons starting from
Southern ports have been delayed and
greatly annoyed by the senseless quaran-
tine restrictions.
The present indications are that there
will be a heavy tourist travel to Cuba
this winter. Several railroad companies
have established agencies for the winter
in (Cuba and special attention is being
paid by the transportation companies to
securing the travel from Cuba to various
Isints in the I'nited States.


D. R. EDWARDS DEAD.

One of Florida's Most Prominent Opera-
tors Passes Away.
Daniel R. Edwards, a prominent turpen-
tine operator of Lawtey, died at his late
residence there Wednesday morning at 7:30
o'clock. He was a native of North Caro-
lina. but had lived in Florida a number of
years, ten of which were spent in Lawtey.
lie was taken sick last Sunday, but his
physician did not feel alarmed and until
Tuesday afternoon had hopes of his re-
covering. lie attended the Turpentine Ope-
rators' meeting here last week and seemed
to be in the best of health. He was elected
a member of the executive committee of
the Turpentine Operators' Association at
the meeting last week.
He leaves a large circle of friends in this
city, who were deeply grieved to learn of
his sudden demise. He was a member of
Highland Icidge No. 75, and Lake Butler
Cllapter No. 19, Order of Masons.
He leaves besides a wife, nine children.
They are Daniel R., Jr.. Ada Goodwin, Wil-
liam Howell. Lewis Middleton, May Eliza-
IHth. Anna Brown, Walter Lawrence and
Able Louise Edwards.
Funeral services took place yesterday at
Lawtey. This morning at 10:30 o'clock the
body arrived in this city and was taken
to Woodlawn Cemetery, where the inter-
ment took place.
The pallbearers were D. H. MeMillan,
1. Little, B. S. Catlett, S. J. Melson,
Lee Taylor and .. B. McNeill.

TANK COMPANY HAS ELECTED OFFI-
CERS.

Jacksonville Man Succeeds John R. Young
as President.
The annual meeting and election of offi-
cers of the National Tank and Export
Company was held yesterday morning.
The new officers are:
President-. II. Burroughs, Jackson-
ville.
Vice-Presidents-A. D. Covington, Jack-
sonville; J. A. G. Carson, Savannah.
Directors-B. F. Bullard, C. W. Saussy,
.1. W. Motte, J. F. Dusenhury, H. L. Rich-
mond, R. B. Powell and J. B. Chesnutt of
Savannah; J. C. Little, Jacksonville; Ray-
mond Cay, Tallahassee; W. J. Hillman,
Jacksonville; J. B. Padgett, Gainesville,
Fla., and S. A. Alford, Chipley.
Secretary and Treasurer-H. L. Kayton,
Savannah.
Executive Committee-J. H. Burroughs,
J. W. Motte, B. F. Bullard, J. A. G. Car-
son and A. D. Covington.

CHANGES IN CIRCULATION.
Changes in circulation during the month
were of minor consequence, except in the
ease of national bank notes, in which there
was an increase of a little over $9,000,000,
which was about the increase in the cir-
culation as a whole for the period in ques-
tion. The increase for the year was a lit-
tle over $88,200,000. The most important
item of increase for the year, as for the
month, was found in the case of national
hank notes, which showed a gain of over
$72,800,000. There were increases of over
$1,500,000 in gold coin and over $7,000,000
in gold certificates. The money in circu-
lation on December Ist last amounted to
$2,(662,134,539. On the basis of a popula-
tion estimated at 83,843,000. the figure
riven by the Treasury experts, the circu-
lation per capital amounted to $31.75, an
increase of 6 cents over the figure for No-
vember 1, tie highest level hitherto at-
tained, and a gain of 53 cents as compared
with the corresponding date last year.

"MEN WHO ARE MAKING THE
SOUTH."
The Industrial Record begins th:s week
-a feature that will not only be pleasing to
all of its readers, but of especial value as
a history for the young men of today who
will le the developers of the future. This
feature is told in the caption above-"Men
Who Are Making the South." It will con-
tain each week the portrait of some man
who is making his mark as a Southern
"captain of industry." This week it is
Mr. A D. Covington, who was last week
elected for the fourth time president of
the Turpentine Operators' Association.
Next week it will be somebody else. Who?
Watch next week's Record.








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11



THE CHRISTIE-GROOVER DRUG CO.,

WHO LESALE DRUGGISTS.
Nt-*rWt R T MMWWiNUs AT N@ME ANM 9AVE TIME AND MOMET. JAUKSWOVILE, FiLOWR4.


Review of Naval Stores for a Week.

Spirits and Rosin. I ...................... 3,371% 3.25
The naval stores market yesterday .-.................. .3.0 2.60
showed a moderate advance in the price of ................... ... 9 2.
spirits of turpentine and the higher level E .................... 2.8 2.52/
for rosin which was indicated in the after ..........-...... 22
D .......................2.80 2.50
close trading of the previous day. The D ................... 2.780 2.47
pl)irits of turpentine market opened firm .('BA -. ..2.77% 2.47*..
at 63% cents, with sales of 470 casks, and Sales 0 receipts 520, exports .553.
closed at 64 cents, with additional sales Tuesday De 12-Rosin firm; sales ,-
of 347 casks. After the close further saies r ei pt .
were made the closing price, but not all 597 receipts 32. E shipments 8,460 AB33.02
the receipts were taken. The receipts were $2771-2; D $2.85; E$2.921-2; F $3(3.02
1.180 casks, and the shipments 120, all to 1-2;: $3.410; h $ 4.85; $3.47 10; K $3.97
domestic points. 1-2; M $4.47 1-2; N $4.85; WG $5.10; WW
The rosin market opened and closed firm $5.
at prices below, with sales of 1,533 bar- Wedneudav, Dec. 13.-Rosin firm; sales
rels at the opening. No sa!es were report- ; r ts 2; shipments 100
ed at the close nor were any made in the te A. r s (. 2.921-2; D $3; i $3. o
late trading, no offerings being on the Quote: A. .1 C. $2.92 1-2; D $3; 1 I
market because of the weather which had 1-; F $ $103.; 3.20@3.221-2; H-
$3.35: 1. $3.521-2: K $4.02 1-2; M $4.52 1-2;
made it impossible for inspectors to pre- $ 14.51. \\WG -5.15: i; $5.40.
pare samples. The receipts were 3,300 N $ $5.4
barrels, and the shipments 4,449. all to
domestic points. Thursday, Dec. 14.-Rosin firm; sales
1,5313; receipts. 3.300; shipments, 4.449
Spirits for the Week at Savannah. Quote: A, B, C. $3.05; D $3.10; E $3.15;
F $3.25; G $3.35; H $3.45; I $3.52 1-2; E
Price Rcpts Sales Exp 1904 $4.021-2; M $4.52 1-2; N $4.90; WG $5.15;
Mon., Dec. 11..61 392 0 375 471/ WW $5.40.
Tues., Dec. 12..61 1,39 1,459| 265471/,
Wed., Dec. 13..63/ 856 8001 32547%
Thur., Dec. 14..64 1,18 8171 120471/2 Savannah Naval Stores Statement.
The following are figures and quotations
Rosin for the Week at Savannah. of the naval stores market as posted at
Monday, Dec. 11. Last Year. the Board of Trade:
WW .................... 5.35 5.15 Spirits. Rosin
W G ..................... 5.10 4.75 Exports ...................... .....
N ....................... .4.85 4.50 Exports for season ...... 88,458 183,22'
M ....................... 4.47%/ 4-30 Last year ............... 55,136 138,45
K ....... .......... .... 3 971/, 3.90 Coastwise ............... 120 4,44(


also conltains nitrogen, for tle reason that
it will cost something for converting the
bone into super-phosphate, and because


W. F. COACHMAN,
President.


J. P. WILLIAMS,
Vce-Preident.


W. J. KELLY,
Vice-President and Treas.


The Naval Stores Export Company


Capital, $1,250,000.00


Bra ich Office 9.
SAVANNAH,GA.
FERNANDINA, FLA.
PENSACOLA, FLA.
TAMPA, FLA.
NEW ORLEANS, LA
CHICAGO, ILL.
NEW YORK.


oFIC^ Jacksonville, Fla.


COMMENCED BUSINESS JUNE 1, 1905


Owned and controlled by Naval Stores Producers and Factors throughout the Yellow Pine
District in South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas


The Object of this Company is to Bring Producer and Consumer into Closer Relations.



For Quotations and Particulars, Address,



THE NAVAL STORES EXPORT COMPANY 5

602 DOWLING GrEE .BLD'G Jacksonville, Fla. 1128-110 UNITY BVILDING
NEW YORK CHICAGO, ILL.


K. P. THAGARD,
Secretary.


EftXUg


i


t


7

9


r a


~?sr_~s.;~sl~s~s~sr~lrr~?~?;lr~?;~u~


C(oastwise for season .... 73,169 304,947
I~ast year ............... 75,442 328,482
receipts Thursday ....... 1,180 3,300
Iast year ................ 402 2,613
Iccipt s since Sept. I.... 184,272 530,445
Last year ............... 159,429 484,848
Stock Thursday ......... 28,045 67,608
La-st year ............... 35,3$46 62.459

SAVANNAH LUMBER MARKET.
Exports of lumber and cross-ties from
Savannah for thle season bIeginning April
1, 190(M. as posted at Board of Trade:
Lumber. Steam. Sail.
Thursday ........... ........ ........
W eek ............... ................
Month ............. 16,426,681 414.381
Since April 1 ....... 55,285,995 45,545,386
Where Shipped- .
Foreign ............ 6,386,330 777,318
Baltimore .......... 11,692,837 4,228,0o 8
Philadelphia ........ 5.874,56il 7,309.908
New York ............. 27,051,710 18.435
Boston .............. 4.280,564 6.227,841
Other ports ................ 7.775,395

SOIL EXHAUSTION AND THE USE OF
FERTILIZERS.
A large proportion of the commercial
fertilizers used on the farm is applied in
the fall. and especially on the wheat crop,
which, in this section, is seeded down at
that season. Fertilizers are costly or
cheap, according to the manner in which
they are used. When used in the spring
the safest mode of applying phosphoric
acid is as super-phosphate (or acidulated
rock), in order to derive benefit from it
as speedilly as possible, but on the wheat
crop, which allows quite a period of time
before the growing season, the cheaper
form of phosphate is ground bone, which


there may be a loss of the soluble phos-
phoric acid during the %winter from rains,
which, however, depends upon the charac-
ter of the soil, the loss being lighter on
clay soils than on those that are sand%.
Nitrogen is not so important in the sum-
mer and fall, compared with the results
derived from it in the spring, as it is very
soluble and quickly shows its effects when
applied to tle crop. Nearly all the phos-
phates, if derived from bone. contain ni-
trogen, and there will consequently be no
lack of that material at any period. Pot-
ash in the shape of muriate or sulphate of
potash, it is not very costly.
Although commercial fertilizers can be
made to supply the elements that are
wanting in the soil, the use of barnyard
manure that has been thoroughly ferment-
ed will supply all that may be required by
plants; but the point in selecting fertiliz-
ers is to procure-those that assist to make
the barnyard manure more complete. The
farmer can judge of the quality of his
manure, to a certain extent, by comparing
its quality with that of the food from
which it is produced. Rich food makes
rich manure, and yet if the food is rich
in nitrogen and deficient in phosphate it is
only rich so far as its use is to be ap-
plied to certain kinds of crops, as some of
the crops prefer the manure rich in nitro-
-en; others desire potash, while again
others thrive best on manure abounding in
the phosphate. By carefully selecting the
fertilizers that will "balance" the ma-
nure the farmer will save the expense of
procuring substances of which he is not
in need.











12 TiH E" \VI KIV Y I 'r I:I.\r, ) I .c< I ).




Jacksonville Grocery Comp'y

w., RI,,, Wholesale Grocers and Distillers' Supplies.
Manager. Office and Waroheftcye Viaauet r 0. L. Ry. Jacksonville, FlorIda


Wanted and For Sale


DEPARTMENT.

Adolerti.einents Willf he Inserted in This Dlpartmcn f at the Foll~ottng Rates:

lior it rhr t. K-., .. ..

f~nt1,fee O fN'ifnfe w f flm&ia'ff ;-I. V 'rf -f rt.-

,o, faflt~i:Mi Itlfft e si-d r N,'t 1r .. r 1,
.nof tli '.fng ft, ferft t3


Help Supplied.
Florida H1elp Supply (Conmpnny is noI,
fully orranif':e'l. intorl,"1ratedl and i .lv tI,
lu iiness. with h]eadq(airters lHioni 0. Ii\
it. -ton P.hlr. Main annd IFrvytli S ,.rt-
Jla-kronville. We supply Saw Mill. T'iu
I,n ine. Quarry and llailr;lad hanwl[. :e:!
,i m1n Cook and Hlou-e Seovant, to ti n
:tind all points in the South. ('orresliii.
et'n'e 'liit'ied.


Wanted


ianl. 11 It 'i : I ,. I n ,t;-. 0 i--.


Position Wanted.


I W
:2


Woodsman Wanted.


S!:'


'0i1


WHISKIES
GINS \0D RUMS
FRO'l

$1.50 to S5 00 per Gallon


ILewis 1866 and Mouunt Vernon
Puse RKe WhikLs.


I'r:, "! I i i .


CHAS. 8 UM & CO.
5i7 actl ;" V.EST BAY STRF. T.
i '. .- -t' i ILL.F FLA.




ABSTRACTS
I lh aun.i 'Ta\ t\h-r,.i't'. Mnps. etc
It :ilftr, tl;c il aii l I'arts of i'htrida an t
< ,ith (ieor't., itiepirrel fur oi\viw rs :aTI.I
il i.p inif rli r ,i ser I I 'i re ; fffinilc .
.licitted.

REALTY TITLE AND TRbST CO,
. l. i, e IH I .. .Ia;,k- \ ilJ c. il P :


C. H. Hargraves Co., HUTClINsN AUDIT co.

Pilblic Accouiltanls & Aiid.tors


WHOLESALE GROCERS.


GRAIN, HAY AND FEED.


514-516 518-520-522-524-52f
EAST BAY SI EET.
JACKSONVIL1 E


Board of Trade Buildint


Phone 3112


1.

, FLORIDA


_o


.lacksonv Ilp, Fla.


Un-Armeican Peruliarities of the Italian
Laborer in the South.
I '.t f tifileld "If, p a;'.e I. ll

,M hr- \\illh ivane |lnfl; that lihave beel
. i,-I-t lI. .\l u ;iIt I ih they have es-
lili-hl ld I.I.irkIt ,. i l. : fi,. t .l 't-. :I fId ; wIIH)It
\ \\ i r' 111h a 1 ih1; a l. < ltC t I sa114
0 lt. \ nt iiln Ilhe 'et' 'l i' -. t !h inf ivi-
I l v il i- hl ir 4 idt .l i l in'ti -allita;i*ry a Iupi r-
''- I. .nld i:o' p|i \rll ;l- r;Isy victims
I I 111 I ;l ll ;I llll r l s ; enIle'S of
,lll- ltolit i I;I.l the lt;llitllln ofln t e con -
. t- l r tl ,il ric lt. inll \ \\ h'tra ltls.
:-ii;n l ll ill ll I. I hit i t t lh y have pre-
<-red the tni- 4 ft e-uspici n.- e.retive-
.r-. n\n f-anitary life. 'Thery have Pstah-
i--h- ill l.-,uir iall a fe e omiimu ities of
r'.11 fr--. thalt are -ertiont of the Iett of
i.OWl traESnimeil hire. Tlpy ORLEAS ADli

ThIy IhIe ;till. i.i iugnr inldutriy-- e-
',I. tfhi rli ; tlh inly ilah r that could
'. ,i tainted and lih.r %\% s ti ie had or
" inl dl %trv \\;I rll:lel.
T'Ilic i.lhiirm re-ml in,- ;in iIny lal)r lhe
lit.in l tilt wfr ill I;# a, good from tile
- .,I, i;.trial -ii nliit nt. \ith fewer
'i:\ ,l'!.< f'oi tfih -ori;al' Traile nnian.

LOW RATES TO NEW ORLEANS AND
RETURN VIA ATLANTIC COAST
LINE.
'I hl \t1 l;1l ii iv + ,. l. ;n i ;liiili ellll< that
\ will -'II liil. litm all p.intsl nl its
i li1 \o\\ iI'r, I .. ;lln r'|rl li on
I k llll 2-7. 2'. *"2 19.15. ;at tlhe rate of
i r' lirI cl- n pin- tI \\<'nty live cents
Ih n l irip. Final limit ,f all
'6i1.\41- iil l., .1:11.,ry Ii. l!li i. prior to
,,,li i.'. il 'l" \\ lii- i; i-~ il IIIU-t r. ie ll
f-, itlt l I fi i' f po.1 1 il lll.
I" r' l 'l h ior n uill m l: 1 iol -i' .Atlantic
l + :i-I l.ihn. +\ riIl -. or ri:
! I.'I\e N ( Iitll. 'l.S ON.


t4- It:: t1 i I-I- 1 +: ....I + ti+++I 4+t.l- ti It 11i- 1 t1 I Ii l: 44:4I
PRICE LIST OF +

Eureka Wine and Liquor Co. :
The Great Southern Mail Order House. *


J. W. WEST, D. M FLY'N H I CI;fMOND
JOH4 E HARR!. S'c v aJn Trcas -o
President. w. I KFT I T D R Wi I A' MS '
Vtcc-PFre -i 'tis Ass' s (c'v and Treas. -




WEST FLYNN & HARRIS CO.j
q i GERMANI BLDG. Savarnnah, Ga '
S GENERAL OFFICES
0 WEST BLDG. Jacksonville. Fla *4


i NAVAL STORES FACTORS,
NAVAL STORES RECEIVED AT SAVANNAH, GA., JACKSONVILLE, -
FLA., AND FERNANDINA, FLA. ;

* Wholesale Grocers also Dealers in Hay. Grain and Heavy :
* Harness. 4

SS E AG NTS for the Celebrated Uniou Turpentine Axes,
SOLE AGENTS and Wilson &Childs Philadelphia Wagons. -
SMERCHANTS WAREHOUSES,
SAVANNAH, GA. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. TAMPA, lrLA 9

03~9)00~PZ~;P~C;13~2+-S~-Cii4.


T
*

4.
4.-
t
4
4.





+
*1-
?*
4i.
*


i.
4.

*1*



I
4.


EXPRESS PREPAID.

H:itehett' Priv;;s t' Stock .. .. ..
f:l tch(fett Th i \Viisk'y .. .. ..
Hlfnthrftt' ()hi ye ........ ..
' -.r.ks N. (i Apple Brandy ..
; ''ka ,' t t i . .... .....
;, :. N ( '.:. h Hrandy .. ..
. I :, ' ,,ly . .. .. ...
S . . .. .
i ', X . .. ...
r'-r *!r. ' ,r f IX X . . .
r \ 'r r i, . i. N .. .. ... .
S . .. .
<, k I:r,, Sour ash
k K.r


FULL QUART MEASURE
Per Four Six Per
Gallon. Quarts. Quarts. C;ise.
.. .. .. .. $4.00 $40.00 $0..o0 12i
. .. .. .. .. 4.50 4.60 6.90 13: 7.
........ .. 3.20 3.20 4.S0 9.
... .. ...... 4.75 4.75 7.00 14.00
... .... .. .3.25 3.25 4.85 9.70
... .. .. 4.00 4.00 6.00 12.00
.... ... 4.75 4.75 7.00 14.0i
. ........ 3.5 3.25 4.85 9 70
.......... 3.25 3.25 4.85 9.70
..... .. .... 3.00 3.00 4.50 9.00
... .. .. .. .. 2.75 2.75 4.15 8.3.
........ 2.50 2.50 3.75 7.50
. ........ 4.F 4.50 6.75 13.50
. ...... ..4.r 4.50 6.75 13.50
...... .. 3.75 3.75 5.65 11.30
........ 3.75 3.765 5.65 11.3n
.... .. 4.50 4.5 6.90 12.75
........ 5.00 5.25 7.S5 15.70
.... .. 3.75 4.00 6.00 12.00


GIN FROM $2.50 TO $3.50 PER GALLON. DELIVERED
S t .ii, lIa' bhels of lintclhei lI' \ate Stock and secure a bottle free.
- i nl\ I Itbols if Il:tch.tti f il Rye :ind secure a bottle free.
', i:hIbols of II.tclhttf Thait's Whiskey and secure a bottle free.
f.f i. i Is .. f 1' ,"rek:n N. i I',rll ;intl secure a bottle free. Save
i i, .f i 1- i N ('. Ap p'' t'lndy antd secure one bottle free. Save
S, : i.s f l rI.k M:,l t t.nii ni. one hbittle free. Prices of all goods
'.9: r 'itiIn r ;It .-f r erillon less than when delivered. No
i . 1,,, -x r1', i '-'. .\., if my bottles a.re full measure. All
si '' *: t oif h 'k. ,,i ,-d ov tr my ttr at Irec per drink. 15
\,' ;Ii\ carry in stock liquors of cheaper grades. 10
All \n 't quoted ,n application -
Si'. i.il prices i: large lots, packed any sizes desired. Leaves 5 for you
Sati-f';ciorrn guitarateed or money refunded.
EUREKA WINE AND LIQUOR. COMPANY.
1::- WVK.-ST BAY STR EET, JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA.


1 11-0-144341*fi1131,4111 11Ittt14I 91l 1413tI11 I13111114 1111441131 1 134


Special attention to Turpentine and Sawmill
Men's Requirements. A Florida firm otr
Floridians.







TIlE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 13


H. W. SAVAGE, President.


B. G. SAVAGE, Sec'y and Treas.


J. C. WHITFORD, rlanager.


Savage & Whitford Carpet Company,
CARPETS, n1ATTINGS, SHADES AND CURTAINS FROM MANUFACTURER DIRECT TO YOU.
131 West Bay Street.


GREAT NAVAL DRY DOCK NEEDED
AT THE PENSACOLA NAVY YARD.
Washington, Dec. 10.-Provision for
construction of a drydock at Pensacola,
la., capable of accommodating the largest
ships in the navy, is urged by Rear Admi-
ral W. L. Capps, chief constructor of the
navy, in his annual report made public
at the Navy Department today. The ne-
censity for a large dock at this point
arises, it is pointed out, from the strategic
importance of Pensacola.
Regarding docking facilities elsewhere
on the Atlantic coast the chief constructor
says there are only two docks on this
coast in which it is possible to dock large
battleships and cruisers and that until the
docks under construction at Portsmouth.
N. H., New York. Ixageue Island. Norfolk.
Charleston and Mare Island are completed
the work of the bureau ,f construction
and repair is performed at a disadvantage.
The report says that while it was antici-
pated that the cost of tle construction of
the Connecticut in a navy yard would ex-
ceed the contract price of the Iouisiana.
her sister -essel. under construction at the
Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock
Company, every effort is being made to
-keep the cost within the limit fixed by
Congress, and it is hoped that it w1ll not
be necessary to recommend an extension
of the limit of cost in this case. The late
of completion of the two vessels will not
differ to any considerable extent.
Regarding the development of navy
yards this recommendation is made:
"That for each navy yard a general
plan of development of the yard as a whole
shouldd be prepared as soon as practicable
by a board composed of the commandant.
the heads of the working departments and
such other officers not attached to the
yard as the Secretary of the Navy may
consider it advisable toi assign to such
duty, such plans when finally considered
and approved by the department and bu-
reaut concerned to be subject only to such
minor changes as may be necessary in
view of new conditions which may have
arisen."


WM. D. JONES
PRESCRIPTION SPECIALIST
.. and...
FAMILY DRUGGIST
107 E. BAY ST.
Mall Orders Solicited.

JOHN S. FRANZ. Agent





for
Cuts
and
Prices


Diebold Safe & Lock Co.
Jacksonville. Florida

H ROBINSON. Pres. H. GAILLARD. Oahler
W. B. OWEN. Vice-Pres.

Commercial Bank,
State Depository.
BRANCHu: Ocala. Fla.. Lake City. Fla
Jacksonville, - - Florida


WILLIAM A. BOURS JAMES O. DARBY

WILLIAM A. BOURS & COMPANY
THE OLDEST ESTABLISHED GRAIN AND SED HOUSE IN THE STATE.
Hay, Grain, Feed, Garden


Seeds, Poultry Supplies, Flour,
Grits, Meal and Fertilizers.
OUR MOTTO: Prompt Shipment, Reliable GOms.


Cataloue Free


206 EAST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


CYPRESS TANKS
Are Best by Every Test
Cypress withstands the effects of heat and moisture
better than any other wood, shrinks and swells less
than other wooS, is impervious to acids, hold paint
well and lasts for aees without decaying. Located
as we are, right in the great cypress forests, we are
able to secure the best selection of the wood and at
very low prices. We have been building tanks for
more than a quarter of a century and boldly assert
that no tanks are better built or will last nger.
Send for catalog and prices.
G. M. DAVIS ft SON


PA LATH A, FLORIDA


Standard Electric Co.,


JACKSONVILLE,


- FLA.


STAV S NON BETTER MADE
ISTAVES Prompt Shipments.
OTTER CREEK LUMBER CO., Jacksonville, Fla


She EVERETT HOTEL
235 WEST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Centrally located, thoroughly repaired and renovated. Newly furnished. European plan.
G. H. MASON, Proprietor.

AN INNOVATION!
THE GUARANTY TRUST & SAVINGS COMPANY is now insuring titles to
property in Dural County. Call and let us explain our methods.

GUARANTY TRUST & SAVINGS COMPANY,
Capital, s1oo, ooo.oo.
James W. Spratt, President. W. M. Bostwick, Jr., Vice-President.
Harlow Barnett, Secretary and Treasurer.
4 per ceat interest paid on depo sits.


ri ti n g Send your order to the Industrial
Record. Prompt and satisfactory


The M etropolis


Is the Paper you want. It is
published daily and is from 12
to 16 hours ahead of any other
daily newspaper in Florida.


$5.00 a Year $2.50 Six Months

Full Telegraphic and Stock
reports. If you want to keep
posted on the news, get the
Metropolis.


CARTER & RUSSELL PUB. CO.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
SC-- -- ----


I


?C~C~WCSCJC3C3i~,~S~SC~CSirCSCSE3CSC1C3C


SC3CSmC3L~XSCSOE3CSCTJC3iiSOCLSaCSm'C1C


TITITISISIC,~SISIT~TI~=+SISISI~IS+SUSC~S


YPIPIPIPY~'~~~r~~~Y`EII1~-~-~~I~-F


1YI


j







14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



COVINGTON COMPANY,
JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA.
W holes e SHOES, HATS. DRY
W oIsale GOODS, NOTIONS..
"SUCCESS FOR. OUR. CUSTOMERS IS SUCCESS FOR VS."
We have succeeded. Sales increased (5009) five hundred per cent in five years.
Call on us in our new building corner Bay and Market Streets, We will do the rest.


Joseph Zapf & Co.
Wnl&lall Dealrs hi mi Iellrs f
AnheuserBusch
St. Louis Lager Beer
Wholesale
LIQUORS. WINES,
Mineral Waters.
Write for Price
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA


FIRE INSURANCE-Lowest rates. Lo
ren H. Green & Co, 9 and 10 Park Bldg.,
Jacksonville, Fla. 6mo

Florida

Electric Co.
Contracting Electrical Engineers
Sell and Install Complete Electric Light
and Power Plants, Telephone Ex-
change. Wholesale Electric
Supplies.
JackAsoavile, Fla.


14 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
The CLOTHIERS
EVERYTHING THAT IS GOOD AND
SMART IN WEARING APPAREL FOR
MEN AND BOYS.
Sam'l P. Holmes& Co.
Stocks, Bonds, Cotton,
Grain and Provisions.
NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE
CIICAGO BOARD OF TRADE
Direct private wires to all exchanges.
Local stocks and bonds a specialty.
BeH Phole 853 Baldwin Block


Lombard Iron Works
and Supply Company
BUILDERS AND DEALERS IN


ENGINES, BOILERS.
Cotton, Saw, Fertiliser, Oil and Ice Ma-
chinery, and Supplies and Repairs.
Capacity for 200 Hands.
Machine Tools, Wood-Working Machinery,
Shafting, Pulleys, Hangers, Leather ana
Rubber Belting and Hos, Railroad and
Mill Supplies and Tools.
Plans and estimates furnished for Power
Plants and Steel Bridges.
Steam Pumps. Feed Water Heaters and
Hoisting Engines.
AVGUSTA. GEOR.GIA.


F
I






F,2

22-o0


MONARCH TYPEWRITER
TYPEWRITERS
RENTED REST
PAIRED BARGAINS
SECOND- HAND MACHINES
Naval Stores Operators
Should Investigate
The Modern Visible
Writer
BEST QUALITY
Carbon, Ribbons, Supplies
Telephone 833
Record Bldg. Newnan and Bay Streets.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
State Dealers


EXCHANGE
a


GETTING'S


...FOR...


NITURE


Send for
Catalogue


Kohn = Furchgott = Company.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


West Bay Street
JACKSONVILLE


~aCrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr~mrur~t~rrrrrrr SE3LC~Ci~Sir~J


Essmmmmmcssmmcsarwscsrs~Es~Ex3Esaamacs~E


--






THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 15


TIMBER LANDS FOR SALE
We have them. Several splendid large and small turpentine locations, saw-
mills and sawmill locations.
Some excellent bargains in large and small tracts of round and boxed
timber lands. Large tracts of Mississippi Delta and Hardwood lands. A
splendid list of valuable property and fine location for a colony or stock
farm in Southeast Georgia.
Some of the choicest residence places in the beautiful little city of DeFuniak
Springs, Fla., and in Milton, Fla. Our prices and terms are reasonable. Call
on or write us.
TfRWIIR L IYUIRv n REAL ESTATE 4a ABSTRACT CO.
TURnER &, AYMARD, iU . OA 115 hFulak Sprlgs, Fla. ASflmc I Curt s.



SThe Clyde Steamship Company


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
CAPITAL S300,000 SURPLUS and UNDIVIDED PROFITS $414760.91
We issue Time Certificates of Deposit. which draw interest at the rate ofthree per ceat per
a*nnm, if held ninety days or longer. Take advantage of this and kt yeor savrlgs a earftrg
soirfthiang for you. Particular attention paid to Out-of-Town accounts. sending deposits by mal
R. S. HALL, Pres. H. B. CLARKSON, V. P. and Mgr. H. A. FORD, See. and Tresa.


Marion Hardware Company,

Hardware, Mill and

Turpentine Supplies


OCAtLA,


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
The magnificent steamships of this line are appointed to sail as follows, calling at
Charleston, S. C., both ways.


From New York,
(Pier 36 North River.)


STEAMER.


From Jacksonville for
Charleston and New York.


Friday, Dec. 1,at3:00pm..APACHE ...... Wednesday, Dec. 6,atl2:30pm
Saturday, Dec. 2, at3:00pm..tALGONQUIN. Friday, Dec. 8, at 1:00pm
*xONONDAGA. Saturday, Dec. 9, at 1:30pm
Tuesday, Dec. 5,at 3:00pm. .ARAPAHOE... Sunday, Dec. 10, at 5:00am
Wednesday, Dec. 6, at3:00pm. .IROQUOIS. .... Monday, Dec. ll, at 5:30am
Friday, Dec. 8, at3:00pm. .COMANCHE... Wednesday, Dec. 13. at 7:00am
Saturday, Dec. 9,at3:00pm. .tHURON...... Friday, Dec. 15,at 8:30am
*xCHIPPEWA. Saturday, Dec. 16, at 9:00am
Tuesday, Dec. 12. at 3:00pm..APACHE....... unday, Dec. 17, at 10:00am
Wednesday, Dec. 13, at 3:00pm. .ALGONQUIN.. Monday, Dec. 18, at 10:30am
Friday, Dec. 15. at 3:00pm. .ARAPAHOE... \Wednesday, Dec. 20, at 12:00n'n
Saturday, Dec. 16, at 3:00pm. .tIROQUOIS.... Friday, Dec. 22, at 12:30pm
..xONONDAGA.. Saturday, Dec. 23,at 1:00pm
Tuesday, Dec. 19. at 3:00pm. .COMANCHE... Sunday. Dec. 24, at 1:00pm
Friday. Dec. 22, at 3:00pm. .APACIHE...... \Wednesday, Dec. 27, at 7:00am
Saturday, Dec. 23, at 3:00pm. .HURON....... Thursday, Dec.28, at 7:30am
*xONOND.\;A. Sat urday, Dec. 30,at 8:30am
unesday. Dec. 26, at 3:00pm..tIARAPAHOE.. Sunday, Dec. 31, at 10:00am
Wednesday, Dec. 27, at3:00pm..ALGONQUIN.. Monday. Jan. atl0:30am
Friday, Dec. 29, at 3:00pm. .COMANCHE... Wednesday, Jan. 3, at 12:00n'n
Saturday, Dec. 30. at 3:00pm ..tIROQUOIS. .... Friday, Jan. 5, at 12:30pm
"-Boston via Brunswick and Charleston. xFreight only. *-Boston via
Charleston. "*-Boston via Charleston and New York. !-To New York direct.
THE CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
Direct Service Between Jacksonville, Boston and Providence and all Eastern Points,
Calling at Charleston both Ways.
SEMI-WEEKLY SAILINGS.
Southbound.. .. .............. .......... From Lewis Wharf, Boston
Northbound ................. .From foot of Catherine Street, Jacksonville.
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
Between Jacksonville and Sanford.
Stopping at Palatka, Astor, St. Francis, Beresford (DeLand) and intermediate
landings on St. Johns River.
STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
is appointed to sail as follows: Leave Jacksonville Sundays, Tuesdays and Thursdays
3:30 p. m. Returning, leave Sanford Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays 9:30 a. m.
SOUTHBOUND NORTHBOUND
Read down | Read up.
Leave 3:30p. m.................... Jacksonville ............... Arrive 2:00a.m.
Leave 8:45p.m.................... Palatka .................... Leave 8:00p.m.
Leave 3:30 a.m..................... Astor ................... Leave 2:30p.m.
Leave 4:30 a. m................. St. Francis .................. Leave 1:00 p. m.
............ ............Beresford (DeLand) ........... .... Leave 12:00noon
Arrive 8:30 a.m.................... Sanford ................... Leave 9:30 a. m.
Arive 10:00 a.m .................. Enterprise .................. Leave 10:00a. mn
GENERAL PASSENGER AND TICKET OFFICE. 122 W. BAY ST., JACK'VILLE.
F. M. IRONMONGER, JR., Aest. Gen. Pass. Agent, 122 W. Bay St. Jacksonville, Fla.
W. G. COOPER, JR., Frt. Agt., Jack'ville. C. P. LOVELL, Superintendent, Jack'ville.
Foot Hogan Street, Jacksonville.
C. HAGGERTY, G. E. P. A., New York. CLYDE MILNE, G. F. A., New York.
THEO. G. EGER, WM. P. CLYDE & CO,
General Manager. General Agents,
Cheebrough Building, 19 State Street, New York.


FLORIDA.


4*tl Oll4t*#*4> 1 t111 lt1 II 111 *ei >IlI#l OI eOIl

JOS. ROSENHEIM & SONS
MANVFACTVRERS AND JOBBERS OF


SSHOES

SSAVANNAH, G O RGIA
U Best Shoes Made for Commissary Trade."
I 1 $* I ii0 iiti ti *4* ii 4 II I I I I i I I 1i


Southern

Electric...

Company


BOARD OF TRADE BUILDING. 213 MAIN ST.
......INSTALLATION OF......
Electric Wires of Every Description.
Elevators Installed and Repaired. Motor
and Fan Work a Specialty.
Electric Fixtures.
BELL PHONE 1330. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


FUEL AND BUILDING MATERIAL.


The Southern Fuel & Supply Co.




ARE YOU INTERESTED IN


TURPENTINE AXES?


The Rixford Axe "' on merito
IThe Rixford A xe alone establish-
ed the greatest reputation of any edge
S tool ever sold. If you want something to
keep hands on your place

THE RIXFORD AXE

IS IT

If you expect to use them order now for
the DEMAND is greater than the supply.


W. H. Briggs Hardware Co.
Sole Southern Agents
VALDOSTA, GEORGIA
X3,X3X AS}O t %<%t3 SXSS(S *^









16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Buyers' Directory

If you want anything look
through this classified list and
write to the firm appearing
therein. The Record guarantees
a prompt response.
AUTOMOBILES.
Clark Automobile & Launch Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
ATTORNEYS.
Jno. W. Dodge, Jacksonville, Fla.
ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and Trust Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
ACCOUNTANTS.
T. G. Hutchinson, Jacksonville, Fla.
BANKS.
Commercial Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Guaranty Trust & Savings Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
National Bank of Jacksonville.
Florida Bank and Trust Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
BOXES AND CRATES.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
BRICK.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jack-
sonville, Fla.
CARPETS AND MATTINGS.
Savage & Whitford, Jacksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING.
Craig & Bro, J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Stuart-Bernstein Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Bailey & Montgomery, New York City.
CONVEYANCING.
Realty Title and Trust Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
COOPERAGE.
Cooperage Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS.
Wm. D. Jones, Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS-WHOLESALE.
Christie:Groover Drug Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Southern Drug Manufacturing Co., Jack-
sonville, Fla.
DRY GOODS--WHOLESALE.
Covington Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
ELECTRIC SUPPLIES.
Southern Electric Co., Jacksonville, Fla
Florida Electric Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Electric Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
National Electric Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGINES.
Lombard Iron Works and Supply Co.
Augusta, Ga.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofleld's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
FERTILIZERS.
Bours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
FOUNDRIES.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
FUEL.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co. The, Jack
sonville, Fla.
FURNITURE.
Fetting Furniture Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GENTS' FURNISHERS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla
Stuart-Bernstein Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
Consolidated Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla
Hargraves Co., C. H., Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
Young Co., John R., Savannah, Ga.
HATS-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla
HARNESS.
Vehicle and Harness Co., Jacksonville
Fla.
HARDWARE.
Bond & Bours Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla
Briggs, W. H., Hardware Co.. Valdosta, G.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co.. J. D.. Savannah. Ga.
HAY AND GRAIN.
Bours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla.


HATS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
'Stuart-Bernstein Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
HOTELS.
Aragon The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Duval Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
Fifth Avenue Hotel, New York, N. Y.
St. George, Jacksonville, Fla.
Everett Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
Windsor Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
Windle Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
HELP SUPPLIED.
Florida Help Supply Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
IRON WORKS.
Lombard Iron Work & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
INSURANCE.
Prudential Life, Walter P. Corbett, Mgr.,
Jacksonville, Fla.
Cay, Shine & McCall, Jacksonville, Fla.
Loren H. Green & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
JEWELERS.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
R .. J. 'les & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
KEELEY INSTITUTES.
Keeley Institute, Jacksonville, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Blum & Co., Chas., Jacksonville, Fla.
Altmayer & Flatau Liquor Co., Macon, Ga.
Eureka Wine and Liquor Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Joseph Zapf & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Greater New York Sample Room, Jackson-
ville, Fla.
MEDICINES.
Spencer Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tenn.
Southern Drug Manufacturing Co., Jack-
sonville, Fla.
Christie-Groover Drug Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
MAPS.
realty Title and Trust Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
MACHINE WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR TURPENTINE PRO-
CESS.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
METAL WORKERS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
SWeed & Co., J. D., Savannah, Ga.
NAVAL STORES.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
Standard Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Timmons-Blount Co., Tampa, Fla.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
West-Flynn-Harris Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
Young Co., John R., Savannah, Ga.
Jacksonville Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville
Fla.
NAVAL STORES EXPORTERS.
Naval Stores Export Co., Jacksonville, Fla
PAINTS.
Bond & Bours Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
PIANOS AND ORGANS.
Abrams, Jas. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
PLUMBERS.
(oons & Golder, Jacksonville, Fla.
PUMPS.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
L. Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
REAL ESTATE.
" Brobston, Fendig & Co., Jacksonville, Fla
C. Buckman, Jacksonville. Fla.
Christie, J. D., Jacksonville, Fla.
Livingstoi & Sons, J. H., Ocala, Fla.
. Hedrick Real Estate Agency, Jacksonville
Fla.
e, Southern States Land and Timber Co
Jacksonville. Fla.
Sebring & Slone, Jacksonville. Fla.
. Stewart & Hunter. Jacksonville, Fla.
RUBBER STAMPS.
Florida Rubber Stamp Works, Jacksonville
Fla.
SAFES.
Diabold Safe and Lock Co., Jacksonville
Fla.


SEEDS.
Bours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
SHIP YARDS.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Merrill-Stevcnts Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
SHOES-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Jos. Rosenheim & Sons, Savannah, Ga.
STEAMSHIPS.
Clyde Steamship Co. The, New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Holmes & Co., Samuel P., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Miller & Company, Jacksonville, Fla.
TALKING MACHINES.
Metropolitan Talking Machine Co., Jack-
sonville, Fla.
TANKS.
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
TITLES AND TAX ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
TURPENTINE APPARATUS.
Chattanooga Pottery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
TURPENTINE STILLS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
TURPENTINE STILL TUBS.
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
TURPENTINE VATS.
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.


TURPENTINE TOOLS.
Council Tool Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
VEHICLES.
Vehicle & Harness Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
WATCHES.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
YELLOW PINE LUMBER.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
East Coast Lumber Co., Watertown, Fla.


Cay, Shine & McCall


FIRE INSURANCE.
212 Dyal-Upchurch Bldg


'one 1955


Trade Checks
FOR THE


COMMISARY BUSINESS.
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD mnu-
facturen more of them than all the print-
ing and office supply houses in the South
combined.

Industrial Record Go.


THE OLDEST WHISKEY HOUSa IN
GEORGIA. (Established ln 1881.)
OLD SHARP WILLIAMS-Pure Fine Old
Rye.-. By the gallon $3.00; four full quarts
$3.50. express prepaid.
GEO. J. COLEMAN-Pure Pennsylvania
Ryv; Rich and Mellow. By the gallon
$2.75; tour full quarts $3.00. express prepaid.
ANVIL RYE-Pure Substantial Family
Whiskey. By the gallon $2.50; four full
quarts $2.90. express prepaid.
CLIFFORD RYE-By the gallon $2.5;
four full quarts $2.65, express prepaid.
OLD KENTUCKY CORN-Direct from
- Bonded Warehouse; fine and old. By the
gallon $3.00; four full quarts $3.50 express
prepaid.
0, OLD POINTER CLUB CORN Rich
and Mellow. By the gallon $2.56; four full
quarts $3.90. express prepaid.
We handle all the leading brands of Rye and Bourbon Whiskies in the market
and will save you from 3u to 6 per cent on your purchases. Send for price list and
catalogue. Killed free upon application.


The Altmayer QL
MACON. GA.


Flatau Liquor Company,
AND BIRMINGHAM. ALA.


DIAMONDS AND WATCHES

We simply ask a call. We can show yon, at correct and money
savIng prices, many papers of loose pare white, perfect
DIAMONDS. It Is onr desire to continue being the largest
Diamond dealers in Jacksonville, and our specialty Is flie round-
cut gems and high-grade Waltham and Elgin Watches.

R Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry,
11-13 Mile St., 33W. 11ay, Jacksevill, Fla.




M. A. Baker,
INVENTOR AND MANUFACTURER OF THE

Baker Improved

Seamless Turpen

tine Stills.
Write me for prices and outfits
F. O. B- any point in Georgia. Flor-
ida, Alabama or Misisssippi. All
stills sold under a guarantee.
JOB WORK
Throag the Cometry a specialty.
The Largest and Oldest Copper Brunswick, Ga.
Works n Georgia.lty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do notea.
1W My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do not leak.









COMP NY
GRAIN AND PROVISIONS.


West Building Jacksonville. Fla. Paul R. Wiggs, Manager. Telephiin 20-2..
Members: NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE. NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE,
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE.
Our ow n private wires to lie xciiniIhe-. ItIIn -t AlonId on dii.,p its ut.illji t
cheek. N W1 York O()liee. 1110 Bi],ad;lw i y.


I Turpentine Locations
S I hl to. l ;i l \ 'a lihri, ; n l. I1 11,i -li'- 0,\ i l ill .1 .

, REDDING C. SELVIDGE, |
ARCADIA, FLORIDA
%\\%%%%%%%% %% 1 1%\%\1\\1\\\\11 %% %\\\\\\%\\1\1\S\\t\\% \
H. E. PRITCHETT, 1'res. P. SUTII EItL \\1'. \ we 'Pre A. D. oC0\ IN( I(N. S
.. 1 (' C N I I ,- ;n, in'l Mt r.
THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.,
General Offi-cs: T. '-' NVI '.7. FI.A
Factory: WA'I'NANISH, N. C
Manufacturers of High Grade Tools
fc.. Iavl Stores Op.rstois.

SUMMER LUMBER COMPANY
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

Rough and Dressed Lumber

Long Leaf Yellow Pine.
BOXES AND ORATES.
SI l 1 *I 1 3 .-tI4 14 + *+++++tI4+ I4t 5 ++++ t+ ++I *<+-+ -0:
W W. W. CARNI IM' W TI ;.N nM ,. R. \\1. e. ,& re.-

Tampa Hardware Co.

Wholesale
Hardware
Turpentine, Mill and Phosphate Supplies.

LARGE STOCK COUNCIL AND HOLMES HACKS AND PULLERS ON HAND. +
STAMPA. FLORIDA,
NaaAAi SuiAII I 2i 4 14a*iit I -tt l 4III I4IAI 41i 114I 1:4ts:1 -i: i-:


St. George Hotel
EUROPEAN PLAN.
Rooms: 75c, $1.00 and $1.50 :~",
PHONE 317.


rm'- -i-.-i MRS. GEO. W. BROCK,
PROPRIETRESS.
*%@ SMl %4*%*%+ 41*,%* %4% %%%S*%4%.-1+\+%+%.%%%+1 %.i%

T" VEHICLE & HARNESS CO. L
SCr. Forsyth and Cedar Sts.. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Dealers in
SCa rriages and Wagons
Carriage and Wagon Material, Wheels, Spokes, Rims, Axles, Etc.
Turpentine and Mill Warness. Wagons. BHueies. Saddlery. Dump Carts, Deli.,ry +
Wagons, Surrles and everything kept in a first-class c\tahli\hmtnt.
Largest Dealers in Florida.
4*4S* * S.S(++S.4 o4eK%*^*se%. +1i.+%%q.%+X*K*++4


MILLER &
STOCKS, BONDS, COTTON,


~i~mm


JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
NOW OPEN
Under new management Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout. in-
cludinig 1pw electric elevator and our
own electric light plant.
H. N. O'NEAL. Prop.


J. S. Schofield's Sons company,

S- Headquarters for
t Distiller's Pumping
Outfit.
No plant complete witllout one.
S nHundreds of them in use in Georgia,
F F lorda labamna. Mjssissiippi and 4
S'Soatlth (' i:.,lina. V iL us for particu-
. "^^^ 1 *lars and price-. We also manufacture e
SBEngines, Boilers and ligh *
Grade Machinery,
Sl is vell as carry a f.il and complete v
.iiock ot-
S. uMill Supplies, Pipe,
?. f Boiler Tubes, Etc.
Advise your wants.
S' Macon, - Georgia.
"A ti Lealing Specialty ot all
SKidsni o Tlank Work fr, IL rnLthrle Storage Purposes



Timmons Blount Co.
* W. W. TIMMONS, B. W. BLOUNT, J. P. CARSON,
President. Vic Y :; sident. Sec'y & Treas.

SNaval Stores Factors

, And Dealers in Suppl.es of all Kinds for Turpentine
5 Operators.
SCorrespondence Solicited. Address
TIMMONS- BLOUNT CO.
* I
/ American National Bank Bldg. TAMPA, FLORIDA.
E s\\\\\\t\\*A \EatoLumSber% Co.

East Coast Lumber Co.


ROUGH AND DR

Yellow Pi

Bundled Rosin B:rrel
Steamer Ship
WATERTO


ESSED LONG LEAF

ne Lumber

Staves in Carload Lots.
ments a Specialty.
VN, FLORIDA.


FIFTH A VENUE HOTEL
I Madison Square, New York.
I -
SAmerican Plan $5 per day. European Plan $2.00 per day-
llic 1!1....t l .....or- l pi "'1. native hotel
Sill \n I'iirai. N\ev 1 h tlie newe-l. :ihlwavs
1,'*,.II ;iltI lr.in. TIhe la1tion in M.di'son
N'loen' i li li es in the city.
5 HITCHCOCK. DARLING (D. COMPANY.
\%%%%\\\\\\\\\\\%%%%%%%%%% L "l \\\__\_%%_


THE ARAGON


'11TV, WFF~EIj)IY "'DI8s1'T'MAT, MCORT).:






18 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



OPERATORS
Bear i Mid Th Duri Yo
Bear in Mind That During Your


regular
Stock
Complete
Outats,
New and
Second-
hand.
Extra
Kettles,
Worms.
Cap, Arms,
Furnace
Doors.
Grate Bars,
and all
other at-
tachments
pertaining
to-
Turpentine
Stills and
Fixtures.


Busy


Season


YOU MEET WITH A
1 YOU BREAK DOWN
YOU BURN OUT
YOU NEED US


MISHAP


Over in the Left- Hand Corner Will Interest You.


McMILLAN BROS.,


Southern Copper

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Works.


Savannah, ".
Mobile, Ala.
Faytteville, N. C.


The


Cooperage


Company


Manufacturers of High Grade

Western White Oak Spirit Barrels

Capital $200,000.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Orders sent direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.
We are now prepared to furnish barrels from six shops]advantageously located.

OFFICERS:


J. C. LITTLE, President.
E. H. MOTE, General Manager.


JOHN E. HARRIS, Vice-President.
C. H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasurer.


J. C. LITTLE,


JOHN E. HARRIS,
W. C. POWELL,


DIRECTORS:
C. H. BARNES,
W. F. COACHMAN.


J. W. WEST,
E. H. MOTE.


W. J. KELLY


4.-


CC~CIL"""""'~U''-----U----~~~~~~~CI


ICIMI)~~~~~~-~~~~ LI)Il~~~UIIIIII4LI~~LUMMML~,Hh~


-------------------- ~ ~ )~


I j.: 1.:,,. 01,S:=12--:






l*lttII t t tItlt ittIto Itlll$ tII $I It Ito It*ltltt I tit IIt I I I it I tt I Itllo It I to I I I I.1 IMt I ItIIIII IIttoglt t
C. B. ROGERS, President. W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAMPLAIN, Vice-Presidents. C. H. HODGSON, Sec. and Treas.
DIRECTORS: C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain, H. A. McEachern and J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonville;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $500,000.
Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches in Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville;. the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the
grocery branch of the Southern 1Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-
visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.


Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Consist of one Three-Story Building, 70x200; one two-story building. 50x390; one one-story building, 80x250,:
making the largest space of any Company of the kind In the South.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner"'Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.

Drenches Tampa. Fla-, Pensacols. Fla.., end Sevemnuh. Co..
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When in Jacksonville, Remember that

GREENLEAF & CROSBY CO.
41 W. BAY STREET
HAVE THE LARGEST STOCK, IN THIS SECTION. OF

Diamonds, Precious Stones, Watches
Jewelry, Clocks, Silverware, Bronzes, Fine China, Objects of Art
I |As they are the largest buyers they get the
BEST PRICE and are accordingly able to sell the
lowest, They invite a comparison of prices,
They Give Mail Orders Prompt Attention.
WRITE NOW FOR A CATALOGUE.



Half Tones-Zinc Etchings

Illustrating and Engraving Department
OF
THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
Splendidly, equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and.all kinds oftCommercial Work, Pamphlets, etc
I SPlllT 13 IUDE IF OF IE. 11, ITO 11 UIEESIIK PE1010n II PIMTElS.
IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT .,DELVERIES PROMISED.
A Florida Enterprise. Try It.