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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00150
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: December 1, 1905
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00150
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text
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U'


I RECORD



if1Y NAVAl KEToRE,
IA'IsXAERl GEbE AJ3
|I rsTTRIAhW FINtAGIAIl
SG7E rEWPAPER. _


gFAe JiftA .Aonnual Convention
of tAe
Jarpentine COperators' associationo n
lill be Aced in
,Jacksondvile, gla.,
)ecem6er 6.7, 7905
& reduced Mrailroad -ates fom all points r 'or-tA
and SoutA Ca.lia tGeor yi, 1/oqida,
l-/ahaa,ma -Aisswippi and Couis,
Wania, east of fAe -.is-
sisseppi 0/ie".


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122






President, W. C. POWELL; Vice-Presidents, who with the President, constitute the Directors and Board of Managers, W. F. COACHMAN, B. F. BUL
LARD, H. L. COVINGTON, H. A. McEACHERN, JOHN R. YOUNG, J. A. CRANFORD, D.H. McMILLAN, C. DOWN-
ING. J. R. SAUNDERS, C. B. ROGERS; Auditor, JOHN HENDERSON.
j.I


CONSOLIDATED

NAVAL STORES

.. COMPANY..


JACKSONVILLE, FLA,


SAVANNAH, GA.

PENSACOLA, FLA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS


Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
Small Amount of Stock Yet in Reserve
to Sell to Operators Who Can Arrange to Buy.

The Consolidated is Purely a Cooperative Company. Its
Interests are Identical with those of the Producers The
Patronage of Turpentine Operators everywhere Invited.
Plenty of Money and Plenty of Timber for Everybody.

Yards at Jacksonville, Savannah, Fernandina, Pensacola and Port Tampa

All Producers are Invited to Call or Correspond.


ii







WEEKLY


INDUSTRIAL


RECORD.


PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY. DEVOTED TO NAVAL STORES, LUMBER AND MANUFACTURING INTERESTS.
Adopted Sept. 12.1902. by the Executive Committee of the Turpentine Operators' Associaion as its Exclusive Official Organ, and adopted Sept. 11. 1902. in Annual Convention. as an Official Organ also of the General Association. Adopted Sept. t1. 1903 a t
only Official Organ of Turpentine Operators' Association. Adopted April 27. 1903. as Official Organ of the Inter-State Cane Growers' Association. Endorsed by Georgia Sawmill Association. OficialOrgan of Southeastern Stock Growers Association



A CORI)IATLPETI OPINRITEI)






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+ AINDUSTRIZ 11REiCORD COMPANY +


T CORNER 01F NEVNAlN AIND BAI Y STREET TS


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4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


New York Market and Trade Conditions,

(By the Record's Regular New York Correspondent.)
New York, Nov. 28.-Consumers gener- Spirits. Rosin. Tar.
ally are satisfied that market conditions bbls. bbls. bbls.
in naval stores are rapidly becoming nor- S its for wk ..1,240 2,89 1,313
mal, and that prices will be firmly estab- Deliveries for week. 664 2,756 144
lished on a natural trading basis. The S. Stock Nov. 25 ...... 1,572 27,878 1,169
P. Shotter combine has made every at- piled by James Watt & Son:
tempt the past few weeks to hold on- The following is the statistical position
tempt the past ew wees to o c-of spirits of turpentine in London, as com-
sumers off from trading, hoping that such
a course would embarass the operators' -15 14 3 19Ba
organization, by forcing them to accumu- Stock, Nov. 11..24,533a .... 27,787 28,913
late at fictitious prices, and planned at Del'd this wk- 1,491b .... 2,338 1,516
the same time a bear campaign that might Since Jan. 1st..68,515 .... 80,187 79,977
put them in possession of their own re- .. d. d s d 3. d.
quirements at unreasonably low prices, but Price Nov. 1... 49 3 38 7J 44 0 38 3
the trade generally has taken no stock in Jan.-April .... 50 0 39 1l 44 0 39 1
a campaign of personal prejudice and en- Savannah ...... 67c. 50c. 56Ac. 50c.
mity, and have paid little or no attention (a) includes 159 barrels of French; (b)
to the Shotter combine's misleading state- includes 1,671 barrels of French.
ments. Consumers are willing to trade New York Paint Market.
on a natural basis and they generally rec-
ognize that despite Mr. Shooter's attempts Notwithstanding the exceptionally fav-
to raid the Savannah market they will not orable weather, the demand for paints and
be able to get spirits at less than 60 cents, colors has been on the decrease and the
Savannah quotations, and they are willing movement of supplies into the channels ot
to pay that price. As to rosins it is consumption for out-of-door work has
generally known that at least 85 per cent fallen off materially. The usual consump-
of the crop is already marketed and con- tion of paints for in-door work is begin-
sumers expect prices on the commons to ning to set in and in the advent of only
gradually increase from the break of yes- a moderate demand during the winter
terday at Savannah, and are willing to months the output of the lead in oil will
pay even a reasonable advance if neces- be readily absorbed, which also applies to
ay a ra a aa other paints. Shipments and goods in
ary. transit are still suffering delays by the
On the whole trade conditions are rap- congested freight at transportation points,
idly becoming entirely satisfactory to but a slight improvement in the movement
consumers and producers alike and the of goods at most points in proximity to
consumers realize that advices from Sa- this city has been noted. Dry colors are
vannah sent out by the Shotter combina- moving along in small quantities but there
tion about "demoralization," etc., is all a appears to be a disinclination on tle part
part of his own campaign for his own pur- of large grinders to make contracts for
poses. supplies for delivery during the Spring.
Trade in first hand parcels in yard here Corroders of white lead are not inclined
show estimated sales since our last report, to make contract sales of supplies of lead
embracing about 500 to 700 bbls., through in oil, owing to the uncertain course of
yards and over docks, equivalent to W/2 prices for pig lead which has made a fur-
@6412c for machine bbls., and i/2c less for other advance owing to tle scarcity of sup-
oil bbls., in yard. Aside from this, only ply on the spot and the god demands.
a small business in parcels for immediate Purchases of the latter article on the spot
consumption has been done. Early in the have been difficult at 5.65 t5%: e and lots
week, prices advanced to 641/2c and reacted to arrive at under 5.i5c. In St. Louis
to 64c in response to like changes at Sa- sales of 50 to 75 tons on the spot at 5/c
vannah, where stocks are "reported" to be have been made. The London market for
unusually heavy, but in reality are not soft Spanish lead is quoted at 15 pounds,
as great as at same time last year. To- 7 shillings and 6 pence, sterling. hOnl
ward the close, however, prices here were small sales of domestic white lead in oil
firmer at 631/, to 64c for parcels of ma- at (;~,(r'7c, according to size of order.
chine bbls. in yard here, in sympathy with have been made. Stocks of dry white lead
firmer reports from the South. are steadily increasing, owing to smaller
The demand for tar has been slow and withdrawals as is usual with the near
first hand sales included about 100 oil approach of winter. As a result of large
bbls., gauging 50 gallons in yard, at $5.40 competitors who are to enter into the
per bbl., and smaller lots for direct con- market for handling dry white lead in large
sumption at $5.50@$5.60 according to quantities early next year, keen competi-
terms of sale. tion for contracts for supplies for delivery
Trade in pitch has been fair and ad- during next year has unsettled the market
ditional sales of about 150 bblr. for prompt and prices vary from 51/@61/4e, according
shipment at $3 per bbl. on the spot, have to terms of sale, but as near as could be
been effected. Lesser quantities are bring- learned few sales have been made or urged
ing from $3.05 to $3.10 per bbl. at the inside figure. Imported lead in oil
Owing to the unsettled market for the is meeting with a fair jobbing sale at
low grades of rosin ,prices for rosin oil 91/%(S93%c, according to size of order and
have been nominal and the demand demor- seller. Trade in red lead has not been
alized. Sellers, however, were not dis- active and only small parcels of domestic
posed to urge sales, and a preference for for prompt delivery at 6%/,(q7c, according
holding off until the market for rosin has to terms of sale. have been made. As a
become normal has been evident. Mean- result of the higher and uncertain market
while no accurate prices could be quoted for pig lead. manufacturers are disinclined
and latter closed nominal on the basis of to sell parcels for forward delivery. The
21c for carload lots of first run of oil, withdrawals on contracts show a further
per gallon, f. o. b. New York and small falling off. Imported red lead has been
jobbing parcels at 21y/@22c per gallon. in fair demand at prices ranging from
First hand sales have been very light and 6::/, (S/i/c, according to make. size of order
included some 200 barrels at the quoted and terms of sale. In domestic orange
range of prices, mineral only small parcels are heing book-
*New York Naval Stores Quotatiosn. ed at prices ranging from 8/,8:. ec, nc-
cording to size. owing to the light supply
Spirits turpentine, per gallon 631/,61 64e. in excess toto stocks for contract deliveries.
Rosin, common strained, per bbl., $3.90; In the imported goods. a fair jobbing blusi-
good strained $3.90; D $4.20; all small ness has been done in Frenche orange mnin-
bbls. Large iron-bound bbls., 100 per cent eral. ex store at 11/ itlls 1. for supplies
guaranteed grading: ABC, $4.35; D $4.50; in casks: 121/,&12'S,c in keys, and other
E $4.65; F $4.90; G $4.95; H $5: I $5.05; makes lower in quality at 10:/', llc. ne-
K $5.20; M $5.25; N $5.35; VG $5.(60: ordinr_ to size of order. Abroad. prices
WW $5.85. Tar, oil bbls., 50 gallons, $5.40 for German goods have been advanced, but
@5.60 per bbl. Pitch. per bbl.. $3@3.10. quotations here remain unchanged at 81'o
Rosin oil, per gallon, first run, 21c; second ril10n e. according to size of order and
run 23c; third run 25c; fourth run 27c. gade. Shipments of zincs are still hehl
*Prices nominal, in check to a great extent by the car
The following figures represent the esti- shortage and no relief is as yet in sight.
mated receipts and deliveries of naval
stores at New York during the past week: (Continued on page 6.)


R. C. DAVIS


T. A. FULGHVM



R. C. DAVIS & CO.,

General Agents



Fay-Sholes


Typewriter


We buv, sell, exchange or rent second hand
machines, offering liberal inducements.
Write for descriptions of the Fay-Sholes,
which is the world's record machine for speed,
simplicity and durability.


R. C. DAVIS & CO.,


JACKSONVILLE.
FLORIDA.


_____________________crrrr3 CL~a '%aOSE aC ~ S&%%yij~c~i ;~-


PLANTERS


"Old Time" Remedies


THE JOY OF THE HOUSEHOLD.
These four great remedies, Nubian Tea, Benedicta, Cuban Relief
and Cuban Oil, are the joy of the household. With them near at hand, a NubiM
man is ready for any emergency. He has a safe, reliable and speedy relief Ben"ect
for wife, children, self or stock. With these remedies you can keep the ahn
doctor's hands out of your pockets, and yet have a healthy, happy family. CReliel
Besides, you can cure your stock of any ailment that may befall them. ____
NUBIAN TEA-In Liquid or Powder Form-Is the great family medicine. It
will cure all forms of Liver and Kidney Complaints, Prevents Chills and Malarial
Fever. Cures the common ailments of children; and as a laxative tonic it is without
an equal-safe and reliable. In the liquid, it is extremely palatable-even children
like it-and it is READY FOR USE.
BENEDICTA is a woman's medicine. It will cure all the diseases common to
women, and classed as Female Troubles. It will bring youth back to the xaded woman,
who has gone one suffering because she thought it woman's lot. It will care for the
young girl just entering womanhood; and prepare the young woman ror the sacred
duties of wife and mother.
CUBAN RELIEF-The instant Paint Killer, for either man or beast. Relieves
instantly, Colic, Cramps, Cholera Morbus, Diarrhoea, Dystentery and Sick Headache.
For colic in horses it is an infallible remedy and is guaranteed to give relief in five
minutes.
CUBAN OIL-The Best Bone and Nerve Liniment. Is antiseptic for cuts,
snagged or torn flesh, and will instantly relieve the pain. Cures insect bites and stings,
scalds and burns, bruises and sores, chapped hands and face, ore and tender feet.
Relieves rheumatic pains, lame back, stiff joints, and in stock cures wire fence cuts,
scratches, thrush, splint, collar sores, saddle galls, and diseased hoofs.
Write us for Prices

SPENCER MEDICINE CO., Chattanooga, Ten.

a ataiI I tImt at 3t4 ltti ll Il14U 9 l II44I666 It ItI44a


Propositions That Cannot Last


Great activity in Turpentine and Sawmill Propositions. The good ones
are becoming scarce. But here are two rare ones.
28.000 acres, Hillsborough County, estimated to cut 50 boxes; 3,500 feet
if mill timber to the acre. Will make 50 barrels of spirits per crop. $4.00 per
acre.
20.000 acres saw mill timber in Hernando County. Timber will cut 4,000
feet per acre. Four railroads through the tract. $3.15 per acre. Complete
saw mill, capacity 40.000 feet daily, included.
Operators, ask to be put on our mailing list and keep posted on all prop-
ositions which are put upon the market.


Brobston, Fendig & Company
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA BRUNSWICK, GEORGIA


*1
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33I iI~tI4I IIIIII 33iiCuii IeI uICI 1341 III)I IUU III46i II tI)


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THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


Some Figures on Florida Industries

as Compiled from Census Report.


Washington. I. ('.. ov3. -TIhe ('cn-
sus Bureau has issued a bulletin on the
manufacturing industries of the State of
Florida. giving tihe statistics for the years
100! and 1!94. The figures given cover the
manufacturing establisihments of Florida
with a product of $5fi) or over, tIIIIo ex-
eludin; the neighlsorhood industries and
hand-trades. sluch as thle building trades.
dress-nmaking. cston nilliner.y. cilstoin-
sawing and grindling. cotton gillling. Icob-
blin andl Ilackslmithing. Incildinug these
industries there were reported at the
twelfth census. 2.0534 estabilislhments witll
34.230 wage-earners and products valued at
3">.4l10.243. T1lie proliuct of the four in-
distries treated of in tlie bulletin were
valued as follow's in the year 1904: To-
Imeco. cigars and cigarettes, $14i.764.27f:
lumber. $12..52.105: turpentine and romin,
.$".8.1l.173: fertilizers. $1.5.390.371.
The bulletin also give- thle suminiar (of
the establishnients locate in ltie eity of
Jacksninville. Florida. iani analysis of wli'ch
shows that in the city in 1900 there were
74 establishments in operation with II e(ap-
ital of $1 .957.144. while in 1H144 there were
125 estalblishinents in .Jacksonville withl a
capital of i4.937.281. Tlhs shows an in-
crease of (1S.9 per cent in establishments
for 1904. and an increase of 1i0.4 loer cent
in the capitalization of the establishlients
in Jacksonville.
The villll of the Iproluct-s of t lese es-
tahlishments in lacksonville was 1 p lacd at
$1.79n.607 in 1900 and $5.340.264 ill 19H4.
showing an increase of 1Mi.li per cent.
In 1900 there were emiploiedl biv the es-
tablishments in Jacksonville 112 salaried
officials and clerks. who received in sala-
ries $101.491. while in 11<4 there were 274
such emllovees in these estalblislinients.
who received f 3102.191 in salaries. Tliis
shows an increase for 1P904 over 1900 of
144.6 per cent in officials and 1!);. per
cent in salaries.
Tn 1900 there uere enliloyed bv th1 e es-
tablisilments iln Jacksonville 1.231 wiage
earners, who received $49S8.263 in wages.
while in 1904 there were 2.1650 wae-e'ar-
ners who received in wages -.1.073.477.
showing an increase for 104 over 1900
of 114.0 per cent in wagfe-earners and 115.4
lwr cent in wages.
In 1900 the establlishlents in .Tackson-
ville spent $q1)5'.703 for materials used in
the operation of tile establishlirents. as
eomlpared to $2.749!1.41!2 -ipent in 1904. an
increase for 1904 of 24fi.2 peIr cent In 1900
$132.917 was spent for niseellaneoiis items.
and in 19404 .$434.61S was devoted this endl.
an increase for 1904 of 227.0 per cent.
An analysis of the bulletin shows that
in the State of Florida in 1900 there were
in operation 1.275 establishments. capital-
izedl at $25.6 2.171. while in 1904 there
were reriortedl -o tlie censuss lilrea 1.410
estalilis;,ii ents with a total lcalpilalization
of *32.954s.42. an increlas-e of 10.li in e-ta;-
lishments and 211.3 per cent in capital. In
1900 there were 1.781 salaried officials and
clerks in the emiploy of these estallish-
ments in Florida. who received salaries al-
rreatin. a total of $1.299.576;. while in
1904. 3.115 wpr ssons were employlvel in these
estalblishmentN as officials and clerks.
whose wares amounted to $2.'fi'3.626. an
increase of 74.9 per cent in ninmllir of
officials, and 10(.0 per cent in salaries re-
ceived.
There were in the employ of the estal-
lishments in 1900. 35.471 wage earners,
who received wasRes amounting to $10.916.-
443. while in 1904. 41.9l6 persons emploeil
as wvaKge-earners received $15.736.322. thiu,
showmin an increase of 1..3 per cent ol
wag-e-earners employed and 44.2 per cent
in wages paid them. These establlishment'
spent *.2.177.941 in miscellaneous exp~ensec
in 19Mw). as compared with $5.60.02.862 ir
1904. an increase for 1904 of 157.2 tHuI
cent. The material. used in the operatior
of the estallhlinients in 1900 co,,t $12,
8147.5"17. while in 19-04 they cost $16.525.
214. tlllus showing a 'i increase for 1904 o1
2 i; per c nt. The 1.'roduct of the estab
lislientens of thle Stnte' of Klorl in 190
was placed at $314.1`P93.5. as9 comiparled to
$-0.241.074 in 19404. ,or an invrevse" for 190-
of 46.9 pewr cent.
An analysis of 'ihe stattics of the in
dlutries of the S ;lte soow that tile to
baeco trade leads li.e ot!(ers, in 1900 hav


ing 127 establishmlnents engaged in the
manufacture of tobacco, cigars and cigar-
ettes. 'apitalized at $5.337,107. In 1!4
tle toliacck industry had 208 establlish-
inents, which were ciapitalized atl $7,313.-
93. I Ii 19I there were in tlle employ of
these establlishments 2646i salaried otic'iials
and clerks, wlho received salariess amount-
ilgi to $:1.i.,424, \lhile in !904 there were
re'porteil to I' 741i salaried ollicials ini
these estlablishliients, who were paid in
salaries ;$7i5.354. Persons employed in
these establishments, and classed as wage-
earnier',. were given :., .i.370 in 1IMN), whlo
were paid $3.1.159,914 in salaries, as coin-
pared to 49,657 el'mpiloheil( in 1914, wh to re-
ceivedl $5.377.14Mi for their services. Inl
19!00 these tobacco establishments expend-
ed .$1 .254.513 for miscellaneous expenses, as
coiillpare(l to $2.3itS.743 expended in 1904.
In IM1) thle material- used in tlhe operation
of the tobacco establishments was valued
at $4.724.25.. whliile in 1904 these estab-
lislilents pIinl .$id,.595.5.T for their mate-
rials. The \iaile of the tobacco industry
in 9!HN was placed at $10.735,8241, and in
11i15. at $116.744.274;.
In 1900 there were seven estalllishiments
eiiageol in the fertilizer industry, capi-
talized at $7:33.319. whereas in 1904 there
were eight such establishlments, with a
'capitalizaiti(ion of $Th.9.049.i There were 21.
salaried otlicials and clerks ill their eln-
ploy in !4100. who received (i $2i.;731 in sal-
aries. as compared to tl employed in 1904
at wages aggregating $63.179. ()ne hun-
dI ed and seventeen' %age-iarners were ecn-
plyoed in these establishIments in 1900.
who received Y$399.!il in waives, whlile in
N14". 242 such ilersons were enpllloye'd, re-
ceiving wages aggregatin- in all $70.25).
In 1I() it t(ook $34.03:1 to defray the miis-
(ellaneolus expenses of these fertilizer es-
tablishmnents. as compared to $ i*,!,S3 for
ti:s purlose in 1904. In Imaterials used
in tlese establishments .1330.i-49! was in-
vested in 4!)0. while in 1904 $1.1325.070 was
slitnt on materials. Thle value of the
pirolduict (f tihe fertilizer estallishnients in
19) was placed at $ 5.00.21139, while in 1904
the value rose to $1.590,371.
Engaged in thle lumlier industry in the
State of Floiida in 11900 nwre 3 t15 estal-
slisiteiits. capitalized at $8.!957.54) !in
1904 tliere were 234 such estLablishinients.
a derecase front 19110. but lie capitalizal-
tion (of tiese estallishriients in 191i was
.$12.61.il.5. In 19!00 these estalishlnients
empldo.yed 43k1 salarie l oflieials and clerks.
ais conpllared to (32 employed in Il04. They
rtec(i\ vie il 1900 salaries ainounting ti
t16.2.11.). hliihl inll 1904 tlhe lpay roll for
Ilhese enl pll vyees inirei sedl to $t;4F .J44.
'rhi.re were i0.2..55 persons einplolyeil in tl4
hliilher iindllstry of Florida in 1900 (elasse'd
as wnal'e eiiarnlles. whlo received $1 .241.40fs
in \iwaes. a4s co(illaiire(l to 11.2462 eipllolyel
in 11104 at. uiagees ;inregatiig in all $4.(O2.-
961. In t hle illiscel laneileo (is expenl( es of
liuese -illllihni lis $43N.i.24 wa: s defra ied
in 1900. .and $1.74.9.:15- in 1901. Materials
whichli clost .4.57S.7.50 were Isilght liy the
lumber e('ta lishmll nts of Florida in 1900.
whilh wt ;is oiire tihain ;iS a spent on thi-
arccount in 1914. they costing in that year
$3.41.91ii3. The value of the prldluct of
tlie liinller es'italishllient' in Florida ill
191,40 was ipla(ed a;it $11..5:13.211. wlihile in
!941 thle priodliet was valued at $12,592.-
105.
In 1900 tIhere were :13i establishments
engaged iln tle turpentine and rosin in-
SdlstrY in the St;ate o(f loridal. capitalizeil
Sat 5."..621.1S. and in 1904 there were 40:1
stilallisllslielits wvithl a (alitial of $*2.92;).774..
'Tl'ice estallishllents employed only 74S1
salaried officials and clerks in 1900. whose
*salalries animountcil to $30641.351. bulit. in 1904.
I 1.06'3 sllclh persons w-ere enplov ed. whose
Salaries iiggregated $567.431. There was
1lit li sliilt vi riiatioin in tlie waige-earners
SleriMl(4s nnlhr collnsideratioln. InI 19110. 15,-
S07:1 wii 1a'e-tirnr were at work for the tiir-
Ipeutine aiil(n rosin indtlitry in Florida at
;"; ges aggrea tin, .$3.049.2(K). and in 1904.
1.411 l ucih i(ons were enlPloved who
4lcccivedl iages to tlie animount of $3.6193,-
k 7-4. In 1IMNN. .2411 .7541; Vas spent for mis-
4 c(ll;inius ite'llms in (conli'ction with the
oI ilat iiin (f t lise estab lishients as coini-
Sareud to $;.52.97l6 spent in 1194. The ma-
(Continued on page 6.)


,,- R ILIA UI.F ,-

PIANOS ORANS-
(125 Upward 35sL Upward

We Sell i Lowest factory Prices
(N EASY TERMS. f-)
(We PayF$eit And Guarantee Satisfaction)
) Ot INSTRUMENTS TAKEN IN EXCHANGE i
(WriteAt OrcFerfulParticulars Ad Catalogue
OF EITHER
PIANOS OR ORGANS.)
) NO AGENTS' -- ,i.7d A iffIAm (
kbriaseir* /Af w. .f T7ier.*bedd i


THE DUVAL


Bank Accounts

We are prepared to carry your account
in one, two or three different ways. First,
a non-interest-learing account, against
which you may write your check. Second,
you nmay open a savings account upon
which we pay 4 per cent. interest; inter-
est on ltis account is reckoned twice year-
ly. and is added to the principal, thus
compounding. Third. we issue an inter-
est-lwarin-g certificate of deposit, which
will draw interest at the rate of 4 per
cent. if left with us for six months.

Union Saving Bank
City of Jacksonville
Depository


Frank M. Turpin
Proprietor.


JACKSONVILE, FLA.
Open the Year Round. Opposite Government Building. Most Centrally and Conven-
iently Located. Thoroughly Repaired and Renovated. Newly Furnished and Equipped.
Liberally Conducted at Popular Prices




Tampa Fair Tampa, Fla.
ATLANTICCOAST LINE 5
LOW RATES via l|MUtHA Mn 1111 $6,55
Tickets on sale November 13, 15, 17, 20, 22, 24, 27, and 29th, 1905. Final
limit of tickets, December Ist, 1905. For full information regarding the above
or any other rates, all on Atlantic Coast Line Agents, or write,

FRANK C. BOYLSTON. District Passenger Agt.
JACSONVILLE FLORIDA.
0X9SX=0PNXX3KXXXXXX0R.V0A.


JOSEPH D. WEED.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. KRENSON


J. D. WEED I CO.,
SAVANNAH. GEORGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OP


Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Etc.



Turpentire


S: Cups

P- if you expect to use the HERTY eup
next season, place your orders now for
future delivery. Prices and all informa-
tion cheerfully furnished on

Cups. Gutters
Snd ill Tools
Used in the Herty system of turpentining.
.*. Address

.-." Chattanooga Pottery
,: : Company,
Jacksonville, Florida.




P printing Send your order to the Industrial
Record. Prompt and satisfactory


__~~_ __









6 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


The Manufacturers' Pure Food and Industrial

Exposition opens next month in

Jacksonville,


PRICE LIST OF

Eureka Wine and Liquor Co.
The Great Southern Mail Order House.


The date for the opening of the Manu-
facturers' Pure Food and Industrial Ex-
position is not far distant. With an elab-
orate and interesting program, the doors
will be thrown open to the public on Jan-
uary 4th, and will not be closed until the
18th.
While hundreds of columns of articles
have been published in the newspapers at
home and abroad about the exposition. a
short story outlining its plans, purposes
and attractions will be read with interest
by the general public.
It is important to know, to begin with,
that the exposition company is composed
of well known Jacksonville business men
-men of means and ability who have the
industrial interests of the city at heart.
The company will not spare expense in
making the exposition an artistic as well
as a material success.
Pure Food Exhibit.
It was first proposed by the promoters
to hold a Pure Food Show, on the order
of those that have been so successfully
held from time to time in important cen-
ters of the North and West. Working on
this plan. the company met with the hearty
co-operat'on of the large manufacturers
of food stuffs of the country, many of
them being interested in the exposition
through the local jobbers representing them
in Florida. Many of these concerns took
space and will spend large sums of money
in preparing their exhibits and demon-
strating their products. Some of them will
reproduce the exhibits they had at the St.
Louis and Lewis-Clark expositions.
General Exhibits.
Enlarging upon their original plans, it
was decided by' the management of the
exposition company to make a display of
general industrial enterprises. This plan
met with approval as evidenced by the
fact that contracts have been closed with
hundreds of firms for space, in wihch will
be displayed the most recent results in
commercial products of all kinds. Nota-
ble in this display will be the latest models
of automobiles, vehicles, machinery, pianos.
sewing machines, farming utensils, etc.
Many of the local merchants will make
hadnsome exhibits in the various lines of
merchandise which they handle such as
furniture, clothing, dry goods, hardware.
etc.
Amusement Features.
When it was definitely decided by the


New York Market and Trade Conditions.
(Continued from page 4.)
Additional large contract sales of supplies
for delivery next year at full prices have
been made. Quotations rest on a firm
basis for the various grades of New Jersey
makes at 47/,(.5c, and .5(ii5' for single
carload lots. New contract prices for sup-
plies of French process zines for 1906 de-
livery have not as yet been announced, but
it is intimated that quotations will be ad-
vanced about A. above 1905 contract
price. German red and green seal is job-
bing at former prices. but in some in-
prompt shipment, are being shaded.
The market for linseed oil presented no
new features or developments of interest.
The demand throughout the week has Ieen
confined principally to small lots for
prompt shipment at unchanged prices ant
in some instances slight concessions have
been made. consequently quotations were
posted as being nominal. Futures remain-
ed dull and listless and May deliveries
were offered at 35e with bids at l( 2c less.
The card quotations for State and West-
ern raw oil are 3R(23~c. but sales at le
below have been made by some crushers.
City raw oil is held at 40(a)41c per gallon.
but occasional sales at lc less per gallon
have been reported. Boiled oil is being
held at 10 2c per gallon above the prices
for raw oil. C(l'cutta raw oil is quoted
at 62c per gallon.

The market for varnishes remains firm
and business on the whole has been large,


Jacksonville Carnival Association not to
have a Gala Week this year, the Manufac-
turers' Pure Food and Industrial Exposi-
tion Company stepped into the breach and
engaged many of the attractions with
which the Carnival Association were nego-
tiating. They have since engaged other
high-class shows now playing in other
parts of the country. Many of the shows
and amusement features booked for tlhe
exposition were star attractions at the
great expositions recently held in this
country. A famous hand containing over
twenty-five people has blen secured and
will give two concerts daily during the
exposition.
A Handsome Building.
The handsome building on the site of the
old St. James Hotel. in the heart of the
city. is now nearing completion. It covers
an area of over 6 i.000 square feet and is
striking in architectural effect.
Its immense glass-ldoned roof and huin-
drells of windows on the sides will give it
perfect lihrlt advantages in the (lay. and
thousands of -leetric lights will brilliantly
uiilminate it at night.
The beautifully arched main entrance
Between two imposing towers makes at
pleasing effect. The interior will be di-
vided up into hundreds of exhibition
booths of various sizes, each exhibitor vie-
ing with the other in making the most
artistic display. An immense bland stand
is at the middle of the west side of the
uIilding.
Large Attendance Expected.
The fact that the exposition is being
held during the tourist season inmures an
attendance of thousands of visitors from
all sections of the United States. Re-
duced railroad rates will ie given from
Florida points, special excursions will be
arranged, and people fro every section of
Florida and adjoining States will be in at-
tendance. Arrangements are being per-
fected Ihv a number of secret and business
organizations to hold meetings in Jackson-
ville during the exposition. This is a
happy arrangement as it will give the
members of such organizations a chance to
visit Jacksonville. attend their meetings,
see the city and the exposition at a mini-
mull transportation rate.
A conservative prediction is that over
fifty thousand people will attend the Man-
ufalturers' Pure Food and Industrial Ex-
position.


considering the time of this year. The
high prices for the -aw materials, has
maintained a firm feeling among manufac-
turers and in some instances discounts
have lben lowered. At the recent meeting
of the National Varnish Manufacturers'
Association. heIld at Chicago, the following
officers were elected to .serve for the en-
suing year: President. W. S. Potwin, Chi-
eago Varnish Co.: first. vice-president, S.
V. V. Huntington, vice-president of the
Edward Smith Company. of New York:
second vice-president. R. B. Donham. pres-
ident Cleveland Varnish Co. Board of Di-
rectors: Col. Franklin Murphy of the
Murphy Varnish Co.: Col. Ford H. Rogers.
president of the Detroit White ,Lead
Works: Herman Rosenberg; John Dohse.
manager of John Masury & Son: W. S.
Potwin. S. V. V. Huntington anti R. B.
DNnlham. As the above meeting was held
liwhind closed doors, no details regarding
the business transacted were made public.

Some Figures of Florida Industries as
Compiled from Census Report.
continued d from page 5.)
trials used in the turpentine and rosin
establishments of Florida cost the man-
agement .l.222.!t32 in 1900. and only $717.-
429 in 19 4. The value of the product of
the turlentine and ros:n industry in 1900
was placed at $6t.469,605, and in 1904 at
$4.0.X51,173.


EXPRESS PREPAID.

Natchett's Private 8tock .... .. ........ .....
Hatchett's That's Whiskey ..................
Natchett's Old Rye ........................
Eureka N. C. Apple Brandy ........... ....
N. C. Apple Brandy ...... ........ ....
Eureka Malt ..........................
Eureka N. C. Peach Brandy ......... .. .. ..
N. C. Peach Brandy ...... .. .......... .. ..
Eureka N. C. Corn .. .....................
Eureka N. C. Corn, XX ....................
Eureka N. C. Corn, XXX .................
Eureka N. C. Corn, XXXX ................
Old Crow Bourbon :. ......................
Iermitage Rye ..........................
Sunny Brook Rye .......................
Bunny Brook Sour Mash ................
Echo Spring ................ ............
Bilk Velret .... ......................
Oak and .. ......... .................. ..


Room 202 Duval Building


G
I
4
3
4

3
4
4

3
3
3
S
2


a
3
4
5
$


FVLL QUART MEASURE
'er Four Six Per
allon. Quarts. Quarts. Case.
.00 $4.00 $.0 $12.00
.50 4.60 6.90 13.75
.20 2.20 4.80 9.00
.75 4.75 7.00 14.00
.25 3.2 4.85 9.7
.0 4.00 6.00 12.
.75 4.75 7.00 14.00
.5 3.25 4.85 9.7
.25 3.25 4.85 9.7
.00 3.00 4.50 9.00
.75 2.75 4.15 .3.
.60 2.50 3.75 7.5
.50 4.50 6.75 U.0
.50 4.50 6.75 13.G5
.75 3.75 5.65 11.
1.75 3.75 5.65 U.3
.50 4.65 6.90 12.75
.00 5.2 7.85 15.73
.75 4.00 6.00 12.0


* GIN FROM $2.50 TO $3.50 PER GALLON. DELIVERED ,
Save twelve labels of Hatchett's Private Stock and secure a bottle free.
e ave twelve labels of Hatchett's Old Rye and secure a bottle free.
Save twelve labels of Hatchett's That's Whiskey and secure a bottle free. 4
SSave twelve labels of Eureka N. C. Corn and secure a bottle free. Save
Twelve labels of Eureka N. C. Apple Brandy and secure one bottle free. Save #
Twelve labels of Eureka Malt and secure one bottle free. Prices of all goods
bought at company's store are 7Oc per gallon less than when delivered. No
* charge for Jugs, boxes or drayage." A, of my bottles are full measure. All
Standard brands of whiskies sold over my bar at 10c per drink. 15
We also carry in stock liquors of cheaper grades. 1
All wines quoted on application.
Special prices in large lots, packed any sizes desired. Leaves 5 for you
S satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded.
I EUREKA WINE AND LIQUOR COMPANY.
4 4.
135 WEST BAY STR EET, JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
1l0,#1l aIul* tO1fil0111l talit a u11114*44111111ll 1098lll
iftS iiiiti*in>*iiiiiti* ii4iSiiiiii* m


P. 0. SEBRING


J. R. SLONE


Telephone 731


Below proposition is located directly on the railroad and is a bargain. Must
be sold at once at this price:
4.500 acres of land and timber.
One 25-barrel still and all fixtures.
Three mules and one horse, bridle and saddle harness.
One 16-room house.
One stable and barn; one commissary.
I Twelve shanties.
40 acres of land under fence. Price. $13.500.
R acres in Ilearing grove.
St/2 crops boxes, 1, 2 and 3-year.
50 dip barrels and cooper tools.
All necessary equlipments to operate a first-class turpentine place.





You Want a Turpentine Location?

You Want a Sawmill Location?

You Want any Kind of florida Land?

You Mean Business?
IF Call on or Write to

J. H. Livingston & Sons,
OCAI A. FLORIDA.


ill I III MlK 1111111ITI1111 ?11111! i 1111 ii i v IIII KI
-.-.----------------.-- .


- J. P. WrLLIAMS. President. J. A. G. CARson. 1st Vice-President
T. A. JENNINGS, 2nd Vice-President. J F. DusNBauv. 3dVice-President
SH. L. KAiTON. Secretary. D. G]. White,. Treasurer.


J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

illL STORES IND COTTON VICTORS RIM WHOLESALE GROCERS.
+-. Main Office SAVANNAH, GEORGIA.
Branch Officees: 3) PENIrCOLA, FLX. I rancb Grocery House, -
I JACKSONVILLE, FLA. ( COLUMBUS. GA.

Naval Stores Producers are Invited to Correspond With Us. -
llIIllllll 1 ll l II!! 11 1 1 1 1 1 11l I Ii i1 11 11 1 "i


SEBRING & SLONE


--- -- -------










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. T















S ,.any of you will ake advantage of our attendance at the .





Say cooer e ra 'e o rade, oesae and eeoail











e.yte Reeord management points wito a treat degree of pride
o is aoecemr 6tii and 7th, to do your holiday shopping, p uie ie

+ in Jacksonoille. .1Yo dount many of you will Ariny

4 your families alony. Xow it 6eoooes you to readd

+ carefully the announcements of the Jackson-

^ ville firms in this issue.




4nd, 7.e cover every Psine ow f radse, e /em esale and a sementa.






+ +
7'he Arecord management points with a great degree of pride

to its advertising columns. hey are used Ly the 6igy, progressive

+ firms who know how to Auy and sell.

,A'nd, 6I tMe wav, wea vom tade with" our advertisers. ttell te, wiree gou saw ecir adveprisemenft.



^++ + + 4 ++*M tH^^ii--t+M+++ft-^++


According to the records of the Jackson-
ville customhouse, the month of November
was a very good one for shipments of lum-
ber and crossties, the total for the month
amounting to 19,220,255 feet.
During the preceding month the total
shipments amounted to only 16,730,183
feet. During November, 1904, the total
shipments of lumber amounted to 18,077,
476 feet-
The lumber shipments during the past
month, by vessel, from Jacksonville, ac-
cording to the customhouse records, were
divided as follows:
Class and Destination. Feet.
Yellow pine, coastwise ....... 16.5S8.596
Cypress, coastwise .......... 10.000
Crossties, coastwise .......... 1,483.960
Yellow pine, foreign ........ 505,112
Cypress, foreign ............. 8,267
Cypress crossties. foreign .... 624.320
Total ..................... 19,220,255
Foreign Business Increased.
While there was not much gain in the
shipments to coastwise ports during the
month over the preceding month, there
was a considerable gain in the shipments
to foreign ports. During October the total
shipments to foreign ports amounted to
only 462,523 feet, while during Novemler
the shipments to foreign ports amounted
to 1,117,699 feet.
The greatest increase in the business of
the port during the month was in the
imports from foreign countries. While
there were no imports direct during Octo-
ber, and only a few articles in bond. the
value of the foreign imports during the
month of November amounted to $73.846.
Freight Received.
The freight.s from coastwise ports during
the month were as follows: Flour, 4.775
sacks: bacon, 3,050 Ioxes: sugar. 4.250
sacks; shoes. 24.350 cases; grain. 10.500
sacks; rails, 1.065 ton": coal, 6.152 tons;
fertilizer, 650 tons and 2,500 sacks: mis-
cellaneous, 106.372 packages.


The imports from foreign ports were
as follows: Nine packages of brick-mak-
ing machinery, 30 packages of unstemmed
filler tobacco. 15 packages of unstemmed
filler tolbcco, 200 ctcoanuts, 77 cases of
miscellaneous material, such as glassware,
crockery ware, chinaware, clocks and jew-
elry; 7.000 sacks of double manure salts.
3,000 sacks of sulphate of potash, 6,722,821
pounds of kainit in bulk, and numerous
small articles such as books, spectacles,
etc. The total value of the foreign im-
ports amounted to $73,846.22.
Outward Freights.
Besides the lumber shipments from the
port the following articles were carried by
vessels to coastwise ports: Oranges. 75.-
550 boxes: other fruits and vegetables. 29,-
220 packages: crossties, 37.( 9 pieces, eluial
to 1.4Il.!960 feet of lumber; naval stores,
27.075 barrels; shingles 16,500 bundles:
cotton. 450 bales; clay (kaolin), 19,960
sacks; tannic acid. 500 barrels: tobacco.
175 whales; cigars. 70 cases; miscellaneous
44.000 packages.
The exports to foreign ports during the
month, other than the lumber mentioned.
consisted of 1.960 packages of orange box
shocks. 79,000 shingles. 100 tons of coal.
and 1,800 packages of miscellaneous sup-
plies such as groceries, and household
goods. The total value of the exports to
foreign countries for the month amounted
to $21.526.77.
Vessels and Tonnage.
The total numlwr of vessels entering
and clearing during the month was 113. of
a total tonnage of 149.274. and employing
3.117 men.
Forty-five vessels entered from coast-
wise ports, of a total tonnage of 71,024.
and employing 1.450 men. and eight ves-
sels entered from foreign sprts of a total
tonnage of 3.176. and employing 7 men.
Of the vessels entering from costwise
ports 26 were steamers. 15 were sailing
continuede d on page 14.)


Naval Stores Situation in the New Orleans

Territory,

The Operators' Factorage Company Opening Offices in the Hibernia Bank

Building-Operators' Getting Together.


New Orleans, La., Nov. 20, 1905. move from Young. Miss.-near Lumberton
The New Orleans, Mobile and Gulfport -to the city, and take personal charge of
territory now looming up in importance in affairs. Mr. Ewing is a most successful
naval stores circles, will soon take the and prosperous naval stores producer, and
Ilace of prominence and influence to which is personally very popular with the opera-
it is properly entitled, tors in Mississippi and Iouisiana. and en-
In accepting the kind invitation of the joys their confidence. His selection as
"Record" to send you a weekly letter from President was a most excellent one.
over here. we beg to say that we hope to The yards and sheds of the Export Con-
interest your readers across the Alabama pany ill soon Ih ready for business.
River (east), and a letter with various ere are a r ines
news items froimi this territory will doubt- There are alot 250 turpentine stills in,
less Is. appreciated by your numerous sub- the Mobile. Gulfport and New (Orleans ter-
scrilers in our western section, who have ritory- not 400. as stated by the "Naval
long wanted your excellent paper to give Stores Review' in that remarkable speci-
more attention this "neck of the woods." men of artistic revariation in their iue
Of course, the event of greatest interest of Nov. 1thl--so well shown "up b you
in trans-Alabama naval stores circles for by the "deadly parallel collmn."
a long time was the meeting of turpentine There are three factorage firns in Mo-
men here on November 17th and the organ- lile. handling naval stores, viz: Union
nationn of the "Naval Stores Operators' Naval Stores Co., Talor & Lowenstein. and
Factorage Co." with $1,000.000 capital. W. 1. Patterson & (,.
The attendance of producers was not In (Gulfport, only one concern, the "New
only large. but representative in charac- Orleans Naval Stores ('o.'" and in New
ter. ani the interest and enthusiasm re- Orleans, t'e same state of affairs. Of
imarkahbl. We violate no confidence in course, th:s (virtual) monopoly has been
stating that the strongest kind of at- a rich thing. The "lmone" had so much
tempt was made by the Shotter interests meat on it. anti was altogether so "juicy"
to break up this meeting, and prevent the that it is small wonder the old dog has
formation of the new company, but met been growling and showing his teeth ulin
with dismal failure. the approach of the new arrival, which
The "Naval Stores Operators' Factorage proposes to "share the slmme."
(0." anl the Naval Stores Export Co. will before concluding this letter, the writer
Ic'eupy a handsome suite of offices on the feels that your readers should know that
third floor of the Hiiernia Bank building. during the time that Mr. (amble. and the
a nmodo-n and magnificent office building "Naval Stores Revicw" have heen spending
which is the center of the business activity so much time and sliace and worrying ( )
of New Orleans. President J. A. Ewing.
of the Factorage Company. will shortly (Continued on page 14.)


The Port of Jacksonville for November.










8 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Southern T

Louisville.-Business does not decrease,
but collections are slow. Activity in uiildl-
ing benefits dealers in supplies and mIate-
rial. Staples are tirm and in gons demand.
Produce also is yielding satisfactory re-
turns. H wadware, paints and oils continue
brisk. Clothing orders for future deliv-
ery are being received in good volume, andl
it is worthy of note that the manufacture
of high-grade clothing is becoming a lead-
ing feature here. Trade in dry goods and
notions is of satisfactory volume, and fu-
ture prospects are excellent. Burley to-
bacco of the highly colored variety appears
to be in best demand, and satisfactory
prices are being realized. Country stock's
are now reaching a stage where a falling
off in volume of business is to be expected.
The applications for rediscounts from
country banks are not numerous, which
indicates general soundness. Demand for
money is stronger and rates are firm.
St. Louis.-Trade conditions are satis-
factory and business compares favorably
with last year's. House trade, which is
usually very quiet at this season of the
year, shows some activity. The combined
dry-goods sale conducted by the principal
houses of St. Ijlis was very successful.
groceriess and drugs have been active it
steady prices. Hardware and building
material are still in gonsl demand at firnn.
quotations. Grain is quiet and irregular
in price, causing millers to purchase. Flour
for domestic tiade continues good, though
but few large orders for future delivery
have been booked. Lumber continues to
advance in price, but the demand is good.
Retail trade shows some improvement, and
the display of holiday goods is larger than
in previous years, and from present pros-
pects the turnover will be the heaviest on
record. Collections have fallen off some
and are now quoted fair. local stocks
and bonds are quiet, with prices fluctuat-
ing.
Kansas City.-Coitinued warm weather
overshadows to some extent otherwise fa-
vorable trade prospects. robberss in lead-
ing lines, however, say that the volume of
business compares well with a year ago.
Trade in groceries and provisions, as well
as hardware and building material, is ac-
tive. Retail business is only fair. Col-
lections are quiet.
Wichita.-Retail trade is increasing rap-
idly in volume as the holidays approach.
Wholesale trade is good. Collections have
improved.
Milwaukee.-Trade is expanding under
favorable weather conditions, but collec-
tions are somewhat unsatisfactory.
Sioux City.-Heavy rain has retarded
corn husking, but the major portion is
finished. Trade is quiet both in whole-
sale and retail lines. Collections are fair.
St. Paul.-Dry goods and grocery houses
report satisfactory sales, and collections
are good. Trade in boots and shoes is
lighter, but spring orders are coming in.
Collections are unsatisfactory in this line.
The hardware trade is godsl for this sea-
son, but collections are only fair.
Minneapolis.-Continued mild weather
has given the northwestern farmer such a
favorable opportunity th d(o his fall work
that country retailers have suffered a les-
sened volume of business, and jobbers also
have felt the effects. Still. trade in gen-
eral is characterized as good. The short-
age of cars still retards complete crop
movement and affects lumber distribution
as well. Flour production and sales are
large.
Omaha.-Jobbers in bsoots and shoes, dry
goods and groceries report trade excellent,
the volume being considerably in excess
of a year ago. building olprations con-
tinue very active. making an unusual de-
mand for structural and building material.
Open weather has permittel farm work to
progress rapidly. Most of the corn is now
being cribbed. Tie indications are that
the demand for holiday goods will exceed
all records. Confectioners are unusually
busy. Collections are fair to good.
Charleston, S. C.--Wholesale trade and
collections have improved.
(harleston, W. Va.-Wholesale and re-
tail trade increases in volume as holidays
approach. Collections in general are good.
but the car shortage in the coal fields
seriously handicaps deliveries and retards
collections in that district. New manufac-


trade Notes,

turilg industries are to be added to tihe
nunlber already here, Iwing induced by the
uinlliiiteil suiply of natural gpis. Addi-
tional Ilrge w ells have been recently lo-
cated and mininiun prices prevail. Banks
report an easv financial condition.
Savannah.-T'lhe sharp advance in cot-
tOn has irt snltcd in a temlolrary spurt ill
a market tlat haid l.eni dull, but the ac-
tivitv was brief. The spot market is quiet,
thle ;ispositiolln lIing to hold for further
advances. Receipts of naval stores are
larger ,Iecause many shipments are being
diverted to this l>ort from Jacksonville.
This has resulted ill a dull, declining mar-
ket. General jobbing trade shows a sub-
stantial gain over the same period last
year. and there is no cessation in tie tun-
usual demand for holiday godls. Collec-
lions have not shown tile expected iim-
provement.l anid wlarln weather has inter-
fered with retail traiie.
Augusta. Trade continues go(il. Col-
lections are fair.
Atlanta.-Trade meets expectations. Or-
ders for spring delivery are of gratifying
volume. lDemand for holiday goods ex-
'cels the suil)lly, and local jobbers coim-
pilai of delayed shipments. Farnlers are
holling cotton for higher prices, hence col-
lections a're nolt so giod. The advance in
the market during the past few days, how-
ever. hlas resullted in some selling, but a
considerable a;llmunt of the staple is still
leing held. lDemanid for money is good.
Iklik being made at low rates. The movement
of freight, especially lumber, is consid-
erably congested due to a scarcity of cars.
Jacksonville.-Some of the banks de-
cline loans at 8 per cent oni good collateral,
indicating a tight money market. Whole-
sale grocers are doing a heavy business,
but other lines are more quiet. Collec-
tions are only fair.
Birininglham.-The iron market is quiet
but firm. No. 2 southern foundry iron is
bringing $14.50. The market tends up-
ward, and an early advance is expected.
Wholesalers report a good trade, with col-
lections satisfactory.
Montgon ery.-Trade in all lines contin-
ues of satisfactory volume, witl fair to
good collections. The movement of cotton
has slightly lessened owing to the' holding
tendency of some larger planters, who
wisl to obtain better prices.
Chattanooga.-Trade in all lines con-
tins active. l holesaleal and retail houses
tire busy tilling orders for holiday goodls.
I.unlluer is scarce in tile face of large de-
imands for building purposes, with prices
high. Itank clearings continue to increase.
lIeal estate is active at gradually increas-
ing prices.
Knoxville.-Business remains goodl in all
lines. but collections are only fair.
Mentilhis.-Wholesale and retail busi-
ness is fair, but not up to last year's. Col-
lections are slow to good. Demand for
nminey is increasing andl ratis are firln.
Nasliville.-Trade is goodl. Collections
hold up well. Demand for money is active.
Activity continues in realty and building
material.
Little Rock.-Trade has improved. Col-
lections are reasonably good.
New ()rlans.-General trade is excep-
tionally gpoo. .Joblers and retailers state
that they are exI~eriencing an advanced
lioliday traile. Experts in all lines are
large, and the city presents an llpearance
of commercial activity never before seen.
Fort Worth. Reports from the Pan-
handle of Texas. are encouraging. Winter
wheat is in excellent condition. A nluch
larger iacreage than last year and a go;ps
yield are looked for. ('otton in that see-
tion. as ell as w-est Texas, has nearly all
Ieen gathered aind is sIving sold at present
prices. Jobleirs report satisfactory Ibusi-
nels in tile territory covered from here.
and collections are holling up well. Retail
trade is goodl.
I )lla ls. (.oIl cotton-picking weather
has preoviled, but considerable of thle icropl
remains to hie gathered. Wholesale trade
is not very active in any line, and coll ec-
tions aire slow.
WaVio. ()Only smliall amiiount of coittonl
wV;is mairketeid li f.irnii''rs otn tli(e preIsent
rise in price. Picking is practically i ver.
All itradls itare fairlv active. C(',ole'tio, ns
are fair to gii--l.


5I431 Il e 5tl l I lllulesit i**ii ti* IuIm l II i llljl

: MERRILL-STEVENS CO.
4.


SBoilermaking and Repairing

Still Boilers and Pumps.
: SHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.

4"
Jacksonville. Fla. f
4 11 I* t 6 1*I t t s 1' 11 1g 1116 1 1e 1 1 1 I 1 Ie le IF 91t| I & I i I I +a


FOR SALE.

6.00 Acres Round Timber, just south of Stuart.
Fronts Indian and St. Lucy Rivers; choice Pineapple
lands. Must be sold as a whole, $3.50 per acre.
C BUCKMA 22 Hogan St.
C. BUC IMAN, JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

i-lll1 mt1 lt6 3tl liii mC ii-aa. rio I r aa a am rba r i a


Standard Clothing Company




One Price One Price :



FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURINISHERS,
17 and 19 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Florida.
Stestwn ad Hawes Hats. Special Attentin tGiven to Mail Orders.
*aaI *as.....sase aaL


W. J. L'ENGLE. J. W. WADE. EL HUGHES,
President. Vice-President. Sec'y and Treas


Union Naval Stores Co.
MOBILE, ALA. PENSACOLA, FLA. NEW ORLEANS, LA.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
... .....DEALERS IN..........

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable location in West Flor-
ida, Alabama and Missisippi. Liberal advances made against consi',.-ant Cor-
respondence solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.


VIRGIN TIMBER.
Several tracts of 8,000 acres to 35,000 acres and
several good turpentine places already open

OFFERED FOR SALE
HEDRICK'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY,
112 West Frsyth Street. JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA.


1*4*l 10tlttt4141ttlll lI i I a *ll It*Iaa l a saIe Ias m


PEARL WIGHT,
President.


T. H. MCCARTHY,
Vice-President.


MAURICE STERN,
Treasurer.


S SOUTHERN STATES LAND & TIMBER COMPANY,
*
IRVING H. WELCH Manager.
4.


| Florida Timber, Grazing &.
. 4.

; Agricultural Lands.


O 401-404 LAW EXCHANGE. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. 3
SIIll l t I a #1i441t11Itl t l II I I4 #i Itll ll 1411 ate a


1 1


,








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


Indian Indigo and Oilseed Crops.

The ('oilintiercei Intelligeine Depa)rtillent (.cm11p:Ird u\ith lhe coires~N.,ldiig periiol
of tile Governllient of Ini lia. li.~t i t-d tlhe of lai't year. :alld Alad.ras (rai iytwari vil-
following First, (Geeiieral .ililllmoralin o11 n ilage,- Ion1y) Icjr.'ts a111 increase of 73,0MN)
the Indigo crop of the season 1905: The ilc 111. l .r.I'' "Ip all tile lled f 1 Sp)temllr'l
four pIrovinces re porid ol in this ien- at, compared %illh Iist year. In the Pan-
I Ip,' 1 4 A 'li 'l e't iililte hia.s lie l )'l'ed ed
ouranlllll Iinac ict ally coio t;lill tlhe \hole ,. i. I jH) ;<., . 11. i t 1 Ide lille froi, last
(f i peIr ce t.) of lIh in.ligo ;in'a in l'rit \oir lig 1lir.. i i I pit. ,i 23.IN) I(tcres. A
ish Indlia, in tlhe fdollom ing prolor'tion-: 4i. .ise of igolt. I is.INI ai(Mleis i s reported
BJeiigal. 8.l per (cent.; .ladr2s, ..4 per Irln tl tlmay ail Silul (inculiling Native
cent; United Provinces, 2'2 ope'r (-Ven; Ii;ll- ,;t,,s). but considerable portioll of this
jal), 9.4 per (cent. 'Th'h iv ei't.,N .'li .es arI l', i, el(pt44 to diap.i pea oln fitl- rei eip t if
caleulatlie on the a el\'rigi'les ol li ke i -ll e 4al*, 4tli htilt't lfl lli ii. Tili nllot rest'llts if
ending ]!:1-0-M, aIidl iln U'le a .period tUe the.,. estimats of Utl ;1r; pilanltd lill to
average total area if til re..lited indigo d;lat.-at;er al. alliance lhas wenll made for
crop of iBritish India u.%s S434,700) acres. the illconipletenes'll of lthe ioillliaVy retlllurns
All these province reliorlt a clntration 1l 'hows very little variation as c-mipared
area in the current year's clrop i' (-)i- 4i' lth, I;i .'i ar'. lfigures for those proV-
i nlri with fl.st % a'-tt'. tliu total t.l -ie;>e itlo e., in t hich hil, 1)'1';.| ';ge of ithe (11op liis.
a llolllti g to 1:(.ll. i N> 1- O.r.4.1i'l 0 1 Il y 3l1' c r' ellort (l.
per e-(lit. In certain l li tri.ts thi- ".1onuile.- .I le ,llosming i, a ,lnalryv of the pro
tion has n1o lPouil t hI..li dili to ,,Ilf4vort)- 1 i t iiio
a lel weatiiher io.l itoll.on ilnt it., ilii rt ,e ll, in ial repoItlil, l figures l iin ill. ukets
ognist.e that tlhe klolt I.ietll .,e l tihe l in- oll- tig pI,. wine.iI of ichi provide. iud
favourablle conditio,,ltl of tit. indigo ni arke.t. t l''ilat per lll i;4t' I f le t(it otal larel
lan tvfol vlfo-ll| e (on llinin I ie s;timllf'l illl ill Brli-t h Indal) is 0el4l-
the (.ltilonst tion of lit-. l is ll r.porlted to le it'1 ir to tral Plict inlce. id lI',rr (24i per .celnt.
goot in the lParij;l) and Mladli'n-, lbt un h t|Iotal aI a i % r leorted is 6i3.60I
satisfactory in ll ngal il11l i tl iitd I (nS iitedi. i the ('i'tnral 'lro il t'. ;l1111
rovi. nee 79,200 in IBelr i:)' ;a1. (.o 4n 'r(edil with i .>ll;.:.I
o''n t u ., 'S.->S.711) ini tI le Central I'roviicen a111
The following is a siummiinry of thl p'ro- 1o3.(il) ill Bin l.ir ) illor last vcar. IThe. sow-
vincial repo rts: in,, se .1liolln s It1.1 vouraliltl for the early
In sHengalil (38 per celit) life area sowit crop. but hIt';Iavy at iil ctiliiilln raill ill
is relortedl to Ibe I 70.itNi 4l0'S, as o0i111- Se p;re iteCl'ase of .32.2 110 a1"1s. or1 23 per cent. rrolp li;mis suffered front excssi've rain iandl
wing to the sti ltat oif the miarke't c thle are i insel- ts in plioli's. ;itn out-tulrn 12 Ipr cent
under inligo is ionlltractinlg r.pidly. Thle ;hilo\e tlhe iiollal is at plresen t e'stiniatted
,owins iega latt'r tlihan usual on ac.-Ount ifoi tlhe' (t n l I'rov intie. Iln li'rarl, where
of the unusually pirotr'acted (cold weather tihe c'roil .i'llrtred froil insllilihient rainl in
of last year. but the rainfall was general- lfhe iii ille l of the InonsIll)on as well as from
ly favotirable in April and Al;ay. June was iex.essive ioin in Seil itnber. the present
an iexeeptionally diT.r 111411lti. and tlie ist.illl a l of the l ropl is 81 "'r cent of tihe
drought coittinuling till the nl' idille of .Ily l1nor111 al. It i', onsolere problinhale', hlow-
dlamaged the pinits and111 delayed the first ev'r, thliat fa;ivourtlble conditions during
cuttings. Then again the lieavy and con- the next two months may improve the
tinuous rain front the inhie of J.uly to collndition of tle (crop ill those districts of
tie middle of Septembleire <-;iuscd llooh and lcr;u- \\h| the loss of a ctiisiIdel'i) il' quantity of I'li Ivrittih distri< oif IlOl)ihlay ( .4 per
plant. The season itas I ten thuiis on the rent) and Sind 12.S lier cent) estimate the
whole lnfaivoull'trale. It is estim. ted, that tirei i\\.nll. ;is fair as reported.t, to.I he ;ti;S,;(K)
the out-turn IHJIo l-'re 1a1 lie ailloit 44 ;itres. w\hi il is 2.i.l;I) aerles or (6i.4 per
per cent of the normal. mlmpared with .56 ,enII ) les than tl e area at tlhe corres-
per cent last year; anl the gross yieltll londilng d;at't of last Iyear. The Native
will not lie imore tlha ii 2DIU.N) factory States report :819.lmN>) e-l'es .;>s Com pa red
aauiinds. In Madra1 s 12!i.4 per cent) the with 4S2.IN) ;iles at tl.e 1corres.iodiing
raiyatwari villages iiup to the end of .ll- dale of l't 'year. a decrease of i 4 per t'ent.
gust reported a 41 total iar4 a oi f 31.1N) acre I. Tlit. i eiliii'. ti t attrih l.ted in I r l't to deti-
under inldigo-a ldecrea.se of 22.11NI acres. ciene v- of rain: but it is noted that the
or 30 pelr cent.. as comipaired witli tihe c(r e.stitmatves nowl received arei ll several t caseI
reslponing. date of last year, and 9.0150 incompllete. a1nd it is exipectel that most
acres. or 6*i per (.cent lelow the laveratge olt f Ilthe d're;ses w ill disi '|;'alr wIhe.n coiln-
the last five years. The decrease is nt- plete inforaintiohi lhas bIeen received. In
tribtlted partly to wanit of timtely irill Sinld lhere i 111n inicreaie of 3 per cent.
and partly to the extensive cultivation ol ]ne to favour;able inuiil n I tlill. 'hle crop is
food crops in |ptefretnce to itidigo, the de- fairly g mnand for which lhas of lat considerably liUtndesah: elseiher' it is s itering
fallen. The crop was reported to lie either tlIrollgh tlhe sa;nt iness of later rains.
fair or good. but to reiillii-e rain in parts. initel PrI'ivinces 1i.7 iper i'.ent No defi-
United Irovinet, (22 ler t, ent): The ex- lite ififormlaition regarding tle area sown
art area soown will not le kio in until is availhhle at pr-lint. but froin repolort
De)emlier. but as far ;as in'forilation is recei'kedl it is co.lsidered probable thiat thie
available, it i estitititetl hilat the acng'!e are114 will 1,e aitbll the normal. Inl the
is probably not i, more than oiine-forth of chief se-niuin-'rowing tracts tlihe rainfall
last year's area. which i nlintiinted to 74.- in .A gnst 1and Seitenhler was onl the whole
(OKI acres. towint- were n1lliie at t lie light. i111n di ll no serious harlill to tile irop.
usual time. the crop germinlted well. and wlhilh is s fao t;irl relor-teId to Ibe in fair con-
water for irrigation i"fis generally avalila- itilion. andl is exi'ete'll to yield an outtllurn
hie; but during tlie last three imont lii ot of firollm 1l I1o S3 pe-r cent of tlie normal.
winds and continued want of ira;!11 in fthe I';anjahi '13.:{ io-r ,cent.) now reports tlhe
I)oalh have injuriolshly afiTec-ted tle |l.int. i.areni to 1ie 1::3.71) aci-s as compared witli
Panjab (9..4 Iper cen(. t) i] irts tie irei 13fl.1(1H ;1 "" lilljlly e--tiallited i;st year.
sown ll toi the enid of Suptoenler allt 2.31(N) IT'he prolon'i1 d aIrs as compared with 3.(.(lNN avre, linal- J.ly to hle t ihle l' f September not onli.%
ly Isertained ist ye;ir. Tlhis elr.ents prel.\ entell flrller -i.nwillns. ibut also in-
a oiecrease of I 53 perl cent. Thlie crop is re jtilred ti1e s':iiling (l'p consiiderlaliv. I'ros-
porltedl to bIe illn g d co imdlit ion. pect-, :(are now ablloult average on irriailtd
.1A ".eol l G;enerall Mel <;'lirl4d i n fll ille a11111 faiir onll n11irligaiiteid lald. I) n141ge by
Nsesi nuinn ( til or jilljilii cr1I I oif tlhe eona- llo14ds i. however. Irelorted from certain
son of lh)3-Ni. which l- hla been i- Ined 1\ riv erl;in trliet -. t idlrIs (l 119.9 iIer cent.)
the lsallle leparm ent| t.|l les tl hl, li \r in,\\ lho, eport 471G.100> ;<'re, mll ler ses-.imi m
in lesu dealt witl in ll-, ie|llort ( OIvi, an in rli .it w 1;1ri %illge.s II, fill t he fill. d I f
area represent n l it r c t of tIl lie ;4 v- Il l.lt l ei ;n in cr11'1e of 9 li per cent. (75;'.-
eragp total area under I ll in British 54MN ;l-'l' ;1s 4-ollil el \wilh fttil correl- s.-
Ii llia fo r the five y e;irs ,n1 il g l .1110! 3 4. I| iI lini g < ll -,e o f I;>tl \%e a r. a nI (i o f *2 "e
No reports ihave yet ltien r"cei'l frmli entl :i, 1iip:;irl with tlhe average of t1lhe
Bengal anildl II lhr.4T lial. No iehlinile inflo l;|s| IxlI. v iar-. 'The illn rese is iattribiuted
nation regain lding tli e arf a Nit-. ii i fn ile p;itly lto '-.i-o ona.iie raiilifill ai l(partly to
Fnitel PI rovincs iK avi;il iahle ait |1i<'s-elil. \, et inild, halvi'ng been l rllilghlit ider tihe
ulit it is reported that it will piro'bally lw vnitlivit iion .f 4e-.innim #owing to the in-
al i+ut tlhe normall. (>f thel re(aiiin. pro\ -nllicienl -upply of wal;itr in tih irig:i-
inces ihlilt \witi ifn tlhi imein iloinhlii lh li]Vii -Ini i e. "Ih'e .olidiloll of tle 1ro. p is
Central Provin es ai port a silglit illncren-se :l.O 00 es as ( olo3iriil;i'.. i Jo niial.


B. R. POWELL.
President.


CHAS. 6. NARRIS. HENRY ASHLEY.
Vice-President lnd Treasurer. Secretary.


DIRECTORS:
B. R. Powell Chas. 6. Harris, D. 0 l.cMllan. P. L. Sutherland, R. V. Corlintor.

THE '

Southern Drug Manufacturing

Company
Corner of Forsythjand Jefferson St.
Jacksonville, Florida.



Wholesale Drugs & Commissay Supplies
We solicit the 'lTrpentine and Mill Trade and will be glad to quote prices on
anything in the drug line. We make packed drugs a specialty and can save you
money. Mail orders are given prompt attention.




Standard Naval Stores Co.,
JACKSONVILLE



EXPORTERS

SSt CARGO LOTS A SPECIALTY



SStandard Naval Stores Co. JACKSONVILLE I
SJ3SCCLCSCCCCCCWM C33CESS a0CSXSSECXitW3SCC^aa

s esXtXcx?xK^^~~cccEssr c~~ss


I






















I

4.


CAPITAL STOCK $300,000.00


Jacksonville Naval Stores


Company

JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA


A NEW COMPANY


Will do a general naval stores commission business. We
guarantee Savannah prices upon day of arrival, and to make
prompt return.


A MUTUAL COMPANY


Each shipper invited to become a stockholder.
It is but fair and right that the operator should share in the
profits of the selling end of his product.
We have ample capital and facilities to take care of our
customers. Your business solicited.



Jacksonville Naval Stores Co.

Blum Building, Rooms 21-23 Jacksonville, Florida

I). C. ASHLEY, President. W. P. ROBERTS. V. P. and Gen. Mgr.
J. (. CRANFORD J. F. FENDER C. H. BROWN J. N. BRAY
VI:E-PR.UIDENTS
S. H. BERG. Secretary and Treasurer


\\LI~U~\UUI1\-~U~IS~3~*~ l~*~S~*~Z1Z~SJ1~U~~










THE WEEKLY INDTTSTRIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL RECOR.D.

JAMES A. HOLLOMON.
Edioerand Manager.
Published Every Friday.
SI.arax (Domestic). 3.00 Per Annum
.su .r...o. (Foretin) .... $3.50 .

"The Pine and Its Products."

All communications should be addressed
The Industrial RIecord Company.
Jacksonville. Fla.

sanh Editorial and Businee Officee at
Atlanta. ,Ga. Savannah. Ga.

Entered at the Postoffice at Jacksonville, Fla..
as second-class matter.

Adopted by the Executive Committee
of the Turpentine Operators' Association,
September 12, 1902, as its exclusive offi-
cial organ. Adopted in annual conven-
tion September 11 as the organ also of
the general association.
Adopted April 27th, 1903, as the offi-
cial organ of the Interstate Cane Grow-
ers' Association. Adopted September
11, 1903, as the only official organ of the
T. O. A.
Commended to lumber people by spe-
cial resolution adopted by the Georgia
Sawmill Association.

The Record's Offices.
The publishing plant and the main offi-
ces of the Industrial Record Company
are located at the intersection of Bay
and Newnan streets, Jacksonville, Fla.,
in the very heart of the great turpentine
and yellow pine industries.
The Atlanta, Ga., office is located in the
Equitable Building, No. 723. Atlanta is
the center of the great manufacturing
trade of the entire South.
The Savannah, Ga., office is in the
Board of Trade Building. Savannah is
the leading open naval stores market in
the world.

Notio* to Patrons.
All payments for advertising in the In-
dustrial Record and subscriptions thereto
must be made direct to the home office in
Jacksonville. Agents are not allowed to
make collections under any circumstances.
Bills for advertising and subscriptonsare
sent out from the home office, when due,
and all remittances must be made direct
to this company.
Industrial Record Publishing Co.

STOCKHOLDERS TO MEET.
The stockholders of the Naval Stores
Export (o. are called to meet at 10 o'clock
Wednesday morning. December 6th in tlhe
Board of Trade auditorium, Jacksonville.
to consider amending the charter, increas-
ing the capital stock to two million dol-
lars and transacting such other business as
may be necessary.

TIMMONS QUITS SHOTTER.
The Record's Tampa correspondent sends
it the following:
"W. W. Timmons. President of the Tim-
mons-Blount Naval Stores Company, has
resigned and severe all connection with
the company, returning to his home in
Tifton. Ga.
"B. W. Blount has been elected Presi-
dent of the Company. to succeed Mr. Tin-
ions.
"Mr. Carson. son-in-law of Mr. Tim-
mons, who was Secretary and Treasurer
of the company, has also resigned. (cen-
eral Manager Bacon cnmt;nues in charge
of the active business affairs of the com-
pany."

ATLANTA EXPOSITION, xigo.
Atlanta proposes to have a big exposi-
tion in ItlO-the biggest ever held in thel
South. and it is safe to say s;e will ac-
complish just what shle attempts. That is
Atlanta's way. The following telegram
explains the shooting of the first gun for
this I;g celebration:
Atlanta. Nov. 28.-At a banquet of the
Atlanta Chamnler of ('onmnerce here to-
night plans for holding the Southern In-
dustrial Exposition in this city in 1910


were formally launched. A number ot
prominent speakers front other States
were guests of the Chamber of 'Commlerce
and delivered speeches heartily indorsing
the exposition. Prominent among these
was ex-(:overnor lDavid R. Francis, of Mis-
souri: lion. Willian E. Camecron, (iover-
nori- of Virginia: lion. W\illiaul L. Frierson.
Mayor of ( hattanooga: Mayor ChapI l oit
C('olumus. (I a. H on. It. H. Edltuonllsoi., dl-
itor of tlhe Manuf;acturers' Iecord; Plresi-
dent .1. IL. Parker of the Birimiigliani
C'haiuler of Commlierce atnil C. I(ariner.
president of the .Jacksonville, Fla., Board
of Trade. The feature of the occasion was
tile speech of ex-(lovernior Francis.
Prominent local speakers were governor r
.oseplh M. Terrell. Mayor .lJames (. Woosl-
ward, President I FK. Malddox of the At-
lanta (Chamlber of (Comiluiercc, and Presi-
dent-elect Samuel 1). Jones, of thle local
t iatnl'br of Commerce. More than 409)
representative business umen of Atlianta
attended the banquet and were etllhusias-
tic in their support of tlie Cexpsition
mnoveiment.

NAVAL STORES TERMINALS.

Southern Warehouse Company, of Jackson-
ville, Sells Yards to Coast Line.
The naval stores terminals in Jackson-
ville, heretofore, since the organization of
the Naval Stores Export Co., owned by
the Southern Warehouse Company, have
been sold to the Atlantic Coast Line Rail-
road Company. These terminals, now
known as the Naval Stores Export Co.'s
yards, join the Coast Line terminals on the
west bank of the St. Johns.
In addition to the land, about fifteen
acres, the deed conveys to thle railroad
company all the riparian rights, all the
docks and dock privileges, together with
all the buildings of every nature, the
wharves, tanks, rosin-sheds, boiler pumps,
and all other buildings, rights and privi-
leges now held and owned by the Southern
Warehouse Company. All the lands lying
east of the track described above and sub-
merged by the waters of the St. Johns
are also conveyed in the deed to the Coast
Line.
In tile deed the party of the first part
relinquishes each and every right they
formerly held in the property and agrees
to make any other deeds and conveyances
which may be deemed necessary by the
counsel to insure all rights to the party
of the second part, and secure them against
counter claims and lawsuits.
Attorney John E. Hartridge, who ap-
pears as counsel for the Atlantic Coast
Line, is quoted in answering a direct ques-
tion as to the meaning of the deal as fol-
lows :
"The deal means simply that the Atlan-
tic Coast Line Railroad Comlany has pur-
chased all of tile export terminals of tlhe
turpentine people. All of the property of
the Southern Warehouse Company has
been secured by the transaction, and not
only the land, but all the warehouses and
other buildings and properties of the coin-
pany are conveyed to the railroad coim-
pany in the deed.
"This will mean much to the turpentine
exporters and to other similar interests."
Mr. Hartridge was asked further regard-
ing the use that the Coast Line wulld
make of the recently acquired property,
and. in reply, is quoted by a local paper
as saying:
"It means that an open market is to be
maintained. To put it in other words, it
means that anyone can store turpentine in
these warehouses, no matter how small the
amount that he may offer. Of course.
there will be a warehouse-storing charge
demanded. but thle market, upon payment
of that charge, is to be open to all, and
in nowise limited nor closed.
"Tile Southern Warehouse Company will
continue in business, and will store its
turpentine in the present warehouses. But
the ownership of the buildings and the
tract of land now lies with the railroad
colipany, anl that corporation will deter-
mine the storage charges, receive the mon-
eys and exercise all the other rights of
ownership."
As the Rlecord views it the selling, of
these terminals simply places them in the
hands of neutral parties, as is necessary.
looking to Jacksonville becoming all olpen
market in tlhe future.


__


WOOD DISTILLATION.
Wooil distillation has been tried in this
country so extensively of late, and has
been brought so prominently to the at-
tention of the Forest Service as a means
of utilizing waste in ]umlbering. that a
careful and thorough investigation is to be
made by l the Service, covering both what
has lieen accompiillishliel in this industry and
what Imay bee doe to reduce it to more sci-
entitic principles and to place it upon a
sound commercial basis. The various pro-
cess*s now ill use will be studied and
compared. as well as the resulting products
and the uses to which they are or nayv
le put.
To push this study to early and useful
reo'ults with tihe least possible delay, Mr.
Thonia \\ W. I'ritchard. a practical expert
in wood distillation. has leen engaged by
the Forest Service to devote his entire
time to the work. Mr. Pritchard, who is
a trlailned chelnist. has for several years
been connllcteid witl successful distillation
plant in thle South. Hle has already be-
gun his work withl tli Forest Service, anti
wi'l at once coiiimullllnicate with the owners
of wool-distillation plants throughout the
country to first determine the degree of
succ-c, to which the business has reached.
IIH will tlen closely examine the methods
which have resulted i uio'st successfully, and
attempt to extend their use. He will pay
particular attention to tle extent to which
luiibcrninl mlay adlopt woodd distillation
as a iteans. of turning into useful prod-
lctf tile tops slabs and other waste of
sawmiills, which are often at present a to-
tal loss.
Destructive distillation consists in driv-
ing out all the liquid matters in the wood
and collecting and condensing them after-
wards. Intense heat is employed, and the
original form of the wood is changed chenm-
ically into various liquids and pure car-
Iln. The wo~,dl is closely placed in a steel
retort, with tile doors tightly sealed, and
tires are started in tile furnace underneath.
In a few hours distillation begins. The
liquids are driven from the wood, are
changed to vapors, and pass off through a
pipe at the top of the retort, which leads to
a condense cr or worm. immersed in water.
where they are condensed in the order of
their gravity. Again restored to liquid
form. they then pass through tle rest of
the coil and run into collecting tanks. The
gas, lightest of the products, rises to the
top of tile e.il and is piped off.
The liquid products are redistilled in a
secondary still into the various oils and
liy-llprnlucts. T'llus. the thin, amber-col-
ored oil, which is one of the products of
the first distillation, is changed in the
second still into wood spirits of turpen-
tine. a light oil. and a heavy oil, the resid-
num tlI ing tar. This process, which is the
one carried on at 'several successful plants.
is only one of those which the Forest Ser-
vice is to take tlp critically.
IThe outllit for a plant with a capacity
of Ili0 cords of wood every thirty-six
hours, which is as small as can be profit-
ab l handled, consists of a "battery." or
t\o retorts holding 5 cords of wood each.
Tlhee Iretorts are set in brickwork, alout
.tA0.0Wt bricks being required for a "hat-
terv." In addition are needed a coil or
conldenlser of copper, a copper still of a
capacity of 1.000 gallons. a second con-
deln er. untlicient collecting and storing
tanks. :, boiler of not less than 10 horse-
nower. and Ipumps to handle the products.
All piping should lie. if possible of copper.
except after the second distillation. and
the punips should be brass-lined.
From such a plant the yield should be
applroxinlately from 75 to 100 gallons of
oil or tar per cord, and from 10 to 15 gal-
lons iof wood turpentine. There are also
lpoduccd alhout 25 bushels of charcoal and
pyroligenolr acid in quantities about equal
to the iil. The amount of products is in
direct rati to ith(e reiinous constituents in
the raw iiiaterinl. The vlhie of the prod-
nct is variable. If properly made. the tar
-hoiild bring the average market price of
li:n tar. and thle spirits sell for from 15
to 5 cents bIlow the market price of spir-
its of turpentine. If no tar is made, and
oil is lirodllci. the latter must lie made
into special preparations. miuc as wwood
rieservatives. paints, stains, disinfectants.
Tli demand fior wiood creosote oil in the
state in which i. copies from tlhe still is
liniited.
The application of wolod distillation to
tle utiliyatioii of waste material both from


the lumber mills and from the cut-over
coniferous forests of the South is beyond
question. Any mill waste which is rich
in resinous products can be used. and the
very lIest results are obtained from the
down timler and stumps in the cut-over
pine forests. Most of the lumbermen have
timber holdings wlich contain material
suitable for distillation. The great saw-
mills of the Pacific coast have a large
proportion of such material in the slabs
which now have little or no use. By using
the down timber in the woods thle fire risk
is greatly minimized, since any and all
material suitable for wodl distillation is
necessarily of a umit inflammable nature.
In many ecastes even the roots as well as
the stunmps may be used for distillation.
thus greatly lowering the cost of clearing
land for agricultural purposes.
Tlie Forest Service is most desiroiu to
secure the hearty coitperation of all who
are interest intrt in the industry. Sugges-
tions and ideas of a practical nature will
be gladly received and carefully consid-
ered.

URGES ORGANIZATION.
The cotton growers of Florida met at
Lake City Tuesday to lear addresses by
Hon. Harvey .lordan, president of the 'ot-
ton (Growers' Association, of Georgia. (ol-
onel Edwin Brobston, of Jacksonville. and
others. Mr. Itrobston's address is of ie-
culiar interest to tle Record d ecanuse lie
dealt largely with the necessity for co-ope-
ration and organization among producers-
a condition that is no longer a theory with
the naval stores men. Among other
things, lie said:
"The eyes of the country are to-day on
the South. While t..e big railway com-
panies and the steamship lines have been
building up a great and wealthy West, the
South has struggled on, meeting and deal-
ing with the problems which confronted her
and meeting them in her own way, and
as Iwst she could. But she finally at-
tracted the attention of the whole world
hy the vast extent of her undeveloped for-
ests, her undeveloped farms and mines
and other undeveloped resources.
"But it is of organization which I desire
to speak. When tle South came last fall
with her 13,500.000 bales of cotton the cot-
ton spinners saw what they thought to
be an opportunity and determined to beat
the price of the South's great product
down. 'lley did. Six cent cotton stared
the flrmners in the face as a stern reality.
The time had come, and with it the man
for the occasion. Harvie Jordan, with his
co-workers, met at New Orleans, organ-
ized, and flaunted the challenge into the
faces of the speculator, and the manufac-
turer who thought to browbeat this favor-
ed section of the globe. There issued an
edict from New Orleans, which in positive
words declared that the South was no
longer the field for the one who would rob
tle makers of wealth. The spinners
laughed back. but they soon turned their
thoughts in serious channels. The organ-
ization of the Southern farmers had turned
the trick. Organization had brought re-
denmption from what looked like grim
poverty.
"This is a day of organization. The
sawmill man is organized and has been so
long enough to note the great advantages
of that organization. The naval stores
operators organized a few years ago and
under the leadership of that great Florid-
ian and industrial genius, Walter Coach-
man. see the results today? A few vears
ago the turpentine operator was consid-
ered a sort of bandit, who, it was thought.
settled in the wosots. stole your timber,
placed negroes alout your farms, and
committed other depredlatons and sins
against society. He was a sort of outcast
in this State. hardly noticed and most
cordially despised. Formerly he was wont
to go to town albnut three times each year
with his hat in his hand and ask his factor
for nioney. rTo-day lie is his own factor
and controls a considerable portion of the
wealth of tlie State. And with all that
lie is a pretty big fellow in the State. a
social favorite. as Awell as an industrial
king. That is what organization has done
for that industry. and that is just what
it will do to you. You have the key to the
situation. and it is ip tto yu whether or
not you control it."









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11



THE CHRISTIE-GROOVER DRUG CO.,


WHOLESALE
. renIf T aw DaNI AT HME AMI svrE TiME AND AOIEY.


DRUGGISTS.


JureoanWuA, FWNDDAu.


Review of Naval Stores for a Week.


Savannah, (.a., Saturday. Dec. 2.-The
largest -sale of rosins ever made in one
day's trading on the Savannah market
was made today by exporters taking twen-
ty-four thousand barrels. in round num-
hwrs, at from $2.671/2 to $5.23, an advance
on the prices established on Monday by
Shotter. when he broke the market by
trading with te .I.. IP. Williams Co. The
market is firm and advances are looked for.
It is not lilieveid aat tlhe Shotter combine
will bIe able to hammer the prices down
any lower.

Rosin for the Week at Savannah.
Monday. Nov. 27. Last Year.
\VW ................ 000 .25n 5.10
W4( ................. 4.75(a 5.() 4.75
N ................... 4.0 4.7; 4.5,0
NM ............... 4.00(a 4.50 4.30
K ................... 3..0(. 4.1N) 3.90
I .... .............. 3 00( 3.25 3.35
H ................... 2.75(n 3.10 2.H
(; ................... 2.8.-(n 2.1MI) 2.6"5
F .................. 2.75(a 2..!9 2.110
E ................... 2.65(a 2.8.3 2.55
I) ................ ....... 2.6(0 2.52/:,
( B ................ 2.55 0 2 M) 2.50
Sales 12.41-0). receipts 1.414. exlnorts I.1116).
Tuessday. Nov. 2.-oi. 8.teadl%: -ales
6i.700; r'(ceipts 3.203; shipments 575.
Quote: AIB'. *2.355&2.F): 1) $2.55(02.980:
F $2.(i65(2.95: F $2.75( 2.!0: (; $2.85(a
:3.(): H *2.90&: 3.10: I 3.OO(,0:.25: K l3.50
(M4.25; M $4.00(a4.75: N .*4..-0)',5.00: AW(;
*4.753( 5.25: WW $I3.()w(a 5..0.


W\edneslday. Nov. 29.-Rosin firm, salhs
7.063: receil)ts :1.06(O: shipments 1.9(i5.
Quote: ABC. $2.6i7 1-2: 1) $2.70; E $2.75:
F $2.82 1-2: ( $2.921-2: IH 3.00); I
$3.12 1-2: K $3.87 1-2: M $4.37 1-2: N
$4.75: W(; $5.:); WW $5.25.
Thursday. Nov. 30--Legal Holiday.
Friday. c. iD .-Rosin firm; sales 1.:3)4:
receipts 3.751: shipments 3193. Quote: A..
h. ('. $2.67 1-2: 1) $2.70: E *2.75; F
$2.82 1-2: (; $2.92 1-2: It $ 1.N); I $3.12 1-2:
K $3.87 1-2: 3M $4.37 1-2: N $4.75:; W(4
$5.00: WW $5.25.
Saturday. Dec. 2.-Rosin firm: ahles 23.-
S"12: receipts 3.344: shipments 1.344. Quo-
tations: AB(C. $2.67 1-2; 1) A:?.70- E 4.2.75:
F $2.S2 1-2: (; *2.82 1-2: H $:1.00; I 3.:1:
1-2: K $:.S7 1 -2: M $3.47 1-2: N $4.7.:>:
\\(; $3..(A \ .,\ .25..
XN
Spirits for the Week at Savannah.
Price I(epts Sales Exp 1904
Mon.. Nov. 27 .410 550' 219i 3.477147/,
Tues.. Nov. 2. .6(0 i 1.2491 7l1!)i 5>17147'/4
eI, Nov. 2141. .0 ; 704)o! 703:1 1001471;
Th'urs. Nov. 30..I egal IHolida-y.
Fri.. I)e. I .... .2 1.110 1..569! 447147i.
Sat.. I)v.. 2 ... 12 1/4 1.1011 148 1.7471471/4

Savannah Naval Stores Statement.
The following are figures and quotations
of the naval '.tovs, market as Insted at
the Ioard of Trade:
Spirit. los''n.
Exports for season ...... S7.8HS 17S..6125
last year ........ ... 54.341; 129.23!1
Coastwise ....... .... 1.747 1.331
Coastwise for season .... 18.4iS 283.698S


last vear .............. 73,456

Last year ............... 470

La.,t year ............. .154.22
St Iok Sat irday ........ ...2,548
l~ast yearll ............... 33.275


321,761
3.344
1.841
501),721
4(1.123:
72.733
54.6i70


THE FLORIDA CIGAR & TOBACCO CO.
T'Irh Florida Cigar & lTobacco (o.. es-
tal:mlhvd here l~st Muarchli has grown to
splendid l pro rtionls during this short
tune. Albout fifteen of tlie large wholesale
grocery firms in the State are tockholders
in the Florida Cigar & Tobacco (o. and
lulm their cigar-. tobacco. etc.. exclusively
from this firm. Taking the sales for tile
past Iontllh as a a average hasis, thlw Flor-
ida Cigar & Tobacco (Co. is doing a million
dollars a year mhimsie-s.

LUDDEN & BATES' NEW HOME.
Th'le iiiudlen & Bates S uthern Music
Company is now comfortably established
in its new homne at 23 East Bay Street.
Their handsome three-story building is
complete ill every particular for the pur-
poses of this well known music house. The
third siory of the builliing is to bw used as
a c-ncert hall. The third tioor of the ad-
joiinig Iuilding has I Cen engaged by the
Iludden & Bates (Company. this giving
them tIlie advantage of a splendid hall
for concert piirlposes.
The first and second floors of the new


W. F. COACHMAN,
Presidat.


J. P. WILLIAMS,
Vice-President.


W. J. KELLY,
Vice-Presiaent and Treas.


The Naval Stores Export Company


Capital. $1.250.000.00


Branch Offices:
SAVANNAH, GA.
FERNANDINA, FLA.
PENSACOLA, FLA.
TAMPA, FLA.
NEW ORLEANS, LA
CHICAGO, ILL.
NEW YORK.


OFFI^ Jacksonville, Fla.


COMMENCED BUSINESS JUNE 1, 1905


Owned and controlled by Naval Stores Producers and Factors throughout the Yellow Pine
District in South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas


The Object of this Company is to Bring Producer and Consumer into Closer Relations.



For Quotations and Particulars. Address,



THE NAVAL STORES EXPORT COMPANY


Jacksonville, Fla.


602 BOWLING GREEN BLD'G
NEW YORK


1128-1130 UNITY BUILDING
CHICAGO. ILL.


x -'


3. P. THAGARD,
Secretary.


piano building will he used as display
rooms. business office,, etc. Mr. PR E.
Wells, who has recently been appointed
manager of the Jacksonville branch of
this company, has made a host of friends
during his short residence in the city, and
the already splendid business of Ludden
& Bates will be increased under his able
management.

C. F. COLE SHOE CO.
C. F. (ole Shoe Company, 21) East Bay
Street. are catering for the best trade in
Jacksonville and are carrying goods ac-
cordingly. This shoe firm has the ex-
clusive agency for such well-known makes
as Edwin Clapp & Sons for men. Laird,
Sclolier & (o. for women and E. R. Reed
Company. You can get all widths of
-lhoes at their store from AA to EE. Mr.
(Cle has been in Jacksonville for the past
fifteen years and understands thoroughly
the wants of the trade. Special attention
given to infants' and children's slhoes. One
price to everybody.

SEWING MACHINES.
Mr. F. (). Miller. the well known sewing
machine man at 419 West Bay Street.
handles high grade sewing machines ot
every make at cut prices. He also handle.
supplies :ind equipment for all machines.
.r. Miller has been in business in Jack-
-onville for many years and has built up
a splendid trade.


9%1%1%%"_%11MWW"











12 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


TIMBER AS A FARM CROP.
"''The planting of tiree- lha. not aplpeahled
in a large way to, tlihe .\nerica;n pI.ople' a
a practical or proitall<, thing. Because.
primarily. of the slow growth of tile tree';
secondarily, Iecause in a large part of our
country native trees are more or less
plentiful. or lumber, fuel and fencing can
he had for a reasonable price." says (Com-
mereial West. "The average American las
not come to seriously consider investing
anything for tihe coming generations that
cannot be pulled up andi shipped to some
new location. Our population is not no-
madic. but it is by nlo neans fixed. In
the west especially,. comparatively few
children live to middle age in thle home
where they were Irn or even near it. To
plant trees for one's children would ap-
peal to a large percentage of tile western
owners of land. lut to plant for the son
of a foreigner is not an attractive propo-
sition. For this reason chiefly the timlbr
areas of our treeless sections have in-
creased with very slow speed. In tlhe
past one hundred years. it may safely Ie
said. two hundred acres of land llhave been
denuded of timl'er for every acre planted."
"In New England there are many ex-
amiples to-day where land. once denuded of
timber and being unfit for tillage. has
been permitted to raise another crop of
timber-pine. spruce or harder toodls--
and has proven to Ie in a cro, pIerioil of
fifty years worth more to the farmer's
estate than tie same numllber of acres in
crops. So plentiful are these examplles
that there is no question to-day but that
a mall c(tn with certainty provide a hand-
some hletcy for a child Ib tlhe groivwt of
a forest crop of ierchantable timler for
him. Crops of white pine Oir spruce have
been grown in Mainie that in fifty years
have been worth $4(00 to $1.(W0 per acre
Nor has the- value of this crop all Iiten de-
ferred to the time of harvesting. Twentv
acres of such a crop could well furnish
a family a goil fuel supply without, at all
impairing the value of thle general crop.
Nor does this take account of the grove's
landscape, its flood-retarding or wind-
break value.
"All these lessons are vet to ble learned


by all but a very few of the people east
of tlie Misississippi river. In the treeless
regions west of the river there ha's I1ien
a more or less serious attempt on the
iart (of many landowners to plhiant trees
1I,' the acre. Many of these experiments
are now ,hi enough to furnish some data
as to what may reasonably be expected
from forest planting and cultivation in
the treeless and more or less. arid sec tions
4,f thle west ais well as in territory of good
rainfall. Nebraska has to-tlav aoliut 300.-
0R00 acres of planted forest of varying age,
and fortunes.
"('ifford Pinchot. chief of the United
States Forestry Service. states in a recent
piiblict:on tha;;t at U'rbana. Ill.. there is a
thirty-five-year-ohl plantation of European
larch (tamarae) good for post., poles, ties.
etc.. that is now worth $619 per acre; and
another in southwestern Minnesota. twen-
tv-one years old. worth $471 per acre. Tn
N,,rth lDakota he reports a cottonwood
plantation twenty-three years old that has
grown $286- worth of lumber and fuel per
acre: a white willow plantation twenty-
one years old in eastern South Dakota
that is wortl now $390 per acre; a south-
eastern Nebraska catalpa plantation that
fielded $213. worth of fine posts per acre
in fourteen ears. and another twenty
years old at Quincy. Ill.. that is now worth
$240 ipr acre. Some of the southern rail-
roads are making plantations of catalpa
along their right of way anti in larger
n'eas plantations, using the trees when of
suflicieit size for ties and posts. The
results in value of crop per acre per an-
num are surprising andi instructive. Tie
examples cited alove are not rare. They
represent nmany successful plantations and
an indication of what any farmer may
do with small expense.
"TIe examples given show that the land
planted to tees as a crop paid an average
of I10 to $20l per annum for terms of
vears ranging from fourteen to thirty-five.
There are few farms in these regions that
will show a better return per acre for this
periodd from their annual crops. In fact.
the forest's records of profits are far be-
vond the averaLe o(f annual crops and are
Iositivelv handsome. There is no doubt
but that the return s fourteen to thirty-


5he EVERETT HOTEL
235 WEST BAY ST.. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
Centrally located, thoroughly repaired and renovated. Newly furnished. European plan
G. H. MASON, Proprietor.

FUEL AND BUILDING MATERIAL.


The Southern Fuel & Supply Co.
Anetamele, -rems amsi aDrkmf seat, Um,r Owme e, emO.e, aie..
Fooe IIo#ma Stret, Jakseoville, Florla


AN INNOVATION!
THE GUARANTY TRUST & SAVINGS COMPANY is now insuring titles to
property in Dural County. Call and let us explain our methods.

GUARANTY TRUST & SAVINGS COMPANY,
Capital, $oo, ooo.oo.
James W. Spratt, President. W. M. Bostwick, Jr., Vice-President.
Harlow Barnett, Secretary and Treasurer.
4 per cent interest paid on depo sits.


B. B. TATUM, Pres.


J. L. WALLACE, Vice-Pres. 11. G. STONE, Secy-Treas.


Keeley Institute,
Incorporated 525.000 Capital Stock.
A branch of the original Leslie E. Keeley Institute of Dwight, Ill., has just been
opened at corner of Park and Stockton Streets in IRiverside, where a splendid
building, equipped with all the comforts and conveniences of a modern home or
sanitarium has been secured and is ready for the reception of patients in need of
treatment for-
WHISKEY, OPIUM, MORPHINE, COCAINE, TOBACCO OR CIGARETTE HABITS.
Write for full information as to treatment, terms, etc.
KEELEY INSTITUTE OF FLORIDA.


WILLIAM A. OURS JAMES C. DARBY


WILLIAM A. BOURS & COMPANY
THE OLDEST ESTABLISHED GRAIN AND SEED HOUSE IN THE STATE.
Hay, Grain, Feed, Garden
Seeds, Poultry Supplies, Flour,
Grits, Meal and fertilizers.
OUR MOTTO: Prompt Shipment, Reliable Geds. Cataltege rree
206 EAST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


CYPRESS TANKS
Are Best by Every Test
Cypress withstands the effects of heat and moisture
better than any other wood, shrinks and swells less
than other wood, is impervious to acids, o:ds paint
well and lasts for ages without decaying. Located
as w,- are, right in the great cypress forestswe are
able to secure the best selection of the wood and at
very low prices. We have been building tanks for
more than a quarter of a century and bo.dly assert
that no tanks are better built or will lst longer.
f Send for catalog and prices.
G. M. DAVIS .M SON
PALATKA. FLORIDA


St. George Hotel


EUROPEAN PLAN.
Jl 1: Rooms: 75c, $1.00 and $1.50 P^cN
PHONE 317.

MRS. GEO. W. BROCK,
PROPRIETRESS.






Se M etropolis |



Is the Paper you want. It is
published daily and is from 12
to 16 hours ahead of any other
daily newspaper in Florida..



$5.00 a Year $2.50 Six Months


0 Full Telegraphic and Stock
Reports. If you want to keep
Posted on the news, get the
A Metropolis.


CARTER & RUSSELL PUB. CO. I

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.




TAVIS NONE BETTER MADE

Prompt Shipments.


OTTER CREEK LUMBER CO.. Jacksonville, Fla


----


Jacksonville, Fla.


Telephone No. 1553.









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 13


five years from this date will be much
more handsome than those that can be
shown to-day. Fuel. fencing and lumber
must advance in value for many years to
come.
"The planting of a forest crop need not
be an investment wholly for a future gen-
eration. Young men can lay by a compe-
tence for old age in this way that is surer
than any old-age pension or annuity. Div-
idends from a wood lot may he drawn in
six or eight years by planting quick grow-
ing trees among the plantings of harder
slower growing and more valuable wood.
the quicker growths being cut away for
fuel as the better wood demands room.
"In territory where black walnut can he
grown to advantage, which includes all
well watered northern land in the Missis-
sippi valley (lowlands preferred) south of
Minneapolis, this timber offers fabulous
returns. It has been grown to the value
of several thousand dollars per acre in
a single generation. Here is one of the
surest and richest provisions a farmer can
make for his children.
"Full instructions as to varieties of trees
Iwst adapted to various latitudes and cli-
mates and the best methods of planting.
cultivating and harvesting can he had free
of cost to every American citizen by re-
quest from the Bureau of Forestry at
Washington. Every man who owns land
should have interest enough in tree plant-
ine to get the government's free instruc-
tions and plant. a useful tree. Every far-
mer should have from one to fortv acres
of his farm hearing a forest crop."
THE KNIGHT CROCKERY COMPANY.
The distinction of Iting one of the ol-
est and largest business firms in the State
is without doubt helI by the well known
firm of The Knight ('rockery Co.. 12-14
East Bay Street. who have been -etal,-
lished for more than half a century. Thec
are extensive dealers. both wholesale and
retail, of (rockery. China. (Ilassware.
Wooden. Tinware and lhomefurnishing
goods, etc.. and by their enormous trade
are one of the most prominent and influ-
ential houses, potential in building up the
mammoth trade of Jacksonville. The firm
is incorporated and has for its officers the


following well known gentlemen of marked
ability and progressive spirit: Raymond
D. Knight. president: C. H. 1arnes, vice-
president. and C. Finley Knight. the cour-
teous and affable secretary and treasurer.
all native Ihrn Floridians. who tioroughlyl
understand the conducting of a business of
this class. Their beautiful store is indeed
a very handsome building, comprising three
floors. 30xl00 feet in dimensions. We cer-
tainly a dvise all who may be coming to
our city not to omit paying a visit to this
grand store, where will be seen amongst.
other varied goods enormous stocks of
Hfaviland French china, (arlsbad German
china, old willow-ware and English Flown
Blue. etc., forming a most pleasing and in-
teresting sight, well worth viewing. This
business is pointed to by all our citizens
with much pride, employing as they do
a large force of experienced and pains-tak-
ing men to wait upon their city and State
trade. which together with their complete-
ly assorted stock attractively displayed in
many various departments assures all wJho
may he seeking goods of this kind that
their wishes will be crowned with ipositive
success.


Windsor Hotel


Jacksonville's Finest
and Florida's Largest
and Best Year-Round
Hotel
DODGE & CULLENS
Owners and Proprietors.


Standard Electric Co.,


JACKSONVILLE,


- FLA.


I i1i*M*tll)ll tiiltggtiigiiiiggliriirfrggrtii
* W. W. CARNES, Pres. W. C. THOMAS, Manager. R. S. CARNES See. &Treas

STampa Hardware Co.

Wholesale
Hardware *

Turpentine. Mill and Phosphate Supplies.
* 4o
LARGE STOCK COUNCIL AND HOLMES HACKS AND PULLERS 01 HAND.

TAMPA. FLORIDA.
"4 1 0 1* tti*t 4 41i#111 t 1i 4,4t lt I t tt I t11tt11 t I I t # I t Iga t I



C. H. Hargraves Co.,


WHOLESALE GROCERS.

GRAIN, HAY AND FEED.


Special attention to Turpentine and Sawmill
Men's Reuirements. A Florida Firm for
florMidans.


HOTEL WINDLE.
15, 17, 19 East Forsyth St.,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
American plan, $2.50 to $3.00 per day. European plan, $1.00 per day up.
Center of city. First-class in all appointments.
C. B. SMITH, Proprietor.


LjjY IZ 111 3 1 T 7 ITT 7 T7 T


Ben F. Johnson, Prep. P
5 Greater New York Sample Room.
* Jacksonville's New and attractive Bar and Cafe. Choic
* Liquors and Cigars. Pool and Billiard Parlors Attac
4 234 W. Bay Street. on Transportation
Row and Opposite Everett Hotel.
: Mail orders a, special ty. Jacksons


hone 279.


:e Wines,
hed.

ville. Fla.


9##999#~~999##W**9~wv4~* 9*####~.*9@@##m9##~


Southern Machinery & Supply Co,
(INCORPORATED.
Machinists and Engineers.
Engines, Boilers, Saw, Shingle, Planing and Veneer Mill Machinery. Corliss En-
gines, Water Tube Boilers, Pumps and Electric Outfits. Contracts
for Complete Outfits a Specialty. Plans and estimates fur-
nished on application.


Home Office, Jacksonville, Fa.


Branch: .Tampa, Fla.


Who's Your Broker?
The Stock, Cotton and Grain Markets of America are on the eve of the greatest
activity known in the history of the country, due to our great prosperity and the
general activity in all lines of business. To traders we offer the very best service, and,
realizing that a customer's success means more business thereby insuring our success,
we use our earnest endeavors to at all times place him on the right side of the market.
We do strictly a commission business.
S. L. RAWLINS & COMPANY
Room 7, 112 West Bay Street. Phone 1172. JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
Reference: Florida Bank and Trust Company.


LOW


RATES


P1RK


Special Occasions
VIA


SOUTHERN RAILWAY I


SUMMER TOURIST RATES
TO ASHEVILLE, HOT SPRINGS, WAYNESVILLE, HENDERSONVILLE,
LAKE TOXAWAY AND OTHER DELIGHTFULLY COOL
PLACES IN SUMMER TIME
Spend a vacation in the beautiful "Land of the Sky" and "Sapphire Country."
Write for booklet descriptive of the North Carolina resorts, giving pmeasgger
fare and hotel rates.
J. C. LUSK, District Passenger Agent, Jacksonville, Floid.




SUMMER LUMBER COMPANY
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Rough ad Dressed Lumber

Long Leaf Yellow Pine.
BOXES AND ORATES.


514-516-518-520-522-524-526
EAST BAY STREET,
JACKSONVILLE, nLORiDA


~aC~3C3~SCSC3CSaC3EXSCXTSE3CSC3C3CSESC~E









14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



Jacksonville Grocery Comp'y

w. ..... Wholesale Grocers and Distillers" Supplies.
MA*UW. Oftfle mr Wa e ams VladMet A. 0. L. ly. al Jlneetol, Flioa.h


Wanted and For Sale

DEPARTMENT.

Advertis ts W er t W b rted is This Departme t t rte followlIg Rates:
For one week, 20 cents a line.
For two weeks 35 eentsa line.
For three weeks, 50 cents a lie.
For four weeks, - 65 cents a line.
Nine words of ordinary length make one line.
Heading counts as two lines.
No display except the headings can be admitted.
Remittances to accompany the order. No extra charge for copies of paper
containing advertisement. Copy must be in this office not later than Thursday
morning to secure insertion in Friday's paper.


Help Supplied.
Florida Help Supply Company is now
fully organized, incorporated and ready for
business, with headquarters Room 20, Liv-
ingston Bldg, Main and Forsyth Streets,
Jacksonville. We supply Saw Mill, Tur-
pentine, Quarry and Railroad hands, Ger-
man Cooks and House Servants to any
and all points in the South. Correspond-
ence solicited.
Woodsman Wanted.
Wanted First-class woodsman. No
other need apply. References requlreed. .1.
A. Kelly & 'o.. It. F. I). No. 3, Vallosta,
G;a.


Woodsman Wanted.
Wanted-Woodsman with family. None
but first-class need apply. Address Walk-
hill Turpentine Co., Green Cove Springs,
Fla. 3t
Wanted.
To correspond with manufacturers of
turpentine cups not of the Herty
system or Herty patent. Address G. W.
Deen, Waycross, Ga. tf
Woodsmen Wanted.
Wanted-Two sober, experienced tur-
pentine woodsmen at once. J. B. Peacock,
Williston, Fla. 2t


Florida Bank and Trust Company
Capital $1.000.000.00. Jacksonvill ,.. Fa.
DEPOSITARY OF STATE COUNTY AND CITY FUNDS
W. F. COACHMAN. President. W. S. JENNINGS. Vice President.
W. A. REDDING, Cashier. ARTHUR F. PERRY, Vice President.
F. P. FLEMING, Jr., Trust Officer
Receives deposit accounts of individuals, firms, corporations and banks. Pays 4 per
cent on saving deposits. Rents safe deposit boxes. Buys and sells foreign exchange and
Issues letters of credit.
Acts as trustee, transfer agent, registrar and fiscal agent for corporations and
municipalities. Executes all trusts such as executor, trustee under will or appointment
of court and receiver.
UVnqualed Facilities. Accounts Solicited. Correspondence Invited


4Successful Men

appreciate, use and advise Life Insu-
rance. The advice of successful men
is worth following. Insure in

OF AMERICA.
WATE ^ T1E PRUDENTIAL 'NSUCECOMPNY
WALTER P. CORBETT. Manager. JOHN F. DRYDEN, Pres.
409 West BIdg.. Jackavale, Fla. Honme Office Newark..FJ

i lSiia li a lii ,t ai i11*l 0 iiiiiiRll illliAl i*i ial i ii


SJohn R. Young. J. W. Motte, C. B. Parker, James McNatt. W. W. Wilder.
President. Vice-Pres. Vice-Pres. Vice-Pres. Sec. & Treas.



,John R. Young Co.,


Commission

Merchants.


SNaval Stores factors. Wholesale Grocers. :

SSavannah 4 Brunswick. Ga.
* see &&41111111 asssesses a I 1 I a e ase da4o
a tll llllII tBl l~ ll II Ittt4dl


WHISKIES


GINS AND RUMS
FROM

$1.50 to $5.00 per Gallon
......AGENCY FOR......
Lewis 1866 and Mount Vernon
Pure Rye Whiskies.
Controllers Blum's Monogram and Syl-
van Rye-Agents for Jungst Cincin-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.

CHAS. BLUM & CO.
517 and 519 WEST BAY STREET.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.



ABSTRACTS
Title and Tax Abstracts, Maps, etc.,
of large tracts in all parts of Florida and
South Georgia, prepared for owners and
intending purchasers. Correspondence
solicited.

REALTY TITLE AND TRUST CO.
Law Exchange Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla.


EVERYTHING IN
SEALS, RUBBER STAMPS AND STENCILS
Made to Order Six to Twelve Hours.

Florida Rubber Stamp Co.


224 Main Street.


Jacksonville, Fla.


H ROBINSON. Pr s. H. GAILLARD. ashierr
W. B. OWEN. Vice-Pres.

Commercial Bank,

State Depository.
BRANCHem: Ooala. Fla.. Lake City. Fla

Jacksonville, - - lorida



THOSE. G. HUTCHINSON
FELLOW AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS
Room 7. Board of Trade BIdg.


Plove 312


JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Lease on 125 Thousand Acres

Virgin Turpentine Timber
For particulars address, Apartado Pos-
tal No. 80, Moreali, Michoacan, Mexico.

WILLIAM G. POWEI
Attorney at Law,
County Court House
Jackaonvillo. Fla.
Real Property Law a Specialty.
Searches Abstracts and Reports.


Naval Stores Situation in Shotter's "Sa-
cred Territory.
(Continued from page 7.)
over the troublles and difficulties of Mr.
(oachman and The Naval Stores Export
C(o. in adjusting matters with their cus-
tonmers. who had contracted half of their
product from June until December, a little
matter ihas developed over in this terri-
tory, which Mr. Gamble seems to have
failed to hear about. As a conscientious
public journalist, with the interest of the
producers at heart, he really should not
be so careless, and ill informed. (It is
well known that there is no friction what-
ever between the Naval Stores Export Co.
and its customers.
We refer to the ugly and unpleasant fact
that a number of claims are pending in
this territory against certain companies,
controlled by Mr. Shotter, for a difference
Ibtween the market price for turpentine
from June 5th to June 8th, namely, the
difference between 78/, and 60 cents. We
learn that some of these claims have been
settled privately; others (not so influen-
t:al) have been "staved off." but the par-
ties insist that they will collect their
money Iwfore they are through with it.
And; now, on top of all this, comes the
recent "nominal" and "nothing doing" con-
dition of the Savannah market as to
ro(in, and our information is that a per-
feet mass of claims are pouring in on
those eomnianies for settlement on the
posted Savannah quotations, which it is
claimed the parties are entitled to, under
tile terms of the contracts, signed, sealed
and delivered, between thle buyers and sell-
ers. covering turpentine and rosin received
at the stills in the interior.
ft is also reported that the Mississippi
Naval Stores Company at Hattiesburg
(who are very friendly to Mr. Shotter's
nlmipanie-( are in some trouble over this
-a!mt poIint. as some of their customers
are insisting on settlement for rosin bought
during this period, on the posted Savan-
nah quotations.
The Naval Stores Export Company. for-
tunately. has steered clear of any such
troubles, anl we regret to have to call the
attention of Brother Gamble, as a faith-
ful and correct (?) public journalist, to
his singular omission of these facts, from
the pages of his "Naval Stores Review."
Next week we will send you another let-
ter. and hope to keep you and your readers
jposted on the news and matters of inter-
est in the Naval Stores line from this im-
portant section. NOVUS HOMO.
The Port of Jacksonville for November.
((Continued from page 7.)
craft, and 4 were schooner barges in tow
of tugs. Of the vessels front foreign ports
7 were sailing craft. and one was a steam-
ship.
Fifty-one vessels cleared for coastwise
ports, with a total tonnage of 72,885 and
employing 1.517 men. Nine vessels, one
steamer and eight sailing craft, cleared for
foreign ports, of a total tonnage of 2,219,
and employing 77 men. Of the vessels
clearing for coastwise ports 27 were steam-
ers. 20 were sailing vessels, and 4 were
schooner charges in tow of steam tugs.
During the month of October the total
number of vessels entering and clearing
coastwise and foreign, was 101, of a total
tonnage of 147.473. and employing 3,198
mlen.
NOTICE OF STOCKHOLDERS' METING
Notice is hereby given that a meeting
of the stockholders of the Atlantic Sup-
ply Company will be held at the office of
the company in Jacksonville, Florida, on
Wednesday, the 27th day of December,
1905, at eight o'clock p. m., at which
meeting all stockholders are requested to
be present. The object of the meeting is
to provide for increasing the capital stock
of said company, adopting proposed alter-
ations or amendments to the charter, and
attending to such other business as may
be brought before the meeting.
D. T. GEROW,
November 23, 1906. President










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 15


H. W. SAVAGE, President. B. G. SAVAGE, Sec'y and Treas. J. C. WHITFORD, ilanager.



Savage & Whitford Carpet Company,
CARPETS, 'IATTINGS, SHADES AND CURTAINS FROM MANUFACTURER DIRECT TO YOU.

131 West Bay Street.


H. E. PRITCHETT, Pres. P. L. SUTHERLAND, Vice-Pres. A. D. COVINGTON, Sec'y.
J. P. COUNCIL, Treas and Gen'l Mgr.

THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.,
General Offices: JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Factory: WANNANISH, N. C.
Manufacturer of High Grade Tools
f, NavaIl 51ie o@wpters.


J. W.


WEST, D. M. FLYNN.
JOHN E HARRIS.
President. W. KELLEY.
Vice-Presients.


H.
D.


L. RICHMOND.
Sece' and Treas.
. WILLIAMS.
Ass't Secy md Treas.


WEST FLYNN & HARRIS CO.


GENERAL OFICEGERMANI4 BLDG. Savarrnnh. Ga.
I WEST BLDG. Jacksonville. Fta.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
NAVAL STORES RECEIVED AT SAVANNAH, GA, JACKSONVILLE,
FLA., AND FERNANDINA, FLA.

Wholesale Grocers also Dealers in Hay. Grain and Heavy
Harnebs.

Ofor the Celebrated Union Turpentine Axes,
SOLE AGENTS and Wilson &Childs Philadelphia Waeons.
MERCHANTS WAREHOUSES.


SAVANNAH, GA.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


TAMPA, PLA


JAMES STEWART. GILBERT HUNTER.

STEWART & HUNTER
so5 West Building. Telephone 2063.
TURPENTINE AND SAW MILL TIMBER TRACTS.
Turpentine and saw mill proposition located in Volusia County, Fla..
*1s live miles from East Coast Railroad. 37.(in> acres round timber: estima-
ted cut 3 IMoI feet and 45 boxes per acre. 21.0401 acres cypress estimated
to cut 6~,NI.itill feet This timber can also be handled by river. Round
timber JO i54 per acre. in fee simple Cypre.ss $.N) per ucre. stumpage.
ya Both tracts in one body. la order to secure this property, immediate e
action is necessary, as time is limited.




Let Santa Claus bring you a Victor Talking Machine
Records are now reduced to 35 cents, 60 cents and S1. for 7 inch,
10 inch and 12 inch respectively. This rate went into effect
December Ist. We are the only wholesalers in this section for
the Victor people, and are pleased to answer all letters of inquiry
and mail catalogues free.
METROPOLITAN TALKING MACHINE CO.
323 Main Street. Jacksonville. Fla.


THE BOND & BOURS CO.
WHOLESALE & RETAIL

HARDWARE

SASi, DOORS, BLINDS, PAINTS.


Stoves, Tinware, Country Holloware.


10 WMrT nAy STREET.


JOHN W. DODGE,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
ROOMS 4 AND 5, 91 WEST ADAMS ST.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
GENERAL PRACTICE AND OPINIONS ON TITLES.


*6*t**ta *6W M. D. JONES


PRESCRIPTION SPECIALIST


FAMILY DRUGGIST
107 E. BAY ST.
Mall Orders Solicited.


JOHN S. FRANZ. Agent


Write
for
Cuts
and
Prices


Diebold Safe & Lock Co.
Jacksonville. Florida.


J. GUMBINGER,

Refracting Optician


Over forty years' theoretical and practi-
cal exlwrience in correcting defective eyes
by proper lenses. Broken lenses and
frames replaced landl repaired. A large as-
sortlenlt of lenses and framesI on hand, at
the old place. i; Hlogan Street.


WHAT WILL THEY DO ABOUT IT?
Secretary Hester says the consumption
of cotton in southern mills was cut off
twenty per cent. last year by the shortage
of labor. But for this feature the South
would have run far ahead of the North,
and would have made a magnificent show-
ing.
If the labor had been stable it is proba-
ble that the consumption of cotton would
have been at least eight per cent. larger.
The number of mill hands in transit each
day in tlie South is appalling. Men who
travel considerably and keep their eyes
open say they rarely board a train in the
mill district but they see a crowd of ope-
ratives. Time is lost in the change from
mill to mill. to say nothing of the conse-
quent demoralization to the mill left short-
handed.
At a little Georgia junction one night
this past month, twenty mill hands were
waiting for a train which would carry
then to a new mill not far away. They
had come front a mill in the southern part
of the State. and in making the change,
lost nearly a week's time. A talk with
the oldest man in the crowd developed the
fact that these people had moved at least
Since in three months for two years. They
had quit one mill for no reason but that
their restlessnes- was augmented and en-
couraged by the agent of another mill
which wanted help. They will stay at the
new mill but a short time. There are two
mills within twenty miles of their present
location, and it is safe to say that these
hands will try them both in six months.
The mill men are to blame for this rest-
lessnems of labor. Many manufacturers
never look for labor anywhere but in near-
hy mill towns. They suffer at their neign-
lb)r's hands, and in turn prey upon one
further on. This feature will have to
Ime largely modified in the near future.
There is still green help to be had in cer-
tain quarters. This is to be preferred by
far to the trained kind that has the itch
for change.
In changing from one mill to another
these nomads rarely give any other reason
than that, they want to get to another
town. No charge of ill treatment or fail-
ure to keep contract on the part of the mill
is made. Their natural restlessness is
played upon by a glib agent of another
mill. and on they go.
A STRONG ARGUMENT.
The Rlhles-Futch-Collins Furniture Com-
pany use a strong argument in their at-
tractive advertising matter printed in the
Industrial Record and other papers. To
quote literally, they say: "We are a link
in a chain of thirty-eight stores, buying
more goods than all of the other furniture
stores in Jacksonville. We own our own
store and pay spot cash for our goods, and
can easily afford to sell goods cheaper than
tle iwan who buys on long time and pays
b;g rent." More detailed information will
be found in their page advertisement in
this issue of the Record.


***w rw-* ---- *-**** *********----


J. A. Craig Bro.

239 W. Bay Street EVERETT BLOCK.

SLeaders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth- i
ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.

SAgents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.
S99#ff##9##9W99#### #.#.#m##.9e9"Of


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JACKSONVILLr- FLA.


0115, Glass,









16 TIlE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.










4 +

+ Official Program for the Turpentine Operators' Convention.

+ Jacksonville, December 6th and 7th.
4.
+e The Turpentine Operators' Association will hold its Fifth Annual Convention in the Board of Trade auditorium, Jack- +
+ sonville, Fla., December 6th and 7th, 1905. Reduced railroad rates will go into effect on the 4th from all points in Florida, +
4 Georgia. North and South Carolira, Alalama. Mississippi and Louisiana east of the Mississippi river. These rates granted 4
+e by all the transportation companies through the Southeastern Passenger Association, are one and one-third fare for the 4+
+ round trip on the certificate plan. All producers and their families and others attending the Convention, will pay the full 4
+. fare to Jacksonville and apply to the railroad or ticket agent for a certificate to the effect that the purchaser has bought one +
+ or more tickets, as the case may be, to Jacksonville for the purpose of attending the Turpentine Operators' Convention. +
+ That certificate endorsed by J. A. Hollomon, at Jacksonville, will entitle the holder to purchase return tickets for all persons 4+
+' named therein at one-third the regular fare. It is important that all persons attending the convention should ask for +
+ these certificates when buying tickets to Jacksonville.
STlThe headquarters of the convention delegates in Jacksonville will be at the Aragon Hotel.
4' Following is the official program as promulgated by the Executive Committee of the T. O. A.:
___
Wednesday, December 6th, 10:3o am. m.
& Convention called to order by the president, A. D. Covington.
4' Address of welcome on behalf of the city-Hon. George M. Nolan, Mayor of Jacksonville.
+' Address of welcome on behalf of the Jacksonville Board of Trade and the press of Jacksonville-Hon. George W. Wilson, 4
+e editor of the Florida Times-Union.
+' Response to addresses of welcome-Colonel W. M. Toomer, of Jacksonville.
e' Address, The Turpentine Industry from a Consumer's Standpoint, by H. J. Schnell, manager of the Oil, Paint and
S Drug Reporter. of New York.
+ Discussion, open to all naval stores men in attendance.
+e Appointment of committee on resolutions, and other committees, by the Chair. 4b
e+ Adjournment for dinner. *L
+e Afternoon Session, 2:30 p. m.
+' Annual address of the president, A. D. Covington.
+' Discussion of the president's address, open to the house. +
+' Address, The Turpentine Industry West of the Alabama River, by John A. Ewing, of Lumberton, Mississippi.
+ Address, Cooperation Essential Among Operators in Every Branch of the Industry, Dr. J. D. Chason, Bainbridge, Ga.
General discussion on matters of interest to producers, especially along the lines of thorough organization and co-
Soperation.
Adjournment to following day.
Thursday, November 7th, 9:30 o'clock a. m. f
e4 Address, The Question of Producing and Distributing Combined, by Captain C. E. Garner, President of the Jackson-
+' ville Board of Trade. +
t -General discussion along the line of Captain Garner's address. +
+ Address, The Factor as a Factor and Operator, by John E. Harris.
+e4 General discussion among factors present along the line of Mr. Harris' address.
\ Address, The Labor Problem, E. L. Vickers, Tifton, Ga.
+A General discussion on the labor situation, the evils, the remedies.
+e Business session-the introduction and discussion of resolutions by the resolution committee; the action upon same;
+ ti the report of other committees; the enrollment of members.
+' Afternoon Session.
+ The election of officers for 1906.
+e New and uncompleted business.
er Adjournment.
e The convention this year, it is expected, will be the largest ever held. All turpentine men, whether they have ever 4+
4 joined the Turpentine Operators' Association or not, in whatever branch of the industry they may be engaged, are earnestly 4+
4' invited and urged to attend. It is hoped and believed that the convention will be of great practical benefit to every person 4
+,' all m.mlbers of a common cause; they encourage a unity of purpose and action that advances and protects the interests
of all concerned alike. The Turpentine Operators' Association in the past five years has been of great practical benefit 1
to the turpentine producers as a whole. No person who is familiar with the history of the industry will deny this. Resolu-
tions may have been passed and broken; scales of wages may have been made and ignored; hut the insincerity of one man
+' or a half dozen men does not stop or even retard a'great power for good. This is a day of organization; it is a day of
S cooperation and united action. Organization has been the salvation of the turpentine industry. *
e ++4-
4' <
1 t' t, e;-~tt*^-f 3" *-Fl *-E~-^-F '*t'lf *f *I.'-?'*? ****"^-? t










+ +




SJJacksonville, Florida.




IArnerican Plan I
+ +


++
g +
Ji F d 4








+ +
A+uericnn Pasn


H. N. 'N L, ropiet, or.






+
4


*

4







- +
-- 4
4 +
4 T


I N. +NE AL, Proprietor.
t


THIE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


17








18 TIE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.





iT IF MONEY IS AN OBJECT Il
DON'T THROW IT AWAY. WE'LL HELP YOU SAVE IT. WE'RE A LINK IN A CHAIN OF THIRTY-EIGHT STORES.
BUYING MORE GOODS THAN ALL OF THE FURNITURE STORES IN JACKSONVILLE.
We Own Our Own Store and Pay Spot Cash for our Goods
and can easily afford to SELL GOODS CHEAPER th an the man who buys on long time and pays big rent. We
make a specialty Standard Grades and guarantee everything as represented or money cheerfully refunded

FREIGHT PAID ON ALL ORDERS OVER $25.00 TO ANY RAILROAD STATION IN FLORIDA
THE COLDEST
L WT THIG THAT Buck's Steel Ranges
EVER HAP-
SPENED. BEEN GOOD
I' The little .ce- SIXTY YEARS
THE BEST

i ell. 11 whole o Ine-li;rhe o ell i I
|1 GtiE PE A POLICY S t : Y I
V EVERYTHING % are air
REMOVABLE. tiiht. have ell-
SThai t is til. key- e li
llote: iakee it oell doos 1. and

able. coa.
SI m. ll-t i -.. al.,elilel v f FIRE-BACKS
saoitaix. It i, not GUARAN-
a-ll h'ehei Ihefrig- TEED FIF-
Shirle. ,t Al ,, iiieno TEEN YEARS. I
bler. tor hut ufse.. no t e
SC li J more ice than i I IlI n'lte I
hte anz oaeleIs ry to pro-iest t .e
c r rIllill hourd. 'o it r' ill mia lil t plle e nllerated.
VI YrTto^ Y takes quiWker. lSihter (no hating neYeOsary) and with
n SOLID OAK On I.es ful than ti E heeap -jin.t a, ,o" variety. in't
CASES. tAe\er ,i ,l i jllu t ,, ,l." (Get "the real tling.-" ;I nlck's
FIVE DIFFER- tI and uoule l makae frieii d of the vook for life. Ten fpat-
f ENT LININGS. pu ternB iS chooe from beihe telve ., at I ron (or k Stov. es
X"Stonie VWhite" is all Buck's.
SOfl -the ver-vy oldest
A~ I it sa RANGES, $30 to $75,
mail von one. COOK STOVES, $6.50 to $35

GREEN POINT METAL BEDS OUR POLICY .he HWINNERV" Air Tight
RED HOT-BURNS EVERYTHING.
This line is o well known that it needs no ilntroductioie in.
It comprises all that is newest and liet in metal bed con- The atove Cut k .. .. .. i t everything'
struction. Heav- LIcks. Heav- Rails. either flat or re- defines it .i. coal nad eoke. A 'lu-ia In Ir 'ot lv. uitih sheet steel
verse. High-tirade Tubing. All Iron Beds illishel inl linI in o ll at e t l l t iron top and
Olfl N THllE SQUA R lhii llei'wll I j: ellter l gol (i a-it itieen tile iiostl
white and colors. The Enamel used is the best that t"ON T E SQUARt ilel. rl ei I M of ak ight tIhe n ie r. t
me-oney an u s uilll type of air-iight heater
is our motto. made.
and wl'hen applied
Sto these beds pre-
.ents a surfaee as We'll Ship Exactly What You THE FRONT FEED DOOR
hard as flint. A
steer Buy. We Don't Substituten frm
VERNIS MARTIN unless Vo authorize it. early railed a:ain-.t air-tight
-- -he;. ter, for if -oii'll buy a 4
C)-iFnishedl in n Gold o .ont have
Enamel that won't e ik y,, .on t have
rub off. TERMS: smoked ilings. smoked faes.
B BRASS BEDS In Jacksonville, ill. han or soiled sleeves.
at all kinIs ef EASY PAYMENTS OR CASH. ill all -izes to '-it ever
40**. at al,.l .. .... i f ,,1 1. ;1# -
priee.,. to it l Out ot town rt it.
WHITE AD CAS WIT ORDER OR SATISAGTORY
No. 263 G AND GOLD $8.50 REFEENCES No. 17, $5.50.



0Rhodes- Futch- Collins-

308, 310, 312 and 314 308, 310, 312 and 314
Main Street, F r iu Co1mpiiy Main Street,
Jacksonville, Florida. Jacksonville, Florida. e





THE WEEKLY INTDUTRIAL RECORD. 19
b.*f~lSLs2samUmaF~S.-.SS~ -- -- -- -- b004


JOSEPH ZAPF


JACKSONVILLE,


& COMP'Y


- FLORIDA


vy


Sole Distributors of the Celebrated


Anheuser


- Busch


ST. LOUIS BEERS


Blue Label

Bottled

Beer


Budweiser
KING OF ALL


WINES AND LIQUORS AND BEST


"ABSOLUTE RELIABILITY"
IS THE MOTTO OF OUR HOUSE


Wholesale Only


Sv u, sswrvs sv v vv v v e_ : -. -- - - - ---


---


I:


--~--`----


~---~







20 TTE WEEKLY INDTTSTRIAL RECORD.


THE SECOND CLUB
Will be filled inside of two weeks. to
take one hundred New Scale $400 L.udl'en
& Bates lPianos at $2S7 e.sli or .287 on
payments of $10 cash and .1 8 n111nthil (S
per cent interest.)
If you join the Club and
buy your Piano on our
co-operative plan you save
$x13.


NEW QUARTERS.


23 EAST BAY STREET


Ludden (Q Bates, S. M. H.
Temple of Music,
No. 23 EAST BAY STREET.


A most Distinguished Gathering of the World's best Pianos, priced to meet your purse.


CHICKERING, EVERETT. WEBER. MATHUSHEK.
IVERS L POND. BEHR BROS.. VOSE. The Popular
LUDDEN & BATES. LESTER. STECK. LUDWIG
and ten other makes--the best in their class.


Chickering Quarter Grands take up but little more room than anl Upright. Art designs a
Specialty. Grands and Uprights

Weber Pianola Pianos, Aeolians andrchestrals


L. & B. Pianos are guaranteed for a lifetime.
Ninety-nine other members join with
you, thereby purchasing together-saving
all middlemen and agents' profits. ex-
penses, etc. You buy in quantities on a
cash basis. Take time if you like-month-
ly, quarterly or yearly by merely paying
interest Write at once or call at the store
for details and application for memlwr-
ship. Do not wait.
LUDDEN & BATES S. M. H.
Bull & York.
SAVANNAH. GA.


Buy your Pianos where you have an assortment of the best to
select from and in all latest design of cases.

Easy payments---monthly, quarterly or yearly to suit customer.


LUDDEN


( BATES,


Remember New Location, 23 East Bay Street.


Call on us or write for our catalogue, 114
Pages, Describing with cuts,

Watches, Die.mornds

and

Jewelry.


Come and see us while in the city. We
can save you money on every Purchase.



Hess (& Saiger

Diamonds, Watches and Jewelry,
Il & 13 Main St, 339 W. Bay St. Jacksonville, Fla. S
%%%%%%%%%%%%g1%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
L~Xlli \\\~\\\~,r~,~?L~SSSCi~L f a4,


Pabst
Blue Ribbon
The beer of quality


Chas. Blum & Co.
517,519 W. Bay St.,

Jacksonville, Fla.


S. M. H.






TIHE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


1SIXIXIX> IXIXI X1X101 rIC:10IXIXIXII1I13 1 1:1X4 ITIVN ^^^w^^VV V^^V^^^N
1" VEHICLE & HARNESS CO. F. O. MILLER,
S Cer. Forsyth and Cedar Sts. JACKSONVILLE. LA.
Dealers in 419 West Bay Street.
SCarriages and Wagons
Carril and Waps Mate.rial, Wheals, Spokes, Rim, kiles, Etc. I
crnapaj.d cc..termihesp.srks.,RiHIxiH,.Ete. HIGH-GRADE SEWING MACHINES
T rrpetIle and Mill Narness, Wagons, Buggles. Saddlery, D ,mp Carts. Delivery
Wagsos, Surrles aed everything kept It a first-class establishment. AT C T PRICES.
Largest Dealers In florida.
~I~~~ssEccc~sstccss ~~


C. F. COLE SHOE COMPANY
29 EAST BAY STREET, JAOKSOMNVE, FlORIDA.
CELEBRATED EDWIN CLAPP SHOES FOR MEN. CELEBRATED LAIRD SCHOBER SHOES FOR WOMEN. MAIL ORDERS SOLICITED.


O'Donald &.Taylor Hardware Company

E GENERAL HARDANAR
TAIL DEALERS IN GENERAL HARDWARE
Stoves, Ammunition, Glass, Sash, Doors and Blinds, Builders' Hardware.
a Specialty.


Bell Phone 803.


Jacksonville, Fla.


24 E. Bay St.


STATE AGENTS FOR
Breinigs Lithogate Silicate Paints. Yale and Towne Manufacturing Co.
and Agents for the Celebrated Ellwood Wire Fencing.
xlatxxxs~otsfxaCT3stttxxxxxxxxxxatEsc^ b


C . ROGERS, Pres. T. E. BRYAN, Tamp, Vee-Pres C. B. VAN DEMAN, Vee-Pres. C. W. BARTLESO. Sect'y &. Treas. H. C. ARMSTRONG. V-P. & General Maager

The Florida Cigar and Tobacco Co.
Jacksonville
The Only Exclusive Cigar and Tobacco Wholesale House in Florida.
We are equipped to take care of the wants of our retail friends in Cigars. Pipes, Tobac-
Scos, Snuffs. Cigarettes and Smokers articles of every description. Our stock is the most
complete and best selected in the State. Send us your mail orders.
5he F orida Cigar and Tobacco Company.


I


11875. T. MURPHY 1905.
+ JACKSONVILLE MACHINE and IRON WORKS $
+ 610 TO 617 EAST BAY STREET. JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA. 0
+ Engineer, Iron and Brass Founder and Machinist, Sawmills, Pumps. Engines
Sand Machinery, Iron. Brass and Phosphor-Bronze Castings of Every Description.

+ Prompt. Accurate, R.eliable. Established 30 years ago. +


4iNS7S`S*_%_ A-----.%_ ___


SC1C~Q1~3C3C1CSilciX1~'Ci~i3CSCX3CSC3aC3







22 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



COVINGTON COMPANY,
JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA.

Wt l a1 SHOES. HATS. DRY
W oles le GOODS, NOTIONS..
SUCCESSS FOR. OUR CUSTOMERS IS SUCCESS FOR US."

We have succeeded. Sales increased (50096) five hundred per cent in five years.
Call on us in our new building corner Bey and Market Streets, We will do the rest.


Joseph Zapf & Co.
Wmls alk rs In ah Idllnirsf

AnheuseroBusch
St. Louis Lager Beer
Wholsale
LIQUORS. WINES.
Mineral Waters.
Write for Prices
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
FIRE INSURANCE-Lowest rates. Lo
ren H. Green & Co., 9 and 10 Park Bldg.,
Jacksonville, Fla. 6mo


Florida

Electric Co.

Contracting Eectrical Engimeers
1ell and Install Complete Electric Light
and Power Plants, Telephone Ex-
changes. Wholesale Electrie
Supplies.
Jackmnvile, Fr.


Lombard Iron Works
and Supply Company
BUILDERS AND DEALERS IN


ENGINES, BOILERS.
Cotton, Saw, Fertilizer, Oil and lee Ma-
chinery, and Supplies and Repair..
Capacity for 200 Hands.
Machine Tools, Wood-Working Machinery,
Shafting, Pulleys, Hangers, Leather ana
Rubber Belting and Hose, Railroad and
Mill Supplies and Tools.
Plans and estimates furnished for Power
Plants and Steel Bridges.
Steam Pumps. Feed Water Heaters and
Hoisting Engines.
AUGUSTA. GEORGIA.


MONARCH TYPEWRITER
TYPEWRITERS
DENTED DEST
PAIRED DARGAINS
SECOND- HAND MACHINES
Naval Stores Operators
Should Investigate
The Modern Visible
Writer
BEST QUALITY
Carbon, Ribbons, Supplies
Telephone 833
Record BIde. Newnan and Bay Streets,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
State Dealers


14 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

The CLOTHIERS
vERTlyIlaG THAT IS GOOD AND
SMART IN WEARING APPAREL FOR
MEN AND BOYS.

Sam'l P. Holmes& Co.
Stocks, Bends, Cotten,
Grain and Provisions.
NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE
CHICAGO BOARD Of TRADE
Direct private wires to all exchanges.
Local stocks and bonds a specialty.
Beh Pbhe 853 Baldwla Block


Kohn = Furchgott = Company.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


EXCHANGE








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 23


TIMBER. LANDS FOR SALE
We have them. Several splendid large and small turpentine locations, saw-
mills and sawmill locations.
Some excellent bargains in large and small tracts of round and lixed
timber lands. Large tracts of Mississippi Delta and Hardwood lands. A
splendid list of valuable property and fine location for a colony or stock
farm in Southeast Georgia.
Some of the choicest residence places in the beautiful little city of DeFuniak
Springs, Fla., and in Milton. Fla. Our prices and terms are reasonable. Call
on or write us.
TURER & AYMARD, REAL ESTATE B ABSTRACT CO.
h MMMnu p.. tl 115 HeFmlak Splhs, Fla. Nlo In rt s.



The Clyde Steamship Company


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
JACKSONVILLE. PLA.
CAPITAL $300,000 SURPLUS and UNDIVIDED PROFITS 5414760.91
We issue Time Certificates of Deposit, which draw Interest at the rate ofthree per center
*anum, if held ninety days or longer. Take advantage of this and let your sartavs be camins
something for you. Particular attention paid to Out-of-Town accounts, sending deposits by mUa
R. S. HALL, Pres. H. B. CLARKSON, V. P. and Mgr. H. A. FORD, Sec. and Treas.


Marion Hardware Company,

Hardware, Mill and

Turpentine Supplies


OCALA,


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
The magnificent steamships of this line are appointed to sail as follows, calling at
Charleston, 8. C., both ways.
From New York, From Jacksonville for
(Pier 36 North River.) STEAMER. Charleston and New York.
Wednesday, Nov. 1, at 3:00pm. .ALGONQUIN.. Monday, Nov. 6, at 2:00n'n
Friday, Nov. 3,at 3:00pm ..ARAPAHOE... Friday, Nov. 10, at 5:00am
Saturday, Nov. 4,at3:00pm. .IROQUOIS.... Friday, Nov. 10, at 1:00 pm
..xONONDAGA.. Saturday, Nov.ll,at 6:00am
Tuesday, Nov. 7,at3:00pm. .COMANCHE... Sunday, Nov. 12, at 6:00am
Wednesday, Nov. 8,at3:00pm..HURON ....... Monday, Nov. 13.at 6:30am
Friday, Nov. 10,at3:00pm .APACHE...... Wednesday, Nov.15,at 8:00am
Saturday, Nov. 11, at 3:00pm..tALGONQUIN. Friday, Nov. 17, at 9:00am
..xCHIPPEWA.. Saturday, Nov. 18, at 9:30am
Tuesday, Nov. 14, at 3:00pm. .ARAPAHOE... Sunday, Nov. 19, at 11:00am
Wednesday, Nov. 15,at3:00p ..IROQUOIS..... Monday, Nov. 20, at 11:30am
Friday, Nov. 17,at3:00pm .COMANCHE... Wednesday, Nov.22, at 12:30pm
Saturday, Nov. 18, at3:00pm...tHURON ...... Friday, Nov. 24, at 1:00pm
..xONONDAGA.. Saturday, Nov. 25, at 6:00am
Tuesday, Nov.21, at 3:00pm..APACHE...... Sunday, Nov.26, at 6:00am
Wednesday, Nov. 22, at 3:00pm..ALGONQUIT.. Monday, Nov. 27, at 6:30am
Friday, Nov. 24, at 3:00pm. .ARAPAHOE... Wednesday, Nov. 29, at 8:00am
Saturday, Nov. 25, at 3:00pm..tIROQUOIS.... Friday, Dec. 1, at 9:30am
..xCHIPPEWA.. Saturday, Dec. 2,at10:00am
Tuesday, Nov. 28, at 3:00pm.. OOMANCHE... Sunday, Dec. 3, at 11:00am
Wednesday, Nov. 29, at 3:00pm. .HURON ...... Monday, Dec. 4, at 1:30am
*-Boston via Brunswick and Char leton. xFreight only. *-Boston via
Charleston. ***-Boston via Charleston and New York. !-To New York direct.
THE CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
Direct Service Between Jacksonville, Boston and Providence and all Eastern Points,
Calling at Charleston both Ways.
SEMI-WEEKLY SAILINGS.
Southbound.......... ................ .. From Lewis Wharf, Boston
Northbound................. ..... From foot of Catherine Street, Jacksonville.
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
Between Jacksonville and Sanford.
Stopping at Palatka, Astor, St. Francis, Beresford (DeLand) and intermediate
landings on St. Johns River.
STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
is appointed to sail as follows: Leave Jacksonville Sundays, Tuesdays and Thursdays
3:30 p. m. Returning, leave Sanford Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays 9:30 a. m.
SOUTHBOUND,. NORTHBOUND,
Read down. I I Read up.
Leave 3:30 p. m................... Jacksonville ................ Arrive 2:00a.m.
Leave 8:45 p.m.................... Palatka .................... Leave 8:00p.m.
Leave 3:30a.m ..................... Astor ...................Leave 2:30p.m.
Leave 4:30a.m................... St. Francis .................. Leave 1:00 p.m.
............. .............Beresford (DeLand) .............. Leave 12:00noon
Arrive 8:30a.m................... Sanford ................... Leave 9:30a.m.
Arrive 10:00 am. ................. Enterprise .................. Leave 10:00 a. m.
GENERAL PASSENGER AND TICKET OFFICE, a12 W. BAY ST, JACK'VILLE.
F. M. IRONMONGER, JR., Asat. Gen. Pass. Agent, 122 W. Bay St. Jacksonville, Fla.
W. G. COOPER, JR., Frt. Agt., Jack'ville. C. P. LOVELL, Superintendent, Jack'ville.
Foot Hogan Street, Jacksonville.
A. C. HAGGERTY, G. E. P. A., New York. CLYDE MILNE, G. F. A., New York.
THEO. G. EGER, WM. P. CLYDE & CO,
General Manager. General Agents,
(bespbrough Building, 19 State Street, New York.


- FLORIDA.


Illl*hItlli4II1it4 III UtII i it I t1*1* IIII IlIII I Oi1i

I JOS. ROSENHEIM & SONS
MANUFACTURERS AND JOBBERS OF


I SHOES
40


SAVANNAH, GEORGIA
Best Shoes Made for Commissary Trade."
I#tIIIlI tSi*III t S IItlIII**8l tI *** 1 II I IIII* Illll I


Southern

Electric...

Company


BOARD OF TRADE BUILDING. 213 MAIN ST.
......INSTALLATION OF......
Electric Wires of Every Description.
Elevators Installed and Repaired Motor
and Fan Work a Specialty.
Electric Fixtures.
BELL PHONE 1330. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Pine Staves D Heading
STANDARD SIZES 1- PROMPT SHIPMENT
Send me your orders for present or future use

T. J. WHIILT D. Bonifay, FleL.
~c~~c~c~c~r~,w~c~~c~rrrr;r ~c*


ARE YOU INTERESTED IN


TURPENTINE AXES?


The Rixford Axe has on merit
The RIxford Axe alone establish-
exal AxE ed the greatest reputation of any edge
.-|i tool ever sold. If you want something to
"-"= ~keep hands on your place

!THE RIXFORD AXE

I IS IT
If you expect to use them order now for
the DEMAND is greater than the supply.


W. H. Briggs Hardware Co.
Sole Southern Agents
VALDOSTA. GEORGIA


M_


X_ 1;.\XUS J1!~5~~~1*1*










24 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Buyers' Directory

If you want anything look
through this classified list and
write to the firm appearing
therein. The Record guarantees
a prompt response.
ATTORNEYS.
Jno. W. Dodge, Jacksonville, Fla.
ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and Trust Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
ACCOUNTANTS.
T. G. Hutchinson, Jacksonville, Fla.
BANKS.
Commercial Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Guaranty Trust & Savings Co., Jackson-
ville, Ila.
National Bank of Jacksonville.
Florida Bank and Trust Co., Jacksonville,

BOXES AND CRATES.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
BRICK.
Soutbhen Fuel & Supply Co., The, .lack
sonville, Fla.
CARPETS AND MATTINGS.
Savage & Whitford .Jacksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Stuart-Bernstein Co., Jacksonville. Fla.
CLOTHING-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Bailey & Montgomery, New York City.
CONVEYANCING.
Realty Title and Trust Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
COOPERAGE.
Cooperage Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS.
Wm. D. Jones, Jacksonville, Fla.
DRUGS---WHOLESALE.
Christie:Groover Drug Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Southern Drug Manufacturing Co., Jack-
sonville, Fla.
DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
ELECTRIC SUPPLIES.
Southern Electric Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Florida Electric Co., Jacksonville, Fia.
Standard Electric Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
National Electric Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGINES.
Lombard Iron Works and Supply Co.,
Augusta, Ga.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
FERTILIZERS.
Hours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
FOUNDRIES.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
FUEL.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co. The, Jack-
sonville, Fla.
FURNITURE.
Fetting Furniture Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GENTS' FURNISHERS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Stuart-Bernstein Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GROCERS--WHOLESALE.
Consolidated Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla
Hargraves Co., C. H., Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah. Ga.
Young Co., John R., Savannah, Ga.
HATS-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla
HARNESS.
Vehicle and Harness Co., Jacksonville
Fla.
HARDWARE.
Bond & Bours Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla
Briggs. W. H.. Hardware Co.. Valdosta, Ga
Marion Hardware Co.. Ocala. Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co., J. D., Savannah, Ga.


HAY AND GRAIN.
Bours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
HATS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Stuart-Bernstein Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
HOTELS.
Aragon The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Duval Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
Fifth Avenue Hotel, New York, N. Y.
St. George, Jacksonville, Fla.
Everett Ilotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
Windsor Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
Dwindle lotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
HELP SUPPLIED.
Florida Help Supply Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
IRON WORKS.
Lombard Iron Work & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
INSURANCE.
Prudential Life, Walter P. Corbett, Mgr.,
Jacksonville, Fla.
Cay, Shine & McCall, Jacksonville, Fla.
Loren H. Green & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
JEWELERS.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
KEELEY INSTITUTES.
Keiley Instilute, acksonville, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Bluin & Co., Chas., Jacksonville, Fla.
Altinaver & Flatau Liquor Co., Macon, Ga.
Eureka \\ine and Liquor Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Joseph Zapf & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
greaterr Newv ork Sample Room, Jackson-
ville, Fla.
MEDICINES.
Spencer Medicine Co., Chattanooga, Tenn.
Southern Drug Manufacturing Co., Jack-
sonville. Fla.
Christie-Groover Drug Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
MAPS.
Realty Title and Trust Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
MACHINE WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
gusta, Ga.
Sclofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR TURPENTINE PRO-
CESS.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
METAL WORKERS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick. Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Marion Hardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co., J. D., Savannah, Ga.
NAVAL STORES.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
ville. Fla.
Standard Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Timmons-Blount Co., Tampa, Fla.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
West-Fl nn-llarris Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
Young Co.. John R., Savannah, Ga.
Jacksonville Naval Stores Co., Jacksonville
Fla.
NAVAL STORES EXPORTERS.
Naval Stores Export Co., Jacksonville, Fla
PAINTS.
Bond & Bours Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Marion llardware Co., Ocala, Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
PIANOS AND ORGANS.
Abrams, Jas. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
PUMPS.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
REAL ESTATE.
* Brobston. Fendig & Co., Jacksonville, Fla
C. Buckman. .acksonville. Fla.
* Christie .1. D.. Jacksonville, Fla.
Livingston & Sons, J. H., Ocala, Fla.
iledrick Real Estate Agency, Jacksonville
Fla.
SSouthern States Land and Timber Co
Jacksonville. Fla.
Seclring & Slone, Jacksonville. Fla.
Stewart & Ilunter. Jacksonville, Fla.
RUBBER STAMPS.
. Florida Roihlwr Stampn[ Works, Jacksonville
. Fla.
SAFES.
Diabold Safe and Lock Co., Jacksonville
Fla.


SEEDS.
Bours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
SHIP YARDS.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Merrill-Stevents Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
SHOES-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co. The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Jos. Rosenheim & Sons, Savannah, Ga.
STEAMSHIPS.
('lyde Steamship Co. The, New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Ilolmes & Co., Samuel P., Jacksonville,
Fla.
S. L. Rawlins Co.. Jacksonville. Fla.
Miller & Coitmpany. Jacksonville. Fla.
TALKING MACHINES.
Metropolitan Talking Machine Co., Jack-
sonville, Fla.
TANKS.
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
TITLES AND TAX ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
TURPENTINE APPARATUS.
Chattanooga Pottery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
TURPENTINE STILLS.
Baker. M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
TURPENTINE STILL TUBS.
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.
TURPENTINE VATS.
Davis & Son, G. M., Palatka, Fla.


TURPENTINE TOOLS.
Council Tool Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
TYPEWRITERS AND SUPPLIES.
R. C. Davis & Co., Jacksonville. Fla.
VEHICLES.
Vehicle & Harness Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
WATCHES.
,reenleaf & Crosby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville, Fla.
YELLOW PINE LUMBER.
summerr Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
East Coast Lumber Co., Watertown, Fla.


Cay, Shine & McCall
FIRE INSURANCE.


212 Dyal-Upchurch Bld&


'tone 1955


Trade Checks
FOR THE


COMMISSARY 1BUS18 S.
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD manu
fractures more of them than all the print-
ing and office supply houses in the South
combined.

Industrial Record Go.


THE OLDEST WHISKEY HOUSl IN
GEORGIA. (Emtablished In 1881.)
OLD SHARP WILLIAMS-Pure Fine Old
Rye. By the gallon $3.00; four full quarts
$3.50, express prepaid.
GEO. J. COLEMAN-Pure Pennsylvania
Rye; Rich and Mellow. By the gallon
$2.75; four full quarts $3.00, express prepaid.
ANVIL RYE-Pure Substantial Family
Whiskey. By the gallon $2.50; four full
quarts $2.90, express prepaid.
CLIFFORD RYE-By the gallon 12.5;
four full quarts $2.65, express prepaid.
OLD KENTUCKY CORN-Direct from
Bonded Warehouse; fine and old. By the
gallon $3.00; four full quarts $3.50 express
prepaid.
OLD POINTER CLUB CORN Rich
and Mellow. By the gallon $2.50; four full
quarts $2.90. express prepaid.


We handle all the leading brands of Rye and Bourbon Whiskies in the market
and will save you from 5 to 5i per cent on your purchases. Send for price list and
catalogue. Mailed free upon application.

The Altmayer L Fltau .Liquor Company,
MACON. GA. AND BIRMINGHAM. ALA.





DIAMONDS AND WATCHES

We simply ask a call. We can show yoe, at correct and money
saving prices, many papers of loose pure white, perfect
DIAMONDS. It is our desire to continue being the largest
Diamond dealers in Jacksoville, and our specialty Is fine ronad-
cut gems and high-grade Waltham and Elgin Watches.

H Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry,
HESS & SL E II11-13 ai St., 3311 lay, Jaeksenvill, Fla.




M. A. Baker,
INVENTOR AND MANUFACTURER OF THE

Baker Improved

Seamless Turpen

tine Stills.
Write me for irieps and outfits
F. O. B. an, point in Georgia. Flor-
Ida. Alabama or Mi.ssissippli All
stills sold under a guarantee.
JOB WORK
Tkrouth the Countr, a Specialty.
The Largest and Oldest Copper
Works in Georgia. Brunswick, Ga.
ir My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do not leak,









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 25


MILLER 8r COMPANY.
STOCKS, BONDS, COTTON, GRAIN AND PROVISIONS.
West Building Jacksonville, Fla. Telephone 2025.
Paul R. Wiggs, Manager.
Members: NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE, NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE,
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE.
Our own private wires to the exchanges. Interest allowed on deposits subject to
check. New York Office, 100 Broadway.
SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 1903-o4 AND TWO PREVIOUS YEARS

Receipts. 1903-04 1902-03 1901-02
Spirits, casks ................... .............. 193,647 292,490 314,346
Rosins, barrels .............................. 650,938 940,507 1,071,446
Total ................................... 844,585 1,233,033 1,385,780
Exports.
Spirits, casks ................................. 188,393 296,430 314,876
Rosins, barrels ............................... 752,270 975,428 62,637
Foreign.
Spirits, casks ............................... 93,384 206,109 217,446
Rosins, barrels ............................... 338,171 504,173 535,042
New York.
Spirits, casks ................................ 35,658 42,765 53,763
Rosins, barrels .............................. 87,353 133,121 129,095
Sundries.
Spirits, casks ................................ 59,351 37,556 43,637
Rosins, barrels .............................. 326,746 337,734 398,5391
The receipts of spirits are less than 1902-03 by 98,849 casks, and of rosins, 289,569
barrels.
Crops of Spirits and Rosins for Three Years,


Crop 1903-04.
Spirits. Rosin.
Wilmington ....... .16,511 89,667
Charleston .......... 2,409 3,159
Savannah ......... .176,418 650,938
Brunswick ..... .... 55,002 184,527
Mobile ............ 12,315 50,380
New Orleans ........ 36,017 133,126
Carrabelle .......... .closed closed
Georgetown ........ 7,515 44,214
Pensacola ...... .. 42,554 205,982
Jax. & Fernandina .. .187,210 653,210
Tampa .......... .closed closed


Crop 1902-03.
Spirits. Rosin.
18,883 113,968
3,007 11,835
270,670 940,507
68,947 144,106
18,969 79,272
33,103 108,033
3,394 32,148
10,307 46,899
38,275 192,206
91,976 375,211
13,565 40,664


Crop 1901-02.
Spirits. Rosin.
16,021 109,484
3,004 13,270
313,085 1,071,440
79,669 286,125
21,080 88,572
21,038 94,336
8,177 47,497
8,458 50,515
37,786 154,350
70,000 245,000
15,424 51,779


Totals ........ ..535,915 2,020,925 571,096 2,184,818 593.492 2,212.413

Imports of Turpentine to United Kingdom.
From official returns; cwts turned into barrels at 320 cwts, 16,230 kilos, 100 bbls.
1900 1901 1902 1903 1904
From United States ................. 174,446 193,429 155,122 143,851 144,400
From France ........................ 2,283 859 1,656 4,630 2,859
From other countries ............... 840 53 904 516 11

177.569 194,341 157,682 148.997 147,270
Russian Turpentine .................. 8,521 6,861 8,711 17,595 17,765

Total barrels ...................... 186,00 201,202 166,393 166,592 165,035

Percentage of Russian .............. 4.57 3.41 5.24 10.56 10 76
Average price of American ......... 35-4 27-1 33-1 42-2 41-2
Reported by James Watt & Son, London, England.

COMPARATIVE PRICES OF SPIRITS AT SAVANNAH FOR FIVE YEARS.


April 1 .................
April 8 .................
April 15 ................
April 22 ................
April 29 ................
May 6 ..................
May 13 .................
May 20 .................
May 27 .................
June 3 .................
June 10 ................
June 17 ................
Jun 24 ..............
July 1 ................
July 8 .................
July 15 ................
July 22 ................
July 28 ................
Ang. 4 .................
Ang. 12 ................
Ang. 19 ................
Ang. 26 ...............
Sept. 2 .................
Sept. 9 .................
Sept. 16 ................
Sept. 23 ................
Sept. 30 ...............
Oct. 7 ..................
Oct. 14 .................
Oct. 21 .................
Oct. 28 ................
Nov. 4 ..................
Nov. 11 ................
Nov. 18 .................
Nov. 25 .................
Dec. 2 ..................
Dec.9 .................
Dec. 16 .................
Dec. 23 .................
Dec. 30 .................
Ja. 6 ..................


1904-06.
ND
53
541
54%
53%
55
54%
641/4
531/
54
52%
52%
521
53
52%
52%
53y
53%
52%
53y
541/4
54%
52%/
52y
52
52%
52%
52
52%
51%
50%
50
50
48%
36%
47%
48@y,
60%
to0


1903-04.
ND
50
49%
47
45
45
471/4
47%
49
45%
46
46%
471/4
471A
47%
48
4901
50()4
491%
52
52
55@ y%
54
54%
56%
57
55
57
55%
560
65%
56
56%
56
56
56
56
56%
561/4
56%
561/4
57%


1902-03.
45
42%
42%
43
42% @43
43
45
45
45%
45%
47%
48%
47%
451/4
45%
44%
44
43%/
43%/4
44%
441/4
44%
45
44%
46
46%
47%
50
51%
53%
49
52
50
51
50%
51
50%
51%
52
52%
64


1901-02.
34
32
321/
31 @32
32
32
311/4
32%
321/4
32
32
33%@%
341/2
33%
34'/,
34%
33
32%
34
33
34
34
33%
34%
34
33%
34
34%
35
35%
35%
35
35
35
35/4
35%
35%
36%
36%
37%


1900 01.
53%
531/2
53
46
47%
46%
47
48
49
49
46
44%
43%
42%
431/2
431/4
441/4
43
42
39%
39%
38
35%
34
35'/
351 /
36(/4
37
37
37%
40'/.
401/,
40
41
40
39
39

371/4
35
35
37


FIFTH A VENUE HOTEL

Madison Square, New York.

American Plan $5 per day. European Plan $2.00 per day.
The most famous representative hotel
in America. New as the newest, always
fresh and clean. The location in Madison
Square is tle finest in the city.
HITCHCOCK. DARLING 4L COMPANY.





THE ARAGON
JACKSONVILLE, FL.A.

NOW OPEN
Under new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
cluding new electric elevator and our
own electric light plant.
H. N. O'NEAL. Prop.

*o**.**** @-** .*******.4***e*************** **********


i J. S. Schofiel

4,6o 4, 6 @* @*. *+*@


d's Sons Company,

****@e**,$*oo*e4.**o**s*os$*5O*
S Headquarters for

Distiller's Pumping

Outfit.
No plant complete without one.
Hundreds of them in use in Georgia,
Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and *
SSouth Carolina. Write us for particu-
lars and prices. We also manufacture
Engines, Boilers and High ?
-;- Grade Machinery,
+ as well as carry a full and complete *
S--stockof-
Mill Supplies, Pipe,
SBoiler Tubes, Etc. .
Advise your wants.
SMacon, - Georgia.
A leadie Specialty tof
SKIl of Task Work for TorpentiM Sterms Prpoe


***** *O*9**..* ****9 *** ** 9'< *-'9O 96 *** *9*9*0*0 9




Timmons Blont Co.

W. W. TIMMONS, B. W. BLOUNT, J. P. CARSON,
President. Vice-President Sec'y & Treus.


S Naval Stores Factors


And Dealers in Supplies of all Kinds for Turpentine
Operators.

Correspondence Solicited. Address

STIMMONS- BLOUNT CO.

American National Bank Bldg. TAMPA, FLORIDA.




East Coast Lumber Co.

ROUGH AND DRESSED LONG LEAF


Yellow Pine Lumber


Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.


Steamer Shipments a Specialty.
wATERTO W N, FLORID A.






26 lE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


OPERATORS


Bear in Mind That During Your


Busy


YOU BREAK


Extra
Kettles,
Worms
Caps, Arms,
Furnace
Doors,
Grate Bars,
and all
other at-
tachments
pertaining
to-
Turpentine
Stills and
Fixtures.


YOU BURN OUT
YOU NEED US


Over in the Left- Hand Corner


Will Interest You.


McMILLAN BROS.,


Southern Copper Works.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Savannah, Ga.
Mobile, Ala.
Fayetteville, N. C.


The


Cooperage


Company


Manufacturers of High Grade

Western White Oak Spirit Barrels


,Capital $200,000.


JACKSONVILLE,


FLA.


Orders sent direct to us will receive promi- and ca elfi! attention.
We are now prepared to furnish barrels frim six shops advantageously located.


OFFICERS:


J. C. LITTLE, President.
E. H. MOTE, General Mianager.


JOHN E:. HA\I;I'lS, Vice-President.
C It. 1A.':N"'ES, Secretary and Treasurer.


J. C. LITTLE,


JOHN E. IHARRIS,
W. C. POWELL,


DIRECTORS:
C. HI. IAHN:I S.
W. F. COACIHM I


.T. NW. WEST,
E. H. MOTE.


WV. J. KELLY


Regular
Stock
Complete
Outfits,
New and
Second-
hand.


Season


YOU MEET WITH A MISHAP


DOWN


__ '


----------------------------------------


ASSLHLAAMSMSAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA~fe~eaN~A---------VM M ~ ~M01hANWt







C. B. ROGERS, President. W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAMPLAIN, Vice-Presidents. C. H. HODGSON, Sec. and Treas.
ai~JsUTOBS: C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain, H. A. McEachern and J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonville;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.
*


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $500,000.
Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches In Tampa, Pensacola, Fla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the Gulf Naval Stores Company of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola: the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything in Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain,


Pro-


visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.


Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Coasist of one Three-Story Building, 70x200; one two-story building. 50x390; one one-story baldlag, 80x250,
making the largest space of any Company of the kind in the South.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.


Brunches Tampa. Fla., Pensacola.. Fla., and Savannah, Ga,.


---------- III@ affilsee emaIaagoIsago -IlaoaV@aamas lossmuIua -------------IVuIuIV*ua -1I







When in Jacksonville, Remember that

GREENLEAF & CROSBY CO.
41 W. BAY STREET
HAVE THE LARGEST STOCK, IN THIS SECTION. OF

Diamonds, Precious Stones, Watches
Jewelry, Clocks, Silverware, Bronzes, Fine China, Objects of Art
I /As they are the largest buyers they get the
BEST PRICE and are accordingly able to sell the
lowest. They invite a comparison of prices, I

They Give Mail Orders Prornpt Attention.
WRITE NOW FOR A CATALOGUE.



Half Tones-Zinc Etchings

Illustrating and Engraving Department
OF
THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of Commercial Work, Pamphlets, etc
I SMILIT 1 lE IOF KSIf1K1, mIKG 1 m 11f0 ISHIMIGM1 nIm i P I i P S.
IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
Goou WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED
A Florida Enterprise. Try It.
S' *l--