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Weekly industrial record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00140
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: September 22, 1905
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00140
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

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PENSACOLA,FLA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS


Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000


Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
Small Amount of Stock Yet in Reserve
to Sell to Operators Who Can Arrange to Buy.


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Patronage of Turpentine Operators everywhere


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WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL


RECORD.


FUDMSHED EVERY FRIDAY. DEVOTED TO THE NAVAL STORES, LUMBER AND MANUFACTURING I hRihf I .

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The Orange Crop Guess Below Last Year,

For several days oranges have been will have an excellent financial return from
leaving from counties in South Florida his crop.
by carload lots, and for this early in the Rains during the summer have been reg-
year the fruit appears to be in excellent ular, and what fruit there has been on the
condition. trees has been well provided with all the
Conditions generally have been favorable weather qualities, and has made a good
this summer for the orange crop of Flor- growth. The quality of the fruit is what
ida. Rains have been regular during the will count. Last year there was a drouth
summer, and there has been no drouth. during the summer, while during the fall
In fact, conditions as to weather have been there was everything to cause the fruit
more favorable this year than they have to become soggy and spoil in transit. The
been for many years past, and the quality rains coming late made the fruit very in-
of the fruit will be much better this fall firm, and it was because of this quality
than it was last fall, when shippers found that there was a lack of the ordinary
that it would not carry. prices for the Florida stock.
But there is not to be as large a crop This year the first shipments are to the
of oranges this year as there was last, West, as usual. Carloads of fruit have
due largely to the cold of last winter, been going that way for several days, and
which destroyed the chances for a crop in have been bringing satisfactory prices. No
a great many of the groves in the northern early fruit is shipped to the East. The
part of the State, and which even injured East will not take the early fruit from
the chances for a crop as far south as Florida at a price anything like reason-
De8oto and Manatee Counties, according able.
to the report made yesterday by Colonel What fruit is going forward now ap-
Watkins of Noeatee, in DeSoto County. pears to be pretty well matured, though
Estimates of the crop this year fall far there is a sign of greenness, which will
short of what they were last fall and win- mitigate against the Florida fruit for sev-
ter. Last winter estimates ranged from eral weeks at least. But the sizes are
tA,000 to 2,500,000 boxes, while this good, an dthe flavor is there, even this
yeat the highest estimate is for 2,000,000 early.
sad from reports received from all parts of Prices this year for fruit have been on
the State this estimate is not to be reach- an average of $1 per box on the tree and
ed. There are a great many reasons offer- $1.60 f. o. b. These prices are considered
ed for the falling off in the estimate over good and are far ahead of what they were
last year. In the first place the cold of last season. A great many growers have
last winter interefered to a great extent sold their oranges this year on the trees.
with the crop in the northern counties of In fact there are but few who resisted
the orange belt, while in the southern the offers of $1 per box on the trees, after
counties this appears to be an off year in the experience of last year and when this
the crop, as far as seedling trees are con- price took in all of the crop.
earned. Grapefruit this year is of exceptional
Last winter in Orange, Volusia, Marion, quality and there is a fairly good crop.
Hillaboro, Putnam, Alachua, Dade and The prices for grapefruit are good, ranging
Pasco Counties the cold weather cut the from $2.50 to $3 on the trees.
prospects for a crop considerably. The J. S. Arnold of this city, who has made
cold even affected the counties far south a careful study of the conditions this year
ia the orange belt. This year there ought and who has visited all of the orange pro-
to have been a much larger crop than last during counties of the State, claims that
year, but the cold cut off about a year's there ought to be at least 2,000,000 boxes
growth for the trees so far as the crop of oranges and grapefruit this year. He
was concerned, makes this estimate, even after account-
Colonel Watkins, who was here yester- ing for the cutting down of the crop by
day, and who places the estimate for the the cold in some counties. He says that
cop this year at 1,250,000, though he the condition of the fruit this year is to
stated that the probabilities were that the be excellent and that the prices are to be
rop would exceed that to a limited extent. much better than they were last year.
He does not think it will reach 1,500,000. Much more fruit has been sold on the
Colonel Watkins has had a great deal of trees this year than last and there will
sacess during recent years in estimating be but little of the crop marketed on the
the orange crop, and his estimates have commission plan. Buyers have been in the
always been made after a thorough study field early this summer and they have
of conditions and a competent knowledge made good bids for the fruit of every grove
of the industry. This year he states that in the State. The range of prices for the
in addition to the cold, which has mate- bidding have been close. In fact there is
rialy set back the orange crop in nearly a better understanding this year than
every county of the orange belt, this is an there has been for several years past, due
of year for seedling trees in DeSoto doubtless to the fact that the crop this
County. This is also true, he states, of year appears to have been easier to esti-
Manatee County. Seedling trees never mate than it was last.
yield their limit for successive years. On- The extent of the yield this year may
y every other year is there a big crop depend largely upon the condition of the
from this kind of a tree, and DeSoto and weather. Rains will have a tendency to
Manatee Counties have a great many seed- increase the size of the fruit and may
lags to take into consideration when mak- affect the output to the extent of a hun-
ing estimate of the orange crop of the dred thousand boxes, though this is hardly
State. probable.
But conditions are more favorable this Packinghouses throughout the orange
year than they were last, when Florida's belt are beginning to sho some activity
orange crop was almost a failure, because and in a few weeks there will be train-
of the lack of carrying qualities. There loads of oranges leaving this State daily.
were a great many shipments of the fruit
last year, which would not carry, and LUMBER FERE IN TEXAS.
which hardly brought the freight. Cali-
fornia fruit sold for a remarkable advance Beaumont, Texas, Sept. 21.-A special to
over Florida fruit, but the reverse is more the Fnterprise from Bronson, Tex., seven-
than apt to be the case this year. Florida ty miles north of here, says: "The entire
fruit is far superior to the California fruit plant of the Kirby Lumber Company was
as a general rule, and if the quality is up totally destroyed by fire at 6 o'clock this
to the standard this year there is every evening. One hundred men are thrown out
reason to believe that the Florida grower of work. Loss, $100,000."


The Condition of Trade in the Southewt.

Atlanta.-Dry goods and notions houses goods, shoes and furnishing goods. Dis-
report a good house trade. Dealers in tillers and wholesale liquor houses report
hats and kindred goods say they have all that fall trade has been fairly good, but
the business they can take care of for complain of the quarantine restrictions,
some time. Other lines report business and say that the yellow fever situation
good. Collections average fair to good. in New Orleans has hurt their business
Business suffers to some extent from the considerably. Collections from the mouth,
quarantine around New Orleans, many lo- as is usual at this time of year, are slow.
cal houses having to call in their men from St. Louis.-Many buyers are still in the
that section. Cotton continues to open market and all lines of trade are bImy.
rapidly, and in some instances premature- General conditions are favorable, and jobo
ly. There appears to be but little or no bers express themselves as much gratifed
top crop or new growth, and the crop in with the outlook for the year's business.
this section will be small as compared Collections, while not so active as last
with last year. week, are quoted good. Retail trade shows
Jacksonville.-Quarantine restcirctions steady improvement. Banks continue to
have a disturbing effect on trade in all make heavy shipments of money to the
lines. The local builders' strike is still country for moving crops. Local stocks
unsettled. Collections are slow. and bonds are inactive and prices are
Birmingham.-Southern iron remains weak.-Bradstreets.
firm; $12 for No. 2 foundry, with no large
sales. Wholesalers report good business,
while retail trade is ahead of last year. BIRMINGHAM IRON MARKET.
Collections are improving. There is an Birmingham, Ala., Sept. 21.-The Bir-
active demand for all kinds of lumber, mingham iron market is unusually brisk
and firmness prevails in prices. In the this week. One company reports sales
Birmingham territory there is (a vast of 80,000 tons of pig iron within the past
amount of building in contemplation and three days, and another reporting sale of
that already completed will double any about 80,000 tons since Sept. 1. The sales
previous year. of other Birmingham companies will bring'
Montgomery.-Jobbers report a satis- the total up to about 225,000 since the,
factory volume of business, and retailing first of the month.
continues active, with increasing sales. This is probably the best record ever
Cotton has deteriorated slightly owing to made by Southern companies in the same
unfavorable weather, and prospects indi- length of time. The bulk of the iron sold
cate that the crop will fall short of its is for 1905 delivery. It is said by official
original estimated yield. of the leading companies that not a tor
Chattanooga. Wholesale and retail has been sold at less than $12 on No. 2
trade is improving. Collections are fair. basis, which is nearly $1 a ton better than
Memphis.-Wholesale and retail business the prices obtained in July, when a large
in most lines is quiet, but improvement is buying movement set in.
noted in a few instances. Collections
range from slow to good. Money is easy
and the supply exceeds the demand. NAVAL STORES DEAL AT FATMANlwr
Charleston.-Wholesale dealers in dry Gainesville, Fla. Sept. 21,-Another deal
goods, clothing, shoes and groceries report of more than ordinary importance in ri-
business good in many places. Half or val stores circles has been consummated in
more of the cotton- crop has been picked. this city, C. W. Chase having purchased
Sea-island cotton has improved, anil as from J. B. McDonald his immense naval
picking progresses the yields are better stores interests situated at Fairbanks, aad
than anticipated, while the lint is of ex- embracing an area of several thousand
cellent quality, acres of fine timber, and twenty-three
Savannah. Receipts of cotton since crops in operation. This is one of the
September 1 are 40 per cent in excess of most extensive and has proved" one of the
the same period last year. The spot mar- most profitable turpentine farms in the
ket is tending downward, and is active county. It was established about ive
only on declines. Reports of conditions years ago by B. F. McCall, who, after
are various and for the most part biased, working the same a couple of years, sold
so that it is difficult to get reliable data. the property to J. B. McDonald & Co. Mr.
The prevailing belief is that the yield in McDonald acquired eventually the entire
this section will not be over 15 per cent business, and has been operating it cor-
short of the unprecedented yield of last tinually until the transfer was made to
year. Naval stores and lumber are high Mr. Chase.
in price and in good demand. Jobbing Mr. Chase, the purchaser of this farm,
trade is improving in nearby territory, is president of the Dutton Phosphate Com-
and collections are slightly better than pany, who are among the most extensie
last week. miners of high grade phosphate rock in
Augusta.-Trade in general is improv- the United States. He has always been
ing. Crop conditions are fair. Cotton active in building up the commercial in-
picking is general. Collections are fair. terests of this section of the State, and
New Orleans.-General trade is satis- to his excellent business management is
factory, and some lines have been more largely due the magnificent success of that
active than at this time last year. Retail firm. Always conservative in his business
merchants continue to hold fair amounts of ideas and views, he is regarded as one of
trade. Reports of the cotton crop indi- the safest directors of large business af-
cate only a fair yield on the lowlands, fairs in the State.
but hill crops are somewhat better, though Mr. McDonald could not be seen by the
the plants do not appear to be fruiting correspondent, hence it is not known what
properly. his future plans will be. It is safe to
Louisville.-But for the obstacle of yel- say, however, that he will soon be ae-
low fever Louisville would in all proba- tively engaged again.
ability have had the largest fall business
this year in its history. Traveling men .One of the biggest pulp mergers in the
are, owing to the quarantine restrictions, history of Canada was recently perfected
kept out of their territories, and trade at Montreal whereby a number of eoa-
is therefore somewhat lessened. There panics operating in Newfoundland, havig
has been, however, during the last ten an aggregate capital of 1,500,000 acre of
Says, a very large number of out-of-town pulp lands, surrendered their interests to
merchants here, and the result is that a company of English publishers capital-
trade has been very large in clothing, dry ized at $5,000,000.











4 THR WEEKfit 1NDUUSTIAL RERAoO.


The Industrial Trade News of the Week,


The Guarantee Loan, Realty & Insurance
Co., with $100,000 capital, has been incor-
porated at Salisbury, N. C., by E. P. VWhar-
ton, J. 8. McCubbins, E. 1. Harrison, John
8. Henderson, Jas. H. Ramsay, B. B. Mil-
ler, John L. Rendleman, A. Lee Smoot,
Romert C .Hood and Leo. Wallace.
Louisiana-Alabama Cola Co. has incor-
porated at New Orleans, La., with $200,-
000 capital stock to mine coal, etc. Sam-
uel B. McConico is president. Sam W.
Bowman, vice-president, and Walter W.
Girault, secretary-treasurer.
The First National Bank of Waynes-
boro, Ga., has been organized with $50,-
000 capital The officers are P. L. COrdes,
S president; Ed. Fulcher and George 0. Wo-
S mack, vice-presidents; Thomas F. Buxton,
cashier.
)iood Phillips, George H. A. Hunst,
Frank P. Brown, Samuel F. Feasler and
associates have incorporated the Empress
- Glass Co., of Grafton, W. Va., with $50,-
000 capital stock to manufacture and deal
in glass.
Hubbard Cotton Oil Co., of Hubbard,
Texas, has incorporated with $50,000 cap-
S ital stock to construct and operate cotton-
seed oil mills, etc.; incortiporators, J. B.
r5 McDaniel, W. B. Barnes, J. V. Matson,
S Eugene McDaniel, W. O. Mullins, T. C.
Morgan of Hubbard and J. F. Myrick, of
S Irene, Texas.
C.
' The Bank of Holcomb has been organized
at Holeomb, Miss., with $100,000 capital,
by D. L. Holcomb, R. D. Williams, P. D.
Holcomb, R. A. McRee, T. P. Lampkin, J.
S W. Wood, J. 8. Earley, T. A. Staten, H. S.
taten, W. T. Loggins, C. E. Wright, Ben
L. Jones, E. R. McShane and others.
The Central West Construction Co., of
Kansas City and Marshall, Mo., has been
S in corporate with $100,000 capital stock
by George R. Collins, F. A. Baxley of Kan-
-as City and W. P. Hall, of Perkins, Mo.
The Cheek & Neal Coffee Co. has been
- incorporated at Nashville, Tenn., with
$300,000 capital stock by Leslie Cheek, W.
C. Owen, R. S. Cheek, A. H. Goodall and
L T. Cheek.
Second National Mine Operating Co.,
of St. Louis, Mo., has been incorporated
with $100,000 capital stock by F. C.
S Swartz, Jay E. Boyd, Jr., C. H. Rauh and
G. G. Powell to develop mineral and oil
lands.
e The Sieward Milling Co., of New Or-
S leans, La., has been organized with $125,-
000 capital stock to take over and operate
the plant of the David & Crescent Rice
S Mill Co. A. H. Steward is president, and
J. P. Campbell, secretary and general man-
ager.
It is reported that an abbatoir will be es-
tablished by the Mobile (Ala.) butchers
and a committee has been appoitned to
investigate a site for a plant to be built
k. Hartwell can be addressed.
Caloosa Oil & Gas Co., of St. Louis, Mo.,
has been incorporated with $50,000 capi-
tal stock, by Edward C. Reid, James H.
Methune, Thomas B. Crews, Arthur Mittel-
i berg and Elmer Godshalk, to drill for oil
S and gas.
The Oconee Oil & Fertilizer Co., of
i Athens, Ga., has decided on location for
its proposed $300,000 oil refinery. A build-
ing has been secured and machinery is be-
ing stalled. Storage tanks with a capacity
of 500,000 gallons will be provided.
The Old Virginia Copper Co., of Luray,
Va., has been organized with Fred Eckart,
president; H. T. Brinton, vice-president;
O. P. Eversole, secretary and H. T. Schnel-
- ker, treasurer (all of Fort Wayne, Ind.,
where the main office is located), to de-
S velop copper deposits at Stony Man moun-
tain, near Luray. Mr. Brinton was re-
ported recently as organizing company
with $3,000,000 capital stock for this pur-
pome


Jackson Woolen Mills will rebuild at
once its burned plant at Jackson, Tenn.,
destroyed last week at a loss of $100,-
000. A temporary location has been se-
cured and a permanent building will he
erected. Contracts have been awarded for
all the new machinery except electric
lighting plant and elevators.
l'irgilina Lumber & Manufacturing Co.
has been incorporated at Boydton, Va.,
hvith $50.000 capital stock to deal in and
manufacture lumber, etc. John Ford is
president; W. W. Tuck, vice-president
(both of Virgilina, Va.) and E E. Cock-
rell of Boydton, secretary-treasurer.
Beaumont Saw-Mill Co. has incorporated
at Galveston, Tex., with $250,000 capital
stock to operate a saw mill; incorporators
C. H. Moore, A. W. Miller, C. S. V. Alton
of Galveston, W. S. Slagley of Alton,
Iowa, and James G. Berryhill of Des
Moines, Iowa.
The Crab Orchard Improvement Co. has
been chartered at Charleston, W. Va., with
$1,000,000 capital stock and C. J. Witten-
berg of New York, N. Y., president. The
company has taken over the property of
the Crab Orchard Land Co., containing
over 10,000 acres of New River coal, which
will be developed.
It is reported that the North American
Land & Timber Co. is completing arrange-
ments for developing lands in Cameron
county, near Lake Charles, La., for the
cultivation of rice. Contract has been
let for dredging a canal from Sweet lake
for 2 1-2 miles, where a pumping plant
capable of lifting 20.000 gallons of water
per minute will be installed to pump water
from the dredged canal into an overland
canal for irrigating the land adjoining,
which will be laid out in rice farms.
H. H. Brenner, W. C .Tucker, W. T.
Leahy, P. J. Monk and C. N. Prudom have
incorporated the Pawhuska-Cleveland Oil
Co., at Pawhuska, O. T., with $100,000 cap-
ital stock to drill for oil.
Geo. W. Killebrew, M. E. Wheeler and
associates will organize company with
$80,000 capital stock for the establish-
ment of fertilizer factory at Mt. Pleasant,
Tenn., referred to last month. A site has
been secured and arrangements are being
made for the erection of the necessary
buildings. About $50,000 will be invested.
Machinery will be operated by electricity.
Esser Coal & Coke Co. has incorporated,
with $60,000 capital stock, to mine coal
and manufacture coke at Esserville, Va.
G. H. Esser of Dorchester, Va., is presi-
dent, and C. C. Hyatt, of Norton, Va.,
secretary-treasurer.
The Stockmen's Cotton Oil Co. has been
chartered at Fort Worth, Texas, with J.
P. Daggett, president; W. W. Sloan, Jr.,
vice-president; E. W. Pressley, secretary
nad general manager; William Anson,
treasurer, to operate cotton-seed oil mill;
capital stock, $60,000. The company has
begun the construction of proposed build-
ings, to include an 80-ton oil mill; storage
warehouses 70x250 feet, capable of storing
7,500 tons of seed. hullhouse 00xl80 feet,
etc. Machinery has been purchased. Tlhe
company will also build large cattle-feed-
ing pens, with a capacity for 50,000 head.
The Knoxville, Power Co., of Knoxville,
Tenn., held a meeting of directors last
week to consider their plans for the de-
velopment of power and the erection of
electric plant on Little River, the project
which they have been furthering for some
time. According to previous statements
about 40,000 horse power will be availa-
ble for development and transmission by
electricity, and it is estimated that $3,-
500,000 will be the cost of the work. At
the meeting mentioned it was announced
that the financial arrangements for the
enterprise had been completed. Charles
H. Treat, of New York, is president, and
John T. Wilder, of Knoxville, is vice-
president. James B. Cahoon, 42 Broad-
way, New York, has been previously named
as the engineer in charge.


I. C. DAVIS


T. A. PVLGHVM


R, C. DAVIS & CO.,


General Agents




Fay-Sholes


Typewriter


We buy, sell, exchange or rent second hand
machines, offering liberal inducements.
Write for descriptions of the Fay-Sholes,
which is the world's record machine for speed,
simplicity and durability.


R. C. DAVIS & CO.,


JACKSONVILLE,
FLORIDA.


PLANTERS


"Old Time" Remedies

THE JOY Of THE HOUSEHOLD.
These four great remedies, ublan Tea, Benedicta, Cuban Relief -
and Cuban Oil, are the joy of the household. With them near at hand, a
man is ready for any emergency. He has a safe, reliable and speedy relief JT
for wife, children, self or stock. With these remedies you can keep the Cub.
doctor's hands out of your pockets, and yet have a healthy, happy famny. dl 1
Besides, you can cure your stock of any ailment that may befall them. Cbin f
NUBIAN TEA-In Liquid or Powder Form-Is the great family medicine. It
will cure all forms of Liver and Kidney Complaints, Prevents Chills and Malarial
Fever. Cures the common ailments of children; and as a laxative tonic it is without
an equal-safe and reliable. In the liquid, it is extremely palatable-even children
like it-and it is READY FOR USE.
BENEDICTA is a woman's medicine. It will cure all the diseases common to
women, and classed as Female Troubles. It will bring youth back to the iaded woman,
who has gone one suffering because she thought it woman's lot. It will care for the
young girl just entering womanhood; and prepare the young woman for the sared
duties of wife and mother.
CUBAN RELIEF-The instant Paint Killer, for either man or beast Relieves
instantly, Colic, Cramps, Cholera Morbus, Diarrhoea, Dystentery and Sick Hasdache.
For colic in horses it is an infallible remedy and is guaranteed to give relief in fve
minutes.
CUBAN OIL-The Beat Bone and Nerve Liniment. Is antiseptic for.cuts,
snagged or torn flesh, and will instantly relieve the pain. Cures insect bites and stings,
scalds and burns, bruises and sores, chapped hands and face, ore and tender feet.
Relieves rheumatic pains, lame back, stiff joints, and in stock cures wire fence cuts,
scratches, thrush, splint, collar sores, saddle galls, and diseased hoofs.
Write us for Price.

SPENCER MEDICINE CO., Chattanooga, Ten.

*,tI ti1 u1119,?t4ett I I IlI I tttUII t @4i t~ II$UtIt UI tttll

Propositions That Cannot Last

Great activity in Turpentine and Sawmill Propositions. The good ones
are becoming scarce. But here are two rare ones.
28,000 acres, Hillsborough County, estimated to cut 50 boxes; 3,500 feet
)f mill timber to the acre. Will make 50 barrels of spirits per crop. $4.00 per
acre.
20,000 acres taw mill timber in Hernando County. Timber will cut 4,000
feet per acre. Four railroads through the tract. $3.15 per acre. Complete
S saw mill, capacity 40.000 feet daily, included.
Operators, ask to be put on our mailing list and keep posted on all prop-
ositions which are put upon the market.
*


I Brobston, Fendig & Company
. JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA BRUNSWICK GEORGIA


I~+iu+oiu~iueuuuwuuuuusuuuitivvuluu


~,rs~Esmacs~Ex3csisc~c~ac~c~cJac~cs~ Jacsa~s~Exrxxsaacsc~Escxscs~as~E~ar


___________________







,. ic"-


Mu WIKLY 1NbAJAthIL RuOO1RD.


W .8. Bradley, W. E. Bradley and Frank
H. Bradley have incorporated tile Bradley
Manufacturing Co., at Charlotte, N. C.,
with $250,000 capital stock, to manufacture
clothing, shirts, etc.
The Tidewater Fuel & Gas Manufac-
turing Corporation has incorporated at
Alexandria, Va., with $50.000 capital stock
to manufacture gas, coke, tar, etc. A. D.
Shrewsbury is president; F. D. Blackstone,
vice-president (both of Alexandria), and
A. Georgmaul of Washington, D .C., secre-
tary-treasurer.
The Parsons & Cheat River Lumber Co.,
of Parsons, W. Va., has been organized
with $150,000 capital stock by Robert
Felty, Cyrus Echard, Frank W. Wright,
W. H. Brown of Connellsville, Pa.; E. B.
Stone of Morgantown, W. Va.; W. W.
Wright of Cadiz, Ohio, and Frederick Fel-
ty, of Uniontown, Pa., for the development
of 15,000 acres of timber land near Par-
sons.
It is reported that Louis B. Magid
has purchased the Tallulah Falls (Ga) wa-
ter power property for which he has been
negotiating, and will arrange for the full
development of the power as well as the
erection of the silk mill he has had in view
for some time. From 25,000 to 40,000
horse power is said to be available, and
when developed it will be transmitted by
electricity for the silk mill and other
manufacturing plants
The Vermilion Live Stock Co., Ltd., has
been incorporated with $100,000 capital
stock, to take over and operate the cattle
ranch of Felix Broussard near Abbeville.
Ia. Dr. C. J. Edwards is president; S. A.
Pipes, secretary, and Felix Broussard,
treasurer.
Weaver Coal & Coke Co. has been char-
tered with $1,000,000 capital stock to mine
coal and manufacture coke near Crossville,
Tenn. It is proposed to build a $100,00C
coke plant. Henry E. Weaver of Chicago,
Il., is president; J. C. Van Barecom of St.
Louis, Mo., vice-president, and William
Ramsey of Chicago, I1l., general manager.
Asbury Wright, J. T. Tarwater, Polk
Tarwater, of Rockwood, Tenn.; H. M. La-
follette, Sewell Howard of Campbell coun-
ty and H. B. Lindsay of Knoxville, Tenn.
have purchased 6,000 acres of coal lands
on Hickory creek in Campbell county,
Tenn., at $200,000, and will organize the
Campbell County Mining Co., with $250,-
000 capital stock, for the development of
the tract. It is stated that the land also
contains hardwood timber and iron and
mineral deposits.
The Birmingham Frog & Crossing Co.
of Birmingham, Ala., previously reported
incorporated with $60,000 capital stock t<
manufacture railroad frogs and crossings
has purchased site on .which to' locatA
plant, and the work of construction wil
begin at once. W. W. Stringfellow ol
Anniston, Ala., is president.
C. C. Wilson, W. V. Wilson and Oscar
Kahl have incorporated the Wilson Fur
niture Company at Louisville, Ky., git]
$100,000 capital stock.
The Louisiana-Alabama Coal Co., re
ported in corporate last week at Nev
Orleans, La., with $200,000 capital stock
has purchased and will develop 3320 acre
of coal lands in Franklin County, Ala
bama. It is proposed to install machinery
for a daily output of 400 tons at th'
start. W. S. Douglas of Russellville, Ala
will be superintendent in charge of con
struction and operation. S. B. ifonico i
president; Sam W. Bowman, vice-presi
dent, and W. W. Girault. secretary-treas
urer. main office, New Orleans, La.
Park Zinc Mining Co. has been incorpc
rated with an authorized capital stocl
of $160,000 at Black Rock, Arkansas.
O. Denman is president.
The Illinois Development Co. has income
porated with an authorized capital stock
of $100,000, at Newport, Arkansas. Elh
Graves is president; C. A. Darnell, vice
president; I. B. Keithley, secretary, an
B. M. Johnson, treasurer.


The American Pipe and Foundry Co.
has secured site in North Birmingham.
on whlicl to build proposed plant. The
company has a capital stock of $200,000.
E. E. Linthicum is general manager.
A company is being organized by An-
drew Pizzini, .Jake Wells of Richmond,
Otto Wells of Norfolk, Va.; Chester E.
Albright, and H. B. Auchy of Philadelphia,
Pa., to build an amusement resort at
West End Electric Park near Richmond.
Va., to be known as "Dreamland Park."
About $50.000 will be expended.
The Angola Oil Co., of Fairmont, W.
Va., reported incorporated last week with
$50,000 capital stock, will develop 180
acres of oil land in Pleasants county. W.
B. Cornwell is president, and W. H. Con-
away, secretary-treasurer.

JOHN S. FRANZ, Agent
I


ull.l.lllllll Io 2l1uu4l ul aullluhlll I


THE DIAMOND.
Wholesale anb RIotaU

Wines, Liquors and Cigars,
SSole Agents for the State for Lacananmm Beer. also Wlhtne.la aU* miLe -
Serl Water. We guarantee all Brand put up by us full nesim as falmo we
4 Creme de la Creme, bottle .... $200 Diamond Brand, bottle ........ 1.9
4 [I 1 v ra*m j ral, ]PFm )i Heart Brand, bottle .......... .
* C. C. C. Brand, bottle ........ 1.50 Spade Brand, bottle ........... .1S
SClub Brand, bottle ........... 1.25 Premium Brand, bottle ........ .


MYERSON CO.,
105 e 107 Wet Bay St.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


gh.Iauaaaa,.uluuu..uug~uuauuI.


JOSPH D. WEED.


Diebold Safe & Lock Co.
Jacksonville. Florid.

FIRE INSURANCE-Lowest rates. Lo-
ren H. Green & Co., 9 and 10 Park Bldg.,
Jacksonville, Fla. Omo


Joseph Zapf & Co,

feime DamW l Iettdr W


Anheuser-Busch

St. Louis Lager Beer

Wholesak

LIQUORS, WINES,

Mineral Waters.

Write for Prices

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA

THOSE. G. HUTCHINSON
FELLOW AMIECAN ASSOIATlIN *
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS
Room 7, Beard of Trade Bldg.
Pne 312 JACKSONVILLE rA.



BIRl MOIIIMERY,
Commission Merchants,
Navel Stores & Cotton
Liberal advances made against ship-
ments. Consignments solicited.
78-80 Wanll St, ROoms 813-14-15
NEW YORK CITY.


WM. D. JONES
PRESCRIPTION SPECIALIST
..&d..
FAMILY DRUGGIST
I 107 E. BAY ST.
Mall Orders Sllfcfted.


Pbhm 171


*UU#SIIUSSIUIUSUUU~IUI


W. D. KR


J. D. WEED I CO.,
SAVANNAH. GEORGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF

Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Et


TurpentirNe

Cups

If you expect to use the HERTY
next season, place your orders nOw
future delivery. Prices and all infte
tion cheerfully furnished on
Cups, Gutters
end 6ll Too1
S used in the Herty system of turpentim

Chattanooga Potteri
Company,
Jadseriuk, Frida.


You Want a Turpentine Location?
You Want a Sawmill Location?
You Want any Kind of Florida Land? .
You Mean Business?
F 4
Call on or Wrts to

J. H. Livingston & Sons,
L 'OCALA. FLORIDA.


SBottled from famous Suwannee
SuwanneeSprng Spring water. Cures Rheumatism,
Indigestion and Kidney Trouble.-
C 1 The most refreshing, natural, spark-
ling Ginger Ale known. Bottled and
sold by the Live Oak Bottling Works,
Live Oak, Fla. For sale by Consoli-
dated Grocery Company, Jackson-
A I ville, Johnson, King & Co., of Jack-
A li sonville, and M. Ferst's Sons & Co,
Savannah, Ga.


H. D. WEED.


__








.. -.--- -


THE WEEKLY iN4DUUSmIAL RECORD.


fa considering the question of immigra-
te- to the South, discrimination must be
AMde between nthe classes of Europeans
me may be induced to come to this coun-
=y and locate in the Southern States.
the is good ground for apprehension, lest
Sclass of people should settle in the
atherni States who would cause a de-
change for the worse in this section.
Sthe movement of immigrants into New
Tfk was diverted southward even for a
ear, unquestionably it would do the
1awtherm States incalculable harm, owing
b the character of those who comprise the
jbJsrity of the immigrants at present.
Si needless to say that the tenement
ltrkits of New York, Chicago, Pittsbqrg,
1d ether cities of the North and West,
460 thronged with Italians and other tu-
Srepresenting the lowest classes of
thaental life, for they prefer existence
e as it is in cities to life In the coun-
Ssad would undoubtedly swell the pop-
ion of southern communities while
Swho entered the rural districts would
p a most undesirable class of citizens.
Swe have already stated, however, a
tet m must be made between the
of people in the countries from
the South might be able to obtain
a m l white labor. It is a question
the criticism of Italians has not been
y too wholesale, when it is remem-
that a large portion of the peasant
m are scacely represented in the Uni-
Btate. In recent years the bulk of
Italians coming to America have come
the vicinity of Naples and southern
United States consuls and Amer-
who have traveled extensively in the
agree that the inhabitants of
Sarthern provinces are of a far bet-
ste--as to physical and moral con-
and from an industrial standpoint
as intimated, such a small percent-
f these Italians have thus far enter-
the United States that we have had
Soprtunity to judge of their better

To gave a clear conception of the differ-
in the Italian race, a brief outline of
agricultural industry of the country is
The greater portion of the coun-
ha a climate very similar to that of
Ghlf States, permitting the produc-
mot only of crops native to the tem-
but to the tropical climate. Con-
ly the Italian harvests include
corn, rice hay, as well as cotton,
beets, tobacco, in addition to the
culture, of which Italy is one
leading countries. The wheat crop
aerages between 25,000,000 bushels
25,00,060 bushels annually, while the
erop averages between 80,000,000
and 100,000,000 bushels. The to-
produeed is of fine quality and aver-
from 12,0000,000 pounds to 15,000,000
each year. The farmers of Italy
one hundred and seventy million
worth of grapes either in the form
ruit or wife, while the raw silk rep-
a value of nearly $40,000,000. Con-
these statistics it is not strange
er 50,000,000 acres of land are eul-
of which about 6,000,000 acres
rendered fertile by artificial irriga-

tio of the various districts
it apparent at a glance that the
of the northern provinces are more
for the reason that they are
more industrious and a better
tof citismmsU all around. In the com-
or provinces of Tuscany, Um-
BLmbardy and Venetia the Italian
of the better class can be foupd.
Lt is largely due the abundance of the
and the success which has been
in distinct branches of agricul-
such as the productions or grarnsand
The northern Italian is almost .as
in type from the peasant of Cam-
in southern Italy, as from the peas-
of France or Switzerland. His lands
,better tilled, his buildings are of a
Better character and the contrast is
great that it is apparent to the most
Sobserver.
It the inhabitant of the rural districts
northern Italy could be induced to come
theouthern States to assist in devel-
their resources, there is little ques-
what he wvold make a desirable


citizen, and his assistance would be of the
utmost value in the field, orchard and
garden. This applies to cotton growing,
as well as the cultivation of the cereals,
for while cotton production has considera-
bly declined in recent years, the peasants
are familiar with the growth of the plant
as were their ancestors. What is of more
importance is that such a large propor-
tion are spinners and weavers, although
the cotton manufacturing industry as car-
ried on by modern methods is conducted
on a very limited scale thus far in the
kingdom. Spinning and weaving by tana,
however, are to be seen in nearly every
province, in fact, the Italian is a natural
textile worker on account of his famili-
arity with seri culture, and there is no
doubt but what the southern cotton man-
ufacturers could recruit their help on a
large scale if the northern Italians could
be induced to cross the Atlantic.
The same argument can be applied to
Spain. While it may seem strange that
the latter country has an abundance of
labor which would be especially desirable
in the south, this is true as anyone who
is familiar with the Pyrenees provinces
is well aware. There is a striking similar-
ity between.the habits and methods of the
northern Spaniards and the northern Ital-
ians. The farmers also thrifty and indus-
trious, are expert in tilling the soil and
today the most prosperous portion of
Spain is composed of the portions of the
kingdom where they reside. It is an in-
teresting fact that Spanish immigration to
Cuba has probably done more to develop
the resources of this island than any
other factor. Prior to the war the move-
ment was of such proportions that during
a single year from 50,000 to 100,000 of the
Spanish mountaineers disembarked at Ha-
vana and were scattered over the interior
of the island. While the movement has
been somewhat checked since the freedom
of Cuba, vessels frequently enter Havana
with from 2,000 to 3,000 of these immi-
grants on board.
While there is no question but what
vigorous measures should be taken to re-
strict the immigration from southern Italy
and other undesirable movements so far
as the South is concerned, if systematic
efforts were made to secure the classes of
foreigners referred to they would un-
doubtedly be attended with success. When
it is remembered that a large acreage of
western Canada has actually been settled
by farmers from the northwest states-
a portion of the country which is noted
for its productiveness-it is evident that
a practical plan of this kind will bring
results, for by the .Canadian system as
many as 50,000 American families have
been induced to cross the border in a single
year. As matters now stand, however,
those most active in inducing immigration
ot the United States are the representa-
tives of the Trans-Atlantic steamship
companies. The character of the immi-
grants or the homes from which they
come are of no consequence to them,
provided the would-be settler has enough
money to buy a ticket and can pass the
inspection at American seaports. Thus
it is that practically no effort thus far
has been made to induce the northern
Italian to come to America in any consid-
erable numbers, and if the promoters of
the southern immigration movement would
establish agencies in the provinces re-
ferred to as well as in northern Spain-
agencies provided with men who are fa-
miliar with the language and customs of
the people-the effort might be worth
while. That such agencies are of impor-
tance in securing desirable immigration is
shown by the fact that the Canadian gov-
ernment has no less than one hundred
scattered throughout the United States,
being represented in all of the larger
communities and especially in the west
and northwest It may be added that
for every family induced to cross the
border the Canadian authorities pay the
successful agent a bonus ranging from
$1 to $3, according to the size of the
family in addition to his regular salary.
Whether this would be desirable in case of
foreign agents or not is a question, but
personal solicitation is absolutely neces-
sary if the types of people referred to are
to be secured for the south.-Tradesman.


PRICE LIST OF

Eureka Wine and Liquor Co.
The Great Southern Mail Order House.


EXIPR.ES IPEEPAI.


atchett'a Private Stock ......
Hatchett's That's Whiskey ....
Hatchet' Old Rye ............
Eureka N. C. Apple Brandy ....
N.'C. Apple Brandy..........
Eureka Malt ................
Eureka N. C. Peach Brandy ....
N. C. Peach Brandy ..........
Eureka N. C. Corn ............
Eureka N. C. Corn, XX ........
Eureka N. C. Corn. XXX ......
Eureka N. C. Corn, XXXX ....
Old Crow Bourbon ...........
Hermtage Rye ..............
Sunny Brook Rye.........
Sunny Brook Sour Mash... .. .
Echo Spring ..................
811k Velvet ..................
Oak and ....................


FrLL QVART MIASVUl
Per Four 8Ix Per
Gallon. Quarts. Quarta. Cue.
..84.0 S4.W 05.6 SI2.6
..4.4 4.60 6. 22.5
... 8.3 4. 9.6
..4.5 4.1 7.0 146.
.. .5 3.5 4.15 8.
.. 4.00 4.M .6 2t.6
4.75 4.75 7.0 14.6
.. 3.15 4.85 9.7
.. 2.. 4.5 3.11
.. .00 3. 4.1 3.0
..2.7 2.75 4.15 8.
2.5. 3.6 L.% 7.6
..4.0 4.6 I6. 13.0
..4. 4.5 IS 12.0
.N 3.25 6.6 U.N
4.1 4.0 $.3 n.2
..6 5.1 7.05 1."
.. L5 4.6M 48. 12.


* GIN FROM 52.50 TO $S.50 PEILGALLON. DELIVERED
Save twelve labels of Hatchetts Private Stock and secure a bottle tree.
Save twelve labels of Hatchett' Old Rye and secure a bottle tree.
Save twelve labels of Hatchett's That's Whiskey and secure a bottle free.
SSave twelve labels of Eureka N. C. Corn and secure a bottle free. Save
Twelve labels of Eureka N. C. Apple Brandy and secure one bottle free Save
twelve labels of Eureka Malt and secure one bottle free. Prices of all goods
bought at company's store are 70c per gallon less than when delivered. No
Charge for Jugs, boxes or drayage. Au of my bottles are full measure. All
d standard brands of whiskies sold over my bar at 10c per drink. 15
S We also carry in stock liquors of cheaper grades. M
* All wines quoted on application.
S Special prices In large lots, packed any sizes desired. Lea ves G for you
S Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded.
EVRECKA WINE AND LIQUOR COMPANY.
1 i WEST BAY BTR EET, JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA.
Il t 8tttt #t ofttiitt tttt Ittt lstottt1t 1ttttttt


uuu3,63u613313u(1u3111I


PEARL WIWT. Pros.


41111111 1131 6uouuUaWualsoUUU


T. I. MsCAtIIY, Vise-Pres.


MACue TER1. Tram.


SOUTHERN STATES LAND & TIMBER COMPANY.

omiI N. wcELuCt Manager.



Florida Timber, Grazing &


Agricultural Lands.


401-404 LAW EXCHANGE,


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


... NATIONAL...



Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH, GA., U. S. A.


JOHN B. YOUNG,
Presides

J. P. WILLIAMS.
C. W. SAUSSY.
S. A. ALPORD,


A. D. COVINGTON,
VIe*-President.
OItSi-.


C. S. ELLIS.
P. L SUTHERLAND.
J. B PADGWrT.
J. .I YOUNG.


B. F. BULLARD
W. C. POWEI..
WALTER RAY,
A. D. COVINGTON.


H. L KAYTON, '
Seet remtaers T r.


J. B. CHRSNJTT
G. W. D.N,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L. CONOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and are
conveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. C. L.
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRITE EITHER OF THE ABOVE FOR PARTICULARS.




Printing For all Purposes.
P ri -The Iuiustral Resewr Pau. Ce
Jaksa vUe,


The Better Classes for the South,


I


-z








THE WNKfY IJbUISNISItr]AL RECORD.


r-State Rules of 1905.

Classcation and Inspection of Yellow
Pin Lumber.
RULES.
Approved in conference of committee
from The Georgia Inter-State Saw Mil
Association, South Carolina Lumber As-
sociation, New York Lumber Trade Asao-
eiation of New York City, Yellow Pine
Exchange of New York City, The Lumber-
men's Exchange of Phiadelphia, Pa, The
Lumber Exchange of Baltimore, Md, De-
cember 10, 1904.
GENERAL RULES
All lumber must be sound, commercial
long leaf yellow pine (pine combining
large coarse knots, with coarse rain, is
excluded under these rules), wel manu-
factured, full to size and saw butted, and
shall be free from the following defects:
Unsound, looe and hollow knots, worm
holes and knot holes, through shakes or
round shakes that show on surface; and
shall be square edge, unless otherwise
specied.
A through shake is hereby denied to
be through or connected from side to side,
or edge to edge, or side to edge.
In the measurement of dressed lumber
the width and thickness of the lumber
before dressing must be taken-less than
one inch thick shall be measured a one
inch.
The measurement of wane shall always
apply to lumber in the rough.
Where terms one-half and thirds heart
are used they shall be construed as re-
ferring to the are of the face on which
measured.
In the dressing of lumber, when net
otherwise specified, one-eighth inch shall
be taken off by each planer ct.
CLSSIFICATIOH.
Flooring shall embrace four, five and
six quarter inches in thickness by three
to six inches in width, excluding 1%x6.
For example: 1a, 4, 5 sad 61 1%x3, 4,
and 6; l%x3, 4 and 5.
Boards.
Boards shall embrace all tickneses
under one and a half inches by over six
inches wide. For example: %, 1,1% and
1% inches think by over six inches wide.
Plank shall embrace all ss from one
and one-half to under six inches in thick-
nes by six inches and over in width. Foi
example: 1%, 2%, 3, 3%, 4, 4%,, %,
5% by 6 and over in width.
Scantling.
Scantling shall embrace all sies exceed-
ing one and one-half inches and under si8
inches in thickness, and from two to undei
six inches in width. For example: 2x2
x4, 2x4, 2x6, 3x3, 3x4, 3x5, 4x4, 4x5 and
6x5
Diameneio
Dimension sines shall embrace all sine.
six inches and up in thickness by sh
inches and up in width. For example: 6x6
x7, 7x, 7x8, 8x9 and up.
Stepping shall embrace one to two an
a half inches in thickness by seven ineha
and up in width. For example: 1, 1%
1%, 2 and 2%x7 and up in width.
ough dge or Fitch
Bough Edge or Flitch shall embrace al
sies one inch and up in thickness by eighl
inches and up in width, sawed on tw4
sides only.L For example 1, 1%, 2, 3, 4 am
up thick by eight inches and up wide
sawed on two sides only.
SPECTION.
Standard.
All lumber shall be sound, sap no objee
tion. Wane may be allowed one-eighth o
the width of the piece measured aeros
face of wane, extending one-fourth of th
length on one corner, or its equivalent o:
two or more corners, provided that no
over 10 per cent. of the pieces of any on
size shall show such wane.
Merchantable.
All sizes under nine inches shall shoi
some heart entire length on one side
sizes nine inches and over shall ahoi
some heart the entire length on two oa
polite ides. Wane may be allowed one
eighth of the wi4 of tjr ple measure


acre face of wane, and extending one-
fourth of the length of the piece on one
corner or its equivalent on two or more
corners; provided that not over 10 per cent
of the pieces of any one size shall show
such wane.
Prime.
Flooring shall show one heat face, free
from through or round shakes or knots
exceeding one inch in diameter, or more
than four in a board on the face side.
Boards seven inches and under wide
shall show one heart face; over seven
inches wide shall show two-thirds heart
on both sides, all free from round or
through shakes, large or unsound knots.
Plank seven inches and under wide
shall show one heart face; over seven
inches wide shall show two-thirds heart
on both sides, all free from round or
through shakes, large or unsound knots.
Planks seven inches and under wide
shall show one heart face; over seven
inches wide shall show two-thirds heart on
both sides, all free from round or through
shakes, large or unsound knots.
Scantling shall show three corners heart
free from through or round shakes or
unsound knots.
Dimension Sizes.-All square I umber
shall show two-thirds heart on two sides,
and not less than one-half heart on other
two sides. Other sizes shall show two-
thirds heart on face and show heart two-
thirds of length on edges, excepting when
the width exceeds the thickness by three
inches or over, then it shall show heart
on the edge for one-half the length.
Stepping shall show three corners heart,
free from shakes and all knots exceeding
half inch in diameter, and not more than
six in a board.
Rough edge or fitch shall be sawed from
good heart timber, and shall be measured
in the middle, on the narrow face, free
from injurious shakes or unsound knots.
Wane on not over 5 per cent of the
pieces in any one size shall be allowed as
on merchantable quality.


Cay, Shine & McCall
FRE IWHSURATc.


z21 Dyal-Upchurch Bidt


Phoe 19S5


WHISKIES
GINS AND RUMS
FROM
$1.50 to $5.00 per Gallon
......AGENCY FOR......
Lewis 1866 and Mount Vernon
Pure Rye Whiskies.
Controllers Blum's Monogram and Syl-
van Bye-Agents for Jungst Cincin-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.
CHAS. BLUM & CO.
517 and 519 WEST BAY STREET.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

Lombard Iron Works

and Supply Company
BUILDERS AND DEALERS IN






ENGINES, BOILERS.
Cotton, Saw, Fertiler, Oil and lee Ma-
ehinr, -ad Suppli ad repairs.
Capacity for 200 Hands.
Machine Todls, Wood-Working Machinery,
Shafting, Pulleys, Hangers, Leather a
Rubber Belting and Hoe Railroad and
Mill Supplies and Tools.
Plans and estimates furnished for Power
Plats and Steel Bridges.
Stem Pumps. Feed Water Heaters and
Hoisting Engines.
AVGvSTA. GEORIGIA.


Florida Bank and Trust Company
Capital $1.000.000.00. Jackuenvlle. Fla.
DEPOSITARY OF STAT. COUNTY AND CITY FUND
W. P. COACHMAN President. W. S. JENNINGS. Vice PresMuaL
W. A. BEDDING, Caser. ARTHUR F. PERRY, Vice Priea.
F P. FLEMING, Jr., Trust Offeer
Beeeives deposit accounts of individuals, firms corporations sad beaks. Pas 4 ar
cent on sving deposit. Reats safe deposit boxes. Bs and sells foreign ex hage a
issues letters or credit.
Acts S trustee, transfer agent, registrar and fiscal agent for oerporatois &'
municipsalties. Executes trsus h as executor, trustee der wifl or aagtena
of court and receiver.
Vnoquatod FracllUe Aooemat SotL C. I ..io


FUEL AND BUILDING MATERIAL,


The Southern Fuel & Supply c
Auaar'ti*, -m f mE or* C, U L~ .m Prn.-, -


F* ee**l S ..e ********* a- F--- -.
A
J. A. Craig s Bro.
239 W. Bay Street EVERETT BLOCK.

SI-eeders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloths
0 ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.

Agents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City.
9 ___mom
in- o sooooooowwo


THE BOND & BOURS CO
WHOLESALE RETAIL

HARDWAER

SASH, DOORS, BLINDS, PAINTS.
Oils, Olass, Stoves, Tinware. Country Hollowa
sO WEaST BnA STR.ET. JACKSONVILL .I. lA.
-
WILLIAM A. BOURS JAMES 0. mIsN"


WILLIAM A. BOURS & COMPi
THE OLDEST STAUSEB GRAIN Al SD OUSE THE STATE.

ay, Grain, Feed, Garden
Seeds, Poultry Suplies, Flor.
Grits, Meal and ertilizers.
OUR MOTTO: Prempt Selllmet, ReIBl Geeds. Catabom
206 EAST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

JIII 1i 10# 0i#4 O S lt 1 111,911 t 1 @l o ts@ tol me II I 1i I II I:*oeq
John Young . J. W. Motte, C. Parker, James MeNatt. W. W. Wi..
President. ViePres. Vce-Pres.. Vioe-Pres. See. & es.



John R. Young Co.,


Commission

Merchants.


i Naval Stores factors. Wholesale Grocers.
4

S Savonrnah d Brunswick. Ga
:u1,f3'4331U11111U11 3hi 11 1 0801 1110 -82 "
d~lJ









THE WREKLY iNDU~rrImXAL RORD.


ater-State Rules of 05.

Classiication and Ispection ef Yellow
Pine Lumber.
RULES.
Approved in conference of committee
from The Georgia Inter-State Saw Mill
Association, South Carolina ALmber As-
sciation, New York Lumber Trade Aso-
ciation of New York City, Yellow Pine
xcbaLsge of New York City, The Lumber-
men's Exchange of Philadelphi, Pa., The
Lumber Exchange of Baltimore, Md, De-
eember 10, 1904.
GENERAL RULES
All lumber must be sound, commercial
long leaf yellow pine (pine combining
large coarse knots, with coarse rain, is
excluded under these rules), well manu-
faetured, full to size and saw butted, and
shall be free from the following defects:
Unsound, loose and hollow knots, worm
holes and knot holes, through shakes or
round shakes that show on surface; and
shall be square edge, unless otherwise
specified.
A through shake is hereby defined to
be through or connected from side to side,
or edge to edge, or side to edge.
In the measurement of dressed lumber
the width and thickness of the lumber
before dressing must be taken-less than
one inch thick shall be measured a one
inch.
The measurement of wane shall always
apply to lumber in the rough.
Where terms one-half and thirds heart
are used they shall be construed as re-
ferring to the area of the face on which
measured.
In the dressing of lumber, when net
otherwise specifed, one-eighth inch shall
be taken off by each planer ut.
CLASSIFICATION.
Hoping.
Flooring shall embrace four, five and
six quarter inches in thickness by three
to six inches in width, exluindig Ix.
For example: 1x3, 4, 5 sad 61 l% , 4,
and ; 1%x3, 4 and 5.
Boards.
Boards shall embrace al thickanees
under one and a half inches by over six
inches wide. For example: %, 1, 1 sand
1% inches thick by oer sx inches wide.
Plank shall embrace all si from one
and one-half to under six inches in thick-
ness by six inches and over in width. For
example: 1%., ,2%, 3, 3 55%,
5% by 6 and over in width.
Scantlin.
Scantling shall embrace all sides exceed-
ing one and one-half inches and under sis
inches in thickness, and from two to under
six inches in width. For example: 24x
2x3, x4, S, 3x, 3x4, 3x5, 4x4, 4x5 and
5x5.
Dimesiao.
Dimension sies shall embrace all sise
six inches and up in thickness by si
inches and up in width. For example: 0x6
6x7, 7x7, 7x8, 8x9 and up.
Stepping.
Stepping shall embrace one to two an4
a half inches in thickness by seven inche
and up in width. For example: 1, 1%
1%, 2 and 2%x7 and up in width.
Rough Edge or Flitch.
Rough Edge or Flitch shall embrace a&
sies one inch and up in thickness by eighb
inches and up in width, sawed on tw(
sides only.* For example 1, 1%, 2, 3, 4 and
up thick by eight inches and up wide
sawed on two sides only.
INSPECTION.
Stadard.
All lumber shall be sound, sap no objee
tion. Wane may be allowed one-eighth o0
the width of the piece measured aros
face of wane, extending one-fourth of the
length on one corner, or its equivalent o0
two or more corners, provided that no
over 10 per cent. of the pieces of any one
size shall show such wane.
Merchantable.
All sizes under nine inches shall shoa
some heart entire length on one side
sizes nine inches and over shall shoi
some heart the entire length on two op
posite sides Wane may be allowed one
eighth of tho width of W te p-i mnure


aeroe face of wane, and extending oae-
fourth of the length of the piece on one
corner or its equivalent on two or more
corners; provided that not over 10 per ent
of the pieces of any one size shall show
such wane.
Prim&
Flooring shall show one heart face, free
from through or round shakes or knots
exceeding one inch in diameter, or more
than four in a board on the face side.
Boards seven inches and under wide
shall show one heart face; over seven
inches wide shall show two-thirds heart
on both sides, all free from round or
through shakes, large or unsound knots.
Plank seven inches and under wide
shall show one heart face; over seven
inches wide shall show two-thirds heart
on both sides, all free from round or
through shakes, large or unsound knots.
Planks seven inches and under wide
shall show one heart face; over seven
inches wide shall show two-thirds heart on
both sides, all free from round or through
shakes, large or unsound knots.
Scantling shall show three corners heart
free from through or round shakes or
unsound knots.
Dimension Sizes.-All square umber
shall show two-thirds heart on two sides,
and not less than one-half heart on other
two sides. Other sizes shall show two-
thirds heart on face and show heart two-
thirds of length on edges, excepting when
the width exceeds the thickness by three
inches or over, then it shall show heart
on the edge for one-half the length.
Stepping shall show three corners heart,
free from shake and all knots exceeding
half inch in diameter, and not more than
six in a board.
Rough edge or fitch shall be sawed from
good heart timber, and shall be measured
in the middle, on the narrow face, free
from injurious shakes or unsound knots.
Wane on not over 5 per cent of the
pieces in any one size shall be allowed as
on merchantable quality.

Cay, Shine & McCall
FIRE INSURANC,.


212 Dyal-Upchurch Blg


Pheme 955


WHISKIES
GINS AND RUMS
FROM
$1.50 to $5.00 per Gallon
......AGENCY FOR......
Lewis 1866 and Mount Vernon
Pure Rye Whiskies.
Controllers Blum's Monogram and Syl-
van Rye-Agents for Jungst Cincin-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.
CHAS. BLUM & CO.
517 and 519 WEST BAY STREET.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Lombard Iron Works

and Supply Company
BUILDERS AND DEALERS IN


ENGINES. BOILERS.
Cotton, Saw, Fertiler, Oil sad le Ma-
chinery, and Suppli- and Repair
Capacity for 200 Hands.
Machine Todls, Wood-Working Machinry,
Shafting, Pulleys, Hangers, Leather an
Rubber Belting and Hos Railroad and
Mill Supplies and Tools.
Plans and estimates furnished for Power
Plants and Steel Bridges.
Steam Pumps. Feed Water Heaters and
Hosting Engines
AVGVUTA, GEORGIA.


Florida Bank and Trust CompanyI
Capital $1.0O.000.00. Jackionville. Fla.
DEPOSITARY O STATM. COUNTY AMD CITr FrVDS
W. F. COACHMAN Peident. W. S. JENNINGS. Vice PrsMt.
W. A. WEDDING, shier. ARTHUR F. PERRY, Vice PredMemt.
F. P. FLEMING, Jr., TrustOffeer
Receives deposit aconnts of inviduas. frm, corporation and banh. Pays
cent on svnla deposits. Reats safe deposit boxes. Buys ad sells forel n exeIog i"..
issues letters ol credit.
.Ats as trustee, transfer agent, registrar and fiscal aget for corporaUi _-I'
munic ipales. eutes all trusts such a exeutor, trustee under w r
Set court and receiver.



FUEL AND BUILDING WIATERIAL.


The Southern Fuel &, Supply a


Foo/ 86 "a 61004 -,os l o m- -f fAWI.h
-^****-------**- ----------------->

J. A. Crai D Bro.

0 239 W. Bny Street EVERETT BLOCK.
I I
l ,-arlers in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-

Sing and Up-to-Date Furimshings.

SAgents for Dunlap and Stetson Hats; largest stock in the City. -



THE BOND & BOURS OC
WHIOLESALE RETAIL

HARDWAER

SASH, DOORS, BLINDS, PAINTS.
Oils, Glass, Stoves, Tinware, Country Hollorw
10 rEST MAT STRJIET. JACaKSONVIJI. FLa.
WILLIAM A. SOURS JAMES 0. MUa


WILLIAM A. BOURS & COMPANY
TH OLD.ET ESTA.SLRM GRAM A i E OUSE M TE TATI.


Hay, Grain, Feed, Garden
Seeds, Poultry Suli, flour,
Grits, Meal and Fertilizers.
OUR MOTTO: Prempt SiLmeMt Re1Moe Geed.
206 EAST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE,


c -tlo
f LA.


*ee a aeaaaeaam umam mmsua** Hornmmiii iii mm mmm


John R. Young. JW.. ..o. u. r P er, Jais M Natt.
President. Vice-Pres. Vie-Pres. Vloe-Pres.


w. W.a. .
See. A Treess.


John R. Young Co.,


Commission

Merchants.


Naval Stores factors. Wholesale (rocers.-

SSavou'nah f Brunawick. Ga
Ieamass a AA IlI I AII I I I uI I II l 8II I l 1 114uiii nuum


mmv









THE WEEKLY INDUSrIlAL RECORD.


DEVELOPING THE SOUTH,

The Important Part Played by Railroad Companies in the Task,


In an article in the New York Sun bear-
Sing upon material progress of the South
'i recent years, Sylvester Baxter writes:
r "The magnificent Union Station at
SWashington, which will soon be one of the
great monumental buildings of that splen-
dfid city, has been called the vestibule of
mar national capital. It might alpo be
called the gateway of the South; that is,
for us of the North. On the other hand,
--er the South it will be the gateway of
--ke North. The South, to be sure, has
s: iny gateways along its northern frontier,
S- is necessarily the case with a boundary
liae that stretches across the continent.
1R*9t Washington, from its national rank
La d its relation to the densest populations,
bIth North and South, is pre-eminently the
opnmad portal of the section.
- 'In our observations of typical indus-
.trial development as influenced by the
iiways, strong contracts and most inter-
comparisons are offered in proceed-
L from one old section to another old
; from densely populated New Eng-
to the as yet sparsely populated
; from a new section in the extrem-
tpart of old New England into many
of the South where what perhaps
the richest fields of varied natural re-
a'res in the world awaiting exploitation.
rW. shall find the same vital American
animating both sections, with many
Ita i contrasts, and equally Aptable
mreeents and parallels. The South,
r, is distinguished by a marvelous
of the spirit that prevailed there
eM Broken by the blight of slavery
of civil war, only in recent years has
rained its old-time momentum. It is
Speeding forward to marvelous new
S'There cannot be the least question as
the fact that the present splendid ad-
ie, which marks a new era throughout
South, has been made possible only
the railways in their taking up of the
modern and enlightened methods for
exploitation of the territories tribu-
to them. The railway development
the South in the antebellum days was
important, and corresponded to like
of development in the North. In
days, however, the Southern rail-
y, while including many trunk lines
great importance, were broken up into
fragmentary sections, controlled
ws many independent companies.
these such traffic relations existed
l were possible under those conditions.
there was little coherence among
and equally little possibility of
in unison as demanded by modern
e requirements. The era of con-
ti into great systems began much
in the South than in the North, but
process is now being carried forward
magnificent consummations.
flailway development in the South,
ver, is not even half complete as yet.
many parts of the North it has prac-
y attained its full growth. In the
the general conditions may be com-
to those of a forest where the trees,
large and flourishing, have yet
double in size, at least, before they
S the possibilities of maturity. There
to be a general impression that
great consolidations mean practical-
t monopoly of railway transportation
one control, as has been the result
certain other sections of the country.
however, is far from the correct
of the present situation. The South
ns several very large systems, one
-t them already including considerably
8,000 miles of lines. But these over-
and interlace to a very great extent,
into the territories of one an-
er and coming together at various great
points. Threfore, while there
ay be harmonious relations, there is cer-
Sa great deal of competition for
"It has been a fashion of late to depict
railways as raging monsters, devour-
the substance of the hind, delighting in
Sthe destruction of industries and blighting
_prospects of flourishing communities.
there have been and doubtless still


are not a few instances of injustice to in-
dividuals and communities, it is evident
that the self interest of a railway system
lies in building up the territory along its
line without favor or discrimination to its
patrons. The ways in which the railways
have built up the South in the past few
years and are still building it up in stead-
ily accelerating degrees find probably their
best illustration in the great work which
is being carried out by the land and in-
dustrial departments of the various sys-
tems and companies.
"There was recently a meeting of the
Southern Railway Land and Industrial
Agents' Association at Asheville, N. C.
In relation to this occasion it was said at
the time that until the Southern railroads
began a systematic campaign for promul-
gating information concerning the South
there was very little perceptible develop-
ment in comparison with the newer sec-
tions of the United States. But in con-
sequence of the effective work that has
been done, a great movement of capital
and industry and of population toward
the South has taken place.
"Altogether the South is now regarded
as the most prosperous section of the
United States, and this fact appears to be
chiefly due to the systematic work of de-
velopment which has been carried on by
the railroads. How extensive this is may
be seen from the fact that the association
in question represents 16 different rail-
way companies, whose combined mileage
is over 40,000, covering every part of the
10 great States which they penetrate.
"The pioneer in this work of industrial
development was M. V. Richards, the land
and industrial agent of the Southern Rail-
way. When that great system was cre-
ated by the consolidation of numerous
smaller lines scattered all through the
South from the Potomac to the (ulf of
Mexico and from the Atlantic to the Mis-
sissippi, the president, Samuel Spencer,
called Mr. Richards to him and asked him
to undertake the organization of a great
land and industrial department for the
big new company. Mr. Richards had had
long training and successful experience in
railway work in the far West, and later
on the Baltimore & Ohio Railway in a
similar capacity under Mr. Spencer. Hs
was told that there would be no disal-
pointment should no results be evident
from his work for at least a year, for the
management was well aware of the diffi-
culty of the problem that lay with an old
and most conservative section of the coun-
try, entirely unused to such activities.
"In the work of the department thus
established we have one of the most evi-
dent benefits from railway consolidation
on a vast scale. Unquestionably there is
economy in the increased efficiency thus
achieved, for the extension of enlightened
efforts thereby set on foot for the im-
provement of communities is thus made
applicable to every part of a vast area.
No such elaborate activities would be pos-
sible for a small railway.
"In many such ways the work is kept
close in touch with the entire population
with which it has to do. The agent of the
land and industrial department acts very
largely as guide, philosopher and friend
for many hundreds of persons in the com-
munities where he is known. His advice is
sought and he is consulted for many pur-
poses, and it is felt that this should be
given friendly consideration. All this, of
course, works for the good of the entire
public. 1While it is not corporate philan-
thropy-the purpose of no great industrial
corporation being to do good without ref-
erence to financial returns-it has the
same result. It is an enlightened self
interest in the line of policy; but among
the individuals concerned, both the repre-
sentatives of the corporation and the mem-
bers of the community, the most genuine
good-will is mutually manifest.
"This work for the Southern Railway.
set on foot ten years ago, so()n proved
such a lni in llental success that similar
partnients have wben instituted ly all tlin
great railroad companies. These depart-
ments have no trade secrets; they feel that
what one does in the way of advancing the


MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


I Boilermaking and Repairing

S Still Boilers and Pumps.
SSHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.
Jeckhsonville, Fla.
I III 1181 l I I I II t 11 I t ii S t I)l 1 stCI II II
--'

FOR. SALE.
6,00 Acres Round Timber, just south of Stuart.
Fronts Indian and St. Lucy Rivers; choice Pineapple
lands. Must be sold as a whole, $3.50 per acre.
C. BUCKMANR, St
C. BUCKMAN, JACKSONVILLE. FLA.



CUMMER LUMBER Co.

JACKSONVILLE. FLA.

Rough amd Dressed Lumber

Long Leaf Yellow Pine.
BOXES AND ORATES.



| Standard Clothing Company I
* .idts..


SOne Price


One Price


FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
17 and p1 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Flors.
Staetse and Hawes Hat. Special Attention Given to Mail Order.


,,u1 ,,U Uu u uui iuu ------------------------


W. 1. L'ENGLE,
VPredent.


J. W. WADE.
SVioe-Presdent.


. G. BUGHES,
See' ma" Tres


Union Naval Stores Co.
MOBILE, ALA. PENSACOLA, FLA. NEW ORLE.ANS, LA.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
..........DEALERS IN ..........

Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable location ia West Flor-
ida, Alabama and Missimipp Liberal advances made against counaiaet Cer-
respondence solicited.
,Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.

H. E. PRrLijIfT, Press. P. L. SUTHERLAND, Vice-Pres. A. D. OOVINGTON, See'y.
J. P. COUNCIL, Tress and Genl Mgr.

THE COUNCIL TOOL CO.,
General Offices: JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Factory: WANANISH, N. C.

Mamufacfurers of High GraeO Tools



VIRGIN TIMBER.
Several tracts of 10,000 acres to 75,000 acres

FOR SALE QUICK.
HEDRICK'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY,
112 West rersyth Street. JACSONVIULf rLIA.


I-


1


J


1









THE WEEKrY iNuubrRBIAbI RECORD.


interests of its own section advances the
interests of the entire South. Therefore
the work is mutually encouraged and the
association of agents has been organized
with conspicuous success. one result has
been the creation of a new profession in
the vocation of the railway land and in-
dustrial agent. The existing demand for
such services is said to be greater than the
supply. The young men who enter the
work are enthusiastic over it. They say
it is an education in itself in the way in
which it brings them into contact with all
the varied phases of American industrial
and agricultural life and the many pro-
cesses involved, with which they have to
make themselves familiar. Such talent is
sought for and is well recompensed. Edu-
cated and able young men fill these posi-
tions.
"The millions upon millions of dollars
that have been added to the wealth of the
South by such work are beyond compre-
hension. While the creation of good rail-
way facilities has been the chief factor in
the phenomenal development of the South
in recent years, it is evident that but for
the work of these land and industrial de-
artments the process of growth would
have been immensely longer than it has
been."

FORIDIAN WRITES OF OUR PROGRESS
Capt. John H. Stephens, one of the best
posted men on immigration in the State,
and who has had a great deal of experience
in this work, has offered the following
suggestions to the people of Florida, and
especially to those who are interested in
bringing to the State people to take a part
in Florida's industrial development:
While acting as agricultural and immi-
gration agent of the Plant System of Rail-
ways, I outlined a plan for the population
of Florida which I then thought, and still
think, the only correct principle to be ob-
served in this great work.
In Florida, with its millions of acres of
lands, suitable for horticulture and agri-
culture, with its bountiful store of artes-
ian ,water which can be utilized for irri-
gation, there should be no reason for a
lack of intelligent people who would come
fully equipped with money, brawn, men-
tality and morals to develop our State,
and soon make of it the richest section of
our Union.
With cheap irrigation our State could
be made to supply the demands of the
entire country for winter vegetables,
strawberries, oranges, grapefruit and Flor-
ida sirup. The cheap irrigation we have,
as there are thousands of acres where ar-
tesian wells can be made to flow and,
once established, there is no further ex-
pense from this source, and with proper
energy we can easily supply eighty mil-
lions of people with what is necessary for
a living of comfort and luxury during the
winter and early spring months.
To secure suitable people it is only nec-
essary to secure control of a few thous-
and acres of suitable land (which consti-
tutes les than 25 per cent of our area)
and then make contracts with influential
men of the race desired, and have the
people brought here ready to proceed with
the development.
These lands should be sold to immi-
grants on long time, if necessary, with a
small cash payment to evidence good in-
tention, and with suitable rewards to
stimulate energy and thrift.
The outlay on the part of the State
would be a bagatelle compared with the
benefits, and with each family thus located
the task would become easier and the
expense less.
In my official capacity I corresponded
with and had two conferences with a man
in Paterson, N. J., who proposed to bring
actual settlers from Holland and else-
where, with money enough to start life,
and who thoroughly understood market
gardening, if homes could be secured on
easy payments, he, the agent, to receive
ten dollars for each such family actually
located. This man said he had placed
over six hundred families in the United
States, under contract with various rail-
wav lines.
There is an organization in Amster-
dam which proposes to furnish money to
worthy persons seeking homes abroad, if
proper security can be obtained for such
advances, an by cooperation with such


organization our immigrants would come
not only well equipped for the battle of
life, but we could thus have assurances
of their moral status, as only good people
could secure the endorsement and assist-
ance of such organization.
If the Legislature would appropriate
$25,000 to be expended for suitable land,
and to make contracts with honest and
capable agents, five or six hundred fam-
ilies should be secured the first season and
in less than ten years the State would
not only be reimbursed, but its taxable
values would be so enhanced as to show
a large margin on the credit side. -
There are many matters of detail con-
nected with this proposition, which can
and must be arranged as they confront the
promoters of this scheme, but there is no
difficulty which cannot be easily brushed
aside.

CANADIAN-MADE TURPENTINE.
It is reported that a company has been
formed in Ontario to manufacture turpen-
tine and by-products out of pine stumps.
The capital stock is $500,000, and several
American financiers are associated in the
enterprise. At Barry's Bay on the Can-
ada Atlantic coast an experimental plant
that cost $10,000 is in operation, and has
already manufactured turpentine. The
company have acquired all tle pine stumps
in the upper regions of the Ottawa, and
will locate about thirty or forty turpen-
tine stills in different places. The manu-
facture of turpentine is a process of dis-
tillation. The pine stumps are placed in
a large retort 10 feet high by 6 feet in
diameter; this receptacle is lined with
sheet iron. Around it, but not in close
proximity to it, a wall of brick, and then
steam is turned into this vacant jacket.
The retort is heated by the steam, and
the tar thus obtained is conveyed in pipes
to a drill where it is boiled. The vapour
arising runs through a worm, with cold
water running into it, and runs out tur-
pentine. A large number of by-products,
such as creosote, charcoal, oil of tar and
others have been obtained.

PERCENTAGE OF FAILURES.
Some fool at some time or another made
the statement that 95 per cent. of men
who engage in business ultimately fail,
and that statement has been accepted as
gospel and handed down from generation
to generation as an oracle. How the
statement ever gained currency we are
at a loss to understand, ror practically
the opposite is the truth. Dun shows that
instead of ninety-five failures out of every
100 attempts in business there are ninety
successes, for 90 per cent of the men
who engage in business ultimately win.
Because a man at some time in his busi-
ness career meets with adversity, ani is
forced to begin over again, does not sig-
nify that he is a failure in any sense of
the word. It is what he ultimately ac-
complishes that fixes his position. Rolwrt
Bruce failed six times, but he succeeded
on the seventh attempt. He certainly
does not rank in history as a failure, yet
the ratio is six to one in favor of that
estimate of him.
A man can fail a dozen times and still
be a success. it is what one learns in
adversity that he remembers best. Some
of the most successful men that we know
in business today have at some time or
another met with reverses that were re-
corded in the agency reports as "failures,"
yet they wouldn't down. and their pluck.
or energy, or whatever you choose to call
it, brought them to the top again, andi
they stayed there.
This bugaboo of ninety-five failures out
of every one hundred attempts should not
scare off the ambitious young man from
venturing into the sea of commerce. What
if his little cockle shell does get upset a
time or two-if lie has the right stuff in
him he will come up to the top again.
and if he hasn't the right stuff in him,
he deserves to sink.-Drygoodsman.

Thie Salisbury Realty & guarantyy (,.
has *ben organized at Salisbury. N. ('.,
with J. M. Maupin, president; Emil Clarke
vice-president and W. C. Maupin, secre-
tary; authorized capital stock, $100,000.


I. R.PWL.CA.6 ARS ER EL?


a. A. POWrLL, CMAS. C. HMARIS, Mr.RY AS M,.
President. rice-Presidest ml freassrer. SecraryW.
DIREcrTOS:
a. R. Powel. Chs. G. Marris, D. M. McAltlak P. L. Sutherlande R. V. Certuea-.

THE

Southern Drug Manufacturing

Company
Ceraer of West Bay amd Madlse Stb.

Jacksonville, Florida.




Wholesale Drugs & Commissary Supplies
We solicit the Turpentine and Mill Trade and will be glad to quote prices o
anything in the drug line. We make packed drugs a specialty and an rave you
money. Mail orders are given prompt attention.





Standard Naval Stores Co.,
JACKSONVILLE


Pays Turpentine Producers

Full Savannah Market

Makes no Charge for Commission, Storage or Insurance

This Beats Savanah so Sli to


SStandard Naval Stores Co. JACKSONVILE
--------------------- -- ----------A





Special Notice.


READ THIS CAREFULLY.


In answer to numerous inquires, I de-
sire to state to my many friends and
business acquaintances throughout the
South, that I have no interest in or
connection with the Ludden & Bates'
Southern Music House, which was es-
tablished by me and J. A. Bates about
thirty-five years ago. I am now inter-
ested largely and solely in the LUD-
DEN & SMITH MUSIC COMPANY,
and in the LUDDEN-CAMPBELL-
SMITH COMPANY, of Jacksonville,
Fla., who continue the ame policies
and business dealings which built up
for us the largest music business in
the South. WM. LUDDEN.


I desire to have it known to my
friends and acquaintances that I hav
no connection with or interest in the
Ludden & Bates' Southern M-I
House, established by Wi. Luddea sad
myself in z87o. Mr. Ludden and my-
myelf and Jaspermen Smith, mun
years associated with us, are now ie-
terested in the LUDDEN-CAMPBFLL-
SMITH COMPANY, of Jackbaavill
Fla. Co far as I am aware, oet a sin-
gle individual who helped to make the
Ludden & Bates name so well know
throughout the South is now comected
with the same. J. A. BATES.


We print the above letters in order to correct certain
misleading impressions which are being made among our
many friends and customers. We believe that most buy-
ers wish to deal with the PEOPLE whose policies and
methods gave them the greatest reputation ever accorded
any piano dealers in the South.


LUDDEN-CAMPBELL SMITH CO.,

18 West Bay Street.


Pianos, Organs, Musical Merchandise.


WT"












~iItDUSThLU
~JAMES 4


Edfar
imose
Iu~mm


-. .
a

-~ a~


THR wVuKLY II1IiT f t1j" RZ009D.


IL RECORD.
L KOLONON9.
.a ...er.

= ones"le). .. Pae r umum
ar n....3. -


"T#% Pbin a" le pIdsaeft."


AU eommnieations should be addressed
The IndwstrlMa I 3Lord Company,
Jachewonville. EIls.
Ionslh rdllrw slsad uin a Ol9ee0 at
Adlant. Ce. a 8V&5tMJh. Ga.

Entered at the Postofiee at Jacksonville,
Fla., a second-class matter.

Adopted by the Executive Committee
of the Turpentine Operators' Association,
September 12, 190, a its exclusive ofi-
ial organ. Adopted in annual onven-
tio September 11 as the organ also of
the general association.
Adopted April 27th, 1903, as the off-
ial organ of the Interstato Cne Grow-
r Aodation. Adopted September
S 11, 190, as the only ofcial org of the
T. O A.
Cbmendd to lumber people by pe-
slsa resolution adopted by the Georgia
Sawmll Association.

THE RBOORD'S OFFICES.
The publishing plant and the main ofi-
-e of the Indstrial Rdeord Company
re located at the intersection of Bay
and Newna streets, Jacksonvile, F.,
in the very heart of the great turpentine
and yellow pine industrie.
The Atlanta, G., office is located in the
SBmtale Building, No. 723. Atlanta is
the esater of the great -niufactilg
trade of the entire South.
The Savannah, Ga., office is in the
Beard of Trade Building. ISavanah is
th leading open naval stores market in
the world.

NOTICE TO PATRONS.
AB payments fer avertlMM g in the In-
ustuar l Recrd arn aubscriptirns, therete
at be made direct to the heme eac in
j: a kssmIn Agets ame nt allowed to
cellectivem underany rcnumtanceas

n ae t from the hme office, wh dM,
Va sld all rtttace must be made direct
t to ti company.
IItuatrial Rece Plbbi B Ca.

S PANAMA CAAL VS IRRIGATION
DITCHES.
The Panama canal is conceded to be the
giant undertaking of the age, a project
h which the French have failed, the
United States will now take hold and
build. We will construct the Panama
eaal beyond a peradventure of a doubt
Sad it will become the greatest add most
important waterway in the world, with
untold possibilities to commerce and the
' strategy of possible warfare. What will
S It ost and when will it be completed?
Engineers predict in 12 or 15 years and
estimate an expenditure of 200 million
S dollars. Yet it will be observed that the
wording of these estimates is provisional
sad qualified both as to the amount of
treasure necessary for the work and as
S'to the time of completion.
But while this great American work
is going on, or rather its preliminary sur-
veys and excavations, Uncle Sam is doing
another engineering work which promises
even greater results than the Panama ca-
na. The truth of this becomes manifest
Sto the most unthinking upon a little re-
Sfeetion. The government has now under
onsideration-one is already completed-
seven great irrigation projects in the west
involving the reclamation of some million
and a quarter acres of desert land, at a
cost of about $30,000,000. A half dozen
more are in the course of survey and
commencement of work.
The fund for this work is constantly
growing from the receipts of all the sales
of public lands; moreover as every dollar
expended .by the government must be re-
S turnd to the fund by the settlers taking
Sthe led, the fund becomes a revolving one


and is capable of use over and over again
for building new works.
It is officially estimated that there are
over 70,000,000 acres of irrigable land in
the west, and it is admitted that an in-
tensively cultivated irrigated agricultural
community will support a population of
one person to the acre, which would people
the western half of the United States with
nearly the present population of the entire
country.
The cost of this great work would
amount to $2,000,000,000-- work the vast-
est ever entered into by any country in
any time, yet costing the government not
one dollar, for every dam and every canal
is paid for by eager settlers who flock upon
the rich, irrigated desert lands.

THE PRICE PAID LABOR.
In the woods, Sept. 19, 1905.
Editor Industrial Record, Jacksonville, Fla.
Dear Sir-I notice under the caption
"Stop Advancing" Operator writes about
a question that has been talked about
and resolved, etc., at all meetings of the
operators, whether local associations or the
annual meeting of the T. 0. A., and it is
a good thing for this matter to be talked
about. I don't believe there is as much
of this done this year as last and I believe
the operators are beginning to see they
lose money by advancing in this manner.
One of the worst features is the big dif-
ference paid for labor. Some are paying
40c. for dipping, 65 c for chipping. Others
are paying 50e for dipping and 70 to 75c.
for chipping, and I have heard of some
paying 90c. and even $1.00 for chipping.
The turpentine operators as a class are
good business men; if they will consider
for a moment the conditions that confront
them now it may be to their interest to
do so. Consider how much round timber
you have and how long it will last, when
it is used up what are you going to do.
The few remaining years of the industry
by proper management may yet be made
the most profitable ones of the industry,
but by advancing to your hands too much,
paying too much for your labor, trying to
work up your timber too fast, may place
you in a condition that for all your work
you will have nothing left to show for it.
Prices this year have been good, and at
the same time it is doubtful if the opera-
tors will make as much this year as they
did two years ago. This is the opinion of
several reliable operators I have talked
with. If this is true, ask yourselves the
reason why. All these subjects should be
considered at the coming meeting of the
T. 0. A. Let every operator attend the
meeting and let them discuss these mat-
ters, and see if they can't devise some
means of putting the turpentine business
on the same basis as the saw mill men,
phosphate men and railroads.
OPERATOR.

STILLS ARE IDLE FOR WANT OF
LABOR.
Mr. Olin T. McIntosh of the Southern
States Naval Stores Company, has just
returned to Savannah after a trip of sev-
eral weeks through South Georgia and the
pine belt of Eastern Alabama. His trip
was for the purpose of investigating the
naval stores industry and this he finds
to be in rather an unsatisfactory condi-
tion just at this time.
The trouble is with labor, according to
Mr. MeIntosh, who states that the har-
vesting of cotton has taken away a large
number of the turpentine operators' hands,
left most of the still short-handed, and
some of them in such a condition that they
have shut down entirely. It is believed
that the effect of this will be seen shortly
in the falling off of receipts at all the
ports that draw from various parts of the
cotton belt.
The demand for cotton hands is such Mr.
McIntosh states that in Alabama, chiefly,
$1 per 100 pounds for picking cotton is
commonly paid, and in some instances as
high as $1.25 per 100.--avannah Morning
News.

The New Iberia Cotton Oil & Manufac-
turing (o. has been chartered at New
Iberia, Louisiana, with $50,000 capital
stock, to operate a cotton-seed oil mill.
J. Paul Suberbielle is president, and H.
L. Smith, vice-president.


AMONG THE MEN OF THE TRADE.
Mr. C. H. Barnes, of the Barnes & Jes-
sup Co., returned to Jacksonville Wednes-
day from a business trip in North Caro-
lina.

Mr. R. G. Skinner, of Hogan, Fla., was
a guest of the Aragon last Wednesday.

Mr. U. C. Durham, a leading operator
of Orlando, Fla., was in the city Thurs-
day and Friday.

Mr. Norman, of Norman Park Ga., one
of the largest turpentine operators in
Georgia and Florida was a visitor in the
city this week.

Mr. Joel Tucker, of Live Oak, Fla., spent
a few days in town this week as a guest
of the Aragon.

Mr. C. H. Brown, of Live Oak, Fla., one
of the vice-presidents of the Jacksonville
Naval Stores Company, was in the city
for a few days this week.

Mr. W. B. Conoley, a prominent opera-
tor of Emille, Fla., was in the city as
a guest of the Aragon this week.

Mr. S. A. Rawls, of Ocala, Fla., was in
the city Wednesday on important naval
stores business.

Mr. G. A. Pettiway, of Leroy, Fla., pass-
ed through Jacksonville one day this week
en route to Atlanta, Ga., where he was
called, on account of the serious sickness
of his brother.

Mr. L. J. Knight, a prominent operator
of Ocala, Fla., stopped in Jacksonville for
a few days this week on his way to Geor-
gia, where he will visit relatives.

Col. Toomer, of Hanby & Toomer, who
are extensively engaged in the manufac-
ture of naval stores at Fargo, Fla, was ip
the city this week as a guest of the Wind-
sor.

Mr. J. L. Wells, of Kalon, Fa., was in
the city for a few days this week.

J. R. Benton, of Lake City, was among
the leading operators here today.

Mr. J. N. Tiller, one of the most success-
ful operators, and vice-president of the
Stuckey & Tiller Co., of Ocala, was reg-
istered at the Aragon Wednesday. Mr.
Tiller is one f the parties who some time
ago bought the G. & G. R. R. and it is
their intention to complete the road to
Tampa as soon as possible.

Mr. C. Downing, the great naval stores
factor of Brunswick, is making his head-
quarters at the Windsor Hotel for a few
days. Mr. Downing is one of the oldest
factors in the South and has been an ex-
tensive dealer for many years. He is still
holding forth at Brunswick, but finds it
necessary to make frequent visits to this
city.

Mr. J. C. Edwards, one of the most
prominent operators of Green Cove Springs,
was in the city yesterday.

Mr. P. L. Sutherland returned to Jack-
sonville yesterday, having been out in the'
woods all week overseeing some of his
camps.

Mr. A. O. Frink, one of the leading naval
stores operators of Maxville, Fla., was in
the city this week, registering at the
Aragon.

Mr. Geo. E. Pritchett, of Titusville, Fla.,
was one of the leading operators in the
city yesterday.

Mr. R. D. Spivey, of Mattox, Fla., was
in town this week.

Capt. W. J. Hillman, of Live Oak, Fla.,
was in the city on Thursday.

Mr. M. C. Drew, of Madison, was at the
Aragon Hotel today. Mr. Drew is asso-
ciated with other gentlemen in this State
in transferring Florida capital to the great
State of Tennesee, where opportunities


WILL BUILD NEW ROAD.
Cordele, Ga., Sept. 22.-A petition for a
charter for the Cordele, Hawkinavile &
Northeastern Railroad was filed this after-
noon. The incorporators are:
J. Pope Brown, H. P. Lovejoy, W. N.
Persons, B. J. Henry, J. J. Harvard ad
C. W. Jordan, Jr, of Hawkinsville, and B.
P. O'Neal, R. L. Wilson, L. A. Parker, .
C. Cutts, R. C. Harris, F. R. Wallace, J. A.
Ward and W. H. Dorris of Cordele. 'l
proposed capital stock is $300,000.
The petition sets out that the road will
run from Cordele *in a northeasterly diree-
tion to Tippettville and from there direct-
ly to Hawkinsville. It is estimated that
the length of the road will be thirty-yve
miles. The principal office of the cont-
pany is to be in Cordele.

THIRD FOREIGN CARO.
After being stuck on a sand bar near
Yellow Bluff in the lower St Johns river
for two days, the British steamer Lard
Ormonde was pulled off, and came up to
the city yesterday morning.
The steamer has on board about 3,00
tons of kainit, double manure salts and
other raw material for the manufacture of
commercial fertilizer. The cargo is for
the E. O. Painter Fertilizer Company, and
other manufacturers of fertilizer.
The steamer tied up at the wharf of the
Painter Fertilizer Company, on the sooth
side of the river, and the wor of di-
charging cargo was begun yesterday after-
noon.
The Lord Ormonde is a British tramp
steamer of 2,533 tons net register. -
is commanded by Captain J. Aiken, The
cargo was taken on board at Hamlbrg
Germany. The steamer put in at harles-
ton, S. C., where she discharged part of a
cargo of kainit, and then came to this
city.
This is the third large foreign steamer
that has arrived in this iort this month
with cargoes of raw material for the man-
ufacture of fertilizer. The steamer Glen-
roy brought about 3,500 tons of iron py--
rites for the Painter Fertilizer Company
from Huelva, Spain. The steamer Lord
Dufferin has just finished diselrging a
cargo of kainit and other material at the
wharf of the Wilson & Teomer Fertili
Company, and now comes the Lord Or-
monde with 3,300 tons of kainit and %imer
material.
There are still other steamers expected
here from foreign ports with fertilir
material. None of these steamers have
secured cargoes here for their return voy-
age.
The Glenroy went from here to S5pelo,
Ga., for a cargo of timber; the Lord Dof-
ferin sails to Galveston for a cargo of
cotton, and the Lord Ormonde will go to
Savannah for a cargo of cotton.
If arrangements could be made to give
these vessels cargoes in this port it would
add materially to the importance of the
Iort of Jacksonville. As soon as deeper
water is secured there is a strong proba-
bility of phosphate elevators being built
here and cargoes of phosphate shipped fro
Jacksonville to foreign ports.


for investment have been found by hs
and other progressive minds Be is jet
back from Chattanooga, where he and his
company are engaged in building a salmrb,
and where they are meeting with a great
deal of encouragement from the people
of Chattanooga, who appreciate talent sa
business judgment.

Mr. W. C. Jackson, a popular naval
stores operator of Green Cove -ia.
was in the city several days this wis
as a guest of the Duval

Mr. Richard M. Sasaett. of the Hillima-
Sutherland Co., is now away on his vas-
tion.

0. J. LLOYD, CORDELkE
Cordele, Ga., Sept. 20.-Osar Janes
Lloyd, secretary and manager of the
Hutchinson Lumber and Supply Company,
wholesale hardware and mill supply del-
ers, and one of the best known business
men of Cordele and South Georgi, died
in the Wesley Memorial Hospital at Atlan-
ta, at 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon.
It is supposed that he will be buried
at Jacksonville, Fa., where his wife was
buried a few months ago, or in Ontario


' -f









S TH WEEKLY INDUWTrrBIL RECORD. i. -



THE CHRISTIE-GROOVER o co-,


a WHOLESALE
V-awr wra mw 'M A My'.


Review of Naval Stores for a Week.


SPIRITS AND ROSIS.
The price of spirits of turpentine took
a spurt yesterday after the opening and
the close was firm at n advance of from
half a cent to a full cent a gallon. The
opening was firm at 62% cents, the clos-
ing price of the previous day, with sales
of 536 casks, and the close firm at 63 to
63% cents, with additional sales of 398
easks. In the late trading such sales as
were made were at the outside price
though not all of the offerings were taken
by buyers. The receipts were 592 casks,
and the shipments 426.
The resin market opened firm at prices
below, showing an advance of 5 cents on
WG, N, M, and the remainder of the list
unehanged. The sales were 2,833 barrels.
The dose was firm and unchanged with-
out additional sales. In the late trading
practically everything offering went at an
advance of 10 cents on WW, 2 1-2 on H,
and 5 on G, F, E, with a decline of 5 cents
on WG, N, M. and the remainder at quo-
tations. The receipts were 1,613 barrels,
and the shipments 3,250.

Spirits for the Week at Savannah.
Price Rcpts Sales Exp 1904
Mon. Sept 18..62 4081 624 1,0052
Tes. Sept. 19.62 54 97 61352%
Wed. Sept 20.. 618 643 52%
Thur. Sept 21..163 9 34 426 52


Rosin for the Week at Savannah.
Monday, Sept. 18. Last Year.
WW ............. 5.50 5.00
WG .............. 5.10 4.70
N ............. 4.65 4.40
M ............. 4.00 4.15
K .............. 4.55 3.75
I .... .......... 4.50 3.05
H .... .. ...... 4.45 2.85
G ......... .... 4.40 2.80
F ......... .... 435 2.75
E............ 4.15 2.65
D ............... 3.70 2.60
CBA .... .. .... 3.35 2.60
Sales 1,827. receipts 1,420; exports 1,866.
Tuesday, Sept. 19.-Rosin firm; sales
2,078; receipts 4,022; shipments 2,762.
Quotations: ABC, $3.35; D $3.70; E $4.20;
F $4.35; G $4.40; H $4.45; I $4.50; K
$4.55; M $4.65; N $4.70; WG $5.15; WW
$5.45.
Wednesday, Sept. 20.-Rosin firm; sales
2,641; receipts, 2,195; shipments 2,270.
Quotations: ABC, $3.35; D $3.70; E $4.20;
F $4.40. H $4.45; I $4.50; K $4.55; M
$4.65; N $4.70; WG $5.15; WW $5.45.
Thursday, Sept. 21.-Rosin firm; sales
2,383; receipts 1,613; shipments 3,250.
Quote: ABC, $3.35; D $3.70; E $4.20; F
$4.35; G $4.40; H $4.45; I $4.50; K $4.55;
M $4.70; N $4.75; WG $5.20; WW $5.45.

Turpentine at London.
1905. 1904 1903 1902
Stock Sept. 2..32,0900 ..... 21,134 20,856


DRUGGISTS.


Del'd this wk.. 1,955b ..... 2,676 1,765
Since Jan. 1 .53,800. 62,393 62,002
Price Sept. 2..46 39-10% 43-7% 33-4%
October-Dec.... 46- 40- 43-9 33-7%
Jan.-April .......47- 41 44-6 34-7%1i
Savannah ...... 61%c. 52%c 54c 45c
(a) includes 1,604 French; (b) includes
167 French.
Reported by James Watt & Son.

Savannah Naval Stores Statement.
Spirits. Rosin.


Exports ........................
Exports for season ...... 66,658
Last year .............. 43,024
Coastwise ............... 426
Coastwise for season .... 47,910
Last year .............. 56,893
Receipts Thursday ...... 592
Last year .............. 377
Receipts since Sept. 1 ...131,759
Last year .............. 117,160
Stock Thursday ........ 22,592


105,625
60,255
3,250
220,885
239,361
1,613
2,100
354,464
336,796
53,289


- 98R_ FLO -


the exception of pales, which are a. M
slow.
AC, $3.75-80; graded-D $4.10-15; &
$4.45-50; F $4.60. G $4.70; H $4.80; I
$4.80; K 4.90-95; M $4.96-5.00; N $5-
10; WG $5.50-60; WW $5.85-90.

LUMBER MARKET.
Exports of lumber and cras-ties fnr .
Savannah for the season beginning AplM
1, 1905. as posted at Board of Trade:
Lumber. Steam. ail.
Yesterday ......... 233,990
Week ............ 1,128,675 151,i
Month ......... ... 4,240,833 f47l
Since April 1, 1905 ..36,817,818 31,95,1 M.
Where Shipped-
Foreign ............ 2,933,434 367,1~
Baltimore ......... 8,77,180 3,4,SO
Philadelphia ........ 4,167,731 50,748
New York .........19,977,794 11,0ll ,
Boston ............ 2,438,576 4,385,0F
Other ports ................... 6,SMl.


Idst year .............. z3,7io o1,i "S
COTTON EXPORTERS DOWT LIK
Bailey & Montgomery's Review. ADVANCLE
New York, September 20, 05. The Atlantic Compress Company SS
notified the Savannah cotton exportqmws
Spirits Turpentine-Stock, 2,016 barrels, that it is no longer able to m-ure
The market during the week has been jute to be used in patching the eoveriw
fairly steady and business on the whole of cotton, and as a consequence will bs.
has been good. to use new material and charge a higbsr
Thursday, Sept. 14--66c. asked, price for it. The exporters are avenrse ti
Friday, Sept. 15-65%c. steady. standing the increased charge, and heUl a
Saturday, Sept. 16-65c. steady, meeting at the Cotton Exchangi y~ct-*
Monday, Sept. 18-65c. steady. day afternoon to decide on some rmaiir.
Tuesday, Sept. 19-65c. steady. Nothing definite was done, except to
Wednesday, Sept. 20-65fc. firm. point a committee to look into the ma--
Rosin-Stock, 24,460 barrels. ter and report back to the exporters at *:
This market has held very steady all later date. Maj. Edward Karow was ms'
the week and business has been fair with chairman of the committee.


W. F. COACHIXA, J. WILLIAMS, W.. KELLY, P. THAGARD,
Prilent. Vie-PreMmt. Vice-Preselt am Treu. Swresy.



The Naval Stores Export Company


Branh Offices:
SAVANNAH, GA.
FIRNANDINA, FLA.

Capital, $1,250,000.00 o"A0LL.^ I OIC' Jcksonville. Fla.
NEW ORLEANS, LA
CHICAGO, ILL.
NEW YORK.



COMMENCED BUSINESS JUNE 1, 1905

Owned and controlled by Naval Stores Producers and Factors throughout the Yellow Pine
District in South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas


The Objet if this Company Is to Bring Proder and Cosumr ito Clesr Relaties,



For Quotations and Particulars. Address,


THE NAVAL STORES EXPORT COMPANY

0* DowMIMG OamJM BlvW Jacksonville. Fli. Is5o1ss vmNITY naUIMG
NEWvo" W CHICAGO, LL
B-- Mff H. 1,i,* 7,, ,>'>*i >i m i~n rmTnT i ^ T^ ^ rT~iiiTii^ w ^







THE WEE KLY iwUIm1AL REOORD.


.-a-


Jacksonville Grocery Comp'y

A,. M Wholesale Grocers and Distillers' Supplies.
ia reame O~ftle mwefA Wees VlWAe t A. O. L yt. k avoi tl


Wanted and For Sale

DEPARTMENT.
II
advMrtmra te Wrill e inserted aS MS Dseprtmnt at the Folhlorwig n tes:
For one week, 2a cents a line.
For two weeks, 35 cents line.
For three weeks. 50 cents a line.
For four weeks, - 65 cents a lie.
Nine words of ordinary length make one line.
Heading coats as two lines.
No display except the headings can be admitted.
Remittances to accompany the order. No extra charge for copies of paper
contaiaing advertisement. Copy mast be in this office not later than Thursday
imoring to secure insertion in Friday's paper.


Wanted.
A first-class stiller and a thorough tur-
peatine man to ride woods, or take charge
of turpentine place wanted. Good price
to right man. Address Gay & Ellarbee,
Bilox, Miss. 4t
For Sale.
Good turpentine location, situated one
sad one-half miles from Hartford, Ala.
Good community and plenty boxes near
sad timber enough to cut six crops in
reach of still. Will furnish schedule for
delivery now or end of season. W. F.
MGriffr Hartford, Ala. 6t
For Sale
I have for sale the following: One five-
hoe power steam engine, good as new,
cheap One fiber press, very cheap; shaft-
teg, etc. Address C. H. Curtis, Astor, Fla.


THE DUVAL


Position Wanted.
Experienced turpentine man wants po-
sition as manager of turpentine place.
Best of references. Address R. E., Box
487, St. Petersburg, Fla. 4t
Help Supplied.
Florida Help Supply Company is now
fully organized, incorporated and ready for
business, with headquarters Room 20, Liv-
ingston Bldg, Main and Forsyth Streets,
Jacksonville. We supply Saw Mill, Tur-
pentine, Quarry and Railroad hands, Ger-
man Cooks and House Servants to any
and all points in the South. Correspond-
ence solicited.
For Sale.
One-half interest in small but desirable
turpentine place. The right thing for a
man with limited capital Must take sup-
ervisory control. For further information,
address or call on W. K. Cook, Ben Haden,
Florida. 4t


Frank M. Turpin
Proprletor.


JACKSONVILE, FLA.
Open the Year Round. Opposite Government Building. Most Centrally and Conven-
ieny Located. Thoroughly Repaired and Renovated. Newly Furnished and Equipped
Library Connected at Popular Prices.

TAV S NONE BETTER MADE

STAVES L Prompt Shipments.
OTTER CREEK LUMBER CO., Jacksonville, Fla
A- _^^*AAA*,A,*,,,1,AAAAAA a eAa^A


J. V. VEST, IL JA FLYNN.
YOM E. HARRYS=
Preident. V. J. KEIY.
VerPresidenis.


H L RIK3AON
Smey and Tram.
D. L VIeUAM5.
Ault Seev and Trin.


WEST FLYNN & HARRIS CO.
G"NEEA. EC GERMAANIA BLDG. Savorann Ga.
SWIEST BODG. Jaolksonvi. Fla.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
NAVAL STORES BCElIVED AT SAVANNAH, GA., JACKSONVILLH,
FLA., AND FERMANDIA, FLA.


WholesaleGrocers also Dealers in Hay. Grain and Heav
Harnebs.


y


SOLE AGENTS the Cat Union Tpentine Axes,
SOLE A Er1and Vilson & Childs Philadelphia Vagons.


MERCHANTS WAREHOUSES.
SAVANNAH, GA. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


TAMPA, ILA


.0O -


i






t


km


** *******6*M****ftftft** *t-fr e-** -* ****
HOTEL BARTHOLDI "' %mL" c"'f | k
Facing Madison Square Park. Newly Furnished Throughout. Near
all Big Stores and Places of Amusement. Cars Pass the Door for all
Railroad Stations and Steamboat Landings. Large Sample Boonm for
Commercial Travelers. Here you find no grand and magnificent deeo-
rations; no luxurious grandeur; no awe-inspiring surroundings; no
elaborate bill of fare, printed in French; no clerks that will disdain to 0
No employee in any way inattentive. a
s* peak to you. 0
But just a cozy, home-like little hotel that will appeal to the hearts of
3 those who are looking for solid comfort. Good, plain American cook-
p ing, and affable and courteous treatment.
MILTON ILOBLEE. Propretor.


C Y CYPRESS TANKS
Are Best by Every Test


Cyirm wlttde the effcts of bet and m/i t
better tban myr fer woodd, hrin and meelI lkn
t1 uls t. Ci ,, Is i. enw to acih. bnlb .d.M
weUi andlmsifta t es decaying. Loma
i we are. ricbt I the reat fritm fmtwe-m
aMe to cure the beoa selectim of tIe an and at
very low price. We have been buindig tana f
aroMe tia qmater of a ceimary a boldbt mat
tbht o tal are beer built or wi to ltlongr.
Se d foAV ctI ande S
G. M. DAVIS ft SON


- l IPALATKA. FLORIDA


St. George Hotel
EUROPEAN PLAN.
Rooms: 75c, $1.00 ad 5$.L PER
PnONE 337.
,,IH, MRS. GEO. W. BROCK.
PROPRIETRESS.

S ww w w 6 S S 9


he M etropolis


Is the Paper you want. It is
published daily and is from 12
to 16 hours ahead of any other
daily newspaper in Florida..


$5.oo a Year $2.50 Six Months

Full Telegraphic and Stock
reports. If you want to keep
posted on the news, get the
Metropolis.


CARTER & RUSSELL PUB. CO.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
MITSITITl.lTII-l


v


i







THE WEEKLY INitIrklAL RBOOBD. 1


JOHN W. DODGE,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
1000 ANDs, 21 WEST ADAMS ST.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
OGRAEAL PRACTICE AND OPINIOns ON TITLES.


10: R. OSR JR.
MANUFACTURER OF

BRICK K.
MIE F I PRIME
,Capacity of Yard 800,000 Per Month
'TI. 90.


H IDOINSON. Pres. H. QATLL-A-D. hsle"
W. B. OWEN. Vioe-Pre.
Commercial Bank,
State Depository.
BmawnCo: Oek. Frl.. Lake Cty. rei
Jacksonville, - -Florida


ABSTRACTS
Title and Tax Abstracts, Maps, etc.,
of large tracts in all parts of Florida and
South Georgia, prepared for owners and
intending purchasers. Correspondence
solicited.
REALTY TITLE AND TRUST CO.
Law Exchange Bldg., Jacksonville, ha.


AN INNOVATION!
THE GUARANTY TRUST & SA INGS COMPANY is now insuring titles to
property in Duval County. Call and let us explain our methods.
GUARANTY TRUST & SAVINGS COMPANY,
Capital, $100oo, oo.o.
James W. Spratt, President. W. M. Bostwick, Jr., Vice-President.
Harlow Barnett, Secretary and Treasurer.
4 per cent interest paid on deposits.

C Successful Men


WALTER P. COmTT. N
W West sIS.. Jcb


appreciate, use and advise Life Insu-
rance. The advice of successful men
is worth following. Insure in
THE PRUDENTIAL '""",F" AM R".
Ismager, JOHN F. DRYDEN, Pres.
mevile, Fla. Heme Offce Newark. NJ


I


+dE~YSY~WS~r3E~SICI uI~uO)mIu~'uur


I"m VEHICLE & HARNESS CO.
Cur. ersyth MW Caerl Sts., JACKSONVIUZ. FLA.
Dealers in
Carriages and Wagons
Carriap and Wage Iaerial, Whels, Spekn, Rim, Ads, Etl.


Torattlne mnd Mll Iarmess. Wagoss, Blggles, Ssadlery., O
Wagons, Sarrels sad ererythu kept Is a first-class establib=m
Largest Dealers Is rlorida.


p Carts, Delery
eat.


We54546@@WeM@5tSt 55isiWi5iiDe5454W454WisiiWisiWis@00@@Weit
5


JACKSONVILLE.


- FLA.


Il.l. ,I lee IlIEIHtI 51551OUI lg tulSlll lgl llllGul O**Su1 llu
* W. W. CARNES Pres. .C. THOMAS, Manager. R. S. CARNES Sec. & Tre

ITampa Hardware Co.

Wholesale
4 Hardware :
Turpentine, Mill ern Phosphate Supplies. :


LARGE STOCK


COUNCIL AID HOLMES HACKS AND PULLERS ON UAID.
TAMPA. FLORIDA.


74##119#410142#41411#41 all 1u163511uu4u165116U1194


CAPITAL STOCK $300,000.00

Jacksonville Naval Stores

Company
JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA

A NEW COMPANY
Will do a general naval stores commission business. We
guarantee Savannah prices upon day of arrival, and to make
prompt return.

A MUTUAL COMPANY
Each shipper invited to become a stockholder.
It is but fair and right that the operator should share in the
profits of the selling end of his product.
We have ample capital and facilities to take care of our
customers. Your business solicited.


Jacksonville Naval Stores Co,
Blum Building, Rooms 21-23 Jacksonville, Florida
D. C. ASHLEY, President. W. P. ROBERTS. V. P. and Gen. Mgr.
J. 0. CRANFORD J. F. FENDER C. H. BROWN J. N. BRAY
VIcs-PRsIDrrUNTs
S. H. BERG, Secretary and Treasurer
to1MHi>IPS8SSaP9^


C. H. Hargraves Co.,


WHOLESALE GROCERS.
GRAIN, HAY AND FEED.


Sbecl tenti to Turpentine and Sawmill
1ea's Reeulremeats. A Florida Fir for
I'Serldians.


SLOW


CAST BAY STREET,
JACISONV1LE, ILOWMA


RATES I


FOP

Special Occasions


VI


A


SOUTHERN RAILWAY

SUMMER TOURIST RATES
TO ASHEVILLE, HOT SPRINGS, WAYNESVILLE, HENDEISONVILI,
LAKE TOXAWAY AND OTHER DELIGHTFULLY COOL
PLACES IN SUMMER TIME.
Spend a vacation in the beautiful "Land of the Sky" and "Sapphie Contry."
Write for booklet descriptive of the North Carolina resorts, giving pameS
fare and hotel rates.
J. C. LUSX, District Passenger Agent, Jacksonville, Florda.


__ ___


3hcsns~f~Es~f~r~El~c~


jm~3~,~;~:~s~Eifi~~,r~


r;U~I;I~-_~#-~~2h~~n-52d-~C2P






14 THE WEEKLY MLNDUJ tMIAL RUCCOD.


THE


COVINGTON


CO.0


.JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Wholesale SHOES -
Wholesale: DRY GOODS.


"*Success


For Our Customers


is Success


For Us."


NOTICE!
We have about a dozen
Desirable Turpentine Lo-
Scations in which we wish
to sell a one-fourth or
Sone-half interest to de-
sirable parties.

HilM Sitlrlaud Co.,
JACKSUMILLE, FLORIDA


Florida

Electric Co.

S"l au l Omnplete Electric Light
aw Powe Plant., Telephone Ex-
dM WhmholeMse Eletrie
npPlie=.
Jausheville, ha.


14 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLZ, FLA.
The CLOTHIERS
KVLKixjlnuG THAT IS GOOD AND
ISMAT IN WVIARIG APPAREL FOR
M ArD BOYS.
Sam'l P. Holmes& Co.
Stoks, B oem, Cotten,
Grain aMd Previslms
NEW YORK GOTTEN EXCHANGE
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE
Direct private wires to all exchanges.
leskl stook and bonds a specialty.
i Pkeu as BaIdw BIM ack


'F LETTING'S


...FOR...


FURNITURE


22-30 West Bay Street
JACKSONVILLE


Send for


Catalogue


Do You Went a Perfect Standard
TYPEWRITER CHEAP
SNAP BARGAIN
In our wholesale department we have the following special "pick-up" bargains in type-
writers:
One new FAY-SHOLE, just out of the factory and never opened, $87.50. The regular
price of this machine is $110, and it is one of the best machines made.
One new SMITH-PREMIER, a uiap at $73.00.
One REMINGTON No. 7, but little used and 'good new, $60. Everybody knows the
Remington, the "old reliable."
One SMITH-PREMIER, second-hand, but in perfect order, $55.
One FAY-SHOLES, good as new, a real bargain at $55.
If you want to buy a typewriter and want to save money, buy one of these before they
are gone. Better write quick. .
We rent typewriters, too, to responsible parties.


Industrial Record Co.


Wholesale Depart't
JacksOnvlle, Florida


Kohn= Furchgott= Company.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


q


1








THU WUUKLY DIDUWrRTAL RUGORD, 15


I TIMBER LANDS FOR SALE


Over 100,000 aeres, boxed and round timber. Some bargains in Sawmills,
sawmill locations and Turpentine Places. Numerous small tracts from 10
areas up. Good Farms and Country Residences near town and in splendid lo-
ealiies. 65,000 acres Mississippi Delta and hardwood lands. Several choice
residences in the charming town of DeFuniak Springs, Fla. Call or apply for
pries and particulars. Address-


CHAS. F. TURNER, P. 0. Be 115, DeFisNak Spriuf Ha.


I


J


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
JACKSONVILLE. PLA.
CAPITAL $300,000 SURPLUS and UNDIVIDED PROFITS 5414.70.91
We Ie Time Certflcates of Deposit, which draw interest at the rate 1ttree o e cua per
aus. if hod ninety days or longer. Take ot-tae f this u7 kt err arthe U
ssethiM r yea. Particulr attention paid to Out-o-Town accout. sending depode by
DRINK A BOTTLE OF DELICIOUS AND REFRESHINO


The Clyde Steamship Company
; im


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
Te magnificent steamships of this line are appointed to sail as follows, calling at
Charleston, 8. C., both ways.


um New York,
S (PIr 3a erth verw.)


From Jackaonvile for
Charleston and New York.


' t atmday, August2 at3:00pm..COMANCHE... Thursday, August31, at 5:00am
..**xONONDAGA Saturday, Sept. 2, at 6:00am
Weimday, August30, at3:00pm..APACHE...... Sunday, Sept. 3, at 7.00am
Thwly, Angust29, at 3:00pm. .AIGONQUIN.., Monday, Sep 4, at 8:00am
friday, Sept. 1,at3:00pm..ARAPAHOE... Wednesday, Sept. 6,at11:30mm
E-day, ept. 3,atl2:00n'n. .IROQUOIS..... Friday, Sept. 8, at 12:30pm
.*xCHIPPEWA. Saturday, Sept. 9,at 12:0pm
Tuesday, Sept. 5,at3:00pm. .OOMANCH... Sunday, Sept 10, at 1:00pm
S riday, Sept. 8,at3:00pm..APACHB ...... Wednesday, Sept.13,at 6:00am
rday, Sept. 9,at3:00pm..AIIONQUIN... Thursday, Sept.14,at 6:30am
S.."*xONONDAGA Saturday, Sept 16, at 7:30am
Tuesday, Sept.12,at3:00pm..ARAPAHOE... Sunday, Sept.17,at 8:30am
Wedameday, ep13,at3:00pm..IOQU .... Monday Sept.18, at 9:00am
day, Sept.15,at3:00pm..OOMANCHE... Wednesday, Sept. 20, at 10:30am
Saturday, Sept. 16,at 3:00pm. .HURON....... Thursday, Sept.21,at11:00am
.xCHIPPEWA. Saturday, Sept. 23, at 11:30am
Twday, Sept. 19, at 3.00pm..APACHE ...... Sunday, Sept. 24, at 12:30pm
Wednesday, Sept. 20, at 3:00pm. .AIAIONQUIN.. Monday, Sept.25,at 1:00pm
WHday, Sept.22,at3:00pm..ARAPAHOE... Wednesday, Sept27at 5:00am
Saturday, Sept. 23, at 3:00pm..IROQUOIS..... Thursday, Sept. 28, at 5:30am
..*xONONDAGA Saturday, Sept.30, at 7:00am
Tuanday, Sept. 2, at 3:00pm. .COMANCHE... Sunday, Oct. 1, at 8:00am
Wedneeday, Sept. 27, at3:00pm..HURON....... Monday, Oct. 2, at 9:00am
Mriday, Sept. 20, at 3:00pm.. APACHE...... Wednesday, Oct. 4, at 10:00am
ISaturday, Sept. 30,at 3:00pm. .AIGONQUIN.. Thursday, Oct. 5, at 10:30am
S..xCHIPPEWA. Saturday, Oct 7, at 11:30am
"-B n via i B wlk al Chrlestea. eight eoly. e-Boset via
SCharlentoL. "'-Boeton via Charleston and New York. I-To New York direct.
THIE CLYDE NEW ENoLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
S eat Service Between Jackwmavile, Boaton and Providence and all Eastern Points,
Calling at Charleston both Ways.
SEMI-WEEKLY SAILINGS.
Southbound.. ........ ,. .... ............ .From Lewis Wharf, Boston.
Northbound .... .. ........ .... From foot of Catherine Street, Jacksonville.
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LUNE
Between Jacksonville and Sanford.
Stopping at Palatka, Astor, St. Francis, Beresford (DeLand) and intermediate
mladings on St. Johns River.
STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
s appointed to sail as follows: Leave Jacksonville Sundays, Tuesdays and Thursdays
3:30 p. m. Returning, leave Sanford Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays 9:30 a. m.
aO s10ws1., Rame a .
SLave 3:30p. m.................... Jacksonville ................ Arrve 2:00a. m.
Leave 8:45p.m. .................. Palatka .................... Leave 8:00p.m-
leave 3:30 a. m..................... Astor ................... Leave 2:30p.m.
SLearve 4:S~am. ................. St. rancis .................. Leave 1:00 m.
............. .............. Beresford (DeLand) .............. Leave 12:00noon
Arrive 8:30.m. ................... Sanford ...................Leave 9:30a.m.
Asrve 10:00 a.m ................... Enterprise .................. Leave 10:00a. m.
GCIRAL PASSENGER AND TICKET OFFICE, Ixa W. BAY ST., JACK'VILLI
r. X. IRONMONGER, JR., Ast. Gen. Pass. Agent, 122 W. Bay St. Jacksonville, Fla.
W. 0. COOPER, JR, Frt. Agt., Jack'ville. C. P. LOVELL, Superintendent, Jack'ville.
Foot Hogan Street, Jacksonville.
A. C. HAGGERTY, G. X. P. A., New York. CLYDE MILNE, G. F. A., New York.
THEO. G. GER, W PCLYDE & CO,
General Manager. General Agents,
... mougI Building, 19 State Street, New York.


Proved by the highest medical experts to be the most healthful drink In enistim.
Sold by the JACKSONVILLE COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO, 6e4 West Bay Street.

R. 8. HALL, Pres. H. B. CLARKSON, V. P. and Mgr. H. A. FORD, See. mad-Trea.


Marion Hardware Company,

Hardware, Mill and

Turpentine Supplies


OCJALA,


FLbRIDLA.


13111111 1 Itttt Il l f lilt lit lltttattltt iti


SJ. P. WnUans, President.
ST. A. J d Vle-President.
SH. L KATO, Secretary.


--------------------
J. A. G. CASoN, it Vice-Prltde
J. F. DusaBUIeY,3d Vice-Rreeirt
D. G. White, Treasurer.


J. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

Iili S I Ml FITIs IN) IOElE gMIS.
Main Office LSAVALXMN GOROGIU.
iranhean erras J PNIXSCOL'e, PLX. I ramet Greery omuse,
ralmeB toe r1 JacerOnvMeLL, Lr i. ( COLUMenU, IX.
Naval Stores ProdUcers are Invited to Correspond WItM Us.


tlllllllllllllllllllllllllllIll Jlllllllllllllllli l f
Sii 1 1 II 111 I I 1 111 11 I I 1 11 l II I I 1

SJOS. ROSENHEIM SONS
SMANVrACTURERS AND JOBBERS or


SHOES

SSAVANNAH, GEORGIA
4
S Best Shoes Maide for CMmissary Trade."
uitiat ael ntuteaeoaessagaegae'u* *itumilemuoum


Southern

Electric...

Company


BOARD OF TRADE BUILDING. 213 MAIN OT.
......INSTALLATION OF......
Electric Wires of Every Descrptioe.
Elevators Installed and Repaired. Motor
and Fan Work a Specialty.
Electric Fixtures.
BELL PHONE 1330. JACKSONVILLE. FIA.


Pine Staves Heading
STANDARD SIZES '$ PROMPT SHIPMENT
S Seed me yur orders far present or future e

T. J. WHiI-Ir- D, Bonifay. Fla.


rd,


r~C~;Su~ilCSfCC~FSF~!


VI~JC)E~S~


L_


s


--I~.- -r"



*
*


THR V11211MY IIn4iDBffr BAL RBD.









16


* Buyers' Directory


If you want anything leok
thrfah this classified list and
write to the firm appearing
therein. The Record guarantees
a prompt response.

ATTORNEYS.
Jno. W. Dodge, Jacksonville, Fa.
ABSTRACTS
Salty Title and Trust Co.
ACCOUNTANTS.
T. .G Hutchinson, Jacksonville, Fla.

Atant e National Bak, Jacknoavill, ia.
Comndrial Beak, Jackaaville, ha.
Guaranty Trust & Savings Co., Jackson-
Fla.
S Florida Bank & Trust Co, Jacksonville,
SFla.
National Bank of Jacksoville.
BOXES AmD CRATES.
OCmO r Iamer Co., JacksoovilL Ma
RIBCK.
S oter, Ge~ R Jr., Jac ville, ia.
Sobtherm Fal & Supply o., The, Jackso-
F..
COCA-COLA.
Jacksoville Coca-Cola Bottling Co, Jack-
sonville, Fla. __
Srig & Bro., J. A., Jacksoville, a.
Standard Cthig Co., Jacksomville,
SCLOTHING--WNHOLSAL.
Kohn, &rehgott Co., Jacksonville, Fl.
COMMISSION MERCHATS.
Bailey Montgomery, New York City.
TolHr, Hart & Co., New York City.
COVKYETAICIG.
ty Title aid Trust Co.
COOPERAGE.
Oompsage Co., The, Jacksonville, .
DRUGS.
Kirk a James, Jacsonvill F19
DRUGS-WHOLESALI.
nothbmn M--uf-~nrig C., Jackonville,

Christle-Oroover Drug Co., JacksNOMvflel
DRY GOODS--WHOLESALE.
Coingt. Co., The, Jacksonville, a.
Kas, Fmeb ott & Co., Jacrsomill, U
ELECTRIC SUPPLIES.
S Southern Electrie Co., Jacksonville,.Fla.
Florida Electric Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Electric Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.
National Electric Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGINES.
L mbard Irt Works & Supply Co, An-
Mr Mrll-teves Co, Jacksoville, Fl.
cebos u s Som Co., J. SL, Maeom, Ga.
g-s, GeL
FERTILIZERS.
Bows & Co, Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fl.
FOUEDRIBS.
S 1ebMSd's 80oe 0o. J. 8., Maoa, Ga
FUEL.
omathr Fad & supply Co., The, Jak-
.ukiniL ux.
ff-~~~ ~ oi*

Feting Fuitme Co., Jacsoville,
GENTS' FURNISHERS.
hg Bra J. o J. a, Jk ville, .
Kohn, Fnrchgott & Co, Jacksonville, Fla
Stanard Clothing Co, Jacksonville, a.
u. Sart-Bernstein Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
Boure & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Gosselatedi Groeery Co, Jacksonville, a
:argrav e Co., C. H., Jacksoville, a i.
Jacksonville Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla
Williams Co., J. P., Savanah, Ga.
Young Co., John R., Savannah, Ga.
GINGER ALE.
Lire Oak Bottling Works, Uve Oak, la
RATS-WHOLESALE.
Eoba, FTrebgott & O., Jaeksemville, aU
HARNESS
Vehicle ad Harness Co., Jacksonville, ia
SHARDWAE.
B ead Bor Co., Theb, Jacksonville, Fl
Mario Hardware Co, Oal, Ha.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, FVa.
Weed & Co.. J. D.. Savanmah Ga.
HAY AND GRAIN.
Bows & Co, Wm. A.. Jacksonville, Fl.
HATS.
Craig Bro, J. A., Jacksonvlle, Ha.
atdard CIothing Co, Jacksonville, Ha


"RE WEEKLY 1NDbUhTWL EECOEI).


Stuart-Bernstein Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
HOTELS
Aragon, The, Jacksonville, l
Duval Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
Hotel Bartholdi, New York City.
St. George, Jacksonville, FV.
Light's Restaurant, Jacksonville, Fla.
HELP SUPPLIED.
Florida Help Supply Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
IRON WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co, An-
gusta Ga
Merrill-Stvens C., Jakeaomnvl, 1a.
Schofeld's Sons Co., J. 8, Maeon, Ge.
INSURANCE.
Prudential Life, Walter P. Corbett, Mgr.,
Jacksonville, Fla.
Cay, Shine & McCall, Jacksonville, Fla.
Loren H. Green & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
JEWELERS
Greenleaf & Croeby Co, Jacksonville, la.
Hess & Blager, Jacksonville, Fla.
LIQUORS.
Blum & Co., Chas, Jacksonville,
Myerson, Max, Jacksonville, Fla.
Altmayer & Flatau Liquor Co, Maoo, Ga.
Eureka Saloon, Jacksonville, Fla.
Joseph Zapp & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
MEDICINES.
Spencer Medicine Co, OCt*-xgse, Tean
Southern Manufacturing Co, Jacksnville,
Fla.
Christle-Groover Drug Co., Jacksonville
na.
NAPS.
Realty Title sad Trust Co.
MACHINE WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co, Au-
gusts, Ga.
Should's Son Co., J. a, Maon, G.
MATERIALS FOR LxuPERnlIn PRO-
CESS.
Schofeld's Sons Co, J. 8, Maeon, Ga.
METAL WORKERS.
Baker, M A., Brunswick, Gr.
MeMillaa Bros, Savannah, Ga.
MILL SUPPLIES.
Marion Hardware Co, Oela, Ha.
Schofled's 8ons Co, J. 8, Maeon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fa.
Weed & Co., J. D., Savannah, Ga.
HAILS.
Salem Nail Co., New York City.
NAVAL STORES
Baily & Montgomery, New York, N. Y.
Consolidated Naval Storme O., Jacksn-
ville Fla.
Standard Naval Stor Co, Jacksoville,
Fla.
Timmons-Blount Co., Tampa, Fla.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala.
Williams Co., J. P, Savannah, Ga.
West-Flynn-Harris Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Young Co., John R., Savmaah, Ga.
Jacksonville Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
NAVAL STORES EXPORTERS.
Naval Stores Export Co., Jacksonville, Flh
PAINTS.
Bond & Bours Co, Jacksonville, FI
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Marion Hardware Co., Oeala, Fa.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tamp, Fla.
PAPER.
Florida Paper Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
PIANOS.
Ludden-Campbell-Smith Co., Jacksonville
Fla.
PUMPS.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, F.
Schofield's Bo1 Co., J. S., Maeon, Ga.
TANK STORAGE.
SNational Tank & Export Co., Savamna
Ga
L REAL ESTATE.
Brobeton, Feadig & Co., Jacksonville, la
C. Buckman, Jacksonville, Fla.
Christie, J. D., Jacksonville, Fla
Livingston & Sons, J. H., Oeal, Fla.
Southern States land and Timber Co.
Hedricks Real Estate Agency, Jackson
vime, FVi.
SAFES.
Diaold Safe and Lock Co., JacksonvillE
SEEDS.
Bours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
SHIP YARDS.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, la.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, PFa.
SHOES-WHOLESALE.
Covminton Co., The, Jacksonville, ia.
.JoeRosenheim & Sons, Savannah, Ga.


TYrjwxITBERS AND SUPPLIES
R. .Davis & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
STEAMSHIPS.
Clyde Steamship Co, The, New York City.
STOCK BROKERS
Holmeo & Co., Samuel P, Jacksonville ,l
TANKS.
Davis & Son, G. M, Palatka, Fa.
Sehofeld's Sons Co, J. S, Maeon, Ga.
TITLES AND TAX ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
I uPEa amu APPARATUS
Chattanooga Pottery Co., Jaeksonvlle,
IUKP .IAsll STILLS
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
McMillan Bros., Savnash, Ga.
TURPENTINE STILL TUBS.
Davis & Son., G. M, Palatka, Fla.
TUEPE alar VATS.
Davis & Son, G. ., Palatka, Fla.
TURPENTINE TOOLS.
Council Tool Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
VEHICLES.
Vehicle & Harnes Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
WATCHES.
Greenleaf & Crosby Co, Jacksonville, L
Hess & Slager, Jacksonvlle. Fla
YELLOW PImN LUMBER.
Cummer Lumber Co, Jacksonville, ka.
East Coast Lumb Co., Wattown, Fa.


----.- -1


ELECTRIC
MOTORS
LAMPS aNo Wm inII
FANS

National Electric Co,
520 Maie St. Jacsinvmw aif



Trade Checks&

FOR THE


COMMISSARY B11IW.
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD mm--
facture more of them than all the -
ing and office supply houses in the
combined.

COMMISSARY CHECKSrM
Send all orders for Oommissary ea -
any color, any denomination, padded e
loose, to the

Industrial Record GI :


Tun OLD=" WMoIU lY zSU NW
GeORIIA. (Etabllshe La 18U .)
OLD SHARP WILLIAMS-Pure n2 0 14.
Rye. By the gallon a$.0; four ftll qmt
3.50, express prepaid.
GEO. J. COLEMAN-Pare Pennetas -
Rye; Rich and Mellow. By the il0m.
$2.75; four full quarts $3.0, express -jrea
ANVIL RYE-Pure Substantial T nm .
Whiskey. By the gallon =.a; four fm
quarts $2.W. express prepaid.
CLIFFORD RYE-By the allo 3.5
four full quarts $2.5, express prseamt
OLD KENTUCKY CORN-Direc hum /
Bonded Warehouse; fine and old. By Ot
gallon $3.00; four full quarts $I2., essz n
prepaid.
OLD POINTER CLUB CORN Bsk'
and Mellow. By the gallon 4.0; t oss fu
quarts $2.16 express prepald.
We handle all the leading brands of Rye and Bourbon Whiskies In the mrratm
and will save you from X to 50 per cent on yur purchases. Send for prie tn :
catalogue. Yaled tree upon application.

The Altmayer .L Flatau Liquor Comnpany.
MACON. GA. AND BIaMINMGAM. ALA.





f DIAMONDS AND WATCHES

We simply as a call. We ca show yoe, at correct and meoey
saving prices, may papers of loose pre white, perfect
DIAMONDS. It Is or desire to confltme belg the largest
DoDfmofd dealers I Jacksonmvlle, ad oWu specialty Is 1ite reafd-
cut gems ad high-grade Waltham ad Elgin Watches.

Diamonds, Watches, Jew ry,
HESS 3 SLAGER33 y, Jk F
g glLUU 06 OLRULo 11-13 U- i ft., 331V hy. A t.Ifd.Rb, F




M. A. Baker,
INVENTOR AND MANUFACTURER OF THE

Baker Improved

Seamless Turpen

tine Stills.
Write me for prices and *oUtm
t. O. B. any point in OGeorgia. elr-
da Alabama or Mississpi. All
stills mold under a guarantee.
JOB WORK A
Th'mgl the Ceatry a Specalty.
The Largest and Oldest Copper Brun
Works in Goorgia. BrunSWick, Ga.
1W My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do not Lek.











T- H WEEKLY INDunTIlAL RECORD. 1 t


Joseph D. Christie, Business Agent
R-- 303 Py-ueIcb mli bg, JaokaeuEs. Fl.
Tele- 45s.
If yu want to beat in Florida ad contemplate going into business, let 1m
help you. If you have a business to sll, list same with me.
SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR 9go3-o4 AND TWO PREVIOUS YEARS


Receipt. 1903-01 1902-08 1901-08
Spirit, ek ................................ 193,647 292,496 314,346
, brre .............................. 660,938 940,607 1,071,44
Total ................................. 844,586 1,233,033 1,8,780
Exports.
Scpirita, sks ............................... 188,393 29,430 314,876
Barrel ............................... 75270 975,428 62,37
Foreign.
Spirit, eaks ............................... 9,384 206,100 217,44
Nn, barrels ............................. 338,171 601,173 535,042
New York.
spirits, casks ............................... 35,658 42,765 53,763
Rosis, buch .............................. 87,353 133,121 129,0W
Sundrie.
Spirit, asks ................................ 59,351 37,556 43,637
Roen, barrels ............................. 326,746 337,734 398,539
The receipts of spirits are les than 1902-03 by 98,849 casks, and of rosin, 289,509
RIram


Crop of Spirie snd Ramn for Thee Yew.
Crop 1903-04. Crop 1902-03
Spirit. Rosin. Spirits. Rosin. E
Wilminu ........ 16,511 89,667 18,883 113,98
(Careitoa .......... 2,400 3,10 3,067 11,83
Savannah ...... .. ..176,418 660,938 270,670 940,607 3
Brunwiek .. ....... 66,00 184,527 8,947 144,106
Mobile ............ 12,315 0,380 18,96 79,272
New Orless ........ 36,017 133,126 33,103 108,033
rabell............. loed oed 3,34 32,148
Georgeown ........ 7,515 44,214 10,07 46,899
PMacola .......... 42A54 305,982 38276 192,06
Ja. Feruandi.. ..187,210 3,210 91,976 375,211
Tapa ............ lsed dloed 13,566 40,664
Total ...........536,916 2,020,9 571,006 2,184,818 5


Crop 1901-0.L
Ipirits. Roia.
16,921 100,484
3,004 13,270
13,085 1,071,440
79,600 28,125
1,080 88,572
21,038 94,336
8,177 47,497
8,458 50,515
37,788 1,350
70,000 245,000
15,424 51,779
3,492 2,212,413


Import of Tupentie to United Kinmflo
From oeial rnturs; ewts turned into barrels at 320 ewts, 16,20 kia, 100 bbls.
1900 1901 1902 1908 1904
From United 8tate ................. 174,446 193,429 165,122 143,851 144,400
From France ....................... 2,283 869 1,656 4,630 2,89
From other outries ............... 840 63 904 516 11

-177,69 194,341 157 82 148,997 147,270
Rsmisa Turpetia .................. 8,521 6,861 8,711 17,606 17,76
Total barrels ...................... 186,090 201,2(0 106,393 166,592 166,03
Pbmtage of Kaiu a .............. 4.57 3.41 624 10.6 10.76
verge price of Ameria ......... 34 27-1 33-1 42-2 41.3
Reported by James Watt & Bo, London, England.
COIPARATIVE PRICES OF SPIRITS AT SAVANNAH FOR FIVE YARDS.


April 1 ...............
April 8 .................
April ................
April 22 .............. .

May 13 .............
May 20 .................
May 3 .................
Juae 3 .................
Jaue 10 ................
June 17 ...............
Jun 24 .................
July I ................
July 8 .................
July 1s ................
uly 22 ................
July 28 ................

Aen .................
Auy 1..................
A lg. 19 ...............
Ang. 2 ................
ept. 2 ................
t. 9 .................
Oe 16 ................
Sep. 2 .................
nSep. ..............
Ot. 71 ................
ep. ...................
et. 21 .................
Ort. ..................
at. 4 ................
Ot. i .................

Oct. 86 .................
DNo. 2 .................
S De. 9 ..................
Dee. 2 ................
Des. 2 .................
De. 13 ..................
SDee. ................


1904-0.
ND
53
54%
64%
53%
sG
54%
54%
53%
52%
62%


52%
63%
52%
52%
53%
53%
62%
53%
54%
54s
52%
52%
52

52%
52%
52%
61%
60%
50
50
48%
36%
47%
484@%
0%
49%
a5


1903-0o
ND
50
49%
47
45
45
47%
47%
49
46%
46
46%
47%
47%
47%
48
49%
50@%
49%
52
52
66@%
54
54%
56%
57
655
57
55%
56%
50%
56
56
66
56
56
56%
66%
56%
57%
so


1902-0.

42%
42%
43
42%@ 43
43
46
45
45%
45%
47%
48%
47%
45%

44%
44
43%
43%
44%
44%
44%
461
44%
46
46%
47%
50
51%
63%
49
52
50
61
60%
51
50%
51%
52
52%
M4


1901-02. 1900-01.
34 53%
32 53%
32% 46
32 46%
32 47
31% 48
32% 49
32% 46
32 44%
33%@% 43%
34% 42%
33% 43%
34% 43%
34% 44%
33 43
32% 42
34 39%
33 39%
34 38
34 35%
33% 34
34 36%
34 37
34% 37
36 37%
35% 40%
35% 40%
35 40
365% 41
35 40
35 39
35% 39
35% 38%
35% 37%
36% 36
36% 35
s7% 37


*.------- T -.-. -*--.. ------


j Atlantic NationalBank of Jacksonville
RESOURCES THREE MLUNM DOLLARS.
SWe invite especial attention to our Savings Department, which is operated
under GOVERNMENT SUPERVISION.
INTEREST COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY.


W. W. TIMMONS,
President


B. W. BLOUNT,
Vice-President.


.P. CARON
Beer & Ties&


Naval Stores Factors


And Dealers in Supplies of all Kinds for Turpentine
Operators.


Correepondence Solicited.


Address


TIMMONS- BLOUNT CO.


American National Bank Bl.


TAMPA, FLORIDA.


East Coast Lumber Co.
ROUGH AND DRESSED LONO LEAF

Yellow Pine Lumber


Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Steamer Shipments a Specialty.
WATERTOWN, FLORIDA.


THE ARAGON
JACKSONVILLE. F.A.
NOW OPEN
Under new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout., i-
eluding new electric elevator and our
own electric light plant.
H. N. O'NEAL, Prop.




SJ. S. Schofield's Sons Company,
*egag*e*e*e*e*,** *s***e**4*eggege*e**0e*@:Oe@e*sO
Headiquarter for
1 Distiller's Pumping

* Outfit
No plant cmplete without e.
41, Hundreds of them in use in Georgia,
Florida, Alsbama, Missisippi d
*a South Carolin. Write u for par
Slars ancl prices. We also aonufuetaor
SEngines, Boilers and ilh T
Grade Machinery,
as well as oarry a full and complete
--estokof-
Mill Supplies, Pipe,
S- Beler Tubes, Et .
S Advise your wants.
;, Macon, - Georgia.


i mmoT n- Blou fnt Ct o.M F



Timmons Blount Co.I







1 THE WEBNLY INDUSTRIAL OID.



OPERATORS


00a

-coml-
Nowmd
bM&.


Do-n,
sManll
otbr at-
t-
Tirpietins
Stills aid
Fitures.


Bear in Mind That During Your

Busy Season


YOU
YOU
YOU
YOU


MEET WITH A MISHAP
BREAK DOWN
BURN OUT
NEED US


Over in the Left- Ha-nd Corner Will Interest You.


McMILLAN BROS.,


Southern Copper Works.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Savannah, 4
Mobile AIl
r&yttovmw N. a.


*" """" U .i,---- L~----~- NL ....~~~. ~ ,,,


The


Cooperage


Company


Manufacturers of High Grade


Western White Oak Spirit Barrels


Capial $100,000.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Orders sent direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.
We are now prepared to furnish barrels from six shops advantageously located.

OFFICERS:
J. C. LITTLE, President. JOHN E. HARRIS, Vice-President.
E. H. MOTE, General Manager. C. H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasurer.


JOHN E. HARRIS,
W. C. POWELL,


DIRECTORS:
C. H. BARNES,
W. F. COACHMAN.


J. W. WEST,
E. H. MOTE.


W. J. KELL!


r


I-LI------ iIIhWh)MC~hhM1111111 -~-~------Y


' ~C.-~5i-
.L


4
1


J. C. LITTLE,

















"A -6 ..e amkr- e Room s, Ja ck. WM. a1., wth Braies -i Tapa,
;r, e.. -

^..SJte.;^.'-.-..^- ---- -AID UP C--APITAL $500,000. ..i



DaMd Savaa"e, Ga.


T.", c oi olid-ated .G cery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacko ille; the lor ida 11, ,.
; the gromtry branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commiusion Company, of Jacksouville; the grocery bt b4b
a Stareompiy, of Jacksonville; the pocery branch or the Gulf waval Stores Compapy, of Tmpatbe
Af 4*.G Naval Stores ompany, of Pensmoola; the grocery branch of the West Coast-Nava Stoes Company, of
uim ofa the Southern Naval Store. Company l of Savannah.



;anleeverything In Heavy and Light Groceries, GraIfa.
S 's, Doerestic and Imported Groceries, Turtpn5,i0e r 5-t,

.- -.
u .to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and
attention given all orders through the main oice and braaces.


.. The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the

slidated Grocery Com







Onm-we Tasapa. El_ f, a Sam ..a., nd svann. q.p
A i l -, .- -- - -- -" .-"--
w t - .- -'r*-...: -,;
U U E5 E... .e-'." ...... . .. t. h.-e ,St .




"ONS"LIDATD GROCERY.
*.- -' .. ar ty rerd Boridge StN, JacjlanileS rE'-.'
'.aei ns T.p.. ....." F -. ... 1..d Svmh .5 GC
-v~sofl, Doestc an imorte Grceris^ urpetin TQite*C ^^
a ~~ ~ ~ ~ ; .*'i :. *'? *.<- ** *** *,.:h sL . .- ,-1--.^-






3~~~~~~~~~~~ C~t9)*;~~r3:;~~ii~g l
-.17` 7i- 4. -.r.~- -i*~~~uiLTp;)i T6j ~ :~~
,~. ~., ~ WWU~UU~L#~~ t
A I fti ~~ s


a ic"-4. -" -- < .- "." "
T2* .-
r^ ^.. -..


- 41 W. BAY STREET


--- '


.- AVE- THE LARGEST STOCK IN THIS SECTION OF


amnds, Precious Stones Watch.


ewry, ocksl Silverwarem Bronzes, Fine China Objects t


As they are the largest buyers they get the
... BEST PRICE and are accordingly able to sell the -.
:- lowest, They invite a comljpison of prices..


I
a


Give Mail Orders Prompt Attet
WRITE NOW FOR. A CATALOGUE. .... -a
I am 06 fid A __ '- ^ mh"' *E.1


ri. -. -Y :jx. u,


Tones-Zinc Etchin
triC ~tr frT r=" ipf


istraing and Engraving Depart. "
ft iting Dima.


OF


S -. THE FLC


)RIDA TIMES-UNION.


~ v equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most im
m tstic fashion. 'lustrations for newspapers and al kinds of omercial Work. PampMits -

t-m IWmmmamma
..; m 8 -- V I IW I9B l ......

- WrIm T APPLmY4mG FOR PRCES, Gv THE MOS EXPLICIT DtscRt-noN OPr WHAT I SWrm
"GooD Wo~a An Piaorr DiUVERIE PRoMmseD .


A IFlorida Enterprise. Try ..


$'(~j~. ;
~. ~6'~*


- ~ ~


U


~,

i,


?--.."


1~~-~ -- ,


w""
^y-


.n-
-d;
"2-1 --:
"1 7~-I"V: ?Y

~..,.~ -;cg
. ..-m