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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00047910/00126
 Material Information
Title: Weekly industrial record
Portion of title: Industrial record
Physical Description: 19 v. : ill. ; 35 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Turpentine Operators' Association
Publisher: Industrial Record Co.
Place of Publication: Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: June 16, 1905
Publication Date: -1909
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Lumber trade -- Newspapers -- Southern States   ( lcsh )
Naval stores -- Newspapers -- Southern states   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville
United States -- Georgia -- Chatham -- Savannah
Coordinates: 30.31944 x -81.66 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began in 1900.
Dates or Sequential Designation: -v. 19, no. 42 (Oct. 25, 1909).
Issuing Body: Official organ of the Turpentine Operators' Association.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 1 (Jan. 3, 1903).
General Note: "Dedicated to the naval stores and lumber interests."
General Note: "The exponent of southern progress."
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 002658368
notis - ANC5461
oclc - 45459418
lccn - sn 00229571
System ID: UF00047910:00126
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Florida's financial and industrial record

Full Text
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T 1hIY MAVAL ToRES,
Ist PITER & GEAEMAb
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JACKSONVILLE, FLA. ATLANTA, GA.


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President, W. C. POWELL; Vice-Presidents, who with the President, constitute the Directory and Board of Managers, W. F. COACHMAN, B. F. BUL-
LARD, H. L COVINGTON, HI A. AMeEACHEBN, JOHN R.YOUNG, J. A. CRANFORD, D. H. MeMILLAN, C. DOWN-
ING, J. B. SAUNDERS, C. B. ROGERS; Auditor, JOHN HENDERSON.
i i


CONSOLIDATED

NAVAL STORES

.. COMPANY..


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


SAVANNAH, GA,

PENSACOLA, FLA.


NAVAL STORES FACTORS


Paid in Capital Stock, $2,500,000
Owned and Controlled by Practical Operators.
Small Amount of Stock Yet in Reserve
to Sell to Operators Who Can Arrange to Buy.

The Consolidated is Purely a Cooperative Company. Its
Interests are Identical with those of the Producers. The
Patronage of Turpentine Operators everywhere Invited.
Plenty of Money and Plenty of Timber for Everybody.

YARDS AT JACKSONVILLE, SAVANNAH, FERNANDINA AND PENSACOLA

All Producers are Invited to Call or Correspond.

















WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL


RECORD.


PUNISHED EVERY FRIDAY. DEVOTED TO THE NAVAL STORES, LUMBER AND MANUFACTURING IN I ki b.

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Practical Results of the Cup and Gutter System of Turpentining


(By Charles Herty, Ph.D.)


The following has just been issued by
the Bureau of Forestry, United States De-
partment of Agriculture:

The cup and gutter system of collecting
crude turpentine, proposed as a substitute
for the box system commonly in use, was
described at length in a former publica-
tion. The saving that it effected was also
shown in the experimental tests, the re-
sults of which were given at the same
time.
Since the publication of the bulletin, ex-
perimental and comparative tests have
been carried on steadily, but only the re-
sults of a year's commercial test of the
new system on the turpentine farm of
Messrs. Powell, Bullard & Co., at Ocilla,
Ga., have been published.
This circular is issued to show the prac-
tical results of three years' working of the
new system, to call attention to several
improvements that have been made in
equipment and methods, and to point out
several faults that have developed. All
the comparative tests were made on sim-
ilar half crops as described in Bulletin 40.
Readers who are not familiar with tur-
pentining are referred to that publication,

TABLE L-Spirita of


but it may be said in general that in this
system the resin is collected in a suitable
vessel, preferably of hard burned clay,
being caught and conducted to this vessel
by inclined metal gutters inserted in shal-
low cuts in the tree.
The advantages claimed for the system
were two: First, that it protects the tree
against the destructive action of storms
and fire; second, that it increases both the
quality and the quantity of the product.
Results.
Since the publication of Bulletin 40 the
plot of timber there described as a "first-
year crop" has been worked two years
more. as a "second-year crop" and as a
"third-year op," complete records being
kept of the yield from the "boxed" and
"cupped" halves of the crop, together
with careful studies of the condition of
the trees in each.
Messrs. Powell, Bullard & Co. have cour-
teously furnished the results of the sec-
ond and third years of operation. Sum-
maries of thfse figures are given in Ta-
bles II, and III. They show that the
cupped trees yielded $1,284.04 per crop,
or over 30 per cent. more than the boxed
trees.

Turpentine from Half Crops.


SCups Boxes Excess Net
from price per Value
Year cuped gaUon t of cup
From From From From pf time o exceo s
dip. rape. Total dip. scrape. Total rop opera
tion

Gallos Oals Gaonsllon Gallons Gallons Gallons Gallons Cents
rrst....... ..... 1,385.3 0 50 1,500.3 1.134.7 153.7 1,288.4 301.9 40 $120.76
Secod...... .........,1:0 15.1 .0 1,28.M 706.2 266 31.8 33.7 45 151.52
Third .................. 781 13.0 917.3 i531 1l0.5 786.6 190.7 45 85s.8
Total.............. 3.21 5.0 3,776.1 2.376.0 70.8 2,946.8 89.3 ......... 8.10

TABLE IL-- et Sales of Rosin from Half Crops.


Cups Boxes Excess
Year .- rom
From dip From Total From From Total e
scrape dip scrape
First.......... ............. 8401.72 147.72 1449.44 $Y.40 35.53 83.93 85.51
Second............... ... ...... 2868 .24 345.1 12.42 84089 216150 128.62
Third.......................... 212.60 61.5 274.25 124.76 79.70 204.46 9.79

Total.................... 901.20 167.61 1,08.18 68s 8 199.31 884.80 283.92


TABLE II.--Summary of gin from cup-
ped half crops.

Spirits of
Year turen- Roein Total

First ........ $1~0.76 $ 85.51 $206.27
Second ...... 151.52 128.62 28014
Third ........ 85.82. 69.70 155.61
Total ...j 358.10 283.92 64202

Total Value of Products from Three Years
of Operation.

Cupped half crop .............$2,6855
Boxed half crop .............. 2,046.53

Gain from cupped half crop 642.02
Or $1,284.04 per crop.
Condition of Trees.
At regular intervals during the three
years of operation, careful study was
made of the condition of the trees in each
half of the crop. The results of these
studies by years follow:


TABLE IV.-Record of Down and of Dead
Trees.

Number of trees Number of trees
blown down dead

Boxed Cupped Boxed Cupped

In 1 year.. 8 3 35 16
In 2 years. 60 34 139 83
In 3 years. i 78 44 217 150

Of the 44 trees blown down in the.cup-
pod half of the crop during the three years
of operation, only 8 fell because they were
Wing turpentined. These 8 were small
trees on which too deep incisions had been
cut by the broadax. Of the 78 trees blown
down in .the boxed half of the crop, the
fall of 59 was due to the cutting of the
boxes. The larger number of cupped trees
blown down from causeS other than the
method of collecting the resin is due to
the fact that many had doty hearts and
were unfit for boxing, but just as well
suited to cupping as sound trees. Many


of these were snapped off above the tur-
pentine face by a storm in the spring of
1903.

TABLE V.-Productive surface lost from
all causes.
-- -- -upped
I trees I trees
In vear .... .. .-..6 -21.02 10.60
In 2 years .............. 30.78 21.20
In 3 years ............. 34.20 27.12
By far the greater part of this loss in
both half crops was due to constantly
increasing "dry face." It is evident that
in the first year the box cutting was
largely responsible for the wide disparity
in the amount of dry face in the two half
crops, hut after the first year the chipping
was the determining factor. In fact. the
rate of increase of dry face after the first
year is grater in the cupped than in the
boxed trees, and is due, no doubt, to the
higher average number of face per tree
in the cupped half. (See Bulletin 40,
page 27.)
Improvements.
Since the cup and gutter system has
been in use, a number of improvements
in the equipment ar.d in methods have
been made.
Cups.-The quality of the cups has been
materially improved. Many of those first
used allowed the resin to seep through.
This was due to the fact that the cups
were made in molds, a method of manufac-
ture requiring a soft, wet clay. Tlis ob-
jection has been entirely overcome by the
use of machinery and a stiff and much
drier clay. The new cups allow no seep-
age and are just as desirable for collect-
ing the resin as if they had been glazed
at considerable cost.
Shipping the cups.-The complete suc-
cess attained in shipping the cups in bulk
has effected a saving to the operator, both
in decreased breakage in transit and in
the cost of the wooden crates formerly
used.
Dipping.-At the time cups were intro-
duced it was hoped that with experience
the dippers would be able to collect as
much gum per day from cups as if usual
from boxes. This hope has been more
than realized, for in practically all eases it
has been found that the dippers sre able
to collect more gum per day from cups
than from boxes. Difficulty was frequent-
ly experienced in getting good bdx dippers
to undertake the dipping of cups, but after
the chance was once made a preference
for cup dipping was uniformly noticed.
Use of the broadax for facing.-The
most important advance made in the ap-
plication of the cup and gutter system has
been the substitution of the broadax for
the club ax in making the flat faces on the
trees. The difficulty in using the corner-
ing ax recommended in Bulletin 40. on the
hard timber near the Gulf coast in South
Florida, led to the suggestion by Mr. R. M.
Radford. of Braidentown, Fla., that the
broadax he used for making the faces. The
experiment was tried and the result was
faster and better work and a good sur-
face for beginning chipping. Later. Mr.
H. H. Ellarbee. of Ellarbee, Fla., suggest-
ed that the usual setting of the broadax
on the handle he reversed, so that in hew-
ing the beveled side would be next to the
tree. This change greatly increased the
speed of the work, as the chip could be
promntlyl split off after the full width of
the face had been obtained.
The next step was to have one man
make both incisions for the gutters in-
stead of employing a right-handed and a
left-handed ax-man for making the two.
At the outset the laborers usually insist
that one man cannot make both cuts, but


a little practice gives perfect facility in
cutting each with equal ease.
These changes have made it easily pos-
sible to double the speed of a squad, and
many laborers have become very skillful
in this use of the broadax. One laborer
during the past winter prepared in one
day, 1,700 faces. Inspection of the work
shows that it was well done in every
respect.
Directions for using the broadax.-The
ax should weigh from 8 to 9 pounds and
have a perfectly straight edge. The han-
die should be straight and not longer than
30 inches. Each laborer sets his ax on
the handle so that its edge is parallel to
the handle and the beveled side lies next
to the tree in hewing.
By almost vertical strokes of the ax a
flat surface is hewn one-half of the width
of the "face" which is to be chipped later.
When the ax first catches the wood the
chip is prized outward slightly, thus facil-
itating the easy entrance of the ax in the
same cut on the second stroke and also
keeping the surface smooth. On the third
stroke it is usually possible to partly cut
and partly break off the chip, thus avoid-
ing useless mutilation of the tree. This
is done by a twist of the ax, given just as
it falls into the previous cut, the eye of
the ax being thrown against the tree and
the edge outward. The laborer then steps
either forward or backward and hews the
second side of the angular face, taking
care to leave no rounded surface in the
center where the two sides join.
On these flat surfaces the incisions for
the gutters are then made, one a right-
handed and the other a left-handed cut.
In making these cuts the ax is held so that
the outer point of the edge is lower than
the inner point, while the eye of the ax is
lower than the edge. By a single blow a
cut is made the full width of one side of
the face, this cut being about one-quarter
of an inch deep at the outer edge of the
face and a little deeper at the center. The
cuts should he at least one inch apart at
the center of the face, to prevent chok-
ing between the two gutters by chips and
"scrape," and for convenience in cleaning
the gutters when the cups are dipped.
Zinc nails.-The cup and gutter system
has been most favorably received by the
owners of mills where the timber is sawed
after it has been turpentined. The only
objection they make is to the use of iron
nails for hanging the cups. To meet this
objection, zinc nails are now manufactured
for use with the cups. Experiments have
shown that if such a nail is left in the
tree no damage whatever is done to a
saw that strikes it, because the metal is
so soft.
Errors Made in Using the Cup and Gutter
System.
Gutters.-In making the incisions for
the gutters, the eye of the broadax is
frequently turned down too much. The
outer half of a gutter inserted in such an
incision lies almost at a right angle to
the trunk of the tree, and hence forms a
shelf rather than a trough. From such a
gutter the resin frequently runs off along
the outer edge. Furthermore, such a gut-
ter is easily forced out when the dipper is
removing the "scrape" from it, the pres-
sure of the dip knife being almost in line
with the direction of the cut. A gutter in-
serted carefully into a properly made in-
cision will never fall out.
Nails.-Two mistakes are frequently
made in driving the nail on which the
cup hangs. First, the nail is driven hori-
zontally. In the latter part of the sea-
son. when hardened resin collects under
the head of the nail, a cup hung on it
will easily drop off. The head of the nail
should have a steep slant upward. A
cup hung on a nail so driven fits snugly
between the nail and the tree, is secure,
(Continued on page 6.)










4 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


"NAVAL STORES AND TIMBER.'

Address by W. F. Coachman at the loint Convention of Florida and Georgia
Bankers Last Week


The following very able address on the
subject, "Naval Stores and Timber," was
prepared by Mr. W. F. Coachman and read
before the joint session of the Florida and
Georgia bankers in convention at Atlantic
Beach last week:
To the general tendency of modern civ-
ilization towards specialization of inter-
ests and the differentiation of labor, bank-
ing is in some respects a notable excep-
tion. The banker's business is concerned
with the trade and commerce of the whole
and every part of his community. He is
a universal specialist. The sources of
wealth, the channels of trade and the ex-
change of money command his attention
and have a direct and immediate bearing
upon his business. Under normal condi-
tions, a banker's profits are in direct pro-
portion to the volume of trade and the
production and interchange of wealth.
Whatever tends, therefore, to the material
development and prosperity of the com-
munity, merits attentive consideration at
the hands of the thoughtful and progres-
sive banker.
These considerations justify the inter-
est with which the bankers of Florida
now regard the naval stores and lumber
industries of this State. No other indus-
try of Florida controls so much capital
or produces so great a revenue. The lum-
ber mills are our principal, and, until re-
cent years, have been our sole, manufac-
tories. Our forest products, unlike any
other product, come from every part ol
the State, and benefit every section and
every class. They constitute the most
important item of our shipping and com-
merce. The indirect effects of the indus-
try upon trade and exchange are far-
reaching and of inestimable importance.
The most casual consideration marks this
industry as one of commanding importance
to Florida bankers, deserving their in-
terest in its history and its influence upon
present and future conditions.
'Trite and familiar as is the thought, it
cannot be too often remarked that the
exploitation of forest products is the pio-
neer industry of every country where
trees grow. The hunter and the trapper
have led the way to the agricultural and
commercial development of much of the
United States. It is no less true that
the lumber men and turpentine operator
are also the vanguard of the farmer, the
tradesman and manufacturer. As in the
Northwest, where this development has
been most apparent, the hunter has been
followed by the lumber man, who in time
made way for the farmer and the mechan-
ic. In the South the same conditions
have repeated themselves. From North
Carolina to the Gulf the progress of the
woodsman has been followed by business
activity and civilization.
Principal Occupation.
Ever since the territorial days of Flor-
ida, forest products have furnished the
principal occupation of its people. Dur-
ing the years which preceded the con-
struction of our present railroad system,
the numerous rivers and streams which
extend hundreds of miles into the interior
of the State, afforded access to the great
forests along their banks. Suited to a
pioneer country, as Florida then was, the
business of felling and hewing timber was
easily conducted without expense .and by
the most primitive methods. With in-
finite patience and time, logs were floated
down the rivers by successive tides to
the saw mills near the coast. There, by
equally primitive methods, the logs were
manufactured into lumber, and shipped
by sea in vessels so small that one cargo
would scarcely equal a single day's cut
of a good-sixed modern saw mill. But
small as the industry then was, agricul-
was equally undeveloped. The sameediffi-
culties and uncertainties of transporta-
tion, acting with other causes common to
new and unsettled countries, restricted
the agricultural development of the State.
But the lumbermen, in spite of the advan-
tages of cheap lands and numerous navi-
gable streams, had to contend against con-
ditions, operating almost until the present


day, which restricted the value of their
products and reduced their profits to the
lowest possible minimum. The forests of
the Carolinas and Georgia were then un-
exhausted. The advantages of nearer
markets, more abundant labor and ample
capital enabled these competitors to un-
der-sell the lumbermen of Florida and keep
the forest products of this State down to
prices which afforded no more than a
hare living to the producers. The cost of
transportation was so great, compared
with the value of the product, that the
business languished in the face of the
competition of the more favored States to
the Northward. The great abundance of
pine timber of large dimensions, and its
accessibility to navigation, kept the busi-
ness alive in spite of the competition of
the forests of the Carolinas, and for more
than fifty years the logger and the lum-
ber manufacturer have been the greatest
wealth producers of Florida. But with
the manufacture of naval stores, diffi-
culties peculiar to the industry, added to
the increased cost of transportation, pre-
cluded the successful conduct of the busi-
ness in Florida in competition with that
of the Carolinas. The business never took
a firm hold in this State until the forests
of the more northerly states had become
exhausted. The manufacture of turpen-
tine requires skilled labor. Experience
as well as capital was required for its
successful management. Outside of the
Carolinas, where years of experience had
produced competent laborers as well as
skilled operators. men could not be had to
conduct the business. So long as skilled
operators with their trained stillers,
woodsmen and laborers found cheap piie
lands nearer to the markets, it is not sur-
prising that none of them found Florida
a profitable field.
Lumber as a, Building Factor.
Meanwhile the lumber business of Flor-
ida furnished occupation for a large part
of its people, slowly building up towns
and adding to the wealth of the State.
Silently, steadily and unnoticed, it pro-
duced the great bulk of our wealth and
formed the foundation of our trade and
commerce. Further and further from the
rivers, the logger moved his camps out
into the great virgin forests of the inter-
ior. With the building of railroads, the
pine lands hundreds of miles from the
streams became available and accessible.
With the advancement of the railroad
went log camps and saw mills, and out
of the distant forests came a steady prod-
net which contributed in a great propor-
tion than any other single factor to the
material prosperity of the State.
But forest products are soon exhausted,
and the life of the industry in any State
is comparatively brief. The rapid des-
truction of the forest of North Carolina
was succeeded by the same process in its
sister State. The Southern lumbermen
found new fields for their labor in Geor-
gia, whose magnificent pine forests yield-
ed riches to him and prosperity to the
State. Its vast untouched forests drew
the accumulated capital and energy of the
mill men and turpentine producers of the
Carolinas. The business grew and pros-
pered. Great areas were denuded of their
forests, and farms and villages sprang
up in their stead. The last quarter of
the preceding century comprised the life
of the industry. At the end of this period
Georgia operators realized that the timber
resources of that State were soon to be
exhausted. It was then that they found
for the first time that Florida also had
vast tracts of pine and cypress timber,
in spite of two generations of logging.
comparatively untouched.
Earlier Industrial Booms.
During the early period of river logging
and the later stage of lumblring by rail,
Florida was not known as preeminently a
lumbering or naval stores State. Impor-
tant as was the industry, it failed to take
its trni position in the popular mind as
our greatest product. In part this was
due to the greater production of the States
to the north. But it may also be ascribed
in a large measure to the attention which


R. C. DAVIS T. A. rrVLGEVM



R. C. DAVIS & CO.,


General Agents



Fay-Sholes


I Typewriter


S We buy, sell, exchange or rent second hand
machines, offering liberal inducements.
Write for descriptions of the Fay-Sholes,
which is the world's record machine for speed,
Simplicity and durability.


R. C. DAVIS & CO.,


JACKSONVILLE,
FLORIDA.


FORL SALE.
6,500 Acres Round Timber, just south of Stuart.
Fronts Indian and St. Lucy Rivers; choice Pineapple
lands. Must be sold as a whole, $3.50 per acre.


C. BUCKMAN,


22 Hoan St..
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


Special Notice.
READ THIS CAREFULLY.


In answer to numerous inquires, I de-
sire to state to my many friends and
business acquaintances throughout the
South, that I have no interest in or
connection with the Ludden & Bates'
Southern Music House, which was es-
tablished by me and J. A. Bates about
thirty-five years ago. I am now inter-
ested largely and solely in the LUD-
DEN & SMITH MUSIC COMPANY,
and in the LUDDEN-CAMPBELL-
SMITH COMPANY, of Jacksonville,
Fla., who continue the same policies
and business dealings which built up
for us the largest music business in
the South. WM. LUDDEN.


I desire to have it known to my
friends and acquaintances that I have
no connection with or interest in the
Ludden & Bates' Southern Msic
House, established by Wm. Ludden and
myself in x87o. Mr. Ludden and my-
myself and Jaspersen Smith, many
years associated with us, are now in-
terested in the LUDDEN-CAMPBELL-
SMITH COMPANY, of Jacksonvile,
Fla. Co far as I am aware, not a sin-
gle individual who helped to make the
Ludden & Bates name so well known
throughout the South is now connected
with the same. J. A. BATES.


We print the above letters in order to correct certain
misleading impressions which are being made among our
many friends and customers. We believe that most buy-
ers wish to deal with the PEOPLE whose policies and
methods gave them the greatest reputation ever accorded
any piano dealers in the South.


LUDDEN-CAMPBELL SMITH CO.,

18 West Bay Street.


Pianos, Organs, Musical Merchandise.,
aa


SC~SCfSmC3~CS~fJSC%*ANNNWC~ a


C11CKEcrC(LeeCYIm~I~











THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 5


the citrus and vegetable culture received
from residents and strangers alike. The
picturesqueness and profitableness of the
orange crop for many years attracted im-
migration and brought foreign capital to
this State. The ease and extent of the
profits of the business drew to it the en-
ergies of our own people. Millions of dol-
lars went into planting and cultivation of
oranges and millions were annually ob-
tained for the crop. The business over-
shadowed all others. The industry in
time became the source of a prosperity
more obvious than real, which a single
night destroyed. Over-production had al-
ready marked the limit of the industry,
and repeated freezes left us with the re-
luctant conviction that the orange could
not become a staple crop for the entire
State.
Coincident with the period of greatest
prosperity of the citrus culture, came the
phosphate boom. In its turn, the mining
and manufacture of this product promised
great things for Florida. Inflated values,
speculative investments, ignorance of
trade conditions and unstable prices pros-
trated the industry, and for a time
threatened its existence. Years of de-
pression in prices ruined many and left
the business flat and apathetic. Sounder
business methods and a wider technical
knowledge eventually placed the indus-
try on a firm footing, but the narrow
range of the phosphate deposits gives to
the business a local character which is
not true of the lumber and naval stores
industries.
The collapse of the orange and phos-
phate industries left the State with shat-
tered hopes and a blighted future. Much
real and not a little fictitious capital had
been lost. The prosperity which had at-
tracted capital and induced immigration
was gone. Financial depression, restric-
tion of credit and narrowing of business
activity followed. To the banker as well
as to the merchant, farmer and mechanic,
the situation looked discouraging enough.
The principal products of the State had
failed, and the future seemed to offer
nothing but the slow growth of agricul-
tural development under the disadvan-
tages of inadequate capital and immigra-
tion.
This was hardly ten years ago. To-day
Florida was never so prosperous. Its
population, its industries, its active cap-
ital are greater than ever before in its
history. The volume of business has
grown to surpass all records. Capital is
abundant and active. Credit is high.
Wherein lies the cause? What has brought
prosperity out of depression; business'
activity out of financial stagnation. I
believe that you will not hesitate for an
answer. It lies in the remarkable growth
of the lumber and naval stores interests,
with their attendant influx of men and
money.
Steady Increase.
During the development and prosperity
of the citrus culture and the excitement
of phosphate speculation, the lumber bus-
iness had slowly but steadily increased in
volume. In our hard times, the pine and
cypress had been as the kindly fruits of
the earth. But the vast forest resources
of the State remained practically unde-
veloped, although they had been for more
than half a century the unrecognized basis
of our commerce and manufactures. Yet
their value was unappreciated. Truly it
can he said that we couM not see the for-
est for the trees. In the midst of stagna-
tion and depression, few realized that the
richest, the most easily convertible asset
tle State possesses, surrounds us on every
side, inviting development and promising
a rich and sure reward.
Experience, capital and commercial fa-
c;lities, factors as necessary as the forests
themselves, were wanting. At this junct-
ure came the timlbr men of the South and
the Northwest. and the turpentine pro-
ducers of (keorgia and the Carolinas. look-
ing for new fields of operation. They had
capital experienced laborers and restless
energy.
The pine and cypress forests of Florida
offered to their inexperienced eyes an in-
viting and profitable field. It was a happy
circumstance for Florida that, after years
of slow and uneven development the ad-
vantages of its forests should have at-
tracted the attention of the Southern and
Northwestern woodsmen at the same time.
By their combined energy and capital,


their experience and sagacity, the forest
products of this State are being exploited
by the most intelligent and thorough
methods which modern conditions have
produced. As elements of population, they
have added strength and progress which
are sure to leave an enduring influence
on its people and the history of the State.
The effect of this immigration in im-
,proving business conditions was startling
in its rapidity. It first made itself mani-
fest in the purchase of immense tracts of
lands.
The State of Florida embraces about
59,000 square miles, or 37,000,000 acres of
land Of this, the greater part was origi-
nally covered with an unbroken growth of
pine' and cypress. While the exact fig-
ures are not obtainable, it is probably
true than ten years ago, when the influx
of lumbermen and turpentine operators
began, there were not less than 15,000,000
acres of forest land available for develop-
ment. The best timbered and most ac-
cessible lands were held in immense bodies
by land-grant railroad companies and for-
eign corporations. Most of these compa-
nies were inactive and unprogressive.
Many of them were almost insolvent.
Their lands had been sold for taxes year
after year, and they lacked money to re-
deem them. Prices of wild lands were at
their lowest ebb. The finest timbered
lands of the State were offered for $1.25
per acre without buyers.
Advancing Land Values.
But with the establishment of the naval
stores industry and the development of
lumbering, these conditions speedily
changed. Lands which for years had been
a dead asset, found ready purchasers at
constantly advancing prices. At first in
small tracts, and then in larger bodies,
the lumbermen and naval stores operators
Iought up the most available and accessi-
ble timber lands-in the northern part of
the State. With the growth of the busi-
ness, thle demand became more active,
and spread from the northern through the
middle counties to the extreme southern
part of the State. The entire holdings of
the land-grant railroad companies were
disposed of in a few years under the influ-
ence of this movement. Foreign land
holding companies likewise were not slow
to sell their property. In six or seven
years front the inception of this move-
nient, nearly all of the timbered lands
of these corporations changed hands.
While figures are not available, from
my own knowledge I can state from 1895
to the present time, between nine and
ten million acres of land in this State
have been sold at least once in the prog-
ress of these enterprises. If we assume
that the average price of these lands was
$1.25 per acre, which would not be far
from a fair average, it would mean that
a single transfer of this great area of
territory has brought into the State and
through its channels of business about
$12.500.1.(0 in less than ten years. But
much the greater part of these lands have
been sold not once, nor twice, but over
and over again, each time at an increased
price. During the period of which we are
now speaking, the constant and more
pressing demand for timber lands has had
its effects upon their values. Millions of
acres were sold for less than a dollar an
acre. In a few years we have seen prices
of choice timber lands advance by suc-
cessive sales, in a period of less than
five years, from $1.25 to $10.00 per acre.
consideringg tlih vast acreage of lands
which have fornmed the basis of active
trailing, andl thle numerous and repeated
sales at constantly advancing prices, the
amount of money which has been put in
cilrellntion yv tlie selling and buying of
t'mi;er lands during this period is in no
%\ay proportionate to their original cost.
Any ligures which might be given would
he nerely conjectural, but it is safe to
say that tlhe buying and selling of timler-
ed lands alone has )ut into circulation
every year a sum far greater than the
value of the orange crop of Florida in
the most prosperous seasons.
F'ronm the banker's point of view, this
activity in our lands means profit from
many sources. It is true that most of the
lands which are the subject of this trad-
ing were owned by foreign corporations
anl non-residents, but it is equally true
that the exchange of money necessary to

(Continued on page 8.)


GUARANTY TRUST & SAVINGS COMPANY,
N. E. Corner Bay and Ocean Sta.
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


OFFICERS.
James W. Spratt, W. M. Bostwick,
President. Vice-President.
Harlow Barnett, Sec'y and Treas.


Capital $100,000
4 per cent interest paid on an depoits.


Pres., W. G. Toomer. Vice-pres. & Mgr., C. O. Patterson. Treas., H. C. Hare, See., Froman Smith


STANDARD ELECTRIC COMPANY

16 Forsyth St. Jaclkonvilk, Fla. -

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS AND SUPPLY DEALERS.

IMPORTS OF ROSIN INTO UNITED KINGDOM.
1900 1901 1902 1903 1904
From United States .................... 87,116 87,298 79,015 81,542 71,816
From France .......................... 2,539 3,126 13,584 2,486 17,860
From all other countries. ............. 424 200 318 510 i 726
Total Tons ...................... 90,079 90,624 92917 84,538 90,402
Percentage from United States ......... -
Reported by James Watt & Son. 96.71 96.33 85.f4 96.45 79.44

Fuel and Building Material.

The Southern Fuel and Supply Oo.
Anthracite, Steam and Blacksmith Coal, Lime, Cement, Brick, Paint.
Foot Hogan St., Jacksonville, Fla.

L. E. Pritchett, Pre. P. L. SUTHERLAND, Vice-Pres. A. D. OOVINGTON, Sec'y.
J. P. COUNCIL, Treas and Genl Mgr.

THE OOUNOIL TOOL CO.,
General Offices: JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Factory: WANNANISH, N. C.

Mamufactwrer of High Frdt Tin1s
fr Naval ms*w o*r- faew.


112 WEST FORSYTH ST.


BELL PHONE NO. 592


HEDRICK'S REAL ESTATE AGENCY
A. J. HEDRICK. Manager. < Formerly of Hedrick 4k Raley

Sole aency for Riverside and adjoining property on easy terms. (The choice residence portion
of the city.) Improved and unimproved property In former burnt district, Springfield, LaVila and
other suburbs. Choice business property and Investments.
MONEY TO LOAN AND MONEY LOANED FOR INVESTORS.



,* Turpentirne
S .. . .

? Cups


If you expect to use the HERTY cup
next season, place your orders now for
future delivery. Prices and all informa-
tion cheerfully furnished on

Cups, Gutters
end e11 Tools
'. used in the Herty system of turpentining.
e Address

S' .. .1 Chattanooga Pottery
'. ,.. cy ,
. .- ,, ,. --, ..,.Company,

Jacksowile,* Fkrid

S***e**e ee*****ee********e****************e se*******

You Want a Turpentine Location?

= You Want a Sawmill Location?

I You Want any Kind of Florida Land?

You Mean Business?
Call on or Write to
J. H. L VINGSTON & SONS,
Ocala. Florida


*******ee*********


eeeeueee. U sum seeceess










6 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


(Continued from page 1.)
and cannot swing away from the spout of
the lower gutter, though it may be easily
removed by the dipper. Second, the nail
is.often driven into the tree above the
lower end of the lower gutter. A cup
hung on such a nail is never vertical, and
its capacity is therefore diminished. Fur-
ther, when a cup so hung fills with water
or resin, the increased weight tends to
bring it to a vertical position, thereby
pressing on the lower gutter and causing
the latter to be prized out of the incision.
The nail should always be driven into the
tree at a point slightly lower than the
lower end of the lower gutter.
Cups.-Experience has demonstrated
that the cups will be broken if water is
frozen in them. During the winter, there-
fore, when the cups are not in use, they
should be removed from the nails and
inverted at the base of the trees, so that
water cannot collect in them.
Fixing Loosened Gutters.
In case a gutter is displaced during the
chipping season, the accident can 1ie easily
repaired by reinserting it in the old in-
cision and driving two nails into the tree
flush with the bottom of the gutter-one
nail near the center of the face and the
other near the upper end of the gutter.
Supported by these two nails a gutter will
stand the scraping of the dip knife with-
out slipping. The gutter and both nails
can readily be drawn from the tree at
the end of the season.
The rapid introduction of the cup and
gutter system, by turpentine operators
proves beyond a doubt that the experi-
mental stage has been passed. No strong-
er confirmation of the value of the results
obtained at Ocilla, Ga., could be given than
the fact that by far the greater portion
of the cups placed during the past winter
were on farms where the cup had been
tested on a small scale during the preced-
ing season. Not all operators are yet con-
vinced; there are still doubters and scof-
fers, but their number is rapidly diminish-
ing.
In the hands of a few the system has
been abused. The fact that under it the
trees are not weakened and made subject
to overthrow by windstorms, as boxed
trees are, has induced some operators to
largely increase the number of cups per
tree as compared with the average of
boxes. The returns from such trees prove
that there is a distinct limit to the sap
surface which can be removed without
weakening the vitality of the tree and
lessening the flow of the resin. The prac-
tice of overcupping results, therefore, in
a financial loss.
In addition to the increased returns
from the use of cups, the naval stores
industry has been benefited in two other
lines by the development of the cup sys-
tem. In many cases timber owners have
made decided concessions in their leases
to operators, on condition that the cups
be used and no boxes cut. In other in-
stances large tracts of timber have been
brought under turpentine operation by
the cup system, though their owners have
persistently refused to lease them for box
cutting.
The rapid rise in the value of turpen-
tine timber within the past few years has
contributed largely to its more conserva-
tive treatment. A thing of little value
in the past, it has received only a small
amount of care. Its rapid enhancement in
value, and the strong probability of a
still further increase, gives the turpen-
tine operator every reason to treat his
timber carefully. Formerly it was an
easy matter for an operator to work
hastily through a place, then move a short
distance and develop a new place on tim-
ber just as inexpensive as that on which
he had been working. But now the ope-
rator knows that when his present foca-
tion is exhausted lie is certain to experi-
ence difficulty in finding a new location,
and equally certain that a largely in-
creased price must be paid for it. This
natural operation of the law of supply and
demand is rapidly bringing serious and
earnest thought to the question of how
best to preserve the present holdings.
The cup and putter system with its great
economies is doing much to solve the
problem.
Approved:
W. M. HAYS, Acting Secretary.
Washington, May 27, 1905.


H ROBINSON .Pre a- GAILLARD. OChier
W. B. OWEN. Vioe-Prea.

Commercial Bank,
State Depository.
BRANCHm:S Ocals. PF.. Lake City. 71a
Jacksonville, --- lerida



Florida


Electric Co.

Contracting Electrical Engineers
Sell and Install Complete Electric Light
and Power Plants, Telephone Ex-
changes. Wholesale Electric
Supplies.
Jacksonville, Fla.

THOSE. G. HUTCHINSON
FELLOW AMENICAN ASSOCIATION OF
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS
-Room 7, Board of Trade Bldg.
Pbmne 312 JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


BAILY A MONTWOMERY,
Commission Merchants.
Nasv&l Stores & Cotton
Liberal advance made against sp-
meots. Ce"nign-ipts solicit.
78-80 Wall St, Rooms 813-14-15.
NEW YORK CITY.


Whiskies, Gins,

RuMns,


from $1.50 to $5.00
per gallon.
Agency for Lewis 1866
Mount Vernon Pure
Whiskies


and
Rye


Controllers Blum's Monogram and Syl
van Rye-Agents for Jungs, Cincin-
nati and Pabst Milwaukee Beers.
Prices on application.

CHAS. BLUM & CO.
517 and 519 West Bay Street,
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Cay, Shine & McCall
FIRE INSURE "1UCE.


2x2 Dyal-Upcmrch Bldg


"lone 1955


Ltiru Iron Wrs B& Sll o.
LBUIL IID11N a SlS .N
BUILDERS AND DEALERS IN


JOHN R. YOUNG,
President.


J. P. WILLIAMS.
C. W. SAUSSY.
S. A. ALFORD.


ENGINES, BOILERS.
Cotton, Saw, Fertilizer, Oil and lee Ma-
chinery, and Supplies and Repairs.
CAPACITY FOR 300 HANDS.
Machine Tools, Wood-Working Machinery,
Shafting. Pulleys, Hangers, Leather amn
Rubber Belting and Hose, Railroad and
Mill Supplies and Tools.
Plans and estimates furnished for Power
Plants and Steel Bridges.
Steam Pumps, Feed Water Heaters and
Hoisting Engines.
AUGUSTA, CA.


EXPRESS PREPAID.

Hatchett's Private Stock .... ........ .... ...
Hatchett's That's Whiskey ................
Hatchett's Old Rye .......................
Eureka N. C. Apple Brandy .. .. ...... .... ..
N. C. Apple Brandy...... ..........
Eureka Malt ................... ......
Eureka N. C. Peach Brandy ..............
N. C. Peach Brandy ...................
Eureka N. C. Corn ........................
Eureka N. C. Corn, XX ............ .. .. ....
Eureka N. C. Corn. XXX..................
Eureka N. C. Corn, XXXX ................
Old Crow Bourbon ........................
Hermitage Rye ..........................
Sunny Brook Rye ........................
Sunny Brook Sour Mash ........... .... ....
Echo Spring .................. ......... ..
Silk Velvet ............ ..................
Oak and .......... .... .... ...... .. ......


A. D. COVINGTON,
Vice-President.
DIRECTORS:


C. S. ELLIS.
P. L SUTHERLAND.
J. B PADGETT.
J. R. YOUNG.


B. F. BULLARD
W. C. POWELL..
WALTER RAY,
A. D. COVINGTON.


4
4
3
4
4
3
a
2

4
a
I
a
4
6
3


FUvLL QUARTMlAbVR$
'er Fout SIx Pe
all1n. Quart. Quarts. Cae.
.00 $1 .09 $1211
.60 4.00 .0' 12.15
.20 3.a 0 0 *-. t.
.75 4.75 7.00 14.0
1.S .3 4.5 9.10
.00 4.00 C.0 12.0
.75 4.75 7.00 14.0
.X S.X 4.8 9.W
.5 3.5 4.85 0.?1
.a 2.5 4.1 9.71
.00 S.0 4.0 9.00
.75 2.75 4.15 .30
.00 2.50 1.76 7.M
.50 4.00 6.75 1.60
.0 4.50 6.Z7 1U.0
.75 1.75 5.5 11.0
.756 .75 6.5 11.n
.50 4.5 6.0 12.7
.@0 65. 7.1 15.W0
.75 4.00 6.0 12.00


j GIN FROM $2.50 TO $3.50 PERI GALL.O, DELIVERED
S ave twelve labels of Hatchett'. Private Stock and secure a bottle free.
Save twelve labels of Hatchett's Old Rye and secure a bottle free.
SSave twelve labels of Hatehett's That's Whiskey and secure a bottle free.
e save twelve labels of Eureka N. C. Corn and secure a bottle free. Save *
Twelve labels of Eureka N. C. Apple Brandy and secure one bottle free. Save
Twelve labels of Eureka Malt and secure one bottle free. Prices of all goods
bought at company's store are 70c per gallon less than when delivered. No
charge for jugs, boxes or drayage. A. of my bottles are full measure. All
Standard brands of whiskies sold over my bar at 10c per drink. 15
S We also carry In stock liquors of cheaper grades. 1
All wines quoted on application.
S 8Special prices In large lots, packed any sizes desired. Leaves 6 for you
* Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded.
EUREKA WINE AND LIQUOR. COMPANY.
S315 WEST BAY STREET, JACKSONVILL.. FLORIDA.

i 440 11 #1Au111i4a1i11iii 11u I a ie 111 1t aai a1m6i1181ssti1i
Ito u1 1At 1e 1 62621 a Imi mIt iltai aat gi ossatiniltt6DIIeut2


PEARL WIGHT. Press.


T. K. M1CARTHY, ve-pres.


MAURI3E STE


m. T


raes.


SOUTHERN STATES LAND & TIMBER COMPANY.

MVINM H. WELCH, Mmager.


Florida Timber, Grazing &


Agricultural Lands.


401-404 LAW EXCHANGE,


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


H. L. KAYTON,
Secretary jma Treemrer.


J. B. CHESNUTT
G. W. DIEN,
RAYMOND CAY.
J. L. CONOLY.


Our tanks are well equipped and thoroughly enameled and are
conveniently situated at the terminals of the S. A. L. and A. C. L.,
Railways. Our charges for storing have been revised.
WRITE EITHER OF THE ABOVE FOR PARTICULARS.



Prin ior all Purposes.
P rig The Industrial Record Pub. Co
Jacksonville. Fla.


0 PRICE LIST OF

: Eureka Wine and Liquor Co.
* The Great Southern Mail Order House.


tluii tlJtittgIItt1411ot1 11i 1 6IItII 11118 l 1IiIIooI IStI



.. NATIONAL...



Tank & Export Company

Of SAVANNAH, GA., U. S. A.








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 7


*5 THE LATEST FRENCH SUMMER MILLINERY.
SDon't Fail We in Jackmvlil t* Pay a Visit (Whether You Buy or Not)
to the Magnificent store of
NxT h LNEXT
" -"".. HENRY JACOBS .x, ":". |
41 SATE BANK lIN Y JAUO STATE BANK
S s EAST BAY STREET,.
11 1 are now on view all the Latest Creations of the Highest and Latest
i nsaitoueptioiips of Millinery Art showing what are the very latest and
Smoqt correct fashions in Head Wear. Buy nowhere else your new Hat until
,y ru have paid a visit to this Grand Exhibition.
S N. By-There are also to be seen all the Newest French Walking Skirts,
W rench Suits and French Waists for summer wear.
gggggy aggg a***off *


I I I I I ete i ltl *i, i*i il tiitl IIaiIII I o I iso


THE DIAMOND.
Whoelsane and Letail

Wines, Liquors and Cigars,

Sole Agents for thtestat. for Lackman's Beer, o "WilheIma Zuele Mta-
oral Water. We guarantee all Brand: put up by us-full measure folews:
Creme de la Creme, bottle .... $2.00 Diamond Brand, bottle ........ 1.00
[ Highly recommend b ic Profeso ] Heart Brand, bottle .......... .75
C. C. C. Brand, bottle ........ 1.50 Spade Brand, bottle ........... .0
Club Brand, bottle ........... 1.25 Premium Brand, bottle ........ 0


NOTICE OF INTENTION TO APPLY
FOR LETTERS PATENT.
Notice is hereby given that the under-
signed will apply to the Governor of the
State of Florida at Tallahassee, Florida,
on the 20th day of June A D. 1906, for
letters patent incorporating Record In-
vestment Company under the following
proposed charter:
P. L. SUTHERLAND,
D. H. McMILLAN,
J. A. HOLLOMON,
ARTHUR F. PERRY.

PROPOSED CHARTER OF RECORD IN-
VESTMENT COMPANY.
ARTICLE I.
The name of this corporation shall be
Record Investment Company. Its prin-
cipal office shall be in the city of Jack-
sonville, Florida, and its business shall
be conducted in other places in the State
of Florida and elsewhere through
branches, agencies and otherwise, as may
be necessary and convenient,
ARTICLE H.
The general nature of the business to
be conducted by the aid corporation
shall be: to buy, own, hold, lease, let up-
on lase, mortgage, sell and convey real
property and also to improve the same
by erecting thereon buildings of any kind
or character; to buy and sell real and
personal property of every kind and de-
scription, either for itself or for others,
on commission or otherwise, and to mort-
gage and pledge same as security for
loans; to make loans and advances to
-thers and to take as security therefore,
either mortgages or pledges upon real or
personal property or personal security;
to carry on and transact a general build-
ing and contracting business for itself or
others; to guarantee, subscribe for, pur-
chase, bold, sell, assign, transfer, mort-
gage, pledge or otherwise dispose of,
shares of capital stock or bonds, securi-
ties or evidences of indebtedness issued
or created by any other corporation, and
while the owner or holder of such stocks,
bonds or obligations, to exercise all the
rights, powers and privileges of owner-
ship; to patent, register and protect by
trade marks or otherwise, any means,
methods, appliances, formulae, secret pro-
cesses, machines, symbols or designa`-
tions; to obtain, purchase, lease or other-
wise acquire any patent, patent rights,
formulae, secret processes, licenses or
privileges, trade marks or designations
and to operate under, sell, assign, pledge
or grant licenses in respect of, or other-
wise to turn the same to account; to ac-
quire, hold, use, mortgage, lease and
convey all such property, real or personal,
in any part of the world, as may be nec-
essary or convenient in connection with
the said businesses; to enter into, carry
out or otherwise turn to account, con-
tracts of every kind; to have and main-
tain branches, agencies and offices, with-
in and without the State of Florida; te
lo any or all things set forth in this
charter as objects, purposes, powers.
businesses or otherwise, to the same ex-
Itent and as fully as natural personE
'might do, and in any part of the world;
and in general to carry on such opera-
tions and enterprises and to do all such
things in connection therewith as ma3
be permitted by the laws of Florida and
he neemary and convenient in the eon.
duetig el the company's businesses.


ARTICLE III.
The amount of the capital stock au-
thorized shall be ten thousand dollars
($10,000.00), divided into one hundred
shares of the par value of one hundred
dollars ($100.00) each. The capital stock
nay be payable either wholly or in part in
cash, or may be issued or used either
wholly or in part, for the purchase of or
payment for property, labor or services at
a just valuation thereof, to be fixed by the
Board of Directors at a meeting to be
called for that purpose.
ARTICLE IV.
The term for which this corporation
is to exist shall be ninety-nine years.
ARTICLE V.
The businesses of said corporation
shall be managed and conducted by a
President, Vice President, Secretary,
Treasurer and a Board of Directors con-
sisting of not less than three nor more
than thirteen members, the number to be
fixed by the by-laws of the company.
The offices of Secretary and Treasurer
may be held by the same person. The
annual meeting for the election of direc-
tors by the stockholders of the company
shall be held on the first Tuesday in June
in each year. The date of the annual
meeting may be changed by the by-laws.
Until the officers elected at the first elec-
tion shall be qualified the businesses of
the corporation shall be conducted by the
following named officers: D. H. McMil-
lan, President; P. L. Sutherland, Vice
President; J. A. Hollomon, Secretary;
Arthur F. Perry, Treasurer; and D. H.
McMillan, P. L. Sutherland, J. A. Hollo-
mon and A. F. Perry as Directors.
ARTICLE VI
The highest amount of indebtedness or
liability to which the corporation may at
any time subject itself shall be two-hun-
dred and fifty thousand dollars ($250,-
000.00).
ARTICLE VII.
The names and residences of the sub-
scribing incorporators of the said cor-
poration, together with the number of
shares of its capital stock subscribed by
each are as follows:
D. H. MeMillan, residing in the City of
Jacksonville, Florida, 25 shares.
P. L. Sutherland, residing in the City
of Jacksonville, Florida, 25 shares.
J. A. Hollomon, residing in the City of
Jacksonville, Florida, 25 shares.
Arthur F. Perry, residing in the City
of Jacksonville, Florida, 25 shares.
P. L. SUTHERLAND,
D. H. McMILLAN,
J. A. HOLLOMON,
ARTHUR F. PERRY.


State of Florida,
County of Duval.
Before me, a Notary Public in and for
the State of Florida at large, personally
appeared D. H. McMillan, P. LI Suther-
land, J. A. Hollomon and Arthur F. Per-
ry, each to me well known and known
to me to be the individuals described in
and who executed the foregoing proposed
charter and severally acknowledged that
they executed the same for the purposes
there in expressed.
Witness my hand and official seal at
the City of Jacksonville, Florida, this
16th day of May, A. D., 1905.
(Notary's Seal) C. SETON FLEMING,
Notary Public State of Florida at Large.
My comsnlasiou umpires Dec. 18th, A. D.,
1907.


MYERSON CO.,
10S a 107 West Bay St.


Phmne 1712.


* JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
ISI)IISSHII(S |SS I IIu I CIIOI* I ISlillSSIBI I)*tuuit*oi* @tl
***4***.*.~.* e e-* ***---------u ..---.- ......a


S J. A. Craig Q' Bro.

f 239 W. Bs.y Street EVERETT BLOCK.

I Leaders in Men's and Boys' Fine Cloth-

0 ing and Up-to-Date Furnishings.






The Bond & Bours Co.
WHOLEsALE = RETAIL

HARDWARE *

Sash, Doors, Blinds. Paints. Oils and Glass.
Stoves. Tinware. Country-Holloware.


tO WEST BAY STREET


Jacksonville, Fla.


Ja nes Stewart. B. F. Hoblood'



STEWART & COMPANY
No. 50 West Building. Jacksonville. Fl..

We have for sale one of the best timber and turpentine propositions in the
State, consisting of 50,000 acres Virgin Timber in Washington County, Flor-
ida, that will cut about 4200 feet of Pine and 1,800 feet of Cypress to the acre
and also about 60 boxes. Water transportation, and RAILROAD NOW
BUILDING. DESIRABLE TERMS. Write for particulars.
XXSCXXS'}9iXX XXXfXXff3S3


John R. Young. J. W. Motte, C. B. Parker, James MeNatt. W. W. Wilder.
President. Vice-Pres. Vice-Pres. Vce-Pres. See. & Treas.



John R. Young Co.,
S S


Commission

Merchants.


SNaval Stores Factors. Wholesale Grocers,

* Savannah tL Brunswick. Ga
IllI4 144 14***04t oe I I It I I I I I t Ir 4 4 1l o It I 4 Sle j







8 THE WEEKLY IMUUl~muBAL RECORD.


Naval Stores and Timber.
(Continued from page 5)

consummate these purchases took place
mainly througfl Florida banks. The pur-
chases themselves meant the introduc-
tion into the State of a great volume of
active capital, backed by business men of
energy and intelligence. This money in a
large part has come to Florida to stay and
to work.
The sale of these large bodies of lands
involved the payment of hundreds of thou-
sandsof dollars into the State and.county
treasuries for delinquent taxes. This fund
cannot be measured with exactness, but
to anyone familiar with the reports of the
State Treasurer, it is apparent that the
free and active movement in wild lands
during the past few years has resulted in
the payment of many hundreds of thou-
sands of dollars of tax claims, which had
been accumulating on the books of the
State with small hopes of recovery.
If the original purchase of timber lands
from their foreign holders inured to the
benefit of Florida's bankers, as we have
seen, the practical benewfs of subsequent
sales has been more direct and far greater.
Ten years ago, we had in the State of
Florida an asset in our timbered lands,
the ultimate value of which, as standing
timber alone, reached many millions of
dollars. A small part of this asset was
being constantly utilized in the manu-
facture of lumber, it is true, but as a
whole it was stationary, without influence
upon trade or commerce. It is to the
lumberman and naval stores producer that
we owe a radical change in this situation.
Instead of being locked up and held out
of reach of trade, this vast asset is now
the subject of active interchange of val-
ues, forming a wide gasis of prosperity
for bankers never available to them be-
fore.
Effect upon Commerce.
The effect of these industries upon the
commerce of the State is pointedly shown
by a few figure. According to the United
States census the lumber and timber
products of Florida in 1880 were valued
at $5,514,879. By 1900 the value of these
products had reached $10,848,403, an in-
crease of nearly 100 per cent in ten years.
Aecordingto the last report of the Com-
missioner of Agriculture of Florida, the
business during the year 1904 covered by
the port shipments, had attained a value
of $13,448,498, a gain of 24 per cent in
four years. The figures last given leave
out of consideration local consumption
and rail shipments, which, if included,
would doubtless double the results shown.
The rosin and turpentine products of the
State in 1890 were valued at only $191,-
859. By 1900 the business had grown to
such an extent that the product was val-
ued by the United States census of that
year at $6,4069,65, an increase of 3,270
per cent in ten years. The report of the
Commissioner of Agriculture shows that
the port shipments of naval stores in 1904
amounted to $10,901,465. Even upon this
restricted basis of calculation, the result
shows an increase of nearly 69 per cent
in the four years succeeding the last cen-
sus figures. While these figures are a
reliable basis of comparison, the absolute
gain has been far greater than indicated.
The only available statistics since the
census of 1900, both for lumber and naval
stores, are based upon the ocean shipments
from our ports. They do not include the
consumption of the State or the great
volume of rail shipments. So large a part
of the lumber and naval stores of Florida
is marketed by rail transportation that,
by taking this element into consideration,
it would be safe to assert that these in-
'dustries have increased 100 per cent. dur-
ing the four years ending December 31,
1904. The turpentine and rosin product
of Florida for the year 1905 will probably
reach a total of not far from $20,000,000.
Of the world's production of naval stores,
the United States furnish more than 96
per cent, one-half of which is produced in
Florida.
n no way can the gain in the business
of e State be more accurately shown
than in the increase of its banking inter-
ests. In 1899 the total resources of the
National and State banks of Florida ag-
gregated $12,492,961. By 1904 this had in-


creased to $.2f.7907,4Hi6, a gain in four years
of 1:3 per cent. This remarkable growth
of the banking business of Florida has fol-
lowed and kept pace with the production
of lumber and naval stores. In large part,
it represents the introduction and in-
crease of the capital of the State arising
from the development of industries di-
rectly and indirectly connected with for-
est products. Ten or fifteen years ago
the wholesale business of Florida was in
its infancy. Our food stuffs were fur-
nished by the wholesalers of the North
and the jobbers of Georgia. The demands
of the lumber and turpentine producer
and the introduction of new capital, have
made possible the development of the job-
bing business of Florida to a degree of
prosperity which has surpassed all ex-
pectations.
The indirect effects of these industries
upon business conditions cannot be defi-
nitely measured. But the growth of our
banks and our shipping and jobbing inter-
ests have been paralleled by the develop-
ment of scores of other industries which
have not attracted attention. The labor
alone necessary to conduct the lumber
and naval stores interests will probably
represent the active employment of fifty
thousand men. Directly dependent upon
these industries, therefore, are probably
two hundred thousand people living in
the State of Florida. Nothing more point-
edly illustrates our present dependence
upon these industries.
As to the Future.
The future of a business so intimately
connected with the commercial prosperity
of the State cannot fail to concern the
representatives of Florida's banking in-
terests. As bankers and business men,
we ask, how long will this industry last,
and what will it leave behind? These are
questions easier to ask than to answer.
Consumed in its use, the forest lasts no
longer than the time required to convert
it into money. It is doubtless true that
the period of the greatest prosperity of
the business is now with us. It is to be
expected that at the end of ten years, it
will show a marked decline. The lumber
business may last longer than the naval
stores industry, because it is usual to
include in the former term the manufac-
ture of cross-ties and cypress lumber,
the peculiar conditions of which promise
longer life. But at the present rate of
destruction, the forests of Florida can
scarcely last more than fifteen years. A
more favorable climate and sparser popu-
lation tend to support the conclusion that
natural re-forestation will to some extent
replace the destruction of the first growth.
It has been observed by some that sec-
ond and even third growths of pine occur
in Florida in shorter periods than in more
northerly States. Hence it is reasonable
to anticipate that the unsettled areas of
the State will continue to produce a eon-
santly diminishing volume of forest prod-
ucts from the second and third growths
of pine springing up in the aftermath of
the lumberman. But with the destruction
of the first growth, the volume of the
business will be reduced to negligible pro-
portions, and it is safe to assert that in
another decade the lumber and turpen-
tine business of Florida will be nearing
the end of its long and prosperous his-
tory.
When our forests are gone, they can
never be restored. The millions which
they represent will have passed from our
control. Present and future prosperity
depend in no small measure upon the ex-
tent of the accumulated wealth into which
our forest products are converted. What-
ever prices these products are able to
command in the markets of the world
must fix the return which we shall derive
from the absolute destruction of the great-
est asset which the State now possesses.
Low prices of lumber and naval stores
mean an actual loss which can never be
recouped. It is, therefore, of the great-
est importance to the entire State that
the prices which our forest products bring
shall be both remunerative and stable.
The lumberman or the turpentine opera-
tor is by no means the only one affected
by the prices of these staple products.
Every branch of industry will be benefited
by high or depressed by low prices. It is
to be hoped that the conservative influ-
ence of our bankers, added to the intelli-
gent co-operation of the producers, will
prevent over-production and stimulate


1, II revl I I tt I III Ii tI>Itl Itt rl i IIII IIIIIIIi

MERRILL-STEVENS CO.


SBoilermaking and Repairing

Still Boilers and Pumps.
SHIP BUILDING and REPAIRING.
Jacksonville. Fla.


WILLIAM A. BOURS JAMES C. DARBY


WILLIAM A. BOURS & COMPANY
THE OLDEST ESTAOLISED GRAIN AND SEED HOUSE I THE STATE.

Hay, Grain, Feed, Garden
Seeds, Poultry Supplies, flour,
Grits, Meal and Fertilizers.

OUR MOTTO: Prompt Shipment, Rellale Goods. Catalegue Fre,
206 EAST BAY ST., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Cummer Liumher Co.

JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


ROUGH & DRESSED LUMBER

Long Leaf Yellow Pine.

BOXES and CRATES.

i taln l CI1 I Iliill ill 4 I Cot*mp lA Ill*ii6*0i*

: Standard Clothing Company |


One Price


One Price


FASHIONABLE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
* 7 and 19 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Florida.
Stetson and Hawes Hats. Special Attention lven to Mall Orders.
*utl 41 |@I44fttutll114itlllilll tttu ttlll4imial


R. TOLAR.


J. n. HART.


T. H. BLACHLY.


J R. TOLAR, JR


(Established 1872.)

TOLAR, HART & CO..
160 FRONT STREET. NEW YORK.


Commission Merchants
and Jobbers of Naval Stores.
Liberal Advances on Consignments of Naval Stores and Cotton. Members of New
York Cotton and Produce Exchange. Orders executed for Cotton Futures.


JOSEPH D. WEED.


H. D. WEED.


W. D. KRENSON


J. D. WEED & CO.,
SAVANNAH. GEORGIA.

Wholesale Hardware,

Bar, Hoop and Band Iron.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF


Turpentine Tools, Glue, Battings, Etc,








THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 9


better technical methods in the further-
ance of a common effort to secure and
maintain a just return for these products.
What, After the Pines?
To the mind of the thoughtful business
man, dwelling upon the future of this
State, must have often recurred the ques-
tion: "What shall come after the pines?"
When our forests are gone, what shall
we have to show for their value? Upon
the answers to these questions depends
the commercial future of this State. It is
clear that out of the great volume of
capital brought into Florida for the de-
velopment and prosecution of this busi-
ness, some portion must remain. No one
can say how much. But in studying the
history of other communities where sim-
ilar movements have taken place and
similar questions have been asked and
answered by the facts of time and expe-
rience, the gratifying conclusion is sus-
tainable that the larger part of this new
capital will remain to develop the agri-
cultural and manufacturing industries of
the State: The lumber and naval stores
men are not, as a class, of a migratory
character. A large proportion settle
where they have made their money and
found ndw friends. Many remain where
they came to sojourn. Their original
capital and accumulated profits remain
with them to form a part of the produc-
tive assets of the country. Their ener-
gies, intelligence and experience are con-
tributed to promote the industrial prog-
ress and material prosperity of their new
homes. They become useful, enterprising
and progressive citizens, whose industry,
thrift and business experience will con-
tribute more to the wealth of the State
than the capital they brought with them.
In his way a large part of the value of
our forests will remain in the State in
the hands of its citizens, new and old,
to be used in the upbuilding and develop-
ment of the State along the lines of its
natural resources. Nor should the thought
be overlooked that the influence and ex-
ample of the lumberman and turpentine
operator is of the utmost value in the
commercial awakening and education of
the "cracker." Bringing near to these
people and into their daily life methods of
thrift, examples of energy, and higher
standards of living and education, this
influence cannot fail to leave a deep and
enduring effect upon the character of the
"cracker," to the lasting benefit of the
State.
When we consider that out of the vast
area of land in Florida, less than one mil
lion acres is under cultivation, little more
need be said in answer to the question
what shall come after the pines. The ex-
haustion of the lumber business will leave
our lands ready for the farmer. Tho
thrifty and energetic men from the Souti
and Northwest who have made theii
homes in Florida will not be slow to sein
upon the opportunities which our cheal
and fertile lands extend to the industrious
and intelligent farmer.
The accumulated riches which will thel
represent the destruction of our forest
will furnish the means for the develop
ment of these lands. The elements o:
prosperity will not be found to be lack
ing when the pines are gone. Men, money
energy and fertile lands will be left
Surely, with proper direction, these an
the essential factors of wealth and pros
perity. It only remains for the thought
ful and experienced business men of the
State to direct the application of thi
capital and this energy. No other inter
est is closer to the problem than the
bankers of Florida, and our best hopes o
its wise solution must be left in grea
part to your constant thought and help
ful suggestion.


Sam'l P. Holmes& Co.
Sticks, Bonds, Cotton,
Gral i and Provsions

NEW YORK COTTON EXCHANGE
CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE
Direct private wires to all exchanges.
Local stocks and bonds a specialty.
Bed Pbone 853 Baldwia Block


Joseph Zapf & Co.

WCm li shl II r If


Anheuser*Busch

St. Louis Lager Beer

Wholesale

LIQUORS. WINES,

Mineral Waters.

Write for Prices

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
JOHN S. FR.ANZ, Agent





write
for

ad
Prices
-r

Diebold Safe & Lock Co.
Jacksonville. Florid.
FIRE INSURANCB-lwt rate. I-
ren H. Grea & Co., 9 sad 10 Pfrk BldM,
Jaeksonvile, Fla. o.


B. R. POWEL,. CHAS. 6. MARRIS. MENRY ASSLEY.
President. VIce-Presldent and Treasurer. Secretary
DIRECTORS:
B. R. Powell Chas. S. larris, D. a. McMillan, P. L. Sutaerlad, R. V. Corelaeu.

THE

Southern Drug Manufacturing

Company
Corner of West Bay aNu Madlsoe St.
Jacksonville, Florida.


Wholesale Drugs & Commissary Supplies
We solicit the Turpentine and Mill Trade and will be glad to quote prices on
anything in the drug line. We make packed drugs a specialty and can save you
money. Mail orders are given prompt attention.

* ****4.*'eeee*ee***4*************66*6***e*o*.**


Standard Naval Stores Co.,"
JACKSONVILLE

Pays Turpentine Producers

Full Savannah Market

SMakes no Charge for Commission, Storage or Insurance

SThis Beats Savamah so Ship to

Standard Naval Stores Co. JACKSONVILLE


I1I44 ti i4, llll t I I l >to 16 I tt III I I l lllt

SJOS. ROSENHEIM & SONS
MANVIACTVRERS AND JOBBERS OF


SHOES

SSAVANNAH. GEORGIA
." Best Shoes Made for Commissary Trade."
4. d-
t4 1 Itl #tti* I itI itlin*ir1tI 11111i11tl i 4


Joseph D. Christie, Business Agent
Roem 303 Dyal-Utpchrch Biiang, JacksomiVe, Fa.
Toelebone 455.
If you want to locate in Florida and contemplate going into businue, let me
help you. If you have a business to sell, list same with me.


W. J. L'ENGLE,
President.


J. B OAMPflU,


Metropolitan Talkig Machine Co
VICTOR
Tatklng Machines and Records.
Write to Metropolitan Talking Machine
Co. for catalogues of New Records and
Machines. Victors only. Largest jobbing
house in the South.
Agents wanted in every town. Retail
trade served. Old records exchanged.
N. B.-Columbia, Zonophone and Vic-
tors accepted.
Metropolitan Talking
Machine Co..
323 Main St, JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


J. W. WADE,
Vice-President.


E. G. HUGHES,
See'y and Tress


Union Naval Stores Co.
MOBILE, ALA. PENSACOLA, FLA. NEW ORLEANS, LA.

NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
DEALERS IN
Supplies for Turpentine Operators.
Can offer at present quite a large number of desirable
locations in West Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Lib-
eral advances madeagainst consignments. Correspondence
solicited.
Principal Office: MOBILE, ALABAMA.









10 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


INDUSTRIAL R.ECOR-D.
JAMES A. HOLLO ON.
Edtemr ad Manager.
Pubatohed Evory Fridv .
S(Dome) .0a3.0 Per Annum
asie"ow (oseffi) .... 83. a
"Tho Plse and Its ProdusOt."
All communications should be addressed
The Induetrii R.ecord Company.
Jacksonville. Fla.
agromh Ed rteaal and Besines Offom at
Adant,. Ga. St Savannah. Ga.
Entered at the Poetoffice at Jacksonville,
Fla., as second-class matter.

Adopted by the Executive Committee
of the Turpentine Operators' Association,
September 12, 1902, as its exclusive offi-
cial organ. Adopted in annual conven-
tion September 11 as the organ also of
the general association.
Adopted April 27th, 1903, as the offi-
eial organ of the Interstate Cane Grow-
ers' Association. Adopted September
11, 1903, as the only official organ of the
T. O. A.
Commended to lumber people by spe-
eial resolution adopted by the Georgia
Sawmill Association.
COPY FOR ADVERTISING.
Advertising copy (changes or new ad-
vertisements) should reach us Tuesday
morning to insure insertion in the issue
of the same week.

THE RECORD'S OFFICES.
The publishing plant and the main offi-
ces of the Industrial Record Company
are located at the intersection of Bay
and Newnan streets, Jacksonville, Fla.,
in the very heart of the great turpentine
and yellow pine industries.
The Atlanta, Ga., office is located in the
Equitable Building, No. 723. Atlanta is
the center of the great manufacturing
trade of the entire South.
The Savannah, Ga., office is in the
Board of Trade Building. Savannah is
the leading open naval stores market in
the world.
NOTICE TO PATRONS.
An payments for advertising in the In-
dustrial Record and sucriptions thereto
mut be made direct to the home office in
Jacksonville. Agnt are not allowed to
make colections under any dircmstanes.
Bill for advertising and becriptonare
aent out from the home office, when due,
and all remittances must be made direct
to this com any.
bdustrial Record Pubishing Co.

DECENCY VS. VULGARITY.
The Record publishes in another col-
umn to-day a letter from one of the larg-
est turpentine operators in the South.
It is not signed in print for the reason
that it was a private letter to the editor
of this paper and we do not feel like tak-
ing the liberty to publish the name with-
out the consent of the author. At the
same time we know the author well
enough to know that he does not say any-
thing in private correspondence that he
would not be willing to say in public col-
umns, if necessary, and if there are any
doubters as to the authenticity they can
be satisfied by calling or writing to this
office.
We make this little introduction to this
article for the purpose of showing two
things:
First, that the Record does not under-
take to deceive its readers by articles
written in the editor's office, purporting
to be written by some reader and sent in
as a communication. In saying this, we
make that direct charge against Mr. Shot-
ter's Naval Stores Review. There are al-
leged communications published in that
paper every week that are written in the
office of the Review, or in Mr. Shotter's


office, and we defy Mr. Shotter or Mr.
Gamble to deny it. No reputable trade
paper, it matters not what trade it may
represent, or faction it may champion,
will be guilty of such violations of news-
paper decency.
Second, that the vulgar caricatures now
being employed by Mr. Shotter in his
campaign against the operators' interests
is a serious reflection upon the intelli-
gence of the very people for whom they
are intended; and are not only not appre-
ciated, but are most severely censured by
the operators, as is cited by the letter re-
ferred to above.

PRESIDENT LANE.
We want to congratulate the Florida
bankers upon the election of Mr. E. W.
Lane as president of this association. Mr.
Lane is one of the youngest bank presi-
dents in the South and one of the ablest.
As president of the Atlantic National
Bank of Jacksonville, he is the executive
head of one of the South's largest and
strongest financial institutions, and the
compliment to him is in every way worth-
ily bestowed and deserved.

New Naval Stores Broker.
Mr. Guy R. Champlain, of Jacksonville,
has entered into the naval stores broker-
age business and will undoubtedly make
a success. He is one of the successful
young business men of Jacksonville, who
enjoys the confidence of the business
public.

Mr. W. W. Timmons, of the Timmons-
Blount Co., Tampa, was in Jacksonville
this week.

Mr. A. D. Covington, president of the
Hillman-Sutherland Co., has been in West
Florida this week.

Mr. W. F. Coachman, president of the
Naval Stores Export Co., is in New York
on business.

Mr. F. M. Plank, manager of salesmen
for the Spencer Medicine Co., of Chatta-
nooga, Tenn., has been spending several
days in the city, looking after the inter-
ests of this most popular medicine com-
pany.

Mr. J. A Tyner, of Hastings, was among
the operators here this week.

Daval County Real Estate Transfers.
The Springfield Company to Jones-
Shaylor Co. for $10: Lot 1, block 73, ac-
cording to Springfield Company's new sub-
division of the eastern portion of Ho-
gan's donation.
Marvin L. Burwell to J. Kelly and wife
for $175: Land commencing at point "A,"
which point is 618 feet north 79 degrees
and fifteen minutes east from a point
which point is 1017 feet north 36 degrees
west from the north side of Alligator
Plank Road, where the eastern Isaac Hen-
dricks grant line intersects said road,
from point "A" 104 feet north 79 degrees
and 15 minutes west to a point, thence
northerly 115 feet to a point, thence 100
feet eastward and at right angles to last
line, to a point, thence southerly 88 feet
and at right angles to last line to point
of beginning at "A"; except a strip of
land 20 feet wide along the entire south
side of land, which 20 feet strip is reserv-
ed for a street. Further described as lots
14 and 16, block C, Burwell's Addition
to Jacksonville.
Jacksonville Development Co. to D. B.
Thomas for $10 and other considerations:
South 48 feet of block 37, Oklahoma (or
South Jacksonville.)
Louis Baker to Bertha M. Thompson
for $125: Lot 2. block 6, Jordan's sub-
division in Jacksonville.
John H. Kruer .and wife to James J.
Williams. for $6,500: East 42 feet of lot
5, in bhwk 5.7, according to Hart's map
the land being in Jacksonville.


Review of Naval Stores for a Week.


Spirits for the Week at Savannah.
Price Rcpts Sales Exp 1904
Mon. June 121591/ 1,460 '62 52%
Tues. June 13591A 1,59 104 1 ,3 2%
Wed. June 1459% 1,281 1,352 52%
Thur. June 15 581 1,303 1,235 56452%

Rosin for the Week at Savannah.


Monday, Jun
WW ..

M .................
K ..............
I .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
H .. . .. .. .. .. ..


D .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
AB l


ie 12.
4.80
4.70
4.60
4.50
4.40
4.00
3.50
3.35
3.30
3.20
3.15
i rm


Last Year.
4.60
4.15
3.85
3.65
3.40
3.30
3.05
2.95
2.90
2.85
2.80
975


Receipts 1,891, sales 6,479, exports 0.

Tuesday, June 13.-Rosin firm; sales
5,972; receipts 4,829; shipments 301T8
Quote A B C, $3.10; D $3.20; E $3.25;
F $3.30; G $3.35; H, $3.50; I $f.00; K
$4.40; M $4.50; N $4.60; WG $4.70; WW
$4.80W4.90.
Wednesday, June 14.-Rosin firm; sales
4,265; receipts 4.444; shipments 1,485.
Quote A B C. $3.12 1-2C@3.15; D, $3.221-2
(03.25; E, $3.27 1-2@$3.30; F, $3.32 1-2@
3.35; G, $3.371-2@3.45; H$3.50; I $4@
$4.10; K, $4.40; M $4.50; N $4.60; window
glass, $4.70; water white, $4.85@4.90.

Thursday, June 15.-Rosin firm; sales
3.775; receipts 3,620; shipments 2,062;
Quote A B C, $3.20; D $3.30; E $3.35; F
$3.40: G $3.45; H $3.55; I $4.30; K $4.40;
M $4.50; N $4.70; WG $4.90; %VWW $5.00.

Tolar, Hart & Co.'s Review.
New York June 13, 1905.
The Industrial Record, Jacksonville, Fla.:
Spirits Turpentine-The market has
been in a demoralized condition during
past week. On the break buyers were
frightened away and it was impossible
to force sales at any figure. Stock, 2,547
barrels. We quote Machines, 62%@63c.
asked.
Rosin-There is an entire absence of
business with quotations nominal. We


quote: BC, $3.45; D $3.50; E $3.60; F
$3.80; G $3.90; H $4.00; I $4.60; K $4.80;
M $5.00; N $5.10; WC $5.20; WW $5.30.
TOLAR, HART & CO.

Savannah Naval Stores atsst.
i;a amin.
Stock April 1 ........... 5M 5,36
Receipts June 15 ........ 1, 2 3,0
Receipts previously ...... 47,18 11,221

Total ............... 6M ,1 148,158

Exports June 14 ........ 564 2,062
Exports previously ...... 34,772 91,497
Total .............. 35,336 93,59

Stock June 14 .......... 18,985 54,599
Stock previously ........ 18,46 53,599

Baily & Montgomery's Review.
New York, June 14, 1906.
Spirits Turpentine-Stock, 1,60 barrels.
The market during the week has been
dull and easy, and only a very small
jobbing business has been done.
Thursday, June 8-- c. a. m.; 65e. p. m.
Friday, June 9-64e a. m.; 641te. p. m.
Saturday, June 10---64e. asked.
Monday, June 12---63ec. easy.
Tuesday, June 13---63. easy.
Wednesday, June 14-63c. weak.
Rosin-Stock, 8,450 barrels.
This market has also been dull and
easy, and the unsettled condition of the
prices South restricted trade to small pro-
portions.
AC, $3.40; graded, D $3.50; E, $8.60; F
$3.70-80; G $3.80-85; H $3.90-4.00; I $4.45-
50; K $4.80-90; M $4.90-5.00; N $5.00-
5.10; WG $5.10-5.15; WW $.25-5.35.
Prices of pales nominal.

Turpentine at London.
1905. 1904. 1903. 1902.
Stock May 27..6,787a 11,844 22,378 13,355
Del'd this wk 1,564b 1,231 1,459 1,439
Since Jan. 1..33,919 38,158 30,396 37,428
Price May 27 60-6 41-6 39-41/, 35-
July-Dec. ... 46-6 41-4% 35-6 33-7%
Savannah ...... 73c. 53%e. 49e. 45%e
(a) includes 538 French; (b) includes
207 French.
Reported by James Watt & Son.


The following letter under date of June
13th, is from one of the largest operators
in the Southern pine belt. It speaks for
itself:

"Mr. J. A. Hollomon, Editor Industrial
Record, Jacksonville, Fla.
"Dear Sir: I wish to commend and
thank you for the instructive and dig-
nified article beginning on page 3 of your
last week's issue. In my opinion, its ap-
pearance was opportune, and will have a
decidedly wholesome effect among pro-
ducers generally, especially so when con-
trasted with the puerile matter and cari-
catures contained in the opposition's Sa-
vannah organ of same date, which is a
reflection upon the intelligence of those
whom it was mainly intended for, and
is another illustration of Shotter & Com-
pany's low estimate of the character and
mental status of the turpentine operators


Taylor County Naval Stores Co.
The Taylor county y Naval Stores Co.,
of which Mr. P. L. Sutherland is president,
has opened offices in the Stockton-Budd
building. This company has a paid in
capital stock of $200,000, and is officered
by as strong men as there are in the in-
dustry. Mr. A. D. Covington is vice-
president and Mr. W. R. Rannie, secretary.


as a whole.
"In this connection, I wish to quote
to me from one of the largest producers
in West Florida, under date of 8th instant,
which reads, in part, as follows:
"Am glad to see stuff come to a reason-
ably good price. I suppose you hive seen
the last circular letter gotten out by Shot-
ter. It is an admission that Coachman
has beaten him at his own game, and it
looks now to me as if Coachman can take
care of his and our interest O. K.
"'Abnormally high prices confuse labor
and small holders of timber, and cause us
to lose heavily when stuff gets down to
straight good prices.'
"It would seem that values (which are
much better than this time last year)
have settled down to a trading basis, and
producers are to be congratulated on the
present situation and prospect-partica-
larly so in view of having been notified by
perhaps the best posted man in the naval
stores trade, that the price for spirits
turpentine would be around 4oc. per gal-
Ion during the summer months.


Covingtm Co. eving.
The Covington Company, wholesale dry
goods and shoes, is moving into its hand-
some new block at the corner of Bay and
Market Streets. This building, just com-
pleted by this company, occupies one of
the most commanding positions in Jack-
sonville and is one of the handsomest
business blocks, not only in Jacksonville,
but in the South.


Turpentine Operators Will Not

be Deceived and Trifled With,


--






THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 11


TE CHRISTIE GROOVER oDnCR.,
WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS.
rea m y ma s M ATMAr A aVE YWlE AM a8E. aJAmr.NVULL FEIn.


Jacksonville Grocery Comp'y
W..... aM i Wholesale Grooers and Distillers' Supplies.
OrI.e.. Or. 9 Wahoew VMet A. 0. L. Ay. ae se vr- NIe, Florda


urr*L1CL~LTE~l~lC3JL~3CELXSSrj


Do You Went a. Perfect Standard


TYPEWRITER


CHEAP
SNAP BARGAIN


In our wholesale department we have the following special "pick-up" bargains in type-
writers:
One new FAY-SHOLES, just out of the factory and never opened, $87.50. The regular
price of this machine is $110, and it is one of the best machines made.
One new SMITH-PRM I BR, a snap at $73.00.
One REMINGTON No. 7, but little used and good as new, $60. Everybody knows the
Remington, the "old reliable."
One SMITH-PREMIER, second-hand, but in perfect order, $55.
One FAY-SHOLES, good as new, a real bargain at $55.
If you want to buy a typewriter and want to save money, buy one of these before they
are gone. Better write quick. .
We rent typewriters, too, to responsible parties.


Industrial Record Co.


Wholesale Departm't
Jacksonville, Florida


. Printing of all kinds for the naval stores
industry-Letterheads, Envelopes, Com-
missary Checks, etc. Record Publishing
Company.

THE CANNON COMPANY

BARRELS
ARE THE
STANDARD
OF THE
WORLD

Use no Other
Mts cea*datly located.
Home Office, QUITMAN, GA
U. & A.


W. F. COACHMAN,
President.


J. P. WILLIAMS,
Vice-President.


W. J. KELLY,
Vice-President and Tres.


E. P. THAGARD,
Secretary.


The Naval Stores Export Company


Capital, $1,250,000.00

*


Branch Offices:
SAVANNAH, GA.
FERNANDINA, FLA.
PENSACOLA, FLA.
TAMPA, FLA.
NEW ORLEANS, LA
CHICAGO, ILL.
NEW YORK.


So.^c Jacksonville. Fla.


WILL COMMENCE BUSINESS JUNE 1, 1905

Owned and controlled by Naval Stores Producers and Factors throughout the Yellow Pine
District in South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas

The Object of this Company is to Bring Producer and Consumer into Closer Relations.


For Quotations and Particulars, Address,

THE NAVAL STORES EXPORT COMPANY


Jacksonville, Fla.


af3aESCSESmESfSmCSESfSCSESCSCSCSCJaESaE3


J~JaTSCSCSaC~C3ESaESTSfSESEXSaE3~?aaES~S


rrrrrrrscsnnamcrsmounrwacsrrscJcsmcrs~Es






12 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.



LUDDEN & BA TES.""'- e
wP EIT NNIS,
S"--'-, e-- n The South's Largest and Most Reliable Music House. W'IS',,os5s


Wanted and For Sale HOTEL BARTHOLDI ""s I
Facing Madison Square Park. Newly Furnished Throughout. Near
D E PA R T M EN T all Big Stores and Places of Amusement. Cars Pass the Door for all
Railroad Stations and Steamboat Landings. Large Sample Rooms for
Commercial Travelers. Here you find no grand and magnificent deco-
rations; no luxurious grandeur; no awe-inspiring surroundings; no
ldnertsemefts FI be Inserted is TrAs Departmeat at the F lloilst Rates: elaborate bill of fare, printed in French; no clerks that will disdain to
For one week, M cents a line. No employees in any wa inattentive.
For two weeks, 35 entsaline. speak to you.
For three weeks, 50 ents a line.pe
For four week, - cents a line. But just a cozy, home-like little hotel that will appeal to the hearts of
Nine words of ordinary length make one line. those who are looking for solid comfort. Good, plain American cook-
Headf counts as two lies. ing, and affable and courteous treatment.
No disl except the headings can be admitted.
emlittances to aeoompam7 the order. No extra charge for copies of paper MILTON ILOBLEE. Propritor.
containing advertisemet. Cpy must be in this office not later than Thersdy
morning to secureU insertion in Friday's paper. | w;vv^ w^ W


Trrpeatine Location.
Twelve thousand acres of cut over lands.
Will make excellent location for turpen-
tine plant. Will sell cheap, if taken at
once. Address Postmaster Johnstown,
Bradford County, Fla.
Position Wanted.
As general manager. A good stiller and
first-class woodsman. Can furnish the
best of references. Married and thor-
oughly sober. Address Manager, care In-
dustrial Record Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Tbrpestiae Location Wasted.
Wanted a good turpentine location now
in operation, with freight rates to Pen-
saeola. Address J. A. T., care Industrial
Record Co., Jacksonville, Fla. 41
Turpentine Men.
Buy a Blakeslee Gasoline Pumping Out-
fit for your still. No. 1 outfit pumps 2,000
gallons per hour at a cost of 3 cents and
requires no attention while running.
Started in one minute. J. P. Campbell,
Oeala, Fla.


TAILORS


Help Supplied.
Naval stores men can secure help by ap-
plying to the City Employment Bureau,
840 West Bay Street, Jacksonville, Fla.
For Sale.
A desirable turpentine location, good
woods, low freight rates. Already opened
up. Write for particulars. Address Jax,
care Record. 4t
For Sale.
Turpentine location in West Florida,
with fee simple timber sufficient to cut
twenty-five to thirty crops boxes. Ad-
dress, Operator, Care Industrial Record.
Position Wanted.
First-class stiller or woodsman requires
position at once. A. L. Sweat, care R. M.
Lewis, Waycross, Ga.
For Sale..Two Steel Tanks.
Quarter of an inch thick. Capacity 125
barrels each. Splendid opportunity for a
turpentine man. Can be bought very
cheap. Address Standard Paper & Supply
Co., Jacksonville, Fla.


Stetson Hats


Suits to Order at ReadyMade Prices Mail Order. Given Personal Attention


439 W. Bay Sfet.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


SOUTHERN ELECTRIC CO.
BOARD OF TRADE BUILDING. 213 MAIN STREET.
fNSTALLATION OF ELECTRIC WIRES OF EVERY DESCRIPTION.
ELEVATORS INSTALLED AND REPAIRED. MOTOR AND FAN
WORK A SPECIALTY. ELECTRIC FIXTURES.
*ELL PHONE 1330. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


NUBIAN TEA In Liquid Form
This well knowa remedy is now put up in liquid, as well as pow-
dered form. In the liquid it is READY FOR USE.
It is a perfect medicine, and extremely palatable. Even children
like it It costs only 50 cents a bottle.
t will cure Constipation, Biliousness, Indigestion, Dyspepsia and
all disease resulting from a torpid liver or disordered kidneys.
WRITE US FOR PRICES.

Spencer Medicine Company
Chattata*ga, Tennmessee.


CYPRESS TANKS
Are Best by Every Test
Cypress withstands the effects of heat andmosture
better than any other wood, shrinks and swells les
than other woods is impervious to acids. ho.ds paint
well and lasts for aes without decaying. Located
S as we are right in the great cypress forests, we are
able to secure the best selection of the wood and at
very low prices. We have been bildintanks for
more than a quarter of a century and boldly assert
that o tanks are better built or will last longer.
Send for cata and prices.
G. M. DAVIS (L SON
PALAT A. L FLIOR LIDA



St. George .Hotel
EUROPEAN PLAN.
Rooms: 75c, $1.00 and $1.50 wPeSon
PHONE 317.
S------- & B MRS. GEO. W. BROCK,
PROPRIETREfS.





j eM e tropolils


Is the Paper you want. It is
published daily and is from 12
to 16 hours ahead of any other
daily newspaper in Florida ..


$5.oo a Year $2.so Six Months |

Full Telegraphic and Stock 2
reports. If you want to keep
posted on the news, get the
Metropolis. 5


| CARTER & RUSSELL PUB. CO.
+ JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA.
+%++i +%+5459%+54+%+l( 5C+9


H. A. Renfroe Co,








THE wIBRKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. is


F. M. DOWLING COMPANY.

S WHOLESALE GROCERS.
PILOVISIONS. GRAIN. HAY, FLOUR.. GRITS and MEAL.
JACKSONVILLE. FLORIDA.

SAVANNAH NAVAL STORES RECORD FOR z903-04 AND TWO PREVIOUS YEARS

Receipts. 1903-04 1902-03 1901-02
Spirits, casks .............................. 193,647 292,490 314,346
Rosins, barrels .............................. 650,938 940,507 1,071,446
Total ................................... 844,585 1,233,033 1,385,780
Exports.
Spirits, casks ............................... 188,393 296,430 314,876
Rosins, barrels ............................... 752,270 975,428 62,637
Foreign.
Spirits, casks ............................... 93,384 206,109 217,446
Rosins, barrels ............................... 338,171 504,173 535,042
New York.
Spirits, casks ................................ 35,658 42,765 53,763
Rosins, barrels .............................. 87,353 133,121 129,095
Sundries.
Spirits, casks ................................ 59,351 37,556 43,637
Rosins, barrels .............................. 326,746 337,734 398,39
The receipts of spirits are less than 1902-03 by 98,849 casks, and of rosins, 289,59
barrels.


Wilmington .
Charleston ....
Savannah .. .
Brunswick ....
Mobile ......
New Orleans
Carrabelle ....
Georgetown .
Pensacola .. ..
Jax. & Fernandi
Tampa ......

Totals .. ..


Crop of Spirits and Rosins for Three Years*
Crop 1903-04. Crop 1902-03.
Spirits. Rosin. Spirits. Rosin.
..... 16,511 80,667 18,883 113,968
...... 2,409 3,159 3,007 11,835
... .. 176,418 660,938 270,670 940,507 3
...... 55,002 184,527 68,947 144,106
..... 12,15 50,380 1869 79,272
..... 36,017 133,126 33,103 108,033
..... closed closed 3,394 32,148
... 7,515 44,214 10,307 46,899
..... 42,554 06,982 38,275 192,20
na ....187,210 653,210 91,976 375,211
..... closed closed 13,565 40,664

.... 535;915 2,020,925 571,096 2,184,t8


Crop 1901-02.
Spirits. Rosin.
16,921 109,484
3,004 13,270
13,085 1,071,440
79,069 286,125
21,08 88,572
21,038 94,33
8,177 47,497
8,458 50,515
37,786 14,350
70,000 245,000
15,424 51,779

i93,492 2,212,413


Imports of Turpentine to United Kingdom.
From official returns; cwts turned into barrels at 320 cwts, 16,230 kilos, 100 bbls.
1900 1901 1902 1903 1904
rom United States .................... 174,446 193,429 155,122 143,851 144,400
rom France ........................ 2,283 859 1,656 4,630 2,89
rom other countries ............... 840 53 904 516 11
177,569 194,341 157,682 148,997 147,270
ussian Turpentine .................. 8,521 6,861 8,711 17,595 17,766

ital barrels ....................... 1 86,090 201,202 166,393 166,52 166,035

percentage of Russian .............. 4.57 3.41 5.24 1056 10.76
verage rice of American ......... 35-4 27-1 33-1 42-2 41-2


Reported by James Watt & Son, London, England.

COMPARATIVE PRICES OF SPIRITS AT SAVANNAH FOR FIVE YEARS.


April 1 .................
April 8 .................
April 15 ................
April 22 ................
April 29 ................
May 6 ..................
May 13 .................
May 20 ................
May 27 ................
June 3 .................
June 10 ................
June 17 ................
June 24 ................
July 1 .................
July 8 .................
July 15 ................
July 22 ................
July 28 ................
Ang. 4 .................
Ang. 12 ................
Ang. 19 ................
Ang. 26 ................
Sept. 2 .................
Sept. 9 .................
Sept. 16 ................
Sept. 23 ................
Sept. 30 ................
Oct. 7 ..................
Oct. 14 .................
Oct. 21 .................
Oct. 28 .................
Nov. 4 ..................
Nov. 11 ................
Nov. 18 .................
Nov. 25 .................
Dec. 2 ...............
Dec. 9 ..................
Dec. 16 .................
Dec. 23 .............. ..
Dec. 30 ................
Jan. 6 ..................


1904-05.
ND
53
541%
54%
53%
55
54%
53%
54
52%
52%
521/
53
52%
52%
53%
531/,
523
53%
5)
54%
54%
521/2
521/,
52
52%
52%
52%
52
52%
511%
50%
50
50
48%1/,
360%
47%
48@%
50%
49%
50


1903-01.
ND
50
491/
47
45
45
471/
47%
49
45%
46
46%
471/4
4714
47%
48
491/
50(%
49%/4
52
52
55@%
54
54%
56% .
57
55
57
55%/
56%
55%
56

56
56
56
56
561

561/4
56%
5761/,
57%


1902-03.
45
42%
421/,
43
42%@43
43
45
45
451/
45%
471/
48%
47%/
4514
45%
44%
44
43%/
43%
441/
44%
44%
45
44%
46
46%
47%
50
51%
53%
49
52
50
51
501/
51
50%
51%
52
524
54


1901-02.
34
32
32%
31%@32
32

321/,
321%
32%
32
33%@%
341/,
34%
34%
33
32%
34
33
34
34
33%
34%
34
33%
34
34%
35
354
35%
35
351
35
35
35%
35%
35%
36%
36%
371/%


1900-01.
531/,
531%
46
47
46%
47
48
49
49
46
44%
43%
42%
431/,
43%
44%
43
42
39%
39%
38
35%
34
35%/,
351/
36%
37
37
37%
40%
401/,
40
41
40
39
39
38%
37%
35
35
37


ISO% is$% is 1I SO%# IN INININ II Is

THE VEHICLE & HARNESS CO.

CMr. Fersyth a" Cedar Sts., JACKSONVILLE, FLA.
Dealers IrI

Caerriages end Wagons

Carriag and Vaps Material, Whel, pkes, Rim, bies, Etc.

rarpertle and Mll Narmess, Wagfos, Bnssies. Saddlery, Dump Carts. Delivery
Wilons, Surrles and everything test In a first-class establishment.
Largest Dealers to l.orMa.
I 4SIN is 14I 1%4% lass l#5


SuwanneeSpring




Ginger



Ale


Bottled from famous Suwannee
Spring water. Cures Rheumatism,
Indigestion and Kidney Trouble.
The most refreshing, natural, spark-
ling Ginger Ale known. Bottled and
sold by the Live Oak Bottling Works,
Live Oak, Fla. For sale by Consoli-
dated Grocery Company, Jackson-
ville, Johnson, King & Co., of Jack-
sonville, and M. Ferst's Sons & Co.,
Savannah, Ga.


U


SW. W. CARNES, Pres. W. C. THOMAS. Manager. C. T. DUDLEY, Sec. & Treas.


Tampa Hardware Co.


Wholesale

Hardware

Turpentine, Mill and Phosphate Supplies.


LARGE STOCK COUNCIL AND HOLES HACKS AND PULLERS 01 HAND.

TAMPA. FLORI DA.







DIAMONDS AND WATCHES

We simply asa a call. We can show you, at correct aad money
savlg prices, many papers of loose pure white, perfect
DIAMONDS. It Is our desire to coutlmwe belug the largest
Diamond dealers ln Jacksovvllle, and orw specialty Is fie rourd-
cut gems amd hlgh-grade Waltham and Elgin Watches.

Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry,
HESS & OLAG LER 11-130ainS., 3iW.hy, Jacksoie,Rb.



THE OLDEFr WHISKEY HOUSE IN
GEORGIA. (Efftbllthed In 1881.)
OLD SHARP WILLIAMS-Pure Fine Old
Rye. By the gallon $3.00; four full quarts
$3.60, express prepaid.
GEO. J. COLEMAN-Pure Pennsylvania
Rye; Rich and Mellow. By the gallon
$2.75; four full quarts $3.00, express prepaid.
ANVIL RYE-Pure Substantial Family
Whiskey. By the gallon $2.60; four full
quarts $2.90. express prepaid.
CLIFFORD RYE-By the gallon $2.25;
four full quarts $2.5, express prepaid.
OLD KENTUCKY CORN-Direct from
Bonded Warehouse; fine and old. By the
gallon $3.00; four full quarts $3.25, express
prepaid.
OLD POINTER CLUB CORN Rich
and Mellow. By the gallon 12.50; four full
quarts $2.90, express prepaid.
We handle all the leading brands of Rye and Bourbon Whiskies in the market
and will save you from 26 to 50 per cent on your purchases. Send for price list and
catalogue. Mailed free upon application.

The Altmayer (& Flatau Liquor Company.
MACON. GA. AND BIR3MINGHAM. ALA.


F
F
F

R

To
P
A


-- - --





14 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


THE


COVINGTON


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Wholesale: SHOES -
o eaSe : DRY GOODS.


" Success


For Our Customers


is Success


For Us."


ABSTRACTS
Title and Tax Abstracts, Maps, etc.,
of large tracts in all parts of Florida 'and
South Georgia, prepared for owners and
intending purchasers. Correspondence
solicited.
REALTY TITLE AID TRUST CO,
Law Exchange Bldg., Jacksonville, Fla.
WM. D. JONES
PRESCRPTION SPECIAUST
FAMILY DRUGGIST
107 E. BAY ST.
ail Orders Solicited.
ORDER YOUR
Whiskies
ad
.. Wines
---BY-
HENRY FREE
The Only Up-to-Date Mall
Order Houwe In the South.
x6 and i8 Clay Street and 0ox W. Bay.
JACKSONVILLE, FA.

B0. R. fOSR JaR.
MANUFACTURER OF'

BRIC K.
uTE HR PRICES.
Capacity of Yard 800,000 Per Month.
'PEIi. 390.
M. E. BEAN. C.L. BEA.
(Formerly Bean & Son.)
FLORIDA PAPER COMPANY
Dealers in all kinds of
WRAPPING PAPERS, PAPER BAGS,
FOLDING BOXES, TWINES AND
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE
WRAPPING PAPERS.
Robinson Building, Viaduct.
Telephone 1927. Jacksonville.
Correpondence Solicited.


14 West Bay Ste',
JACKSONVILLE, FLJ..
The CLOTHIERS
EVERYTHING THAT IS GOOD AND
SMART IN WEARING APPAREL FOR
MEN AND BOYS.
Light's
Rest aurarit
503 West Bay t.. JACK$ INVILLE. FLA


Timmons Blount


W. W. TIMMONS,
President.


B. W. BLOUNT,
Vice-President.


And Dealers in Su
Correspondence Soicited.
STIMM
American National Bank
w^vff^4 t C ^^C t^^W^-^c 4t'^ C^


~E~aCXCT~s ~ 'a~~CECCX~Ecacmc~a% m ui~~cr


F


F


nplies of all Kinds for Turpentine
O:erators.


Address


)NS- BLOUNT CO.


Bldg.


TAMPA, FLORIDA.


FURNITURE


22-30 West Bay Street
JACKSONVILLE


Send for
Catalogue


Kohn = Furchgott= Company.
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Dry Goods, Clothing, Gents Furnishings and Hats.
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN PROMPT ATTENTION
JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Don't forget your subscription to the Record.


Co.


J. P. CARSON,
Sec'y & Tres.


Co.


Naval Stores Factors


GETTING'S


...FOR...


-- --


IS61Ns. IN xX^NX

i(C LIWPWY wCECW~EEC~C










THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 15


Florida Bank and Trust Company
Capital $1.00,O 0.000. JacksonvIlle. Ia.
DEPOSITARY OF STATE, COUNTY AND CITY FUNDS
W. F. COACHMAN, President. W. S. JENNINGS. Vice President.
W. A. REDDING, Cashier. ARTHUR F. PERRY, Vice President.
F. P. FLEMING, Jr., Trust Officer
Receives deposit accounts ofindividuals, flrms, corporations and banks. Pays 4 per
cent on saving deposits. Rents safe deposit boxes. Buys and sells foreign exchange and
issues letters of credit. t
Acts as trustee, transfer agent, registrar and fiscal agent for corporation and
Smunicipalitles. Executes all trusts such as executor, trustee under will or appointment
of court, receiver and guardian.
Vn qualed Facilities. Accounts Solicited. Correspondtnoe Invited.



The Clyde Steamship Company


NEW YORK, CHARLESTON AND FLORIDA LINES
The magnicet steamships of this lir are appointed to mail as follows, calling
at Charleston, S. C. both way.


T"A 3ER.


Tuesday, May 23, at 3:00pm.. -ALGONQUIN...
Wednesday, May 24, at 3:00pm. .*xCH'IPPEWA.
Thursday, May 25, at 3:00pm..COMANCHE...
Saturday, May 27, at 3:00pm ..ARAPAHOE...
*xHURON .......
Tuesday, May 30, at 3:00pm..APACHE......
Friday, June 2,at 3:00pm..ALGONQUIN..
*xNEW YORK...
Monday, June 5,at3:00pm. .COMANCHE...
Wednesday, June 7,at 3:00pm..ARAPAHOE..
Friday, June 9, at 3:00pm..APACHE......
*xC'HIPPEWA.
Monday, June 12, at 3:00pm. .IROQUOIS.....
Tuesday, June 13, at 3:00pm..ALGONQUIN..
Thursday, June 15, at 3:00pm..COMANCHE...
Friday, June 16, at 3:00pm. .**xONONDAGA
Saturday, June 17, at 3:00pm.. ARAPAHOE...
..xNEW YORK..
Tuesday, June 20. at 3:00pm.. APACHE ......
Friday, June 23, at 3:00pm.. IROQUOIS.....
*xCHIPPEWA.


Prem JaeksonvUlo for
Charleitem ad New York.

Sunday, May 28. at 12:00n'n.
Tuesday, May 30, at 1:00pni
Tuesday, May 30, at 1:00pm
Thursday, June 1,at 4:00am
Friday, June 2,at 4:00am
Sunday, June 4, at 5:00am
Wednesday, June 7, at 7:00am
Friday, June 9. at 8:00am
Saturday, Junel0,at 9:00am
Monday. June 12, at 11:30am
Wednesday, June 14, at 12:30pm
Thursday, June 15, at 1:30pm
Saturday, June 17, at 4:00am
Sunday, June 18, at 5:00am
Tuesday, June 20, at 6:30am
Thursday, June 22, at 8:30am
Thursday, June 22, at 8:30am
Friday, June 23, at 9:30am
Sunday, June 25, at 11:00am
Wednesday, June 28, at 12:30pm
Thursday, June 29,at 1:00pm


THE NATIONAL BANK OF JACKSONVILLE
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
CAPITAL 5300,000 SURPLUS and UNDIVIDED PROFITS 414,760.91
We issue Time Certificates of Deposit, which draw Iterest at the rate ofthree per cwt per
asnaz, If held ninety days or longer, Take advantage of tals sad let year sariags as rl
somethls for yon. Particular attention paid to Out-of-Town accounts. seediag depodot by maR
*A*4fe***6ft*****ft****************


JH. WEST,
President.


D 1. FLYNN.
JOlHN & HARRM,
V. J. XLEEY,
Vke-Presidents.


H L RICIMOND.
Seevr and Tree.
D. L. WRIhANS
An't Se'v &i Tress.


WEST FLYNN & HARRIS CO.
GENERAL O S GERMANIA BLDG. Savannah.o Ga
GENIEA L OT ICES WEST BLDG. Jacklsovlle. Fla.


I NAVAL STORES FACTORS.
NAVAL STORES RECEIVED AT SAVANNAH, GA., JACKSON-
VILLE, FLA., AND FERNANDINA, FLA.

Wholesale Grocers also Dealers in Hay, Grain and Heavy
Harness.

SOLE AGENTSfo the Celebrated Union Turpentine Ares,
and Wilson & Child. Philadelphia Wagons.
MERCHANTS WAREHOUSES
SAVANNAH, GA. JACKSONVILLE, FLA. TAMPA, f-LA,


DFrank PA. Turpin
THE DUVAL FPro priet o.
JACKSONVILE, FLA.
Open the Year Round. Opposite Government Building. Most Centrally and Conven-
iently Located. Thoroughly Repaired and Renovated. Newly Furnished and Equipped
Library Connected at Popular Prices.

TANONE BETTER MADE

PSTAV rompt Shipments.

OTTER CREEK LUMBER CO., Jacksonville, Fla
DRINK A BOTTLE OF DELICIOUS AND REFRESHING


**-Boston via Brunswick and Charleston. xFreight only. *-Boston via
Brunswick.
THE CLYDE NEW ENGLAND AND SOUTHERN LINES.
DIret orvlee Between Jaekrsnllle, Bator and Proidenee and an EfsO-
era Points, OaulllK at Ckarleston Botb Ways.
SEMI-WEUKLY FAILINGS.
Bouthbound.. ...... .. .. .. .. ...... .. .. .. ..From Lewit Wharf, Bosto
Nortlbound.. ............ ...... .. Prom foot of Catherine Street, Jackonvllle
CLYDE ST. JOHNS RIVER LINE
Between Jakelranvll ad lSanfoer
Stopping at Palatka, Astor, St. Francis. Beresford (De Land) and intermediate
laadingl on St. Johns river.
STEAMER "CITY OF JACKSONVILLE"
is appointed to small as follow: Leave Jacksonville, Sundays Tuesday and Thur-
days, :0 p. Returntng, leave Sanford, Monda, Wednesdays & Frdays 9: a. m.
soUrTHBOuri,j INORTHBOUND,
Read down. | Read w.
Leave 3: p. mn ..................... Jacksonville ........ ............ ... Arrtvo S a. m.
Leave 8:5 p. m.J........ .. .. .......P lat ......... .* ..... JLeaGve p. m.
Leave a. m...... ... ..........tor..............As.. ..............Iave 230 p. m.
Leave 4:1 a. m. ...... .. ... ..........St. Francis......................ILeave I p m.
.............. .... .... ....... Bereford (DeLand)........ .........L avo e 1 noon
Arrive 32a a. m.l...... .......... ......Sanford ...................... Jeave J a. m.
Ar. 10:00 a. m. ..................Enterprise .................... Lv. 10:00 a. m.
GENERAL PASSENGER AND TICKET OFFICE, z2s W. BAY ST., JACKVILLE.
F. M. TRONMONCER. .JR.. Asst. Gen. Pa s. Agent, 122 W. Bay St. Jacksonville, Fla.
W. 0. COOPER, JR., Local Prt. Alt. Jack 'ville. C. P. LOVELL, Ast. Bupt.,Jaek'Tvnl
Foot Hogan Street. Jacksonville.
A CP.HAOGERTY. o. R. P. A., New York, OLTDB MILNk, 0. P. A.. New Test.
THUe. 0. neaR. Wrm. P. CLYDE 00.
General Manager. General atet.
C-es0breugh uldla. Um ate Steet. New Twek.


Proved by the highest medical experts to be the most healthful drink in existence.
Sold by the JACKSONVILLE COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO., 624 West Bay Street.
R. S. HALL, Pres. T. C. HALL, V. P. and Mgr. L. J. KxIHT, See. and Treas.

MARION HARDWARE CO.,

HARDWARE, MILL AND
TURPENTINE SUPPLIES,
OCALA, FLORIDA.
fll tittislllI I tI Illitti ll l i I I l tlllltrtIll t lltill l--
S J. P. WrILLIAM, President. J. A. G. C&AI oi, 1st Vice-President
T. A. JUNNINaGS 2nd Vice-President J. F. DUSNBuarT,3dVice-President
- H. KATON. Secretary. D. G. White. Treasurer.


SJ. P. WILLIAMS COMPANY,

NIlL STORES 11i COTIION FTOR IN0 IOLESIL[E GIROEi .
^" Main orrffice AVANNXH, OEORIGIA.
" Branch rrice_: PIENAmICOLAJ, PLX. .1 Branch Grow ry Heowe,
M rneb orn1 JACCKSONVILLE, FLA. I COLUMBUS, G1. .
SNaval Stores Producers are Invited to Correspond With Us.
:IIl111 1111 IIItstaltlillII It I aIaI IIlIhII I I-&d.t1


Pr m Now York,
(Per as north RIver).










16 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.


Buyers' Directory

If you want anything look
through this classified list and
write to the firm appearing
therein. The Record guarantees
a prompt response.

ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and Trut Co.
ACCOUNTANTS.
T. .G Hutchinson, Jacksonville, Fla.
BANKS.
Atlantic National Bank, Jacksonville, Fa
Commercial Bank, Jacksonville, Fla.
Guaranty Trust & Savings Co., Jackson-
Fla.
Florida Bank & Trust Co, Jacksonville,
Fla.
National Bank of Jacksonville.
BOXES AND CRATES.
Cummer Lumber Co, Jaeksoville, F.
BOWLING AND BILLIARDS.
Guy's Bowling and Billiard Parlors, Jack-
sonville, Fla.
BRICK.
Foster, Geo. B, Jr Jacksonvill., Fl
Southern Fuel & Supply Co, The, Jackson-
ville, Fla.
COCA-COLA.
Jacksonville Bottling Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
CLOTHING.
Craig & Bro., J. A, Jacksonille, Fla.
Renfroe Co., H. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
CLOTHING-WHOLESALE.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Bailey & Montgomery, New York City.
Tolar, Hart & Co., New York City.
CONVEYANCING.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
COOPERAGE.
Cannon Co., The, Quitman, Ga.
Cooperage Co., The, Jacksonville, FIa
DRUGS.
Kirk & Jones. Jacksonville, Flai
DRUGS-4WHOLESALE.
Southern Manufacturing Co., Jacksonville,
Fla.
Christie-Groover Drug Co.. Jacksonvlle,
DRY GOODS-WHOLESALE.
Covington Co, The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Henry Jacobs, Jacksonville, Fla.
ELECTRIC SUPPLIES.
Florida Electric Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Electric Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.
ENGINES.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., Au-
Merrill-Stevens Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co, J. 8., Macon, Ga.
gusta, Ga.
FERTILIZERS.
Bours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
FOUNDRIES.
Schofield's Sons Co., J. 8., Maeon, Ga.
FUEL.
Southern Fuel & Supply Co., The, Jack-
sonville, Fla.
Fuxnali. uJR
Fetting Furniture Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GENTS' FURNISHERS.
Craig & Bro., J. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Kohn, Furchgott & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Renfroe Co.. H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co.. Jacksonville. Fla.
S'uart-Bernstein Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
GROCERS-WHOLESALE.
B1urs & C(o., Win. A.. Jacksonville. Fla.
(Cnsolidated Grocery Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Dowling & Co.. F. M. Jacksonville, Fln.
largraves Co., C. H., Jacksonville, Fla.
Jacksonville groceryy Co., Jacksonville, Fla
Williams Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
Young Co., John B., Savannah, Ga.
GINGER ALE.
Live Oak Bottling Works. Live Oak, lta.
HATS-WHOLESALE.
Koha, Farehgott & Co, Jacksonville, Fla.


HARDWARE.
Bond & Bourn Co, The, Jacksonville, Fa.
Marion Hardware Co, Oeala, Fla
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co, J. D., Savaanah, Ga.
HARNESS.
Vehicle and Harness Co., Jacksonville, Fla
HAY AND GAIN.
Bours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
HATS
Craig & Bro., J. A, Jackaonvile, Fla.
Renfroe Co., H. A, Jacksonville, Fla.
Standard Clothing Co, Jacksoville, Fla.
Stuart-Bernstein Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
HOTELS.
Aragon, The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Duval Hotel, Jacksonville, Fla.
Hotel Bartholdi, New York City.
St. George, Jacksonville, Fla.
Light's Restaurant, Jacksonville, Fla.
IRON WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co., An-
gusta, Ga.
Merril-Stevem co, Jacksonvie, I
Schofield' Sons Co., J. 8, Maon, Ga.
INSURANCE.
Cay, Shine & McCall, Jacksonville, Fla.
Loren H. Green & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
JEWELERS.
Greenleaf & Croeby Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Hessa & lager, Jacksonville, In.
LIQUORS.
Blum & Co., Chas., Jacksonville, Fl
Henry Free, Jacksonville, Fla.
Myerson, Max, Jacksonville, Fla.
Altmayer & Fltan Liquor Co., Macon, Ga.
Eureka Saloon, Jacksonville, Fla.
Joseph Zapp & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
MEDICINES.
Spencer Medicine Co, Chattanooga, Ten.
Southern Manufacturing Co, Jacksonville,
Fla.
Christie-Groover Drug Co., .Jacksonville
PIna.
MAPS.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
MACHINE WORKS.
Lombard Iron Works & Supply Co, Au-
gust, Ga.
Sehofeld's Sons Co., J. ., Macon, Ga.
MATERIALS FOR TURPEIITINE PRO-
CESS
Schoield's Sons Co, J. 8, Maeon, Ga.
METAL WORKERS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswiek, Ga.
MeMillan Broes, Svannah. Ga.
MILL SUPPLIES
Marion Hardware Co., Oeals, Fla.
Schofield' Sons Co., J. 8, Maeon, Ga.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
Weed & Co., J. D., Savannah, Ga.
MILLINERY.
Henry Jacobs, Jacksonville, Fla.
NAILS.
Salem Nail Co., New York City.
NA AL STORES.
Baily & Montgomery, New York, N. Y.
Barnes-Jemup Co, The, Jacksonville, Fa.
Consolidated Naval Stores Co., Jackson-
ville, Fla.
Standard Naval Stores Co, Jacksoville,
Fla.
Timmons-Blount Co., Tampa, Fla.
Tolar, Hart & Co., New York, N. Y.
Union Naval Stores Co., Mobile, Ala
Williamu Co., J. P., Savannah, Ga.
West-Flynn-Harris Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Young Co., John R., Savannah, Ga.
Tampa Naval Stores Co., Tampa, Fla.
PAINTS.
Bond & Bours Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
PHOSPHATE SUPPLIES.
Campbell, J. RH, Oeala, Fla.
Marion Hardware Co, Oala, Fla.
Tampa Hardware Co., Tampa, Fla.
PAPER.
Florida Paper Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.
PIANOS.
Ludden & Bates. Jacksonville, Fla.
PUMPS
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Schofiell's Sons Co., J. S., Macon, Ga.
White-Blakeslee Mfg. Co., Birmingham,
Ala. '
TANK STORAGE.
National Tank & Export Co., Savannah,
Ga.
REAL ESTATE.
Rrohnton. Fendig & Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
Blount Real Estate Co.. Ocala, Fla.
('. lurtkmnn. Jacksonville, Fla.
Christie. J. D., Jacksonville, Fla.
LTvingston & Sons, J. H., Oesla, Fi.
Southern States Land and Timber Co.,
Stewart & Co.. Jacksonville, Fla.
Hedricks Real Estate Agency, Jackson-
ville. Fla.


SAFES
Diabold Safe and Lock Co., Jacksonville.
SEEDS.
Bours & Co., Wm. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
SHIP YARDS
Cummer Lumber Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
Merrill-Stevens Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
SHOES-WHOLESALLE
Covington Co., The, Jacksonville, Fla.
Jos.Rosenheim & Sons, Savannah, (:a.
STEAMSHIPS.
Clyde Steamship Co., The, New York City.
STOCK BROKERS.
Holmes & Co., Samuel P, Jacksonville Fla.
TAILORS.
Renfroe Co., H. A., Jacksonville, Fla.
TALKING MACHINES.
Metropolitan Talking Machine Co., Jack-
sonville, Fla.
TANKS.
Cypress Tank Co, Mobile, Ala.
Davis & Son, G. M, Palatka, Fla.
Schofield's Sons Co, J. 8., Macon, Ga.
TITLES AND TAX ABSTRACTS.
Realty Title and Trust Co.
TURPENTINE APPARATUS.
Chattanooga Pottery Co, Jaksonville, il.
TuxPtalUn STILLS.
Baker, M. A., Brunswick, Ga.
MeMillan Bros., Savannah, Ga.
TURPENTINE STILL TUBS.
Davis & Son., G. M.. Palatka, Fla.
jURPrA iilE VATS.
Davis & Son, G. M, Palatka, Fla.


I
i

If~S


TURPENTINE TOOLS.
Council Tool Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
VEHICLES.
Vehicle & Harness Co, Jacksonville, Fla.
WATCHES
Creenleaf & Crosby Co., Jackonarille, V.
Hess & Slager, Jacksonville. Fla.
YELLOW PIHE LUMBER.
Cummer Lumber Co., Jacksonville, Fla.
East Coast Lumber Co., Watertown, P.



Trade Checks
FOR THE


COMMISSARY BUSINESS.
THE INDUSTRIAL RECORD manu-
factures more of them than all the print-
ing and office supply houses in the South
combined.
COMMISSARY CHECKS
Send all orders for Commissary Checks,
any color, any denomination, padded or
loose, to the

Industrial Record Go.


Record Readers:

The job printing department

of this company is conducted

for the exclusive benefit of the

naval stores, lumber and man-

ufacturing trades. It is reason-

able to suppose you will get

better and more satisfactory

printing supplies-letter heads,

envelopes, commissary checks

pay-roll reports, etc., by having

us make them.


Industrial Record Co.,

Jacksoavile, Florida.


SM.A. BAKER,
Inventor ag
Iamnhiacturer ofl tei

Baker Improved
Seemless Turpen-
tine stills.
Write me for prices and oatuit
F. 0. -any point in Georgia, 9Ier-
Ids. Alabama or Mississippi. All
stills sold under a guarantee.
Job work through the
S country a spedilt7.
The Largest and Oldest Copper
Works in Georgia. runswic ba
i My specialty is large worms and heavy bottoms that do not leak.


JS~c~c~;i;ir~r~;jr~r;*;s~i;r;+;~,~,~rrr rrc\~;Cc~i;*;~SISiJiSL*~J~I~


ES3ESESSE~(rc~c~c~;iS~:?)~:;~FliSE~


SSES(JESaffS(S~SaffXSa mC3a~3E3CSCSCSC3~S~









THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD. 17


S -- THE ---,

Atlantic National Bank of Jacksonville 0
RESOURCES THREE MILLION DOLLARS.
We invite especial attention to our Savings Department, which is operated
under GOVERNMENT SUPERVISION.
INTEREST COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY.



C. H. HARGRAVES CO.,

WHOLESALE GROCERS

Grain, Hay, Feed
Special attention to Turpentine end Sawmill Men's Requirements
A FLORIDA FIRM FOR FLORIDIANS.
514-516-518-520-522-524-526 EAST BAY SiKRLL.I
Jacksonville, Fla.
GEORGIA INTER-STATE SAW MILL ASSOCIATION.
Minimum Coastwise Price List for Merchantable Rules 1o94. Adopted at Tifton
Georgia, July, 12, 1go04
SFeet | Feet I Feet Feet I Feet I Feet I Feetl Feet | Feet | Feet
SIZES. 120 &U1 21-251 26-301 31-35 36-401 41-45( 46-501 51-551 56-60j 61-65
1 xl0 to 2x10.... $12.50|$13.50J$14.50$6.00$18.00j$20.50j$2 6.5 0$ $32.00$40.00
2%xlO to 8x10.... 12.001 12.501 13.50 14.001 15.501 17.50 20.00| 23.00[ 28.00 36.00
8%x10 to 10x10.... 12.501 13.00114.500 15 .501 6.518.501 21.00 24.00t 29.00 37.00


1 x12 to 2xlZ.... 14. 11.Aw 1O.oI 1i.UI EI.UI Z4.ZJJ Za.U 9i.Ju .51.U
214xl2 to 10x12.... 13.001 13.501 14.5a 16.50 18.50 21.001 24.50 28.50 34.00
10%xl2 to 12x12.... 13.50 14.00( 15.50 17.501 19.501 22.001 25.50 30.00136.50


Would a Turpowtih Prope1Wioa

Interest Yeu 7

What Abhad Saw Mill Timber ?
S0.000 Acres Saw Timber .................. 250 to $5.00
50 000 *. ................ ::........ per Acre.
26.000 Acres Virgin Timber..................

10.000 ......... per Acre.
192.000 ............

*BROBSTON. FENDING 6 CO.

BROBSTON. FENDIG & CO.


BIG W. F~e.rs W.


THE


41.W


431.nn


46.00


1 xl4 to 3x14.... 16.00 19.00 20.00 22.00 24.50 2750 32.00 37.00 44.00 57.00
3%x14 to 12x14.... 14.50 16.50 18.00 20.5 22.00 24.00 28.00 32.50 40.00 5200
1214x14 to 14x14.... 15.50 17.00 1900 21.0( 23.00 26.00 30.00 34.50 42.00 55.00
1 xl6 to 4x16.... 20.50 22.00 24.50 27.501 3LO 34.00 3800 42.50 52.00 66.00
41%xl6 to 12x16.... 19.00 20.00 22.00 25.50 29.00 31.00 35.00 39.50 48.00 59.00
2124xl6 to 16xl6.... 19.50 20.50 23.00 26.501 30.001 03.00 37.00 41.00 50.00 62.00


2 xl8 to
6%x18 to
14%xl8 to


6x18.... 24.50
14x18.... 21.00
18xlS.... 23.00


25.50 28.50
22.00 26.00
24.00 27.00


31.50 35.00 39.00 43.00 49.00 62.00
29.00 33.00 37.00 41.00 45.00 57.00
30.00 34.00 38.00 42.00 48.00 59.00


79.00
69.00
74.00


Terms: Net Cash.
Prices are F. 0. B. Cars Savannah, Brunswick, Fernandina and Jacksonville.
NOTICE. Dimension.
At a meeting of the Georgia Interstate Dimension sizes shall embrace all sizes
Saw Mill Association, held at Jackson- 6 inches and up in thickness by seven
ville, Fla., March 15, 1904, the following inches and up in width, including six by
Classification and Rules for Inspection of six. For example: 6x6, 6x7, 7x7, 7x8, 8x9
Yellow Pine were officially adopted, effec- and up.
tive July 1, 1904: Stepping.
Classification and Inspection of Yellow Stepping shall embrace one to two and
ine Lu er. a half inches in thickness by seven inches
General Rules-All lumber must be and up in width. For example: 1, 1,/,
sound, well manufactured, full to size and 11/, 2 and 21/x7 and up, in width.
saw butted; free from unsound, loose and Rough Edge or Flitch.
hollow knots, worm and knot holes;i Rough Edge or Flitch shall embrace all
through shakes, or round shakes that sizes one inch and up in thickness by eight
show on the surface; square edge, unless inches and up in width, sawed on two
otherwise specified. A through shake is sides only. For example. 1, 1/., 2, 3, 4
hereby defined to be through or connected and up thick by eight inches and up wide,
from side to side, or edge to edge, or side sawed on two sides only.
to edge. In the measurement of dressed
lumber the width and thickness of the
lumber before dressing must be taken; INSPECTION.
less than one inch thick shall be measured Standard.
as one inch.
___ All lumber shall be sound, sap no ob-
CLASSIFICATI. section. Wane may be allowed one-eighth
CLASSIFICATON. of te width of the piece measured across
=1 _wnm_


Flooring shall embrace four and five
quarter inches in thickness by three to
six inches in width. For example: 1x3,
4, 5 and 6; 114x3, 4, 5 and 6.
Boards.
Boards shall embrace all thicknesses un-
der one and a half inches by seven inches
and up wide, including one and a half
inches in thickness by seven in width.
For example: %. 1, 11/ and 1% inches
thick by seven inches and up, wide.
Scantling.
Scantling shall embrace all sizes from
two to five inches in thickness and two to
six inches in width. For example: 2x2,
2x3, 2x4, 2x5, 2x6, 3x3, 3x4, 3x5, 3x6, 4x4,
4x5, 4x6, 5x5 and 5x6.
Plank.
Plank shall embrace all sizes from one
and one-half to six inches in thickness,
not including six inches by seven inches
and up in width. For example: 1%/, 2,
21, 3, 31/2, 4, 4, 5, 5%, 5%x7 inches
and up in width.


iace or wane, extending one-fourtn of the
length on one corner or its equivalent on
two or more corners.
Merchantable.
All sizes under nine inches shall show
heart entire length c:, one side or edge;
sizes nine inches and over shall show
hearth the entire length on two opposite
sides. Wane may be allowed one-eighth of
the width of the piece measured across
face of wane. and extending one-fourth of
the length of the piece on one corner or
its equivalent on two or more corners.


Prime.
Scantling shall show heart on two faces
the entire length; other sizes shall show
two-thirds heart entire length on two
opposite sides. On not exceeding 5 per
cent of the pieces wane may be allowed
one-eighth of the width of the piece meas-
ured across face of wane and extending
one-fourth of the length of the piece on
one corner or its equivalent on two or
more corners.


- __ - Fi .


ARAGON
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
NOW OPEN
SUnder new management. Thoroughly
renovated and repaired throughout, in-
cluding new electric elevator and our
own electric light plant.
H. N. O'NEAL, Prop.


J. S. Schofield's Sons Company,
*O******e*e** 4*.*g.**g*O*s*o**O@s*eO***OsOs**aeO Oe
SHeadquarters for

SDistiller's Pumping
o lOutfit.
SNo plant complete without one.
Hundreds of them in use in Georgia,
Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and
* South Carolina. Write us for partio-
* 9 lan and prices. We also manufacture
0 Engines, Boilers and Hih ?
*. OGrade Machinery,
well s carry a full and complete
----sokof-
M. I Mill Supplies, Pipe,
SBeiler Tubes, Etc. .
,* Advise your wants.
S 8Macon, - Georgia.
A Lcasa ItYh *ft oI
* Mi f Tast WerFt Wtr TwIermethe tms r*es
*.*.**O.*.*.*.****O*.*.*S,*,*.*s@.*s**s*e**s*e.*es.


C. H. BARNES, Pres.


J. D. SHAW, Vie-Pre.


RALPH JESSUP, See.-Trees


BARNES & JESSUP COMPANY,
NAVAL STORE FACTORS.

Exporters of Pure Turpentines and Rosins
Strictly a Producers' Company. Guages,
Grades and Weights Guaranteed.
Deliveries at Jacksonville, Pensacola, Fernandina and Savannah
Correspondence Solicited. JACKSONVILLE. FLA.


East Coast Lumber Co.

ROUGH AND DRESSED

LONG LEAF YELLOW PINE.

Bundled Rosin Barrel Staves in Carload Lots.
Steamer Shipments a Speciaty.
WATERTOWN. FLORIDA.


S;N9~i~ ~~~9,899~ "'~hYt-~-~- )4yl


I






18 THE WEEKLY INDUSTRIAL RECORD.

I

OPERATORS


Bear in Mind That During Your


Stock
Complete
outw
New and
second-

Ixtra
Kettle
WormW
C&p, Arms,
Furnace
Door,
Grate Bar,
and an
other at-
tecbments
to-
Torpenties
Stills and
Fixtures,


Busy


IF


YOU
YOU
YOU
YOU


Season


MEET WITH A MISHAP
BREAK DOWN
BURN OUT
NEED US


Over in the Left-Hand Corner Will Interest You.


McMILLAN BROS.,
Southern Copper Works.


JACKSONVILLE, FLA.


Savanah, Ga.
Mobile, Ala.
Fayetteville, N. C.


- - - - - - -- AU -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
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The


Cooperage


Company


Manufacturers of High Grade

Western White Oak Spirit Barrels

Capital $100,000.
JACKSONVILLE. FLA.
Orders sent direct to us will receive prompt and careful attention.
We are now prepared to furnish barrels from six shops advantageously located.

OFFICERS:.
J. C. LITTLE, President. JOHN E. HARRIS, Vice-President.
E. H. MOTE, General Manager. C. H. BARNES, Secretary and Treasurer.


J. C. LITTLE,


JOHN E. HARRIS,
W. C. POWELL,


DIRECTORS:
C. H. BARNES,
W. F. COACHMAN.


J. W. WEST,
E. H. MOTE.


W. J. KELLY


h~w mm~,Wul~n~- - - - - -~m







W. A. GALLAHER and E. A. CHAPLAIN, VICE-PXESIDXNTD .


DIRECTO S : C. B. Rogers, W. A. Gallaher, E. A. Champlain, H. A. McEaehern and J. A. Cranford, of Jacksonville;
B. F. Bullard, Tampa; C. M. Covington, Pensacola.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


Co.


PAID UP CAPITAL $500,000.

Main Office and Storage Rooms, Jacksonville, Fla., with Branches in Tampa, Pensacola, Pla.,
and Savannah, Ga.

The Consolidated Grocery Company is successor to the C. B. Rogers Company, of Jacksonville; the Florida Grocery Company
of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of Florida Naval Stores and Commission Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the
Mutual Naval Stores Company, of Jacksonville; the grocery branch of the Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Tampa; the grocery branch
of the:,Gulf Naval Stores Company, of Pensacola; the grocery branch of the West Coast Naval Stores Company, of Penscola; the
grocery branch of the Southern Naval Stores Company, of Savannah.


Will handle everything In Heavy and Light Groceries, Grain, Pro-
visions, Domestic and Imported Groceries, Turpentine Tools, etc.


Shipments to all points that can be reached the cheapest through the branch stores of the Company, and prompt
attention given all orders through the main office and branches.


The Jacksonville Storage Rooms of the


Consolidated


Grocery


Company


Consist of one Three-Story Balldiag, 70x200; one two-story ballding. 50x390; one one-story bildlfg,1)80x250,
making the largest space of any Company of the kind la the South.


CONSOLIDATED


GROCERY


CO.,


Headquarters Corner Bay and Bridge Sts., Jacksonville, Fla.
:Branches Tampa, Fia., Pensacola. Fla., and Savannah. Ga.


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*n*m o m Ii0,ll It 0ooe 4e t Ho OIOeOr, I*oooeo , oooo*o I fI$I8090lo o Is $I o..il..il............ .. .i 1 .... I..I


C. B. ROGERS, PnasmrDxT.


C. H. HODG80N, S8c, and TamS'l.







GREENLEAF <& CROSBY CO.
Jewelers and Importers,
41 W. BAY STREET. JACKSONVILLE, FLA.

Diamonds Diamonds
WE
HAVE BEEN
S DEALERS IN DIAMONDS
We Save You /f/AD OTHEn PI~IOus STONES_ We Save You
The Middleman's 'INCETHE E 'BSHT OF The Middleman's
Profit IMPORTERS FOR MORE THAN Profit.
TWENTY YEARS.-
SATISFACTION
ASSURED.

DIAMONDS \ DIAMONDS

Write Vs-Mail Orders R.eceive Prompt Attention.




Half Tones-Zinc Etchings

Illustrating and Engraving Department
OF

THE FLORIDA TIMES-UNION.
Splendidly equipped for business. Half Tones and Zinc Etchings made to order in the most improved
and artistic fashion. Illustrations for newspapers and all kinds of commercial Work, Pamphlets, etc.
I SPECIITI IS lIE OF 0131S1K, RETOHI I E UIBISHII PIOTURIPiS 1i PICTS.
IN WRITING OR APPLYING FOR PRICES, GIVE THE MOST EXPLICIT DESCRIPTION OF WHAT IS WANTED
GOOD WORK AND PROMPT DELIVERIES PROMISED

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